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Sample records for charge transfer collisions

  1. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  2. Transfer ionization in collisions with a fast highly charged ion.

    PubMed

    Voitkiv, A B

    2013-07-26

    Transfer ionization in fast collisions between a bare ion and an atom, in which one of the atomic electrons is captured by the ion whereas another one is emitted, crucially depends on dynamic electron-electron correlations. We show that in collisions with a highly charged ion a strong field of the ion has a very profound effect on the correlated channels of transfer ionization. In particular, this field weakens (strongly suppresses) electron emission into the direction opposite (perpendicular) to the motion of the ion. Instead, electron emission is redirected into those parts of the momentum space which are very weakly populated in fast collisions with low charged ions.

  3. Charge transfer during individual collisions in ice growing by riming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, Eldo E.; Caranti, Giorgio M.

    1991-01-01

    The charging of a target by riming in the wind was studied in the temperature range of (-10, -18 C). For each temperature, charge transfers of both signs are observed and, according to the environmental conditions, one of them prevails. The charge is more positive as the liquid water concentration is increased at any particular temperature. It is found that even at the low impact velocities used (5 m/s) there is abundant evidence of fragmentation following the collision.

  4. Radiative charge transfer in collisions of C with He+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babb, James F.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2017-02-01

    Radiative charge exchange collisions between a carbon atom {{C}}({}3P) and a helium ion {{He}}+({}2S), both in their ground state, are investigated theoretically. Detailed quantum chemistry calculations are carried out to obtain potential energy curves and transition dipole matrix elements for doublet and quartet molecular states of the HeC+ cation. Radiative charge transfer cross sections and rate coefficients are calculated and are found at thermal and lower energies to be large compared to those for direct charge transfer. The present results might be applicable to modelling the complex interplay of [{{C}} {{II}}] (or {{{C}}}+), {{C}}, and {CO} at the boundaries of interstellar photon dominated regions and in x-ray dominated regions, where the abundance of {{He}}+ affects the abundance of {CO}.

  5. Hydrogen Ion-Molecule Isotopomer Collisions: Charge Transfer and Rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.; Stancil, P. C.

    A survey of existing data for collisions of isotopes of hydrogen atoms, ions, and molecules is presented. The survey was limited to atom - diatom ionic collisions and to energies generally less than about 10 keV/u. The processes include particle-rearrangement and charge transfer, including both dissociative and non-dissociative channels, with an emphasis on state-to-state (or state-selected) data, where available. Since the last survey (Linder, Janev and Botero 1995), a small number of investigations for deuterium and tritium ion-diatom systems have been performed, with some involving state-resolved data, which include the initial-state-resolved and state-to-state processes. While some progress has been made since the last survey, the database involving hydrogen isotope collisional processes, both total and state- resolved, is far from complete.

  6. Radiative charge transfer and association in slow Li- + H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaohe; Peng, Yigeng; Wu, Yong; Wang, Jianguo; Janev, Ratko; Shao, Bin

    2017-02-01

    Aims: The radiative charge transfer and association processes in Li- + H collisions are studied in the 10-10-10 eV center-of-mass energy range. Methods: we carried out total and ν-resolved state-selective cross sections have been carried out by using the fully quantum, optical potential, and semiclassical methods. Results: In the energy region below 0.8 eV, the radiative association process is the dominant decay channel, while radiative charge transfer dominates at higher energies. Rich resonance structures are observed in the cross sections of both processes in the 0.1-1.5 eV energy range; These structures are associated with the quasi-bound states below the top of the centrifugal barrier of the effective potential in the entrance channel for specific vibrational and angular momentum states. It is found that with the increase of collision energy, the resonances occur for higher angular momentum states and lower vibrational states. Besides the cross sections for the studied processes we also present their reaction rate coefficients in the 10-6-106K temperature range.

  7. Charge transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions under Debye plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of plasma environment on the 1s → nlm charge transfer, for arbitrary n, l, and m, in proton-hydrogen collisions has been investigated within the framework of a distorted wave approximation. The effect of external plasma has been incorporated using Debye screening model of the interacting charge particles. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogenic wave function, it has been possible to obtain the scattering amplitude in closed form. A detailed study has been made to investigate the effect of external plasma environment on the differential and total cross sections for electron capture into different angular momentum states for the incident energy in the range of 20–1000 keV. For the unscreened case, our results are in close agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  8. Charge transfer reactions in multiply charged ion-atom collisions. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms of hydrogen and/or helium may be rapid at thermal energies. If these reactions are rapid, they will suppress highly charged ions in H I regions and guarantee that the observed absorption features from such ions cannot originate in the interstellar gas. A discussion of such charge-transfer reactions is presented and compared with the available experimental data. The possible implications of these reactions for observations of the interstellar medium, H II regions, and planetary nebulae are outlined.

  9. Charge transfer and momentum exchange in exospheric D-H(+) and H-D(+) collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms that control the escape of deuterium from planetary exospheres include the acceleration of D(+) in the polar wind, and the production of suprathermal D atoms through nonthermal collisions. In this paper we examine the effects of neutral-ion interactions involving deuterium and hydrogen on the velocity distribution of neutral D. A two-center scattering approximation is used as the basis for calculations of the differential cross sections for charge transfer and elastic scatter in collision of H with D(+) and of D with H(+) for ionosphere-exosphere collision energies below 10 e V. These data are used to derive temperature dependent rate coefficients for the charge transfer branches of these interactions, and to determine the effects of ion-neutral temperature differences on the rate of generation of suprathermal D through charge transfer and elastic scatter.

  10. Double charge transfer in low-energy H{sup +}+H{sup -} collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mezei, J. Zs.; Stenrup, M.; Elander, N.; Larson, A.

