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Sample records for charge study children

  1. Immune Dysfunction in Children with CHARGE Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Burg, Mirjam; la Bastide-van Gemert, Sacha; Hogendorf, Lianne A.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a variable, multiple congenital malformation syndrome. Patients with CHARGE syndrome have frequent infections that are presumed to be due to anatomical anomalies of the craniofacial region and upper airway, and cranial nerve problems resulting in swallowing difficulties and aspiration. The possible contribution of immunological abnormalities to these infections has not been systematically studied even though immune deficiencies have been described in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, a condition which shares remarkable clinical overlap with CHARGE syndrome. We assessed the frequency and nature of immune dysfunction in 24 children with genetically proven CHARGE syndrome. All patients, or their parents, completed a questionnaire on infectious history. Their immune system was extensively assessed through full blood counts, immunoglobulin levels, lymphocyte subpopulations, peripheral B- and T-cell differentiation, T-receptor excision circle (TREC) analysis, T-cell function, and vaccination responses. All CHARGE patients had a history of infections (often frequent), mainly otitis media and pneumonia, leading to frequent use of antibiotics and to hospital admissions. Decreased T-cell numbers were found in 12 (50%) patients, presumably caused by insufficient thymic output since TREC amounts were also diminished in CHARGE patients. Despite normal peripheral B-cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production in all patients, 83% of patients had insufficient antibody titers to one or more early childhood vaccinations. Based on our results, we recommend immunological evaluation of CHARGE patients with recurrent infections. PMID:26544072

  2. Asthma and Allergies in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Results From the CHARGE Study.

    PubMed

    Lyall, Kristen; Van de Water, Judy; Ashwood, Paul; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2015-10-01

    Immune aberrations are often noted in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but whether asthma and allergy are related to ASD is not well defined. This study examined asthma and allergies in association with ASD and phenotypic subsets. Participants were 560 children with confirmed ASD and 391 typically developing children from the CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment study. Maternally reported child asthma and allergy was compared between cases and controls, and in association with cognitive and behavioral test scores. Prevalence of asthma and overall allergies did not differ between cases and controls, but overall allergy in children with ASD was associated with higher stereotypy scores as measured by the Aberrant Behavior Checklist. In addition, reported food allergies were significantly associated with ASD (adjusted odds ratio = 2.23, 95% confidence interval 1.28, 3.89). Our results suggest food allergies and sensitivities may be more common in children with ASD, and that these issues may correlate with other behaviors.

  3. Physical Education and Children with CHARGE Syndrome: Research to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Haibach, Pamela; Schedlin, Haley

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Children with CHARGE syndrome often experience significantly delayed motor development, which affects their performance in many motor skills and physical activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the status of physical education provided to children with CHARGE syndrome. There were five main areas of focus: (1) physical…

  4. A charging study of ACTS using NASCAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Joel L.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) computer code is a three dimensional finite element charging code designed to analyze spacecraft charging in the magnetosphere. Because of the characteristics of this problem, NASCAP can use an quasi-static approach to provide a spacecraft designer with an understanding of how a specific spacecraft will interact with a geomagnetic substorm. The results of the simulation can help designers evaluate the probability and location of arc discharges of charged surfaces on the spacecraft. A charging study of NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) using NASCAP is reported. The results show that the ACTS metalized multilayer insulating blanket design should provide good electrostatic discharge control.

  5. Balance and Self-Efficacy of Balance in Children with CHARGE Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haibach, Pamela S.; Lieberman, Lauren J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Balance is a critical component of daily living, because it affects all movements and the ability to function independently. Children with CHARGE syndrome have sensory and motor impairments that could negatively affect their balance and postural control. The purpose of the study presented in this article was to assess the balance and…

  6. Abusive Head Trauma in Young Children: Characteristics and Medical Charges in a Hospitalized Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettaro, L.; Berger, R. P.; Songer, T.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the presenting characteristics, hospital course, and hospital charges associated with hospital admissions for head trauma in young children at a regional pediatric trauma center, and to examine whether these factors differ among abused and non-abused subjects. Method: Comparative case series study involving a retrospective…

  7. Who's in charge of children's environmental health at school?

    PubMed

    Paulson, Jerome; Barnett, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Children spend many hours each week in and around school buildings. Their short- and long-term health outcomes and ability to learn are affected by numerous environmental factors related to the school buildings, the school grounds, the school transportation system, and the use of various products and materials in and around the school. Many school buildings are old, and they-and even newer buildings-can contain multiple environmental health hazards. While some districts self-report they have environmental health policies in place, no independent verification of these policies or their quality exists. Teachers and other staff, but not children who are more vulnerable to hazards than adults, are afforded some protections from hazards by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, by their employment contracts, or through adult occupational health services. Major environmental problems include: indoor air quality, lighting, pests and pesticides, heavy metals and chemical management issues, renovation of occupied buildings, noise, and cleaning processes and products. No agency at the federal or state levels is charged with ensuring children's health and safety in and around school buildings. No systematic means exists for collecting data about exposures which occur in the school setting. Recommendations are made for dealing with issues of data collection, federal actions, state and local actions, and for building the capacity of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-designated and funded Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSU) in responding to and evaluating risks to children's environmental health in schools.

  8. Studying Spacecraft Charging via Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzanno, G. L.; Moulton, D.; Meierbachtol, C.; Svyatskiy, D.; Vernon, L.

    2015-12-01

    The electrical charging of spacecraft due to bombarding charged particles can affect their performance and operation. We study this charging using CPIC; a particle-in-cell code specifically designed for studying plasma-material interactions [1]. CPIC is based on multi-block curvilinear meshes, resulting in near-optimal computational performance while maintaining geometric accuracy. Relevant plasma parameters are imported from the SHIELDS framework (currently under development at LANL), which simulates geomagnetic storms and substorms in the Earth's magnetosphere. Simulated spacecraft charging results of representative Van Allen Probe geometries using these plasma parameters will be presented, along with an overview of the code. [1] G.L. Delzanno, E. Camporeale, J.D. Moulton, J.E. Borovsky, E.A. MacDonald, and M.F. Thomsen, "CPIC: A Curvilinear Particle-In-Cell Code for Plasma-Material Interaction Studies," IEEE Trans. Plas. Sci., 41 (12), 3577 (2013).

  9. Experimental Study of Dust Grain Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F; Venturini, Catherine C.; Comfort, Richard H.; Mian, Abbas M.

    1999-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the charging mechanisms of micron size dust grains are presented. Individual dust grains are electrodynamically suspended and exposed to an electron beam of known energy and flux, and to far ultraviolet radiation of known wavelength and intensity. Changes in the charge-to-mass ratio of the grain are directly measured as a function of incident beam (electron and/or photon), grain size and composition. Comparisons of our results to theoretical models that predict the grain response are presented.

  10. Studying Charged Particle Optics: An Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovalle, V.; Otomar, D. R.; Pereira, J. M.; Ferreira, N.; Pinho, R. R.; Santos A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal…

  11. STUDIES OF TROUBLESOME CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STOTT, D.H.

    TWO STUDIES ARE REPORTED AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS DISCUSSED. IN THE FIRST STUDY AN ATTEMPT WAS MADE TO AVERT DELINQUENCY IN CHILDREN (AGED 12 AND 13) BY IDENTIFYING THE DELINQUENCY PRONE AND TREATING A PORTION OF THEM BY FAMILY CASEWORK METHODS. THROUGH USE OF THE DELINQUENCY PREDICTION INSTRUMENT AND THE BRISTOL SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT GUIDES, 33…

  12. Charge coupled device image sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of a charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensors for use in spacecraft-borne imaging systems was conducted. The study resulted in design recommendations for two sensors, an approximately 500 times 500 element imaging device and a 1 times 190 element linear imaging device with a 190 times 121 buffer store. Emphasis was placed on the higher resolution, area-imaging sensor. The objectives of the proposed sensors are listed, results of the experiments are analyzed, and estimates of the device performance are presented. A summary of the major technical recommendations is included.

  13. Studies in children.

    PubMed

    Perera, Frederica P; Edwards, Susan C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter first discusses the urgent need for prevention of childhood diseases that impose a huge and growing burden on families and society. It provides a review of recent research in this area to illustrate both the strengths and limitations of molecular epidemiology in drawing needed links between environmental exposures and illness in children. For illustration, three of the major diseases in children are discussed: asthma, cancer and developmental disorders. All three impose significant difficulties, have increased in recent decades, and are thought to be caused in substantial part by environmental factors, such as toxic exposures due to lifestyle choices (i.e. smoking and diet), pollutants in the workplace, ambient air, water and the food supply. These exogenous exposures can interact with "host" factors, such as genetic susceptibility and nutritional deficits, to cause disease. Molecular epidemiology has provided valuable new insights into the magnitude and diversity of exposures beginning in utero, the unique susceptibility of the young, and the adverse preclinical and clinical effects resulting from the interactions between these factors. However, molecular epidemiology also faces certain constraints and challenges that are specific to studies of the very young, including ethical issues, technical issues due to the limited amount of biological specimens that can be obtained, and communication of results to parents and communities. These challenges are particularly apparent when incorporating the newer epigenetic and "omic" techniques and biomarkers into studies of children's diseases.

  14. Studies in children.

    PubMed

    Perera, Frederica P; Edwards, Susan C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter first discusses the urgent need for prevention of childhood diseases that impose a huge and growing burden on families and society. It provides a review of recent research in this area to illustrate both the strengths and limitations of molecular epidemiology in drawing needed links between environmental exposures and illness in children. For illustration, three of the major diseases in children are discussed: asthma, cancer and developmental disorders. All three impose significant difficulties, have increased in recent decades, and are thought to be caused in substantial part by environmental factors, such as toxic exposures due to lifestyle choices (i.e. smoking and diet), pollutants in the workplace, ambient air, water and the food supply. These exogenous exposures can interact with "host" factors, such as genetic susceptibility and nutritional deficits, to cause disease. Molecular epidemiology has provided valuable new insights into the magnitude and diversity of exposures beginning in utero, the unique susceptibility of the young, and the adverse preclinical and clinical effects resulting from the interactions between these factors. However, molecular epidemiology also faces certain constraints and challenges that are specific to studies of the very young, including ethical issues, technical issues due to the limited amount of biological specimens that can be obtained, and communication of results to parents and communities. These challenges are particularly apparent when incorporating the newer epigenetic and "omic" techniques and biomarkers into studies of children's diseases. PMID:22997878

  15. A- THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Children's Study (NCS) will be the largest long-term study of children's health and development ever conducted in the United States. The NCS will examine a broad range of environmental influences on children's health and development. It will follow approximately 10...

  16. Solar Array and Auroral Charging Studies of DMSP Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matias, Kelwin

    2013-01-01

    The SSJ electrostatic analyzers and the SSIES plasma instruments on the DMSP spacecraft in low Earth polar orbit can be used to conduct case studies of auroral and solar array charging. We will use a program written in the Interactive Data Language (IDL) to evaluate questionable charging events in the SSJ records by comparing charging signatures in SSJ and SSIES data. In addition, we will assemble a number of case studies of solar array charging showing the signatures from the SSJ data and compare to the SSIES charging signatures. In addition we will use Satellite Tool Kit (STK) to propagate orbits, obtain solar intensity, and use to verify onset of charging with sunrise.

  17. Stratified charge rotary engine combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, H.; Hamady, F.; Somerton, C.; Stuecken, T.; Chouinard, E.; Rachal, T.; Kosterman, J.; Lambeth, M.; Olbrich, C.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of the combustion process in a stratified charge rotary engine (SCRE) continue to be the subject of active research in recent years. Specifically to meet the demand for more sophisticated products, a detailed understanding of the engine system of interest is warranted. With this in mind the objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the controlling factors that affect the SCRE combustion process so that an efficient power dense rotary engine can be designed. The influence of the induction-exhaust systems and the rotor geometry are believed to have a significant effect on combustion chamber flow characteristics. In this report, emphasis is centered on Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurements and on qualitative flow visualizations in the combustion chamber of the motored rotary engine assembly. This will provide a basic understanding of the flow process in the RCE and serve as a data base for verification of numerical simulations. Understanding fuel injection provisions is also important to the successful operation of the stratified charge rotary engine. Toward this end, flow visualizations depicting the development of high speed, high pressure fuel jets are described. Friction is an important consideration in an engine from the standpoint of lost work, durability and reliability. MSU Engine Research Laboratory efforts in accessing the frictional losses associated with the rotary engine are described. This includes work which describes losses in bearing, seal and auxillary components. Finally, a computer controlled mapping system under development is described. This system can be used to map shapes such as combustion chamber, intake manifolds or turbine blades accurately.

  18. Charge-coupled device image sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design specifications and predicted performance characteristics of a Charge-Coupled Device Area Imager and a Charge-Coupled Device Linear Imager are presented. The Imagers recommended are intended for use in space-borne imaging systems and therefore would meet the requirements for the intended application. A unique overlapping metal electrode structure and a buried channel structure are described. Reasons for the particular imager designs are discussed.

  19. Young Children's Emotionally-Charged Moral Narratives: Relations with Attachment and Behavior Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos-Marcuse, Fatima; Arsenio, William F.

    2001-01-01

    Examined affectively-charged moral narratives and attachment-related narratives of preschoolers. Found that, after controlling for child age, gender, SES, and expressive language ability, children with more externalizing problems were more likely to describe aggressive themes, and less likely to mention adult aid or taking responsibility for…

  20. Neural Activation Underlying Cognitive Control in the Context of Neutral and Affectively Charged Pictures in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Connie; White, Lauren K.; McDermott, Jennifer Martin; Fox, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    The neural correlates of cognitive control for typically developing 9-year-old children were examined using dense-array ERPs and estimates of cortical activation (LORETA) during a go/no-go task with two conditions: a neutral picture condition and an affectively charged picture condition. Activation was estimated for the entire cortex after which…

  1. Charge neutralization as studied experimentally and theoretically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linson, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    Problems regarding an isolated sphere which emits negative charge are considered. Such a sphere could charge up to large potentials which would inhibit the electron beam from leaving the vicinity of the body. In order to avoid charging to high potentials, a vehicle must attract a return current equal to the emitted current. The present investigation is concerned with theoretical models of some processes believed to be important for the vehicle neutralization problem under various conditions. Attention is given to general time-scale considerations, the low-altitude regime, the high-altitude regime, vehicle-induced discharge, and beam-plasma discharge. The general pattern which emeres as a result of measurements is that below altitudes of approximately 125 + or - 5 km the vehicle potential rarely rises more than several tens of volts.

  2. Study of digital charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. D.; Young, V. F.

    1980-01-01

    Charge coupled devices represent unique usage of the metal oxide semiconductor concept. These devices can sample an AC signal at the input, transfer charge proportional to this signal through the CCD shift register and then provide an output of the same frequency and shape as the input. The delay time between input and output is controlled by the CCD operating frequency and the number of stages in the shift resistor. This work is a reliability evaluation of the buried channel and surface channel CCD technologies. The constructions are analyzed, failure modes are described, and test results are reported.

  3. Charged particle multiplicity studies with PHOBOS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2008-01-01

    Summary and conclusion: (1) Multiplicity - PHOBOS have performed complete charged particle multiplicity measurements for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions, System size dependence, and 'Complete' pseudorapidity distributions; 'Universality' compared to elementary e+e- collisions; and (2) Midrapidity multiplicity - Factorization of centrality and energy dependencies; (3) Limiting fragmentation - extended longitudinal scaling - Seen for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, and d+Au, Also observed in flow observables; (4) Total charged particle multiplicity - N{sub ch}/N{sub part} constant with centrality, (5) Future - Finish up many analysis and reviews.

  4. "In Charge of the Truffula Seeds": On Children's Literature, Rationality and Children's Voices in Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I investigate how philosophy can speak for children and how children can have a voice in philosophy and speak for philosophy. I argue that we should understand children as responsible rational individuals who are involved in their own philosophical inquiries and who can be involved in our own philosophical investigations--not because…

  5. Solar Array and Auroral Charging Studies of DMSP Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matias, Kelwin

    2013-01-01

    The SSJ electrostatic analyzers and the SSIES plasma instruments on the DMSP spacecraft in low Earth polar orbit can be used to conduct case studies of auroral and solar array charging. We will use a program written in the Interactive Data Language (IDL) to evaluate questionable charging events in the SSJ records by comparing charging signatures in SSJ and SSIES data. In addition, we will assemble a number of case studies of solar array charging showing the signatures from the SSJ data and compare them to the SSIES charging signatures. In addition, we will use Satellite Tool Kit (STK) to propagate orbits, obtain solar intensity, and use to verify onset of charging with sunrise.

  6. Numerical study of cluster formation in binary charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Okuzono, Tohru; Odai, Kana; Masuda, Tatsuhiro; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-07-01

    Cluster formation of oppositely charged colloidal particles is studied numerically. A simple Brownian dynamics method with a screened-Coulomb (Yukawa) potential is employed for numerical simulations. An equilibrium phase which consists of clusters and unassociated particles is obtained. It is shown that the equilibrium association number of clusters and their shapes are determined by charge numbers and charge ratio of the binary particles. The phase diagram of cluster formation for various charge numbers and their ratios is obtained. A simple relation between the association number and the charge ratio is found. It is demonstrated that in the case of high charge ratio the cluster takes a multilayer structure which is highly symmetric. It is also pointed out that the cluster-particle interaction changes dynamically in the cluster formation process, which is involved in the selection of final cluster structure. PMID:27575181

  7. Numerical study of cluster formation in binary charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuzono, Tohru; Odai, Kana; Masuda, Tatsuhiro; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-07-01

    Cluster formation of oppositely charged colloidal particles is studied numerically. A simple Brownian dynamics method with a screened-Coulomb (Yukawa) potential is employed for numerical simulations. An equilibrium phase which consists of clusters and unassociated particles is obtained. It is shown that the equilibrium association number of clusters and their shapes are determined by charge numbers and charge ratio of the binary particles. The phase diagram of cluster formation for various charge numbers and their ratios is obtained. A simple relation between the association number and the charge ratio is found. It is demonstrated that in the case of high charge ratio the cluster takes a multilayer structure which is highly symmetric. It is also pointed out that the cluster-particle interaction changes dynamically in the cluster formation process, which is involved in the selection of final cluster structure.

  8. Effects of charge-charge interactions on dimensions of unfolded proteins: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrotas, Petras J.; Karshikoff, Andrey

    2003-08-01

    Electrostatic interactions (EI) in denatured state of proteins are an important factor regulating folding/unfolding equilibria in these macromolecules. Therefore, a physically adequate model for description of EI in denatured proteins is highly desirable. For this purpose, unfolded polypeptide chains with excluded volume and charge-charge interactions taken into consideration were studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Charge-charge interactions were calculated using the Coulomb law both with constant, ɛs, and distance dependent, ɛ(r), dielectric permittivity. Average dimensions, in terms of radius of gyration, Rg, for chains of different lengths Nr, were obtained within a wide temperature range and for various distributions of positive and negative charges. The results suggest that unfolded proteins can adopt two distinct states, compact and expanded, depending on temperature and charge composition. The compact state is characterized by Rg close to that of native proteins, while the expanded state has Rg corresponding to a flexible homopolymer with excluded volume interactions only. A simple procedure for evaluation of Rg of unfolded proteins at different pH is proposed and the predicted Rg values are compared to the experimental data for fully unfolded states for several soluble denatured proteins.

  9. A charge collection study with dedicated RD50 charge multiplication sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, C.; Barber, T.; Hauser, M.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S.; Parzefall, U.; Wonsak, S.

    2013-12-01

    This study investigates the charge collection efficiency of silicon strip detectors, produced by MICRON Semiconductor Co., Ltd. within the CERN RD50 collaboration, designed specifically to understand the effect of design parameters on the onset and magnitude of charge multiplication. Charge collection measurements are performed before and after irradiation with a proton fluence of 1×1015 1 MeV neq/cm2 (neq/cm2) and neutron fluence ranging from 1-5×1015 neq/cm2. Structures on these devices include varying diffusion times and energies for the implantation process, different sensor thicknesses, the use of intermediate biased or floating strips between the readout strips, and several different strip width and pitch geometries. The charge collection for these devices is studied as a function of the bias voltage, looking for indications of charge multiplication. Results are compared to standard float zone 300 μm thick silicon strip sensors having a strip width of 25 μm and pitch of 80 μm.

  10. EEG Studies with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flohr, John W.; Miller, Daniel C.; deBeus, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Describes how electroencephalogram (EEG) data are collected and how brain function is measured. Discusses studies on the effects of music experiences with adult subjects and studies focusing on the effects of music training on EEG activity of children and adolescents. Considers the implications of the studies and the future directions of this…

  11. A new technique for the study of charge transfer in multiply charged ion-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shinpaugh, J.L.; Meyer, F.W.; Datz, S.

    1994-12-31

    While large cross sections (>10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2}) have been predicted for resonant charge transfer in ion-ion collisions, no experimental data exist for multiply charged systems. A novel technique is being developed at the ORNL ECR facility to allow study of symmetric charge exchange in multiply charged ion-ion collisions using a single ion source. Specific intra-beam charge transfer collisions occurring in a well-defined interaction region labeled by negative high voltage are identified and analyzed by electrostatic analysis in combination with ion time-of-flight coincidence detection of the collision products. Center-of-mass collision energies from 400 to 1000 eV are obtained by varying source and labeling-cell voltages. In addition, by the introduction of a target gas into the high-voltage cell, this labeling-voltage method allows measurement of electron-capture and -loss cross sections for ion-atom collisions. Consequently, higher collision energies can be investigated without the requirement of placing the ECR source on a high-voltage platform.

  12. Studying Meaning in Children' Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopperstad, Marit Holm

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an ethnographic study conducted with two Year 1 classes in two different Norwegian schools. In total, 35 five- and six-year-old children were involved in the study and were observed over a two-month period as they engaged in learning activities that involved drawing. Building on Kress and Van Leeuwen's (1996) theory of a…

  13. Functional Insights into Chromatin Remodelling from Studies on CHARGE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Basson, M. Albert; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny

    2015-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare genetic syndrome characterised by a unique combination of multiple organ anomalies. Dominant loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7), which is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller, have been identified as the cause of CHARGE syndrome. Here, we review recent work aimed at understanding the mechanism of CHD7 function in normal and pathological states, highlighting results from biochemical and in vivo studies. The emerging picture from this work suggests that the mechanisms by which CHD7 fine-tunes gene expression are context specific, consistent with the pleiotropic nature of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26411921

  14. Functional Insights into Chromatin Remodelling from Studies on CHARGE Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basson, M Albert; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny

    2015-10-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare genetic syndrome characterised by a unique combination of multiple organ anomalies. Dominant loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7), which is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller, have been identified as the cause of CHARGE syndrome. Here, we review recent work aimed at understanding the mechanism of CHD7 function in normal and pathological states, highlighting results from biochemical and in vivo studies. The emerging picture from this work suggests that the mechanisms by which CHD7 fine-tunes gene expression are context specific, consistent with the pleiotropic nature of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26411921

  15. Charge Detector Study for a Thin Sampling Calorimeter for ACCESS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongin; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Advanced Cosmic ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS) is a NASA's new mission concept that is now being studied. The scientific objective is to measure cosmic ray elemental energy spectra in the energy range from I TeV up to 1000 TeV. ACCESS will carry two instruments and measure the energy and charge of incoming particles. One of these will be a calorimeter with a charge detector. The charge detector will see not only signals from the incident cosmic rays but also signals from radiation backscattered from the calorimeter. In that case, bias information on particle identification is unavoidable. This study shows how much the charge detector will be affected by backscatter and how it can be designed with a minimized effect.

  16. Proven germline mosaicism in a father of two children with CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pauli, S; Pieper, L; Häberle, J; Grzmil, P; Burfeind, P; Steckel, M; Lenz, U; Michelmann, H W

    2009-05-01

    CHARGE syndrome is an autosomal dominant malformation syndrome caused by mutations in the CHD7 gene. The majority of cases are sporadic and only few familial cases have been reported. In these families, mosaicism in one parent, as well as parent- to-child transmission of a CHD7 mutation, has been described. In some further cases, germline mosaicism has been suggested. Here, we report the first case in which germline mosaicism could be demonstrated in a father of two affected children with CHARGE syndrome. The truncating mutation c.7302dupA in exon 34 of the CHD7 gene was found in both affected children but was not detected in parental lymphocytes. However, in DNA extracted from the father's spermatozoa, the c.7302dupA mutation could be identified. Furthermore, mutation analysis of DNA isolated from 59 single spermatozoa revealed that the c.7302dupA mutation occurs in 16 spermatozoa, confirming germline mosaicism in the father of the affected children. This result has a high impact for genetic counselling of the family and for their recurrence risk in further pregnancies.

  17. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies Of Highly Charged Ions On Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D.

    2011-06-01

    Accurate studies of low-energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X-ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H-like, and He-like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H-like ions of C, N, O and fully-stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV/u-20 keV/u) and compared to previous H-oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV/u-3.3 keV/u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H-oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  18. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies of Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D; Havener, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Accurate studies of low energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H like, and He like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H like ions of C, N, O and fully stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV u 20 keV u) and compared to previous H oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV u 3.3 keV u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  19. Study of surface charges in ballistic deflection transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millithaler, J.-F.; Iñiguez-de-la-Torre, I.; Mateos, J.; GonzáIez, T.; Margala, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study of the behavior of surface charges in ballistic deflection transistors, at room temperature, where the in-plane geometry associating two drains with two gates in push-pull modes allows the control of electron path. Monte Carlo simulations were performed and compared with experimental data by using different models for accounting for surface charge effects. The simple model which assumes a constant and uniform value of the surface charge provides good results at equilibrium, but it is not able to correctly reproduce the BDT’s complex behavior when biased. We have confirmed that for a correct description of the device operation it is necessary to use a model allowing the surface charge to adapt itself locally to the carrier concentration in its surroundings.

  20. Charge collection studies in irradiated HV-CMOS particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolder, A.; Andelković, M.; Arndt, K.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Buttar, C.; Caragiulo, P.; Cindro, V.; Das, D.; Dopke, J.; Dragone, A.; Ehrler, F.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Gorišek, A.; Grabas, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grillo, A.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Huffman, T.; John, J.; Kanisauskas, K.; Kenney, C.; Kramberger, G.; Liang, Z.; Mandić, I.; Maneuski, D.; McMahon, S.; Mikuž, M.; Muenstermann, D.; Nickerson, R.; Perić, I.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Rubbo, F.; Segal, J.; Seiden, A.; Shipsey, I.; Song, W.; Stanitzki, M.; Su, D.; Tamma, C.; Turchetta, R.; Vigani, L.; Volk, J.; Wang, R.; Warren, M.; Wilson, F.; Worm, S.; Xiu, Q.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, H.

    2016-04-01

    Charge collection properties of particle detectors made in HV-CMOS technology were investigated before and after irradiation with reactor neutrons. Two different sensor types were designed and processed in 180 and 350 nm technology by AMS. Edge-TCT and charge collection measurements with electrons from 90Sr source were employed. Diffusion of generated carriers from undepleted substrate contributes significantly to the charge collection before irradiation, while after irradiation the drift contribution prevails as shown by charge measurements at different shaping times. The depleted region at a given bias voltage was found to grow with irradiation in the fluence range of interest for strip detectors at the HL-LHC. This leads to large gains in the measured charge with respect to the one before irradiation. The increase of the depleted region was attributed to removal of effective acceptors. The evolution of depleted region with fluence was investigated and modeled. Initial studies show a small effect of short term annealing on charge collection.

  1. Space charge studies in FFAG using the tracking code Zgoubi

    SciTech Connect

    Tahar, M. Haj; Meot, F.; Tsoupas, N.

    2015-05-03

    A method is implemented in Zgoubi that allows the computation of space charge effects in 2D distributions and with some restrictions in 3D distributions. It relies on decomposing field maps or analytical elements into slices and applying a space charge kick to the particles. The aim of this study is to investigate the accuracy of this technique, its limitations/advantages by comparisons with other linear/nonlinear computation methods and codes, and to apply it to high power fixed field ring design studies.

  2. Instrumentation for Studies of Electron Emission and Charging From Insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, C. D.; Zavyalov, V.; Dennison, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    Making measurements of electron emission properties of insulators is difficult since insulators can charge either negatively or positively under charge particle bombardment. In addition, high incident energies or high fluences can result in modification of a material s conductivity, bulk and surface charge profile, structural makeup through bond breaking and defect creation, and emission properties. We discuss here some of the charging difficulties associated with making insulator-yield measurements and review the methods used in previous studies of electron emission from insulators. We present work undertaken by our group to make consistent and accurate measurements of the electron/ion yield properties for numerous thin-film and thick insulator materials using innovative instrumentation and techniques. We also summarize some of the necessary instrumentation developed for this purpose including fast response, low-noise, high-sensitivity ammeters; signal isolation and interface to standard computer data acquisition apparatus using opto-isolation, sample-and-hold, and boxcar integration techniques; computer control, automation and timing using Labview software; a multiple sample carousel; a pulsed, compact, low-energy, charge neutralization electron flood gun; and pulsed visible and UV light neutralization sources. This work is supported through funding from the NASA Space Environments and Effects Program and the NASA Graduate Research Fellowship Program.

  3. Experimental Studying of Dust Particles Charging by Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Petrov, O. F.; Vorona, N. A.; Vasiliev, M. N.

    2008-09-07

    The studying of the dusty plasma properties under electron beam action are of great interest because it gives the unique opportunities for experimental investigation of strongly coupled systems as well as for developing the new dusty plasma technologies of creating the new composite materials. Highly charged dust particle generates electrostatic field that can accelerate positive ions to high power. It gives the unique possibilities of using these macroparticles (for deeply ions implantation, as catalysts for increasing rate of reactions with the high energy barrier, in the new ionic engines etc.). Presented work deals with the experimental investigation of dust particles charging under direct influence of electron beam. On the basis of experimental data the average velocities of dust particles were obtained and the charge of macroparticle was estimated.

  4. Vulnerable Children; Three Studies of Children in Conflict: Accident Involved Children, Sexually Assualted Children and Children with Asthma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lindy

    Three retrospective studies related children's socially inappropriate behavior to needs for approval and self assurance. Four girls and 16 boys (a sex difference of p=.006) involved in road accidents, aged 5 to 15, who were consecutively admitted to a hospital for arm and leg fractures were matched with controls. The accident children shared a…

  5. Studies of Ion Beam Charge Neutralization by Ferroelectric Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    Space-charge forces limit the possible transverse compression of high perveance ion beams that are used in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics applications; the minimum radius to which a beam can be focused is an increasing function of perveance. The limit can be overcome if a plasma is introduced in the beam path between the focusing element and the target in order to neutralize the space charge of the beam. This concept has been implemented on the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX) at LBNL using Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPS). In our experiment at PPPL, we propagate a perveance-dominated ion beam through a FEPS to study the effect of the neutralizing plasma on the beam envelope and its evolution in time. A 30-60 keV space-charge-dominated Argon beam is focused with an Einzel lens into a FEPS located at the beam waist. The beam is intercepted downstream from the FEPS by a movable Faraday cup that provides time-resolved 2D current density profiles of the beam spot on target. We report results on: (a) dependence of charge neutralization on FEPS plasma density; (b) effects on beam emittance, and (c) time evolution of the beam envelope after the FEPS pulse. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. [Time-resolved optical studies of charge relaxation and charge transfer at electrode interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Key components were identified in a quantitative model of carrier relaxation in semiconductor electrodes: nonlinear aspects of nonradiative and radiative recombination, effect of space charge field on carrier dynamics, self-absorption effects in direct gas semiconductors, and influence of surface state population kinetics on charge carrier recombination. For CdSe, the first three are operative (no direct proof of the last one). A realistic kinetic model for carrier recombination in the bulk of CdSe was used which includes important nonlinear effects, both radiative and nonradiative. The change in interfacial recombination velocity with the chemical nature of the sinterface was studied (n-CdSe/silane interfaces). Temperature effect (278 to 328 K) on fluorescence decay of n-CdSe in contact with 0.5 M KOH was found to be weak. An analytical solution was obtained for time-resolved fluoresence from electrodes under potential bias, and is being tested. Fluorescence work on a different material, CdS, indicate different recombination kinetics; this material was used to directly pump an optical transition of a surface state.

  7. [Time-resolved optical studies of charge relaxation and charge transfer at electrode interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Key components were identified in a quantitative model of carrier relaxation in semiconductor electrodes: nonlinear aspects of nonradiative and radiative recombination, effect of space charge field on carrier dynamics, self-absorption effects in direct gas semiconductors, and influence of surface state population kinetics on charge carrier recombination. For CdSe, the first three are operative (no direct proof of the last one). A realistic kinetic model for carrier recombination in the bulk of CdSe was used which includes important nonlinear effects, both radiative and nonradiative. The change in interfacial recombination velocity with the chemical nature of the sinterface was studied (n-CdSe/silane interfaces). Temperature effect (278 to 328 K) on fluorescence decay of n-CdSe in contact with 0.5 M KOH was found to be weak. An analytical solution was obtained for time-resolved fluoresence from electrodes under potential bias, and is being tested. Fluorescence work on a different material, CdS, indicate different recombination kinetics; this material was used to directly pump an optical transition of a surface state.

  8. Study of longitudinal dynamics in space-charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kai

    Modern accelerator applications, such as heavy ion fusion drivers, pulsed neutron sources, electron injectors for high-energy linear colliders, and X-ray Free Electron Lasers, demand beams with high intensity, low emittance and small energy spread. At low (non-relativistic) energies, the "electrostatic", collective interactions from space-charge forces existing in such intense beams play the dominant role; we characterize these beams as space-charge dominated beams. This dissertation presents numerous new findings on the longitudinal dynamics of a space-charge dominated beam, particularly on the propagation of density perturbations. In order to fully understand the complex physics of longitudinal space-charge waves, we combine the results of theory, computer simulation, and experiment. In the Long Solenoid Experimental system (LSE), with numerous diagnostic tools and techniques, we have, for the first time, experimentally measured the detailed energy profiles of longitudinal space-charge waves at different locations, both near the beam source and at the end of the transport system. Along with the current profiles, we have a complete set of experimental data for the propagation of space-charge waves. We compare these measured results to a 1-D theory and find better agreement for beams with perturbations in the linear regime, where the perturbation strength is less than 10%, than those with nonlinear perturbations. Using fast imaging techniques that we newly developed, we have, for the first time, obtained the progressive time-resolved images of longitudinal slices of a space-charge dominated beam. These images not only provide us time-resolved transverse density distribution of the beam, but also enable us to take time-resolved transverse phase space measurement using computerized tomography. By combining this information with the longitudinal energy measurement, we have, for the first time, experimentally constructed the full 6-D phase space. Part of the results

  9. The National Children's Study and the children of Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Trasande, Leonardo; Cronk, Christine E; Leuthner, Steven R; Hewitt, Jeanne B; Durkin, Maureen S; McElroy, Jane A; Anderson, Henry A; Landrigan, Philip J

    2006-03-01

    Prospective, multi-year epidemiologic studies such as the Framingham Heart Study and the Nurses' Health Study have proven highly effective in identifying risk factors for chronic illness and in guiding disease prevention. Now, in order to identify environmental risk factors for chronic disease in children, the US Congress authorized a National Children's Study as part of the Children's Health Act of 2000. Enrollment of a nationally representative cohort of 100,000 children will begin in 2008, with follow-up to continue through age 21. Environmental assessment and examination of biomarkers collected at specified intervals during pregnancy and childhood will be a major component of the Study. Recruitment at 105 sites across the United States is planned, and will begin at 7 Vanguard Centers in 2008, including Waukesha County, Wis. The National Children's Study will provide information on preventable risk factors for such chronic diseases as asthma, certain birth defects, neurobehavioral syndromes, and obesity. In addition, the National Children's Study will provide training in pediatric environmental health for the next generation of researchers and practitioners.

  10. Computational studies on nitratoethylnitramine (NENA), its tautomers and charged forms.

    PubMed

    Türker, Lemi; Atalar, Taner

    2009-02-15

    An energetic material, nitratoethylnitramine (NENA), its tautomers and also its charged forms are considered quantum chemically, using various basis sets at the levels of ab initio and density functional theories (DFT). NENA has been found to be sensitive to negative charge development, resulting in rupture of ONO(2) bond. Also conformational and molecular dynamics (MD) studies have been performed on NENA. Various geometrical parameters, energies and infrared spectra have been obtained and discussed. Also, calculations indicate that s-cis conformation of NENA is slightly more stable than the s-trans and the tautomers of it have very comparable total energy values to NENA. On the other hand, on the basis of homolytic bond dissociation energies (BDE) for ONO(2) bond in the structures, it is clear that the presence of the tautomers in the bulk of NENA somewhat should decrease its sensitivity. PMID:18565649

  11. A time-resolved study on the interaction of oppositely charged bicelles--implications on the charged lipid exchange kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Po-Wei; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Hu, Yuan; Jeng, U-Ser

    2015-03-21

    Time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering was applied to study charged lipid exchange between oppositely charged disc-shaped bicelles. The exchange of charged lipids gradually reduces the surface charge density and weakens the electrostatic attraction between the oppositely charged bicelles which form alternately stacked aggregates upon mixing. Initially, at a high surface charge density with almost no free water layer between the stacked bicelles, fast exchange kinetics dominate the exchange process. At a later stage with a lower surface charge density and a larger water gap between the stacked bicelles, slow exchange kinetics take over. The fast exchange kinetics are correlated with the close contact of the bicelles when there is almost no free water layer between the tightly bound bicelles with a charged lipid exchange time constant as short as 20-40 min. When the water gap becomes large enough to have a free water layer between the stacked bicelles, the fast lipid exchange kinetics are taken over by slow lipid exchange kinetics with time constants around 200-300 min, which are comparable to the typical time constant of lipid exchange between vesicles in aqueous solution. These two kinds of exchange mode fit well with the lipid exchange models of transient hemifusion for the fast mode and monomer exchange for the slow mode.

  12. THE U.S. NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Children's Study (NCS) is a study to examine the effects of environmental influences on the health and development of more than 100,000 children across the United States, following them from before birth until age 21. The goal of the study is to understand the factor...

  13. Comparative study of analytical techniques for determining protein charge.

    PubMed

    Filoti, Dana I; Shire, Steven J; Yadav, Sandeep; Laue, Thomas M

    2015-07-01

    As interest in high-concentration protein formulations has increased, it has become apparent that routine, accurate protein charge measurements are necessary. There are several techniques for charge measurement, and a comparison of the methods is needed. The electrophoretic mobility, effective charge, and Debye-Hückel-Henry charge have been determined for bovine serum albumin, and human serum albumin. Three different electrophoretic methods were used to measure the electrophoretic mobility: capillary electrophoresis, electrophoretic light scattering, and membrane confined electrophoresis. In addition, the effective charge was measured directly using steady-state electrophoresis. Measurements made at different NaCl concentrations, pH, and temperatures allow comparison with previous charge estimates based on electrophoresis, Donnan equilibrium, and pH titration. Similar charge estimates are obtained by all of the methods. The strengths and limitations of each technique are discussed, as are some general considerations about protein charge and charge determination.

  14. Study of the Charge Density Control Method Including the Space Charge Effect in the Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinichi; Harada, Hiroyuki; Hotchi, Hideaki; Okabe, Kota; Yamamoto, Kazami; Kinsho, Michikazu

    For high intensity proton accelerators, one of the beam loss sources is the incoherent tune spread caused by the space charge force. In the 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, beams are injected sequentially and shifted slightly from the central orbit in order to increase the beam size intentionally and suppress the charge density and incoherent tune spread. This injection method has been adopted and suppressed the beam loss. However, simulations clarified that beams did not spread as much as expected because of the space charge effect in the high current case. As simulation results of the optimized beam shift pattern when the space charge effect is considered, it was obtained that the incoherent tune spread could be suppressed to an extent that has not been achieved previously.

  15. Spotlight on Young Children and Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koralek, Derry, Ed.; Mindes, Gayle, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    When engaged in social studies, with guidance and encouragement from adults, children develop awareness of self and family and become active participants in the larger community. The knowledge and skills learned through social studies prepare children to become informed and engaged citizens of their country and the world. In this collection of…

  16. Young Children's Improvisations: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flohr, John W.

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the behavior of 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children engaged in improvisational musical tasks. Ten subjects from each of the four age levels participated in the 4-year investigation, which lasted until the 2-year-olds reached 5 years of age. Children met individually with the investigator for 15 minutes…

  17. Children's Friendship Development: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, SeonYeong; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Fowler, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Establishing friendships is an important developmental goal of early childhood, but little research has addressed ways in which parents support the friendship development of their young children with disabilities. The purpose of this survey study was to explore the support strategies that parents use to facilitate their children's friendships.…

  18. Case Studies of Environmental Risks to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Lynn R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents case studies on children's exposure to pesticides, including risks through the use of the insecticide aldicarb on bananas, the home use of diazinon, and the use of interior house paint containing mercury. These cases illustrate how regulatory agencies, parents, health-care providers, and others who come into contact with children have…

  19. Electrochemical charge transfer at a metallic electrode: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Stewart K.; Madden, Paul A.; Papadopoulos, Aristides

    2008-03-28

    The calculation of the Marcus free energy curves for electron transfer events between a redox species and a metallic electrode in an atomistic simulation designed to model the electrochemical interface with an ionic liquid is described. The calculation is performed on a system comprising a molten salt mixture confined between model metallic electrodes [Reed et al., J. Chem. Phys. 126, 084704 (2007)] which are maintained at a constant electrical potential. The calculation therefore includes a self-consistent description of the screening of the electrode potential by the liquid and the polarization of the electrode by the ions (image charge effects). The purpose of the study was to examine how the Marcus curves depend on the applied potential and on the distance of the redox species from an electrode. The pronounced oscillations in the mean electrical potential seen in molten salt systems in the ''double-layer'' region are not reflected in the reaction free energy for the electron transfer event. The reorganization energy depends markedly on the distance of the redox ion from the electrode surface because of image charge effects.

  20. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:26932087

  1. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  2. Advanced stratified charge rotary aircraft engine design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badgley, P.; Berkowitz, M.; Jones, C.; Myers, D.; Norwood, E.; Pratt, W. B.; Ellis, D. R.; Huggins, G.; Mueller, A.; Hembrey, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    A technology base of new developments which offered potential benefits to a general aviation engine was compiled and ranked. Using design approaches selected from the ranked list, conceptual design studies were performed of an advanced and a highly advanced engine sized to provide 186/250 shaft Kw/HP under cruise conditions at 7620/25,000 m/ft altitude. These are turbocharged, direct-injected stratified charge engines intended for commercial introduction in the early 1990's. The engine descriptive data includes tables, curves, and drawings depicting configuration, performance, weights and sizes, heat rejection, ignition and fuel injection system descriptions, maintenance requirements, and scaling data for varying power. An engine-airframe integration study of the resulting engines in advanced airframes was performed on a comparative basis with current production type engines. The results show airplane performance, costs, noise & installation factors. The rotary-engined airplanes display substantial improvements over the baseline, including 30 to 35% lower fuel usage.

  3. Study on sources of charging lead acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents the general characteristics of lead acid batteries and two charging methods of these batteries. For charging of lead batteries was used an intelligent power source K 8012 (from Velleman). The power source allows fixing the level of the battery voltage and battery capacity. The intelligent power source uses the joint method (at constant current and, then, at constant voltage) and warning that indicates different situations in the charging process. Other method of charging presented in the paper is at constant voltage using a stabilized power source. In the paper experimental measurements were carried out using data acquisition card SER 10 BIT (from Conrad) for charging/ discharging of a lead acid battery 12V/9Ah (using an intelligent power source) and charging of another high capacity lead acid battery 12V/47Ah/390 A (using a stabilized power source). At the discharging of the lead acid batteries it were used automotive lamps as electric loads.

  4. The study of surface acoustic wave charge transfer device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanicolaou, N.; Lin, H. C.

    1978-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave-charge transfer device, consisting of an n-type silicon substrate, a thermally grown silicon dioxide layer, and a sputtered film of piezoelectric zinc oxide is proposed as a means of circumventing problems associated with charge-coupled device (CCD) applications in memory, signal processing, and imaging. The proposed device creates traveling longitudinal electric fields in the silicon and replaces the multiphase clocks in CCD's. The traveling electric fields create potential wells which carry along charges stored there. These charges may be injected into the wells by light or by using a p-n junction as in conventional CCD's.

  5. Study of central production of charged pionic modes at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, Johannes

    2010-08-05

    The COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy is a fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS accelerator. In the years 2008 and 2009 the collaboration focused on hadron spectroscopy: data with hadronic beams at a momentum of 190 GeV/c impinging on hydrogen, lead, nickel and tungsten targets were taken. In the preparation for this run-time, the apparatus was adapted to measure the formation of resonances by both diffractive scattering and central production. In the latter case, the study of charged pionic channels is well-suited to search for members of the f{sub 0} particle family, including some of the glueball candidates. The analysis of the newly taken data has started, these proceedings are meant to give a status and overview of the current activities.

  6. Autistic-like behavior in CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hartshorne, Timothy S; Grialou, Tina L; Parker, Kellie R

    2005-03-15

    Children with CHARGE syndrome frequently exhibit moderate to severe behavior difficulties, and are often diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit disorder, Tourette syndrome, and autism. Hartshorne and Cypher (2004) surveyed parents of 100 children with CHARGE worldwide and confirmed the prevalence of behaviors that are associated with these disorders. They also found behaviors that could be described as typical of persons who are deafblind. The present study examined whether the autistic-like behaviors of children with CHARGE are more similar to those of children who are deafblind, to those of children who are autistic or are unique to CHARGE. Surveys including the Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC) were mailed to families of 204 children with CHARGE, and 160 usable surveys were returned (78%). Total scores on the ABC for children with CHARGE were significantly different from the norms for those with autism, and those who were deafblind. However, the variance for CHARGE was larger than for the normative groups, and 27.5% of those with CHARGE could be classified as autistic. The pattern of subscale scores for those with CHARGE differed from the other normative groups. PMID:15637726

  7. National Children's Study Dietary Assessment Workshop

    Cancer.gov

    The National Children's Study dietary assessment workshop was an opportunity for experts in dietary assessment methodology to gather and discuss the current state of knowledge about methodologies used to assess dietary intake during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence.

  8. PILOT STUDY: THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY (TACS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot research study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools for children in the age range of 1-5 years old. The pilot study focused on (a) simple, cost-...

  9. 42 CFR 457.540 - Cost-sharing charges for children in families with incomes at or below 150 percent of the FPL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost-sharing charges for children in families with incomes at or below 150 percent of the FPL. 457.540 Section 457.540 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH...

  10. 42 CFR 457.540 - Cost-sharing charges for children in families with incomes at or below 150 percent of the FPL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cost-sharing charges for children in families with incomes at or below 150 percent of the FPL. 457.540 Section 457.540 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH...

  11. Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Prenatal Residential Proximity to Agricultural Pesticides: The CHARGE Study

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Estella M.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Delwiche, Lora D.; Schmidt, Rebecca J.; Ritz, Beate; Hansen, Robin L.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gestational exposure to several common agricultural pesticides can induce developmental neurotoxicity in humans, and has been associated with developmental delay and autism. Objectives: We evaluated whether residential proximity to agricultural pesticides during pregnancy is associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or developmental delay (DD) in the Childhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment (CHARGE) study. Methods: The CHARGE study is a population-based case–control study of ASD, DD, and typical development. For 970 participants, commercial pesticide application data from the California Pesticide Use Report (1997–2008) were linked to the addresses during pregnancy. Pounds of active ingredient applied for organophophates, organochlorines, pyrethroids, and carbamates were aggregated within 1.25-km, 1.5-km, and 1.75-km buffer distances from the home. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of exposure comparing confirmed cases of ASD (n = 486) or DD (n = 168) with typically developing referents (n = 316). Results: Approximately one-third of CHARGE study mothers lived, during pregnancy, within 1.5 km (just under 1 mile) of an agricultural pesticide application. Proximity to organophosphates at some point during gestation was associated with a 60% increased risk for ASD, higher for third-trimester exposures (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.6), and second-trimester chlorpyrifos applications (OR = 3.3; 95% CI: 1.5, 7.4). Children of mothers residing near pyrethroid insecticide applications just before conception or during third trimester were at greater risk for both ASD and DD, with ORs ranging from 1.7 to 2.3. Risk for DD was increased in those near carbamate applications, but no specific vulnerable period was identified. Conclusions: This study of ASD strengthens the evidence linking neurodevelopmental disorders with gestational pesticide exposures, particularly organophosphates, and provides novel results of

  12. Studying and applying channeling at extremely high bunch charges

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The potentially high plasma densities possible in solids might produce extremely high acceleration gradients. However solid-state plasmas could pose daunting challenges. Crystal channeling has been suggested as a mechanism to ameliorate these problems. A high-density plasma in a crystal lattice could quench the channeling process. There is no experimental or theoretical guidance on channeling for intense charged particle beams. An experiment has been carried out at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector to observe electron channeling radiation at high bunch charges. An electron beam with up to 8 nC per electron bunch was used to investigate the electron-crystal interaction. No evidence was found of quenching of channeling at charge densities two orders of magnitude larger than in earlier experiments. Possible new channeling experiments are discussed for the much higher bunch charge densities and shorter times required to probe channeling breakdown and plasma behavior.

  13. A three dimensional dynamic study of electrostatic charging in materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Parks, D. E.; Mandell, M. J.; Harvey, J. M.; Brownell, D. H., Jr.; Wang, S. S.; Rotenberg, M.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the physical models employed in the NASCAP (NASA Charging Analyzer Program) code, and several test cases are presented. NASCAP dynamically simulates the charging of an object made of conducting segments which may be entirely or partially covered with thin dielectric films. The object may be subject to either ground test or space user-specified environments. The simulation alternately treats (1) the tendency of materials to accumulate and emit charge when subject to plasma environment, and (2) the consequent response of the charged particle environment to an object's electrostatic field. Parameterized formulations of the emission properties of materials subject to bombardment by electrons, protons, and sunlight are presented. Values of the parameters are suggested for clean aluminum, Al2O3, clean magnesium, MgO, SiO2 kapton, and teflon. A discussion of conductivity in thin dielectrics subject to radiation and high fields is given, together with a sample calculation.