    2010-07-15

    The cross section for double charge transfer between H{sup +} and H{sup -} at low collision energies (E{<=}90 eV) is calculated using a many-state molecular close-coupling model. The wave function is expanded in a diabatic representation of the seven lowest {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +} and the six lowest {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +} states of the hydrogen molecule. The calculated cross section shows clear oscillations as a function of the collision energy, similar to those observed experimentally. However, the magnitude of the calculated cross section is larger than found in experiments. Also, the cross section for double charge transfer in collisions between D{sup +} and H{sup -} is calculated.

  11. Isotope effect in charge-transfer collisions of H with He{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Loreau, J.; Dalgarno, A.; Ryabchenko, S.

    2011-11-15

    We present a theoretical study of the isotope effect arising from the replacement of H by T in the charge-transfer collision H(n=2) + He{sup +}(1s) at low energy. Using a quasimolecular approach and a time-dependent wave-packet method, we compute the cross sections for the reaction including the effects of the nonadiabatic radial and rotational couplings. For H(2s) + He{sup +}(1s) collisions, we find a strong isotope effect at energies below 1 eV/amu for both singlet and triplet states. We find a much smaller isotopic dependence of the cross section for H(2p) + He{sup +}(1s) collisions in triplet states, and no isotope effect in singlet states. We explain the isotope effect on the basis of the potential energy curves and the nonadiabatic couplings, and we evaluate the importance of the isotope effect on the charge-transfer rate coefficients.

  12. Theoretical study of charge transfer dynamics in collisions of C6+ carbon ions with pyrimidine nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus-Montabonel, M. C.

    2012-07-01

    A theoretical approach of the charge transfer dynamics induced by collision of C6+ ions with biological targets has been performed in a wide collision energy range by means of ab-initio quantum chemistry molecular methods. The process has been investigated for the target series thymine, uracil and 5-halouracil corresponding to similar molecules with different substituent on carbon C5. Such a study may be related to hadrontherapy treatments by C6+carbon ions and may provide, in particular, information on the radio-sensitivity of the different bases with regard to ion-induced radiation damage. The results have been compared to a previous analysis concerning the collision of C4+ carbon ions with the same biomolecular targets and significant charge effects have been pointed out.

  13. Charge transfer and excitation in H++CH3 collisions below 10keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Masatoshi; Hida, Ken-Nosuke; Kimura, Mineo; Rai, Sachchida N.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Buenker, Robert J.; Suno, Hiroya; Stancil, Phillip C.

    2008-07-01

    Charge transfer and electronic excitation in collisions of H+ ions with CH3 from a few tens of eV up to 10keV are theoretically investigated. The adiabatic potential energy curves and corresponding wave functions are calculated by using the multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction method, and the scattering dynamics is studied based on the semiclassical impact parameter molecular-orbital close-coupling approach. Charge-transfer cross sections are found to be large and rather energy-dependent over the entire energy region studied. Electronic excitation is also energy-dependent with a sharp increase from below 10-17to10-16cm2 . Most of the molecular products produced through charge transfer or excitation are known to be unstable and undergo fragmentation producing various hydrocarbon radical species. Hence, identification of fragmented species and their production mechanism are important for spectroscopic analysis.

  14. Time-dependent quantum wave packet dynamics to study charge transfer in heavy particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song Bin; Wu, Yong; Wang, Jian Guo

    2016-12-01

    The method of time-dependent quantum wave packet dynamics has been successfully extended to study the charge transfer/exchange process in low energy two-body heavy particle collisions. The collision process is described by coupled-channel equations with diabatic potentials and (radial and rotational) couplings. The time-dependent coupled equations are propagated with the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method and the modulo squares of S-matrix is extracted from the wave packet by the flux operator with complex absorbing potential (FCAP) method. The calculations of the charge transfer process 12Σ+ H-(1s2) +Li(1 s22 s ) →22Σ+ /32 Σ+ /12 Π H(1 s ) +Li-(1s 22 s 2 l ) (l =s ,p ) at the incident energy of about [0.3, 1.3] eV are illustrated as an example. It shows that the calculated reaction probabilities by the present FCAP reproduce that of quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling very well, including the peak structures contributed by the resonances. Since time-dependent external interactions can be directly included in the present FCAP calculations, the successful implementation of FCAP provides us a powerful potential tool to study the quantum control of heavy particle collisions by lasers in the near future.

  15. Luminescence measurements of Xe+ + N2 and Xe2+ + N2 hyperthermal charge transfer collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, Benjamin D.; Chiu, Yu-Hui

    2011-09-01

    Luminescence spectra are recorded for collisions between Xe+/Xe2+ and molecular nitrogen at energies ranging from 4.5 to 316 eV in the center-of-mass frame. In the Xe+ + N2 collision system, evidence for luminescent charge-transfer products is only found through Xe I emission lines. The most intense features of the luminescence spectra are attributed to atomic N emissions observed above ˜20 eV. Intense N2+ A 2Πu - X2Σ_g+ and B2Σ_u+ - X2Σ_g+ radiance is observed from Xe2+ + N2 collisions. The B state formation cross section decreases with collision energy until 20 eV, after which it becomes independent of impact energy with an approximate value of 3 Å2. The cross section for N2+ A (v > 0) formation increases with energy until 20 eV, after which it remains nearly constant at ˜1 Å2. The N2+ product vibrational distributions extracted from the spectra are non-Franck-Condon for both electronic product states at low collision energies. The distributions resemble a Franck-Condon distribution at the highest energies investigated in this work.

  16. Resonant charge transfer in slow Li+-Li(2s) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tie-Cheng; Liu, Chun-Hua; Qu, Yi-Zhi; Liu, Ling; Wu, Yong; Wang, Jian-Guo; P. Liebermann, H.; J. Buenker, R.