  14. National Children's Study: update in 2010.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, Steven; Songco, David; Kramer, Barnett S; Guttmacher, Alan E

    2011-01-01

    The National Children's Study will examine the effects of the environment and genetics on the growth, development, and health of children across the United States; it will follow participants from before birth until age 21 years. The goal of the study is to improve the health and well-being of children and contribute to understanding the roles various factors play in health and disease. Findings from the study will be made available as the research progresses, making potential benefits known to the public as soon as possible. A robust pilot study, or Vanguard Study, is underway to generate data for designing the subsequent Main Study. The goals of the Vanguard Study are feasibility, acceptability, and cost, and the goals of the Main Study will be exposure-response relationships and biological, environmental, and genetic interactions. The initial Vanguard Study experience among 7 study centers was successful in many ways, including delineating the topics to explore for the next phase of the Vanguard Study. Three different recruitment strategies are under evaluation to determine what approach to use for the Main Study. The organization of National Children's Study operations is currently based on a new decentralized business model. PMID:21259268

  15. A Study of Charged Current Single Charged Pion Productions on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraide, Katsuki

    2009-01-01

    Understanding single charged pion production via neutrino-nucleus charged current interaction in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV is essential for future neutrino oscillation experiments since this process is a dominant background for vμ → vx oscillation measurements. There are two contributions to this process: single pion production via baryonic resonance (vμN → μ-+) and coherent pion production interacting with the entire nucleus (vμA → μ-+), where N is nucleon in the nucleus and A is the nucleus. The purpose of the study presented in this thesis is a precise measurement of charged current single charged pion productions, resonant and coherent pion productions, with a good final state separation in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV. In this thesis, we focus on the study of charged current coherent pion production from muon neutrinos scattering on carbon, vμ 12C → μ-12+, in the SciBooNE experiment. This is motivated by the fact that without measuring this component first, the precise determination of resonant pion production cross section can not be achieved since the contribution of coherent pion production in the region of small muon scattering angle is not small. Furthermore, the coherent process is particularly interesting because it is deeply rooted in fundamental physics via Adler's partially conserved axial-vector current theorem. We took data from June 2007 until August 2008, in both the neutrino and antineutrino beam. In total, 2.52 x 1020 protons on target were collected. We have performed a search for charged current coherent pion production by using SciBooNE's full neutrino data set, corresponding to 0.99 x 1020 protons on target. No evidence for coherent pion production is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the cross section ratio of charged

  16. Charge transfer properties of pentacene adsorbed on silver: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    N, Rekha T.; Rajkumar, Beulah J. M.

    2015-06-24

    Charge transfer properties of pentacene adsorbed on silver is investigated using DFT methods. Optimized geometry of pentacene after adsorption on silver indicates distortion in hexagonal structure of the ring close to the silver cluster and deviations in co-planarity of carbon atoms due to the variations in bond angles and dihedral angles. Theoretically simulated absorption spectrum has a symmetric surface plasmon resonance peak around 486nm corresponding to the transfer of charge from HOMO-2 to LUMO. Theoretical SERS confirms the process of adsorption, tilted orientation of pentacene on silver surface and the charge transfers reported. Localization of electron density arising from redistribution of electrostatic potential together with a reduced bandgap of pentacene after adsorption on silver suggests its utility in the design of electro active organic semiconducting devices.

  17. A study of 10 men charged with patricide.

    PubMed

    Cravens, J M; Campion, J; Rotholc, A; Covan, F; Cravens, R A

    1985-09-01

    The authors reviewed the records of 10 men charged with patricide, including one charged with double parricide, all of whom had been examined at the Forensic Psychiatry Service of Bellevue Hospital from 1970 to 1983. Prior psychoses were documented in all subjects; nine were referred to as delusional. Four perceived their fathers as having posed threats of physical or psychological annihilation to them, and five saw paternal threats to their manhood. The 10th man allegedly killed his father during a drunken brawl. PMID:4025628

  18. Study of symmetry breaking of charged scalar field: Hydrodynamic version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, T.; Rodríguez-Meza, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    We rewrite the Klein-Gordon (KG) equation for a complex scalar field as a new Gross-Pitaevskii (GP)-like equation. The potential of the scalar field is a mexican-hat potential and the field is in a thermal bath with one loop contribution. We interpret the new GP equation as a finite temperature generalization of the GP equation for a charged field. We find its hydrodynamic version as well and using it, we derive the corresponding thermodynamics. We also obtain a generalized first law for a charged Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC).

  19. A Communications Strategy for the National Children's Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The National Children's Study is the largest long term study of children's health and development ever to be conducted in the United States, involving 100,000 children from before birth to age 21. The Study aims to better understand the link between the environments in which children are raised and their physical and mental health and development.…

  20. A Different Approach to Studying the Charge and Discharge of a Capacitor without an Oscilloscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladino, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    A different method to study the charging and discharging processes of a capacitor is presented. The method only requires a high impedance voltmeter. The charging and discharging processes of a capacitor are usually studied experimentally using an oscilloscope and, therefore, both processes are studied as a function of time. The approach presented…

  1. Study on High Efficient Electric Vehicle Wireless Charging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. X.; Liu, Z. Z.; Zeng, H.; Qu, X. D.; Hou, Y. J.

    2016-08-01

    Electric and unmanned is a new trend in the development of automobile, cable charging pile can not meet the demand of unmanned electric vehicle. Wireless charging system for electric vehicle has a high level of automation, which can be realized by unmanned operation, and the wireless charging technology has been paid more and more attention. This paper first analyses the differences in S-S (series-series) and S-P (series-parallel) type resonant wireless power supply system, combined with the load characteristics of electric vehicle, S-S type resonant structure was used in this system. This paper analyses the coupling coefficient of several common coil structure changes with the moving distance of Maxwell Ansys software, the performance of disc type coil structure is better. Then the simulation model is established by Simulink toolbox in Matlab, to analyse the power and efficiency characteristics of the whole system. Finally, the experiment platform is set up to verify the feasibility of the whole system and optimize the system. Based on the theoretical and simulation analysis, the higher charging efficiency is obtained by optimizing the magnetic coupling mechanism.

  2. A Study of CHARGE Syndrome in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deuce, Gail; Howard, Simon; Rose, Steve; Fuggle, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article reports findings of a questionnaire completed by 44 families living in the UK with a child (aged 15 years or younger) with a medical diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome. The questionnaire contained three sections, namely Diagnosis (including medical and health issues), Child development, and Educational provision. This article reports on the…

  3. Russia's Unwanted Children: A Cultural Anthropological Study of Marginalized Children in Moscow and St. Petersburg.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creuziger, Clementine G. K.

    1997-01-01

    Studied the plight of marginalized children in urban Russia, including orphans, children with some family ties living in group homes, and street children. Found that changing public views toward these groups since WWII have led to a deterioration in lifestyle for these children, further contributing to criminal activity and poverty in urban areas.…

  4. Pathways to Language: A Naturalistic Study of Children with Williams Syndrome and Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Yonata; Eilam, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    This is a naturalistic study of the development of language in Hebrew-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with Down syndrome (DS), whose MLU extended from 1[multiplied by]0 to 4[multiplied by]4. Developmental curves over the entire span of data collection revealed minor differences between children with WS, children with DS,…

  5. Young Children's Perceptions of Scientists: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buldu, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Background: Since the 1950s, there has been a growing body of research dealing with perceptions children have of scientists. Typically, research studies in this area have utilized children's drawings in an effort to discern what those perceptions are. Studies assessing perceptions children have of scientists have shown that children have…

  6. Ionic solvation studied by image-charge reaction field method

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuchun; Baumketner, Andrij; Song, Wei; Deng, Shaozhong; Jacobs, Donald; Cai, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In a preceding paper [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 154103 (2009)], we introduced a new, hybrid explicit∕implicit method to treat electrostatic interactions in computer simulations, and tested its performance for liquid water. In this paper, we report further tests of this method, termed the image-charge solvation model (ICSM), in simulations of ions solvated in water. We find that our model can faithfully reproduce known solvation properties of sodium and chloride ions. The charging free energy of a single sodium ion is in excellent agreement with the estimates by other electrostatics methods, while offering much lower finite-size errors. Similarly, the potentials of mean force computed for Na–Cl, Na–Na, and Cl–Cl pairs closely reproduce those reported previously. Collectively, our results demonstrate the superior accuracy of the proposed ICSM method for simulations of mixed media. PMID:21280685

  7. Poor Rural Children Attract Close Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Growing up poor in isolated rural areas and small towns is qualitatively different from growing up poor in the city. Yet most of what experts know about the effects of poverty on children's development comes from studies conducted in big cities. Now, an ambitious project run by universities in Pennsylvania and North Carolina is putting what some…

  8. Study of television viewing habits in children.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sharmila Banerjee; Gupta, Yogita; Aneja, Satinder

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies from developing countries have reported that Television (TV) viewing, if excessive and of poor quality has a proven negative influence on child health. Indian studies on this subject are few. The present study aimed at determining TV viewing habits of children and their families as well as parental perspectives on the impact of TV on child health using a provider completed indigenously developed questionnaire in Hindi. The study group comprised of 109 children attending a government hospital who belonged predominantly to lower socio-economic strata with poor maternal literacy. It was observed that 100 % children watched excessive TV (> 2 h daily), with majority viewing unsupervised and low quality content. There were minimal parental restrictions and no active discussion regarding contents. Negative impact was found on play, hobbies, sleep hygiene and eating habits in most children. Most parents were unaware of unhealthy viewing and the associated deleterious effects. As pediatricians we need to enquire about TV viewing habits routinely and educate parents about appropriate TV viewing. PMID:24682808

  9. Polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent counterions: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Both experiments and theory have evidenced that multivalent cations can mediate the interaction between negatively charged polyelectrolytes and like-charged objects, such as anionic lipoplexes (DNA-cation-anionic liposome complexes). In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the electrostatic interaction responsible for the trivalent-counterion-mediated adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto a like-charged planar surface. The evaluation of the Helmholtz free energy allows us to characterize both the magnitude and the range of the interaction as a function of the polyelectrolyte charge, surface charge density, [3:1] electrolyte concentration, and cation size. Both polyelectrolyte and surface charge favor the adsorption. It should be stressed, however, that the adsorption will be negligible if the surface charge density does not exceed a threshold value. The effect of the [3:1] electrolyte concentration has also been analyzed. In certain range of concentrations, the counterion-mediated attraction seems to be independent of this parameter, whereas very high concentrations of salt weaken the adsorption. If the trivalent cation diameter is doubled the adsorption moderates due to the excluded volume effects. The analysis of the integrated charge density and ionic distributions suggests that a delicate balance between charge inversion and screening effects governs the polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent cations. PMID:24811649

  10. Study of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations using reaction-plane-dependent balance functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; STAR Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    STAR has recently reported charge-dependent azimuthal correlations that are sensitive to the charge separation effect in Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 200 GeV. Qualitatively, these results agree with some of the theoretical predictions for local parity violation in heavy-ion collisions. However, a study using reaction-plane-dependent balance functions shows an alternative origin of this signal. The balance function, which measures the correlation between oppositely charged pairs, is sensitive to the mechanisms of charge formation and the subsequent relative diffusion of the balancing charges. The reaction-plane-dependent balance function measurements can be related to STAR's charge-dependent azimuthal correlations. We report reaction-plane-dependent balance functions for Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 200, 62.4, 39, 11.5 and 7.7 GeV using the STAR detector. The model of Schlichting and Pratt incorporating local charge conservation and elliptic flow reproduces most of the three-particle azimuthal correlation results at 200 GeV. The experimental charge-dependent azimuthal charge correlations observed at 200 GeV can be explained in terms of local charge conservation and elliptic flow.

  11. Polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent counterions: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Both experiments and theory have evidenced that multivalent cations can mediate the interaction between negatively charged polyelectrolytes and like-charged objects, such as anionic lipoplexes (DNA-cation-anionic liposome complexes). In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the electrostatic interaction responsible for the trivalent-counterion-mediated adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto a like-charged planar surface. The evaluation of the Helmholtz free energy allows us to characterize both the magnitude and the range of the interaction as a function of the polyelectrolyte charge, surface charge density, [3:1] electrolyte concentration, and cation size. Both polyelectrolyte and surface charge favor the adsorption. It should be stressed, however, that the adsorption will be negligible if the surface charge density does not exceed a threshold value. The effect of the [3:1] electrolyte concentration has also been analyzed. In certain range of concentrations, the counterion-mediated attraction seems to be independent of this parameter, whereas very high concentrations of salt weaken the adsorption. If the trivalent cation diameter is doubled the adsorption moderates due to the excluded volume effects. The analysis of the integrated charge density and ionic distributions suggests that a delicate balance between charge inversion and screening effects governs the polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent cations.

  12. Polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent counterions: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Both experiments and theory have evidenced that multivalent cations can mediate the interaction between negatively charged polyelectrolytes and like-charged objects, such as anionic lipoplexes (DNA-cation-anionic liposome complexes). In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the electrostatic interaction responsible for the trivalent-counterion-mediated adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto a like-charged planar surface. The evaluation of the Helmholtz free energy allows us to characterize both the magnitude and the range of the interaction as a function of the polyelectrolyte charge, surface charge density, [3:1] electrolyte concentration, and cation size. Both polyelectrolyte and surface charge favor the adsorption. It should be stressed, however, that the adsorption will be negligible if the surface charge density does not exceed a threshold value. The effect of the [3:1] electrolyte concentration has also been analyzed. In certain range of concentrations, the counterion-mediated attraction seems to be independent of this parameter, whereas very high concentrations of salt weaken the adsorption. If the trivalent cation diameter is doubled the adsorption moderates due to the excluded volume effects. The analysis of the integrated charge density and ionic distributions suggests that a delicate balance between charge inversion and screening effects governs the polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent cations.

  13. QIE: Performance Studies of the Next Generation Charge Integrator

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Hirschauer, J.; Freeman, J.; Hughes, E.; Hare, D.; Dal Monte, L.; Whitbeck, A.; Zimmerman, T.

    2015-02-06

    The Phase 1 upgrade of the Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will include two new generations (named QIE10 and QIE11) of the radiation-tolerant flash ADC chip known as the Charge Integrator and Encoder or QIE. The QIE integrates charge from a photo sensor over a 25 ns time period and encodes the result in a non-linear digital output while having a good sensitivity in both the higher and the lower energy values. The charge integrator has the advantage of analyzing fast signals coming from the calorimeters as long as the timing and pulse information is available. The calorimeters send fast, negative polarity signals, which the QIE integrates in its non-inverting input amplifier. The input analog signal enters the QIE chip through two points: signal and reference. The chip integrates the difference between these two values. This helps in getting rid of the incoming noise, which is effectively cancelled out in the difference. Over a period of about six months between September, 2013 and April, 2014 about 320 QIE10 and about 20 QIE11 chips were tested in Fermilab using a single-chip test stand where every individual chip was tested for its characteristic features using a clam-shell. The results of those tests performed on the QIE10 and QIE11 are summarized in this document.

  14. QIE: performance studies of the next generation charge integrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Hirschauer, J.; Freeman, J.; Hughes, E.; Hare, D.; Dal Monte, L.; Whitbeck, A.; Zimmerman, T.

    2015-02-01

    The Phase 1 upgrade of the Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will include two new generations (named QIE10 and QIE11) of the radiation-tolerant flash ADC chip known as the Charge Integrator and Encoder or QIE. The QIE integrates charge from a photo sensor over a 25 ns time period and encodes the result in a non-linear digital output while having a good sensitivity in both the higher and the lower energy values. The charge integrator has the advantage of analyzing fast signals coming from the calorimeters as long as the timing and pulse information is available. The calorimeters send fast, negative polarity signals, which the QIE integrates in its non-inverting input amplifier. The input analog signal enters the QIE chip through two points: signal and reference. The chip integrates the difference between these two values. This helps in getting rid of the incoming noise, which is effectively cancelled out in the difference. Over a period of about six months between September, 2013 and April, 2014 about 320 QIE10 and about 20 QIE11 chips were tested in Fermilab using a single-chip test stand where every individual chip was tested for its characteristic features using a clam-shell. The results of those tests performed on the QIE10 and QIE11 are summarized in this document.

  15. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Silicon and Iron Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1996-01-01

    Charge transfer at electron-volt energies between multiply charged atomic ions and neutral atoms and molecules is of considerable importance in astrophysics, plasma physics, and in particular, fusion plasmas. In the year covered by this report, several major tasks were completed. These include: (1) the re-calibration of the ion gauge to measure the absolute particle densities of H2, He, N2, and CO for our current measurements; (2) the analysis of data for charge transfer reactions of N(exp 2 plus) ion and He, H2, N2, and CO; (3) measurement and data analysis of the charge transfer reaction of (Fe(exp 2 plus) ion and H2; (4) charge transfer measurement of Fe(exp 2 plus) ion and H2; and (5) redesign and modification of the ion detection and data acquisition system for the low energy beam facility (reflection time of flight mass spectrometer) dedicated to the study of state select charge transfer.

  16. Attachment styles in maltreated children: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Finzi, R; Cohen, O; Sapir, Y; Weizman, A

    2000-01-01

    The study compares the emotional impact of maltreatment on the attachment styles in three groups of children aged 6-12 years: children of drug-user fathers (n = 76), physically abused children (n = 41), neglected children (n = 38); non-abused/non-neglected children (n = 35)--control group. The secure style characterized 52% of the children of drug-user fathers and the insecure style characterized the other 48% (anxious/ambivalent or avoidant); physically abused children were characterized mainly by the avoidant attachment style, and neglected children by the anxious/ambivalent style. The conclusion is that physically abused children are at risk of antisocial behavior and sustained suspicion towards others; neglected children are at risk of social withdrawal, social rejection and feelings of incompetence, and children of drug-user fathers may be at risk of behavioral problems and drug use in adolescence.

  17. Taking Charge: A Handbook for Parents Whose Children Have Emotional Disorders. 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelker, Katharin A.

    This handbook was written to share the feelings, experiences, and knowledge of parents of children with emotional disorders. The first chapter, "Feelings Come First," considers recognition of unusual behavior patterns underlying emotional disturbances and the difficulty of determining their causes, their impact on the family, and coping…

  18. Thermal study of battery charge control by temperature derivative reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halkjaerjacobsen, P.; Schmidt, K. A.; Otto, S.; Dudley, G. J.; Spruijt, H. J. N.

    1989-08-01

    A battery charge control technique, invented at ESTEC in 1983, which relies upon the changes in the battery cell temperature time derivative which accompany the onset of overcharge is described. A thermally realistic portion of a typical flight battery is constructed and tested in parallel with detailed thermal modeling in order to develop the technique further. Comparisons between thermal model and test results are presented and show satisfactory agreement. Optimum positions for the temperature sensors within the battery are identified, taking into account sensitivity to cell temperature changes as well as to thermal perturbations due to external effects.

  19. Renal disorders in children: a Nigerian study.

    PubMed

    Eke, F U; Eke, N N

    1994-06-01

    A 5-year prospective study of 699 children with various renal disorders from around the Rivers State, which is in the eastern part of Nigeria, was carried out to investigate the prevalence and significance of renal disorders in a third world country with no facilities for paediatric dialysis and transplantation. Renal disorders accounted for 1.1% of the total outpatients and hospital admissions. The commonest renal disorders were urinary tract infection (UTI, 68.9%); nephrotic syndrome (NS 14.6%) and acute post streptococcal glomerulonephritis (11.4%). Patients with UTI had no vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR); 22.5% of NS patients were steroid sensitive. Wilms' tumour (1.6%) was the second commonest childhood malignant tumour; 8 of 17 cases of obstructive uropathy were secondary to meatal stenosis following circumcision. Fifteen children developed end-stage renal failure (ESRF), mainly due to chronic glomerulonephritis, giving a prevalence rate of 7.5 children per year per million childhood population. Hence, renal disorders are common in Nigeria and although VUR is rare, ESRF may approximate figures seen in the western world. This highlights the need to improve the country's socioeconomic conditions, make medical facilities more available to children and prevent renal diseases that may lead to ESRF.

  20. Camera memory study for large space telescope. [charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. P.; Brewer, J. E.; Brager, E. A.; Farnsworth, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Specifications were developed for a memory system to be used as the storage media for camera detectors on the large space telescope (LST) satellite. Detectors with limited internal storage time such as intensities charge coupled devices and silicon intensified targets are implied. The general characteristics are reported of different approaches to the memory system with comparisons made within the guidelines set forth for the LST application. Priority ordering of comparisons is on the basis of cost, reliability, power, and physical characteristics. Specific rationales are provided for the rejection of unsuitable memory technologies. A recommended technology was selected and used to establish specifications for a breadboard memory. Procurement scheduling is provided for delivery of system breadboards in 1976, prototypes in 1978, and space qualified units in 1980.

  1. Ionization efficiency studies with charge breeder and conventional electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Koivisto, H. Tarvainen, O.; Toivanen, V.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Lamy, T.; Angot, J.; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.; Patti, G.; Standylo, L.; Steczkiewicz, O.; Choinski, J.

    2014-02-15

    Radioactive Ion Beams play an increasingly important role in several European research facility programs such as SPES, SPIRAL1 Upgrade, and SPIRAL2, but even more for those such as EURISOL. Although remarkable advances of ECRIS charge breeders (CBs) have been achieved, further studies are needed to gain insight on the physics of the charge breeding process. The fundamental plasma processes of charge breeders are studied in the frame of the European collaboration project, EMILIE, for optimizing the charge breeding. Important information on the charge breeding can be obtained by conducting similar experiments using the gas mixing and 2-frequency heating techniques with a conventional JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS and the LPSC-PHOENIX charge breeder. The first experiments were carried out with noble gases and they revealed, for example, that the effects of the gas mixing and 2-frequency heating on the production of high charge states appear to be additive for the conventional ECRIS. The results also indicate that at least in the case of noble gases the differences between the conventional ECRIS and the charge breeder cause only minor impact on the production efficiency of ion beams.

  2. A Reflective Study into Children's Cognition When Making Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsop, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, children's mental activities when making digital games are explored. Where previous studies have mainly focused on children's learning, this study aimed to unfold the children's thinking process for learning when making computer games. As part of an ongoing larger scale study, which adopts an ethnographic approach, this research…

  3. A study of short test and charge retention test methods for nickel-cadmium spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for testing nickel-cadmium cells for internal shorts and charge retention were studied. Included were (a) open circuit voltage decay after a brief charge, (b) open circuit voltage recovery after shorting, and (c) open circuit voltage decay and capacity loss after a full charge. The investigation included consideration of the effects of prior history, of conditioning cells prior to testing, and of various test method variables on the results of the tests. Sensitivity of the tests was calibrated in terms of equivalent external resistance. The results were correlated. It was shown that a large number of variables may affect the results of these tests. It is concluded that the voltage decay after a brief charge and the voltage recovery methods are more sensitive than the charged stand method, and can detect an internal short equivalent to a resistance of about (10,000/C)ohms where "C' is the numerical value of the capacity of the cell in ampere hours.

  4. Numerical Study of Stratified Charge Combustion in Wave Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalim, M. Razi

    1997-01-01

    A wave rotor may be used as a pressure-gain combustor effecting non-steady flow, and intermittent, confined combustion to enhance gas turbine engine performance. It will be more compact and probably lighter than an equivalent pressure-exchange wave rotor, yet will have similar thermodynamic and mechanical characteristics. Because the allowable turbine blade temperature limits overall fuel/air ratio to sub-flammable values, premixed stratification techniques are necessary to burn hydrocarbon fuels in small engines with compressor discharge temperature well below autoignition conditions. One-dimensional, unsteady numerical simulations of stratified-charge combustion are performed using an eddy-diffusivity turbulence model and a simple reaction model incorporating a flammability limit temperature. For good combustion efficiency, a stratification strategy is developed which concentrates fuel at the leading and trailing edges of the inlet port. Rotor and exhaust temperature profiles and performance predictions are presented at three representative operating conditions of the engine: full design load, 40% load, and idle. The results indicate that peak local gas temperatures will result in excessive temperatures within the rotor housing unless additional cooling methods are used. The rotor itself will have acceptable temperatures, but the pattern factor presented to the turbine may be of concern, depending on exhaust duct design and duct-rotor interaction.

  5. Listening to Children: Exploring Intuitive Strategies and Interactive Methods in a Study of Children's Special Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Carie

    2012-01-01

    Stemming from the UNCRC, childhood researchers have proposed a variety of methodological strategies for upholding children's rights and understanding their perspectives. This paper aims to advance the conversation on engaging children's perspectives by presenting data collection methods used in a qualitative study exploring children's special…

  6. CONSIDERATION OF CHILDREN'S DISTINCTIVE SUSCEPTIBILITY IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consideration of children's distinctive susceptibility in environmental health studies.
    Pauline Mendola (US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711)

    Children are a particularly susceptible subpopulation with ...

  7. A study of malnourished children in children's hospital Lusaka (Zambia).

    PubMed

    Khan, A A; Gupta, B M

    1979-01-01

    The parents of 200 malnourished childred referred and admitted over the July-December 1976 period to the nutrition wing of the Children's University Teaching Hospital, Zambia, were interviewed in an effort to understand the home environment of malnourished children in Lusaka, Zambia. The 1974 incidence of malnutrition in Zambia was about 23% with higher prevalences of marasmus and moderate malnutrition. There were 9.4% severly malnourished children admitted in 1976 as compared with less than 1% in 1971. Many of these children were admitted very late in a hypothermic shocked state which is directly responsible for the increasing incidence of mortality over these years. Plasma or blood transfusion is a standard procedure in all shocked cases of kwashiorkor, yet many of the children still die within 24 hours of admission. Malnutrition incidence was found to be closely linked to the rise in price index. The majority of the children were admitted from the rainy months November to March, the time associated with a higher incidence of gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, and measles. 88% of the children were between 1-3 years old. Marasmus (33.5%) and marasmic kwashiorkor (40.5%) were more frequent. 63% of the malnourished childred had attended the child health clinics in their infancy and were immunized but discontinued attendance one vaccination was completed. The problem of malnutrition was in the toddler age group. 86% of the childred came from urban slums and periurban areas; 83% were from unitary families, living in 1 or 2 bedroom houses with no separate provision for a kitchen. Rural families (14%) were living as joint families. 32% of the children were from large families. 52% of the parents were employed as casual laborers and earning under US $35 per month. There were only 10 families with earnings in excess of US $125 per month and only 8 had good sources of income from farms. As many as 68.5% children were experiencing 1 or more adverse factors which

  8. Trapping-charging ability and electrical properties study of amorphous insulator by dielectric spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mekni, Omar Arifa, Hakim; Askri, Besma; Yangui, Béchir; Raouadi, Khaled; Damamme, Gilles

    2014-09-14

    Usually, the trapping phenomenon in insulating materials is studied by injecting charges using a Scanning Electron Microscope. In this work, we use the dielectric spectroscopy technique for showing a correlation between the dielectric properties and the trapping-charging ability of insulating materials. The evolution of the complex permittivity (real and imaginary parts) as a function of frequency and temperature reveals different types of relaxation according to the trapping ability of the material. We found that the space charge relaxation at low frequencies affects the real part of the complex permittivity ε{sup ´} and the dissipation factor Tan(δ). We prove that the evolution of the imaginary part of the complex permittivity against temperature ε{sup ′′}=f(T) reflects the phenomenon of charge trapping and detrapping as well as trapped charge evolution Q{sub p}(T). We also use the electric modulus formalism to better identify the space charge relaxation. The investigation of trapping or conductive nature of insulating materials was mainly made by studying the activation energy and conductivity. The conduction and trapping parameters are determined using the Correlated Barrier Hopping (CBH) model in order to confirm the relation between electrical properties and charge trapping ability.

  9. Recent Results from a Laboratory Study of Charging Mechanisms in a Dusty Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venturini, Catherine C.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Comfort, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    A laboratory investigation has been developed to experimentally study the interaction of micron sized particles with plasmas and electromagnetic radiation. The intent is to investigate under what conditions particles of various compositions and sizes become charged, or discharged, while exposed to an electron beam and UV radiation. This investigation uses a unique laboratory technique known as electrodynamic suspension of particles. Here, a single charged micron size particle is suspended in a quadrupole trap and then subjected to a controlled environment. In this paper, we will discuss recent results from this experiment in which different materials including polystyrene and aluminum oxide, and sizes ranging from 10 microns to 1 micron have been used to determine charge to mass ratios and then subjected to an electron beam and /or UV radiation. In each instance, the particle's charge as well as beam current flux and radiation intensity flux is measured. These results will be compared with initial results using salt crystals. It was found that a negatively charged salt crystal exposed for 30 minutes to a 500 eV electron beam with primary electron beam current of -3.06 x 10(exp -5) picoamps yielded a secondary electron current of 3.23 x 10(exp -5) picoamps. Additionally, the particle was observed to be steadily losing charge over this time interval. By studying the microphysics of one particle, a better understanding of theoretical models and other laboratory results associated with particle charging mechanisms can be achieved.

  10. A Charge Separation Study to Enable the Design of a Complete Muon Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, C.; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Johnson, Rolland P.; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Neuffer, David; Yonehara, K.

    2013-12-01

    The most promising designs for 6D muon cooling channels operate on a specific sign of electric charge. In particular, the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) and Rectilinear RFOFO designs are the leading candidates to become the baseline 6D cooling channel in the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). Time constraints prevented the design of a realistic charge separator, so a simplified study was performed to emulate the effects of charge separation on muons exiting the front end of a muon collider. The output of the study provides particle distributions that the competing designs will use as input into their cooling channels. We report here on the study of the charge separator that created the simulated particles.

  11. Light-induced EPR study of charge transfer in poly(3-hexylthiophene)/fullerene bulk heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Krinichnyi, V. I.; Yudanova, E. I.; Denisov, N. N.

    2009-07-28

    The first results of the light-induced EPR study of magnetic, relaxation, and dynamic parameters of charge carriers background photoinduced by optical photons (1.7-3.4 eV) in poly(3-hexylthiophene)/fullerene bulk heterojunctions are described. All magnetic resonance parameters for positively charged polaron and negatively charged fullerene ion-radical in radical pairs photoinduced in the composite were determined separately by the steady-state microwave saturation method. Paramagnetic susceptibility of charge carriers reflects their activation dynamics and exchange interaction. A decay of long-living radical pairs depends on the spatial distance between photoinduced charge carriers. The one-dimensional polaron diffusion along the polymer chain and fullerene rotation near the main molecular axis was shown to follow activation Elliot hopping model and to be governed by photon energy. The difference in activation energies of the charge carriers' dynamics and in their dependence on the exciting photon energy proves their noninteracting character in the polymer/fullerene composite. Main magnetic, relaxation and dynamics parameters of charge carriers are governed by the photon energy band due to inhomogeneity of distribution of polymer and fullerene domains in the composite.

  12. Collaborative Study of Children Treated for Phenylketonuria: Study Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Malcolm; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Available from: Arthur Retlaw and Associates, Inc., Suite 2080, 1603 Orrington Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 60201. Described is a study in which a large sample of children (n=444) with phenylketonuria (an inborn metabolic error usually related to impaired cognitive ability) were treated under controlled conditions from near birth to 6 years of age.…

  13. Syntax and Prosody in Narratives: A Study of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanchi, Paola; Zampini, Laura; Fasolo, Mirco; D'Odorico, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines narrative competence and its relationships with syntactic and prosodic skills in preschool children. The narrative skills of 30 typically developing Italian children were assessed during their first year of kindergarten attendance (T1) and again one year later (T2). A picture book was used to elicit children's…

  14. A Longitudinal Study of Children's Social Adjustment during Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battistich, Victor; Solomon, Daniel

    A 7-year, longitudinal study of children's social development from kindergarten through sixth grade was designed to identify unusually prosocial children and characteristics that differentiated them from average and antisocial peers. Another objective was to identify functional socioemotional predictors of changes in children's social adjustment.…

  15. A Study on Gross Motor Skills of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Joanne Hui-Tzu

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a creative movement program on gross motor skills of preschool children. Sixty children between the ages of 3 to 5 were drawn from the population of a preschool in Taichung, Taiwan. An experimental pretest-posttest control-group design was utilized. The children enrolled in the…

  16. Study Urges Treatment of Parents of ADHD Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Treatment for many young children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) should also include treatment for their parents, according to new research from the University of Maryland's ADHD Program. In conducting one of the first systematic studies of pre-school children with ADHD, the research team found that parents of children with…

  17. Psychological and Educational Studies with Spina Bifida Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diller, Leonard; And Others

    To measure school achievements in spina bifida children, to relate these measures to certain variables, to obtain information on educational problems, and to study facets of cognition and its changes with age, 77 spina bifida children and 53 amputees (all aged 5 to 15) were tested. Sixty non-disabled children were at times used for controls. The…

  18. Temperament and individuality: a study of Malay children.

    PubMed

    Banks, E

    1989-07-01

    Malay parents of 40 infants and preschool children were interviewed using translations of temperament questionnaires by Thomas and Chess, and by Carey. Similarities and differences between Malay children and previously studied American children are discussed, and relationships suggested among temperament ratings and Malay child-rearing practices and values.

  19. A Study of ESP in Hyperkinetic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jampolsky, Gerald G.; Haight, Maryellen J.

    Evaluated with 10 hyperkinetic Ss (9- to 13-years-old) was whether hyperkinetic children have more extrasensory perception (ESP) than normal children and learn ESP skills more rapidly than other children. Ss were administered the Operational Assessment Tool ESP teaching instrument. Results did not support the hypothesis that hyperkinetic children…

  20. Photon correlation studies of charge variation in a single GaAlAs quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piętka, B.; Suffczyński, J.; Goryca, M.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Golnik, A.; Kossacki, P.; Wysmolek, A.; Gaj, J. A.; Stępniewski, R.; Potemski, M.

    2013-01-01

    Complex charge variation processes in low-density, direct-type GaAlAs quantum dots embedded in a type-II GaAs/AlAs bilayer are studied by single-photon correlation measurements. Two groups of excitonic transitions are distinguished in the single quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence spectra, namely due to recombination of neutral and charged multiexcitonic complexes. The radiative cascades are found within each group. Three characteristic time scales are identified in the QD emission dynamics. The fastest one (of the order of 1 ns) is related to excitonic radiative recombination. The two remaining ones are related to the QD charge state variation. The one of 100-ns range (typical blinking time scale) corresponds to random capture of single carriers under a quasiresonant excitation. The slowest processes, in the range of seconds, are related to charge fluctuations in the surrounding of the dot.

  1. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF CHILDREN DIAPHYSEAL FEMORAL FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Cassiano Ricardo; Traldi, Eduardo Franceschini; Posser, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the personal, fracture, treatment and complication characteristics among patients with pediatric femoral shaft fractures attended at the pediatric orthopedic service of the Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study on a population consisting of patients with femoral shaft fractures, aged between birth and 14 years and 11 months, who were divided into four age groups. Information was obtained from medical records and was transferred to a survey questionnaire to present personal, fracture, treatment and complication variables. Results: The study population consisted of 96 patients. Their mean age was 6.8 years. The cases were predominantly among males, comprising closed fractures on the right side, in the middle third with a single line. Regarding fracture etiology, traffic accidents predominated overall in the sample. Most of the patients (74 to 77.1%) presented femoral fractures as their only injury. Conservative treatment predominated in the group younger than six years of age, and surgical treatment in the group aged 6 to 14 years and 11 months. The complications observed until bone union were: discrepancy, infection and movement limitation. The mean time taken for consolidation was 9.6 ± 2.4 weeks, varying with age. Conclusion: The features of these fractures were similar to those described in the literature and the treatment used showed good results. The Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital has used the treatment proposed in the literature for pediatric femoral shaft fractures. PMID:27042619

  2. Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headley, Clea; Campbell, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined primary school teachers' knowledge of anxiety and excessive anxiety symptoms in children. Three hundred and fifteen primary school teachers completed a questionnaire exploring their definitions of anxiety and the indications they associated with excessive anxiety in primary school children. Results showed that teachers had…

  3. STUDIES OF X-RAY PRODUCTION FOLLOWING CHARGE EXCHANGE RECOMBINATION BETWEEN HIGHLY CHARGED IONS AND NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Thorn, D B; Wargelin, B J

    2008-08-28

    We have used microcalorimeters built by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Electron Beam Ion Trap to measure X-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between highly charged ions colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. Our measurements show the spectral dependence on neutral species and also show the distinct differences between spectra produced by charge exchange reactions and those produced by direct impact excitation. These results are part of an ongoing experimental investigation at the LLNL EBIT facility of charge exchange spectral signatures and can be used to interpret X-ray spectra produced by a variety of laboratory and celestial sources including cometary and planetary atmospheres, the Earth's magnetosheath, the heliosphere, and tokamaks.

  4. Superwarfarin poisoning in children: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Smolinske, S C; Scherger, D L; Kearns, P S; Wruk, K M; Kulig, K W; Rumack, B H

    1989-09-01

    This prospective study was undertaken to determine the incidence, severity, time of onset, and duration of coagulopathy in children following accidental ingestion of long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides, often called "superwarfarins." Of 110 children, who ingested superwarfarins and in whom one or more prothrombin time values were obtained, 8 had a prothrombin time ratio (patient to control) of greater than or equal to 1.2, indicative of anticoagulation. Prothrombin time values obtained 48 hours after ingestion were more likely to be prolonged (6/34, 17.6%) than values obtained 24 hours after ingestion (2/104, 1.9%) (P less than .005). The occurrence of an abnormal prothrombin time could not be predicted based on the history of amount ingested or on the presence of the characteristic green-blue product dye in or around the child's mouth. Acute toxicity was evidenced by transient abdominal pain, vomiting, and heme positive stools in 2 patients. The duration of prothrombin time prolongation could not be determined because of the few values obtained after 48 hours. To detect all possible abnormal prothrombin time values, 24- and 48-hour determinations are recommended after a child has ingested a superwarfarin. PMID:2771552

  5. A Detailed Study on the Low-Energy Structures of Charged Colloidal Clusters.

    PubMed

    Cruz, S M A; Marques, J M C

    2016-04-01

    The target of this investigation is the systematic characterization of the low-energy structures of charged colloidal clusters that may be important to understand the self-assembling process of biomolecules. The aggregation of charged colloidal particles is governed by the attractive short-ranged Morse potential and the Yukawa repulsive tail to describe the long-range charge effect. A global optimization strategy, based on our own evolutionary algorithm, was adopted to discover the low-energy structures of colloidal clusters composed of up to 20 particles. A detailed analysis of the low-energy structures involving charged particles shows that the appearance of the Bernal spiral as the most stable motif occurs, first, at N = 6, but it is favored for larger clusters (N ≥ 13); for 6 ≤ N ≤ 12, there is a competition between the spiral (which is favored for higher charges) and more spherical-like structures. Finally, we study binary clusters composed by two sets of differently charged colloidal particles. Although a great diversity of low-energy structures is observed (especially for aggregates with one of the components in excess), the global minimum is disputed by three structural motifs depending on the composition of the cluster and, in some cases, on the range of the Morse potential. PMID:26986933

  6. Phenomenological studies of CLAS data on double charge pion electroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokeev, Victor; Burkert, Volker

    2007-10-01

    Comprehensive studies of unpolarized &-circ;&+circ;p electroproduction cross-sections, for the first time available from CLAS [1,2], were carried out within the framework of phenomenological approach [3]. Analysis of these data allowed us to establish all important mechanisms, contributing to this exclusive channel in N^* excitation region at photon virtualities from 0.2 to 1.5 GeV^2. Electrocouplings for P11(1440), D13(1520) states at Q^2 < 0.6GeV^2 were obtained from the analysis of CLAS data [1]. The contributions from various mechanisms in terms of both amplitudes and single differential cross-sections were determined from the data fit. This information is of particular interest for N^* studies in coupled channel approaches under development at EBAC [4]. [1] G.V.Fedotov, et. al., Bull. of Russian Academy of Science,71,328 (2007). [2] M.Ripani, et. al., Phys. Rev.,91,0222002 (2003). [3] V.I.Mokeev, et. al., Int. Workshop on the Physics of Excited Baryons (NSTAR05) Tallahassee, Florida, 10-15 Oct 2005, ed by V.Crede, P.Eugenio and S.Capstick, p.47. [4] A.Matsuyama, et.al., Phys.Rep.,439,193 (2007); B.Julia-Diaz, et.al., arXiv:0704.1615.

  7. Children's Digital Practices: Case Studies of Children Viewing and Representing with Digital Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Daniel; Khoo, Kay Yong

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on case studies of four primary school children and their digital practices in Hong Kong. The study explored how the participating children view and represent through digital text in the context of their out-of-school technology use. Understanding how these practices extended into their English language classrooms was explicated…

  8. Executive function in CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hartshorne, Timothy S; Nicholas, Jude; Grialou, Tina L; Russ, Joanna M

    2007-07-01

    This study addressed the presence of executive dysfunction in children with CHARGE syndrome, a genetic disorder with multiple physical anomalies and severe challenging behaviors. Ninety-eight children were included in the study. More than half received clinically significant scores on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF; Gioia et al., 2000) scales of Shift, Monitor, and the Behavioral Regulation Index, with additional high scores on Inhibit and the Global Executive Composite. Associations were found with the age the child first walked, scores on the Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC; Krug et al., 1993), and being classified as deafblind. Difficulties with making transitions and flexible problem solving, monitoring their work and their effect on others, and acting on impulse, may be related to the behavioral difficulties exhibited by children with CHARGE. Interventions targeting improved self-regulation may help to manage this challenging behavior. PMID:17564850

  9. Mesiodens: a radiographic study in children.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Kaan; Celenk, Peruze; Zengin, Zeynep; Sümer, Pinar

    2008-09-01

    We analyzed the frequency and radiological features of mesiodens in a group of children in Turkey. The study was based on a radiographic review of 23,000 pediatric patients (male: 12,667 female; 10,333) who visited the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology during the period 2003-2005 (3 years). The presence of an unerupted supernumerary tooth, or tooth bud between the 2 central incisors or as unilateral or bilateral teeth in the midline of the maxilla was noted as mesiodens on radiographs. Eighty-five cases of mesiodens in 69 patients were found. Complete documentation, including radiographs, for these 69 patients were studied and analyzed. In addition to gender and age, the following information about the mesiodens was recorded: 1) number; 2) shape; 3) position; 4) complications caused by the mesiodens; 5) treatment. Of the 69 patients, the ratio of boys (47 cases) to girls (22 cases) was 2.1:1. Fifty-three (76.8%) of the children had 1 mesiodens, and 16 (23.1%) had 2 mesiodentes bilaterally to the midline. Of the 85 mesiodentes, 67 (78.8%) were fully impacted, 6 (7%) were partially erupted, and 12 (14.1%) were fully erupted. Most of the mesiodentes (55.2%) were found in the vertical position, followed by inverted position (37.6%), and horizontal position (7%). The main complications were delayed eruption of the permanent incisors (38.8%), maxillary midline diastema (17.6%), axial rotation or inclination of erupted permanent incisors (16.4%), and resorption of the adjacent teeth (4.7%) The prevelance of mesiodens has been estimated to be 0.15% to 2.2% of the population. PMID:18818464

  10. Spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. John

    1989-01-01

    The effects of spacecraft charging on spacecraft materials are studied. Spacecraft charging interactions seem to couple environment to system performance through materials. Technology is still developing concerning both environment-driven and operating system-driven interactions. The meeting addressed environment but lacked specific mission requirements, as a result system definition are needed to prioritize interactions.

  11. DEVELOPING A QUALITY SYSTEM FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Quality Management Plan (QMP) is under development for a national, interagency, long-term study known as the National Children's Study (NCS). The NCS is a study to examine the effects of environmental influences on the health and development of more than 100,000 children acros...

  12. Study on radiation production in the charge stripping section of the RISP linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Joo-Hee; Oranj, Leila Mokhtari; Lee, Hee-Seock; Ko, Seung-Kook

    2015-02-01

    The linear accelerator of the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) accelerates 200 MeV/nucleon 238U ions in a multi-charge states. Many kinds of radiations are generated while the primary beam is transported along the beam line. The stripping process using thin carbon foil leads to complicated radiation environments at the 90-degree bending section. The charge distribution of 238U ions after the carbon charge stripper was calculated by using the LISE++ program. The estimates of the radiation environments were carried out by using the well-proved Monte Carlo codes PHITS and FLUKA. The tracks of 238U ions in various charge states were identified using the magnetic field subroutine of the PHITS code. The dose distribution caused by U beam losses for those tracks was obtained over the accelerator tunnel. A modified calculation was applied for tracking the multi-charged U beams because the fundamental idea of PHITS and FLUKA was to transport fully-ionized ion beam. In this study, the beam loss pattern after a stripping section was observed, and the radiation production by heavy ions was studied. Finally, the performance of the PHITS and the FLUKA codes was validated for estimating the radiation production at the stripping section by applying a modified method.

  13. A review of studies on ion thruster beam and charge-exchange plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Various experimental and analytical studies of the primary beam and charge-exchange plasmas of ion thrusters are reviewed. The history of plasma beam research is recounted, emphasizing experiments on beam neutralization, expansion of the beam, and determination of beam parameters such as electron temperature, plasma density, and plasma potential. The development of modern electron bombardment ion thrusters is treated, detailing experimental results. Studies on charge-exchange plasma are discussed, showing results such as the relationship between neutralizer emission current and plasma beam potential, ion energies as a function of neutralizer bias, charge-exchange ion current collected by an axially moving Faraday cup-RPA for 8-cm and 30-cm ion thrusters, beam density and potential data from a 15-cm ion thruster, and charge-exchange ion flow around a 30-cm thruster. A 20-cm thruster electrical configuration is depicted and facility effects are discussed. Finally, plasma modeling is covered in detail for plasma beam and charge-exchange plasma.

  14. Charge-magnetic interference resonant scattering studies of ferromagnetic crystals and thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Haskel, D.; Kravtsov, E.; Choi, Y.; Lang, J.C.; Islam, Z.; Srajer, G.; Jiang, J.S.; Bader, S.D.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2012-06-15

    The element- and site-specificity of X-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) makes it an ideal tool for furthering our understanding of complex magnetic systems. In the hard X-rays, XRMS is readily applied to most antiferromagnets where the relatively weak resonant magnetic scattering (10 −2–10 −6Ic) is separated in reciprocal space from the stronger, Bragg charge scattered intensity, Ic. In ferro(ferri)magnetic materials, however, such separation does not occur and measurements of resonant magnetic scattering in the presence of strong charge scattering are quite challenging. We discuss the use of charge-magnetic interference resonant scattering for studies of ferromagnetic (FM) crystals and layered films. We review the challenges and opportunities afforded by this approach, particularly when using circularly polarized X-rays.We illustrate current capabilities at the Advanced Photon Source with studies aimed at probing site-specific magnetism in ferromagnetic crystals, and interfacial magnetism in films.

  15. Accelerated simulation study of space charge effects in quadrupole ion traps using GPU techniques.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xingchuang; Xu, Wei; Fang, Xiang; Deng, Yulin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2012-10-01

    Space charge effects play important roles in the performance of various types of mass analyzers. Simulation of space charge effects is often limited by the computation capability. In this study, we evaluate the method of using graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate ion trajectory simulation. Simulation using GPU has been compared with multi-core central processing unit (CPU), and an acceleration of about 390 times have been obtained using a single computer for simulation of up to 10(5) ions in quadrupole ion traps. Characteristics of trapped ions can be investigated at detailed levels within a reasonable simulation time. Space charge effects on the trapping capacities of linear and 3D ion traps, ion cloud shapes, ion motion frequency shift, mass spectrum peak coalescence effects between two ion clouds of close m/z are studied with the ion trajectory simulation using GPU.

  16. A Comparative Study of Power Supply Architectures In Wireless Electric Vehicle Charging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Bryan

    Wireless inductive power transfer is a transformational and disruptive technology that enables the reliable and efficient transfer of electrical power over large air gaps for a host of unique applications. One such application that is now gaining much momentum worldwide is the wireless charging of electric vehicles (EVs). This thesis examines two of the primary power supply topologies being predominantly used for EV charging, namely the SLC and the LCL resonant full bridge inverter topologies. The study of both of these topologies is presented in the context of designing a 3 kW, primary side controlled, wireless EV charger with nominal operating parameters of 30 kHz centre frequency and range of coupling in the neighborhood of .18-.26. A comparison of both topologies is made in terms of their complexity, cost, efficiency, and power quality. The aim of the study is to determine which topology is better for wireless EV charging.

  17. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Silicon and Iron Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1997-01-01

    The laser ablation/ion storage facility at the UNLV Physics Department is dedicated to the study of atomic processes in low temperature plasmas. Our current program is directed to the study of charge transfer of multiply charged ions and neutrals that are of importance to astrophysics at energies less than 1 eV (about 10(exp 4) K). Specifically, we measure the charge transfer rate coefficient of ions such as N(2+), Si(3+), Si(3+), with helium and Fe(2+) with molecular and atomic hydrogen. All these ions are found in a variety of astrophysical plasmas. Their electron transfer reactions with neutral atoms can affect the ionization equilibrium of the plasma.

  18. Studies of Space Charge Effects in the Proposed CERN PS2

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert; De Maria, Riccardo; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Wienands, Ulrich; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    A new proton synchrotron, the PS2, is under design study to replace the current proton synchrotron at CERN for the LHC upgrade. Nonlinear space charge effects could cause significant beam emittance growth and particle losses and limit the performance of the PS2. In this paper, we report on studies of the potential space-charge effects at the PS2 using three-dimensional self-consistent macroparticle tracking codes, IMPACT, MaryLie/IMPACT, and Synergia. We will present initial benchmark results among these codes. Effects of space-charge on the emittance growth, especially due to synchrotron coupling, aperture sizes, initial painted distribution, and RF ramping scheme will also be discussed.

  19. Assessing Children's Values: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doring, Anna K.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, much attention is devoted to children's values and their development in an educational context. Recent research revealed that children hold a solid concept of their values and may provide accurate and unique information by themselves. Schwartz's (1994) theory established a comprehensive framework of universal human values, and…

  20. STUDIES OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN'S EXPOSURES TO PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children, especially those of the preschool ages, are hypothesized to have greater exposures than do older children or adults to persistent organic pesticides and other persistent organic pollutants, including some compounds that may have endocrine-disrupting effects or d...

  1. Computational Studies on Structural, Excitation, and Charge-Transfer Properties of Ureidopeptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Joy, Sherin; Sureshbabu, Vommina V; Periyasamy, Ganga

    2016-07-14

    Peptides with ureido group enclosing backbones are considered peptidomimetics and are known for their higher stabilities, biocompatibilities, antibiotic, inhibitor, and charge-transduction activities. These peptidomimetics have some unique applications, which are quite different from those of natural peptides. Hence, it is imperative to appreciate their properties at a microscopic level. In this regard, this work outlines, in detail, the charge transfer (CT) properties, hole-migration dynamics, and electronic structures of various experimentally comprehended ureidopeptidomimetic models using density functional theory (DFT). Time-dependent DFT and complete active space self-consistent field computations on basic models provide the necessary evidence for the viability of CT from the end enfolding the ureido group to the other end with a carboxylate entity. This donor-to-acceptor CT has been reflected in excitation studies, in which the higher intensity band corresponds to CT from the π orbital of the ureido group to the π* orbital of the carboxylate entity. Further, hole-migration studies have shown that charge can evolve from the ureido end, whereas the hole generated at the carboxylate end does not migrate. However, hole migration has been reported to occur from both ends (amino and carboxylate ends) in glycine oligopeptides, and our studies show that the ability to transfer and migrate charge can be tuned by modifying the donor and acceptor functional groups in both the neutral and cationic charge states. We have analyzed the possibility of hole migration following ionization using DFT-based wave-packet propagation and found its occurrence on a ∼2-5 fs time scale, which reflects the charge-transduction ability of peptidomimetics. PMID:27314639

  2. A study of the charged ice grains in the Enceladus plume with a composite size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Hill, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    We study the negatively charged ice grains in the Enceladus plume ranging from nanometer to micrometer in size based on Cassini's multiple instrument observations. We have constructed a composite size distribution by combining the CAPS nanograin size distributions (Hill et al., 2012 JGR) and the CDA dust power-law size distribution (Kempf et al., 2008 Icarus). We also study the charging of the ice grains using RPWS-LP data (Morooka et al., 2011 JGR). E3 and E5 CDA data are not available, but RPWS detected impacts of micron sized dust grains with the same power law size distribution (Ye et al., 2012 AGU meeting). Our size distribution formula is fitted with E3 and E5 CAPS and RPWS data, and constrained with the total dust charge density inferred from the RPWS-LP cold plasma data. The fitting with E17 and E18 CAPS nanograin data (Tokar et al., 2012 AGU meeting) and RPWS dust data (Ye et al., 2013 MAPS workshop) will also be discussed. Based on the charge per grain and the size distribution, the densities, source rate, motion, and currents of the ice grains can be calculated. Our size distribution implies that the grains ~2-20 nm dominate in both charge density and number density. But the mass density is very sensitive to the larger grains. We discuss the mass densities and source rates with different size distribution parameters, and compare with the water vapor plume. We study the trajectories of the charged ice grains in both Enceladus and Saturn frames, and calculate the dust currents from their motion. We find that the total dust pickup current at Enceladus is ≥10^5 A. We will also discuss the ion and dust current systems and resulting magnetic perturbations near the moon.