    2015-10-01

    The resonant charge transfer process for Li+-Li(2s) collision is investigated by the quantum-mechanical molecular orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) method and the two-center atomic-orbital close-coupling (AOCC) method in an energy range of 1.0 eV/u-104 eV/u. Accurate molecular structure data and charge transfer cross sections are given. Both the all-electron model (AEM) and one-electron model (OEM) are used in the QMOCC calculations, and the discrepancies between the two models are analyzed. The OEM calculation can also give a reliable prediction of the cross sections for energies below 1 keV/u. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11179041, 11474032, and 11474033) and the NSAF (Grant No. U1330117).

  17. Ionosphere-exosphere coupling through charge exchange and momentum transfer in hydrogen-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The implications of a traditional assumption of exospheric physics, that collisions of hydrogen atoms and protons preferentially result in charge exchange with negligible momentum transfer are examined. Initially adopted as a necessary convenience to accommodate limited computer resources in exosphere model calculations, this approximation results in a direct transformation of the proton velocity distribution into a hot component of neutral hydrogen. With expanding computational facilities, the need for the approximation has passed. As the first step toward its replacement with a realistic, quantum mechanical model of the H - H(+) collision process, differential and cumulative cross sections were calculated for quantum elastic scattering of indistinguishable nuclei for a fine grid of encounter energies and scattering angles. These data are used to study the nature of ionosphere-exosphere coupling through H - H(+) collisions, and to demonstrate that the distribution of velocities of scattered H produced in the traditional exospheric charge exchange approximation, as well as that arising from an alternative, fluid dynamic approach, leads to unacceptable abundances of coronal atoms in long-term, highly elliptic trajectories.

  18. Charge Transfer in Collisions between Bare Ions and Hydrogenic Carbon Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, T. G.

    1997-04-01

    Cross sections have been calculated for electron transfer, as well as ionization, in collisions between 125-1000 keV/amu protons, α particles, Li^2+ ions, etc. and C^5+(1s) ions. The dependence of cross sections on projectile charge has been determined and compared with results of first-order perturbation theory. This study parallels an earlier one in which the target nuclear charge was instead varied.(T. G. Winter, Phys. Rev. A 35), 3799 (1987). A coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach is again taken, yielding capture cross sections accurate to at least a few per cent. In the case of α-particle projectiles, the results are important for understanding α losses to the walls of the TFTR, (H. Herrmann (private communication, 1996).) and are much larger than existing published results.(M. Lal, M. K. Srivastava, and A. N. Tripathi, Phys. Rev. A 26), 305 (1982).

  19. Charge transfer in collisions of Be3+ ions with H atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.; Wang, J. G.

    2013-04-01

    The nonradiative charge-transfer processes for the Be3+(1s)+H(1s) collisions are investigated by the quantum-mechanical molecular orbital close-coupling method in the energy range of 0.01-10 keV/u. The radiative charge-transfer cross sections are calculated by the optical potential and semiclassical methods in the energy range 10-6-103 eV/u. The needed molecular data are obtained by the ab initio multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction method. Total and state-selective cross sections are presented and compared with other available theoretical data. Our calculation agrees well with the atomic orbital close-coupling results of Liu [L. Liu, D. Jakimovski, J. G. Wang, and R. K. Janev, J. Phys. BJPAPEH0953-407510.1088/0953-4075/43/14/144005 43, 144005 (2010)], but there exist some discrepancies with the semiclassical molecular orbital close-coupling results of Shimakura [N. Shimakura, J. Phys. BJPAMA40953-407510.1088/0953-4075/21/13/015 21, 2485 (1988)]. The present results show that the capture to Si2+(1s3l) states is dominant in the whole energy range with the exception of a narrow range of 2-4 keV/u. Rotational couplings play an important role not only in the state-selective cross sections, but also in the total charge-transfer results. At energies below 40 eV/u, the radiative charge transfer exceeds the nonradiative process.

  20. Vibrationally resolved charge transfer for proton collisions with CO and H collisions with CO{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C. Y.; Stancil, P. C.; Li, Y.; Gu, J. P.; Liebermann, H. P.; Buenker, R. J.; Kimura, M.

    2007-07-15

    Electron capture by protons following collisions with carbon monoxide, and the reverse process, is studied with a quantal molecular-orbital coupled-channel method utilizing the infinite order sudden approximation for collision energies between 0.5 and 1000 eV/u. The potential surfaces and couplings, computed with the multireference single- and double-excitation method for a range of H{sup +}-CO orientation angles and C-O separations, are adopted in the scattering calculations. Results including vibrationally resolved and orientation-angle-dependent cross sections are presented for a range of CO and CO{sup +} vibrational levels. Comparison with experiment is made where possible and the relevance of the reaction in astrophysics and atmospheric physics is discussed.

  1. Collisions of fast multicharged ions in gas targets: Charge transfer and ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlachter, A. S.

    1981-05-01

    Measurements of cross sections for charge transfer and ionization of H2 and rare-gas targets were made with fast, highly stripped projectiles in charge states as high as 59+. An empirical scaling rule for electron-capture cross section in H2 valid at energies above 275 keV/amu was found. Similar scaling might exist for other target gases. Cross sections are generally in good agreement with theory. A scaling rule was found for electron loss from H in collisions with a fast highly stripped projectile, based on Olson's classical-trajectory Monte-Carlo calculations, and confirmed by measurements in an H2 target. A similar scaling rule was for net ionization of rare-gas targets, based on Olson's CTMC calculations and the independent-electron model. Measurements are essentially consistent with the scaled cross sections. Calculations and measurements of recoil-ion charge-state spectra show large cross sections for the production of highly charged slow recoil ions.

  2. State selective Rydberg charge transfer and ionization in low energy ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perumal, A. N.; Tripathi, D. N.

    1998-10-01

    The Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) simulation method with a core modified interaction potential has been used to study the single charge transfer in Na +and Ar + ions colliding with a variety of state selected Na Rydberg atom targets ( n=24, 28, 33, 40 and l=2) in the reduced velocity region v=0.2-2.0. The experimentally observed structures in the total capture cross section versus reduced velocity curves are reproduced by CTMC method. The n-distribution of final capture state has got two peaks viz. first one at nf= ni and the second one at a higher nf depending on the initial angular momentum in the velocity regime 0.4-0.6. These structures have been explained in terms of quasimolecular-ion formation and a classical model proposed by Roy et al. (B.N. Roy, D.N. Tripathi, D.K. Rai, Phys. Rev. A 5 (1972) 1252). The CTMC ionization cross section results are benchmarked with the recent experimental measurement of Makarov et al. (O.P. Makarov, D.M. Homan, O.P. Sorokina, K.B. MacAdam, in: F. Aumayr, G. Betz, H.P. Winter (Eds.), Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on the Physics of Electronics and Atomic Collisions, Vienna, 1997, p. FR052) for Na +-Na(24 d).

  3. Charge transfer and electronic excitation in collisions of protons with water molecules below 10keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mada, Shogo; Hida, Ken-Nosuke; Kimura, Mineo; Pichl, Lukáš; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Li, Yan; Buenker, Robert J.

    2007-02-01

    Charge transfer and electronic excitation processes for H++H2O collisions are investigated theoretically below 10keV . Molecular-orbital close-coupling approach is employed for scattering dynamics, while an ab initio multireference single- and double-configuration interaction method is used for the determination of molecular states. The present results for charge transfer show rather weak energy dependence in the energy range from 10keV down to a few tens of eV with very slowly varying cross-section value of 4-13×10-16cm2 , and are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements by Lindsay [Phys. Rev. A 55, 3945 (1997)] where the energy in the experiment and theory overlaps. The electronic-excitation cross sections are found to be much smaller than those for the charge transfer, but increase rapidly and become comparable to charge transfer at a few keV. Most of the water molecular ions and excited species produced in the collision are unstable and soon undergo dissociation; some insight into the fragmentation process and the fragmented species is given.

  4. Charge transfer and electronic excitation in collisions of protons with water molecules below 10 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Mada, Shogo; Hida, Ken-nosuke; Kimura, Mineo; Pichl, Lukas; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Li, Yan; Buenker, Robert J.

    2007-02-15

    Charge transfer and electronic excitation processes for H{sup +}+H{sub 2}O collisions are investigated theoretically below 10 keV. Molecular-orbital close-coupling approach is employed for scattering dynamics, while an ab initio multireference single- and double-configuration interaction method is used for the determination of molecular states. The present results for charge transfer show rather weak energy dependence in the energy range from 10 keV down to a few tens of eV with very slowly varying cross-section value of 4-13x10{sup -16} cm{sup 2}, and are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements by Lindsay et al. [Phys. Rev. A 55, 3945 (1997)] where the energy in the experiment and theory overlaps. The electronic-excitation cross sections are found to be much smaller than those for the charge transfer, but increase rapidly and become comparable to charge transfer at a few keV. Most of the water molecular ions and excited species produced in the collision are unstable and soon undergo dissociation; some insight into the fragmentation process and the fragmented species is given.

  5. Dependence of radiative stabilization on the projectile charge state after double-electron-transfer processes in slow, highly charged ion-molecule collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krok, Franciszek; Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Yamada, Ichihiro; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Kimura, Masahiro; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Ohtani, Shunsuke; Tawara, Hiroyuki

    1997-12-01

    We have measured the radiative stabilization probabilities after double-electron-transfer processes in slow (1.5q keV) Iq++CO collisions in the charge-state regime 8<=q<=26 by using the charge-selected-projectile-recoil-ion-coincidence method. It was found that the radiative stabilization probabilities Prad, defined as Prad=TDC/(TDC+ADC) (TDC is true double capture, and ADC autoionizing double capture), increases from about 1% at the lowest charge up to about 10% at the highest charge as the charge state of the projectile increases. A model is proposed which can explain such a feature, by incorporating a slight modification of the initial population of the transferred levels in the projectile predicted in the extended classical over-barrier model. Based upon the present model, theoretical radiative and autoionization decay rates have been calculated, using the Cowan code. Fairly good agreement between the measured and calculated results has been obtained.

  6. Effects of electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) on doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) is a useful peptide fragmentation technique that can be applied to investigate post-translational modifications (PTMs), the sequencing of highly hydrophilic peptides, and the identification of large peptides and even intact proteins. In contrast to traditional fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD produces c- and z(·)-type product ions by randomly cleaving the N-Cα bonds. The disappointing fragmentation efficiency of ETD for doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptide ions has been improved by ETcaD (supplemental activation). However, the ETD data derived from most database search algorithms yield low confidence scores due to the presence of unreacted precursors and charge-reduced ions within MS/MS spectra. In this work, we demonstrate that eight out of ten standard doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides can be effortlessly identified by electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) using the SEQUEST algorithm without further spectral processing. ET/CID was performed with the further dissociation of the charge-reduced ions isolated from ETD ion/ion reactions. ET/CID had high fragmentation efficiency, which elevated the confidence scores of doubly charged peptide and phosphospeptide sequencing. ET/CID was found to be an effective fragmentation strategy in "bottom-up" proteomic analysis.

  7. Effects of Electron-Transfer Coupled with Collision-Induced Dissociation (ET/CID) on Doubly Charged Peptides and Phosphopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) is a useful peptide fragmentation technique that can be applied to investigate post-translational modifications (PTMs), the sequencing of highly hydrophilic peptides, and the identification of large peptides and even intact proteins. In contrast to traditional fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD produces c- and z·-type product ions by randomly cleaving the N-Cα bonds. The disappointing fragmentation efficiency of ETD for doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptide ions has been improved by ETcaD (supplemental activation). However, the ETD data derived from most database search algorithms yield low confidence scores due to the presence of unreacted precursors and charge-reduced ions within MS/MS spectra. In this work, we demonstrate that eight out of ten standard doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides can be effortlessly identified by electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) using the SEQUEST algorithm without further spectral processing. ET/CID was performed with the further dissociation of the charge-reduced ions isolated from ETD ion/ion reactions. ET/CID had high fragmentation efficiency, which elevated the confidence scores of doubly charged peptide and phosphospeptide sequencing. ET/CID was found to be an effective fragmentation strategy in "bottom-up" proteomic analysis.