  3. Study of surface charge density on solid/liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Hyuk Kyu; Moon, Jong Kyun

    2014-11-01

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid/liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid/liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a DC bias voltage across the plates, an AC electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage difference between the plates as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid/liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. This work was supported by Center for Soft and Living Matter through IBS program in Korea.

  4. A new charge-tagged proline-based organocatalyst for mechanistic studies using electrospray mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Willms, J Alexander; Beel, Rita; Schmidt, Martin L; Mundt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary A new 4-hydroxy-L-proline derivative with a charged 1-ethylpyridinium-4-phenoxy substituent has been synthesized with the aim of facilitating mechanistic studies of proline-catalyzed reactions by ESI mass spectrometry. The charged residue ensures a strongly enhanced ESI response compared to neutral unmodified proline. The connection by a rigid linker fixes the position of the charge tag far away from the catalytic center in order to avoid unwanted interactions. The use of a charged catalyst leads to significantly enhanced ESI signal abundances for every catalyst-derived species which are the ones of highest interest present in a reacting solution. The new charged proline catalyst has been tested in the direct asymmetric inverse aldol reaction between aldehydes and diethyl ketomalonate. Two intermediates in accordance with the List–Houk mechanism for enamine catalysis have been detected and characterized by gas-phase fragmentation. In addition, their temporal evolution has been followed using a microreactor continuous-flow technique. PMID:25246962

  5. Resistive Micromegas for sampling calorimetry, a study of charge-up effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefdeville, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Geralis, T.; Titov, M.

    2016-07-01

    Micromegas, as a proportional and compact gaseous detector, is well suited for sampling calorimetry. The limitation of occasional sparking has now been lifted by means of resistive electrodes but at the cost of current-dependent charge-up effects. These effects are studied in this contribution, with an emphasis on gain variations during operation at high particle rate and under heavy ionisation. Results are reproduced by a simple model of charging-up which will be used for detector design optimisation in the future.

  6. Density functional theory study of neutral, singly, and multiply charged Polycylcic Aromatic Hydrocarbon molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Henning; Holm, Anne I. S.; Johansson, Henrik; Cederquist, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We have studied multiply ionization for a range of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their charge dependent stabilities with respect to H-, H+-, C2H2- and C2H2+-emissions by means of Density Functional Theory. The adiabatic dissociation energies reveal information about the competition between these channels as functions of PAH charge state and provide predictions of the thermodynamical stability limits, while the sequences of ionization energies may e.g. be used to extract absolute ionization cross sections of astrophysical relevance.

  7. Photophysical properties of charge transfer pairs encapsulated inside macrocycle cage: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on three charge transfer donor-acceptor (D-A) molecular pairs, i.e. naphthalene-diamine (Naph) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) molecules as electron donors and benzene-diimide (Diimide) and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) as electron acceptors. Structural, charge transfer and optical properties of the systems have been studied. The D-A pairs then has been considered inside a macrocycle (cucurbit[8]uril) cavity and Naph-Diimide and TTF-Diimide pairs have been shown to exhibit changes in their structures and orientations, TTF-TCNQ pair does not show any significant structural change. Our work suggests that these changes in structures or orientations are result of electronic repulsion between the keto group oxygen atoms and it can lead to tuning of charge transfer and optical properties of the systems.

  8. A theoretical study of charge transport properties of trifluoromethyl (-CF3) substituted naphthalene (TFMNA) molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S. R.; Parida, S. K.; Sahu, S.

    2016-09-01

    We present a density functional (DFT) study of the charge transport properties of CF3-naphthalene. Nature of charge transport is investigated using parameters such as reorganization energy (X), transfer integral (t), ionization potential (IP), electron affinity (EA), and carrier mobility (μ) computed through electronic structure calculations. We observe a decrease in X and IP from 2,6-DTFMNA to 1,5-DTFMNA, whereas, the EA is found to be enhanced, as a result p-type characteristics, with mild n-type signature, in the organic semiconductor gets increased. In addition, the HOMO-LUMO gap also gets reduced inferring more charge injection through the potential barrier. The maximum hole and electron mobility values for the substituted compound are obtained to be 2.17 cm2/ Vsec & 0.20 cm2/ Vsec, respectively.

  9. Educating Homeless Children in Chicago: A Case Study of Children in the Family Regeneration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworsky, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Homeless children tend to experience a variety of academic problems, and little is currently known about this growing segment of the American population. This study was undertaken using administrative data from the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) and a program that serves many of Chicago's most vulnerable homeless families to examine children's…

  10. 75 FR 51467 - ASK (Assess Specific Kinds of CHILDREN Challenges for Neurologic Devices) Study Children Workshop...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration ASK (Assess Specific Kinds of CHILDREN Challenges for Neurologic Devices) Study Children Workshop; Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  11. Morphological Awareness and Chinese Children's Literacy Development: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xiaoying; Anderson, Richard C.; Li, Wenling; Wu, Xinchun; Li, Hong; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Qiu; Zhu, Jin; Shu, Hua; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xi; Wang, Qiuying; Yin, Li; He, Yeqin; Packard, Jerome; Gaffney, Janet S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between morphological awareness and Chinese children's literacy development. Of the 169 children from elementary schools in Beijing, China, who participated in the study, about half received enhanced instruction on the morphology of characters and words in the first and second grade. At…

  12. RECRUITMENT STRATEGIES FOR AN EXPOSURE MEASUREMENT STUDY OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recruiting study participants is always a challenge for researchers. It poses an even bigger challenge for researchers to recruit participants for a study involving intrusive, burdensome data collection activities. A study of preschool children's exposure to persistent organic ...

  13. A nanoscale study of charge extraction in organic solar cells: the impact of interfacial molecular configurations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fu-Ching; Wu, Fu-Chiao; Yen, Chia-Te; Chang, Jay; Chou, Wei-Yang; Gilbert Chang, Shih-Hui; Cheng, Horng-Long

    2015-01-01

    In the optimization of organic solar cells (OSCs), a key problem lies in the maximization of charge carriers from the active layer to the electrodes. Hence, this study focused on the interfacial molecular configurations in efficient OSC charge extraction by theoretical investigations and experiments, including small molecule-based bilayer-heterojunction (sm-BLHJ) and polymer-based bulk-heterojunction (p-BHJ) OSCs. We first examined a well-defined sm-BLHJ model system of OSC composed of p-type pentacene, an n-type perylene derivative, and a nanogroove-structured poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (NS-PEDOT) hole extraction layer. The OSC with NS-PEDOT shows a 230% increment in the short circuit current density compared with that of the conventional planar PEDOT layer. Our theoretical calculations indicated that small variations in the microscopic intermolecular interaction among these interfacial configurations could induce significant differences in charge extraction efficiency. Experimentally, different interfacial configurations were generated between the photo-active layer and the nanostructured charge extraction layer with periodic nanogroove structures. In addition to pentacene, poly(3-hexylthiophene), the most commonly used electron-donor material system in p-BHJ OSCs was also explored in terms of its possible use as a photo-active layer. Local conductive atomic force microscopy was used to measure the nanoscale charge extraction efficiency at different locations within the nanogroove, thus highlighting the importance of interfacial molecular configurations in efficient charge extraction. This study enriches understanding regarding the optimization of the photovoltaic properties of several types of OSCs by conducting appropriate interfacial engineering based on organic/polymer molecular orientations. The ultimate power conversion efficiency beyond at least 15% is highly expected when the best state-of-the-art p-BHJ OSCs are combined with present arguments.

  14. NMR Study of Ion Dynamics and Charge Storage in Ionic Liquid Supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ionic liquids are emerging as promising new electrolytes for supercapacitors. While their higher operating voltages allow the storage of more energy than organic electrolytes, they cannot currently compete in terms of power performance. More fundamental studies of the mechanism and dynamics of charge storage are required to facilitate the development and application of these materials. Here we demonstrate the application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to study the structure and dynamics of ionic liquids confined in porous carbon electrodes. The measurements reveal that ionic liquids spontaneously wet the carbon micropores in the absence of any applied potential and that on application of a potential supercapacitor charging takes place by adsorption of counterions and desorption of co-ions from the pores. We find that adsorption and desorption of anions surprisingly plays a more dominant role than that of the cations. Having elucidated the charging mechanism, we go on to study the factors that affect the rate of ionic diffusion in the carbon micropores in an effort to understand supercapacitor charging dynamics. We show that the line shape of the resonance arising from adsorbed ions is a sensitive probe of their effective diffusion rate, which is found to depend on the ionic liquid studied, as well as the presence of any solvent additives. Taken as whole, our NMR measurements allow us to rationalize the power performances of different electrolytes in supercapacitors. PMID:25973552

  15. AN OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is substantial public health concern that aspects of the environment adversely impact child health and development. Children may be more vulnerable to environmental threats but little comprehensive research exists to identify which factors are harmful, harmless or helpful....

  16. Ion distributions at charged aqueous surfaces: Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Surface sensitive synchrotron X-ray scattering studies were performed to obtain the distribution of monovalent ions next to a highly charged interface at room temperature. To control surface charge density, lipids, dihexadecyl hydrogen-phosphate (DHDP) and dimysteroyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA), were spread as monolayer materials at the air/water interface, containing CsI at various concentrations. Five decades in bulk concentrations (CsI) are investigated, demonstrating that the interfacial distribution is strongly dependent on bulk concentration. We show that this is due to the strong binding constant of hydronium H3O+ to the phosphate group, leading to proton-transfer back to the phosphate group and to a reduced surface charge. Using anomalous reflectivity off and at the L3 Cs+ resonance, we provide spatial counterion (Cs+) distributions next to the negatively charged interfaces. The experimental ion distributions are in excellent agreement with a renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions without fitting parameters or additional assumptions. Energy Scans at four fixed momentum transfers under specular reflectivity conditions near the Cs+ L3 resonance were conducted on 10-3 M CsI with DHDP monolayer materials on the surface. The energy scans exhibit a periodic dependence on photon momentum transfer. The ion distributions obtained from the analysis are in excellent agreement with those obtained from anomalous reflectivity measurements, providing further confirmation to the validity of the renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions. Moreover, the dispersion corrections f0 and f00 for Cs+ around L3 resonance, revealing the local environment of a Cs+ ion in the solution at the interface, were extracted simultaneously with output of ion distributions.

  17. Resonant X-Ray Scattering Studies of Charge Order in Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comin, Riccardo; Damascelli, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    X-ray techniques have been used for more than a century to study the atomic and electronic structure in practically any type of material. The advent of correlated electron systems, in particular complex oxides, brought about new scientific challenges and opportunities for the advancement of conventional X-ray methods. In this context, the need for new approaches capable of selectively sensing new forms of orders involving all degrees of freedom -- charge, orbital, spin, and lattice -- paved the way for the emergence and success of resonant X-ray scattering, which has become an increasingly popular and powerful tool for the study of electronic ordering phenomena in solids. We review the recent resonant X-ray scattering breakthroughs in the copper oxide high-temperature superconductors, in particular regarding the phenomenon of charge order, a broken-symmetry state occurring when valence electrons self-organize into periodic structures. After a brief historical perspective on charge order, we outline the milestones in the development of resonant X-ray scattering as well as the basic theoretical formalism underlying its unique capabilities. The rest of the review focuses on the recent contributions of resonant scattering to the advancements in our description and understanding of charge order. To conclude, we propose a series of present and upcoming challenges and discuss the future outlook for this technique.

  18. Laboratory studies of the influence of the rime accretion rate on charge transfer during crystal/graupel collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, C. P. R.; Peck, S. L.

    1998-06-01

    The process of thunderstorm electrification by charge transfers between ice crystals and riming graupel pellets (the noninductive process) has been the subject of extensive study in the laboratory in Manchester. Quantitative dependencies of the sign and magnitude of charge transfer have previously been determined as functions of ice crystal size, graupel/crystal relative velocity, temperature, and the effective liquid water content (EW) in the cloud experienced by the riming graupel pellets. We now present results of laboratory studies of thunderstorm charging in terms of the rime accretion rate (RAR = EW × V), which combines into one variable the velocity and EW dependence of the sign of graupel charging on temperature. The magnitude of the charge transfer can be determined from its dependence on the crystal size and graupel velocity, while the sign of the rimer charging can now be determined from a new figure showing the dependence of the charge sign on RAR and temperature. This figure may be used to compare charge transfer results from other laboratories obtained over a range of graupel/crystal velocities. These new experiments extend the temperature range of the previous studies and indicate that negative charging of graupel can occur at temperatures as high as -2°C in conditions of low RAR, while at temperatures below -30°C, more positive graupel charging is noted than in the earlier work.

  19. Children's Schooling and Parents' Investment in Children: Evidence from the Head Start Impact Study. NBER Working Paper No. 17704

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelber, Alexander M.; Isen, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Parents may have important effects on their children, but little work in economics explores whether children's schooling opportunities crowd out or encourage parents' investment in children. We analyze data from the Head Start Impact Study, which granted randomly-chosen preschool-aged children the opportunity to attend Head Start. We find that…

  20. Children's Family Drawings: A Study of Attachment, Personality, and Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldner, Limor; Scharf, Miri

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between children's attachment security, as manifested in their family drawings, and their personality and adjustment. Family drawings were collected from 222 Israeli children, as well as data regarding their personality and adjustment. Each drawing was coded and classified into 1 of 4 attachment categories…

  1. Facilitating Children's Self-Concept: A Rationale and Evaluative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Ian

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on the design and effectiveness of the Exploring Self-Concept program for primary school children using self-concept as the outcome measure. The program aims to provide a procedure that incorporates organisation, elaboration, thinking, and problem-solving strategies and links these to children's multidimensional self-concept.…

  2. Improving Children's Formal Word Definitions: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinellie, Sally A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to define a word with accuracy and precision is an important skill that has been associated with academic achievement. This study investigated the feasibility of conducting a lesson on formal word definitions to improve children's definitional production. The participants were 18 children in grade 4 (mean age: 9 years; 8 months) who…

  3. Mathematics Anxiety in Young Children: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harari, Rachel R.; Vukovic, Rose K.; Bailey, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the nature of mathematics anxiety in a sample of 106 ethnically and linguistically diverse first-grade students. Although much is known about mathematics anxiety in older children and adults, little is known about when mathematics anxiety first emerges or its characteristics in young children. Results from exploratory factor…

  4. Realistic Fiction and the Social Studies. Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell-Powell, Brenda, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that children's literature is an effective tool to access and present sophisticated social studies concepts in the elementary classroom. Maintains that realistic fiction can integrate the social sciences with philosophy and religion. Presents a bibliographic essay including children's books and teacher resources. (CFR)

  5. User Studies: Developing Learning Strategy Tool Software for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Gail E.; Koury, Kevin A.; Peng, Hsinyi

    This paper is a report of user studies for developing learning strategy tool software for children. The prototype software demonstrated is designed for children with learning and behavioral disabilities. The tools consist of easy-to-use templates for creating organizational, memory, and learning approach guides for use in classrooms and at home.…

  6. Four Field Studies of Appalachian Parents of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.; And Others

    This document contains the plans for conducting the field studies of Appalachian parents of young children which are part of the Appalachia Educational Laboratory's Home-Oriented Preschool Education Program (HOPE). HOPE is an integrated approach to education for preschool and kindergarten children being developed by AEL's Marketable Preschool…

  7. A Study of Biography as a Literary Form for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, M. Iona

    This study examined children's literature and the development of biography intended for juvenile readers. The writer assembled a list of characteristics of writing for children, reviewed the growth of biography as a literary form, and noted the difference between biography written for the child audience and that intended for adults. Qualities were…

  8. Children's Conceptions of the Word "Disabled": A Phenomenographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skar, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the qualitative differences in children's conceptions of the word "disabled". Two hundred and thirty children, aged 7-12 years of age, were instructed to make a drawing of what came into their minds when they heard the word "disabled". A brief written commentary on their drawing was also requested. The…

  9. Rural and Remote Professional Practice Placements for Children's Studies Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackiewicz, Stephanie; Brockman, Kristen; Lincoln, Rosa

    A graduate children's-studies course at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia implemented a rural and remote practicum to expose students to the special needs of children and families in rural communities. Many graduates will eventually work in the country, and prospective rural employers look for graduates with experience in rural settings.…

  10. A Study of Race and Class Heterogeneity Among Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vietze, Peter M.; Sigel, Irving E.

    An experimental preschool was set up to study the effect of mixing children differing in SES and race on racial awareness and interaction. It was hypothesized that racial self-selection could be explained in terms of SES level and that interracial contact when different SES children were included would serve to counteract racial stereotypes and…

  11. Group Therapy for Adult Children of Alcoholics: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corazzini, John G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses survival roles adopted by children growing up in families where alcohol is abused, relating them to birth order, and emphasizing their maladaptivity for later adult interactions. Presents case studies of two common roles of adult children of alcoholics (ACAs), those of hero and scapegoat, and demonstrates how ACAs interact in a mixed,…

  12. A STUDY OF DIAGNOSTIC SERVICES FOR BRAIN-INJURED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HENNESSY, ERNA

    THE PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE (1) TO INVESTIGATE THE EARLY RECOGNITION OF BRAIN INJURY SYMPTOMS BY PARENTS, (2) TO EXPLORE THE DIAGNOSTIC PROBLEMS AND HISTORIES OF BRAIN INJURED CHILDREN AND THEIR PARENTS, AND (3) TO REVIEW THE EXISTING AND NEEDED FACILITIES FOR BRAIN INJURED CHILDREN IN NEW JERSEY. IN 1964, A QUESTIONNAIRE ELICITING…

  13. Improving Fine Motor Skills in Young Children: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Carol G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Primary Movement programme on the fine motor skills of children in an early years setting in an area of high social disadvantage. Primary Movement is a programme which can be used as an early intervention technique to help children inhibit persistent primary reflexes that have been shown to…

  14. Mothers' Teaching Strategies and Children's Effortful Control: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Vidmar, Masa; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Eggum, Natalie D.; Edwards, Alison; Gaertner, Bridget; Kupfer, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Findings on the relation of maternal verbal teaching strategies to children's effortful control (EC; i.e., self-regulation) are limited in quantity and somewhat inconsistent. In this study, children's EC was assessed at 18, 30, and 42 months (ns = 255, 229, and 209, respectively) with adults' reports and a behavioral measure. Mothers' verbal…

  15. Aflatoxins and kwashiorkor: a study in Sudanese children.

    PubMed

    Hendrickse, R G; Coulter, J B; Lamplugh, S M; Macfarlane, S B; Williams, T E; Omer, M I; Suliman, G I

    1982-09-25

    Blood and urine samples from 252 Sudanese children were investigated for their aflatoxin content by high-performance liquid chromatography. The children comprised 44 with kwashiorkor, 32 with marasmic kwashiorkor, 70 with marasmus, and 106 age-matched, normally nourished controls. Aflatoxins were detected more often and at higher concentrations in sera from children with kwashiorkor than in the other malnourished and control groups. Aflatoxicol, a metabolite of aflatoxins B1 and B2, was detected in the sera of children with kwashiorkor and marasmic kwashiorkor but not in the controls and only once in a marasmic child. The difference between children with kwashiorkor or marasmic kwashiorkor and those in the control or marasmus groups was significant. Urinary aflatoxin was most often detected in children with kwashiorkor but their mean concentration was lower than in the other groups. Aflatoxicol was not detected in urine in any group. These findings suggest either that the children with kwashiorkor have a greater exposure to aflatoxins or that their ability to transport and excrete aflatoxins is impaired by the metabolic derangements associated with kwashiorkor. The presence of aflatoxicol in the sera of children with kwashiorkor but not in the others suggests a difference in metabolism between the two groups. Further studies are needed, and measurement of aflatoxins in the food eaten by these children is already underway.

  16. A feasibility study of space-charge neutralized ion induction linacs: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Slutz, S.A.; Primm, P.; Renk, T.; Johnson, D.J.

    1997-03-01

    Applications for high current (> 1 kA) ion beams are increasing. They include hardening of material surfaces, transmutation of radioactive waste, cancer treatment, and possibly driving fusion reactions to create energy. The space-charge of ions limits the current that can be accelerated in a conventional ion linear accelerator (linac). Furthermore, the accelerating electric field must be kept low enough to avoid the generation and acceleration of counter-streaming electrons. These limitations have resulted in ion accelerator designs that employ long beam lines and would be expensive to build. Space-charge neutralization and magnetic insulation of the acceleration gaps could substantially reduce these two limitations, but at the expense of increasing the complexity of the beam physics. We present theory and experiments to determine the degree of charge-neutralization that can be achieved in various environments found in ion accelerators. Our results suggest that, for high current applications, space-charge neutralization could be used to improve on the conventional ion accelerator technology. There are two basic magnetic field geometries that can be used to insulate the accelerating gaps, a radial field or a cusp field. We will present studies related to both of these geometries. We shall also present numerical simulations of {open_quotes}multicusp{close_quotes} accelerator that would deliver potassium ions at 400 MeV with a total beam power of approximately 40 TW. Such an accelerator could be used to drive fusion.

  17. Charging studies of heat packs using parabolic dish solar energy concentrator for extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rohitash; Vyas, Sumita; Kumar, Ravindra; Dixit, Ambesh

    2016-05-01

    Parabolic dish solar energy concentrator with aperture diameter 1.4 m and focal length 0.32 m is designed and fabricated to charge and store solar thermal energy in phase change material (PCM) based heat packs. Overall heat loss factor, heat duty, over all thermal efficiency, and optical efficiency factor are calculated using water sensible heating and cooling tests and values are 16.11 W m-2 K-1, 546.9 W, 49.2% and 0.62 respectively. The performance characteristic curve is generated using these parameters to understand its performance at different ambient temperatures and solar insolation. The fabricated concentrator has been used to charge 16 PCM heat packs with 150 g PCM in each heat pack, which took about 35 minutes for complete charging of PCM heat packs at average ambient temperature 39 °C and solar radiation flux density 715 W m-2 K-1. The charged heat packs are subjected to discharge studies at average ambient temperature about - 7 °C and observed heat release in the temperature range of 48 to 40 °C for 50 minutes, suggesting its applications for comfort and therapeutic applications in high altitude areas.

  18. The study towards high intensity high charge state laser ion sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H Y; Jin, Q Y; Sha, S; Zhang, J J; Li, Z M; Liu, W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    As one of the candidate ion sources for a planned project, the High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility, a laser ion source has been being intensively studied at the Institute of Modern Physics in the past two years. The charge state distributions of ions produced by irradiating a pulsed 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser on solid targets of a wide range of elements (C, Al, Ti, Ni, Ag, Ta, and Pb) were measured with an electrostatic ion analyzer spectrometer, which indicates that highly charged ions could be generated from low-to-medium mass elements with the present laser system, while the charge state distributions for high mass elements were relatively low. The shot-to-shot stability of ion pulses was monitored with a Faraday cup for carbon target. The fluctuations within ±2.5% for the peak current and total charge and ±6% for pulse duration were demonstrated with the present setup of the laser ion source, the suppression of which is still possible.

  19. Study of the impurity composition and effective plasma charge in the GOL-3 facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokina, N. V. Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Postupaev, V. V.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Shoshin, A. A.

    2015-07-15

    Heating and confinement of plasma in a multimirror magnetic configuration have been studied at the GOL-3 facility (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk). The experiments are aimed at estimating the densities and charge states of the main impurities in the GOL-3 plasma and determining their contribution to the effective plasma charge. Plasma with a density of ∼10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} was heated by a relativistic electron beam (1 MeV, 8 μs, ⩽200 kJ). At the end of electron beam injection, the plasma temperature reached 1 keV. The densities of impurities were determined using VUV and visible spectroscopy, as well as mass spectrometry of the residual vacuum. To determine the effective plasma charge, the experimental data were compared with the results of numerical simulations of the ionization balance of impurities. It is shown that the effective plasma charge calculated with allowance for the contributions from the main impurities does not exceed Z{sub eff} = 1.8, which cannot explain the experimentally observed improved confinement of low-density plasma.

  20. The study towards high intensity high charge state laser ion sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H Y; Jin, Q Y; Sha, S; Zhang, J J; Li, Z M; Liu, W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    As one of the candidate ion sources for a planned project, the High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility, a laser ion source has been being intensively studied at the Institute of Modern Physics in the past two years. The charge state distributions of ions produced by irradiating a pulsed 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser on solid targets of a wide range of elements (C, Al, Ti, Ni, Ag, Ta, and Pb) were measured with an electrostatic ion analyzer spectrometer, which indicates that highly charged ions could be generated from low-to-medium mass elements with the present laser system, while the charge state distributions for high mass elements were relatively low. The shot-to-shot stability of ion pulses was monitored with a Faraday cup for carbon target. The fluctuations within ±2.5% for the peak current and total charge and ±6% for pulse duration were demonstrated with the present setup of the laser ion source, the suppression of which is still possible. PMID:24593615

  1. A numerical study on charged-particle scattering and radiography of a steep density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Guangchao; Wang, Xiaofang

    2016-09-01

    Electron and proton radiography of polystyrene planar targets with different density gradients is studied by Monte Carlo simulations in a regime that the incident charged-particle's kinetic energy is much higher than its energy loss in the targets. It is shown that by scattering of the electrons or protons, the density gradient causes modulations of the charged-particle beam transmitted from the target and the modulation contrast is sensitive only to a steep gradient, which suggests a novel diagnostic method wherein a steep density gradient could be distinguished from the scattering of a charged-particle beam in radiography. By using a 100-MeV charged-particle beam, it is found that the modulation is evident for a steep density gradient of width smaller than 1 μm for electron radiography and 0.6 μm for proton radiography, respectively, but almost negligible when the density gradient width is greater than 1 μm. The feasibility of diagnosing the steep density gradients in compressed matter is confirmed by the simulations of radiographing a laser-ablated planar foil. Simulations also show that it is possible to diagnose the density gradients inside a multilayered spherical capsule.

  2. The Clinical Usefulness of Sleep Studies in Children.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Virginia X Noronha; Teng, Arthur Y

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing is common in children and has the potential to have a significant impact on cognition, activity and social interaction. The overnight in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) continues to be the gold standard instrument for the investigation of sleep-disordered breathing in children. It has the ability to rule in or rule out the need for intervention for common conditions such as obstructive sleep apnoea, assess the role of sleep quality in children and adolescents with hypersomnolence, provide physiologic data in children with hypoventilation as may be seen in neuromuscular disease and assist in the assessment of children with structural airway and lung abnormalities. Polysomnography is valuable and the only reliable method to differentiate habitual snoring from many levels of sleep apnoea syndrome [1]. The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends that, in order to diagnose and manage OSA syndrome, all children should be screened for snoring and complex cases should be referred to a specialist. PSG is the diagnostic gold standard and adenotonsillectomy is the first line of treatment [2]. There is no evidence to support nap studies or ambulatory sleep studies in children [3]. With adequate staffing, expertise, and a child and family-friendly environment, children of any age can undergo a sleep study.

  3. STUDY DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE EXPOSURE COMPONENT OF THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ideal strategy for the exposure monitoring component of the planned National Children's Study (NCS) is to measure indoor and outdoor concentrations and personal exposures of children to a variety of pollutants, including ambient particulate and gaseous pollutants, biologicals,...

  4. Children's environmental knowing: A case study of children's experiences during an environmental education programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sandra Anne

    This study explores children's experiences during WaterWorlds (pseudonym) a field-based environmental education programme at a marine science centre. The study objectives were to investigate how children understand and interpret their experiences, and how these experiences foster their environmental knowing. To address these objectives, I carried out a case study at a marine science centre in British Columbia. I examined children's WaterWorlds experiences and explored their environmental understandings and commitment to environmental action. I analysed the experiences of children in four separate classes and carried out an in-depth examination of four individual children. Data were collected using informal semi-structured interviews, observations, conversations, researcher journal logs, and student documents including their writing and illustrations. My findings indicate that the WaterWorlds programme experience fosters children's environmental knowing. Participation in WaterWorlds activities led to connection, caring, and concern for other species and in some cases, for the marine environment as a whole. During the programme, children chose the ways they interpreted and expressed their environmental knowledge, ethic of care, advocacy, and commitment to action. This development of each child's self-expression resulted in motivational and powerful learning experiences that inspired and nurtured their connections to the earth. This research provides evidence and examples of how educators can foster children's environmental knowing through multi-disciplinary environmental education experiences. It illustrates that activities such as observing and documenting the lives of other animal species, collecting data and conducting research on those species, and working and learning alongside experts in the field of environmental education are powerful experiences that motivate concern and care for the earth among children.

  5. Branching Out: Forest Studies with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argast, Susan; Macdonald, Cheryl

    1996-01-01

    Describes activities which sharpen awareness of trees through the senses in this first of a two-part integrated unit for teaching children about forest ecosystems. Students interact and work in collaborative groups; learn about the impact of forests on daily life; explore the interdependence of plants, animals, soil, water, air, and light; explore…

  6. Study: Children Now Are More Imaginative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    Students today may have less time for free play, but new research suggests their imaginations have actually sharpened compared with those of children two decades ago. In an analysis published in May 2011 in the "Creativity Research Journal" and posted online in May, researchers from Case Western University in Cleveland found elementary school…

  7. Teaching Entrepreneurship to Children: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    do Paco, Arminda; Palinhas, Maria Joao

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays few young people are prepared to consider setting up and managing their own business as a realistic and attractive career option. It is therefore necessary to expose children to the concept of entrepreneurship from a very early age, which means that the school has a fundamental role to play in this task. This research seeks to understand…

  8. Photodissociation and charge transfer dynamics of negative ions studied with femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanni, Martin T.

    1999-12-17

    This dissertation presents studies aimed at understanding the potential energy surfaces and dynamics of isolated negative ions, and the effects of solvent on each. Although negative ions play important roles in atmospheric and solution phase chemistry, to a large extent the ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of gas phase negative ions are poorly characterized, and solvent effects even less well understood. In an effort to fill this gap, the author's coworkers and the author have developed a new technique, anion femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy, and applied it to gas phase photodissociation and charge transfer processes. Studies are presented that (1) characterize the ground and excited states of isolated and clustered anions, (2) monitor the photodissociation dynamics of isolated and clustered anions, and (3) explore the charge-transfer-to-solvent states of atomic iodide clustered with polar and non-polar solvents.

  9. Montessori Elementary Is Different: What Children Study, What Children Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosanova, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an overview of Montessori versus traditional education programs. Focuses on differences of philosophy, curriculum, study, classroom environment, values, preparation for life, and productivity. Defines the major philosophical points of adaptation and development, and meaning. Addresses the Montessori perspective on elementary and the…

  10. Laboratory studies of the charge neutralization of a rocket payload during electron beam emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, W.; Whalen, B. A.; Harris, F. R.; Mcnamara, A. G.; Konradi, A.

    1980-01-01

    The charge neutralization of an electrically-isolated rocket payload emitting an energetic electron beam has been studied in experiments in the large vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center. The introduction of an RF-discharge-produced ambient plasma density (10,000 to 50,000 per cu cm) reduces the payload potential to 200 V for low current (1 and 10 ma) beams. The ignition of the beam-plasma discharge provides an efficient neutralization process for higher current beams.

  11. Study of charge-phase diagrams for coupled system of Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdipour, M.; Shukrinov, Y. U. M.

    2010-11-01

    Dynamics of stacked intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) in the high-Tc superconductors is theoretically investigated. We calculate the current-voltage characteristics (CVC) of IJJ and study the breakpoint region on the outermost branch of the CVC for the stacks with 9 IJJ. A method for investigation of the fine structure in CVC of IJJ based on the recording the "phase-charge" diagrams is suggested. It is demonstrated that this method reflects the main features of the breakpoint region.

  12. Studies on relative effects of charged and neutral defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, M. )

    1992-02-01

    This report covers the third year of a continuing research study to understand the relative importance of charged and neutral defects in amorphous silicon. The objective of the study is to explore the electronic structure, including neutral and charged defects, an optoelectronic effects including the formation of Staebler-Wronski defects. The study concentrated on exploring electroluminescence experimentally and interpreting the results employing a simple guiding model. The simple guiding model assumes an exponential density of states and recombination rate constants (radiative and non-radiative) which are governed by hopping transitions. Measurements were also made as a function of photodegradation of the material. The results implicate that the radiative recombination processes are not distant pair tunneling but rather results from electrons hopping down due to the coulomb interactions. Preliminary experiments have been made on the effect of photodegradation on transient space charge limited currents in n/i/n structures. These experiments can directly yield information on the occupied defects centers induced by the photodegradation and are not a result of recombination processes. To date the results seems to be consistent with a picture which places the doubly occupied defects at quite a high energy ({approx equal} 0.4 e.v. below the conduction band).

  13. Microscopic studies of the fate of charges in organic semiconductors: Scanning Kelvin probe measurements of charge trapping, transport, and electric fields in p- and n-type devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smieska, Louisa Marion

    Organic semiconductors could have wide-ranging applications in lightweight, efficient electronic circuits. However, several fundamental questions regarding organic electronic device behavior have not yet been fully addressed, including the nature of chemical charge traps, and robust models for injection and transport. Many studies focus on engineering devices through bulk transport measurements, but it is not always possible to infer the microscopic behavior leading to the observed measurements. In this thesis, we present scanning-probe microscope studies of organic semiconductor devices in an effort to connect local properties with local device behavior. First, we study the chemistry of charge trapping in pentacene transistors. Working devices are doped with known pentacene impurities and the extent of charge trap formation is mapped across the transistor channel. Trap-clearing spectroscopy is employed to measure an excitation of the pentacene charge trap species, enabling identification of the degradationrelated chemical trap in pentacene. Second, we examine transport and trapping in peryelene diimide (PDI) transistors. Local mobilities are extracted from surface potential profiles across a transistor channel, and charge injection kinetics are found to be highly sensitive to electrode cleanliness. Trap-clearing spectra generally resemble PDI absorption spectra, but one derivative yields evidence indicating variation in trap-clearing mechanisms for different surface chemistries. Trap formation rates are measured and found to be independent of surface chemistry, contradicting a proposed silanol trapping mechanism. Finally, we develop a variation of scanning Kelvin probe microscopy that enables measurement of electric fields through a position modulation. This method avoids taking a numeric derivative of potential, which can introduce high-frequency noise into the electric field signal. Preliminary data is presented, and the theoretical basis for electric field

  14. Hooking the Geographer in Children with Field-Based Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krall, Florence; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Suggests projects to help elementary students learn about man-land relationships through field experience, inquiry techniques, and a thematic, interdisciplinary approach. Children study a natural community, a human community, solid wastes, and energy conservation. (Author/AV)

  15. Depressive Symptoms among Children and Adolescents in Iran: A Confirmatory Factor Analytic Study of the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Olaya, Beatriz; Pasha, Gholamreza; Gilvarry, Catherine; Bray, Diane

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Iranian translation of the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children (CES-DC) in school children and adolescents in Iran. The CES-DC is a 20-item self-report scale designed to measure depressive symptoms in children and adolescents. A total of 1,984 children and…

  16. Numerical studies of the Weibel Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-11-01

    In intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy free energy is available to drive a transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instability. The finite transverse geometry of the confined beam makes a detailed theoretical investigation difficult. In this paper the newly developed bEASt (beam eigenmode and spectra) code which solves the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations is used to investigate the detailed properties of the Weibel instability for a long charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical pipe of radius r_w. The stability analysis is carried out for azimuthally symmetric perturbations about a two-temperature thermal equilibrium distribution in the smooth-focusing approximation. To study the nonlinear stage of the instability, the Darwin model is being developed and incorporated into the Beam Equilibrium Stability and Transport(BEST) code.

  17. Nanoscale charge transport in cytochrome c3/DNA network: Comparative studies between redox-active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Harumasa; Che, Dock-Chil; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    The redox-active molecule of a cytochrome c3/DNA network exhibits nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a threshold bias voltage at low temperature and zero-bias conductance at room temperature. I-V curves for the cytochrome c3/DNA network are well matched with the Coulomb blockade network model. Comparative studies of the Mn12 cluster, cytochrome c, and cytochrome c3, which have a wide variety of redox potentials, indicate no difference in charge transport, which suggests that the conduction mechanism is not directly related to the redox states. The charge transport mechanism has been discussed in terms of the newly-formed electronic energy states near the Fermi level, induced by the ionic interaction between redox-active molecules with the DNA network.

  18. Fundamental Studies of Charge Migration and Delocalization Relevant to Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Therien

    2012-06-01

    This program aimed to understand the molecular-level principles by which complex chemical systems carry out photochemical charge separation, transport, and storage, and how these insights could impact the design of practical solar energy conversion and storage devices. Towards these goals, this program focused on: (1) carrying out fundamental mechanistic and transient dynamical studies of proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions; (2) characterizing and interrogating via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods novel conjugated materials that feature large charge delocalization lengths; and (3) exploring excitation delocalization and migration, as well as polaron transport properties of meso-scale assemblies that are capable of segregating light-harvesting antennae, nanoscale wire-like conduction elements, and distinct oxidizing and reducing environments.

  19. Benchmark study for charge deposition by high energy electrons in thick slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, I.

    2002-01-01

    The charge deposition profiles created when highenergy (1, 10, and 100 MeV) electrons impinge ona thick slab of elemental aluminum, copper, andtungsten are presented in this paper. The chargedeposition profiles were computed using existing representative Monte Carlo codes: TIGER3.0 (1D module of ITS3.0) and MCNP version 4B. The results showed that TIGER3.0 and MCNP4B agree very well (within 20% of each other) in the majority of the problem geometry. The TIGER results were considered to be accurate based on previous studies. Thus, it was demonstrated that MCNP, with its powerful geometry capability and flexible source and tally options, could be used in calculations of electron charging in high energy electron-rich space radiation environments.

  20. Monte Carlo study of molten salt with charge asymmetry near the electrode surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłos, Jacek; Lamperski, Stanisław

    2014-02-01

    Results of the Monte Carlo simulation of the electrode | molten salt or ionic liquid interface are reported. The system investigated is approximated by the primitive model of electrolyte being in contact with a charged hard wall. Ions differ in charges, namely anions are divalent and cations are monovalent but they are of the same diameter d = 400 pm. The temperature analysis of heat capacity at a constant volume Cv and the anion radial distribution function, g2-/2-, allowed the choice of temperature of the study, which is T = 2800 K and corresponds to T* = 0.34 (definition of reduced temperature T* in text). The differential capacitance curve of the interface with the molten salt or ionic liquid at c = 5.79 M has a distorted bell shape. It is shown that with increasing electrolyte concentration from c = 0.4 to 5 M the differential capacitance curves undergo transition from U shape to bell shape.

  1. Monte Carlo study of molten salt with charge asymmetry near the electrode surface.

    PubMed

    Kłos, Jacek; Lamperski, Stanisław

    2014-02-01

    Results of the Monte Carlo simulation of the electrode | molten salt or ionic liquid interface are reported. The system investigated is approximated by the primitive model of electrolyte being in contact with a charged hard wall. Ions differ in charges, namely anions are divalent and cations are monovalent but they are of the same diameter d = 400 pm. The temperature analysis of heat capacity at a constant volume Cv and the anion radial distribution function, g2-/2-, allowed the choice of temperature of the study, which is T = 2800 K and corresponds to T(*) = 0.34 (definition of reduced temperature T(*) in text). The differential capacitance curve of the interface with the molten salt or ionic liquid at c = 5.79 M has a distorted bell shape. It is shown that with increasing electrolyte concentration from c = 0.4 to 5 M the differential capacitance curves undergo transition from U shape to bell shape.

  2. Numerical Study of Three Dimensional Effects in Longitudinal Space-Charge Impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-06-01

    Longitudinal space-charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as detrimental in free-electron lasers as they can seed instabilities. Such “microbunching instabilities” were recently shown to be potentially useful to support the generation of broadband coherent radiation pulses [1, 2]. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beamlines capable of sustaining this LSC instability as a mechanism to produce a coherent light source. To date most of these studies have been carried out with a one-dimensional impedance model for the LSC. In this paper we use a N-body “Barnes-Hut” algorithm [3] to simulate the 3D space charge force in the beam combined with elegant [4] and explore the limitation of the 1D model often used

  3. Studying electromagnetic interference spectrum in antenna under aircraft radome using models with artificial charged aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnikov, A. G.; Gilyazov, M. Z.; Matveev, D. A.; Voronkova, A. Yu.; Chernenskii, L. L.; Orlov, A. V.

    2011-09-01

    The spectrum of electromagnetic interference that is induced by discharges in an antenna arranged under an aircraft radome in an artificial charged aqueous aerosol cloud has been experimentally studied. It is established that, among different possible variants of lightning-arrest radomes, the minimum level of the spectral density of interference signals in the antenna is provided by vertical stripe electrodes on the radome surface. The maximum characteristic frequencies of signals in a model spherical antenna are several times lower than those in model lightning diverters, while the flat model antennas of disk or rectangular shapes exhibit the opposite trend. It has been suggested that a significant role in determining the characteristics of the electromagnetic interference spectrum in weather radar antennas is played by currents of discharges generated by charges accumulated on the dielectric radome surface.

  4. Charge-exchange erosion studies of accelerator grids in ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Xiaohang; Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    A particle simulation model is developed to study the charge-exchange grid erosion in ion thrusters for both ground-based and space-based operations. Because the neutral gas downstream from the accelerator grid is different for space and ground operation conditions, the charge-exchange erosion processes are also different. Based on an assumption of now electric potential hill downstream from the ion thruster, the calculations show that the accelerator grid erosion rate for space-based operating conditions should be significantly less than experimentally observed erosion rates from the ground-based tests conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). To resolve this erosion issue completely, we believe that it is necessary to accurately measure the entire electric potential field downstream from the thruster.

  5. Exiting Foster Care: A Case Study of Former Foster Children Enrolled in Higher Education in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, Jamie R.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, foster care is provided to children to avert maltreatment and abuse of children in distressed families by providing a temporary home or a foster home. Courts with jurisdiction over families have been charged by Congress to find appropriate homes when necessary circumstances occur. In fiscal year 2009, there were 423,773…

  6. Charged colloid-polymer mixtures: a study on electrostatic depletion attraction.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Fernández, M; Moncho-Jordá, A; Callejas-Fernández, J

    2011-02-01

    In this work, light scattering methods have been used to study the effect of adding charged polymer chains on the structural and dynamic properties of a charged colloidal system. The experimental measurements of the static structure factor S(cc)(q) show that as the polymer concentration increases, the main peak moves to higher q-values, which is interpreted in terms of the electrostatically enhanced depletion attraction induced by the polymer. Moreover, we found that the shift of the peak depends on the interplay between two relevant length scales, the polymer radius of gyration, R(g), and the Debye length, κ(-1). To reach these conclusions, the polymer reference interaction site model has been employed to explain the experimental results and to study how the effective depletion attraction depends on the polymer concentration, R(g) and κ(-1). Additionally, the measurements of the dynamic structure factor f(q, τ) indicate that the colloidal diffusion increases with the polymer concentration. Both static and dynamic analysis point out that the repulsion between colloids becomes weaker as the charged polymer is added. PMID:21303158

  7. Charged colloid-polymer mixtures: a study on electrostatic depletion attraction.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Fernández, M; Moncho-Jordá, A; Callejas-Fernández, J

    2011-02-01

    In this work, light scattering methods have been used to study the effect of adding charged polymer chains on the structural and dynamic properties of a charged colloidal system. The experimental measurements of the static structure factor S(cc)(q) show that as the polymer concentration increases, the main peak moves to higher q-values, which is interpreted in terms of the electrostatically enhanced depletion attraction induced by the polymer. Moreover, we found that the shift of the peak depends on the interplay between two relevant length scales, the polymer radius of gyration, R(g), and the Debye length, κ(-1). To reach these conclusions, the polymer reference interaction site model has been employed to explain the experimental results and to study how the effective depletion attraction depends on the polymer concentration, R(g) and κ(-1). Additionally, the measurements of the dynamic structure factor f(q, τ) indicate that the colloidal diffusion increases with the polymer concentration. Both static and dynamic analysis point out that the repulsion between colloids becomes weaker as the charged polymer is added.

  8. Studies on hydrogen plasma and dust charging in low-pressure filament discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B. Kalita, D.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2014-08-15

    The effect of working gas pressure and dust charging on electron energy probability function has been studied for hydrogen plasma in a multi-dipole dusty plasma device. A cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to evaluate the plasma parameters and electron energy probability function (EEPF) for different working pressures. For lower energy range (below 10 eV), the EEPF follows a bi-Maxwellian shape at very low pressure (6 × 10{sup −5} mbar), while elevating the working pressure up to ∼2 × 10{sup −3} mbar, the shape of the EEPF transforms into a single Maxwellian. Some dip structures are observed at high energy range (ε > 10 eV) in the EEPF of hydrogen plasma at all the working conditions. In presence of dust particles, it is observed that the shape of the EEPF changes due to the redistribution of the high and low-energy electron populations. Finally, the effect of working pressure on charge accumulation on dust particles is studied with the help of a Faraday cup and electrometer. From the observations, a strong influence of working pressure on plasma parameters, EEPF and dust charging is observed.

  9. Numerical study of Electrical double layer development: Analysis of the charge genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, P.; Cabaleiro, J. M.; Paillat, T.

    2015-10-01

    This work presents a numerical simulation of the Electric Double Layer (EDL) development process at a solid/liquid interface for adsorption and corrosion models. First, the study is conducted for static EDL development (without liquid flow) until it reaches a static equilibrium. Afterwards, the EDL is perturbed by a laminar liquid flow leading to flow electrification phenomena (dynamic study). The charge conservation equations of the liquid species have been implemented in an industrial code. A parametric study was performed to consider different chemical reaction scenarios and different models.

  10. Laboratory Studies of X-ray Spectra Formed by Charge Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter; Ali, R.; Brown, G. V.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F.

    2013-04-01

    Charge exchange between ions and neutral atoms or molecules has been accepted at an important soft producing process in our solar system. By extension, charge exchange may contribute to the X-ray emission of circumstellar material. It may also produce X-ray emission at the boundaries of supernova ejecta and star burst galaxies, or whenever hot plasma collides with neutral matter. X-ray spectra of K-shell and L-shell ions formed by charge exchange have now been studied in a variety of laboratory settings. These experiments have shown several characteristic features of line formation by charge exchange when compared to the X-ray emission produced by electron-impact excitation, e.g., enhancement emission of forbidden lines and of lines from levels with high principal quantum number. They have also shown a dependence on the interaction gas and on the energy of the ion-neutral collision. Moreover, the transfer of multiple electrons is typically preferred, provided the donor molecules or atoms have multiple valence-shell electrons. The laboratory measurements are in qualitative agreement with theory. However, the details of the observed X-ray spectra, especially those recorded with high spectral resolution, can differ substantially from predictions, especially for spectra produced at collision velocities equal to or lower than those found in thermal plasmas or produced with neutral gases other than atomic hydrogen. Puzzling discrepancies can be noted, such as enhanced emission from an upper level with the 'wrong' principal quantum number. Even more puzzling is a recent experiment in which two, co-mixed bare ion species of similar atomic number produce very different Lyman series emission upon charge exchange with a given neutral gas, defying both theoretical predictions and empirical scaling. Laboratory measurements have also shown that some of the characteristic features of charge exchange can be reproduced by radiative electron capture, i.e., by capture of a continuum

  11. Does son preference influence children's growth in height? A comparative study of Chinese and Filipino children.

    PubMed

    Song, Shige; Burgard, Sarah A

    2008-11-01

    Research has demonstrated that son preference has a serious impact on the survival and well-being of female infants and children in some parts of South and East Asia, but little is known about the consequences of son preference in later childhood and adolescence. We compare children's growth trajectories in height over childhood and adolescence in China, where the level of son preference is relatively high, and the Philippines, where it is relatively low. Children's height reflects long-term nutritional status and exposure to infectious diseases, both influenced by household decision-making and, presumably, by a preference for sons. Using data from two high-quality longitudinal studies and multilevel growth models, we find that male children in China show an additional height advantage relative to their female counterparts, when compared to the sex difference in growth trajectories in the Philippines. Further analysis reveals that the additional advantage of males in China is stronger in rural areas.

  12. Charge ordering in Nd2/3Ca1/3MnO3: ESR and magnetometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishchuk, D. M.; Tovstolytkin, A. I.; Fertman, E. L.; Desnenko, V. A.; Kravchyna, O.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Salak, A. N.; Anders, A. G.; Feher, A.

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of magnetic and electric properties of the narrow-band manganite Nd2/3Ca1/3MnO3 was studied by the electron-spin resonance (ESR), static magnetic field (dc) and resistivity techniques in the temperature range of 100-380 K. It was found that below the charge ordering temperature, TCO≈212 K, the compound is a mixture of the charge ordered and charge disordered phases in varying proportions depending on the temperature. The exchange phase process, when the amount of the charge ordered phase increases under cooling, while the amount of the charge disordered phase decreases is the most intense between ∼220 K and 180 K. At low temperatures, T<160 K, the charge ordered to the charge disordered phase ratio is about 4:1, which is in excellent agreement with previous neutron diffraction data. Both a sharp decrease of the magnetic susceptibility and a huge resistivity increase are evident of the weakening of ferromagnetic correlations and suppression of the double exchange interaction across the charge ordering due to the localization of the charge carriers.

  13. Studies on chemical charge doping related optical properties in monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Adriana M.; Gaur, Anand P. S.; Sahoo, Satyaprakash; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2016-09-01

    Thermal stability of quasi particles, i.e., exciton and trion, and a strong particle-particle interaction significantly tune the optical properties of atomically thin two dimensional (2D) metal dichalcogenides. The present work addresses the effect of inherent defects upon optical properties of chemical vapor deposition grown 1 L-WS2 and proposes the use of chemical transfer doping as a reversible and simple method for identification of the type of excess charge in the system. Photoluminescence (PL) studies in pristine 1 L-WS2 show that an additional band at ˜0.06 eV below trion (X±) PL band was evolved (at low temperature) which was associated to the bound exciton with charged/neutral defect. Using 7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane and 2,2-bis1,3-dithiolylidene as p and n-type dopants, respectively, we determined that the inherent defects/metal vacancies, which could be due to the presence of Tungsten metal deficiency, contributed in p-type nature of the pristine 1 L-WS2. Doping of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides materials with organic molecule via the surface charge transfer method is not only a way to provide a handy way to tailor the electronic and optical properties but also can be used as a tool to determine the nature of defects in the material.

  14. Redox probing study of the potential dependence of charge transport through Li2O2

    DOE PAGES

    Knudsen, Kristian B.; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren H.; Vegge, Tejs; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-11-20

    In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li–O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state-of-the-art Li-ion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li–O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous electron transfer exchange rate as amore » function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (~depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing evidence that hole transport is the dominant process for charge transfer through Li2O2 and showing that the origin of the sudden death observed upon discharge is due to charge transport limitations.« less

  15. A study of charged particles/radiation damage to VLSI device materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okyere, John G.

    1987-01-01

    Future spacecraft systems such as the manned space station will be subjected to low-dose long term radiation particles. Most electronic systems are affected by such particles. There is therefore a great need to understand device physics and failure mechanisms affected by radiation and to design circuits that would be less susceptible to radiation. Using 2 MeV electron radiation and bias temperature aging, it was found that MOS capacitors that were prepositively biased have lower flatband voltage shift and lesser increase in density of surface state charge than those that were not prepositively biased. In addition, it was shown that there is continued recovery of flatband voltage and density of state charge in irradiated capacitors during both room temperature anneal and 137 degree anneal. When nMOS transistors were subjected to 1 MeV proton radiation, charge pumping and current versus voltage measurements indicated that transconductance degradation, threshold voltage shifts and changes in interface states density may be the primary cause of nMOS transistor failure after radiation. Simulation studies using SPICE were performed on CMOS SRAM cells of various transistor sizes. It is shown that transistor sizing affects the noise margins of CMOS SRAM cells, and that as the beta ratio of the transistors of the CMOS SRAM cell decreases, the effective noise margin of the SRAM cell increases. Some suggestions were made in connection with the design of CMOS SRAMS that are hardened against single event upsets.

  16. Thermal Charging Study of Compressed Expanded Natural Graphite/Phase Change Material Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, Anne M; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The thermal charging performance of phase change materials, specifically paraffin wax, combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam is studied under constant heat flux and constant temperature conditions. By varying the heat flux between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 or maintaining a boundary temperature of 60 C for four graphite foam bulk densities, the impact on the rate of thermal energy storage is discussed. Thermal charging experiments indicate that thermal conductivity of the composite is an insufficient metric to compare the influence of graphite foam on the rate of thermal energy storage of the PCM composite. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to melt for various boundary conditions and graphite foam bulk densities, it is determined that bulk density selection is dependent on the applied boundary condition. A greater bulk density is advantageous for samples exposed to a constant temperature near the melting temperature as compared to constant heat flux conditions where a lower bulk density is adequate. Furthermore, the anisotropic nature of graphite foam bulk densities greater than 50 kg/m3 is shown to have an insignificant impact on the rate of thermal charging. These experimental results are used to validate a computational model for future use in the design of thermal batteries for waste heat recovery.

  17. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Srivastava, S.; Pandit, V. S. E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results.

  18. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A; Sing Babu, P; Srivastava, S; Pandit, V S

    2015-11-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results. PMID:26628123

  19. Design and studies on supramolecular ferrocene-porphyrin-fullerene constructs for generating long-lived charge separated states.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Francis; Chitta, Raghu; Gadde, Suresh; Islam, D-M Shafiqul; Schumacher, Amy L; Zandler, Melvin E; Araki, Yasuyuki; Ito, Osamu

    2006-12-21

    Supramolecular ferrocene-porphyrin-fullerene constructs, in which covalently linked ferrocene-porphyrin-crown ether compounds were self-assembled with alkylammonium cation functionalized fullerenes, have been designed to achieve stepwise electron transfer and hole shift to generate long-lived charge separated states. The adopted crown ether-alkylammonium cation binding strategy resulted in stable conjugates as revealed by computational studies performed by the DFT B3LYP/3-21G(*) method in addition to the binding constants obtained from fluorescence quenching studies. The free-energy changes for charge-separation and charge-recombination were varied by the choice of different metal ions in the porphyrin cavity. Free-energy calculations suggested that the light-induced electron-transfer processes from the singlet excited state of porphyrins to be exothermic in all of the investigated supramolecular dyads and triads. Photoinduced charge-separation and charge-recombination processes have been confirmed by the combination of the time-resolved fluorescence and nanosecond transient absorption spectral measurements. In case of the triads, the charge-recombination processes of the radical anion of the fullerene moiety take place in two steps, viz., a direct charge recombination from the porphyrin cation radical and a slower step involving distant charge recombination from the ferrocene cation moiety. The rates of charge recombination for the second route were found to be an order of magnitude slower than the former route, thus fulfilling the condition for charge migration to generate long-lived charge-separated states in supramolecular systems.

  20. Studies of Charged Particle Emission in the Decay of 45Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Pfutzner, M.; Grigorenko, L.; Bingham, C. R.; Czyrkowski, H.; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Darby, Iain; Dabrowski, Ryszard; Ginter, T. N.; Grzywacz, R.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kusmierz, W.; Liddick, Sean; Rajabali, M. M.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Stolz, A.

    2008-01-01

    The decay of extremely neutron-deficient isotope 45Fe has been studied by using a new type of gaseous detector in which a technique of optical imaging is used to record tracks of charged particles. The two-proton radioactivity and the -decay channels accompanied by proton(s) emission were clearly identified. For the first time, the angular and energy correlations between two protons emitted from the 45Fe ground-state were measured. The obtained distributions were confronted with predictions of a three-body model. Studies of -decay channels of 45Fe provided first unambiguous evidence for the -delayed three proton emission.

  1. A comparative study of the spontaneous social interactions of children with high-functioning autism and children with Asperger's disorder.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, Kathleen; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2006-03-01

    A comparative observational study was undertaken of the spontaneous social interactions of children with high-functioning autism and Asperger's disorder. The sample comprised 20 children with high-functioning autism, 19 children with Asperger's disorder and 17 typically developing children matched on chronological age and overall mental age. A one-zero time sampling technique was used in live coding of the children's spontaneous social and play behaviours in the schoolyard. Few differences were found between children with high-functioning autism and Asperger's disorder on the dimensions of social interaction investigated. In contrast, the social behaviour of both clinical samples often deviated markedly from that of the typically developing children. The findings confirmed that although children with high-functioning autism or Asperger's disorder are often socially isolated relative to their typically developing peers, they are capable of spontaneously engaging socially with other children. The results were supportive of the hypothesis that Asperger's disorder is on a continuum with autistic disorder.

  2. [Comparative EEG study in normal and autistic children].

    PubMed

    Lushchekina, E A; Podreznaia, E D; Lushchekin, V S; Strelets, V B

    2010-01-01

    The work represents the results of a comparative study of spectral power as well as averaged coherence in alpha, beta and gamma EEG bands in 5-to-7-year-old autistic and healthy boys in the state of rest and under cognitive load (mental calculation). The mean age of the examined children was 6 years 4 months. In both healthy and autistic children, there was a clear-cut baseline frontal-occipital gradient of the alpha activity. Performance of the cognitive task led to enhancement of spectral power in the alpha1 band and shifting its maximum to the left hemisphere, did not change the activity in the alpha2 band, and considerably increased the spectral power in the alpha3 band. In healthy children, the spectral power and average coherence of the fast rhythms increased in the central and frontal areas of the left hemisphere. The right-side dominance of the spectral power of the alpha band was revealed in autistic children both in the baseline and during cognitive task. The spectral power of the gamma band was higher in autistic children than in healthy children in the baseline. The cognitive task did not change this fast activity in autistic children. PMID:21434401

  3. Failures in outpatient tonsillectomy policy in children: a retrospective study in 311 children.

    PubMed

    Truy, E; Merad, F; Robin, P; Fantino, B; Morgon, A

    1994-03-01

    The literature suggests that outpatient tonsillectomy in children is a safe and cost-effective procedure. These conclusions have been based on the low rate of post-operative complications. Recent papers suggest contra-indications for ambulatory surgery in some patients. A retrospective study involving 311 children was performed in our Department. We defined two groups in which the out-patient policy had failed. The first group (43 children) comprised inpatient children scheduled because of an unhealthy preoperative state (12 patients), a sleep-apnea syndrome (5 children), a major associated procedure (3 patients), a social or family environment not reliable enough for postoperative supervision (19 patients) or because of parental refusal (4 patients). The second group (268 patients) was constituted of scheduled outpatients. In this group, the outpatient policy failed in 31 and children had to be kept overnight, because complications occurred. The main short-term complication was bleeding (13 patients). In 8, delayed complications were observed. Thus, according to the literature, children with concomitant heavy medical problems or with a poor social environment have to be managed as inpatients. For the others outpatient procedures were possible but parents should previously be informed of the possible overnight hospital supervision which is needed in 11.6% of cases. When comparing the youngest patients under 4 years of age with the others, although the preexisting medical and social conditions are important factors that may contraindicate ambulatory surgery, once the latter has been decided on, there is no significant difference between the two age groups regarding the number of children requiring overnight hospital supervision.

  4. PRELIMINARY EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FINDINGS FROM THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools. The four-week study was performed in October and November, 2003. The study involved repeated daily...

  5. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FINDINGS FROM THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY (TACS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools. The four-week study was performed in October and November, 2003. The study involved repeated daily...

  6. Prospective studies on children with sex chromosome aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, S.G.; Paul, N.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. Some of the titles are: Growth and Development from Early to Midadolescence of Children with X and Y Chromosome Aneuploidy: The Toronto Study; Sex Chromomal Aneuploidy: Perspective and Longitudinal Studies; Psychologic Study of XYY and XXY Men; and Cellular and Molecular Studies in Human Chromosomal Diseases.

  7. Study of Mothers' Anxieties Related to Their Children's Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilgar, Sengul

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to study anxieties of mothers related to their children's future. Qualitative method was used in order to study anxieties of mothers from different socio-economic levels. Sample of the study participants are 129 mothers living in Istanbul. 32 of those mothers are from upper socio-economic level, 57, from middle…

  8. Content analysis of 186 descriptive case studies of hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C M; Bandak, A G; Beardslee, C I

    1990-01-01

    One hundred eighty-six single case studies of sick infants, children, and adolescents were analyzed to provide a substantial descriptive data base of children's responses to illness, hospitalization, and treatment over a span of more than 20 years. Units of theory of coping behavior are identified as a first phase for adding new knowledge to the field of pediatric nursing. Indicators of the significance of the data base are included.

  9. Exposure Measurements in Japan Environment and Children's Study.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    The Japan Ministry of the Environment is conducting a large-scale birth cohort study called the Japan Environment and Children's Study (JECS), which involves 100000 mother-child pairs. Mothers are enrolled during pregnancy, and their children are followed up and studied until they reach the age of 13 years. The JECS started recruiting mothers in January 2011 and completed the registration of more than 103000 mothers in March 2014. The National Institute for Environmental Studies takes the lead in the study programming and implementation in cooperation with the National Centre for Child Health and Development and 15 Regional Centres that reach out to the study participants. In the study, the effects of environmental factors on children's health and development are investigated. The environment in this study is defined not only as air, soil, water, and indoor environments but also as various chemical substances, physical conditions, socioeconomic factors, psychological conditions, lifestyles and community situations. Mothers' and children's exposures to these environmental factors are measured through chemical analyses of biospecimens collected during pregnancy and after birth, questionnaires and computer modelling. The homes of the randomly selected participants (5000) are visited to measure the concentrations of volatile organic compounds, nitrogen and sulphuric oxides and particulate matter. Vacuum dust samples are also collected for chemical analysis. All these data will be combined with the information collected by the dwelling unit observation to assess the exposure of children aged 1.5 and 3 years. PMID:27252056

  10. A Prospective Study of Herpes Zoster in Children

    PubMed Central

    Katakam, Bhumesh Kumar; Kiran, Geeta; Kumar, Udaya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Herpes zoster (HZ) is a dermatomal viral infection, caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) that persists in the posterior root ganglion. HZ is uncommonly reported in immunocompetent children. It may be due to intrauterine VZV infection or secondary to postnatal exposure to VZV at an early age. Aims: Our study was to review clinico-epidemiological data for HZ in children for early diagnosis and treatment to prevent complications. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2014. Consecutive cases clinically diagnosed as HZ in the pediatric age group were taken up. Results: We report the clinico-epidemiological study of 26 cases of HZ, their benign course and recovery among children. Conclusions: HZ is a rare disease in childhood. Varicella in early childhood is a risk factor of HZ in immunocompromised and immunocompetent children. Childhood zoster occurs in either healthy or underlying immunodeficient children. The appearance of HZ in a young child does not always imply an underlying immunodeficiency or malignancy. But the identification of HZ with or without immunodeficiency is of prime importance from the treatment and prognostic point of view and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vesicular eruptions. The prognosis is generally good in healthy children. PMID:27688444

  11. A Prospective Study of Herpes Zoster in Children

    PubMed Central

    Katakam, Bhumesh Kumar; Kiran, Geeta; Kumar, Udaya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Herpes zoster (HZ) is a dermatomal viral infection, caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) that persists in the posterior root ganglion. HZ is uncommonly reported in immunocompetent children. It may be due to intrauterine VZV infection or secondary to postnatal exposure to VZV at an early age. Aims: Our study was to review clinico-epidemiological data for HZ in children for early diagnosis and treatment to prevent complications. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2014. Consecutive cases clinically diagnosed as HZ in the pediatric age group were taken up. Results: We report the clinico-epidemiological study of 26 cases of HZ, their benign course and recovery among children. Conclusions: HZ is a rare disease in childhood. Varicella in early childhood is a risk factor of HZ in immunocompromised and immunocompetent children. Childhood zoster occurs in either healthy or underlying immunodeficient children. The appearance of HZ in a young child does not always imply an underlying immunodeficiency or malignancy. But the identification of HZ with or without immunodeficiency is of prime importance from the treatment and prognostic point of view and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vesicular eruptions. The prognosis is generally good in healthy children.

  12. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    SciTech Connect

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2014-10-15

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  13. Assessment of Noise Exposure to Children: Considerations for the National Children's Study

    PubMed Central

    Viet, Susan Marie; Dellarco, Michael; Dearborn, Dorr G.; Neitzel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has been accruing to indicate that young children are vulnerable to noise in their physical environment. A literature review identified that, in addition to hearing loss, noise exposure is associated with negative birth outcomes, reduced cognitive function, inability to concentrate, increased psychosocial activation, nervousness, feeling of helplessness, and increased blood pressure in children. While increasing attention has been given to the health effects of noise in children, research about noise exposure is sparse and often the measure of exposure is simply proximity to a noise source. The U.S. National Children's Study (NCS) provides a unique opportunity to investigate noise exposures to pregnant women and children using a number of assessment modalities at different life stages. Measurement of noise levels in homes and other environments, personal dosimetry measurements made over a period of days, and questionnaires addressing sources of noise in the environment, annoyance to noise, perceived noise level, use of head phones and ear buds, noisy activity exposures, and occupational exposures, are planned for evaluation within the NCS Vanguard pilot study. We describe the NCS planned approach to addressing noise exposure assessment in study visits over a child's lifetime. PMID:25866843

  14. [Street food among children: a study in north Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Neffati, Larbi; Ridha, Hamza; Kolsteren, Patrick; Hilderbrand, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    As urbanization increases in Tunisia, eating meals outside the home is becoming more frequent. Children are prime consumers for the fast food sold in the streets. Neither their nor their parents' attitude towards street food is well documented as yet. This study was conducted in the city of Bizerte in February 1998. Its aim was to gather information about street food and parents' and children's attitudes towards it to help organize educational sessions with the children, parents, teachers, and vendors. The study interviewed 421 primary school children, ranging in age from 6 to 15 years (mean age: 10 years), from 24 schools. Half received pocket money, a percentage that did not differ by sex. Three quarters of the children used more than 75% of their pocket money to buy street food. The items bought most frequently were candy (27.2%), sandwiches (23.9%), pastries (23.9%), sunflower seeds and peanuts (21%), and either pizza, chocolate, or cheese (20.3%); the largest proportion of money was spent on sandwiches. In more than half the cases (55.7% of the children), the main motivation for buying street food was either to replace or fill out a meal at home, with sandwiches or pastries. The parents' monthly income did not influence the children's purchasing behavior, but the rhythm of receiving pocket money did. Most children were satisfied with the nutritional and hygienic quality of the food available, but their opinion of this quality as well as the reasons for buying the food and the prices spent on it differed considerably from that of their parents. This study highlights the important role of street foods in the daily diet of schoolchildren and the need for appropriate nutrition education in primary schools.

  15. Optical studies of the charge localization and delocalization in conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngmin

    A systematic charge transport study on the thermochromism of polyaniline (PAN) doped with a plasticizing dopant, and on a field effect device using conducting poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as its active material, was made at optical (20--45,000 cm-1) frequencies to probe the charge localization and delocalization phenomena and the insulator to metal transition (IMT) in the inhomogeneous conducting polymer system. Temperature dependent reflectance [20--8000 cm -1 (2.5 meV--1eV)] of the PAN sample, together with absorbance and do transport study done by Dr. Pron at the Laboratoire de Physique des Metaux Synthetiques in Grenoble, France, shows spectral weight loss in the infrared region but the reflectance in the very low frequency (below 100 cm-1) remains unaffected. There are two localization transitions. The origin of the 200 K localization transition that affect >˜15% of the electrons is the glass transition emanating from the dopants. The transition principally affects the IR response in the range of 200--8000 cm -1. The low temperature (<75K) localization transition affects the few electrons that provide the high conductivity. It is suggested that these electrons are localized by disorder at the lowest temperature and become delocalized through phonon induced delocalization as the temperature increases to 75K. It is noted that this temperature is typical of a Debye temperature in many organic materials. The thermocromism is attributed to the weak localization to strong localization transition through the glass transition temperature. Below the glass transition temperature (Tg), the lattice is "frozen" in configuration that reduces the charge delocalization and lead to cause increase of strongly localized polarons. Time variation of source-drain current, real-time IR reflectance [20--8000 cm-1 (2.5 meV--1eV)] modulation, and real-time UV/VIS/NIR absorbance [380--2400 nm (0.5--3.3 eV)] modulation were measured to investigate the field induced charge

  16. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy studies in children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Psychosomatic and developmental behavioral medicine in pediatrics has been the subject of significant recent attention, with infants, school-age children, and adolescents frequently presenting with psychosomatic, behavioral, and psychiatric symptoms. These may be a consequence of insecurity of attachment, reduced self-confidence, and peer -relationship conflicts during their developmental stages. Developmental cognitive neuroscience has revealed significant associations between specific brain lesions and particular cognitive dysfunctions. Thus, identifying the biological deficits underlying such cognitive dysfunction may provide new insights into therapeutic prospects for the management of those symptoms in children. Recent advances in noninvasive neuroimaging techniques, and especially functional near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), have contributed significant findings to the field of developmental cognitive neuroscience in pediatrics. We present here a comprehensive review of functional NIRS studies of children who have developed normally and of children with psychosomatic and behavioral disorders. PMID:22433235

  17. Longitudinal study of young children's responses to challenging achievement situations.

    PubMed

    Ziegert, D I; Kistner, J A; Castro, R; Robertson, B

    2001-01-01

    Three studies were conducted to replicate and extend Dweck's findings regarding young children's responses to challenging achievement situations. Dweck's dichotomous helplessness classification system (i.e., task choice, task choice reason) was replicated with kindergartners, n = 235 (50% male), and first graders, n = 70 (46% male). To test whether individual differences in young children's responses to challenging situations are stable over time, 1- and 5-year follow-ups of the kindergartners were conducted. On the basis of children's responses on age-appropriate behavioral tasks, a composite of cognitive, behavioral, and affective helplessness indices predicted helplessness at 1 and 5 years later, n = 114 (50% male), above and beyond kindergarten task ability and gender, p<.05. Kindergarten helplessness predicted teacher ratings of children's helplessness 5 years later as well, p<.05. The implications of these findings for early intervention are discussed. PMID:11333088

  18. Impact of nutrition messages on children's food choice: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Katie; Schwartz, Marlene B

    2006-03-01

    This pilot study tested the influence of nutrition message framing on snack choice among kindergarteners. Three classrooms were randomly assigned to watch one of the following 60s videos: (a) a gain-framed nutrition message (i.e. the positive benefits of eating apples) (n=14); (b) a loss-framed message (i.e. the negative consequences of not eating apples) (n=18); or (c) a control scene (children playing a game) (n=18). Following this, the children were offered a choice between animal crackers and an apple for their snack. Among the children who saw one of the nutrition message videos, 56% chose apples rather than animal crackers; in the control condition only 33% chose apples. This difference was statistically significant (chi2=7.56, p<0.01). These results suggest that videos containing nutritional messages may have a positive influence on children's short-term food choices.

  19. Analytical and numerical studies of photo-injected charge transport in molecularly-doped polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, Amrita

    The mobility of photo-injected charge carriers in molecularly-doped polymers (MDPs) exhibits a commonly observed, and nearly universal Poole-Frenkel field dependence, mu exp√(beta0E), that has been shown to arise from the correlated Gaussian energy distribution of transport sites encountered by charges undergoing hopping transport through the material. Analytical and numerical studies of photo-injected charge transport in these materials are presented here with an attempt to understand how specific features of the various models developed to describe these systems depend on the microscopic parameters that define them. Specifically, previously published time-of-flight mobility data for the molecularly doped polymer 30% DEH:PC (polycarbonate doped with 30 wt.% aromatic hydrazone DEH) is compared with direct analytical and numerical predictions of five disorder-based models, the Gaussian disorder model (GDM) of Bassler, and four correlated disorder models introduced by Novikov, et al., and by Parris, et al. In these numerical studies, disorder parameters describing each model were varied from reasonable starting conditions, in order to give the best overall fit. The uncorrelated GDM describes the Poole-Frenkel field dependence of the mobility only at very high fields, but fails for fields lower than about 64 V/mum. The correlated disorder models with small amounts of geometrical disorder do a good over-all job of reproducing a robust Poole-Frenkel field dependence, with correlated disorder theories that employ polaron transition rates showing qualitatively better agreement with experiment than those that employ Miller-Abrahams rates. In a separate study, the heuristic treatment of spatial or geometric disorder incorporated in existing theories is critiqued, and a randomly-diluted lattice gas model is developed to describe the spatial disorder of the transport sites in a more realistic way.

  20. Cutaneous chemical burns in children - a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hardwicke, Joseph; Bechar, Janak; Bella, Husam; Moiemen, Naiem

    2013-12-01

    Exposure to chemicals is an unusual causation of cutaneous burns in children. The aim of this study is to look at childhood chemical burns and compare this to adult chemical burns from the same population. A total of 2054 patients were referred to the pediatric burns unit during the study period. This included 24 cutaneous chemical burns, equating to an incidence of 1.1%. Over half of the injuries occurred in the domestic setting. The mean total body surface area (TBSA) affected was 1.9%. When compared to a cohort of adult patients from the same population with cutaneous chemical burns, the TBSA affected was identical (1.9%) but distribution favored the buttock and perineum in children, rather than the distal lower limb in adults. Children presented earlier, had lower rates of surgical intervention and had a shorter length of stay in hospital (p < 0.001). Children also had a lower rate of appropriate first aid treatment. Chemical burns in children are rare, but are becoming more common in our region. It is important to be aware of the characteristic distribution, etiology and need to identify children at risk of child protection issues.

  1. Study of charge transfer complexes of menadione (vitamin K 3) with a series of anilines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Purnendu; Saha, Avijit; Mukherjee, Asok K.; Mukherjee, Dulal C.

    2004-01-01

    Menadione (vitamin K 3) has been shown to form charge transfer complexes with N, N-dimethyl aniline, N, N-dimethyl p-toluidine and N, N-dimethyl m-toluidine in CCl 4 medium. The CT transition energies are well correlated with the ionisation potentials of the anilines. The formation constants of the complexes have been determined at a number of temperatures from which the enthalpies and entropies of formation have been obtained. The formation constants exhibit a very good linear free energy relationship (Hammett) at all the temperatures studied.

  2. Neutron-induced charged-particle emission studies below 100 MeV at WNR

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; Lee, T.M.; Sterbenz, S.M.

    1994-07-01

    Charged-particles produced by neutron bombardment of selected targets with Z=5 through 53 have been studied for neutron energies from 1 MeV to about 100 MeV using the spallation neutron source at WNR/LAMPF. Particle detection with energy measurement and particle identification is accomplished by two-element {Delta}E-E counters, three-element {Delta}E{sub l}-{Delta}E{sub 2}-E counters or with pulse-shape discrimination using scintillators directly in the neutron beam. The experimental techniques for these measurements are described and comparisons made among the different approaches. This presentation introduces five papers contributed to this conference.

  3. Influence of defects on excess charge carrier kinetics studied by transient PC and transient PA

    SciTech Connect

    Feist, H.; Kunst, M.; Swiatkowski, C.

    1997-07-01

    By comparison of transient photoconductivity (TPC) and transient photoinduced absorption (PA) the influence of the density of states in the bandgap on excess charge carrier kinetics is studied for a-Si:H films deposited at different temperatures and for state of the art a-Si:H films in two different states of light soaking. In both series the rising deep defect density leads to an enhancement of electron trapping rather than recombination via deep defects. The samples deposited at temperatures lower than 250 C additionally show a lower effective electron mobility, i.e., a broader conduction band tail.

  4. Hispanic parents of overweight and obese children and their outcome expectations for children's television viewing: A qualitative study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to explore parental outcome expectations (OE) regarding children's television (TV) viewing among parents of overweight or obese children. We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with 20 parents of 5- to 8-year-old overweight or obese children. We found tha...

  5. Study of charge transfer complexes of [70]fullerene with phenol and substituted phenols.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Banerjee, Shrabanti; Banerjee, Manas

    2005-07-01

    To improve the understanding of the charge transfer (CT) interaction of [70]fullerene with electron donors, interaction of [70]fullerene with a series of phenols, e.g., phenol, resorcinol and p-quinol were studied in 1,4-dioxan medium using absorption spectroscopy. An absorption band due to CT transition was observed in the visible region. The experimental CT transition energies (h nuCT) are well correlated (through Mulliken's equation) with the vertical ionisation potentials (I(D)v) of the series of phenols studied. From an analysis of this correlation degrees of charge transfer for the [70]fullerene-phenol complexes were estimated. The degrees of charge transfer in the ground state of the complexes have been found to be very low (<2%). The h nuCT values change systematically as the number and position of the -OH groups change on the aromatic ring of the phenol moiety. From the trends in the h nuCT values, the Hückel parameters (h(O) and k(C-O)) for the -OH group were obtained in a straightforward way and the values so obtained, viz., 1.91 and 1.0, respectively, are close to the ones (1.8 and 0.8) recommended by Streitwieser on the basis of other evidence. Oscillator strengths, transition dipole strengths and resonance energies of the [70]fullerene-phenol complexes were determined. Formation constants of the CT complexes were determined at four different temperatures from which enthalpies and entropies of formation of the complexes were estimated.

  6. Interactions of non-charged tadalafil stereoisomers with cyclodextrins: capillary electrophoresis and nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Fejős, Ida; Kazsoki, Adrienn; Sohajda, Tamás; Márványos, Ede; Volk, Balázs; Szente, Lajos; Béni, Szabolcs

    2014-10-10

    The single isomer drug R,R-tadalafil (Cialis) contains two chiral centers thus four stereoisomers (R,R-, S,S-, S,R- and R,S-tadalafil) exist, however, only the most potent inhibitor, the R,R-tadalafil is in clinical use. In our study, over 20 charged cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives were studied for enantiospecific host-guest type interactions in CD-modified capillary electrophoresis. Tadalafil stereoisomers are non-charged; therefore, their electrophoretic separation poses a challenge. Several candidates of both positively and negatively charged hosts were found to be effective for the enantioseparation. Eight out of the beta derivatives and three of alpha derivatives (including sulfated, sulfoalkylated, carboxyalkylated and amino derivatives) resolved all four stereoisomers partially or completely. Cavity size-dependent absolute enantiomer migration order (EMO) reversals were observed in the case of sulfopropyl-alpha (EMO: R,S; S,R; R,R; S,S) and sulfopropyl-beta (S,S; R,R; S,R; R,S) derivatives, while substituent-dependent partial EMO reversals were detected for sulfobutyl-ether-alpha (R,S; S,R; S,S; R,R) and sulfated-alpha-CD (R,R; S,S; R,S; S,R) selectors. Complexation-induced (1)H NMR chemical shift changes reflected that the benzodioxole moiety plays a major role in cavity size-dependent EMO reversal. Sulfobutyl-ether-alpha-CD was the only selector that provided the desired EMO in which the clinically applied eutomer R,R-tadalafil migrates last. Finally, an electrophoretic method applying a background electrolyte (BGE) containing 75 mM Tris-acetic acid buffer (pH 4.75) and 7 mM sulfobutyl-ether-alpha-CD was developed for the baseline resolution of all isomers at 25 °C and +25 kV applied voltage.

  7. Charge-density study of the nonlinear optical precursor DED-TCNQ at 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Jacqueline M.; Copley, Royston C.; McIntyre, Garry J.; Howard, Judith A.; Szablewski, Marek; Cross, Graham H.

    2002-03-01

    A charge-density study of the nonlinear-optical (NLO) precursor \\{4-[bis(diethylamino)-methylium] phenyl\\}dicyanomethanide (DED-TCNQ), space group P21/c, a=11.174(2) Å b=12.859(2) Å c=12.486(2) Å β=112.00(1)°, is presented. The results derive from a suitable combination of complementary 20 K x-ray and neutron diffraction data, the latter being important for locating the hydrogen atoms precisely. The compound is one in a series of TCNQ derivatives that exhibit varying degrees of quinoidal and zwitterionic character, these two electronic states being very close energetically. Bond-length-alternation type calculations show that the molecule at 20 K exists in a mixture of the two states, the zwitterionic ground state being dominant (63:37% zwitterionic: quinoidal). A topological analysis of the bonding density within the benzenoid ring provides for a more direct, alternative method to calculate this ratio which utilizes ellipticity values derived from the charge-density study. Results are identical thus corroborating the validity of the ``strength-length'' relationship implicitly assumed in bond-length-alternation type calculations. The ratio determined corresponds well to the electronic configuration needed to meet the requirements of the general rule for obtaining a maximum value of β (a measure of the NLO response on the molecular scale) as a function of bond-length alternation. The promise of this class of compounds for nonlinear optics also lies partly in their high molecular dipole moments and so the pseudoatomic charges derived from this study were used to evaluate the nature of the molecular charge transfer in detail and the solid-state dipolar vector moment μ. Such measurements of μ are otherwise difficult in the solid state. A value of \\|μ\\|=91×10-30 Cm was deduced which compares with liquid and gas phase theoretical calculations of μ=66.71×10-30 Cm and μ=33.36×10-30 Cm, respectively. This comparison, combined with an analysis of the sense

  8. Study of Optimal Perimetric Testing in Children (OPTIC): Feasibility, Reliability and Repeatability of Perimetry in Children

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipesh E.; Cumberland, Phillippa M.; Walters, Bronwen C.; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Rahi, Jugnoo S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate feasibility, reliability and repeatability of perimetry in children. Methods A prospective, observational study recruiting 154 children aged 5–15 years, without an ophthalmic condition that affects the visual field (controls), identified consecutively between May 2012 and November 2013 from hospital eye clinics. Perimetry was undertaken in a single sitting, with standardised protocols, in a randomised order using the Humphrey static (SITA 24–2 FAST), Goldmann and Octopus kinetic perimeters. Data collected included test duration, subjective experience and test quality (incorporating examiner ratings on comprehension of instructions, fatigue, response to visual and auditory stimuli, concentration and co-operation) to assess feasibility and reliability. Testing was repeated within 6 months to assess repeatability. Results Overall feasibility was very high (Goldmann=96.1%, Octopus=89% and Humphrey=100% completed the tests). Examiner rated reliability was ‘good’ in 125 (81.2%) children for Goldmann, 100 (64.9%) for Octopus and 98 (63.6%) for Humphrey perimetry. Goldmann perimetry was the most reliable method in children under 9 years of age. Reliability improved with increasing age (multinomial logistic regression (Goldmann, Octopus and Humphrey), p<0.001). No significant differences were found for any of the three test strategies when examining initial and follow-up data outputs (Bland-Altman plots, n=43), suggesting good test repeatability, although the sample size may preclude detection of a small learning effect. Conclusions Feasibility and reliability of formal perimetry in children improves with age. By the age of 9 years, all the strategies used here were highly feasible and reliable. Clinical assessment of the visual field is achievable in children as young as 5 years, and should be considered where visual field loss is suspected. Since Goldmann perimetry is the most effective strategy in children aged 5–8 years and this

  9. The National Children's Study Waukesha County, Wisconsin Vanguard Center.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Jeanne B; Leuthner, Steven R; Weiss, Marianne; Whelan, David; Athey, Leslie; McElroy, Jane A; Durkin, Maureen S; Cronk, Christine E

    2006-03-01

    The National Children's Study (NCS) is a large, longterm study designed to detect environmental influences on the health and development of children. Waukesha County, Wisconsin, was selected as 1 of 7 "Vanguard Centers" currently funded to finalize and lead the implementation of the study protocol. The authors provide an overview of key design and planning processes that will be used at all NCS Vanguard locations, the specific approaches to be used in the NCS Waukesha County Vanguard Center, and information about how Wisconsin physicians and other health care professionals can become involved in working with the NCS.

  10. Using the Balance Function to study the charge correlations of hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Christakoglou, P.; Petridis, A.; Vassiliou, M.

    2007-02-27

    We present the recent Balance Function (BF) results obtained by the NA49 collaboration for the pseudo-rapidity dependence of non-identified charged particle correlations for two SPS energies. Experimental results indicate a clear centrality dependence only in the mid-rapidity region. The results of an energy dependence study of the BF throughout the whole SPS energy range will also be discussed. In addition, the correlation of identified hadrons is studied and presented for the first time. The study of hadron correlation has also been extended in order to cope with the high multiplicity environment that is expected to be seen at LHC. We will present the latest results from simulations concerning the extension of these studies to the ALICE experiment.

  11. Malnutrition Affects the Urban-Poor Disproportionately: A Study of Nigerian Urban Children of Different Socio-Economic Statuses.

    PubMed

    Ejike, Chukwunonso E C C

    2016-09-23

    Income inequality within the same place of residence may impact the nutritional status of children. This study therefore investigated the impact of income inequality on the nutritional status of children living in the same place of residence, using anthropometric tools. Children in four schools (Schools 1-4) within the vicinity of a housing estate in Umuahia, Nigeria, that charge fees making them 'very affordable', 'affordable', 'expensive' and 'very expensive', respectively, were recruited for the study. Thinness, overweight and obesity were defined using the Cole et al. reference standards. Thinness was present in 10.4% (13.0% of boys, 7.6% of girls); 20.4% (15.6% of boys, 27.3% of girls; and 0.7% (1.4% of boys, 0.0% of girls) of children in Schools 1-3, respectively; but absent in school 4. Only 3.7% (1.4% of boys, 6.1% of girls) and 5.6% (6.3% of boys, 4.5% of girls) of children in Schools 1 and 2, respectively, were overweight/obese. Conversely, 25.8% (18.9% of boys, 32.5% of girls) and 41.6% (38.8% of boys, 45.3% of girls) of children in Schools 3 and 4, respectively, were overweight/obese. The urban-poor (School 2) are clearly affected by malnutrition disproportionately.

  12. Malnutrition Affects the Urban-Poor Disproportionately: A Study of Nigerian Urban Children of Different Socio-Economic Statuses.

    PubMed

    Ejike, Chukwunonso E C C

    2016-01-01

    Income inequality within the same place of residence may impact the nutritional status of children. This study therefore investigated the impact of income inequality on the nutritional status of children living in the same place of residence, using anthropometric tools. Children in four schools (Schools 1-4) within the vicinity of a housing estate in Umuahia, Nigeria, that charge fees making them 'very affordable', 'affordable', 'expensive' and 'very expensive', respectively, were recruited for the study. Thinness, overweight and obesity were defined using the Cole et al. reference standards. Thinness was present in 10.4% (13.0% of boys, 7.6% of girls); 20.4% (15.6% of boys, 27.3% of girls; and 0.7% (1.4% of boys, 0.0% of girls) of children in Schools 1-3, respectively; but absent in school 4. Only 3.7% (1.4% of boys, 6.1% of girls) and 5.6% (6.3% of boys, 4.5% of girls) of children in Schools 1 and 2, respectively, were overweight/obese. Conversely, 25.8% (18.9% of boys, 32.5% of girls) and 41.6% (38.8% of boys, 45.3% of girls) of children in Schools 3 and 4, respectively, were overweight/obese. The urban-poor (School 2) are clearly affected by malnutrition disproportionately. PMID:27669325

  13. Young German children's early syntactic competence: a preferential looking study.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Miriam; Abbot-Smith, Kirsten; Lieven, Elena; Tomasello, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Using a preferential looking methodology with novel verbs, Gertner, Fisher and Eisengart (2006) found that 21-month-old English children seemed to understand the syntactic marking of transitive word order in an abstract, verb-general way. In the current study we tested whether young German children of this same age have this same understanding. Following Gertner et al. (2006), one group of German children was tested only after they had received a training/practice phase containing transitive sentences with familiar verbs and the exact same nouns as those used at test. A second group was tested after a training/practice phase consisting only of familiar verbs, without the nouns used at test. Only the group of children with the training on full transitive sentences was successful in the test. These findings suggest that for children this young to succeed in this test of syntactic understanding, they must first have some kind of relevant linguistic experience immediately prior to testing--which raises the question of the nature of children's linguistic representations at this early point in development. PMID:18576965

  14. Using singing to nurture children's hearing? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Welch, Graham F; Saunders, Jo; Edwards, Sian; Palmer, Zoe; Himonides, Evangelos; Knight, Julian; Mahon, Merle; Griffin, Susanna; Vickers, Deborah A

    2015-09-01

    This article reports a pilot study of the potential benefits of a sustained programme of singing activities on the musical behaviours and hearing acuity of young children with hearing impairment (HI). Twenty-nine children (n=12 HI and n=17 NH) aged between 5 and 7 years from an inner-city primary school in London participated, following appropriate ethical approval. The predominantly classroom-based programme was designed by colleagues from the UCL Institute of Education and UCL Ear Institute in collaboration with a multi-arts charity Creative Futures and delivered by an experienced early years music specialist weekly across two school terms. There was a particular emphasis on building a repertoire of simple songs with actions and allied vocal exploration. Musical learning was also supported by activities that drew on visual imagery for sound and that included simple notation and physical gesture. An overall impact assessment of the pilot programme embraced pre- and post-intervention measures of pitch discrimination, speech perception in noise and singing competency. Subsequent statistical data analyses suggest that the programme had a positive impact on participant children's singing range, particularly (but not only) for HI children with hearing aids, and also in their singing skills. HI children's pitch perception also improved measurably over time. Findings imply that all children, including those with HI, can benefit from regular and sustained access to age-appropriate musical activities.

  15. Using singing to nurture children's hearing? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Welch, Graham F; Saunders, Jo; Edwards, Sian; Palmer, Zoe; Himonides, Evangelos; Knight, Julian; Mahon, Merle; Griffin, Susanna; Vickers, Deborah A

    2015-09-01

    This article reports a pilot study of the potential benefits of a sustained programme of singing activities on the musical behaviours and hearing acuity of young children with hearing impairment (HI). Twenty-nine children (n=12 HI and n=17 NH) aged between 5 and 7 years from an inner-city primary school in London participated, following appropriate ethical approval. The predominantly classroom-based programme was designed by colleagues from the UCL Institute of Education and UCL Ear Institute in collaboration with a multi-arts charity Creative Futures and delivered by an experienced early years music specialist weekly across two school terms. There was a particular emphasis on building a repertoire of simple songs with actions and allied vocal exploration. Musical learning was also supported by activities that drew on visual imagery for sound and that included simple notation and physical gesture. An overall impact assessment of the pilot programme embraced pre- and post-intervention measures of pitch discrimination, speech perception in noise and singing competency. Subsequent statistical data analyses suggest that the programme had a positive impact on participant children's singing range, particularly (but not only) for HI children with hearing aids, and also in their singing skills. HI children's pitch perception also improved measurably over time. Findings imply that all children, including those with HI, can benefit from regular and sustained access to age-appropriate musical activities. PMID:26561889

  16. A Comparative Study of Leptospirosis and Dengue in Thai Children

    PubMed Central

    Libraty, Daniel H.; Myint, Khin S. A.; Murray, Clinton K.; Gibbons, Robert V.; Mammen, Mammen P.; Endy, Timothy P.; Li, Wenjun; Vaughn, David W.; Nisalak, Ananda; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Hospenthal, Duane R.; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L.; Ennis, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis that is often under-recognized in children and commonly confused with dengue in tropical settings. An enhanced ability to distinguish leptospirosis from dengue in children would guide clinicians and public health personnel in the appropriate use of limited healthcare resources. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a prospective, hospital-based, study of children with acute febrile illnesses and dengue in Thailand. Among the children without dengue, we identified those with leptospirosis using anti-leptospira IgM and microscopic agglutination titers in paired acute and convalescent blood samples. We then performed a case-control comparison of symptoms, signs, and clinical laboratory values between children with leptospirosis and dengue. In a semi-rural region of Thailand, leptospirosis accounted for 19% of the non-dengue acute febrile illnesses among children presenting during the rainy season. None of the children with leptospirosis were correctly diagnosed at the time of hospital discharge, and one third (33%) were erroneously diagnosed as dengue or scrub typhus. A predictive model to distinguish pediatric leptospirosis from dengue was generated using three variables: the absolute neutrophil count, plasma albumin, and aspartate aminotransferase levels in the first 72 hours of illness. Conclusions/Significance Unrecognized leptospirosis can be a significant cause of “dengue-like” febrile illness in children. Increased awareness of pediatric leptospirosis, and an enhanced ability to discriminate between leptospirosis and dengue early in illness, will help guide the appropriate use of healthcare resources in often resource-limited settings. PMID:18160980

  17. Recent Advances in Computational Studies of Charge Exchange X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, Renata

    2016-06-01

    Interest in astrophysical sources of charge exchange (CX) has grown since X-ray emission from comet Hyakutake was first observed, the origin of which is primarily due to CX processes between neutral species in the comet’s atmosphere and highly charged ions from the solar wind. More recent observations have shown that CX may have a significant contribution to the X-ray emission spectra of a wide variety of environments within our solar system including solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with neutral gases in the heliosphere and in planetary atmospheres, as well as beyond the solar system in galaxy clusters, supernova remnants, and star forming galaxies.While the basic process of CX has been studied for many decades, the reliability of the existing data is not uniform, and the coverage of the astrophysically important projectile and target combinations and collisional velocities is insufficient. The need for reliable and robust CX X-ray emission models will only be amplified with the with the high resolution X-ray spectra expected from the soft X-ray imaging calorimeter spectrometer (SXS) onboard the Hitomi X-ray observatory. In this talk, I will discuss recent advances in theoretical CX cross sections and X-ray modeling with a focus on CX diagnostics. The need for experimental X-ray spectra and cross sections for benchmarking current theory will also be highlighted. This work was performed in collaboration with David Lyons, Patrick Mullen, David Schultz, Phillip Stancil, and Robin Shelton. Work at UGA was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  18. The Charged Aerosol Release Experiment (Care II) to Study Artificial Dusty Plasmas in the Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Gatling, G.; Briczinski, S. J., Jr.; Vierinen, J.; Bhatt, A.; Holzworth, R. H., II; McCarthy, M.; Gustavsson, B.; La Hoz, C.; Latteck, R.

    2015-12-01

    A sounding rocket launched from Andoya, Norway in September 2015 carried 37 rocket motors and a multi-instrument daughter payload into the ionosphere to study the generation of plasma wave electric fields and ionospheric density disturbances by the high-speed injection of dust particles. The primary purpose of the CARE II mission is to validate the dress-particle theory of enhanced incoherent scatter from a dusty plasma and to validate models of plasma instabilities driven by high-speed charged particles. The CARE II chemical payload produces 66 kg of micron-sized dust particles composed of aluminium oxide. In addition to the dust, simple molecular combustion products such as N2, H2, CO2, CO, H20 and NO will be injected into the bottomside of the F-layer. Charging of the dust and ion charge exchange with the molecules yields plasma particles moving at hypersonic velocities. Streaming instabilities and shear electric fields causes plasma turbulence that can be detected using ground radars and in situ plasma instruments. The instrument payload was separated from the chemical release payload soon after launch to measure electric field vectors, electron and ion densities, and integrated electron densities from the rocket to the ground. The chemical release of high speed dust was directed upward on the downleg of the rocket trajectory to intersect the F-Layer. The instrument section was about 600 meters from the dust injection module at the release time. Ground HF and UHF radars were operated to detected scatter and refraction by the modified ionosphere. Optical instruments from airborne and ground observatories were used to map the dispersal of the dust using scattered sunlight. The plasma interactions are being simulated with both fluid and particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. CARE II is a follow-on to the CARE I rocket experiment conducted from Wallops Island Virginia in September 2009.

  19. Further studies of single-sided charge-sharing CZT strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Burcin; Macri, John R.; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.; Widholm, Mark; Narita, Tomohiko; Hamel, Louis-Andre

    2005-08-01

    We report progress in the study of a thick CZT strip detector module designed to perform gamma-ray spectroscopy and 3-D imaging. We report preliminary performance measurements of 7.5 mm thick single-sided charge-sharing strip detector prototype devices. This design features both row and column contacts on the anode surface. This electron-only approach addresses problems associated with poor hole transport in CZT that limit the thickness and energy range of double-sided strip detectors. This work includes laboratory and simulation studies aimed at developing compact, efficient, detector modules for 0.05 to 1 MeV gamma measurements while minimizing the number and complexity of the electronic readout channels. This is particularly important in space-based coded aperture and Compton telescope instruments that require large area, large volume detector arrays. Such arrays will be required for the NASA Black Hole Finder Probe (BHFP)and Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT). This new design requires an anode pattern with contacts whose dimensions and spacing are roughly the size of the ionization charge cloud. The first prototype devices have 125 μm anode contacts on 225 μm pitch. Our results demonstrate the principle of operation but suggest that even finer anode contact feature sizes will be necessary to achieve the desired performance.

  20. THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY: PROGRESS DEVELOPING METHODS APPROPRIATE FOR ASSESSING CHILDREN'S EXPOSURE, BIOMARKERS AND GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Invited presentation: no abstract submission fee required
    Introduction abstract for Workshop.

    CONTROL ID: 56947
    CONTACT (NAME ONLY): Barbara Abbott
    Abstract Details
    PRESENTATION TYPE: Invited Presentation : Workshop
    KEYWORDS: National Childrens Study, Ri...

  1. Winter Nature Study for Middle School Children and Their Parents. A Course for Parents and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigford, Ann

    Designed to be a supplement to a short course for middle school children and their parents, this document provides learning experiences for studying ecology during the winter. The purposes of the course are to introduce families to the pleasures of outdoor field exploration and to give them a basic ecological framework as well as specific skills…

  2. Saccades Improve Postural Control: A Developmental Study in Normal Children

    PubMed Central

    Ajrezo, Layla; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Bucci, Maria Pia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dual-task performance is known to affect postural stability in children. This study focused on the effect of oculomotor tasks like saccadic eye movements on postural stability, studied in a large population of children by recording simultaneously their eye movements and posture. Materials and Methods Ninety-five healthy children from 5.8 to 17.6 years old were examined. All children were free of any vestibular, neurological, ophtalmologic and orthoptic abnormalities. Postural control was measured with a force platform TechnoConcept®, and eye movements with video oculography (MobilEBT®). Children performed two oculomotor tasks: fixation of a stable central target and horizontal saccades. We measured the saccade latency and the number of saccades during fixation as well as the surface, length and mean velocity of the center of pressure. Results During postural measurement, we observed a correlation between the age on the one hand and a decrease in saccade latency as well as an improvement in the quality of fixation on the other. Postural sway decreases with age and is reduced in the dual task (saccades) in comparison with a simple task of fixation. Discussion - Conclusion These results suggest a maturation of neural circuits controlling posture and eye movements during childhood. This study also shows the presence of an interaction between the oculomotor system and the postural system. Engaging in oculomotor tasks results in a reduction of postural sway. PMID:24278379

  3. Reading and Visual Search: A Developmental Study in Normal Children

    PubMed Central

    Seassau, Magali; Bucci, Maria-Pia

    2013-01-01

    Studies dealing with developmental aspects of binocular eye movement behaviour during reading are scarce. In this study we have explored binocular strategies during reading and during visual search tasks in a large population of normal young readers. Binocular eye movements were recorded using an infrared video-oculography system in sixty-nine children (aged 6 to 15) and in a group of 10 adults (aged 24 to 39). The main findings are (i) in both tasks the number of progressive saccades (to the right) and regressive saccades (to the left) decreases with age; (ii) the amplitude of progressive saccades increases with age in the reading task only; (iii) in both tasks, the duration of fixations as well as the total duration of the task decreases with age; (iv) in both tasks, the amplitude of disconjugacy recorded during and after the saccades decreases with age; (v) children are significantly more accurate in reading than in visual search after 10 years of age. Data reported here confirms and expands previous studies on children's reading. The new finding is that younger children show poorer coordination than adults, both while reading and while performing a visual search task. Both reading skills and binocular saccades coordination improve with age and children reach a similar level to adults after the age of 10. This finding is most likely related to the fact that learning mechanisms responsible for saccade yoking develop during childhood until adolescence. PMID:23894627

  4. Reading and visual search: a developmental study in normal children.

    PubMed

    Seassau, Magali; Bucci, Maria-Pia

    2013-01-01

    Studies dealing with developmental aspects of binocular eye movement behaviour during reading are scarce. In this study we have explored binocular strategies during reading and during visual search tasks in a large population of normal young readers. Binocular eye movements were recorded using an infrared video-oculography system in sixty-nine children (aged 6 to 15) and in a group of 10 adults (aged 24 to 39). The main findings are (i) in both tasks the number of progressive saccades (to the right) and regressive saccades (to the left) decreases with age; (ii) the amplitude of progressive saccades increases with age in the reading task only; (iii) in both tasks, the duration of fixations as well as the total duration of the task decreases with age; (iv) in both tasks, the amplitude of disconjugacy recorded during and after the saccades decreases with age; (v) children are significantly more accurate in reading than in visual search after 10 years of age. Data reported here confirms and expands previous studies on children's reading. The new finding is that younger children show poorer coordination than adults, both while reading and while performing a visual search task. Both reading skills and binocular saccades coordination improve with age and children reach a similar level to adults after the age of 10. This finding is most likely related to the fact that learning mechanisms responsible for saccade yoking develop during childhood until adolescence.