  8. Strong isotope effects on the charge transfer in slow collisions of He2+ with atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium.

    PubMed

    Stolterfoht, N; Cabrera-Trujillo, R; Ohrn, Y; Deumens, E; Hoekstra, R; Sabin, J R

    2007-09-07

    Probabilities and cross sections for charge transfer by He2+ impact on atomic hydrogen (H), deuterium (D), and tritium (T) at low collision energies are calculated. The results are obtained using an ab initio theory, which solves the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. For the H target, excellent agreement is achieved between the present and previous results. Differences by orders of magnitude are observed between the cross sections for H, D, and T. A method is introduced to separate the contributions of charge-transfer mechanisms due to radial and rotational coupling. The large differences observed for H, D, and T are attributed to isotope effects in the rotational coupling mechanism.

  9. Luminescence Measurements of Xe+ + N2 and Xe2+ + N2 Hyperthermal Charge Transfer Collisions (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-10

    Landau - Zener curve-crossing models,18 where CT proba- bilities are maximum at intermediate coupling distances. Lindinger16 studied charge-transfer rate...tran- sition probability approaches a maximum in the high en- ergy limit, unlike the Landau - Zener CT probability which ap- proaches zero. Thus, at the...the cross sections remain constant with energy at high energies is further support for a Rosen- Zener /Demkov over a Landau - Zener curve-crossing

  10. Numerical study of charge transfer processes in collisions of Be^4+ and He^2+ with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Tatsuya; Pindzola, Michael S.; Lee, Teck-Gee

    2005-05-01

    We have calculated state-selective charge-transfer cross sections in collisions of Be^(4+ with H(1s) and of He^2+ with H(1s). We have used the lattice time-dependent Schr"odinger equation (LTDSE) approach, the atomic orbital coupled channel (AOCC) method, and the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. The calculations are performed with impact energy ranging between 1keV/u and 1MeV/u. With a well chosen basis-function set, we have found that AOCC gives good agreement with LTDSE. Also, with regard to Wigner's n-3 law, we have found that CTMC gives good extrapolations to the cross sections calculated by LTDSE and AOCC toward high n levels such as for those greater than 6. Thus, in our presentation, we will propose theoretical values of the total charge-transfer cross sections for these collision systems based on a combination of the most reliable results of the various method. This research used resources of the Center for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725, and also of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  11. Total electron loss, charge transfer, and ionization in proton-hydrogen collisions at 10-100 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołakowska, A.; Pindzola, M. S.; Schultz, D. R.

    1999-05-01

    A three-dimensional lattice solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for low quantum states (n<=3) is combined with classical trajectory Monte Carlo results for high quantum states (n>=4) to predict total electron loss and total charge-transfer cross sections for proton collisions with atomic hydrogen at intermediate energies. The total charge-transfer cross sections range from 5% above to 10% below the furnace target measurements of McClure [Phys. Rev. 148, 47 (1966)], while the total electron-loss cross sections range from 5% to 15% above the pulsed crossed-beams measurements of Shah, Elliot, and Gilbody [J. Phys. B 20, 3501 (1987)]. The calculation of ionization as a difference between electron loss and charge transfer leads to theoretical ionization cross sections that are 10% to 35% larger than the crossed-beams measurements of Shah and Gilbody [J. Phys. B 14, 2361 (1981)] and Shah, Elliott, and Gilbody [J. Phys. B 20, 2481 (1987)].

  12. Absolute Charge Transfer and Fragmentation Cross Sections in He{sup 2+}-C{sub 60} Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rentenier, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Ruiz, L. F.; Diaz-Tendero, S.; Alcami, M.; Martin, F.; Zarour, B.; Hanssen, J.; Hervieux, P.-A.; Politis, M. F.

    2008-05-09

    We have determined absolute charge transfer and fragmentation cross sections in He{sup 2+}+C{sub 60} collisions in the impact-energy range 0.1-250 keV by using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. We have found that the cross sections for the formation of He{sup +} and He{sup 0} are comparable in magnitude, which cannot be explained by the sole contribution of pure single and double electron capture but also by contribution of transfer-ionization processes that are important even at low impact energies. The results show that multifragmentation is important only at impact energies larger than 40 keV; at lower energies, sequential C{sub 2} evaporation is the dominant process.

  13. State-selective charge transfer in slow collisions of B5+ with H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwayne, Joseph; Saha, Bidhan

    2004-05-01

    State selective charge transfer from H2 by B5+ in the low energy region (0.01 < E <2 keV/amu) has been investigated employing the semi-classical, impact parameter, close-coupling method based on a molecular expansion augmented with the plane wave electron translation factor. Freezing the molecular features of H2, the colliding system is approximated[1] by a pseudo-one-electron entity. The method of pseudo-potential is used to account for the binding of the electron in the transient diatomic quasi-molecule. A large number of coupled equations are solved to obtain converged cross sections. Comparisons are made with other theoretical and experimental results. [1] A. kumar and B. C. Saha, J. Phys. B 31, L937 (1998); A. Kumar and B. C. Saha, Phys. Rev. A 59, 1273 (1999).

  14. Charge Transfer Dissociation of Complex Oligosaccharides: Comparison with Collision-Induced Dissociation and Extreme Ultraviolet Dissociative Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropartz, David; Li, Pengfei; Fanuel, Mathieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Rogniaux, Hélène; Jackson, Glen P.