  5. A Major Children's Educational Art Exhibit: An Evaluative Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenk, George W.; Shrock, Sharon A.

    Results of a case study of an exhibit of art and artifacts designed for children are presented. The focus of the study was to apply the principles of instructional-message design to the evaluation of the exhibit. The exhibit, "Art Inside Out: Exploring Art and Culture through Time," was displayed at the Art Institute of Chicago. Textual elements,…

  6. Children as Educational Computer Game Designers: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baytak, Ahmet; Land, Susan M.; Smith, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how children designed computer games as artifacts that reflected their understanding of nutrition. Ten 5th grade students were asked to design computer games with the software "Game Maker" for the purpose of teaching 1st graders about nutrition. The results from the case study show that students were able to express their…

  7. Rorschach Responses of Sexually Abused Children: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Gregory T.; Jenkins-Monroe, Valata

    1994-01-01

    Using archival data, this study compared Rorschach protocols of 94 sexually abused children to the Exner norms in order to determine the potential usefulness of the Rorschach test in the area of child abuse assessment and treatment. Of the 18 Rorschach variables studied, 17 significantly distinguished at least one subject group from the norms.…

  8. New Missions and the Future of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, K. D.

    2016-04-01

    Several newly approved missions in astrophysics and heliophysics will study solar wind charge-exchange (SWCX) directly as either primary or secondary science goals. Of these, SMILE and CuPID will study the magnetosheath by means of the SWCX emission and will provide a direct measure of the magnetospheric emission from in both the 1/4 keV and 3/4 keV bands. HaloSAT observations will be designed to minimize the magnetospheric component for its observations of the Galactic Halo, but will make at least some dedicated observations of heliospheric SWCX. I will outline the simulation needs and observational strategies required to study SWCX for astrophysical purposes.

  9. Telemetric motor activity in children. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Foster, F G; McPartland, R J; Kupfer, D J

    1977-01-01

    A lightweight telemetric mobility sensing system was used to study the relationship between high levels of motor activity during free-play and school performance. Among the 21 normal children, there was a significant correlation between high ankle motor activity during free-play, poor school achievement, the presence of neurological soft signs, and a poor self-image. Those normals whose free-play ankle activity was above the mean, also had significantly more errors and performed at a significantly lower level on the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test than children whose activity was below the mean. This preliminary study suggests that the telemetric mobility sensing system can be easily applied to children to assess clinically relevant components of psychomotor activity.

  10. Thermal charging study of compressed expanded natural graphite/phase change material composites

    DOE PAGES

    Mallow, Anne; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Jr., Samuel

    2016-08-12

    The thermal charging performance of paraffin wax combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam was studied for different graphite bulk densities. Constant heat fluxes between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 were applied, as well as a constant boundary temperature of 60 °C. Thermal charging experiments indicate that, in the design of thermal batteries, thermal conductivity of the composite alone is an insufficient metric to determine the influence of the graphite foam on the thermal energy storage. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to end of melt for each applied boundary condition, the energy storage performancemore » was calculated to show the effects of composite thermal conductivity, graphite bulk density, and latent heat capacity. For the experimental volume, the addition of graphite beyond a graphite bulk density of 100 kg/m3 showed limited benefit on the energy storage performance due to the decrease in latent heat storage capacity. These experimental results are used to validate a numerical model to predict the time to melt and for future use in the design of heat exchangers with graphite-foam based phase change material composites. As a result, size scale effects are explored parametrically with the validated model.« less

  11. Three-dimensional numerical studies of the temperature anisotropy instability in intense charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2005-05-01

    In neutral plasmas with a uniform magnetic field and strongly anisotropic distribution function (T∥/T⊥≪1) an electrostatic Harris-type collective instability may develop if the plasma is sufficiently dense. Such anisotropies develop naturally in accelerators, and a similar instability may lead to a deterioration of the beam quality in a one-component nonneutral charged particle beam. The instability may also lead to an increase in the longitudinal velocity spread, which would make the focusing of the beam difficult and impose a limit on the minimum spot size achievable in heavy ion fusion experiments. This paper reports the results of recent numerical studies of the temperature anisotropy instability using the newly developed Beam Eigenmodes And Spectra (bEASt) code for space-charge-dominated, low-emittance beams with large tune depression (ν/ν0≪1). Such high-intensity beams are relevant to next-step experiments such as the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), which would serve as proof-of-principal experiment for heavy-ion fusion.

  12. Experimental study of the stochastic heating of a single Brownian particle by charge fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christian; Piel, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The Brownian motion of a micro-particle, which is suspended in the sheath of a radio-frequency discharge, is studied by high-speed video microscopy. In this environment, stochastic heating by charge fluctuations is expected, which should lead to an anisotropic kinetic temperature of the particle with a preferential heating in the direction of the mean electric field in the sheath. The stochastic heating should become more effective at low gas pressures where cooling by the neutral gas becomes ineffective. Our refined experiments confirm the anisotropic heating and the temperature rise for diminishing pressure. Particle-in-cell simulations have guided us in modifying the gap width of the discharge and to specify the dependence of the plasma density on gas pressure as n i ∝ p 1 / 2 . Since the stochastic heating rate also depends on the life-time of charge fluctuations, a temperature scaling T kin ∝ p 3 / 2 results, which is in agreement with the experimental data. The experimental procedure to eliminate other spurious heating mechanisms is described in detail.

  13. A safety and tolerability study of differently-charged nanoparticles for local pulmonary drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Harush-Frenkel, Oshrat; Bivas-Benita, Maytal; Nassar, Taher; Springer, Chaim; Sherman, Yoav; Avital, Avraham; Altschuler, Yoram; Borlak, Jurgen; Benita, Simon

    2010-07-15

    Nanoparticle (NP) based drug delivery systems provide promising opportunities in the treatment of lung diseases. Here we examined the safety and tolerability of pulmonary delivered NPs consisting of PEG-PLA as a function of particle surface charge. The rationale for such a comparison should be attributed to the differential pulmonary toxicity of positively and negatively charged PEG-PLA NP. Thus, the local and systemic effects of pulmonary administered NPs were investigated following 5 days of daily endotracheal instillation to BALB/c mice that were euthanized on the eighth or nineteenth day of the experiment. We collected bronchoalveolar lavages and studied hematological as well as histochemistry parameters. Notably, the cationic stearylamine based PEG-PLA NPs elicited increased local and systemic toxic effects both on the eighth and nineteenth day. In contrast, anionic NPs of similar size were much better tolerated with local inflammatory effects observed only on the eighth experimental day after pulmonary instillation. No systemic toxicity effect was observed although a moderate change was noted in the platelet count that was not considered to be of clinical significance. No pathological observations were detected in the internal organs following instillation of anionic NPs. Overall these observations suggest that anionic PEG-PLA NPs are useful pulmonary drug carriers that should be considered as a promising therapeutic drug delivery system.

  14. Negatively Charged Lipids as a Potential Target for New Amphiphilic Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: A BIOPHYSICAL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Sautrey, Guillaume; El Khoury, Micheline; Dos Santos, Andreia Giro; Zimmermann, Louis; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Décout, Jean-Luc; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2016-06-24

    Bacterial membranes are highly organized, containing specific microdomains that facilitate distinct protein and lipid assemblies. Evidence suggests that cardiolipin molecules segregate into such microdomains, probably conferring a negative curvature to the inner plasma membrane during membrane fission upon cell division. 3',6-Dinonyl neamine is an amphiphilic aminoglycoside derivative active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including strains resistant to colistin. The mechanisms involved at the molecular level were identified using lipid models (large unilamellar vesicles, giant unilamelllar vesicles, and lipid monolayers) that mimic the inner membrane of P. aeruginosa The study demonstrated the interaction of 3',6-dinonyl neamine with cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, two negatively charged lipids from inner bacterial membranes. This interaction induced membrane permeabilization and depolarization. Lateral segregation of cardiolipin and membrane hemifusion would be critical for explaining the effects induced on lipid membranes by amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics. The findings contribute to an improved understanding of how amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics that bind to negatively charged lipids like cardiolipin could be promising antibacterial compounds.

  15. Experimental and modeling study on charge storage/transfer mechanism of graphene-based supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Shuai; Jing, Xie; Zhou, Hongjun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jiujun

    2014-12-01

    A symmetrical graphene-based supercapacitor is constructed for studying the charge-transfer mechanism within the graphene-based electrodes using both experiment measurements and molecular simulation. The in-house synthesized graphene is characterized by XRD, SEM and BET measurements for morphology and surface area. It is observed that the electric capacity of graphene electrode can be reduced by both high internal resistance and limited mass transfer. Computer modeling is conducted at the molecular level to characterize the diffusion behavior of electrolyte ions to the interior of electrode with emphasis on the unique 2D confinement imposed by graphene layers. Although graphene powder poses a moderate internal surface of 400 m2 g-1, the capacitance performance of graphene electrode can be as good as that of commercial activated carbon which has an overwhelming surface area of 1700 m2 g-1. An explanation to this abnormal correlation is that graphene material has an intrinsic capability of adaptively reorganizing its microporous structure in response to intercalation of ions and immergence of electrolyte solvent. The accessible surface of graphene is believed to be dramatically enlarged for ion adsorption during the charging process of capacitor.

  16. Cohort Profile: Andhra Pradesh Children and Parents Study (APCAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Kinra, Sanjay; Radha Krishna, KV; Kuper, Hannah; Rameshwar Sarma, KV; Prabhakaran, Poornima; Gupta, Vipin; Walia, Gagandeep Kaur; Bhogadi, Santhi; Kulkarni, Bharati; Kumar, Aniket; Aggarwal, Aastha; Gupta, Ruby; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Reddy, K Srinath; Davey Smith, George; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Ebrahim, Shah

    2014-01-01

    The Andhra Pradesh Children and Parents Study (APCAPS) was originally established to study the long-term effects of early-life undernutrition on risk of cardiovascular disease. Its aims were subsequently expanded to include trans-generational influences of other environmental and genetic factors on chronic diseases in rural India. It builds on the Hyderabad Nutrition Trial (HNT) conducted in 1987–90 to compare the effects on birthweight of a protein-calorie supplement for pregnant women and children. The index children of HNT and their mothers were retraced and examined in 2003–05, and the children re-examined as young adults aged 18–21 years in 2009–10. The cohort was expanded to include both parents and siblings of the index children in a recently completed follow-up conducted in 2010–12 (N = ∼6225 out of 10 213 participants). Recruitment of the remaining residents of these 29 villages (N = ∼55 000) in Ranga Reddy district of Andhra Pradesh is now under way. Extensive data on socio-demographic, lifestyle, medical, anthropometric, physiological, vascular and body composition measures, DNA, stored plasma, and assays of lipids and inflammatory markers on APCAPS participants are available. Details of how to access these data are available from the corresponding author. PMID:24019421

  17. Molecular structure and charge transfer contributions to nonlinear optical property of 2-Methyl-4-nitroaniline: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmine, G. Femina; Amalanathan, M.; Roy, S. Dawn Dharma

    2016-05-01

    The Charge transfer contributions to the second-order nonlinear optical properties of 2-Methyl-4-nitroaniline have been performed by means of DFT computation. The vibrational contribution studies of 2-Methyl-4-nitroaniline have also been performed using FTIR, FT-Raman analysis. More support on the experimental findings were added from the quantum chemical studies performed with DFT (B3LYP) method using 6-311++G(d,p)basis sets. Natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction. The HOMO and LUMO analysis reveals the possibility of charge transfer within the molecule. The first order hyperpolarizability (α0) and related properties (β,α0 and Δα) of 2-Methyl-4-nitroaniline were calculated. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), charge analysis also were investigated using theoretical calculations.

  18. Magnetoencephalography in the study of children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Yoshimura, Yuko; Mutou, Kouhei; Minabe, Yoshio

    2016-02-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive neuroimaging technique that provides a measure of cortical neural activity on a millisecond timescale with high spatial resolution. MEG has been clinically applied to various neurological diseases, including epilepsy and cognitive dysfunction. In the past decade, MEG has also emerged as an important investigatory tool in neurodevelopmental studies. It is therefore an opportune time to review how MEG is able to contribute to the study of atypical brain development. We limit this review to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The relevant published work for children was accessed using PubMed on 5 January 2015. Case reports, case series, and papers on epilepsy were excluded. Owing to their accurate separation of brain activity in the right and left hemispheres and the higher accuracy of source localization, MEG studies have added new information related to auditory-evoked brain responses to findings from previous electroencephalography studies of children with ASD. In addition, evidence of atypical brain connectivity in children with ASD has accumulated over the past decade. MEG is well suited for the study of neural activity with high time resolution even in young children. Although further studies are still necessary, the detailed findings provided by neuroimaging methods may aid clinical diagnosis and even contribute to the refinement of diagnostic categories for neurodevelopmental disorders in the future. PMID:26256564

  19. Spectroscopic studies of charge transfer complexes between colchicine and some π acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Mustafa; Duymus, Hulya

    2007-07-01

    Charge transfer complexes between colchicine as donor and π acceptors such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano- p-benzoquinone (DDQ), p-chloranil ( p-CHL) have been studied spectrophotometrically in dichloromethane at 21 °C. The stoichiometry of the complexes was found to be 1:1 ratio by the Job method between donor and acceptors with the maximum absorption band at a wavelength of 535, 585 and 515 nm. The equilibrium constant and thermodynamic parameters of the complexes were determined by Benesi-Hildebrand and van't Hoff equations. Colchicine in pure form and in dosage form was applied in this study. The formation constants for the complexes were shown to be dependent on the structure of the electron acceptors used.

  20. Studies of Photosynthetic Energy and Charge Transfer by Two-dimensional Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer

    2010-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy has recently emerged as a powerful tool for the study of energy transfer in complex condensed-phase systems. Its experimental implementation is challenging but can be greatly simplified by implementing a pump-probe geometry, where the two phase-stable collinear pump pulses are created with an acousto-optic pulse-shaper. This approach also allows the use of a continuum probe pulse, expanding the available frequency range of the detection axis and allowing studies of energy transfer and electronic coupling over a broad range of frequencies. We discuss several benefits of 2D electronic spectroscopy and present 2D data on the D1-D2 reaction center complex of Photosystem II from spinach. We discuss the ability of 2D spectroscopy to distinguish between current models of energy and charge transfer in this system.

  1. Studies of Charged Particle Emission in the Decay of 45Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Pfutzner, M.; Grigorenko, L.; Bingham, C. R.; Czyrkowski, H.; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Darby, Iain; Dabrowski, Ryszard; Ginter, T. N.; Grzywacz, Robert; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kusmierz, W.; Liddick, Sean; Rajabali, Mustafa; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Stolz, A.

    2008-01-01

    The decay of extremely neutron-deficient isotope 45Fe has been studied by using a new type of gaseous detector in which a technique of optical imaging is used to record tracks of charged particles. The two-proton radioactivity and the beta-decay channels accompanied by proton(s) emission were clearly identified. For the first time, the angular and energy correlations between two protons emitted from the 45Fe ground-state were measured. The obtained distributions were confronted with predictions of a three-body model. Studies of beta-decay channels of 45Fe provided first unambiguous evidence for the beta-delayed three proton emission.

  2. Study on temperature distribution effect on internal charging by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Internal charging (or deep dielectric charging) is a great threaten to spacecraft. Dielectric conductivity is an important parameter for internal charging and it is sensitive to temperature. Considering the exposed dielectric outside a spacecraft may experience a relatively large temperature range, temperature effect can't be ignored in internal charging assessment. We can see some reporters on techniques of computer simulation of internal charging, but the temperature effect has not been taken into accounts. In this paper, we realize the internal charging simulation with consideration of temperature distribution inside the dielectric. Geant4 is used for charge transportation, and a numerical method is proposed for solving the current reservation equation. The conductivity dependences on temperature, radiation dose rate and intense electric field are considered. Compared to the case of uniform temperature, the internal charging with temperature distribution is more complicated. Results show that temperature distribution can cause electric field distortion within the dielectric. This distortion refers to locally considerable enlargement of electric field. It usually corresponds to the peak electric field which is critical for dielectric breakdown judgment. The peak electric field can emerge inside the dielectric, or appear on the boundary. This improvement of internal charging simulation is beneficial for the assessment of internal charging under multiple factors.

  3. 78 FR 11661 - Request for Information: Main Study Design for the National Children's Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Children's Study AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), is issuing a Request for Information (RFI) as part of the National Children's Study's...

  4. Age Effects in a Study Abroad Context: Children and Adults Studying Abroad and at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llanes, Angels; Munoz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effects of learning context and age on second language development by comparing the language gains, measured in terms of oral and written fluency, lexical and syntactic complexity, and accuracy, experienced by four groups of learners of English: children in a study abroad setting, children in their at-home school, adults in…

  5. Congenital abnormalities and acute leukemia among children with Down syndrome: a Children's Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Linabery, Amy M; Blair, Cindy K; Gamis, Alan S; Olshan, Andrew F; Heerema, Nyla A; Ross, Julie A

    2008-10-01

    Children with Down syndrome, due to their heightened risk of leukemia and increased prevalence of congenital abnormalities, comprise a valuable population in which to study etiology. A Children's Oncology Group study investigated the causes of childhood leukemia in children with Down syndrome diagnosed at ages 0 to 19 years during the period 1997-2002. Telephone interviews were completed with mothers of 158 cases [n=97 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and n=61 acute myeloid leukemia (AML)] and 173 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were computed via unconditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between congenital abnormalities and acute leukemia overall, and ALL and AML analyzed separately. The results do not provide evidence for an association among the index children (OR(Combined), 0.74; 95% CI, 0.45-1.23; OR(ALL), 0.67; 95% CI, 0.38-1.20; OR(AML),1.03; 95% CI, 0.49-2.16) or their siblings (OR(Combined), 1.23; 95% CI, 0.71-2.13; OR(ALL), 1.12; 95% CI, 0.60-2.09; OR(AML), 1.60; 95% CI, 0.66-3.86), suggesting congenital malformations do not confer additional risk of leukemia beyond the risk attributable to trisomy 21 in this population.

  6. Children's Experiences and Meaning Construction on Parental Divorce: A Focus Group Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maes, Sofie D. J.; De Mol, Jan; Buysse, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The global aim of this study was to explore children's narratives of parental divorce. A convenience sample, composed of 11- and 14-year-old children, was recruited. A total of 22 children (12 male, 10 female) participated in this focus group study. The findings show that two components seem to be really important for children during the divorce…

  7. A Population-Based Longitudinal Study of Depression in Children with Developmental Disabilities in Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shooshtari, Shahin; Brownell, Marni; Dik, Natalia; Chateau, Dan; Yu, C. T.; Mills, Rosemary S. L.; Burchill, Charles A.; Wetzel, Monika

    2014-01-01

    In this population-based study, prevalence of depression was estimated and compared between children with and without developmental disability (DD). Twelve years of administrative data were linked to identify a cohort of children with DD living in the Canadian province of Manitoba. Children in the study cohort were matched with children without DD…

  8. Medicaid program; payments for services furnished by certain primary care physicians and charges for vaccine administration under the Vaccines for Children program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    This final rule implements Medicaid payment for primary care services furnished by certain physicians in calendar years (CYs) 2013 and 2014 at rates not less than the Medicare rates in effect in those CYs or, if greater, the payment rates that would be applicable in those CYs using the CY 2009 Medicare physician fee schedule conversion factor. This minimum payment level applies to specified primary care services furnished by a physician with a specialty designation of family medicine, general internal medicine, or pediatric medicine, and also applies to services rendered by these provider types paid by Medicaid managed care plans contracted by states to provide the primary care services. It also provides for 100 percent federal financial participation (FFP) for any increase in payment above the amounts that would be due for these services under the provisions of the approved Medicaid state plan, as of July 1, 2009. In other words, there will not be any additional cost to states for payments above the amount required by the 2009 rate methodology. In this final rule, we specify which services and types of physicians qualify for the minimum payment level in CYs 2013 and 2014, and the method for calculating the payment amount and any increase for which increased federal funding is due. In addition, this final rule will update the interim regional maximum fees that providers may charge for the administration of pediatric vaccines to federally vaccine-eligible children under the Pediatric Immunization Distribution Program, more commonly known as the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of charged dendrimers in salt-free solution: Effect of counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A.; Lyulin, Sergey V.; Karttunen, Mikko; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2006-03-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, being protonated under physiological conditions, represent a promising class of nonviral, nanosized vectors for drug and gene delivery. We performed extensive molecular dynamics simulations of a generic model dendrimer in a salt-free solution with dendrimer's terminal beads positively charged. Solvent molecules as well as counterions were explicitly included as interacting beads. We find that the size of the charged dendrimer depends nonmonotonically on the strength of electrostatic interactions demonstrating a maximum when the Bjerrum length equals the diameter of a bead. Many other structural and dynamic characteristics of charged dendrimers are also found to follow this pattern. We address such a behavior to the interplay between repulsive interactions of the charged terminal beads and their attractive interactions with oppositely charged counterions. The former favors swelling at small Bjerrum lengths and the latter promotes counterion condensation. Thus, counterions can have a dramatic effect on the structure and dynamics of charged dendrimers and, under certain conditions, cannot be treated implicitly.

  10. A microcalorimetric study of molecular interactions between immunoglobulin G and hydrophobic charge-induction ligand.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Ming; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Gao, Dong; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2016-04-22

    Hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography (HCIC) with 4-mercaptoethyl-pyridine (MEP) as the ligand is a novel technology for antibody purification. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to evaluate the molecular interactions between MEP ligand and immunoglobulin G (IgG). Three types of IgG molecules including human IgG (hIgG), bovine IgG (bIgG) and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) were investigated with human serum albumins (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the comparison. The thermodynamic parameters obtained from ITC were compared with the adsorption data. The results indicated that MEP binding to protein at neutral pH was entropy driven and induced by multimodal molecular interactions that was dominated by hydrophobic forces. The interactions between MEP and IgGs were stronger than that of albumins, which resulted in high binding affinity of IgGs. Moreover, the effects of pH and salt addition on MEP-hIgG binding were studied. The change of enthalpy increased obviously with the decrease of pH, which revealed that the electrostatic forces dominated the MEP-hIgG interactions at acidic condition and caused typical charge-induced elution of HCIC. Salt addition influenced both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. With the increase of salt concentration, the hydrophobic interactions decreased first and then increased, while the electrostatic interactions showed the opposite trend. This resulted in trade-off between the multimodal interactions, which caused the salt-tolerant property of MEP resin. In general, ITC studies revealed the molecular mechanism of three critical characteristics of HCIC, multimodal interactions, pH-dependent and salt-tolerant properties.

  11. A microcalorimetric study of molecular interactions between immunoglobulin G and hydrophobic charge-induction ligand.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Ming; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Gao, Dong; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2016-04-22

    Hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography (HCIC) with 4-mercaptoethyl-pyridine (MEP) as the ligand is a novel technology for antibody purification. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to evaluate the molecular interactions between MEP ligand and immunoglobulin G (IgG). Three types of IgG molecules including human IgG (hIgG), bovine IgG (bIgG) and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) were investigated with human serum albumins (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the comparison. The thermodynamic parameters obtained from ITC were compared with the adsorption data. The results indicated that MEP binding to protein at neutral pH was entropy driven and induced by multimodal molecular interactions that was dominated by hydrophobic forces. The interactions between MEP and IgGs were stronger than that of albumins, which resulted in high binding affinity of IgGs. Moreover, the effects of pH and salt addition on MEP-hIgG binding were studied. The change of enthalpy increased obviously with the decrease of pH, which revealed that the electrostatic forces dominated the MEP-hIgG interactions at acidic condition and caused typical charge-induced elution of HCIC. Salt addition influenced both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. With the increase of salt concentration, the hydrophobic interactions decreased first and then increased, while the electrostatic interactions showed the opposite trend. This resulted in trade-off between the multimodal interactions, which caused the salt-tolerant property of MEP resin. In general, ITC studies revealed the molecular mechanism of three critical characteristics of HCIC, multimodal interactions, pH-dependent and salt-tolerant properties. PMID:27017449

  12. Polarization and charge limit studies of strained GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    This thesis presents studies on the polarization and charge limit behavior of electron beams produced by strained GaAs photocathodes. These photocathodes are the source of high-intensity, high-polarization electron beams used for a variety of high-energy physics experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Recent developments on P-type, biaxially-strained GaAs photocathodes have produced longitudinal polarization in excess of 80% while yielding beam intensities of {approximately} 2.5 A/cm{sup 2} at an operating voltage of 120 kV. The SLAC Gun Test Laboratory, which has a replica of the SLAC injector, was upgraded with a Mott polarimeter to study the polarization properties of photocathodes operating in a high-voltage DC gun. Both the maximum beam polarization and the maximum charge obtainable from these photocathodes have shown a strong dependence on the wavelength of illumination, on the doping concentration, and on the negative electron affinity levels. The experiments performed for this thesis included studying the effects of temperature, cesiation, quantum efficiency, and laser intensity on the polarization of high-intensity beams. It was found that, although low temperatures have been shown to reduce the spin relaxation rate in bulk semiconductors, they don`t have a large impact on the polarization of thin photocathodes. It seems that the short active region in thin photocathodes does not allow spin relaxation mechanisms enough time to cause depolarization. Previous observations that lower QE areas on the photocathode yield higher polarization beams were confirmed. In addition, high-intensity, small-area laser pulses were shown to produce lower polarization beams. Based on these results, together with some findings in the existing literature, a new proposal for a high-intensity, high-polarization photocathode is given. It is hoped that the results of this thesis will promote further investigation on the properties of GaAs photocathodes.

  13. A theoretical model for smoking prevention studies in preteen children.

    PubMed

    McGahee, T W; Kemp, V; Tingen, M

    2000-01-01

    The age of the onset of smoking is on a continual decline, with the prime age of tobacco use initiation being 12-14 years. A weakness of the limited research conducted on smoking prevention programs designed for preteen children (ages 10-12) is a well-defined theoretical basis. A theoretical perspective is needed in order to make a meaningful transition from empirical analysis to application of knowledge. Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory (1977, 1986), the Theory of Reasoned Action (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980), and other literature linking various concepts to smoking behaviors in preteens were used to develop a model that may be useful for smoking prevention studies in preteen children.

  14. A study on refractive errors among school children in Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Das, Angshuman; Dutta, Himadri; Bhaduri, Gautam; De Sarkar, Ajay; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Bannerjee, Manas

    2007-04-01

    Childhood visual impairment due to refractive errors is a significant problem in school children and has a considerable impact on public health. To assess the magnitude of the problem the present study was undertaken among the school children aged 5 to 10 years in Kolkata. Detailed ophthalmological examination was carried out in the schools as well as in the Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Kolkata. Among 2317 students examined, 582 (25.11%) were suffering from refractive errors, myopia being the commonest (n = 325; 14.02%). Astigmatism affected 91 children (3.93%). There is an increase of prevalence of refractive errors with increase of age, but it is not statistically significant (p > 0.05). There is also no significant difference of refractive errors between boys and girls. PMID:17822183

  15. Balancing Voice and Protection in Literacy Studies with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Rebecca; Labadie, Meredith; Pole, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    One of the tensions in conducting participatory literacy research with young children is finding the balance between protection and voice. In this paper, we describe how we sought to create participant-centred research techniques within the evolving design of a yearlong action research study with kindergarten students. Through weekly classroom…

  16. Research Updates in Neuroimaging Studies of Children Who Stutter

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Soo-Eun

    2016-01-01

    In the past two decades, neuroimaging investigations of stuttering have led to important discoveries of structural and functional brain differences in people who stutter, providing significant clues to the neurological basis of stuttering. One major limitation, however, has been that most studies so far have only examined adults who stutter, whose brain and behavior likely would have adopted compensatory reactions to their stuttering; these confounding factors have made interpretations of the findings difficult. Developmental stuttering is a neurodevelopmental condition, and like many other neurodevelopmental disorders, stuttering is associated with an early childhood onset of symptoms and greater incidence in males relative to females. More recent studies have begun to examine children who stutter using various neuroimaging techniques that allow examination of functional neuroanatomy and interaction of major brain areas that differentiate children who stutter compared with age-matched controls. In this article, I review these more recent neuroimaging investigations of children who stutter, in the context of what we know about typical brain development, neuroplasticity, and sex differences relevant to speech and language development. Although the picture is still far from complete, these studies have potential to provide information that can be used as early objective markers, or prognostic indicators, for persistent stuttering in the future. Furthermore, these studies are the first steps in finding potential neural targets for novel therapies that may involve modulating neuroplastic growth conducive to developing and maintaining fluent speech, which can be applied to treatment of young children who stutter. PMID:24875668

  17. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART II: FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to determine the adequacy of protocols for dietary exposure measurements. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of pesticides transferred from contaminated surfaces or hands to foods of young children and to validate a dietary mod...

  18. RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION ISSUES FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A better understanding of the most effective recruitment techniques and retention strategies for longitudinal, community-based, children's environmental health studies is needed. A series of 18 focus groups were conducted across the U.S. in February 2003. Pregnant women and exp...

  19. Prosodic Processing by Children: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plante, Elena; Holland, Scott K.; Schmithorst, Vince J.

    2006-01-01

    Prosodic information in the speech signal carries information about linguistic structure as well as emotional content. Although children are known to use prosodic information from infancy onward to assist linguistic decoding, the brain correlates of this skill in childhood have not yet been the subject of study. Brain activation associated with…

  20. A Study of Children's Acquisition of Piagetian Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parvand, Mohamad H.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of practice on relevant components of selected operations on a child's ability to conserve substance and weight. A group of 108 children between the ages of five and seven was selected from one school and pretested for conservation of weight and substance. The 48 non-conservers were then…

  1. Theory, Method, and Triangulation in the Study of Street Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucchini, Riccardo

    1996-01-01

    Describes how a comparative study of street children in Montevideo (Uruguay), Rio de Janeiro, and Mexico City contributes to a synergism between theory and method. Notes how theoretical approaches of symbolic interactionism, genetic structuralism, and habitus theory complement interview, participant observation, and content analysis methods;…

  2. Speech Sound Disorders in a Community Study of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Sharynne; Harrison, Linda J.; McAllister, Lindy; McCormack, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To undertake a community (nonclinical) study to describe the speech of preschool children who had been identified by parents/teachers as having difficulties "talking and making speech sounds" and compare the speech characteristics of those who had and had not accessed the services of a speech-language pathologist (SLP). Method:…

  3. FINAL REPORT: NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY FOCUS GROUPS - FOLLOW-UP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this work assignment was to add to our knowledge of the issues that will affect

    recruitment and retention of pregnant women into the National Children's Study by conducting 14 focus

    groups comprised of pregnant women, couples, and parents of young chi...

  4. A Study of Otoneurologic and Balance Tests with Deaf Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holderbaum, Flora M. Ingalls; And Others

    1979-01-01

    To determine whether or not the Floor Ataxia Test Battery (FATB) is associated with vestibular dysfunction, 31 deaf children (mean age 13 years) were studied. Performance on the FATB and the Heath Railwalking Test were compared to nystagmus reactions induced by the cold water caloric test. (Author/PHR)

  5. Metacognition and Control of Study Choice in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Janet; Finn, Bridgid

    2013-01-01

    Middle childhood may be crucial for the development of metacognitive monitoring and study control processes. The first three experiments, using different materials, showed that Grade 3 and Grade 5 children exhibited excellent metacognitive resolution when asked to make delayed judgments of learning (JOLs, using an analogue scale) or binary…

  6. Children's Content Interest--A Factor Analytic Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Joan T.

    Recognizing that interest is essential to motivation, this study was designed both to identify and describe the content interest patterns and media preferences (print and television) of middle-grade children and to determine any relationship between these interests and sex, race, or socioeconomic status (SES). An inventory was administered to 250…

  7. Understanding Insecure Attachment: A Study Using Children's Bird Nest Imagery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheller, Sandy

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a phenomenological study of the artistic creations of bird nests by four school-aged children to illuminate their internal experiences of attachment. The author analyzed qualitative data from in-depth interviews pertaining to two-dimensional and three-dimensional artistic representations of a bird's nest and a family of…

  8. Children's Linguistic Attitudes: A Study and Some Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Richard L.

    Linguists and psychologists have disagreed concerning the development and nature of children's social perceptions of others on the basis of speech differences. The present study sought to determine in what ways 8- and 9-year olds from different socioeconomic backgrounds might react to dialect differences. Ninety-two randomly selected 8- and…

  9. QUALITY MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has taken the lead, in consort with NIH, in developing the Quality Management Plan (QMP) for the National Children's Study (NCS); the QMP will delineate a systematic planning process for the implementation of the NCS. The QMP will state the goals and objectives of the NCS, th...

  10. IDENTIFYING RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION ISSUES FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recruitment and Retention Issues for the National Children's Study
    Danelle T Lobdell1, Suzanne Gilboa2, Pauline Mendola1 (1US EPA, NHEERL; 2UNC Chapel Hill)

    A better understanding of the most effective recruitment techniques and retention strategies for longitudinal, co...

  11. A comparative study of room temperature ionic liquids and their organic solvent mixtures near charged electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatamanu, Jenel; Vatamanu, Mihaela; Borodin, Oleg; Bedrov, Dmitry

    2016-11-01

    The structural properties of electrolytes consisting of solutions of ionic liquids in a polar solvent at charged electrode surfaces are investigated using classical atomistic simulations. The studied electrolytes consisted of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (NEt4-BF4), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (c2mim-BF4) and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (c8mim-BF4) salts dissolved in acetonitrile solvent. We discuss the influence of electrolyte concentration, chemical structure of the ionic salt, temperature, conducting versus semiconducting nature of the electrode, electrode geometry and surface roughness on the electric double layer structure and capacitance and compare these properties with those obtained for pure room temperature ionic liquids. We show that electrolytes consisting of solutions of ions can behave quite differently from pure ionic liquid electrolytes.

  12. Ab initio study of nitrogen-multisubstituted neutral and positively charged C{sub 20} fullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Anita; Kumar, Ranjan

    2014-04-24

    Ab initio investigation of structural and electronic properties of Nitrogen doped fullerenes, obtained from C{sub 20} by replacing up to 10 C atoms with N atoms, are studied by means of first principals density functional theory calculations using numerical orbitals as basis sets. We have obtained the ground state structures for C{sub 20−n}N{sub n} for n=1-10. While substituting nitrogen atoms, we cannot substitute more than 9 nitrogen atoms. Nitrogen doping in C20 shows a significant change in density of states. For a better comparison with experimental measurements, we have also considered some positively charged ions and report the differences between properties of these ions and the corresponding neutral molecules.

  13. Optical study of charge dynamics in CaCo2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhang; Bing, Xu; Run, Yang; Jin-Yun, Liu; Hao, Yang; Xiang-Gang, Qiu

    2016-05-01

    We present an infrared spectroscopy study of charge dynamics in CaCo2As2 single crystal. In this material, the optical conductivity can be described by two Drude components with different scattering rates (1/τ): a broad incoherent background and a narrow Drude component. By monitoring the temperature dependence, we find that only the narrow Drude component is temperature-dependent and determines the transport properties. Especially a Fermi liquid behavior of carriers is revealed by the T 2 behavior in the dc resistivity ρ n and scattering rate 1/τ n , indicating a coherent nature of quasiparticles in the narrow Drude subsystem. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB821400, 2012CB921302, and 2015CB921303) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11274237, 91121004, 51228201, and 11004238). Wei Zhang also thanks the support of the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD).

  14. Supramolecular fullerene/porphyrin charge transfer interaction studied by absorption spectrophotometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Partha; Bhattacharya (Banerjee), Shrabanti; Nayak, Sandip K.; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Bhattacharya, Sumanta

    2009-06-01

    A detailed UV-Vis spectrometric and thermodynamic studies were done to look insight into the nature of molecular interactions of the electron donor-acceptor complexes of C60 and C70 with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(octadecyloxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin (1) in chloroform and toluene. Charge transfer (CT) absorption bands were located in the visible region and vertical ionization potential of 1 was determined utilizing CT transition energy. Low values of oscillator and transition dipole strengths suggested that the complexes were almost of neutral character in ground states. The high binding constant value for the C70-1 complex indicated high selectivity of 1 molecule towards C70. Experimental as well as theoretically determined of enthalpies of formation value substantiated the trend in K values for fullerene-1 complexes.

  15. Picosecond charge transport in rutile at high carrier densities studied by transient terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajac, V.; Němec, H.; Kužel, P.

    2016-09-01

    We study terahertz photoconductivity of a rutile single crystal between 10 and 300 K under strong photoexcitation by femtosecond pulses at 266 nm. A marked dependence of the carrier mobility on the carrier density is observed leading to highly complex transport phenomena on a picosecond time scale. We develop a general model of carrier photoconductive response in the case of time dependent inhomogeneous distribution of carrier density and mobility. This allows us to assess an important role of both electrons and holes in the response of photoexcited rutile. At low temperatures, the carrier mobility is initially reduced due to the electron-hole scattering and increases by one order of magnitude upon ambipolar diffusion of the carriers into deeper regions of the sample. At room temperature, contributions of transient hot optical phonons and/or of midinfrared polaron excitations with charge-density-dependent dielectric strength emerge in the photoconductivity spectra.

  16. Simulation Studies of Temperature Anisotropy Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams for IBX Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, E. A.; Davidson, R. C.; Qin, H.

    2003-10-01

    The Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) is a proof-of-principal experiment for heavy ion fusion designed to test source-to-target beam physics using a single beam of K^+ ions of duration 0.2 - 1.5 μ s, accelerated to energies 5-10 MeV, and driver-scale normalized perviance in the range 10-5 -10-3. An important physics issue to be addressed by IBX is the effect of longitudinal-transverse coupling on the beam transport and focusibility of the driver. Our previous numerical and theoretical studies of intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson and H. Qin, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138, 2002] demonstrated that a fast, electrostatic, Harris-like instability may develop. This paper reports the results of recent simulations of the temperature anisotropy instability using the Beam Equilibrium Stability Transport (BEST) code for IBX parameters.

  17. A comparative study of room temperature ionic liquids and their organic solvent mixtures near charged electrodes.

    PubMed

    Vatamanu, Jenel; Vatamanu, Mihaela; Borodin, Oleg; Bedrov, Dmitry

    2016-11-23

    The structural properties of electrolytes consisting of solutions of ionic liquids in a polar solvent at charged electrode surfaces are investigated using classical atomistic simulations. The studied electrolytes consisted of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (NEt4-BF4), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (c2mim-BF4) and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (c8mim-BF4) salts dissolved in acetonitrile solvent. We discuss the influence of electrolyte concentration, chemical structure of the ionic salt, temperature, conducting versus semiconducting nature of the electrode, electrode geometry and surface roughness on the electric double layer structure and capacitance and compare these properties with those obtained for pure room temperature ionic liquids. We show that electrolytes consisting of solutions of ions can behave quite differently from pure ionic liquid electrolytes. PMID:27623976

  18. Kinetics study of crystallization with the disorder-bcc-fcc phase transition of charged colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Du, Xuan; Liu, Lixia

    2011-06-21

    Structure transformation (disorder-bcc-fcc) in charged colloidal dispersions, as a manifestation of the Ostwald's step rule, was confirmed by means of reflection spectrum (RS) measurements in our previous study. By taking advantage of a reflection spectrum containing plenty of information about the crystallization behaviors, time-dependent changes of parameters associated with the crystal structure and composition during the disorder-bcc-fcc transition are reported by treating the data from RS in this article. In addition, Avrami's model is adopted to analyze the transition process and investigate the transition rate. On the basis of the above investigations, associated kinetic features of crystallization with the disorder-bcc-fcc transition are described.

  19. Comprehensive study on charge trapping property of Si-containing hafnium-oxide polymorph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Masao; Mizutani, Masaharu; Kadoshima, Masaru; Sonoda, Kenichiro; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Matsuura, Masazumi

    2016-08-01

    The electron-trapping property of Hf oxides with a wide range of Si contents (0-64 at. %) is studied as a charge storage layer of a nonvolatile memory. The largest flatband voltage shift in the MOS capacitor is obtained at a Si content of ˜20 at. %, which corresponds to the formation of a metastable crystalline phase such as a tetragonal or orthorhombic phase. First-principles calculation reveals that metastable phases tend to have a formation energy of oxygen vacancy lower than that of stable monoclinic ones. A schematic picture of traps in crystalline Hf oxides is provided. The metastable phase is also demonstrated to have retention characteristics superior to other phases.

  20. A Cross-Sectional Study of Shared Attention by Children with Autism and Typically Developing Children in an Inclusive Preschool Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Catherine E.; Adamson, Lauren B.; Winner, Ellen; McGee, Gail G.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the ways in which young children with autism and typical children focus their engagement with objects and people (peers and adults) in an inclusive preschool setting. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of 30 typical children and 30 children with autism, with 10 different children from each group at 3 different ages (2, 3,…

  1. Working Memory Arrest in Children with High-Functioning Autism Compared to Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Results from a 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Per N.; Skogli, Erik W.; Hovik, Kjell T.; Geurts, Hilde; Egeland, Jens; Øie, Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the development of verbal working memory in children with high-functioning autism compared to children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and typically developing children. A total of 34 children with high-functioning autism, 72 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and 45 typically…

  2. Children's understanding of scientific concepts: A developmental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickerton, Gillian Valerie

    Combining theory-oriented inquiry and research that aims to improve instruction is a major goal of neo-Piagetian theory. Within this tradition, Case's (1992) developmental model enables educational researchers to conduct a detailed analysis of the structural and conceptual changes that occur in children's representation of knowledge in different domains at various points in their development. In so doing, it is now possible for educators to first assess children's "entering competence" in a specific subject and then set developmentally realistic instructional goals. Using Case's (1992) model as a theoretical framework, a developmental study was conducted investigating children's understanding of scientific phenomena, specifically buoyancy, at the ages of 6, 8, and 10 years. The main goal was to determine whether or not children's conceptual levels of understanding change systematically with age in a progressive manner consistent with neo-Piagetian stages of development hypothesized by Case. Participants attended one elementary school in a suburban school district near Vancouver, B.C. Sixty children were individually administered a set of five buoyancy tasks that varied in level of difficulty and involved objects of different weights, shapes and sizes. Each student was asked to predict whether an object would float or sink in different liquids and to support their prediction with an explanation. Analyses using the neo-Piagetian approach of articulating the semantic and syntactic nature of children's mental structures were conducted on the students' responses. Shape, size, weight and substance were identified as the semantic components of buoyancy which are syntactically related Using Case's dimensional metric for classifying different levels of conceptual understanding of buoyancy, the results of the study confirmed that children's understanding of buoyancy did progress through the developmental sequence as hypothesized. The structural progression from

  3. A structural study of charge-density-wave perturbations in mixed-halide MX solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Brian; Johnson, Sabina R.; Swanson, Basil I.

    Mixed-halide crystals have been formed by co-crystallizing pure (Pt(en)2Cl2)(Pt(en)2)(ClO4)4(PtCl) and (Pt(en)2I2)(Pt(en)2)(ClO4)4(PtI), where en = 1,2 diaminoethane. Single crystal x-ray diffraction reveals that these crystals are of high quality. The pure PtI and PtCl contain chains of alternating Pt and halogen atoms that have undergone a Peierls distortion and commensurate charge disproportionation, resulting in alternating valence states on the platinum atoms: X-Pt(IV)-X---Pt(II)---X. The Peierls distortion results in a charge-density-wave (CDW), the strength of which is measured as the ratio, rho, of the short Pt(IV)-X bond distance to the long Pt(II)---X bond distance. PtCl is a strong CDW system with rho = 0.750 and PtI is a weak CDW system with rho = 0.919. The mixed-halide systems have the stoichiometry PtCl(1-x)I(x), with x = 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.3, 0.7, 0.8, 0.85, and 0.90. A Chain lattice constant versus composition study strongly suggests distorted PtI and PtCl chains in these solids. A single crystal diffraction study on PtCl(0.85)I(0.15) shows significant perturbations in the PtCl and PtI chain CDW strengths, with the PtI segment showing no Peierls distortion (rho = 1). This control of the CDW strength, which is strongly tied to electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions in these solids, potentially allows tuning of electronic and optical properties on a nanometer scale.

  4. Effects of Emotionally Charged Auditory Stimulation on Gait Performance in the Elderly: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, John-Ross; Raghavan, Preeti; McCrery, J.R.; Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Verghese, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of a novel divided attention task—walking under auditory constraints—on gait performance in older adults and to determine whether this effect was moderated by cognitive status. Design Validation cohort. Setting General community. Participants Ambulatory older adults without dementia (N=104). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures In this pilot study, we evaluated walking under auditory constraints in 104 older adults who completed 3 pairs of walking trials on a gait mat under 1 of 3 randomly assigned conditions: 1 pair without auditory stimulation and 2 pairs with emotionally charged auditory stimulation with happy or sad sounds. Results The mean age of subjects was 80.6±4.9 years, and 63% (n=66) were women. The mean velocity during normal walking was 97.9±20.6cm/s, and the mean cadence was 105.1±9.9 steps/min. The effect of walking under auditory constraints on gait characteristics was analyzed using a 2-factorial analysis of variance with a 1-between factor (cognitively intact and minimal cognitive impairment groups) and a 1-within factor (type of auditory stimuli). In both happy and sad auditory stimulation trials, cognitively intact older adults (n=96) showed an average increase of 2.68cm/s in gait velocity (F1.86,191.71=3.99; P=.02) and an average increase of 2.41 steps/min in cadence (F1.75,180.42=10.12; P<.001) as compared with trials without auditory stimulation. In contrast, older adults with minimal cognitive impairment (Blessed test score, 5–10; n=8) showed an average reduction of 5.45cm/s in gait velocity (F1.87,190.83=5.62; P=.005) and an average reduction of 3.88 steps/min in cadence (F1.79,183.10=8.21; P=.001) under both auditory stimulation conditions. Neither baseline fall history nor performance of activities of daily living accounted for these differences. Conclusions Our results provide preliminary evidence of the differentiating effect of emotionally charged auditory stimuli on gait

  5. Studies of the surface charge of amorphous aluminosilicates using surface complexation models.

    PubMed

    Jara, Alejandra A; Goldberg, Sabine; Mora, M L

    2005-12-01

    Synthetic noncrystalline aluminosilicates with variable charge, similar to allophanes present naturally in volcanic soils, were studied. The surface charge behavior was determined by zero point charge (ZPC) measured by electrophoretic mobility (isoelectric points, IEP) and determined by potentiometric titration (point of zero salt effect, PZSE). The ZPC calculated by Parks model (ZPC(c)), compared with IEP values, showed that the aluminosilicate (AlSi) surface was slightly enriched by AlOH (34% Al(2)O(3) and 66% SiO(2)) compared with the bulk composition (29% Al(2)O(3) and 71% SiO(2)). For aluminosilicate coated with iron oxide (AlSiFe) the ZPC(c) (4.4) was lower than the IEP (8.46), showing that the surface composition is formed mainly from iron oxide. The PZSE values for AlSi and AlSiFe were 6.2 and 4.8, respectively. The differences between the IEP and PZSE are attributed to the formation of Si-O-Fe or Si-O-Al bonds; therefore, the reactivity of Fe and Al atoms was modified on the surface. Two mechanistic models, the constant capacitance model (CCM) and the triple layer model (TLM), using the program FITEQL 3.2 were able to describe the surface behavior of both synthetic aluminosilicates. The acidity constants determined using both models for the aluminosilicates showed differences with respect to pure oxide, mainly attributed to the presence of SiOH sites on the internal surfaces. The ionic strength showed a good relation with the parameters obtained using the CCM (pK(int)(a1), pK(int)(a2) and capacitance values) and the TLM (pK(int)(a1), pK(int)(a2), pK(int)(Cl-), pK(int)(K+), and inner capacitance) for both aluminosilicates. However, the TLM was able to describe the acidity and complexation constants better since it considered the formation of the outer sphere complex between the background electrolyte and the surface. Then, the TLM makes it possible to describe real systems.

  6. Associations of diet quality with cognition in children - the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children Study.

    PubMed

    Haapala, Eero A; Eloranta, Aino-Maija; Venäläinen, Taisa; Schwab, Ursula; Lindi, Virpi; Lakka, Timo A

    2015-10-14

    Evidence on the associations of dietary patterns with cognition in children is limited. Therefore, we investigated the associations of the Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score with cognition in children. The present cross-sectional study sample included 428 children aged 6-8 years (216 boys and 212 girls). The BSDS and the DASH score were calculated using data from 4 d food records, higher scores indicating better diet quality. Cognition was assessed by the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM) score, a higher score indicating better cognition. Among all children, the BSDS (standardised regression coefficient β = 0·122, P =0·012) and the DASH score (β = 0·121, P =0·015) were directly associated with the Raven's CPM score. Among boys, a lower BSDS (β = 0·244, P< 0·001) and a lower DASH score (β = 0·202, P= 0·003) were related to a lower Raven's CPM score. Boys in the lowest quartile of the BSDS (22·5 v. 25·3, P= 0·029) and the DASH score (22·4 v. 25·7, P= 0·008) had a lower Raven's CPM score than those in the highest quartile of the corresponding score. Among girls, the BSDS or the DASH score were not associated with cognition. In conclusion, a poorer diet quality was associated with worse cognition in children, and the relationship was stronger in boys than in girls.

  7. Study comparing the applicability of dorsal lumbotomy in older children

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, Jonathan; Haidar, Nadim; Rompre-Deschenes, Marie-Pier; Grimard, Maryse; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Dismembered pyeloplasty through dorsal lumbotomy to correct ureteropelvic junction obstruction is mainly successfully performed in children under 5 years old for technical reasons. We compared children who underwent dorsal lumbotomy by age group (<5 vs. ≥5 years old) to determine if the surgical success and long-term results were comparable. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 134 children undergoing a pyeloplasty. Group 1 consisted of children <5 years old (n = 90) and Group 2 consisted of children ≥5 years old. Patients’ characteristics, as well as hospital stay, narcotic use, radiologic follow-up and success rate, were compared. Success was defined by absence of symptoms and ≥50% reduction in renal pelvis anteroposterior diameter and/or scintigraphic normalization of the drainage T1/2 when obtained. Univariate analysis was performed to compare the groups. Results: Mean age (years) and weight (kg) at surgery for Groups 1 and 2 were 1/8 kg and 11/35 kg, respectively. Mean operative time was 98 minutes versus 120 minutes, respectively; mean hospital stay was 2.5 days for both groups and analgesia requirement was 50% higher in Group 2. A Pippi-Salle stent was used in 90% (n = 120) of cases. Mean follow-up was 26 months and the success rate was 89% and 90% for Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed comparable success rates. We can infer that, as a technique, dismembered pyeloplasty is effective and safe in the younger and older children. PMID:21539770

  8. Aflatoxins and kwashiorkor: clinical studies in Sudanese children.

    PubMed

    Coulter, J B; Hendrickse, R G; Lamplugh, S M; Macfarlane, S B; Moody, J B; Omer, M I; Suliman, G I; Williams, T E

    1986-01-01

    Aflatoxin analysis of blood and urine by high performance liquid chromatography in 584 Sudanese children is reported. The results in 404 malnourished children comprising 141 kwashiorkor, 111 marasmic kwashiorkor and 152 with marasmus are compared with 180 age-matched controls and correlated with clinical findings. The aflatoxin detection rate and mean concentration were higher in serum of children with kwashiorkor than the other groups. The difference between the detection rate in kwashiorkor and controls was significant (p less than 0.05). The aflatoxin detection rate in urine was highest in the marasmic kwashiorkor group and the mean concentration was higher in the marasmic kwashiorkor and marasmic groups than in the kwashiorkor and control groups. There were important differences in the detection of certain aflatoxins between the groups. Aflatoxicol was detected in the sera of 16 (11.6%) kwashiorkor, in six (6.1%) marasmic kwashiorkor, but in none of the controls and only once in marasmus. These differences are highly significant (p less than 0.0001). The ratio of AFB1 to AFM1 was higher in the sera and urines of kwashiorkors than in controls, suggesting that the normal transformation of AFB1 to AFM1 may be impaired in kwashiorkor with consequent increase in transformation of AFB1 to aflatoxicol. The study therefore provides evidence of differences in the metabolism of aflatoxins in children with kwashiorkor compared with children with other forms of malnutrition and normally nourished children and confirms the association between aflatoxins and kwashiorkor contained in a preliminary report on this work.

  9. Postural development in school children: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lafond, Danik; Descarreaux, Martin; Normand, Martin C; Harrison, Deed E

    2007-01-01

    Background Little information on quantitative sagittal plane postural alignment and evolution in children exists. The objectives of this study are to document the evolution of upright, static, sagittal posture in children and to identify possible critical phases of postural evolution (maturation). Methods A total of 1084 children (aged 4–12 years) received a sagittal postural evaluation with the Biotonix postural analysis system. Data were retrieved from the Biotonix internet database. Children were stratified and analyzed by years of age with n = 36 in the youngest age group (4 years) and n = 184 in the oldest age group (12 years). Children were analyzed in the neutral upright posture. Variables measured were sagittal translation distances in millimeters of: the knee relative to the tarsal joint, pelvis relative to the tarsal joint, shoulder relative to the tarsal joint, and head relative to the tarsal joint. A two-way factorial ANOVA was used to test for age and gender effects on posture, while polynomial trend analyses were used to test for increased postural displacements with years of age. Results Two-way ANOVA yielded a significant main effect of age for all 4 sagittal postural variables and gender for all variables except head translation. No age × gender interaction was found. Polynomial trend analyses showed a significant linear association between child age and all four postural variables: anterior head translation (p < 0.001), anterior shoulder translation (p < 0.001), anterior pelvic translation (p < 0.001), anterior knee translation (p < 0.001). Between the ages of 11 and 12 years, for anterior knee translation, T-test post hoc analysis revealed only one significant rough break in the continuity of the age related trend. Conclusion A significant linear trend for increasing sagittal plane postural translations of the head, thorax, pelvis, and knee was found as children age from 4 years to 12 years. These postural translations provide preliminary

  10. Nonlinearity, resonance, charging, and motion at the atomic scale studied with scanning tunneling microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Xiuwen

    2008-10-01

    Several novel phenomena at the single-atom and single-molecule level occurring on the surfaces of single crystals were studied with home-built low temperature scanning tunneling microscopes. The results revealed intriguing properties of single atoms and single molecules, including nonlinearity, resonance, charging, and motion. First, negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed in the dI/dV spectra for single copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules adsorbed on one- and two-layer sodium bromide (NaBr), but not for single CuPc molecules adsorbed on three-layer NaBr, all grown on a NiAl(110) surface. This transition from NDR to the absence of NDR was explained as the result of competing effects in the double-barrier tunnel junction (DBTJ) and was reproduced in a calculation based on a resonant-tunneling model. Second, the nonlinearity of the STM junction due to a single manganese (Mn) atom or MnCO molecule adsorbed on a NiAl(110) surface was used to rectify microwave irradiation. The resulting rectification current was shown to be sensitive to the spin-splitting of the electronic states of the Mn atom and to the vibrations of the MnCO molecule. Next, the ordering of cesium (Cs) atoms adsorbed on a Au(111) surface and a NiAl(110) surface was imaged in real space. Because of charge transfer to the substrates, Cs adatoms were positively charged on both surfaces. Even at 12 K, Cs adatoms were able to move and adjust according to coverage. On Au(111), the Cs first layer had a quasi-hexagonal lattice and islands of the second Cs layer did not appear until the first was completed. On NiAl(110), a locally disordered Cs first layer was observed before a locally ordered layer appeared at higher coverages. The cation-pi interactions were then studied at the single molecular level. We were able to form cation-pi complexes such as Cs···DSB, Cs···DSB···Cs, Rb···DSB, and Rb···ZnEtiol controllably by manipulation with the STM tip. We could also separate these

  11. Study of the top quark electric charge at the CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the top quark electric charge using the jet charge tagging method on events containing a single lepton collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab between February 2002 and February 2010 at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. There are three main components to this measurement: determining the charge of the W (using the charge of the lepton), pairing the W with the b-jet to ensure that they are from the same top decay branch and finally determining the charge of the b-jet using the Jet Charge algorithm. We found, on a sample of 5.6 fb-1 of data, that the p-value under the standard model hypothesis is equal to 13.4%, while the p-value under the exotic model hypothesis is equal to 0.014%. Using the a priori criteria generally accepted by the CDF collaboration, we can say that the result is consistent with the standard model, while we exclude an exotic quark hypothesis with 95% confidence. Using the Bayesian approach, we obtain for the Bayes factor (2ln(BF)) a value of 19.6, that favors very strongly the SM hypothesis over the XM one. The presented method has the highest sensitivity to the top quark electric charge among the presented so far top quark charge analysis.

  12. Phosphorus solubility of agricultural soils: a surface charge and phosphorus-31 NMR speciation study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated ten soils from six states in United States to determine the relationship between potentiometric titration derived soil surface charge and Phosphorus-31 (P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) speciation with the concentration of water-extractable P (WEP). The surface charge value at the...

  13. The Pittsburgh Children's Museum. Study Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donley, Susan K.; And Others

    These five study guides present ideas for activities based on museum exhibition themes. The learning activities are designed for coordination with museum visits, but may be adapted for independent use. Activities appropriate for preschool and elementary levels are indicated. Exhibition themes include: (1) "Space Exploration," which explores the…

  14. Play as a Resource for Children Facing Adversity: An Exploration of Indicative Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fearn, Maggie; Howard, Justine

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we suggest that the ability and opportunity to play affords children a natural resource to meet intellectual and emotional challenge. Analysis of case studies focusing on interventions with children caught in the bombing of Beirut, children abandoned to the state system in Romania, and the street children in Rio de Janeiro and Cali…

  15. Do Children Who Bully Their Peers Also Play Violent Video Games? A Canadian National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrick, Crystal J.; Beran, Tanya N.; Mishna, Faye; Hetherington, Ross; Shariff, Shaheen

    2013-01-01

    The study examined whether children who bully others are likely to prefer playing video games that are rated high in maturity and violence. A stratified random sample of Canadian children ages 10 to 17 years from the provinces of Canada was obtained. Parents (n = 397) and their children (n = 492) completed an online survey of children's…

  16. Improvement of Fine Motor Skills in Children with Visual Impairment: An Explorative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, A. M.; Cox, R. F. A.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M. W. G.; Boonstra, F. N.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we analysed the potential spin-off of magnifier training on the fine-motor skills of visually impaired children. The fine-motor skills of 4- and 5-year-old visually impaired children were assessed using the manual skills test for children (6-12 years) with a visual impairment (ManuVis) and movement assessment for children (Movement…

  17. Study of the Effects of "Sesame Street" and "Polka Dot Door" on Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Laurie A.

    This paper presents a study designed to determine whether or not parents' attitudes and children's intelligence scores affect children's reactions to television programs. Preschool children's behavior before, during, and after the viewing of two half-hour television programs, "Sesame Street" and "Polka Dot Door," was compared. The children,…

  18. Phonological Development in Specific Contexts: Studies of Chinese-Speaking Children. Child Language and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Zhu

    This book examines the phonological development and impairment of Chinese-speaking children. It contains a series of studies of phonological acquisition and development of children in specific contexts (Putonghua or Modern Standard Chinese, the language variety promoted by the Chinese government, and normally developing children, children with…

  19. Fluoroolefins as peptide mimetics: a computational study of structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Urban, Joseph J; Tillman, Brendon G; Cronin, William Andrew

    2006-09-28

    The design of peptide mimetic compounds is greatly facilitated by the identification of functionalities that can act as peptide replacements. The fluoroalkene moiety has recently been employed for that purpose. The purpose of this work is to characterize prototypical fluoroalkenes (fluoroethylene and 2-fluoro-2-butene) with respect to key properties of peptides (amides) including structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding. The results are compared to those obtained for model peptides (formamide, N-methylacetamide). Calculations have been carried out at the MP2 and B3LYP levels of theory with the 6-311++G(2d,p) and 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis sets. The results suggest that the fluoroalkene is similar in steric requirements to a peptide bond but that there is less charge separation. Calculations of the hydration free energies with the PCM bulk continuum solvent model indicate that the fluoroalkene has much smaller hydration free energies than an amide but that the difference in solvation free energy for cis and trans isomers is comparable. In studies of complexes with water molecules, the fluoroalkene is found to engage in interactions that are analogous to backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions that govern many properties of natural peptides and proteins but with smaller interaction energies. In addition, key structural differences are noted when the fluoroalkene is playing the role of hydrogen-bond acceptor which may have implications in binding, aggregation, and conformational preferences in fluoroalkene peptidomimetics. The issue of cooperativity in hydrogen-bonding interactions in complexes with multiple waters has also been investigated. The fluoroalkene is found to exhibit cooperative effects that mirror those of the peptide but are smaller in magnitude. Thus, pairwise addivitity of interactions appears to more adequately describe the fluoroalkenes than the peptides they are intended to mimic.

  20. Local Parity Violation or Local Charge Conservation/Flow? A Reaction-Plane-Dependent Balance Function Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; STAR Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    STAR has recently reported charge-dependent azimuthal correlations using a three particle correlator that is sensitive to the charge separation effect in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV. Qualitatively, these results agree with some of the theoretical predictions for local parity violation in heavy-ion collisions. However, a study using reaction-plane-dependent balance functions shows an alternative origin of this signal. The balance function, which measures the correlation between oppositely charged pairs, is sensitive to the mechanisms of charge formation and the subsequent relative diffusion of the balancing charges. We report reaction-plane-dependent balance functions for Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. The reaction-plane-dependent balance function analysis is consistent with the three particle correlator analysis as expected mathematically. The model of Schlicting and Pratt incorporating local charge conservation and elliptic flow can reproduce most of the three-particle azimuthal correlation results at 200 GeV.

  1. Influence of the size and charge of gold nanoclusters on complexation with siRNA: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Mudedla, Sathish Kumar; Azhagiya Singam, Ettayapuram Ramaprasad; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Subramanian, Venkatesan

    2015-11-11

    The complexation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) with positively charged gold nanoclusters has been studied in the present investigation with the help of classical molecular dynamics and steered molecular dynamics simulations accompanied by free energy calculations. The results show that gold nanoclusters form a stable complex with siRNA. The wrapping of siRNA around the gold nanocluster depends on the size and charge on the surface of the gold cluster. The binding pattern of the gold nanocluster with siRNA is also influenced by the presence of another cluster. The interaction between the positively charged amines in the gold nanocluster and the negatively charged phosphate group in the siRNA is responsible for the formation of complexes. The binding free energy value increases with the size of the gold cluster and the number of positive charges present on the surface of the gold nanocluster. The results reveal that the binding energy of small gold nanoclusters increases in the presence of another gold nanocluster while the binding of large gold nanoclusters decreases due to the introduction of another gold nanocluster. Overall, the findings have clearly demonstrated the effect of size and charge of gold nanoclusters on their interaction pattern with siRNA.

  2. A study of behavior modification for developmentally disabled children.

    PubMed

    Boj, J R; Davila, J M

    1989-01-01

    A tape-slide series, using a desensitization and modeling approach, was developed in order to prepare three- and four-year-old developmentally disabled children for an initial dental examination. The tape-slide series pleasantly describes what to expect during the first visit to the dental office. A clown and a four-year-old girl were used as models. Twenty-eight children participated in the study, divided into two groups: control and experimental. A requirement for qualification as a patient was that the child not have had any previous dental experience. Three techniques for measuring behavior were used: heart rate, a modified Melamed's scale, and a dentist's subjective evaluation. The results demonstrated that: a) The experimental group was in a high state of arousal when starting the dental procedures; b) Children exposed to the tapeslide series showed worse behavior and a higher heart rate than children not exposed to the series; c) Heart rate was sensitive and objective in measuring anxiety and arousal in the dental setting; d) Modified Melamed's scale was not sensitive enough to measure microbehavior in this study; e) The subjective dentist's evaluation showed the impossibility of preventing a biased interpretation of behavior by the evaluator. PMID:2478601

  3. A study of behavior modification for developmentally disabled children.

    PubMed

    Boj, J R; Davila, J M

    1989-01-01

    A tape-slide series, using a desensitization and modeling approach, was developed in order to prepare three- and four-year-old developmentally disabled children for an initial dental examination. The tape-slide series pleasantly describes what to expect during the first visit to the dental office. A clown and a four-year-old girl were used as models. Twenty-eight children participated in the study, divided into two groups: control and experimental. A requirement for qualification as a patient was that the child not have had any previous dental experience. Three techniques for measuring behavior were used: heart rate, a modified Melamed's scale, and a dentist's subjective evaluation. The results demonstrated that: a) The experimental group was in a high state of arousal when starting the dental procedures; b) Children exposed to the tapeslide series showed worse behavior and a higher heart rate than children not exposed to the series; c) Heart rate was sensitive and objective in measuring anxiety and arousal in the dental setting; d) Modified Melamed's scale was not sensitive enough to measure microbehavior in this study; e) The subjective dentist's evaluation showed the impossibility of preventing a biased interpretation of behavior by the evaluator.

  4. Laboratory Studies of Charging Properties of Dust Grains in Astrophysical/Planetary Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-11-01

    Dust grains immersed in ambient plasmas and radiation, are charged and coupled to the plasma through electric and magnetic fields. Dust grains in various astrophysical/planetary environments are generally charged by: (a) photoelectric emissions with incident radiation at photon energies higher than the work function of the material and (b) sticking of low energy electrons and ions of the surrounding plasma or by secondary electron emissions induced by incident electrons/ions at sufficiently high energies. Consequenly, the particle charge is an important parameter that influences physical and dynamical processes in the interplanetary and interstellar medium, planetary rings, interstellar dust clouds, comets and the outer atmospheres of planets. The charging properties of individual micron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the bulk materials. However, no viable models for calculation of the charging properties of individual micron size dust grains are available at the present time. Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains. In this paper we give a review of the results of the measurements on charging of analogs of the interstellar as well as Apollo 11 and 17 lunar dust grains carried out on the Electrodynamic Balance Facility at the NASA-MSFC.

  5. Laughter, Humor and Pain Perception in Children: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hilber, Sherry Dunay; Mintzer, Lisa Libman; Castaneda, Marleen; Glover, Dorie; Zeltzer, Lonnie

    2009-01-01

    Although there are many clinical programs designed to bring humor into pediatric hospitals, there has been very little research with children or adolescents concerning the specific utility of humor for children undergoing stressful or painful procedures. Rx Laughter™, a non-profit organization interested in the use of humor for healing, collaborated with UCLA to collect preliminary data on a sample of 18 children aged 7–16 years. Participants watched humorous video-tapes before, during and after a standardized pain task that involved placing a hand in cold water. Pain appraisal (ratings of pain severity) and pain tolerance (submersion time) were recorded and examined in relation to humor indicators (number of laughs/smiles during each video and child ratings of how funny the video was). Whereas humor indicators were not significantly associated with pain appraisal or tolerance, the group demonstrated significantly greater pain tolerance while viewing funny videos than when viewing the videos immediately before or after the cold-water task. The results suggest that humorous distraction is useful to help children and adolescents tolerate painful procedures. Further study is indicated to explore the specific mechanism of this benefit. PMID:18955244

  6. Oral habits in children--a prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Shetty, S R; Munshi, A K

    1998-06-01

    This epidemiological study was conducted upon 4,590 school children to find the prevalence of oral habits in Mangalore in relation to their age and sex and to find the correlation, if any, between the habits and the malocclusion status. We noted that 29.7% of the population had habits of which 3. 1% had digit sucking, 4.6% mouth breathing, 3.02% tongue thrusting, 6.2% bruxism, 6% lip/cheek biting, 12.7% nail biting, 9.8% pencil biting and 0. 09% masochistic habits respectively. Digit sucking, pencil biting and tongue thrust were highly prevalent among Group 1 (3-6 years) children. Mouth breathing and bruxism were significant in Group 2 (7-12 years) cases whereas lip/cheek biting and nail biting were more common in Group 3 (13-16 years) cases. Digit sucking, tongue thrust, mouth breathing and bruxism were more prevalent among the boys whereas lip/cheek biting, nail biting and pencil biting were more prevalent among the girls. 28.95% of the children in Group 2 and 3 with habits had malocclusion. There was a significant correlation between class I type 2, class II div 1 and tongue thrust and mouth breathing whereas children with digit sucking showed a high correlation with class I type 2 malocclusion.

  7. Study of spirometry in children from Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Namihira, D.; Strope, G.L.; Helms, R.W.; Pekow, P.; Bojalil, B.M.; Fernandez, F.

    1986-11-01

    A study was conducted in two elementary schools in Mexico City to determine values for pulmonary function tests in school-aged residents of Mexico City. The schools were located in Xalostoc, a highly industrialized area of Mexico City, and San Lorenzo, a suburban area of the city. Although data regarding atmospheric pollution were not available, there is an acknowledged higher level of macroenvironmental air pollution in Xalostoc. Pulmonary function tests were performed on 468 children in San Lorenzo and 405 children in Xalostoc. No differences between residents of the two communities for acute or chronic respiratory conditions were detected by questionnaire. The pulmonary function data demonstrate that boys have larger forced vital capacities (FVC) and forced expiratory flows over the middle half of the FVC (FEF25-75) than girls. Slopes of regression lines for FVC but not for FEF25-75 are greater in boys and girls from Xalostoc than in boys and girls from San Lorenzo. This suggests that young children from Xalostoc may experience ill effects of air pollution but develop catch-up growth later. There were no important community or gender effects on slopes of regression lines for height and weight on age. In general, the regression lines for FVC and FEF25-75 were below regression lines reported for children of Mexican ancestry living at sea level.

  8. Mothers' teaching strategies and children's effortful control: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Vidmar, Masa; Spinrad, Tracy L; Eggum, Natalie D; Edwards, Alison; Gaertner, Bridget; Kupfer, Anne

    2010-09-01

    Findings on the relation of maternal verbal teaching strategies to children's effortful control (EC; i.e., self-regulation) are limited in quantity and somewhat inconsistent. In this study, children's EC was assessed at 18, 30, and 42 months (ns = 255, 229, and 209, respectively) with adults' reports and a behavioral measure. Mothers' verbal teaching strategies were assessed while the mother and child worked on a task together. Children's general vocabulary also was measured. In a structural panel model taking into account prior levels of constructs and correlations within time, as well as the relations of EC and teaching strategies to children's vocabulary, socioeconomic status, age, and sex of the child, 18-month EC positively predicted mothers' 30-month cognitive assistance and questioning strategies and negatively predicted 30-month maternal directive strategies. In addition, high 30-month EC predicted greater 42-month maternal cognitive assistance and fewer directive strategies. Thus, mothers' teaching strategies were predicted by individual differences in self-regulatory skills, supporting potential evocative child effects on mothers' teaching strategies.

  9. An electron energy-loss study of picene and chrysene based charge transfer salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Eric; Mahns, Benjamin; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The electronic excitation spectra of charge transfer compounds built from the hydrocarbons picene and chrysene, and the strong electron acceptors F4TCNQ (2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethan) have been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The corresponding charge transfer compounds have been prepared by co-evaporation of the pristine constituents. We demonstrate that all investigated combinations support charge transfer, which results in new electronic excitation features at low energy. This might represent a way to synthesize low band gap organic semiconductors.

  10. An electron energy-loss study of picene and chrysene based charge transfer salts.

    PubMed

    Müller, Eric; Mahns, Benjamin; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-05-14

    The electronic excitation spectra of charge transfer compounds built from the hydrocarbons picene and chrysene, and the strong electron acceptors F4TCNQ (2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethan) have been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The corresponding charge transfer compounds have been prepared by co-evaporation of the pristine constituents. We demonstrate that all investigated combinations support charge transfer, which results in new electronic excitation features at low energy. This might represent a way to synthesize low band gap organic semiconductors.

  11. An electron energy-loss study of picene and chrysene based charge transfer salts

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Eric; Mahns, Benjamin; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-05-14

    The electronic excitation spectra of charge transfer compounds built from the hydrocarbons picene and chrysene, and the strong electron acceptors F{sub 4}TCNQ (2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethan) have been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The corresponding charge transfer compounds have been prepared by co-evaporation of the pristine constituents. We demonstrate that all investigated combinations support charge transfer, which results in new electronic excitation features at low energy. This might represent a way to synthesize low band gap organic semiconductors.

  12. Ultra-Orthodox Children's Literature in Israel: A Case Study of Sub-Cultural Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yitzhaki, Moshe; Shoham, Snunit

    Scholars of Israeli children's literature have recently noticed an interesting socio-literary phenomenon: the emergence of an entirely new branch in Israeli children's literature, namely ultra-orthodox children's literature. The books belonging to this special category are easily distinguished from "regular" Israeli children's books by their…

  13. Antibody-ligand interactions for hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography: a surface plasmon resonance study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang; Li, Ming-Yang; Wang, Han-Qi; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Qu, Jing-Ping

    2015-03-24

    This article describes the use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy to study antibody-ligand interactions for hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography (HCIC) and its versatility in investigating the surface and solution factors affecting the interactions. Two density model surfaces presenting the HCIC ligand (mercapto-ethyl-pyridine, MEP) were prepared on Au using a self-assembly technique. The surface chemistry and structure, ionization, and protein binding of such model surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), contact-angle titration, and SPR, respectively. The influences of the surface and solution factors, e.g., ligand density, salt concentration, and solution pH, on protein adsorption were determined by SPR. Our results showed that ligand density affects both equilibrium and dynamic aspects of the interactions. Specifically, a dense ligand leads to an increase in binding strength, rapid adsorption, slow desorption, and low specificity. In addition, both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding contribute significantly to the protein adsorption at neutral pH, while the electrostatic repulsion is overwhelmed under acidic conditions. The hydrophobic interaction at a high concentration of lyotropic salt would cause drastic conformational changes in the adsorbed protein. Combined with the self-assembly technique, SPR proves to be a powerful tool for studying the interactions between an antibody and a chromatographic ligand.

  14. Femtosecond Heterodyne Transient Grating Spectroscopic Studies of Intramolecular Charge Transfer Character of Peridinin and Peridinin Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Michael; Khosravi, Soroush; Obaid, Razib; Whitelock, Hope; Carroll, Ann Marie; Lafountain, Amy; Frank, Harry; Beck, Warren; Gibson, George; Berrah, Nora

    2016-05-01

    The peridinin chlorophyll-a protein is a light harvesting complex found in several species of dinoflagellates. Peridinin absorbs strongly in the mid-visible spectral region and, despite the lack of a strong permanent dipole moment in its lowest energy excited state, is able to transfer excitation energy quickly and efficiently to chlorophyll-a. It is believed that the high efficiency arises from the development of intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) character upon photoexcitation. Recently, heterodyne transient grating spectroscopy has been used to study the ultrafast (<50 fs) dynamics of β carotene and peridinin. The studies show evidence for a structurally displaced intermediate in both cases and strong ICT character in the case of peridinin, but up to now the work has not provided appropriate control experiments. The present experiments examine peridinin and two peridinin analogs, S1-peridinin and S2-peridinin. S1-peridinin is reported to have greatly diminished ICT character, and S2-peridinin is reported to have little-or-no ICT character. Heterodyne transient grating data will be presented and provide a more unambiguous characterization spectral and kinetic properties associated with the peridinin ICT state. Funded by the DoE-BES, Grant No. DE-SC0012376.

  15. Study of fluorescence characteristics of the charge-transfer reaction of quinolone agents with bromanil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Fang; Xuan, Chun-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    A spectrofluorimetric method was discussed for the determination of three antibacterial quinolone derivatives, ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) through charge-transfer complexation (CTC) with 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-1,4-benzoquinone (bromanil, TBBQ). The method was based on the reaction of these drugs as n-electron donors with the π-acceptor TBBQ. TBBQ was found to react with these drugs to produce a kind of yellow complexes and the fluorescence intensities of the complexes were enhanced by 29-36 times more than those of the corresponding monomers. UV-vis, 1H NMR and XPS techniques were used to study the complexes formed. The various experimental parameters affecting the fluorescence intensity were studied and optimized. Under optimal reaction conditions, the rectilinear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of 0.021-2.42 μg mL -1, 0.017-2.63 μg mL -1 and 0.019-2.14 μg mL -1 for OFL, NOR and CIP, respectively. The methods developed were applied successfully to the determination of the subject drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage forms with good precision and accuracy compared to official and reported methods as revealed by t- and F-tests.

  16. The uses of electron beam ion traps in the study of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, D.

    1994-11-02

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is a relatively new tool for the study of highly charged ions. Its development has led to a variety of new experimental opportunities; measurements have been performed with EBITs using techniques impossible with conventional ion sources or storage rings. In this paper, I will highlight the various experimental techniques we have developed and the results we have obtained using the EBIT and higher-energy Super-EBIT built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The EBIT employs a high-current-density electron beam to trap, ionize, and excite a population of ions. The ions can be studied in situ or extracted from the trap for external experiments. The trapped ions form an ionization-state equilibrium determined by the relative ionization and recombination rates. Ions of several different elements may simultaneously be present in the trap. The ions are nearly at rest, and, for most systems, all in their ground-state configurations. The electron-ion interaction energy has a narrow distribution and can be varied over a wide range. We have used the EBIT devices for the measurement of electron-ion interactions, ion structure, ion-surface interactions, and the behavior of low-density plasmas.

  17. Operating in the space plasma environment: A spacecraft charging study of the Solar X-ray Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Joel L.; Mccollum, Matthew B.; James, Bonnie F.

    1994-01-01

    This study presents the results of a spacecraft charging effects protection study conducted on the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI). The SXI is being developed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for NOAA's Space Environment Laboratory, and will be used to aid in forecasting energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. Images will provide information on the intensity and location of solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and high speed solar streams. The SXI will be flown on a next-generation GOES sometime in the mid to late 1990's. Charging due to the encounter with a worst-case magnetic substorm environment is modeled using the NASCAP/GEO computer code. Charging levels of exterior surfaces and the floating potential of the spacecraft relative to plasma are determined as a function of spacecraft design, operational configuration, and orbital conditions. Areas where large surface voltage gradients exist on or near the SXI are identified as possible arc-discharge sites. Results of the charging analysis are then used to develop design recommendations that will limit the effects of spacecraft charging on the SXI operation.

  18. Orbital dependent ultrafast charge transfer dynamics of ferrocenyl-functionalized SAMs on gold studied by core-hole clock spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liang; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Li; Nerngchamnong, Nisachol; Feng, Yuan-Ping; Wee, Andrew T. S.; Qi, Dong-Chen; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the charge transport properties in general of different molecular components in a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is of importance for the rational design of SAM molecular structures for molecular electronics. In this study, we study an important aspect of the charge transport properties, i.e. the charge transfer (CT) dynamics between the active molecular component (in this case, the ferrocenyl moieties of a ferrocenyl-n-alkanethiol SAM) and the electrode using synchrotron-based core-hole clock (CHC) spectroscopy. The characteristic CT times are found to depend strongly on the character of the ferrocenyl-derived molecular orbitals (MOs) which mediate the CT process. Furthermore, by systemically shifting the position of the ferrocenyl moiety in the SAM, it is found that the CT characteristics of the ferrocenyl MOs display distinct dependence on its distance to the electrode. These results demonstrate experimentally that the efficiency and rate of charge transport through the molecular backbone can be modulated by resonant injection of charge carriers into specific MOs.

  19. Pilot Study: A Pediatric Pedestrian Safety Curriculum for Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Bovis, Stephanie E; Harden, Taijha; Hotz, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate and implement the WalkSafe Pre-Kindergarten Pedestrian Safety Curriculum. A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design without a control group was used to measure children's pedestrian safety knowledge. Knowledge assessments consisting of multiple-choice and short-answer questions were administered pre- and post-curriculum implementation by classroom teachers. Knowledge assessments gauged prekindergarten students' knowledge of pedestrian safety activities prior to safety curriculum implementation and, again, after the students received the curriculum. A total of 605 children (aged 3- to 5-year) from 38 prekindergarten classrooms in 16 randomly selected elementary schools participated in the pedestrian safety education pilot program. Subjects were of multiethnic and diverse backgrounds from the Miami-Dade County Public School District. Of the 605 educated subjects, 454 children completed both pre- and posttests. A statistically significant difference was found between pretest knowledge (M = 5.49, SD = 1.54) and posttest knowledge (M = 6.64, SD = 1.35) assessment scores across all 454 subjects, t(452) = -16.22, p < .001, 95% CI [-1.29, -1.01]. Previous studies have shown that classroom-based training of children as young as 4 years old can yield significant improvements in traffic safety knowledge. The statistical findings of the WalkSafe Pre-Kindergarten Pedestrian Safety Curriculum revealed statistically significant improvements in pedestrian safety knowledge of these young children. Future research efforts will focus on longitudinal behavioral changes in these students and an increase in pedestrian safety behaviors (e.g., utilization of crosswalks or sidewalks). PMID:27618373

  20. A SYSTEMATIC STUDY ON THE SURFACE CHARGE OF MICROORGANISMS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of microbiological pathogens from drinking water is an important function of water treatment. The mechanisms of particle and pathogen removal during coagulation/flocculation/filtration processes are well known. Surface charge is particularly important in particle dest...

  1. A scaled experiment to study energy dissipation process during longitudinal compression of charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Y.; Nakajima, M.; Hasegawa, J.; Kikuchi, T.; Horioka, K.

    2016-03-01

    Beam behavior during longitudinal bunch compression of charged particles was investigated using a compact simulator device based on electron beams. Beam current waveforms and bunch compression ratios were measured as a function of the initial beam current. We found that the current waveform became blunt and the compression ratio degraded at higher beam currents. These results indicate that space-charge fields dissipate the kinetic energy of beam particles.

  2. Development of a biomarkers database for the National Children's Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lobdell, Danelle T.; Mendola, Pauline . E-mail: mendola.pauline@epa.gov

    2005-08-07

    The National Children's Study (NCS) is a federally-sponsored, longitudinal study of environmental influences on the health and development of children across the United States (www.nationalchildrensstudy.gov). Current plans are to study approximately 100,000 children and their families beginning before birth up to age 21 years. To explore potential biomarkers that could be important measurements in the NCS, we compiled the relevant scientific literature to identify both routine or standardized biological markers as well as new and emerging biological markers. Although the search criteria encouraged examination of factors that influence the breadth of child health and development, attention was primarily focused on exposure, susceptibility, and outcome biomarkers associated with four important child health outcomes: autism and neurobehavioral disorders, injury, cancer, and asthma. The Biomarkers Database was designed to allow users to: (1) search the biomarker records compiled by type of marker (susceptibility, exposure or effect), sampling media (e.g., blood, urine, etc.), and specific marker name; (2) search the citations file; and (3) read the abstract evaluations relative to our search criteria. A searchable, user-friendly database of over 2000 articles was created and is publicly available at: http://cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/cfm/recordisplay.cfm?deid=85844. PubMed was the primary source of references with some additional searches of Toxline, NTIS, and other reference databases. Our initial focus was on review articles, beginning as early as 1996, supplemented with searches of the recent primary research literature from 2001 to 2003. We anticipate this database will have applicability for the NCS as well as other studies of children's environmental health.

  3. [Criteria for determining the adaptation of children to studying loads].

    PubMed

    Potupchik, T V; Makarova, M V; Prakhin, E I; Evert, L S; Baksheeva, S S

    2011-01-01

    Three hundred and two Krasnoyarsk gymnasium students were examined to define criteria for determining the adaptation to high schooling loads. The values of the emotional status and adaptive processes were studied in children with varying resistance and varying mastering capacities; the impact of cardiovascular parameters on their adaptive process was defined The criteria for estimating the adaptation to high schooling loads were the presence or absence of acute chills and neurotic reactions, cardiovascular performance, and psychoemotional status. PMID:22250390

  4. Computational and experimental study of charge distribution in the α-disulfonyl carbanions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binkowska, Iwona; Koput, Jacek; Jarczewski, Arnold

    2014-03-01

    The electron densities of the disulfonyl carbanions were determined using experimental 13C chemical shifts. The 13C NMR spectra and electron densities for the disulfonyl, nitro, and cyano carbon acids were calculated at the MP2/cc-pVDZ level of theory. The calculated chemical shifts for disulfonyl carbanions show satisfying correlation with our own experimental data. The calculated π electron densities at the Cα atom correspond roughly to the "experimental" π electron densities estimated from the 13C chemical shifts. The natural charges at Cα in disulfonyl stabilized carbanions are significantly more negative than with other types of carbanions, partly because of the significant negative natural charge of the α carbon in parent carbon acids. The calculated increase of the negative charge caused by ionization is larger for sulfonyl carbon acids than for cyano- and nitroalkanes. The 13C chemical shifts δ of Cα in disulfonyl stabilized carbanions decrease with more negative calculated negative natural charge at Cα, with a slope of 220 ppm/electron. The influence of phenyl ring para-substitution on the charge distribution in carbanions and relationship between the 13C chemical shifts and charge density have been discussed. It appears that the π electron density in these planar or nearly planar carbanions has a decisive impact on the chemical shifts.

  5. A Closer Look at Changes in Children's Living Arrangements in Low-Income Families. Working Paper. Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherlin, Andrew J.; Fomby, Paula

    This study examined changes in low-income children's living arrangements over time. Caregivers of children in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio completed interviews in 1999 and then again 16 months later as part of the Three-City Study of low-income families with children. The percentage of children living with single mothers who were not…

  6. Cultural Mediation of Children's Cosmologies: A Longitudinal Study of the Astronomy Concepts of Chinese and New Zealand Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2006-01-01

    These longitudinal studies investigated the cultural mediation of children's thinking about the Earth using an interview technique designed to elicit responses from children from all "levels" of their conceptual organization (intuitive, cultural, and scientific). Close scrutiny of the research literature in this field reveals that some strategies…

  7. How Does Linguistic Competence Enhance Cognitive Functions in Children? A Study in Multilingual Children with Different Linguistic Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Videsott, Gerda; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Wiater, Werner; Franceschini, Rita; Abutalebi, Jubin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the attentional mechanisms of multilingual children with differential degrees of language competence. For this purpose, 118 children (61 female/57 male; mean age 10.9 years (SD = 0.29); early acquisition multilinguals) from the Ladin valleys in South Tyrol, Italy, performed the Attentional Network…

  8. Children's Sexual Thinking: A Comparative Study of Children Aged 5 to 15 Years in Australia, North America, Britain and Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Ronald; Goldman, Juliette

    The purpose of this cross-national descriptive study is to measure the extent of children's sexual knowledge and sexual understanding at various ages and to identify what processes of thought children use in trying to explain biological functions and the phenomena of their own bodies as they grow and change. Sexual thinking is defined as thinking…

  9. A Randomized Controlled Study of Parent-Assisted Children's Friendship Training with Children Having Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Fred; Myatt, Robert; Sugar, Catherine; Whitham, Cynthia; Gorospe, Clarissa M.; Laugeson, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated Children's Friendship Training (CFT), a manualized parent-assisted intervention to improve social skills among second to fifth grade children with autism spectrum disorders. Comparison was made with a delayed treatment control group (DTC). Targeted skills included conversational skills, peer entry skills, developing friendship…

  10. Children of the "Sug": A Study of the Daily Lives of Street Children in Khartoum, Sudan, with Intervention Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudrati, Mustafa; Plummer, Mary L.; Yousif, Nassrin Dafaalla El Hag

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The study examines street children's daily lives in Khartoum, Sudan to recommend ways to improve their conditions and to successfully assist them off the streets. Methods: In 2000-2001, eight researchers conducted participant observation for 7 weeks; 20 groups of children engaged in role-plays and drawing activities; over 500 children…

  11. Cross-sectional study of malocclusion in Spanish children

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-Company, José M.; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Puertes-Fernández, Neus

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the orthodontic treatment need of the child population of the Valencia region of Spain, employing the DAI and the IOTN, to examine the relations between treatment need, socio-economic data and gender and to assess the diagnostic agreement between the two indices. Study Design: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in a random representative sample of the schoolchild population of the Valencia region of Spain. The sample size was a total of 765 children aged 12 and 15 years at 39 schools. Results: The orthodontic treatment need assessed by the DAI was 21.7% at 12 years of age and 14.1% at 15 years. The orthodontic treatment need assessed by the IOTN DHC was 20.9% at 12 years of age and 12.7% at 15 years. The diagnostic agreement between the DAI and the modified IOTN was moderate, with Kappa scores of 0.426 at 12 years of age and 0.415 for the 15-year-old group. Conclusions: Approximately 20% of the children needed orthodontic treatment. Neither gender nor social class appeared to exert a significant influence on orthodontic treatment need. Key words:Orthodontics, epidemiology, children, malocclusion. PMID:23986013

  12. Studies of hypersensitivity reactions to foods in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Bock, S A; Lee, W Y; Remigio, L K; May, C D

    1978-12-01

    In order to extend previous investigations of adverse reactions to foods performed at this institution, 68 children, aged 5 mo to 15 yr, were studied. All subjects reported a history of adverse reaction to ingestion of one or more of the 14 foods under study. Sixteen of 43 subjects, 3 yr of age or older, had 22 adverse reactions during 94 food challenges with one or more of the 14 foods. All reactions confirmed were to peanut or other nuts, milk, egg, and soy. Skin testing with 1:20 weight/volume concentrations of food extracts applied by the puncture technique produced a net wheal reaction 3 mm or greater in all subjects 3 yr of age or older in whom double-blind food challenges confirmed the history of adverse reaction. Thirteen of 25 children less than 3 yr of age manifested adverse reactions during 49 food challenges. Skin testing by puncture technique produced a net wheal 3 mm or greater in 9 children less than 3 yr of age in whom food challenge elicited a clinical response within 2 hr. One of 4 subjects less than 3 yr of age in whom the adverse reaction occurred more than 4 hr after food challenge exhibited a wheal to puncture skin test of 3 mm or greater. These studies suggest that at present double-blind food challenge is an indispensible tool for the unequivocal evaluation of adverse reactions to foods.

  13. Developmental Changes in the Rosenzweig Picture--Frustration Study, Children's Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graybill, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Study examined the validity of 1948 norms of the Picture-Frustration Study, Children's Form. Instrument was administered to 140 children, grades 2 through 6, as part of a project investigating effects of video games. Though findings differed from the 1948 norms, they supported the validity of the Children's Form of the Picture-Frustration Study.…

  14. Adverse Consequences of School Mobility for Children in Foster Care: A Prospective Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pears, Katherine C.; Kim, Hyoun K.; Buchanan, Rohanna; Fisher, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Few prospective studies have examined school mobility in children in foster care. This study described the school moves of 86 such children and 55 community comparison children (primarily Caucasian), living in a medium-sized metropolitan area in the Pacific Northwest who were approximately 3 to 6 years old at the study start. Additionally, the…

  15. Child Maltreatment in the "Children of the Nineties": A Cohort Study of Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidebotham, Peter; Heron, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the multiple factors affecting the risk of maltreatment in young children within a comprehensive theoretical framework. Methods: The research is based on a large UK cohort study, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Out of 14,256 children participating in the study, 293 were investigated by social services for…

  16. Optical studies of the charge transfer complex in polythiophene/fullerene blends for organic photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drori, T.; Holt, J.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    2010-08-01

    We studied the photophysics of regioregular polythiophene/ C61 (RR-P3HT/PCBM) blend films utilized for organic photovoltaic applications using the femtosecond transient and steady-state photomodulation techniques with above-gap and below-gap pump excitations and electroabsorption spectroscopy. We provide strong evidence for the existence of charge transfer complex (CTC) state in the blend that is formed deep inside the optical gap of the polymer and fullerene constituents, which is clearly revealed in the electroabsorption spectrum with an onset at 1.2 eV. We identify this “midgap” band as the lowest lying CTC state formed at the interfaces separating the polymer and fullerene phases. With above-gap pump excitation the primary photoexcitations in the blend are excitons and polarons in the polymer domains that are generated within the experimental time resolution (150 fs), having distinguishable photoinduced absorption (PA) bands in the mid-IR. The photogenerated excitons subsequently decay within ˜10ps , consistent with the polymer weak photoluminescence in the blend. In contrast, with below-gap pump excitation, a new PA band in the mid-IR is generated within our time resolution, which is associated with photogenerated species that decay into polarons at much later times; also no PA of excitons is observed. We interpret the photoexcitations as CT excitons, which with below-gap pump excitation are resonantly generated on the CTC states at the interfaces, as the first step for polaron generation, without involving intrachain excitons in the polymer phase. We found that the polarons generated with below-gap pump excitation are trapped at the interfaces with relatively long lifetime, and thus may generate polarons on the polymer chains and fullerene molecules with a different mechanism than with above-gap excitation. In any case the interfacial polarons generated with below-gap excitation do not substantially contribute to the photocurrent density in photovoltaic

  17. STUDY DESIGN FOR A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC PESTICIDES "CTEPP"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study is one of the largest aggregate exposure studies of young children in the United States. The CTEPP study examines the exposures of about 260 preschool children and their primary ad...

  18. First-principles studies on the charge density wave in uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ruizhi; Lu, Haiyan; Ao, Bingyun; Tang, Tao; Chen, Piheng

    2016-06-01

    The charge density wave (CDW) state of α-U (called {α1} -U) was studied through a first-principles total-energy minimization using the conjugate gradient algorithm. The optimized crystal structure of {α1} -U was found to have the space group Pbnm, which was proposed in the earlier Landau-type theory and is isostructural with the α-Np structure. In particular, the changes in the lattice parameters of Pbnm-U with respect to α-U are consistent with the experimental observations. In addition, the energetic stability of Pbnm-U with respect to α-U was confirmed by enthalpy calculations, and the value of the critical pressure in the pressure-induced quantum transition from Pbnm-U to α-U is in good agreement with the experimental result. Moreover, the phonon calculation verified the dynamical instability of α-U and the stability of Pbnm-U. Finally, the calculated electronic structures exhibit features of the CDW state.

  19. Environmentally Reformed Travel Habits During the 2006 Congestion Charge Trial in Stockholm—A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Greger; Hagman, Olle; Andréasson, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Policy measures that reduce or replace road traffic can improve environmental conditions in most large cities. In Stockholm a congestion charge was introduced during a test period in 2006. This was a full-scale trial that proved to meet its targets by reducing traffic crossing the inner city segment during rush hours by 20%. Emissions of carbon dioxide and particles were also substantially reduced. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 40 inhabitants, analyses how and why new travel habits emerged. The results show that particular, sometimes unexpected, features of everyday life (habits, resources, opportunities, values, etc.) were crucial for adjustment of travel behaviour in relation to the policy instrument. One example was that those accustomed to mixing different modes of transport on a daily basis more easily adapted their travel in the targeted way. On a more general level, the results revealed that the policy measure could actually tip the scales for the individual towards trying out a new behaviour. PMID:21909301

  20. Environmentally reformed travel habits during the 2006 congestion charge trial in Stockholm--a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Greger; Hagman, Olle; Andréasson, Håkan

    2011-08-01

    Policy measures that reduce or replace road traffic can improve environmental conditions in most large cities. In Stockholm a congestion charge was introduced during a test period in 2006. This was a full-scale trial that proved to meet its targets by reducing traffic crossing the inner city segment during rush hours by 20%. Emissions of carbon dioxide and particles were also substantially reduced. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 40 inhabitants, analyses how and why new travel habits emerged. The results show that particular, sometimes unexpected, features of everyday life (habits, resources, opportunities, values, etc.) were crucial for adjustment of travel behaviour in relation to the policy instrument. One example was that those accustomed to mixing different modes of transport on a daily basis more easily adapted their travel in the targeted way. On a more general level, the results revealed that the policy measure could actually tip the scales for the individual towards trying out a new behaviour.

  1. Optical study of charge dynamics in CaCo2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhang; Bing, Xu; Run, Yang; Jin-Yun, Liu; Hao, Yang; Xiang-Gang, Qiu

    2016-05-01

    We present an infrared spectroscopy study of charge dynamics in CaCo2As2 single crystal. In this material, the optical conductivity can be described by two Drude components with different scattering rates (1/τ): a broad incoherent background and a narrow Drude component. By monitoring the temperature dependence, we find that only the narrow Drude component is temperature-dependent and determines the transport properties. Especially a Fermi liquid behavior of carriers is revealed by the T 2 behavior in the dc resistivity ρ n and scattering rate 1/τ n , indicating a coherent nature of quasiparticles in the narrow Drude subsystem. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB821400, 2012CB921302, and 2015CB921303) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11274237, 91121004, 51228201, and 11004238). Wei Zhang also thanks the support of the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD).

  2. Geometry and quadratic nonlinearity of charge transfer complexes in solution: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, S; Pandey, Ravindra; Das, Puspendu K; Ramasesha, S

    2011-01-28

    In this paper, we have computed the quadratic nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of a class of weak charge transfer (CT) complexes. These weak complexes are formed when the methyl substituted benzenes (donors) are added to strong acceptors like chloranil (CHL) or di-chloro-di-cyano benzoquinone (DDQ) in chloroform or in dichloromethane. The formation of such complexes is manifested by the presence of a broad absorption maximum in the visible range of the spectrum where neither the donor nor the acceptor absorbs. The appearance of this visible band is due to CT interactions, which result in strong NLO responses. We have employed the semiempirical intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO∕S) Hamiltonian to calculate the energy levels of these CT complexes using single and double configuration interaction (SDCI). The solvent effects are taken into account by using the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) scheme. The geometry of the complex is obtained by exploring different relative molecular geometries by rotating the acceptor with respect to the fixed donor about three different axes. The theoretical geometry that best fits the experimental energy gaps, β(HRS) and macroscopic depolarization ratios is taken to be the most probable geometry of the complex. Our studies show that the most probable geometry of these complexes in solution is the parallel displaced structure with a significant twist in some cases.

  3. X-ray absorption structural study of a reversible, photoexcited charge-transfer state

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Bowman, M.K.; Norris, J.R. Univ. of Chicago, IL ); Montano, P.A. )

    1993-05-19

    Electron-transfer reactions can be accompanied by significant nuclear movements. Nuclear motion appears to be especially vital to the reversible, photoinduced charge-transfer chemistry of cyclopentadienylnickel nitrosyl (C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO). Although extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has recorded photoinduced changes in the ligation of myoglobins, similar X-ray studies of electron-transfer chemistry have not been reported. Here we examine reversible, photoinduced structural changes in C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO by EXAFS and propose a mechanism for the electron-transfer chemistry. This work demonstrates that EXAFS can measure distance changes accompanying photoinduced electron transfer to provide new details of the geometry of photoexcited state and suggests that electron transfer occurs in the transient, optically excited states of C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO and C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup CT] as dictated by NO movement that produces either C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup CT] or C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup GS]. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Geometry and quadratic nonlinearity of charge transfer complexes in solution: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Ramasesha, S.; Pandey, Ravindra; Das, Puspendu K.

    2011-01-28

    In this paper, we have computed the quadratic nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of a class of weak charge transfer (CT) complexes. These weak complexes are formed when the methyl substituted benzenes (donors) are added to strong acceptors like chloranil (CHL) or di-chloro-di-cyano benzoquinone (DDQ) in chloroform or in dichloromethane. The formation of such complexes is manifested by the presence of a broad absorption maximum in the visible range of the spectrum where neither the donor nor the acceptor absorbs. The appearance of this visible band is due to CT interactions, which result in strong NLO responses. We have employed the semiempirical intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO/S) Hamiltonian to calculate the energy levels of these CT complexes using single and double configuration interaction (SDCI). The solvent effects are taken into account by using the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) scheme. The geometry of the complex is obtained by exploring different relative molecular geometries by rotating the acceptor with respect to the fixed donor about three different axes. The theoretical geometry that best fits the experimental energy gaps, {beta}{sub HRS} and macroscopic depolarization ratios is taken to be the most probable geometry of the complex. Our studies show that the most probable geometry of these complexes in solution is the parallel displaced structure with a significant twist in some cases.

  5. S-, N- and C-doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization and redox charge transfer study

    SciTech Connect

    Madhusudan Reddy, K.; Baruwati, Babita; Jayalakshmi, M.; Mohan Rao, M.; Manorama, Sunkara V . E-mail: manorama@iict.res.in

    2005-11-15

    Herein we report on the synthesis and characterization of TiO{sub 2} nanomaterials doped with anions like sulfur, carbon and nitrogen. Upon doping, the absorption extends well into the visible region. This shift in the absorption edge is accompanied by a concomitant narrowing of band gap. The resulting anion-doped TiO{sub 2} nanomaterials were characterized by XRD, XPS, elemental analysis, EDAX, TEM, UV-DRS, DC conductivity, AC impedance and cyclic voltammetric studies. XPS confirms the presence of the dopants and the elemental analysis determined the amount of dopants in TiO{sub 2}. Electrochemical characterization was carried out by cyclic voltammetry at pHs 2, 6.5 and 10. As against the response of undoped TiO{sub 2}, the doped samples show an active electrochemical response indicating an induced charge transfer across the titania/solution interface, thus forming two anodic peaks and a cathodic peak. This interesting and significant observation was understood in terms of band bending due to anion doping as well as to the pH changes in the experimental solutions.

  6. Numerical study of an electrostatic plasma sheath containing two species of charged dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Foroutan, G.; Akhoundi, A.

    2012-10-01

    A multi-fluid model is used to study the dynamics of a dusty plasma sheath consists of electrons, ions, and two species of charged dust particles, i.e., nano-size and micron-size particles. It is found that, when the sheath is dominated by the nano-size dust grains, spatially periodic fluctuations are developed in the profiles of the sheath potential, and the number density and velocity of the plasma and dust particles. Due to inertial effects, the fluctuations in the parameters of the micron-size grains are much lower than those of the other parameters. The competition between the electric and ion drag forces plays the primary role in development of the fluctuations. The spatial period of the fluctuations is approximately a few Debye lengths and their amplitude depends on the plasma and dust parameters. The fluctuations are reduced by the increase in the radius, mass density, and Mach number of the nano-size particles, as well as the density and Mach number of the ions. But, they are enhanced by the increase in the plasma number density and the electron temperature. The sheath thickness demonstrates a non-monotonic behavior against variation of the nanoparticle parameters, i.e., it first decreases quickly, shows a minimum, and then increases. However, the sheath width always decreases with the plasma number density and ion Mach number, while grows linearly with the electron temperature.