    2016-10-01

    The structural characterization of oligosaccharides still challenges the field of analytical chemistry. Tandem mass spectrometry offers many advantages toward this aim, although the generic fragmentation method (low-energy collision-induced dissociation) shows clear limitations and is often insufficient to retrieve some essential structural information on these molecules. In this work, we present the first application of helium charge transfer dissociation (He-CTD) to characterize the structure of complex oligosaccharides. We compare this method with low-energy collision-induced dissociation and extreme-ultraviolet dissociative photoionization (XUV-DPI), which was shown previously to ensure the successful characterization of complex glycans. Similarly to what could be obtained by XUV-DPI, He-CTD provides a complete description of the investigated structures by producing many informative cross-ring fragments and no ambiguous fragmentation. Unlike XUV-DPI, which is performed at a synchrotron source, He-CTD has the undeniable advantage of being implementable in a conventional benchtop ion trap in a conventional laboratory setting.

  15. Charge transfer and ionization in collisions of Si{sup 3+} with H from low to high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. G.; He, B.; Ning, Y.; Liu, C. L.; Yan, J.; Stancil, P. C.; Schultz, D. R.

    2006-11-15

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state Si{sup 3+}(3s {sup 1}S) ions with atomic hydrogen are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) methods. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial coupling matrix elements obtained from Herrero et al. [J. Phys. B 29, 5583 (1996)] which were calculated with a full configuration-interaction method. Total and state-selective single-electron capture cross sections are obtained for collision energies from 0.01 eV/u to 1 MeV/u. Total and state-selective rate coefficients are also presented for temperatures from 2x10{sup 3} K to 10{sup 7} K. Comparison with existing data reveals that the total CTMC cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental measurements at the higher considered energies and that previous Landau-Zener calculations underestimate the total rate coefficients by a factor of up to two. The CTMC calculations of target ionization are presented for high energies.

  16. Radiative and nonradiative charge transfer in collisions of Be{sup 2+} and B{sup 3+} ions with H atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. H.; Wang, J. G.; Liu, L.; Qu, Y. Z.; Janev, R. K.

    2010-08-15

    The nonradiative charge-transfer processes in Be{sup 2+}(1s{sup 2})+H(1s) and B{sup 3+}(1s{sup 2})+H(1s) collisions are investigated by the quantal molecular orbital close-coupling method in the energy range of 10{sup -5}eV/u-10 keV/u and by the two-center atomic-orbital close-coupling method in the energy range of 0.1-100 keV/u. The radiative charge-transfer cross sections are calculated by using the optical potential and semiclassical methods in the energy range 10{sup -5}-100 eV/u. For both collision systems, the nonradiative charge-transfer cross sections in the low-energy region show an increasing behavior with decreasing energy. The nonradiative process is the dominant charge-transfer process in the Be{sup 2+}(1s{sup 2})+H(1s) collision in the entire eV and sub-eV energy region. In the B{sup 3+}(1s{sup 2})+H(1s) collision case, however, the cross section for radiative decay to 1 {sup 2{Sigma}+} and 2 {sup 2{Sigma}+} molecular states significantly exceeds that for the nonradiative process for energies below 30 eV/u.

  17. Improved atomic model for charge transfer in multielectron ion-atom collisions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. D.; Tunnell, L. N.

    1980-07-01

    Electron capture to the K shell of projectiles from the K and other subshells of multielectron target atoms is studied in the intermediate energy region using the single-active-electron approximation and the two-state, two-center atomic eigenfunction expansion method. It is concluded that the theoretical capture cross section is not sensitive to the atomic models used at high collision energies where the projectile velocity v is near or greater than the orbital velocity ve of the active electron. For vcollision systems are obtained and compared with experimental data when available to illustrate the reliability of the present model.

  18. Relating the current science of ion-defect behavior in ice to a plausible mechanism for directional charge transfer during ice particle collisions.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J Paul

    2011-11-28

    A melding of modern experimental results descriptive of fundamental ion defect properties of ice is presented as a logical basis of a mechanism for the preferential transfer of positive charge from large to small colliding ice particles. The result may relate to the electrification of storm clouds. It is broadly agreed that such localized charge transfer during collision of small upwardly mobile ice particles with falling ice granules (i.e., graupel/hail) can lead to macroscopic charge separation capable of initiating lightning strikes during the expansion stage of a storm cell. Though the larger particles are thought to become negatively charged during the collisions neither a generally favored charge-exchange agent nor a preferred mechanism for the directional particle-to-particle charge transfer exists. Nevertheless, should ionic point defects of ice play a key role, the fundamental properties of ice defects considered here must apply. They include: (1) above 140 K protons move readily within and on the surface of ice while hydroxide ions are orders-of-magnitude less mobile, (2) whether generated by dissociation of HCl buried in ice, during neat ice particle growth, or at platinum-ice interfaces, interior protons move to and apparently collect at the ice-vacuum interface, and (3) proton activity and populations are orders-of-magnitude greater at the surface of ice films and free-standing ice particles than in the interior. From these fundamentals an untested argument is developed that within an ensemble of free floating ice particles the proton density at the surface is greater for larger particles. This implies a plausible proton-based mechanism that is consistent with current concepts of ice particle charging through collisions.

  19. Charge-transfer processes in F{sup 2+}+H{yields}F{sup +}+H{sup +} collisions and the reverse process at low-keV energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, C. M.; Nordlander, P.; Gu, J. P.; Hirsch, G.; Buenker, R. J.; Kimura, M.