  7. Invasiveness of pharmacokinetic studies in children: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Altamimi, Mohammed I; Choonara, Imti; Sammons, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore whether pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in paediatric patients are becoming less invasive. This will be evaluated by analysing the number of samples and volume of blood collected for each study within four different decades. Methods A systematic literature review was performed to identify PK papers describing number of samples and volume of blood collected in studies of children aged 0–18 years. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE (1946 to December 2015), EMBASE (1974 to December 2015), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to December 2015), CINAHL and Cochrane Library. Results A total of 549 studies were identified between 1974 and 2015. There were 52 studies between 1976 and 1985, 105 between 1986 and 1995, 201 between 1996 and 2005 and 191 between 2006 and 2015. The number of blood samples collected per participant increased between the first two decades (p=0.013), but there was a decrease in the number of samples in the subsequent two decades (p=0.044 and p<0.001, respectively). Comparing the first and last decades, there has been no change in the number of blood samples collected. There were no significant differences in volume collected per sample or total volume per child in any of the age groups. There was however a significant difference in the frequency of blood sampling between population PK studies (median 5 (IQR 3–7)) and non-population PK studies (median 8 (IQR 6–10); p=<0.001). Conclusions The number of blood samples collected for PK studies in children rose in 1985–1995 and subsequently declined. There was no overall change in the volume of blood collected over the 4 decades. The usage of population PK methods reduces the frequency of blood sampling in children. PMID:27431899

  8. Theoretical study of differential charge-transfer cross sections for Ne4++He collisions at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J.; Lin, C. D.

    1988-02-01

    A quantal two-channel calculation is applied to study charge-transfer differential cross sections in Ne4+ on He collisions at laboratory impact energies from 220 to 500 eV. The experimental data of Tunnell et al. were used to fit empirical potential curves and coupling terms from which the observed oscillatory structures in the differential cross sections were analyzed. In contrast with the double-charge-transfer process in C4+ on He, where the oscillations in the differential cross sections are attributed to pure Stueckelberg oscillations, we demonstrated that the differential cross sections for charge transfer in Ne4+ on He exhibit many fine fast oscillations and the observed structures are due to the envelopes of these unresolved fast oscillations. Classical deflection functions are used to help in interpreting the calculated oscillations.

  9. Theoretical and experimental study of the space-charge oscillations in the electron-optical system of a relativistic gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyakov, E. V. Kulagin, I. S.; Manuilov, V. N.; Movshevich, B. Z.

    2011-12-15

    A theoretical and experimental study of the oscillations of a space-charge cloud in a magnetron-injection gun of a powerful relativistic gyrotron has been performed. The charge storage occurs via electron-beam magnetic compression of the reflection of a part of the electrons having the highest transverse velocities from a magnetic mirror. It has been established that at high values of the compression coefficient the beam loses its stability that finally leads to the appearance of the beam current modulation at the frequency of the longitudinal oscillations of an electron beam in an adiabatic trap. According to the numerical simulations, the energy spread in the formed beam under these conditions reaches 4.6%, which is higher by an order of magnitude than that due to the space-charge effect in the beam transported along the metal tube.

  10. A theoretical model for smoking prevention studies in preteen children.

    PubMed

    McGahee, T W; Kemp, V; Tingen, M

    2000-01-01

    The age of the onset of smoking is on a continual decline, with the prime age of tobacco use initiation being 12-14 years. A weakness of the limited research conducted on smoking prevention programs designed for preteen children (ages 10-12) is a well-defined theoretical basis. A theoretical perspective is needed in order to make a meaningful transition from empirical analysis to application of knowledge. Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory (1977, 1986), the Theory of Reasoned Action (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980), and other literature linking various concepts to smoking behaviors in preteens were used to develop a model that may be useful for smoking prevention studies in preteen children. PMID:12026266

  11. National Children's Study: environmental exposures in Waukesha County.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Jane A; Anderson, Henry A; Durkin, Maureen S; Cronk, Christine E

    2006-03-01

    The National Children's Study (NCS), launched in September of 2005, will investigate the effects of environmental exposures and children's health and development. Waukesha County, Wis was selected as 1 of 7 sites to spearhead this ambitious undertaking. Residents of Waukesha County may experience different kinds of environmental exposures from water, land, and air based on where they live, work, and play. A selected number of Waukesha County's environmental exposures described briefly in this report will serve the NCS well with their heterogeneity of potential exposures: from private well water and community water supplies that obtain water from both surface and groundwater; from the variable exposures to ambient air pollution from mobile sources, local industrial sources, and distant sources (ozone); and the different levels of exposures from soil and dust depending on the prevalence of pesticide use and lead-based paints. By combining data gathered from Waukesha County's participants with other study sites, a holistic picture of environmental exposures in the United States can be evaluated as it influences the health of our nation's children.

  12. [Study on structure, charge and spectrum for para-halogenated diphenyl ethers through density functional theory].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Long; Cai, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Chen; Zou, Qiao; Li, Yu

    2013-11-01

    The present paper mainly researched the molecular geometry, charge distribution and spectrum vibration of diphenyl ether and its 3 kinds of para-halogenated diphenyl ethers based on density functional theory (DFT). The infrared and Raman spectrum vibration frequency for para-halogenated diphenyl ethers was calculated based on respective optimal molecular geometry with the same method which was carried out at the B3LYP/6-31(d) level, then spectrum vibration of para-halogenated diphenyl ethers was assigned in detail for the first time. Combined with charge distribution of diphenyl ether and by the nuclear magnetic resonance and Milliken charge distribution, the authors also analyzed the effect of different para-halogenated substituent on charge distribution, at last the vibration mechanism and change rule of of para-halogenated diphenyl ethers' characteristic vibrations were analyzed in the view of charge distribution innovatively. From the research we can see that the more the electronegativity of para-halogenated substituent, the bigger the atomic radius, and the longer the C-X bond, the easier they are degraded in the environment; para-halogenated substituent affected the charge distribution greatly especially to para-carbon relative to ether bond, and meta-carbon was controlled by the combination electronic effect of para-halogenated substituent and oxygen atom, meanwhile ortho-carbon didn't have distinct change; charge gap between bond atoms played significant role in the stability of bonds and vibration frequency of characteristic vibration, and the larger the electronegativity of para-halogenated substituent, the larger the vibration frequency. PMID:24555401

  13. Clinical studies on angiostrongyliasis cantonensis among children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hwang, K P; Chen, E R

    1991-12-01

    Angiostrongyliasis cantonensis is a disease commonly seen in Taiwan, especially in children during the summer rainy season. Most of the cases reported in other countries were adults and their clinical manifestations were different from children. Studies on special clinical characteristics of angiostrongyliasis cantonensis among 82 children in Taiwan were performed. Thirty-eight (46.3%) were male and 44 (53.7%) females, and 87% could be traced to a history of contact with the intermediate host, the giant African snail, Achatina fulica, which plays a major role in transmission. The incubation period (average: 13.2 days) was shorter in children than in adults (average: 16.5 days). In about one-third (30.5%) of the total cases, the clinical form was meningoencephalitis, which was higher than in adult cases seen in Thailand (5%). The most common clinical symptom was fever (91.5%), followed by vomiting and headache. The percentages of sixth and seventh cranial neuropathy associated with the disease were 19.5% and 11.0% respectively. Ophthalmologic fundoscopy showed that 25.0% with papilledema which was significantly higher than seen in adults (12%) in Thailand. Most of the cases in this study had peripheral leukocytosis (above 10,000/mm3) and eosinophilia (above 10%); the percentages were 82.9% and 84.1%, respectively. The worm recovery rate from cerebrospinal fluid by lumbar puncture of 82 cases was 41.5%; 141 worms were collected from one female patient using a pumping method. In the recent 2 years, albendazole and levamisole were used clinically with good result.

  14. Acceptance of Asthma Pharmacogenetic Study by Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ann Chen; Davis, Robert; Tantisira, Kelan; Dutta-Linn, M. Maya; Hemmes, Mia; Weiss, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenetic testing may change clinical medicine by allowing clinicians to tailor medications based on a patient’s genetic makeup, however, these tests must first be validated in large, real-life populations of subjects that include children. A dearth of knowledge exists for whether pediatric populations are as willing as adult populations to provide samples for such studies. Objective (1) To assess whether pediatric and adult patients with persistent asthma are willing to provide specimens for DNA extraction and genetic studies. (2) To assess whether patients’ willingness to provide blood as compared to buccal smear specimens differ. Methods Of 644 patients ages 4–38 years who had three or more prescription fills for inhaled corticosteroids in one year, 60% (385) were randomized to the blood specimen group and 40% (259) were randomized to the buccal smear group in order to study acceptance of different biospecimen collection methods. Research assistants contacted subjects to obtain consent, perform a phone survey, and request a specimen. Results There were no baseline differences between subjects randomized to the blood specimen group versus buccal smear group with respect to age, gender, or number of dispensings of inhaled corticosteroids. Of 259 subjects in the buccal smear group, 30% (78) provided samples, and of 385 subjects in the blood specimen group, 16% (60) provided samples. Subjects randomized to the buccal smear group were more likely to provide specimens for genetic study compared to subjects randomized to the blood specimen group (RR 1.21; 95% CI 1.10 – 1.32), even after adjusting for age. Pediatric subjects were more likely to provide specimens for genetic study than adult subjects with 23% (113) of pediatric subjects providing samples and 15% (25) of adult subjects providing samples (p=0.03). Conclusion Children with asthma are as likely to participate in genetic studies as adults. Both children and adult subjects are more

  15. Music Therapy with Autistic Children: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelayo, Jose Maria G., III; Sanchez, Celeste S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the researchers was to determine if there are alternative methods in treating children with autism. Children diagnosed with autism are currently attending special schools with a different type of curriculum. Many methods have been used by psychologists and psychiatrists to treat children diagnosed with autism. Children with mental or…

  16. Laboratory Studies of Charging Properties of Dust Grains in Astrophysical/Planetary Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with UV/X-ray radiation, as well as by electron/ion impact. Knowledge of physical and optical properties of individual dust grains is required for understanding of the physical and dynamical processes in space environments and the role of dust in formation of stellar and planetary systems. In this paper we focus on charging of individual micron/submicron dust grains by processes that include: (a) UV photoelectric emissions involving incident photon energies higher than the work function of the material and b) electron impact, where low energy electrons are scattered or stick to the dust grains, thereby charging the dust grains negatively, and at sufficiently high energies the incident electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). It is well accepted that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the bulk materials. However, no viable models for calculation of the charging properties of individual micron size dust grains are available at the present time. Therefore, the photoelectric yields, and secondary electron emission yields of micron-size dust grains have to be obtained by experimental methods. Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains. Our experimental results, obtained on individual, micron-size dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance facility (at NASA-MSFC), show that: (1) The measured photoelectric yields are substantially higher than the bulk values given in the literature and indicate a particle size dependence with larger particles having order-of-magnitude higher values than for submicron-size grains; (2) dust charging by low energy electron impact is a complex process. Also, our measurements indicate that

  17. A molecular dynamics study on the transport of a charged biomolecule in a polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto a charged ligand.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, E; Wang, J-C; Liapis, A I

    2010-08-28

    The transport of a charged adsorbate biomolecule in a porous polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto the covalently immobilized ligands have been modeled and investigated using molecular dynamics modeling and simulations as the third part of a novel fundamental methodology developed for studying ion-exchange chromatography based bioseparations. To overcome computational challenges, a novel simulation approach is devised where appropriate atomistic and coarse grain models are employed simultaneously and the transport of the adsorbate is characterized through a number of locations representative of the progress of the transport process. The adsorbate biomolecule for the system studied in this work changes shape, orientation, and lateral position in order to proceed toward the site where adsorption occurs and exhibits decreased mass transport coefficients as it approaches closer to the immobilized ligand. Furthermore, because the ligands are surrounded by counterions carrying the same type of charge as the adsorbate biomolecule, it takes the biomolecule repeated attempts to approach toward a ligand in order to displace the counterions in the proximity of the ligand and to finally become adsorbed. The formed adsorbate-ligand complex interacts with the counterions and polymeric molecules and is found to evolve slowly and continuously from one-site (monovalent) interaction to multisite (multivalent) interactions. Such a transition of the nature of adsorption reduces the overall adsorption capacity of the ligands in the adsorbent medium and results in a type of surface exclusion effect. Also, the adsorption of the biomolecule also presents certain volume exclusion effects by not only directly reducing the pore volume and the availability of the ligands in the adjacent regions, but also causing the polymeric molecules to change to more compact structures that could further shield certain ligands from being accessible to subsequent adsorbate molecules. These

  18. A molecular dynamics study on the transport of a charged biomolecule in a polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto a charged ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, E.; Wang, J.-C.; Liapis, A. I.

    2010-08-01

    The transport of a charged adsorbate biomolecule in a porous polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto the covalently immobilized ligands have been modeled and investigated using molecular dynamics modeling and simulations as the third part of a novel fundamental methodology developed for studying ion-exchange chromatography based bioseparations. To overcome computational challenges, a novel simulation approach is devised where appropriate atomistic and coarse grain models are employed simultaneously and the transport of the adsorbate is characterized through a number of locations representative of the progress of the transport process. The adsorbate biomolecule for the system studied in this work changes shape, orientation, and lateral position in order to proceed toward the site where adsorption occurs and exhibits decreased mass transport coefficients as it approaches closer to the immobilized ligand. Furthermore, because the ligands are surrounded by counterions carrying the same type of charge as the adsorbate biomolecule, it takes the biomolecule repeated attempts to approach toward a ligand in order to displace the counterions in the proximity of the ligand and to finally become adsorbed. The formed adsorbate-ligand complex interacts with the counterions and polymeric molecules and is found to evolve slowly and continuously from one-site (monovalent) interaction to multisite (multivalent) interactions. Such a transition of the nature of adsorption reduces the overall adsorption capacity of the ligands in the adsorbent medium and results in a type of surface exclusion effect. Also, the adsorption of the biomolecule also presents certain volume exclusion effects by not only directly reducing the pore volume and the availability of the ligands in the adjacent regions, but also causing the polymeric molecules to change to more compact structures that could further shield certain ligands from being accessible to subsequent adsorbate molecules. These

  19. Impact of updraft on neutralized charge rate by lightning in thunderstorms: A simulation case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yijun; Zheng, Dong

    2015-12-01

    The rate of neutralized charge by lightning (RNCL) is an important parameter indicating the intensity of lightning activity. The total charging rate (CR), the CR of one kind of polarity (e.g., negative) charge (CROP), and the outflow rate of charge on precipitation (ORCP) are proposed as key factors impacting RNCL, based on the principle of conservation of one kind of polarity charge in a thunderstorm. In this paper, the impacts of updraft on CR and CROP are analyzed by using a 3D cloud resolution model for a strong storm that occurred in Beijing on 6 september 2008. The results show that updraft both promotes and inhibits RNCL at the same time. (1) Updraft always has a positive influence on CR. The correlation coefficient between the updraft volume and CR can reach 0.96. Strengthening of the updraft facilitates strengthening of RNCL through this positive influence. (2) Strengthening of the updraft also promotes reinforcement of CROP. The correlation coefficient between the updraft volume and CROP is high (about 0.9), but this promotion restrains the strengthening of RNCL because the strengthening of CROP will, most of the time, inhibit the increasing of RNCL. (3) Additionally, increasing of ORCP depresses the strengthening of RNCL. In terms of magnitude, the peak of ORCP is equal to the peak of CR. Because precipitation mainly appears after the lightning activity finishes, the depression effect of ORCP on RNCL can be ignored during the active lightning period.

  20. Laboratory-Based Studies of Eating among Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Haynos, Ann F.; Kotler, Lisa A.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of pediatric overweight has increased dramatically over the past three decades, likely due to changes in food intake as well as physical activity. Therefore, information examining eating patterns among children and adolescents is needed to illuminate which aspects of eating behavior require modification to prevent and treat pediatric overweight. Because child self-report and parent-report of children's eating habits are often inconsistent and limited by recall and other biases, laboratory-based studies in which food intake is observed and monitored have increased in number. Such studies offer objective and controlled methods of measuring and describing eating behaviors. However, to our knowledge, no publication exists that consolidates, reviews, and provides critical commentary on the literature to date in pediatric samples. In this paper, we review the literature of studies utilizing laboratory methods to examine eating behavior in samples ranging from birth through adolescence. Our review includes all relevant articles retrieved from the PubMed, Medline and PsychInfo search engines. Specifically, we examine meal-feeding studies conducted during the various developmental stages (infancy, preschool, middle childhood, and adolescence), with a focus on methodology. Included in our review are feeding studies related to dietary regulation, exposure and preference, as well as paradigms examining disordered eating patterns and their relationship to body composition. We have structured this review so that both consistent and inconsistent findings are presented by age group, and innovative methods of assessment are discussed in more detail. Following each section, we summarize findings and draw potential conclusions from the available data. We then discuss clinical implications of the research data and suggest directions for the next generation of studies of feeding behavior in children. PMID:19030122

  1. A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (CTEPP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pilot Study of Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) investigated the aggregate exposures of 257 preschool children and their primary adult caregivers to pollutants commonly detected in their everyday environments. ...

  2. The Development of Preschool Children of Heroin-Addicted Mothers: A Controlled Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Geraldine S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Disturbances of growth and behavior in children of heroin-addicted mothers was studied in 77 preschool children. Arthur Retlaw and Associates, Inc., Suite 2080, 1603 Orrington Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 60201. (Author/DLS)

  3. The Case of the Missing Childhoods: Methodological Notes for Composing Children in Writing Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Anne Haas

    2013-01-01

    Writing studies has been an intellectual playground dominated by the "big kids." If we are to understand how writing becomes "relevant" to children as children, then we must study them, not for who they are becoming, but for who they are in life spaces shared with other children. This essay on the methodology entailed in…

  4. Mapping the Journey from Home to School: A Study on Children's Representation of Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thommen, Evelyne; Avelar, Silvania; Sapin, Veronique Zbinden; Perrenoud, Silvia; Malatesta, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted with 235 children from Brazil and Switzerland. The children, from 5 to 13 years of age, were asked to draw the journey they undertake every day from home to school. The purpose of the study is to understand the relationship between the cognitive development and map-drawing abilities of children in both…

  5. Characteristics and Dental Experiences of Autistic Children in Saudi Arabia: Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murshid, Ebtissam Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report base line information about characteristics, and dental experiences of a group of autistic children in three major cities of Saudi Arabia. Most of the children (76.2%) included in the study were diagnosed with autism before the age of 5 years. More than half of the children (53.7%) had no previous dental…

  6. Motor Milestone Development in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ting

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if a sample of children currently diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) would have shown motor milestone delays before age three as compared to typically developing children. Given delays in motor skills, the study also strived to determine which specific skills might be delayed. Parents of 44 children who…

  7. IN UTERO ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES IN THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY - MEASUREMENT STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Children¿s Study (NCS) is a longitudinal cohort study which is designed to follow a nationally representative sample of American children from prior to conception or early pregnancy until age 21 years. The Children's Health Act of 2000 directs a consortium of United...

  8. Phonological Development in Very-Low-Birthweight Children: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Noort-Van Der Spek, Inge L.; Franken, Marie-Christine J. P.; Wieringa, Marjan H.; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Very-low-birthweight (VLBW; birthweight less than 1500g and/or gestational age less than 32wks) children are at risk for speech problems. However, there are few studies on speech development in VLBW children at an early age. The aim of this study was to investigate phonological development in 2-year-old VLBW children. Method: Twenty VLBW…

  9. Time Dependent Chemical Study of Contracting Interstellar Clouds. III. The Charge Distribution in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M. Y.; El Nawawy, M. S.; Ateya, B. G.; Aiad, A.

    1995-01-01

    We have constructed a chemical reaction model in a contracting interstellar cloud including 104 species which are involved in a network of 557 reactions. The chemical kinetic equations were integrated as a function of time by using gear package. The evolution of the system was followed in the density range 10 107 particles cm-3. The calculated fractional abundances of the charged species are in good agreement with those given by other investigators. The charge density has been followed in diffuse, intermediate and dense regions. The most dominant ionic species are metallic ions, HCO+ and H{3/+} in the shielded regions and atomic ions H+, C+, Si+, He+, S+ and metal ions in the diffuse and intermediate regions. The abundances of negatively charged ions were found to be negligible. The results of the calculations on the different metallic ions are interpreted.

  10. Thermally stimulated currents and space charge studies on field-aged extruded cable material

    SciTech Connect

    Amyot, N.; Pelissou, S.; Toureille, A.

    1996-12-31

    In the perspective of gaining more knowledge on extruded cable field aging diagnosis, complementary techniques were investigated: thermally stimulated currents (TSC) and space charge measurements, the latter being performed by the thermal step (TS) method. Measurements were taken on 28 kV extruded cable samples of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE). Samples were peeled-off from three cables; one unaged and two field-aged. Both techniques show differences between field-aged and unaged cable material. Results obtained by TS show that aged material can store more space charges that lead to greater intensity of the electrical field in some sites in the polymer matrix and eventually initiate electrical trees leading to breakdown. Comparison with TSC results show that the origin of space charge formation cannot be attributed uniquely to traps formed by carbonyl groups from polymer oxidation.

  11. Study of Grating Structures Transferred to Glass Substrates via Corona Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Daisuke; Miho, Daichi; Harada, Kenji; Barada, Daisuke; Fukuda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The fabrication of a grating structure on/in a glass substrate via corona charging was investigated. According to the experimental result, it was found that a surface relief grating (SRG; depth=1.5 nm) and a volume grating were transferred to the substrate when a polymer film with an SRG as a template was employed. The polymer template should be prebaked before corona charging to inhibit the generation of structural disorder, which degrades the optical quality of the transferred grating. The diffraction properties were discussed in order to characterize the transferred grating that consists of an SRG and a volume grating. Additionally, the erasability and rewritability of the grating structure stored on/in the glass substrate were investigated. Then, it was experimentally confirmed that a Fourier transform hologram stored on/in a glass substrate could be erased via homogeneous corona charging. Furthermore, it was found that a glass substrate becomes unrecordable after the erasure.

  12. Children's exposure to metals: a community-initiated study.

    PubMed

    Callan, Anna Carita; Winters, Matthew; Barton, Caroline; Boyce, Mary; Hinwood, Andrea Lee

    2012-05-01

    In 2007, it was shown that the shipping of lead (Pb) through Esperance Port in Western Australia resulted in contamination and increased Pb concentrations in children. A clean-up strategy was implemented; however, little attention was given to other metals. In consultation with the community, a cross-sectional exposure study was designed. Thirty-nine children aged 1 to 12 years provided samples of hair, urine, drinking water, residential soil and dust. Concentrations of nickel (Ni) and Pb were low in biological and environmental samples. Hair aluminium (Al) (lower than the detection limit [DL] to 251 μg/g) and copper (Cu) (7 to 415 μg/g), as well as urinary Al (

    children at the time of sampling in 2009. Further investigation is required to determine the source(s) and significance of other increased metals concentrations. PMID:22068721

  13. A developmental study of children's stereotyping of facially deformed adults.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, N; Bull, R; Gahagan, D

    1986-05-01

    A frequent complaint of facially deformed people is that they are rejected by others. This study was designed to examine whether negative reactions to facially deformed people would be demonstrated by girls and boys aged 5-11 years. The children were asked to attribute positive or negative characteristics to photographs in which adults were shown before and after minor oral surgery. Despite the relatively small differences in appearance between each adult's before- and after-operation photographs, it was found that, whereas overall the younger children selected faces at around chance level (i.e. 50 per cent), the 11-year-olds on 75 per cent of occasions selected in response to questions concerning friendliness and helping (deemed 'positive') the after-operation photographs, and in response to questions concerning fear and anger (deemed 'negative') the before-operation photographs. When the children's own judgements of facial attractiveness were related to the faces they had chosen in response to positive and negative questions, while again for the five-year-olds only chance responding (50 per cent) was observed, by age seven 75 per cent, and by age 11 90 per cent, of choices suggested facial stereotyping.

  14. The Fun Families Study: intervention to reduce children's TV viewing.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Markham, Christine M; Addy, Robert C; Greisinger, Anthony; Murray, Nancy G; Brehm, Brenda

    2010-02-01

    Media consumption may contribute to childhood obesity. This study developed and evaluated a theory-based, parent-focused intervention to reduce television and other media consumption to prevent and reduce childhood obesity. Families (n = 202) with children ages 6-9 were recruited from a large, urban multiethnic population into a randomized controlled trial (101 families into the intervention group and 101 into the control group), and were followed for 6 months. The intervention consisted of a 2-hour workshop and six bimonthly newsletters. Behavioral objectives included: (i) reduce TV watching; (ii) turn off TV when nobody is watching; (iii) no TV with meals; (iv) no TV in the child's bedroom; and (v) engage in fun non-media related activities. Parents were 89% female, 44% white, 28% African American, 17% Latino, and 11% Asian, mean age 40 years (s.d. = 7.5); 72% were married. Children were 49% female, mean age 8 years (s.d. = 0.95). Sixty-five percent of households had three or more TVs and video game players; 37% had at least one handheld video game, and 53% had three or more computers. Average children's weekday media exposure was 6.1 hours. At 6 months follow-up, the intervention group was less likely to report the TV being on when nobody was watching (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.23, P < 0.05), less likely to report eating snacks while watching TV (AOR = 0.47, P < 0.05), and less likely to have a TV in the child's bedroom (AOR = 0.23, P < 0.01). There was a trend toward reducing actual media consumption but these outcomes did not reach statistical significance. Effective strategies to reduce children's TV viewing were identified. PMID:20107469

  15. A study on the effects of relativistic heavy charged particles on the cellular microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costes, Sylvain Vincent

    This study was done under the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) effort to assess the effect of cosmic radiation on astronauts during a 3 year mission to Mars. Carcinogenesis is known to be induced more efficiently by cosmic radiation. Our attention was turned towards one of the most efficient cosmic particles in inducing cancer, relativistic Fe, and focused in assessing its effect on the cellular microenvironment (ECM). Previous observations on mammary glands were showing irregularities in the immunoreactivity of the ECM protein laminin one hour after whole body irradiation with 1GeV/amu Fe ions for a dose of 0.8 Gy. This effect was not observed after 5 Gy γ-rays exposure. The rapidity of such a change suggested that the effect might be due to a physical event specific to relativistic charged particles (HZE), rather than a biological event. Our study showed that this effect is actually a complex and rapid response of the microenvironment to highly ionizing radiation. It involves a fast disruption of the basement membrane of the ECM induced by the highly localized ionization and reactive oxygen formation around the track of the Fe ion. This disruption triggers further chemical and biological responses involved in the remodeling of the laminin network in the basement membrane. A metalloproteinase is suspected to be the intermediate protease affecting laminin. The HZE effect on the microenvironment was seen in both mouse mammary glands and skin, but the laminin isoforms sensitive to Fe ions were different for each organ, with a clear disruption of laminin-1 network in skin and of laminin-5 in mammary glands. In addition, the laminin receptor integrins seem to be involved in this mechanism, but its contribution is unclear at this point. Finally, such studies suggest a shift from the concept of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) used in classical radiation biology since the effect is only seen with HZE at viable whole body doses. In addition, this

  16. Photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer process of betaine pyridinium: A theoretical spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Aurélie; Aloïse, Stéphane; Pawlowska, Zuzanna; Sliwa, Michel; Maurel, François; Abe, Jiro

    2011-10-01

    Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory and taking into account bulk solvent effects, we investigate the absorption and emission spectra of a betaine pyridinium molecule, the 2-(1-pyridinio) benzimidazolate (SBPa). This molecule exhibits strong photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). We have identified two different electronic states involved, respectively, in the strong bathochromic ICT absorption band (S 2) and in the moderate emission band (S 1). The ICT process is analyzed in terms of charge distribution and dipole moment evolutions upon photoexcitation. These results are compared with steady-state spectroscopic measurements.

  17. Study of Deformation Effects in the Charged Particle Emission from 46Ti*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekiesz, M.; Papka, P.; Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Beck, C.; Bednarczyk, P.; Grebosz, J.; Haas, F.; Meczynski, W.; Rauch, V.; Rousseau, M.; Zafra, A. Sanchez I.; Styczen, J.; Thummerer, S.; Zieblinski, M.; Zuber, K.

    2005-04-01

    The 46Ti* compound nucleus, as populated by the fusion--evaporation reaction 27Al + 19F at the bombarding energy of 144MeV, has been investigated by charged particle spectroscopy using the multidetector array ICARE at the VIVITRON tandem facility of the IReS (Strasbourg). The light charged particles have been measured in coincidence with evaporation residues. The CACARIZO} code, a Monte Carlo implementation of the statistical model code CASCADE, has been used to calculate the spectral shapes of evaporated α -particles which are compared with the experimental spectra. This comparison indicates the possible signature of large deformations of the compound nucleus.

  18. A New Method to Study Hawking Radiation of Charged Particle from Stationary Axisymmetric Sen Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu-Zheng; Chen, De-You

    2007-01-01

    Taking the self-gravitation interaction and energy conservation, charge conservation and angular momentum conservation into account, we discuss the tunnelling characteristics of the charged particle from Sen black hole by the Hamilton-Jacobi method. The result shows that the tunnelling probability is related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, and the actual radiation spectrum deviates from the pure thermal one, which is consistent with the result of Parikh and Wilczek and gives a new method to correct the Hawking pure thermal spectrum of Sen black hole.

  19. A fundamental study of the charge transport and morphology of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, R. Joseph

    Conjugated polymers include some of the most promising candidates for the active layer of low-cost thin-film transistors (TFTs) and bulk heterojunction photovoltaic (PV) cells. The charge carrier mobility of these conjugated polymers is the key materials property limiting the performance of both of these devices. This thesis outlines a fundamental investigation of the charge transport and morphology of the first high mobility conjugated polymer, regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). The charge carrier mobility in TFTs was found to increase by four orders-of-magnitude as the molecular weight (MW) of P3HT is increased from 3000 g/mole to 36,000 g/mole. P3HT films with different MWs provided an ideal system for correlating morphological changes in conjugated polymers to resulting changes in charge transport. Atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction and grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS) were used to measure changes in the crystallinity and crystal orientation associated with varying the spin-casting solvent, annealing conditions, substrate surface treatment, and drop-casting at a constant MW. The GIXS results showed that at a constant MW in both low- and high-MW films, the mobility correlated to the strength of in-plane pi-stacking. When comparing different MWs, however, this correlation broke down. Rocking curves on samples with a chemically modified surface showed highly oriented crystals that were nucleated from the substrate and correlate with variations in charge transport. Switching to low-MW P3HT improves the overall crystallinity, the intensity of in-plane pi-stacking, and the concentration of highly oriented crystals, but the mobility is more than a factor of 100 lower than high-MW P3HT. These counterintuitive results clearly show that the charge carrier mobility of conjugated polymers is coupled to several different aspects of the morphology. In the case of the low-MW films, the strong driving force for ordering creates grain boundaries that

  20. Charge transport in metal oxides: A theoretical study of hematite α-Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanova, N.; Dupuis, M.; Rosso, K. M.

    2005-04-01

    Transport of conduction electrons and holes through the lattice of α-Fe2O3 (hematite) is modeled as a valence alternation of iron cations using ab initio electronic structure calculations and electron transfer theory. Experimental studies have shown that the conductivity along the (001) basal plane is four orders of magnitude larger than the conductivity along the [001] direction. In the context of the small polaron model, a cluster approach was used to compute quantities controlling the mobility of localized electrons and holes, i.e., the reorganization energy and the electronic coupling matrix element that enter Marcus' theory. The calculation of the electronic coupling followed the generalized Mulliken-Hush approach using the complete active space self-consistent field method. Our findings demonstrate an approximately three orders of magnitude anisotropy in both electron and hole mobility between directions perpendicular and parallel to the c axis, in good accord with experimental data. The anisotropy arises from the slowness of both electron and hole mobilities across basal oxygen planes relative to that within iron bilayers between basal oxygen planes. Interestingly, for elementary reaction steps along either of the directions considered, there is only less than one order of magnitude difference in mobility between electrons and holes, in contrast to accepted classical arguments. Our findings indicate that the most important quantity underlying mobility differences is the electronic coupling, albeit the reorganization energy contributes as well. The large values computed for the electronic coupling suggest that charge transport reactions in hematite are adiabatic in nature. The electronic coupling is found to depend on both the superexchange interaction through the bridging oxygen atoms and the d-shell electron spin coupling within the Fe-Fe donor-acceptor pair, while the reorganization energy is essentially independent of the electron spin coupling.

  1. Analytical study for the charge-transfer complexes of rosuvastatin calcium with π-acceptors.

    PubMed

    Alzoman, Nourah Z; Sultan, Maha A; Maher, Hadir M; Alshehri, Mona M; Wani, Tanveer A; Darwish, Ibrahim A

    2013-07-03

    Studies were carried out to investigate the charge-transfer (CT) reaction of ROS-Ca, as a n-electron donor with various p-acceptors: tetracyanoethylene, p-chloranilic acid, 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone, 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-1,4-benzoquinone, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone, 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-quinodimethane, and 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone. Different colored CT complexes were obtained. The reaction mechanism and site of interaction were determined by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometric techniques and computational molecular modeling. The formation of the colored complexes was utilized in the development of simple, rapid and accurate spectrophotometric methods for the determination of ROS-Ca. Under the optimum reaction conditions, linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (0.9984-0.9995) were found between the absorbances and the concentrations of ROS-Ca in the range of 2-200 mg mL⁻¹. The limits of detection ranged from 0.41 to 12.24 mg mL⁻¹. No interference could be observed from the additives commonly present in the tablets or from the drugs that are co-formulated with ROS-Ca in its combined formulations. The methods were successfully applied to the analysis of tablets with good accuracy and precision; the recovery percentages ranged from 99.54-100.46 ± 1.58-1.82%. The results were compared favorably with the reported method. The proposed methods are practical and valuable for routine application in quality control laboratories for determination of ROS-Ca in its bulk form and tablets.

  2. Theoretical study of negatively charged Fe(-)-(H2O)(n ≤ 6) clusters.

    PubMed

    Castro, Miguel

    2012-06-14

    Interactions of a singly negatively charged iron atom with water molecules, Fe(-)-(H(2)O)(n≤6), in the gas phase were studied by means of density functional theory. All-electron calculations were performed using the B3LYP functional and the 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis set for the Fe, O, and H atoms. In the lowest total energy states of Fe(-)-(H(2)O)(n), the metal-hydrogen bonding is stronger than the metal-oxygen one, producing low-symmetry structures because the water molecules are directly attached to the metal by basically one of their hydrogen atoms, whereas the other ones are involved in a network of hydrogen bonds, which together with the Fe(δ-)-H(δ+) bonding accounts for the nascent hydration of the Fe(-) anion. For Fe(-)-(H(2)O)(3≤n), three-, four-, five-, and six-membered rings of water molecules are bonded to the metal, which is located at the surface of the cluster in such a way as to reduce the repulsion with the oxygen atoms. Nevertheless, internal isomers appear also, lying less than 3 or 5 kcal/mol for n = 2-3 or n = 4-6. These results are in contrast with those of classical TM(+)-(H(2)O)(n) complexes, where the direct TM(+)-O bonding usually produces high symmetry structures with the metal defining the center of the complex. They show also that the Fe(-) anions, as the TM(+) ions, have great capability for the adsorption of water molecules, forming Fe(-)-(H(2)O)(n) structures stabilized by Fe(δ-)-H(δ+) and H-bond interactions.

  3. Are there more bowel symptoms in children with autism compared to normal children and children with other developmental and neurological disorders?: A case control study.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Farnworth, H; Wright, B; Allgar, V

    2009-07-01

    There is considerable controversy as to whether there is an association between bowel disorders and autism. Using a bowel symptom questionnaire we compared 51 children with autism spectrum disorder with control groups of 35 children from special school and 112 from mainstream school. There was a significant difference in the reporting of certain bowel symptoms (constipation, diarrhoea, flatulence) and food faddiness between the autism group and the mainstream school control group. There was no significant difference between the autism group and children in the special schools except for faddiness, which is an autism specific symptom and not a bowel symptom. This study confirms previously reported findings of an increase in bowel symptoms in children with autism. It would appear, however, that this is not specifically associated with autism as bowel symptoms were reported in similar frequency to a comparison group of children with other developmental and neurological disorders.

  4. Predicting long-term outcomes for children affected by HIV and AIDS: perspectives from the scientific study of children's development.

    PubMed

    Stein, Alan; Desmond, Christopher; Garbarino, James; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Barbarin, Oscar; Black, Maureen M; Stein, Aryeh D; Hillis, Susan D; Kalichman, Seth C; Mercy, James A; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Rapa, Elizabeth; Saul, Janet R; Dobrova-Krol, Natasha A; Richter, Linda M

    2014-07-01

    The immediate and short-term consequences of adult HIV for affected children are well documented. Little research has examined the long-term implications of childhood adversity stemming from caregiver HIV infection. Through overviews provided by experts in the field, together with an iterative process of consultation and refinement, we have extracted insights from the broader field of child development of relevance to predicting the long-term consequences to children affected by HIV and AIDS. We focus on what is known about the impact of adversities similar to those experienced by HIV-affected children, and for which there is longitudinal evidence. Cautioning that findings are not directly transferable across children or contexts, we examine findings from the study of parental death, divorce, poor parental mental health, institutionalization, undernutrition, and exposure to violence. Regardless of the type of adversity, the majority of children manifest resilience and do not experience any long-term negative consequences. However, a significant minority do and these children experience not one, but multiple problems, which frequently endure over time in the absence of support and opportunities for recovery. As a result, they are highly likely to suffer numerous and enduring impacts. These insights suggest a new strategic approach to interventions for children affected by HIV and AIDS, one that effectively combines a universal lattice of protection with intensive intervention targeted to selected children and families. PMID:24991899

  5. A study of the play behavior of retarded children.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, R

    1978-07-01

    Piaget, Almy and Peller have pointed to the necessity of play for cognitive development. Earlier, Lehman and Witty, Boyton and Ford, Horne and Philleo. Tilton, Ottinger and Weiner conducted studies on play in cognitively disturbed children. Hetzer and Inhelder show that the retarded child annot utilize his play area because of poor imagination and lack of expressive skills. Many play activities have a perseverating character. They cannot make sufficient use of the possibilities inherent in the toys presented to them. Uncontrolled drives inhibit creative and constructive play. Often, a plan d'attaque for play is lacking. Following on the heels of earlier studies, systematic play observations of 38 retarded children were made using ten observation categories. In Table II the results are shown of the way in which the child uses a toy. The play behavior of the retarded child is predominated by a great need to explore, experiment and move. He hardly has a chance to use toys in a creative way resulting in a play endproduct. The choice of toys is given in Table III. Boys had a particular interest in vehicles and environmental material, girls in dolls. According to expectation, the level of play behavior (Table IV) and the scores on an intelligence test (HAWIK) appeared to positively correlate with each other. This was also true for the correlations between the subtest scores and play behavior, with the exception of similarities and block design. Also, the variation in the exhibited play behavior correlated positively with the measured IQ's. In view of the correlations found, there are indications that imitation play is important for emotional and social behavior. Older study results, which showed a connection between an identification score and imitation play seem to be confirmed in retarded children, too. For the practical situation in child-rearing and education, the study results point to the necessity of bringing the retarded child into contact with as many different

  6. Charge Transfer in FeOCl Intercalation Compounds and its Pressure Dependence: An X-ray Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    I Jarrige; Y Cai; S Shieh; H Ishii; N Hiraoka; S Karna; W Li

    2011-12-31

    We present a study of charge transfer in Na-intercalated FeOCl and polyaniline-intercalated FeOCl using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy at the Fe-K edge. By comparing the experimental data with ab initio simulations, we are able to unambiguously distinguish the spectral changes which appear due to intercalation into those of electronic origin and those of structural origin. For both systems, we find that about 25% of the Fe sites are reduced to Fe{sup 2+} via charge transfer between FeOCl and the intercalate. This is about twice as large as the Fe{sup 2+} fraction reported in studies using Moessbauer spectroscopy. This discrepancy is ascribed to the fact that the charge transfer occurs on the same time scale as the Moessbauer effect itself. Our result suggests that every intercalated atom or molecule is involved in the charge-transfer process, thus making this process a prerequisite for intercalation. The Fe{sup 2+} fraction is found to increase with pressure for polyaniline-FeOCl, hinting at an enhancement of the conductivity in the FeOCl intercalation compounds under pressure.

  7. Charge transfer in FeOCl intercalation compounds and its pressure dependence: An x-ray spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrige, I.; Cai, Y. Q.; Shieh, S. R.; Ishii, H.; Hiraoka, N.; Karna, S.; Li, W.-H.

    2010-10-15

    We present a study of charge transfer in Na-intercalated FeOCl and polyaniline-intercalated FeOCl using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy at the Fe K edge. By comparing the experimental data with ab initio simulations, we are able to unambiguously distinguish the spectral changes which appear due to intercalation into those of electronic origin and those of structural origin. For both systems, we find that about 25% of the Fe sites are reduced to Fe{sup 2+} via charge transfer between FeOCl and the intercalate. This is about twice as large as the Fe{sup 2+} fraction reported in studies using Moessbauer spectroscopy. This discrepancy is ascribed to the fact that the charge transfer occurs on the same time scale as the Moessbauer effect itself. Our result suggests that every intercalated atom or molecule is involved in the charge-transfer process, thus making this process a prerequisite for intercalation. The Fe{sup 2+} fraction is found to increase with pressure for polyaniline-FeOCl, hinting at an enhancement of the conductivity in the FeOCl intercalation compounds under pressure.

  8. Developmental Characteristics of Urban Children: Contrasts Between Children Cared for in their Own Homes, in Homes of Grandparents and in Agency Foster Care. A Pilot Study. Final Report to the Office of Child Development - Agency for Children, Youth and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Jay; And Others

    This descriptive study of the developmental characteristics of urban children, most of whom were black, was a pilot study designed to take a broad overview of agency foster children as compared with children who had been cared for by a grandparent (usually the grandmother) and children cared for by their parents. In this comparison, the agency…

  9. Design and Testing of Electric-Guided Delivery of Charged Particles to the Olfactory Region: Experimental and Numerical Studies.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jinxiang; Yuan, Jiayao Eddie; Alshaiba, Mohammad; Cheng, Dongxue; Firlit, Zachary; Johnson, Aaron; Nolan, Alex; Su, Wei-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Neurological drugs delivered to the olfactory region can enter the brain via olfactory pathways and bypass the blood-brain barrier. However, clinical applications of the direct nose-to-brain delivery are rare because of the extremely low olfactory doses using conventional nasal devices. This poor bioavailability is mainly caused by two factors: the complex nasal structure that traps particles in the anterior nose and the complete lack of control over particle motions after their release at the nostrils. In this study, the feasibility of electric-guided delivery to the olfactory region was tested in an anatomically accurate nasal airway model both experimentally and numerically. The nose replicas were prepared using 3-D printing and could be dissembled to reveal the local deposition patterns within the nasal cavity. A test platform was developed that included a dry powder charging system and a particle point-release nozzle. Numerical modeling was conducted using COMSOL and compared to corresponding experiments. Compared to conventional nasal devices, electric-guidance of charged particles noticeably reduced particle losses in the anterior nose and increased depositions in the olfactory region. The thickness and relative permittivity of the wall were observed to affect the electric field strength and olfactory dosages. Consistent deposition patterns were obtained between experiments and numerical simulations in both 2-D and 3-D nose models. Two conceptual designs were proposed to generate, charge, and control aerosols. Results of this study indicate that it is feasible to use an electric field to control charged particles in the human nose. Both electric-guidance and point-release of particles are essential to achieve targeted olfactory delivery. Future studies to refine the aerosol charging and release systems are needed for further enhancement of olfactory dosages.

  10. Design and Testing of Electric-Guided Delivery of Charged Particles to the Olfactory Region: Experimental and Numerical Studies.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jinxiang; Yuan, Jiayao Eddie; Alshaiba, Mohammad; Cheng, Dongxue; Firlit, Zachary; Johnson, Aaron; Nolan, Alex; Su, Wei-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Neurological drugs delivered to the olfactory region can enter the brain via olfactory pathways and bypass the blood-brain barrier. However, clinical applications of the direct nose-to-brain delivery are rare because of the extremely low olfactory doses using conventional nasal devices. This poor bioavailability is mainly caused by two factors: the complex nasal structure that traps particles in the anterior nose and the complete lack of control over particle motions after their release at the nostrils. In this study, the feasibility of electric-guided delivery to the olfactory region was tested in an anatomically accurate nasal airway model both experimentally and numerically. The nose replicas were prepared using 3-D printing and could be dissembled to reveal the local deposition patterns within the nasal cavity. A test platform was developed that included a dry powder charging system and a particle point-release nozzle. Numerical modeling was conducted using COMSOL and compared to corresponding experiments. Compared to conventional nasal devices, electric-guidance of charged particles noticeably reduced particle losses in the anterior nose and increased depositions in the olfactory region. The thickness and relative permittivity of the wall were observed to affect the electric field strength and olfactory dosages. Consistent deposition patterns were obtained between experiments and numerical simulations in both 2-D and 3-D nose models. Two conceptual designs were proposed to generate, charge, and control aerosols. Results of this study indicate that it is feasible to use an electric field to control charged particles in the human nose. Both electric-guidance and point-release of particles are essential to achieve targeted olfactory delivery. Future studies to refine the aerosol charging and release systems are needed for further enhancement of olfactory dosages. PMID:26362143

  11. Brownian-dynamics simulation studies of a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension under shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, J. ); Sood, A.K.; Krishnamurthy, H.R. Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research, Indian Institute of Science campus, Bangalore 560012 )

    1994-11-01

    We have carried out Brownian-dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension under oscillatory shear flow with both Couette and Poiseuille velocity profiles. We show that in the steady-shear'' limit, for both of the velocity profiles, the enhancement of the self-diffusion coefficient in directions transverse to the flow shows a crossover from a [dot [gamma

  12. Dynamic aperture and space charge effect studies for the Recycler ring for Project-X

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, M.; Vorobiev, L.G.; Johnson, D.E.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    A simplified Recycler lattice was created to fine tune injection straight, ring tune, and phase trombone. In this paper, we will present detailed modifications for further optimization of Recycler lattice which requires the investigation of tune footprint and dynamic aperture based on higher order momentum components of the magnetic fields, together with the space charge effects.

  13. Theoretical study of the role of charge ordering in antiferromagnetically ordered manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Saswati; Kar, J. K.; Rout, G. C.

    2016-09-01

    We address the interplay of charge and magnetic orderings in colossal magnetoresistive material manganese oxides. We propose here on-site double exchange spin-spin interaction in the presence of Heisenberg-type spin-spin interaction in localized t 2g core electrons. We consider charge-density wave (CDW) interaction in the crystal lattice as an extra mechanism in the itinerant e g band, to take into account of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in the system. We calculate electron Green’s functions by Zubarev’s Green’s function technique and hence calculate the charge-ordering gap and magnetic gap in the conduction band as well as core electron states. These orders are solved self-consistently for different model parameters of the system. We observe that the induced magnetic gap in the conduction band exists near the antiferromagnetic Néel temperature, which accounts for the CMR in the system. For all values of temperature, the CDW coupling lies in the range of g = 0.04 to 0.06, where the induced magnetic gap exists. The temperature-dependent specific heat exhibits anomalous jumps near charge-ordering and magnetic-ordering temperatures. The e g electron density of states exhibits a two-gap structure which explains tunneling conductance spectra measurements.

  14. A Study of Spacecraft Charging Due to Exposure to Interplanetary Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Nelson W.; Frederickson, A. Robb

    2006-01-01

    Long life spacecraft may be exposed to one or more major solar storms during the mission lifespan. This research task was undertaken to determine the risk to long duration interplanetary spacecraft from spacecraft charging due to exposure to solar energetic protons.

  15. A study of spacecraft charging due to exposure to interplanetary protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Nelson W.; Frederickson, A. Robb

    2006-01-01

    The majority of research regarding IESD has been concerned with the electrons in the space environment around the Earth and at Jupiter; little research has been done on the charging of spacecraft in interplanetary space due to solar event protons. This paper provides a review of the literature regarding IESD due to protons and presents the results of recent laboratory experiments.