    2005-11-15

    Theoretical investigations on single charge-transfer processes in collisions of F{sup 2+}+H{yields}F{sup +}+H{sup +} and its reverse process have been carried out at collision energies from 20 eV/u to 10 keV/u. The molecular orbital expansion method within the semiclassical impact parameter formalism has been employed for the scattering dynamics, while the ab initio multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRD-CI) method was adopted for determination of molecular electronic states. The initial channels correspond to the quintet and triplet states for the corresponding collision processes, respectively. Four molecular states in the quintet manifold and eight molecular states in the triplet manifold were coupled. In the quintet manifold, the charge-transfer cross sections for F{sup 2+}+H{yields}F{sup +}+H{sup +} range from 1.3x10{sup -22} cm{sup 2} at 20 eV/u to 2.5x10{sup -15}cm{sup 2} at 10 keV/u. The cross sections of the reverse process, F{sup +}+H{sup +}{yields}F{sup 2+}+H, range from 3.0x10{sup -22} cm{sup 2}to 2.3x10{sup -15} cm{sup 2} in the same energy range. In the triplet states, the charge-transfer cross sections for F{sup 2+}+H{yields}F{sup +}+H{sup +} range from 1.1x10{sup -18} cm{sup 2} to 2.5x10{sup -16} cm{sup 2}, and its reverse process gives charge-transfer cross sections ranging from 1.7x10{sup -24} cm{sup 2} to 1.5x10{sup -17} cm{sup 2}.

  20. Numerical study of charge transfer in ion-ion collisions using the lattice time-dependent Schr"odinger equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, T.; Pindzola, M. S.; Lee, T.-G.; Schultz, D. R.

    2006-05-01

    Br"auning, et.al. (J. Phys. B, 38, p2311) recently measured cross sections of charge transfer in collisions of He^2+ with Li^2+. At the same time, they also performed calculations of the cross sections of this collision system and of collisions of H^+ with He^+ using the basis generator method (BGM). For the former system, BGM seems to overestimate the cross sections compared to their experiment, while for the latter system, BGM provides excellent agreement with past experiments. Since both are ion-ion collision with asymmetrical nuclear charges involving one electron, BGM agreeing one system but the other points to a situation requiring further study. Motivated by this question, we have performed atomic orbital coupled channel (AOCC) calculations for both systems. When we use our most complete basis set for the calculations, we obtain results close to BGM on both systems. However, results from AOCC do not readily converge with regard to the size of the basis sets and therefore results were not conclusive. We also have performed the lattice time-dependent Schr"odinger equation (LTDSE) calculations. Preliminary results for both systems by LTDSE are close to BGM. In this presentation, we compare BGM, AOCC and LTDSE with the experiment. This research used resources of NCCS at ORNL and NERSC, and was supported by DOE OFES.

  1. Comparative study on contribution of charge-transfer collision to excitations of iron ion between argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma and nitrogen microwave induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Kozue; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an ionization/excitation phenomenon of singly-ionized iron occurring in an Okamoto-cavity microwave induced plasma (MIP) as well as an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP), by comparing the Boltzmann distribution among iron ionic lines (Fe II) having a wide range of the excitation energy from 4.76 to 9.01 eV. It indicated in both the plasmas that plots of Fe II lines having lower excitation energies (4.76 to 5.88 eV) were fitted on each linear relationship, implying that their excitations were caused by a dominant thermal process such as collision with energetic electron. However, Fe II lines having higher excitation energies (more than 7.55 eV) had a different behavior from each other. In the ICP, Boltzmann plots of Fe II lines assigned to the higher excited levels also followed the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels, even including a deviation from it in particular excited levels having an excitation energy of ca. 7.8 eV. This deviation can be attributed to a charge-transfer collision with argon ion, which results in the overpopulation of these excited levels, but the contribution is small. On the other hand, the distribution of the high-lying excited levels was non-thermal in the Okamoto-cavity MIP, which did not follow the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels. A probable reason for the non-thermal characteristics in the MIP is that a charge-transfer collision with nitrogen molecule ion having many vibrational/rotational levels could work for populating the 3d64p (3d54s4p) excited levels of iron ion broadly over an energy range of 7.6-9.0 eV, while collisional excitation by energetic electron would occur insufficiently to excite these high-energy levels.

  2. Charge transfer in slow collisions of O{sup 8+} and Ar{sup 8+} ions with H(1s) below 2 keV/amu

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teck-Ghee; Hesse, M.

    2004-07-01

    We calculated the charge-transfer cross sections for O{sup 8+}+H collisions for energies from 1 eV/amu to 2 keV/amu, using the recently developed hyperspherical close-coupling method. In particular, the discrepancy for electron capture to the n=6 states of O{sup 7+} from the previous theoretical calculations is further analyzed. Our results indicate that at low energies (below 100 eV/amu) electron capture to the n=6 manifold of O{sup 7+} becomes dominant. The present results are used to resolve the long-standing discrepancies from the different elaborate semiclassical calculations near 100 eV/amu. We have also performed the semiclassical atomic orbital close-coupling calculations with straight-line trajectories. We found the semiclassical calculations agree with the quantal approach at energy above 100 eV/amu, where the collision occurs at large impact parameters. Calculations for Ar{sup 8+}+H collisions in the same energy range have also been carried out to analyze the effect of the ionic core on the subshell cross sections. By using diabatic molecular basis functions, we show that converged results can be obtained with small numbers of channels.

  3. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen-atom collisions with neutral atoms: Theory, comparisons, and application to Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical method is presented for the estimation of cross sections and rates for excitation and charge-transfer processes in low-energy hydrogen-atom collisions with neutral atoms, based on an asymptotic two-electron model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen-atom system. The calculation of potentials and nonadiabatic radial couplings using the method is demonstrated. The potentials are used together with the multichannel Landau-Zener model to calculate cross sections and rate coefficients. The main feature of the method is that it employs asymptotically exact atomic wave functions, which can be determined from known atomic parameters. The method is applied to Li+H , Na+H , and Mg+H collisions, and the results compare well with existing detailed full-quantum calculations. The method is applied to the astrophysically important problem of Ca+H collisions, and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20 000 K.