  16. Rectal prolapse in children: a study of 71 cases

    PubMed Central

    Askarpour, Shahnam; Peyvasteh, Mehran; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Mooghehi-Nezhad, Meisam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prolapse of the rectum is the herniation of the rectum through the anus, which may be categorised as mucosal or complete. Aim To evaluate the clinical manifestation, treatment, and surgical complications of children with rectal prolapse over a 6-year period. Material and methods This study was carried out on children aged < 14 years who were admitted or referred for rectal prolapse that failed to respond after medical treatment in Imam Khomeini and Abouzar Children's Hospital. Duration of the study was 6 years starting in March 2002. These cases were referred after failure of medical and conservative treatment. Age, sex, clinical manifestation, and type of procedure were recorded. Analysis was done using SPSS version 11.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA). The χ2 test was used for comparison. Results Seventy-one cases were included in this study. Of these cases, 50 (70.4%) were male and 21 (29.6%) were female (p < 0.0001). Mean age of cases was 4.97 ±3.42 years (range: 2 days to 13 years). Of the male cases, 38% were in the age range of 3–6 years. In female cases, 57.1% were in the range of 1.5–3 years. Of all 71 cases, injection sclerotherapy was done for 50 (70.43%) for the first time. Twenty-one cases had history of injection sclerotherapy and 16 (22.53%) were treated by perineal surgery, and 5 (7.04%) had abdominal surgery. One case experienced recurrent rectal prolapse (1.40%) following injection sclerotherapy. Conclusions In girls, more than half of the cases were in the age range 1.5–3 years. Among male cases, 38% were in the age range of 1.5–3 years. The results of treatment of rectal prolapse in our hospitals was similar to that seen in developed countries. PMID:26557942

  17. Antiamoebic chemoprophylaxis using quinfamide in children: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Nicolas; Diaz, Rosalinda; Alarcon, Alfonso; Barreda, Roberto

    2002-04-20

    This study sought to examine whether the administration of quinfamide at 3- or 6-month intervals diminished the frequency of Entamoeba histolytica cysts in stool samples compared to controls. The prospective, longitudinal, randomized, single-blind study examined children from six primary schools in Celaya and Neutla, Guanajuato. Of the 1,524 students in these schools, we selected participants for the study as follows: Children were included in the study if their parents agreed in writing to the study and if the children demonstrated evidence of E. histolytica cysts after a parasitoscopic analysis by concentration (PSC) in three samples over consecutive days using Faust"s method. Those included in the study received a single 4.3-g/kg dose of quinfamide, and we performed PSC on days 5, 6, and 7 following dose administration to examine whether quinfamide had affected the presence of the cysts. The study participants who tested negative for cysts were divided into three groups: Group 1 had 102 patients who underwent quinfamide treatment and three CPS analyses after the 12 months of the study; Group 2 had 98 subjects who underwent the quinfamide treatment and three CPS analyses at months 3, 6, 9, and 12 after their entrance into the study; and Group 3 had 102 patients, who underwent the quinfamide treatment and series of three CPS analyses at months 6 and 12 of the study. All participants received the dose of quinfamide after providing stool samples and after a clinical gastrointestinal history was obtained. Further clinical gastrointestinal data were collected 5 days after the quintamide dose was administered. We used EpiInfo 6.0 for statistical analysis, calculating c2 and p values for the clinical data and the CPS data after the 12 months concluded. Of the initial samples of 1,524 subjects, 308 (20.2%) had Entamoebic cysts. Of these, six were further eliminated because they did not meet the inclusion requirements. At the conclusion of the study, Group 1 presented

  18. Molecular dynamics study of self-agglomeration of charged fullerenes in solvents.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soumik

    2013-01-28

    The agglomeration of fullerenes in solvents is an important phenomenon that is relevant to controlled synthesis of fullerene-based nanowires as well as fullerene-based composites. The molecular aggregation in solvents depends on the atomistic interactions of fullerene with the solvent and is made complicated by the fact that fullerenes accrue negative surface charges when present in solvents such as water. In the present work, we simulated fullerenes of varying size and shape (C60, C180, C240, and C540) with and without surface charges in polar protic (water), polar aprotic (acetone), and nonpolar (toluene) solvents using molecular dynamics method. Our results demonstrate that uncharged fullerenes form agglomerates in polar solvents such as water and acetone and remain relatively dispersed in nonpolar toluene. The presence of surface charge significantly reduces agglomerate size in water and acetone. Additionally, the relative influence of surface charge on fullerene agglomeration depends on the size and geometry of the fullerene with larger fullerenes forming relatively smaller agglomerates. We evaluated the diffusion coefficients of solvent molecules within the solvation shell of fullerenes and observed that they are much lower than the bulk solvent and are strongly associated with the fullerenes as seen in the corresponding radial distribution functions. To correlate agglomerate size with the binding energy between fullerenes, we evaluated the potential of mean force between fullerenes in each solvent. Consistent with the solubility of fullerenes, binding energy between fullerenes is the greatest in water followed by acetone and toluene. The presence of charge decreases the binding energy of fullerenes in water and thus results in dispersed fullerenes.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of self-agglomeration of charged fullerenes in solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Soumik

    2013-01-01

    The agglomeration of fullerenes in solvents is an important phenomenon that is relevant to controlled synthesis of fullerene-based nanowires as well as fullerene-based composites. The molecular aggregation in solvents depends on the atomistic interactions of fullerene with the solvent and is made complicated by the fact that fullerenes accrue negative surface charges when present in solvents such as water. In the present work, we simulated fullerenes of varying size and shape (C60, C180, C240, and C540) with and without surface charges in polar protic (water), polar aprotic (acetone), and nonpolar (toluene) solvents using molecular dynamics method. Our results demonstrate that uncharged fullerenes form agglomerates in polar solvents such as water and acetone and remain relatively dispersed in nonpolar toluene. The presence of surface charge significantly reduces agglomerate size in water and acetone. Additionally, the relative influence of surface charge on fullerene agglomeration depends on the size and geometry of the fullerene with larger fullerenes forming relatively smaller agglomerates. We evaluated the diffusion coefficients of solvent molecules within the solvation shell of fullerenes and observed that they are much lower than the bulk solvent and are strongly associated with the fullerenes as seen in the corresponding radial distribution functions. To correlate agglomerate size with the binding energy between fullerenes, we evaluated the potential of mean force between fullerenes in each solvent. Consistent with the solubility of fullerenes, binding energy between fullerenes is the greatest in water followed by acetone and toluene. The presence of charge decreases the binding energy of fullerenes in water and thus results in dispersed fullerenes.

  20. Molecular dynamics study of self-agglomeration of charged fullerenes in solvents.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soumik

    2013-01-28

    The agglomeration of fullerenes in solvents is an important phenomenon that is relevant to controlled synthesis of fullerene-based nanowires as well as fullerene-based composites. The molecular aggregation in solvents depends on the atomistic interactions of fullerene with the solvent and is made complicated by the fact that fullerenes accrue negative surface charges when present in solvents such as water. In the present work, we simulated fullerenes of varying size and shape (C60, C180, C240, and C540) with and without surface charges in polar protic (water), polar aprotic (acetone), and nonpolar (toluene) solvents using molecular dynamics method. Our results demonstrate that uncharged fullerenes form agglomerates in polar solvents such as water and acetone and remain relatively dispersed in nonpolar toluene. The presence of surface charge significantly reduces agglomerate size in water and acetone. Additionally, the relative influence of surface charge on fullerene agglomeration depends on the size and geometry of the fullerene with larger fullerenes forming relatively smaller agglomerates. We evaluated the diffusion coefficients of solvent molecules within the solvation shell of fullerenes and observed that they are much lower than the bulk solvent and are strongly associated with the fullerenes as seen in the corresponding radial distribution functions. To correlate agglomerate size with the binding energy between fullerenes, we evaluated the potential of mean force between fullerenes in each solvent. Consistent with the solubility of fullerenes, binding energy between fullerenes is the greatest in water followed by acetone and toluene. The presence of charge decreases the binding energy of fullerenes in water and thus results in dispersed fullerenes. PMID:23387595

  1. Children Rights in Social Studies Curricula in Elementary Education: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merey, Zihni

    2012-01-01

    Social studies classes educate students as citizens who are expected to adopt democratic values and apply their information and richness to their life. Social studies classes are the ones that include human rights education in the first place. The purpose of this study is to make a comparison of inclusion levels of children's rights issues in…

  2. A study of children's taste and visual preferences in dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Spear, C S; Savisky, L A

    1991-01-01

    Variables and gimmicks can make choosing a dentifrice for a child complicated. Various flavors, colors, shapes, consistency, labelling, and type of dispensers provide a constellation of choices for the consumer. This study sought to determine whether children actually prefer the dentifrices designed for them. Visually the child-oriented products were preferred; modern containers were preferred over the traditional. In terms of taste, however, "child-flavored" dentifrices were not preferred over the regular flavor of the same brand, when one is tasted after the other. PMID:1939794

  3. Computational study of the energetics of charge and cation mixing in U1-xCexO₂

    DOE PAGES

    Hanken, B. E.; Stanek, C. R.; Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Asta, M.

    2011-08-26

    The formalism of electronic density-functional theory (DFT), with Hubbard-U corrections (DFT+U), is employed in a computational study of the energetics of fluorite-structured U1-xCexO₂ mixtures. The computational approach makes use of a procedure which facilitates convergence of the calculations to multiple self-consistent DFT+U solutions for a given cation arrangement, corresponding to different charge states for the U and Ce ions in several prototypical cation arrangements. Results indicate a significant dependence of the structural and energetic properties on the nature of both charge and cation ordering. With the effective Hubbard-U parameters that reproduce well the measured oxidation-reduction energies for urania and ceria,more » we find that charge transfer between U⁴⁺ and Ce⁴⁺ ions, leading to the formation of U⁵⁺ and Ce³⁺, gives rise to an increase in the mixing energy in the range of 4–14 kJ/mol of the formula unit, depending on the nature of the cation ordering. The results suggest that although charge transfer between uranium and cerium ions is disfavored energetically, it is likely to be entropically stabilized at the high temperatures relevant to the processing and service of urania-based solid solutions.« less

  4. Charged nanoparticle attraction in multivalent salt solution: A classical-fluids density functional theory and molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Salerno, K. Michael; Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, negatively charged nanoparticles (NPs) in 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 electrolyte solutions are studied in a primitive ion model using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT). We determine the conditions for attractive interactions between the like-charged NPs. Ion density profiles and NP–NP interaction free energies are compared between the two methods and are found to be in qualitative agreement. The NP interaction free energy is purely repulsive for monovalent counterions, but can be attractive for divalent and trivalent counterions. Using DFT, the NP interaction free energy for different NP diameters and charges is calculated. The depthmore » and location of the minimum in the interaction depend strongly on the NPs’ charge. For certain parameters, the depth of the attractive well can reach 8–10 kBT, indicating that kinetic arrest and aggregation of the NPs due to electrostatic interactions is possible. Rich behavior arises from the geometric constraints of counterion packing at the NP surface. Layering of counterions around the NPs is observed and, as secondary counterion layers form the minimum of the NP–NP interaction free energy shifts to larger separation, and the depth of the free energy minimum varies dramatically. We find that attractive interactions occur with and without NP overcharging.« less

  5. Study of the effect of the charge transport layer in the electrical characteristics of the organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Ronak; Roberts, Alex; Narang, V.; Kumbham, Vamsi Krishna; Korakakis, D.

    2013-09-01

    Significant progress in fabrication and optimization of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) has been made during the last decade. The main reason for popularity of OPVs is due to their low production cost, large area devices and compatibility with flexible substrates 1-3. Various approaches including optimizing morphology of the active layers 1, 2, introducing new materials as the donor and acceptor 3,4, new device structures such as tandem structure 5, 6 have been adapted to improve the efficiency of the organic photovoltaics. However, electrical characteristics of the OPVs do not only depend on the active layer materials or device structure. They can also be defined by the interface properties between active layers and the charge transport layers or the metal contacts. Within this paper, the effect of the thickness variation of the charge transport layer in the electrical properties of the bilayer heterojunction OPVs has been studied. Several devices with CuPc/PTCDI-C8 as the donor/acceptor layers have been fabricated with different thicknesses of electron transport layer. MoO3 and Alq3 have been used respectively as the hole transport layer (HTL) and the electron transport layer (ETL). It has been shown that the S-shape effect in the current-voltage curve is attributed to the accumulation of the charge carriers at the interface between the active layer and the charge transport layer 5, 7.

  6. Study of the effect of the charge transport layer in the electrical characteristics of the organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Ronak; Roberts, Alex; Narang, V.; Kumbham, Vamsi Krishna; Korakakis, D.

    2013-03-01

    Significant progress in fabrication and optimization of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) has been made during the last decade. The main reason for popularity of OPVs is due to their low production cost, large area devices and compatibility with flexible substrates [1-3]. Various approaches including optimizing morphology of the active layers [1,2], introducing new materials as the donor and acceptor [3,4], new device structures such as tandem structure [5,6] have been adapted to improve the efficiency of the organic photovoltaics. However, electrical characteristics of the OPVs do not only depend on the active layer materials or device structure. They can also be defined by the interface properties between active layers and the charge transport layers or the metal contacts. Within this paper, the effect of the thickness variation of the charge transport layer in the electrical properties of the bilayer heterojunction OPVs has been studied. Several devices with CuPc/PTCDI-C8 as the donor/acceptor layers have been fabricated with different thicknesses of electron transport layer. MoO3 and Alq3 have been used respectively as the hole transport layer (HTL) and the electron transport layer (ETL). It has been shown that the S-shape effect in the current-voltage curve is attributed to the accumulation of the charge carriers at the interface between the active layer and the charge transport layer [5,7].

  7. Potential-derived point-charge model study of electrostatic interaction energies in some hydrogen-bonded systems.

    PubMed

    Ray, N K; Shibata, M; Bolis, G; Rein, R

    1985-01-01

    Mulliken's atomic changes (MC) and potential derived (PD) point charges obtained from STO-3G wave functions are used to study the electrostatic interaction energies for a series of representative hydrogen-bonded complexes. The results of the above-mentioned models are compared with the more accurate results of segmental multipole moment (SMM) expansion, and it is shown that the PD model is superior to the MC model. The results of PD model are shown to be well correlated with the results of SMM expansion technique. Results of our calculations using 6-31G and 6-31G** PD charges are also reported here. Electrostatic interaction energies obtained using 6-31G** PD charges are compared with the 6-31G** SCF interaction energies available for the nine hydrogen-bonded dimers of ammonia, water, and hydrogen fluoride and a good correlation between the two is shown. The interrelationship between the results of different basis sets are also examined for the PD point-charge model. The electrostatic interaction energies obtained using STO-3G PD model are shown to be well correlated to the results of 6-31G and 6-31G** PD models.

  8. Charged Nanoparticle Attraction in Multivalent Salt Solution: A Classical-Fluids Density Functional Theory and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Salerno, K Michael; Frischknecht, Amalie L; Stevens, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Negatively charged nanoparticles (NPs) in 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 electrolyte solutions are studied in a primitive ion model using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT). We determine the conditions for attractive interactions between the like-charged NPs. Ion density profiles and NP-NP interaction free energies are compared between the two methods and are found to be in qualitative agreement. The NP interaction free energy is purely repulsive for monovalent counterions, but can be attractive for divalent and trivalent counterions. Using DFT, the NP interaction free energy for different NP diameters and charges is calculated. The depth and location of the minimum in the interaction depend strongly on the NPs' charge. For certain parameters, the depth of the attractive well can reach 8-10 kBT, indicating that kinetic arrest and aggregation of the NPs due to electrostatic interactions is possible. Rich behavior arises from the geometric constraints of counterion packing at the NP surface. Layering of counterions around the NPs is observed and, as secondary counterion layers form the minimum of the NP-NP interaction free energy shifts to larger separation, and the depth of the free energy minimum varies dramatically. We find that attractive interactions occur with and without NP overcharging. PMID:27057763

  9. Narrative Comprehension and Production in Children with SLI: An Eye Movement Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreu, Llorenc; Sanz-Torrent, Monica; Olmos, Joan Guardia; MacWhinney, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates narrative comprehension and production in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Twelve children with SLI (mean age 5;8 years) and 12 typically developing children (mean age 5;6 years) participated in an eye-tracking experiment designed to investigate online narrative comprehension and production in Catalan- and…

  10. Air Pollution, Cognitive Deficits and Brain Abnormalities: A Pilot Study with Children and Dogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderon-Garciduenas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareno, Antonieta; Ontiveros, Esperanza; Gomez-Garza, Gilberto; Barragan-Mejia, Gerardo; Broadway, James; Chapman, Susan; Valencia-Salazar, Gildardo; Jewells, Valerie; Maronpot, Robert R.; Henriquez-Roldan, Carlos; Perez-Guille, Beatriz; Torres-Jardon, Ricardo; Herrit, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Osnaya-Brizuela, Norma; Monroy, Maria E.; Gonzalez-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Solt, Anna C.; Engle, Randall W.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with neuroinflammation in healthy children and dogs in Mexico City. Comparative studies were carried out in healthy children and young dogs similarly exposed to ambient pollution in Mexico City. Children from Mexico City (n:55) and a low polluted city (n:18) underwent psychometric testing and brain magnetic…

  11. Multiracial Children and Poverty: Evidence from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study of Kindergartners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratter, Jenifer; Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert

    2013-01-01

    Despite the recent growth in multiracial children among American children, we know very little about their well-being. Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class (N?=?17,706), we evaluated the likelihood of living in poverty and near poverty for multiracial and monoracial children. Most multiracial groups have poverty or near…

  12. Text-Messaging Practices and Links to General Spelling Skill: A Study of Australian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushnell, Catherine; Kemp, Nenagh; Martin, Frances Heritage

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated 10- to 12-year-old Australian children's text-messaging practices and their relationship to traditional spelling ability. Of the 227 children tested, 82% reported sending text-messages; a median of 5 per day. Use of predictive and multi-press entry methods was roughly equal. Children produced a wide range of text-message…

  13. Study of Level of Stress in the Parents of Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sethi, Sujata; Gandhi, Raghu; Anand, Vidhu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Parents who have children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often experience high level of stress related to caring for their children. But not much research has been conducted in this area in India. This study aimed to assess the stress of parenting children with ADHD. Methods: This is a clinic based comparative…

  14. How Children Learn the Ins and Outs: A Training Study of Toddlers' Categorization of Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Chris A.; Fisher, Anna V.; Rakison, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Young children are able to categorize animals on the basis of unobservable features such as shared biological properties (e.g., bones). For the most part, children learn about these properties through explicit verbalizations from others. The present study examined how such input impacts children's learning about the properties of categories. In a…

  15. The Impact of War on the Mental Health of Children: A Salvadoran Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Joan Riley; Nuttall, Ronald L.; Nuttall, Ena Vazquez

    1997-01-01

    A study of 54 Salvadoran children (age 12), born in the Salvadoran Civil War, found the personal/social impact of the war was more important than family togetherness or war intensity in determining the mental health of the children. Children's intelligence was highly related to surviving with greater mental health. (Author/CR)

  16. Understanding Children's Sedentary Behaviour: A Qualitative Study of the Family Home Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granich, Joanna; Rosenberg, Michael; Knuiman, Matthew; Timperio, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Electronic media (EM) (television, electronic games and computer) use has been associated with overweight and obesity among children. Little is known about the time spent in sedentary behaviour (SB) among children within the family context. The aim of this study was to explore how the family home environment may influence children's…

  17. A Case Study of Three Children's Original Interpretations of the Moon's Changing Appearance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    A case study of three children was conducted to shed light on the process that children undergo in developing their understanding of physical phenomena. Using the notion of spontaneous construction and its relationship with school learning of scientific concepts, children's early thoughts of the moon's appearance were explored. Research questions…

  18. A Study of Reading Comprehension in Older Children Using Selected Korean Bible Translations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2014-01-01

    Problem: The problem of this study was to determine the difference in Bible comprehension scores among gender-based groups of older children using selected passages from three Bible translations: the Children's Bible, the Easy Bible, and the New Revised Korean Bible. Procedures: A total of 288 older children in three churches (Beautiful Baptist…

  19. A Longitudinal Study of the Development of Stop Consonant Production in Normal and Down's Syndrome Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bruce L.; Stoel-Gammon, Carol

    1983-01-01

    The longitudinal study of four normal children, 18 to 36 months old, and five Down's syndrome (DS) children, 3 to 6 years old, analyzed the development of stop consonants and stop clusters. Although similar sound patterns were observed for the two groups, the DS children showed considerable performance delay. (DB)

  20. Parents' Causal Attributions Concerning Their Children's School Achievement: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rytkonen, Katja; Aunola, Kaisa; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the causes to which parents attribute their children's academic successes and failures during children's transition from preschool to primary school. It followed 182 mothers and 167 fathers of 207 children. The parents completed a questionnaire concerning their causal attributions, level of education, and parenting…

  1. The Role of Children's Appraisals on Adjustment Following Psychological Maltreatment: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeson, Fiona J.; Nixon, Reginald D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the cognitive mechanisms involved in the development of psychopathology following psychological maltreatment in children. This study therefore examined the role of thinking styles on children's outcomes following this subtype of maltreatment. Children who had experienced past maltreatment (n = 24) and a control group (n = 26)…

  2. Parenting Stress and Social Support in Hearing Mothers of Deaf and Hearing Children: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederberg, Amy R.; Golbach, Traci

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 23 mothers of children with deafness and 23 controls investigated the impact of child deafness on stress, social networks, and social support satisfaction. When children were 22 months, mothers of children with deafness expressed more stress, however at ages 3 and 4, stress was comparable to controls. (Contains references.)…

  3. Everyday Segregation amongst Disabled Children and Their Peers: A Qualitative Longitudinal Study in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ytterhus, Borgunn

    2012-01-01

    This article is based on a qualitative longitudinal study of children's changing peer relationships through childhood, with particular emphasis on experiences of disabled children. Initial observation of face-to-face-encounters among children in school made us aware of social inclusion and exclusion mechanisms relating to informal interaction…

  4. A Longitudinal Study of Pragmatic Language Development in Three Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown how cochlear implants (CIs), in children with hearing impairments, have improved speech perception and production, but very little is known about the children's pragmatic language development. During a 4-year longitudinal study of three children with CIs, certain aspects of pragmatic language development were observed in free…

  5. Motion and Emotion: A Novel Approach to the Study of Face Processing by Young Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gepner, Bruno; Deruelle, Christine; Grynfeltt, Stanislas

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 13 children (ages 5-7) with autism and 13 typical children on their ability to match videotaped still, dynamic, and strobe emotional and non-emotional facial expressions with photographs. The children with autism did not perform significantly worse than controls on any experimental conditions. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  6. Working Memory, Attention, and Mathematical Problem Solving: A Longitudinal Study of Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    The role of working memory (WM) in children's growth in mathematical problem solving was examined in a longitudinal study of children (N = 127). A battery of tests was administered that assessed problem solving, achievement, WM, and cognitive processing (inhibition, speed, phonological coding) in Grade 1 children, with follow-up testing in Grades…

  7. Incidence of Dysarthria in Children with Cerebellar Tumors: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, S.; Schoch, B.; Ozimek, A.; Gorissen, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Kaiser, O.; Hovel, M.; Wieland, R.; Gizewski, E.; Timmann, D.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated dysarthric symptoms in children with cerebellar tumors. Ten children with cerebellar tumors and 10 orthopedic control children were tested prior and one week after surgery. Clinical dysarthric symptoms were quantified in spontaneous speech. Syllable durations were analyzed in syllable repetition and sentence…

  8. Acute Nonbacterial Gastroenteritis in Hospitalized Children: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokrollahi, Mohammad Reza; Noorbakhsh, Samileh; Monavari, Hamid Reza; Ghavidel Darestani, Sahar; Vosoughi Motlagh, Ahmad; Javadi Nia, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Viral acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of morbidity in childhood and leads to hospitalization in developed countries, such as Iran. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and viral types (rotavirus, adenovirus, human parechoviruses-1, and human bocavirus) of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in hospitalized children. Patients and Materials: This was a across-sectional prospective study performed at the Pediatric Department of Rasoul Hospital, Tehran, Iran (2009-2011) on 80 hospitalized children with viral AGE. All Stool samples were collected on viral transport media. Human bocavirus (HBoV) was detected using the Real-time PCR TaqMan method. Molecular detection of human parechovirus type 1 (HPeV-1) RNA in stool samples was done using a specific nested reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Rota and adeno virus antigens were sought by rapid chromatographic tests. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Fever was determined in 47.5% of cases (38), nausea and vomiting in 42.5% (34), respiratory symptoms in 16.3% (13), abdominal pain in 76%. Duration of diarrhea was 1-30 days (mean = 6.3 + 4.3 days). No dehydration was observed in 43.5% of subjects, mild dehydration in 33.8%, moderate dehydration in 17.5% and severe dehydration in 5% of cases. Positive rotavirus was found in 48.8% of cases (39), adenovirus in 20% (16), HBoV in 8% (6) and HPeV-1 in 23.2% (19), and adeno and rotaviruses co-infection in 6% (4). The frequency of positive HBoV was significantly lower than adeno and rotaviruses infection (P value = 0.0001). Rotavirus was more frequent in males (P value = 0.003) and in young children (17.49 months vs. 21.44 months) [P value = 0.03, CI = -13.4, 5.5]. Rotavirus infection was related to the degree of dehydration (P value = 0.001) but was not related to the presence of vomiting or fever (P value > 0.5). Conclusions: This study indicates that viral agents, especially rotavirus (48

  9. Design of asymmetric particles containing a charged interior and a neutral surface charge: comparative study on in vivo circulation of polyelectrolyte microgels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Xu, Jing; Luft, J Christopher; Tian, Shaomin; Raval, Jay S; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2014-07-16

    Lowering the modulus of hydrogel particles could enable them to bypass in vivo physical barriers that would otherwise filter particles with similar size but higher modulus. Incorporation of electrolyte moieties into the polymer network of hydrogel particles to increase the swelling ratio is a straightforward and quite efficient way to decrease the modulus. In addition, charged groups in hydrogel particles can also help secure cargoes. However, the distribution of charged groups on the surface of a particle can accelerate the clearance of particles. Herein, we developed a method to synthesize highly swollen microgels of precise size with near-neutral surface charge while retaining interior charged groups. A strategy was employed to enable a particle to be highly cross-linked with very small mesh size, and subsequently PEGylated to quench the exterior amines only without affecting the internal amines. Acidic degradation of the cross-linker allows for swelling of the particles to microgels with a desired size and deformability. The microgels fabricated demonstrated extended circulation in vivo compared to their counterparts with a charged surface, and could potentially be utilized in in vivo applications including as oxygen carriers or nucleic acid scavengers.

  10. A PRIMER ON THE EPIDEMIOLOGIC FIELD STUDY OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern about children's environmental health is increasing as newly characterized risks are indentified. Often little data is available to guide policy decisions. Research on children's ambient exposures to environmental contaminants is essential to understand the magnitude ...

  11. Study the Effects of Charged Particle Radiation on Gravitational Sensors in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Space-flight charging of free floating masses poses an unusual problem-- how can one control charge on the object without exerting a significant force on it? One approach is to make contact to the object with a fine wire. However, for many precision applications no physical contact is permissible, so charge must be conveyed in, a more sophisticated manner. One method has already been developed: Gravitational Probe B (GP-B) uses an ultraviolet photo-emission system described in ref 1. This system meets the experiment requirements, yet poses a number of constraints, including high power dissipation (approximately 10 W peak, approximately 1 W average), low current output (approximately 10(exp -13) A), and potential reliability problems associated with fiber optics system and the UV source. The aim of the current research is to improve this situation and, if possible, develop a more rugged and lower power alternative, usable in a wide range of situations. An potential alternative to the UV electron source is a Spindt-type field emission cathode. These consist of an array of extremely sharp silicon tips mounted in a standard IC package with provision for biasing them relative to the case potential. They are attractive as electron sources for space applications due to their low power consumption (10(exp -5) W), high current levels (10(exp -9) to 10(exp -5) A), and the absence of mechanical switching. Unfortunately, existing cathodes require special handling to avoid contamination and gas absorption. These contaminants can cause severe current fluctuations and eventual destruction of the cathode tips. Another potential drawback is the absence of any data indicating the possibility of bipolar current flow. This capability is needed because of the large uncertainties in the net charge transfer from cosmic rays to a free floating mass in space. More recent devices reduce the current fluctuations and destructive arcing by mounting the tips on a resistive substrate rather than

  12. METHODS STUDIES FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY: MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED POLYMERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are required to link exposure with health effects in epidemiological studies. Although long-term integrated exposure measurements are a critical component of exposure assessment, the ability to include these measurements into epidemiologic...

  13. Children's Perceptions of Live Arts Performances: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Wendy

    2005-01-01

    "Children?s Voices" is a longitudinal research project to document and understand children's perceptions of live arts performance and the impact on their teachers and school communities. The research conducted in South Australia with 135 5?12-year-olds in four schools involves collaboration between the South Australian Department of Education and…

  14. A Historical Study of Children's Heroes and Fantasy Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Judy

    Is the superhero that preschool children emulate and dramatize in their play qualitatively different from the heroes of children in the past? To answer this question, data were gathered (1) from a historical review of the literature on children's play and their heroes and (2) from a survey questionnaire completed by 100 subjects stratified to…

  15. Maternal Intelligence and Institutionalized Children's Developmental Quotients: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casler, Lawrence

    1976-01-01

    Product-moment correlations between Stanford-Binet IQs of 151 women and the Gesell Developmental Quotients of their illegitimate children were significant when the children were approximately 2 months old and residing in institutions. After the children were adopted, the correlations dropped at first but then increased in the final tests given at…

  16. Internet Surfing for Kindergarten Children: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    The Internet is an effective learning tool for gifted children because it allows them to independently select the areas in which they have talent. The Internet also enables children to discover and maximize their potential. However, younger children might not have a large enough vocabulary to surf the Internet, even if they are gifted. For…

  17. CHARGE IMBALANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the theory of charge imbalance, and to discuss its relevance to a number of experimental situations. We introduce the concepts of quasiparticle charge and charge imbalance, and discuss the generation and detection of charge imbalance by tunneling. We describe the relaxation of the injected charge imbalance by inelastic scattering processes, and show how the Boltzmann equation can be solved to obtain the steady state quasiparticle distribution and the charge relaxation rate. Details are given of experiments to measure charge imbalance and the charge relaxation rate when inelastic scattering is the predominant relaxation mechanism. Experiments on and theories of other charge relaxation mechanisms are discussed, namely relaxation via elastic scattering in the presence of energy gap anisotropy, or in the presence of a pair breaking mechanism such as magnetic impurities or an applied supercurrent or magnetic field. We describe three other situations in which charge imbalance occurs, namely the resistance of the NS interface, phase slip centers, and the flow of a supercurrent in the presence of a temperature gradient.

  18. Adsorption edge study about cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc adsorption by variable charge soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, J. C.; Mouta, E. R.; Soares, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    The improper discharge of industrial and urban residues and the inadvertent use of fertilizers and pesticides can result in soil and water pollution and improve the potential of trace metals to enter in the human food chain. Adsorption reactions occur at the solid/liquid interface and are the most important mechanisms for controlling the activity of metal ions in soil solution. In a complex system with amphoteric behavior, the comprehension of the mobility, availability and fate of pollutants in the soil system is crucial for the prediction of the environmental consequences and for development of prevention/remediation strategies. A comparative study of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) adsorption by highly weathered soils was carried out. Surface (0-0.2m) and subsoil (B horizon) samples were taken from a Rhodic Kandiudalf (RH), an Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox (XA) and an Anionic "Rhodic" Acrudox (RA), located in brazilian humid tropical area. As the pH and the ionic strength are important environmental factors influencing the solution chemistry of heavy metals in variable charge systems, adsorption envelopes, in a batch adsorption experiment, were elaborated by reacting, for 24 h, soil samples with individual 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 aqueous solutions containing nitrate salts of the adsorptive heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) at the initial concentration of 5 mg L-1, with an increasing pH value from 3.0 to 8.0. pH50-100%, the difference between the pH of 100 and 50 percent metal adsorption was determined. A sharp increase of adsorption density (adsorption edge) was observed within a very narrow pH range, usually less than two pH units. Commonly, the relative affinity of a soil for a metal cation increases with the tendency of the cation to form inner-sphere surface complexes. This may be caused by differences in extent of hydrolysis of Cu ions and in affinity of adsorption sites for Cu. In general, subsurface samples showed low pH50

  19. [Prevalence of obesity in children: study in the primary public Parisian schools].

    PubMed

    Barthel, B; Cariou, C; Lebas-Saison, E; Momas, I

    2001-03-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor in public health. In Paris, few statistical data are available in this area. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in 10 years-old children attending Paris elementary schools (cours moyen deuxième année--CM2--last level of the elementary school). 148 classes were randomly selected, gathering 3,621 schoolchildren 10 years 6 months old. 66 doctors in charge of health at school participated in the study, doing the measurements of weight, size and collecting also the weight and size at birth and at the "grande section-GS-level" (last level of the infant school, 5 years-old children) from the individual health file of the schoolchildren. The statistical analysis was based on the study of distributions of the observed Quetelet index (Q0) at the different ages, compared to French reference curves. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine whether birth weight and GS weight predict obesity in CM2. In GS and in CM2, observed Quetelet indices are over expected values: in CM2, 22.8% of boys and 25.6% of girls exceed the reference value Q90; the prevalence of obesity (Q0 > or = Q97) is 13.4% in boys and 13.5% in girls. Among the variables "term", "weight at birth", weight in GS level and "gender", the weight in GS level is the only predictive factor of obesity in CM2 level. The situation in Paris appears to be serious. Preventive actions are needed at early stages to try to stop and, if possible, to reverse the present increase of overweight. In this context, school doctors have to play a prominent role. PMID:11525044

  20. Gut microbiota in children with type 1 diabetes differs from that in healthy children: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A recent study using a rat model found significant differences at the time of diabetes onset in the bacterial communities responsible for type 1 diabetes modulation. We hypothesized that type 1 diabetes in humans could also be linked to a specific gut microbiota. Our aim was to quantify and evaluate the difference in the composition of gut microbiota between children with type 1 diabetes and healthy children and to determine the possible relationship of the gut microbiota of children with type 1 diabetes with the glycemic level. Methods A case-control study was carried out with 16 children with type 1 diabetes and 16 healthy children. The fecal bacteria composition was investigated by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results The mean similarity index was 47.39% for the healthy children and 37.56% for the children with diabetes, whereas the intergroup similarity index was 26.69%. In the children with diabetes, the bacterial number of Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, and the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio were all significantly decreased, with the quantity of Bacteroidetes significantly increased with respect to healthy children. At the genus level, we found a significant increase in the number of Clostridium, Bacteroides and Veillonella and a significant decrease in the number of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Blautia coccoides/Eubacterium rectale group and Prevotella in the children with diabetes. We also found that the number of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, and the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio correlated negatively and significantly with the plasma glucose level while the quantity of Clostridium correlated positively and significantly with the plasma glucose level in the diabetes group. Conclusions This is the first study showing that type 1 diabetes is associated with compositional changes in gut microbiota. The significant differences in the number of

  1. A study of the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Zmudzińska, Wioletta; Uber, Dorota; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2014-12-01

    Chain reversals are often nucleation sites in protein folding. The β-hairpins of FBP28 WW domain and IgG are stable and have been proved to initiate the folding and are, therefore, suitable for studying the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin conformation. In this paper, we carried out NMR examination of the conformations in solution of two fragments from the FPB28 protein (PDB code: 1E0L) (N-terminal part) namely KTADGKT-NH2 (1E0L 12-18, D7) and YKTADGKTY-NH2 (1E0L 11-19, D9), one from the B3 domain of the protein G (PDB code: 1IGD), namely DDATKT-NH2 (1IGD 51-56) (Dag1), and three variants of Dag1 peptide: DVATKT-NH2 (Dag2), OVATKT-NH2 (Dag3) and KVATKT-NH2 (Dag4), respectively, in which the original charged residue were replaced with non-polar residues or modified charged residues. It was found that both the D7 and D9 peptides form a large fraction bent conformations. However, no hydrophobic contacts between the terminal Tyr residues of D9 occur, which suggests that the presence of a pair of like-charged residues stabilizes chain reversal. Conversely, only the Dag1 and Dag2 peptides exhibit some chain reversal; replacing the second aspartic-acid residue with a valine and the first one with a basic residue results in a nearly extended conformation. These results suggest that basic residues farther away in sequence can result in stabilization of chain reversal owing to screening of the non-polar core. Conversely, smaller distance in sequence prohibits this screening, while the presence oppositely-charged residues can stabilize a turn because of salt-bridge formation.

  2. A study of the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Zmudzińska, Wioletta; Uber, Dorota; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2014-12-01

    Chain reversals are often nucleation sites in protein folding. The β-hairpins of FBP28 WW domain and IgG are stable and have been proved to initiate the folding and are, therefore, suitable for studying the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin conformation. In this paper, we carried out NMR examination of the conformations in solution of two fragments from the FPB28 protein (PDB code: 1E0L) (N-terminal part) namely KTADGKT-NH2 (1E0L 12-18, D7) and YKTADGKTY-NH2 (1E0L 11-19, D9), one from the B3 domain of the protein G (PDB code: 1IGD), namely DDATKT-NH2 (1IGD 51-56) (Dag1), and three variants of Dag1 peptide: DVATKT-NH2 (Dag2), OVATKT-NH2 (Dag3) and KVATKT-NH2 (Dag4), respectively, in which the original charged residue were replaced with non-polar residues or modified charged residues. It was found that both the D7 and D9 peptides form a large fraction bent conformations. However, no hydrophobic contacts between the terminal Tyr residues of D9 occur, which suggests that the presence of a pair of like-charged residues stabilizes chain reversal. Conversely, only the Dag1 and Dag2 peptides exhibit some chain reversal; replacing the second aspartic-acid residue with a valine and the first one with a basic residue results in a nearly extended conformation. These results suggest that basic residues farther away in sequence can result in stabilization of chain reversal owing to screening of the non-polar core. Conversely, smaller distance in sequence prohibits this screening, while the presence oppositely-charged residues can stabilize a turn because of salt-bridge formation. PMID:25316116

  3. Improving the spatial resolution in CZT detectors using charge sharing effect and transient signal analysis: Simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Zeng; Deen, M. Jamal; Peng, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors are capable of providing superior energy resolution and three-dimensional position information of gamma ray interactions in a large variety of fields, including nuclear physics, gamma-ray imaging and nuclear medicine. Some dedicated Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems, for example, for breast cancer detection, require higher contrast recovery and more accurate event location compared with a whole-body PET system. The spatial resolution is currently limited by electrode pitch in CZT detectors. A straightforward approach to increase the spatial resolution is by decreasing the detector electrode pitch, but this leads to higher fabrication cost and a larger number of readout channels. In addition, inter-electrode charge spreading can negate any improvement in spatial resolution. In this work, we studied the feasibility of achieving sub-pitch spatial resolution in CZT detectors using two methods: charge sharing effect and transient signal analysis. We noted that their valid ranges of usage were complementary. The dependences of their corresponding valid ranges on electrode design, depth-of-interaction (DOI), voltage bias and signal triggering threshold were investigated. The implementation of these two methods in both pixelated and cross-strip configuration of CZT detectors were discussed. Our results show that the valid range of charge sharing effect increases as a function of DOI, but decreases with increasing gap width and bias voltage. For a CZT detector of 5 mm thickness, 100 μm gap and biased at 400 V, the valid range of charge sharing effect was found to be about 112.3 μm around the gap center. This result complements the valid range of the transient signal analysis within one electrode pitch. For a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of ~17 and preliminary measurements, the sub-pitch spatial resolution is expected to be ~30 μm and ~250 μm for the charge sharing and transient signal analysis methods

  4. Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Yang, Hui; Xu, Ke Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang

    2014-01-07

    Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure.

  5. Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Haijian; Xu, Ke; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang; Yang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure.

  6. Andean rural children's views of the environment: A qualitative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurial, Mahia

    Andean rural children's drawings and narratives about their crops and the immediate biological environment are rich tools to understand local views of the environment. Children's drawings and narratives were collected and linked to interviews as well as participant observation gathered from parents, leaders and teachers. The research sites are the community of Willca and the school of Mayu. Fieldwork was completed in 1998. In the conceptual framework I distinguish between two dissimilar knowledges, school knowledge and local knowledge. These knowledges produce two dissimilar views of the environment. I further analyze relationships of knowledge and power and argue that school knowledge overpowers local knowledge. Concomitantly, I studied set of ideas associated with two knowledges aforementioned: superacion (surpass) and regeneration (Apffel-Marglin 1995). Although these ideas coexist in peoples' minds they are not linked or effectively connected. In order to link local knowledge and school knowledge together, I propose the integration of environmental studies and art education to enhance a local sense of place (Blandy et. al 1993) in Andean and other schools. This will contribute to grassroots educational policy.

  7. A longitudinal study of very young children's vowel production

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Rebecca W.; McGowan, Richard S.; Denny, Margaret; Nittrouer, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ecologically realistic, spontaneous adult-directed longitudinal speech data of young children was described by acoustic analyses. Method The first two formant frequencies of vowels produced by six children from different American English dialect regions were analyzed from ages 18 to 48 months. The vowels were from largely conversational contexts and were classified according to dictionary pronunciation. Results Within-subject formant frequency variability remained relatively constant for the span of ages studied here. It was often difficult to detect overall decreases in the first two formant frequencies between the ages of 30 and 48 months. A study of the movement of the corner vowels with respect to the vowel centroid showed that the shape of the vowel space remained qualitatively constant from 30 through 48 months. Conclusions The shape of the vowel space is established early in life. Some aspects of regional dialect were observed in some of the subjects at 42 months of age. The present paper adds to the existing data on the development of vowel spaces by describing ecologically realistic speech. PMID:24687464

  8. Algorithms for verbal autopsies: a validation study in Kenyan children.

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, M. A.; Armstrong Schellenberg, J. R.; Snow, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    The verbal autopsy (VA) questionnaire is a widely used method for collecting information on cause-specific mortality where the medical certification of deaths in childhood is incomplete. This paper discusses review by physicians and expert algorithms as approaches to ascribing cause of deaths from the VA questionnaire and proposes an alternative, data-derived approach. In this validation study, the relatives of 295 children who had died in hospital were interviewed using a VA questionnaire. The children were assigned causes of death using data-derived algorithms obtained under logistic regression and using expert algorithms. For most causes of death, the data-derived algorithms and expert algorithms yielded similar levels of diagnostic accuracy. However, a data-derived algorithm for malaria gave a sensitivity of 71% (95% Cl: 58-84%), which was significantly higher than the sensitivity of 47% obtained under an expert algorithm. The need for exploring this and other ways in which the VA technique can be improved are discussed. The implications of less-than-perfect sensitivity and specificity are explored using numerical examples. Misclassification bias should be taken into consideration when planning and evaluating epidemiological studies. PMID:8706229

  9. Sports injuries in school-aged children. An epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Backx, F J; Erich, W B; Kemper, A B; Verbeek, A L

    1989-01-01

    In November 1982, epidemiologic data were collected in a unique, large scale, population-based survey on sports injuries in school-aged children living in Holland. A total of 7,468 pupils, aged 8 to 17, completed questionnaires covering a retrospective period of 6 weeks. Seven hundred ninety-one sports injuries were registered, amounting to an incidence of 10.6 sports injuries per 100 participants. In 31% of the cases, medical consultation was needed. Injuries incurred during the study period caused 36% of the children to miss one or more physical education classes and caused 6% to miss school for at least 1 day. Contusions and sprains were the most common lesions (77%). Three of four injuries involved the lower extremity, in particular the ankle. Sixty-two percent of all the injuries occurred in organized sports, 21% in physical education classes, and 17% in unsupervised sports activities. The highest injury rates were found in basketball and field hockey. In this study population, 15 and 16-year-old boys who had a high sports activity index and played team sports, particularly contact team sports, formed a high risk group.

  10. Children of the atomic bomb survivors: A genetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.; Schull, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    This volume represents the results of over 40 years of study of the latent health effects on the survivors of the atomic bomb blasts. Planning for this research began in 1946 and data collection has been ongoing since 1948. The work represents the efforts of both US and Japanese agencies and presents 13 papers which the editors believe represent the best scientific information related to the genetic effects of radiation exposure. In general, the results presented here indicate that radiation exposure effects on reproductive cells are less than previously thought. The paper contained here examine that question in light of effects on pregnancy outcome, sex ratio, congenital defects, and early mortality of children. The papers also present helpful comparison of these results with the results seen in experimental radiation studies with animals. For anyone interested in the risks associated with radiation studies, this book represents a vital collection of information.

  11. Simulation study of beam-beam effects in ion beams with large space charge tuneshift

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.

    2012-05-20

    During low-energy operations with gold-gold collisions at 3.85 GeV beam energy, significant beam lifetime reductions have been observed due to the beam-beam interaction in the presence of large space charge tuneshifts. These beam-beam tuneshift parameters were about an order of magnitude smaller than during regular high energy operations. To get a better understanding of this effect, simulations have been performed. Recent results are presented.

  12. Comparing performance within a virtual supermarket of children with traumatic brain injury to typically developing children: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Erez, Neta; Weiss, Patrice L; Kizony, Rachel; Rand, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the usability of a virtual reality environment for pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) by assessing the performance of a simple virtual shopping task and comparing their results to typically developing peers. Twenty children with TBI and 20 typically developing children, matched in age and sex, "shopped" for four items in a virtual supermarket (VMall). A short feedback questionnaire, Borg's scale of perceived exertion, and the Zoo Map subtest from the Behavioral Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome for Children were also administered. All of the children were able to complete a four-item test within the VMall. Overall, good usability was obtained. A significant difference in shopping performance was found between the two groups; the mean shopping time and number of mistakes was higher for the children with TBI. The use of a short shopping test within a functional virtual environment enabled detection of poorer performance of children with TBI that may be due to executive function deficits. Because the task was enjoyable and motivating, the VMall may also be used to enhance participation in instrumental activities of daily living and play for children with TBI. [OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health. 2013;33(4):218-227.].

  13. In vivo demonstration of ultrasound power delivery to charge implanted medical devices via acute and survival porcine studies.

    PubMed

    Radziemski, Leon; Makin, Inder Raj S

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies are an important step in proving the utility and safety of an ultrasound based implanted battery recharging system. To this end an Ultrasound Electrical Recharging System (USER™) was developed and tested. Experiments in vitro demonstrated power deliveries at the battery of up to 600 mW through 10-15 mm of tissue, 50 mW of power available at tissue depths of up to 50 mm, and the feasibility of using transducers bonded to titanium as used in medical implants. Acute in vivo studies in a porcine model were used to test reliability of power delivery, temperature excursions, and cooling techniques. The culminating five-week survival study involved repeated battery charging, a total of 10.5h of ultrasound exposure of the intervening living tissue, with an average RF input to electrical charging efficiency of 20%. This study was potentially the first long term cumulative living-tissue exposure using transcutaneous ultrasound power transmission to an implanted receiver in situ. Histology of the exposed tissue showed changes attributable primarily due to surgical implantation of the prototype device, and no damage due to the ultrasound exposure. The in vivo results are indicative of the potential safe delivery of ultrasound energy for a defined set of source conditions for charging batteries within implants.

  14. First experimental charge density study using a Bruker CMOS-type PHOTON 100 detector: the case of ammonium tetraoxalate dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N; Kamiński, Radosław; Dobrzycki, Lukasz; Cyrański, Michał K

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test the applicability of a Bruker AXS CMOS-type PHOTON 100 detector for the purpose of a fine charge density quality data collection. A complex crystal containing oxalic acid, ammonium oxalate and two water molecules was chosen as a test case. The data was collected up to a resolution of 1.31 Å(-1) with high completeness (89.1%; Rmrg = 0.0274). The multipolar refinement and subsequent quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analysis resulted in a comprehensive description of the charge density distribution in the crystal studied. The residual density maps are flat and almost featureless. It was possible to derive reliable information on intermolecular interactions to model the anharmonic motion of a water molecule, and also to observe the fine details of the charge density distribution, such as polarization on O and H atoms involved in the strongest hydrogen bonds. When compared with our previous statistical study on oxalic acid data collected with the aid of CCD cameras, the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detector can certainly be classified as a promising alternative in advanced X-ray diffraction studies.

  15. Charging of interplanetary grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baragiola, R. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Newcomb, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this program is to quantify, by laboratory experiments, the charging of ices and other insulators subject to irradiation with electrons, ions and ultraviolet photons and to model special conditions based on the data. The system and conditions to be studied are those relevant for charging of dust in magnetospheric plasmas. The measurements are supplemented by computer simulations of charging or grains under a variety of conditions. Our work for this period involved experiments on water ice, improved models of charging of ice grains for Saturn's E-ring, and the construction of apparatus for electron impact studies and measurements of electron energy distributions.

  16. Studies on fluoride distribution in infants and small children.

    PubMed

    Hellström, I

    1976-05-01

    The fluoride (F) concentrations in hard tissues and blood plasma were determined in biopsy and autopsy specimens from fetuses, infants, and children on varying F intake. In newborn autopsy cases specimens consisting of rib, jawbone with teeth, and blood plasma the F concentrations of bone and dentin were of the same order, those of the enamel lower. Correlations between individual F values in different tissues were all positive, highest for enamel/dentin. Low birth weight entailed only slightly reduced F contents, high water F significantly increased F contents. In the biopsy material (rib and blood plasma) the maximal rib/ash concentration was about 400 parts/10(6) F. A negative correlation between rib F and plasma F is specially commented on. The possible influence of F on bone development as expressed by blood plasma F and phosphatase activity was investigated in three groups of infants aged 2-6 months, either breast-fed or fed dry-milk formulas diluted with drinking waters of different F content. The children of these groups were calculated to ingest F in the ratio of about 1:10:50. The highest F group had higher plasma F values than the two other groups, whereas its alkaline phosphatase was significantly higher than that of the lowest F group only. The influence of disturbances in the skeletal development on F retention studied in physically handicapped children aged 4-15 years living in a city with about 1 part/10(6) F in the drinking water. The severely handicapped showed a higher urinary F excretion than the controls.

  17. Design study of low-energy beam transport for multi-charge beams at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Qiang, Ji; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-12-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) at the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) is being designed to simultaneously accelerate beams with multiple charge states. It includes a driver superconducting (SC) linac for producing 200 MeV/u and 400 kW continuous wave (CW) heavy ion beams from protons to uranium. The RAON consists of a few electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, a CW 81.25 MHz, 500 keV/u radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport system, the SC linac, and a charge-stripper system. The LEBT system for the RISP accelerator facility consists of a high-voltage platform, two 90° dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB), solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles, a velocity equalizer, and a diagnostic system. The ECR ion sources are located on a high-voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 10 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam is transported through the LEBT system to the RFQ accelerator. The generated charge states are selected by an achromatic bending system and then bunched by the MHB in the LEBT system. The MHB is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ by generating a sawtooth wave with three harmonics. In this paper, we present the results and issues of the beam dynamics of the LEBT system.

  18. A study of different modes of charge transfer to ground in upward lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Helin; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Diendorfer, Gerhard; Thottappillil, Rajeev; Pichler, Hannes; Mair, Martin

    2015-04-01

    We examined simultaneous measurements of currents and close electric field changes, as well as high-speed video images, associated with pulses superimposed on the initial continuous current (ICC pulses) and M-components following return strokes in upward flashes initiated from the Gaisberg Tower in Austria. For tower-initiated lightning, upward leaders often create multiple branches below the cloud base that can facilitate initiation of transients at relatively low heights along the grounded channel carrying ICC of some tens to hundreds of amperes. In this situation, a conducting channel is present, which is necessary for the M-component mode of charge transfer to ground, but the excitation wave (leader), after entering the channel, cannot form a long-front downward M-wave, because of the relatively short distance between the entry (junction) point and the strike-object top. Clearly, two parallel channels, one previously existing and the other newly formed (or rejuvenated) are involved in the charge transfer, and there is a common channel section between the junction point and the strike object. We use the term "mixed mode of charge transfer to ground", to indicate that in the case of low junction point the "classical" M-component mode is not possible, even though a conducting channel to ground (an attribute of the M-component mode) is present. The mixed mode scenario is also applicable to impulsive processes during continuing currents following return strokes in upward lightning.

  19. A first-principles study of the effect of charge doping on the 1D polymerization of C60

    SciTech Connect

    Poloni, R.; San Miguel, A.; Fernandez-Serra, M. V.

    2012-02-09

    We study the interplay between charge doping and intermolecular distance in the polymerization of C₆₀ fullerene chains by means of density functional theory-based first-principles calculations. The potential energy surface analysis shows that both the equilibrium intermolecular distance of the unpolymerized system and the polymerization energy barrier are inversely proportional to the electron doping of the system. We analyze the origin of this charge-induced polymerization effect by studying the behavior of the system's wavefunctions around the Fermi level and the structural modifications of the molecules as a function of two variables: the distance between the centers of the molecules and the number of electrons added to the system.

  20. The Study Of Charge Carrier Transport On The Calamitic Liquid Crystals `` 5, 5'-Di-(Alkyl-Pyridin-Yl) - 2' Bithiophenes''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Naresh; Pokhrel, Chandra; Ellman, Brett; Getmanenko, Yulia; Twieg, Robert

    2010-03-01

    The hole and electron mobilities in both types of calamitic liquid crystals C9 [5,5'-Di-(5-n-nonyl-pyridin-2-yl)-2,2'-bithiophenes] and C10 [5,5'-Di-(5-n-decyl-pyridin-2-yl)-2,2'-bithiophenes] were studied. The charge carrier mobilities were strongly electric field dependent. The mobilities decreased continuously with increase in the electric field up to a certain value, after which it became constant. Both types of charge carrier mobilities are independent of the temperature over our temperature range. The qualitative feature of our results could be tentatively explained by the Monte--Carlo modeling proposed by H Bassler. However, the results require further study for better understanding.