  4. Resonant charge transfer process in ion-metal surface collisions: effect of the presence of vacancies on the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. A. M. C.; Wolfgang, J.; Borisov, A. G.; Gauyacq, J. P.; Nordlander, P.; Teillet-Billy, D.

    In this paper an investigation of how the presence of a vacancy on a metal surface influences the energy shift and broadening of negative ion states near the surface is presented. Results for H - and F - ions in the vicinity of a surface vacancy defect on an Al(1 1 1) surface are included. The vacancy-induced electron potential is calculated using a density functional method and the Coupled Angular Mode (CAM) method is used to determine the shift and broadening of H - and F - levels. The results show that the vacancy induces a repulsive potential, shifting the negative ion levels up, while narrowing the width. These two effects have opposite influences on the resonant charge transfer process. Their approximate cancellation makes the RCT process in these systems relatively insensitive to vacancies in the surface layer.

  5. Holographic heavy ion collisions with baryon charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; van der Schee, Wilke; Triana, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    We numerically simulate collisions of charged shockwaves in Einstein-Maxwell theory in anti-de Sitter space as a toy model of heavy ion collisions with non-zero baryon charge. The stress tensor and the baryon current become well described by charged hydrodynamics at roughly the same time. The effect of the charge density on generic observables is typically no larger than 15%. We find significant stopping of the baryon charge and compare our results with those in heavy ion collision experiments.

  6. Vibrational effect on charge-transfer processes in collisions of H{sup +} and O{sup +} ions with C{sub 2}H{sub 4} molecules at energies below 10 keV/u

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Toshio; Gotanda, Kazushi; Kimura, Mineo; Rai, Sachchida N.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Buenker, Robert J.

    2007-10-15

    Charge-transfer processes in collisions of H{sup +} and O{sup +} ions with C{sub 2}H{sub 4} molecules have been studied in joint theoretical and experimental approaches for collision energies below 10 keV/u. Since H and O atoms possess nearly identical ionization potentials, these two ions are expected to share similar dynamics and hence to have similar cross-section values for charge transfer, at least for the energy region above 100 eV. In the present experiments, these cross sections of H{sup +} and O{sup +} ions have been derived by the initial growth rate method in the energy range of 0.20 to 3.6 keV, while the present theoretical study has been carried out for H{sup +} impact only. We have examined the vibrational effect on charge transfer, especially the 'temperature effect' of the initial vibrational states of the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} molecule as well as the final vibrational states of the product C{sub 2}H{sub 4}{sup +} molecular ion. Indeed, a strong influence of the initial vibrational states on charge transfer has been observed since these vibrationally excited initial and final states force the process to be more nearly resonant, thus making charge transfer more efficient. This vibrational effect, and perhaps rotational effect as well, that makes the collision process more nearly resonant has not been well investigated previously, and thus the present study is expected to shed much light on this effect in general.

  7. Charge transferred in brush discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talarek, M.; Kacprzyk, R.

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatic discharges from surfaces of plastic materials can be a source of ignition, when appear in explosive atmospheres. Incendivity of electrostatic discharges can be estimated using the transferred charge test. In the case of brush discharges not all the energy stored at the tested sample is released and the effective surface charge density (or surface potential) crater is observed after the discharge. Simplified model, enabling calculation of a charge transferred during electrostatic brush discharge, was presented. Comparison of the results obtained from the simplified model and from direct measurements of transferred charge are presented in the paper.

  8. Charge transfer in collisions of B{sup 2+}({sup 2}{ital S},{sup 2}{ital P}) and B{sup 3+}({sup 1}{ital S}) ions with He atoms below 200 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, M. |; Suzuki, S.; Shimakura, N.; Gu, J.P.; Hirsch, G.; Buenker, R.J.; Shimamura, I.

    1996-10-01

    Charge transfer in B{sup 2+}({sup 2}{ital S},{sup 2}{ital P})+He and in B{sup 3+}({sup 1}{ital S})+He collisions is studied theoretically by using a semiclassical molecular representation with 8 and 12 molecular channels for B{sup 2+} and B{sup 3+} on He systems, respectively, at collision energies between 200 eV and 200 keV for the former and between 600 eV and 50 keV for the latter. The {ital ab} {ital initio} potential curves and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements are obtained from the multireference single- and double-excitation configuration-interaction (MRD-CI) calculations for the B{sup 2+}-He system and a pseudopotential-modified configuration-interaction method for the B{sup 3+}-He system. The present cross sections for charge transfer by the ground state B{sup 2+} ions are found to have a broad maximum with a magnitude as large as 2{times}10{sup {minus}15} cm{sup 2} at 100 keV and those by an excited B{sup 2+}({sup 2}{ital P}) state are found to be larger by a factor of 6 than those by the ground state in the same energy regime. B{sup 2+}-excitation cross sections are smaller than those for charge transfer below 1 keV, while they increasingly dominate above this energy. The present total charge-transfer cross section for B{sup 3+} in collisions with He is similar to that obtained in earlier work by Gargaud {ital et} {ital al}. [J. Phys. B {bold 27}, 3985 (1994)] both in magnitude and energy dependence, but is found to show slightly different B{sup 2+}(2{ital s}) and B{sup 2+}(2{ital p}) production ratio. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Charge transfer between fullerenes and highly charged noble gas ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narits, A. A.

    2008-07-01

    A semiclassical model for the description of charge-exchange processes in collisions between fullerenes and multiply charged ions is developed. It is based on the decay model combined with the impact-parameter representation for the heavy particles' relative motion. The charge-transfer process in our model is treated as a transition of the active electron over and under the quasistatic potential barrier formed by the electric fields of the target and projectile. Due to the high electron delocalization on the surface of fullerene we represent it as a perfectly conducting hard sphere, whose radius is determined by the dipole polarizability of C60. The energies of the active electrons are assumed to be equal to the corresponding ionization potentials including the Stark-shift effect. We have developed an efficient technique for the evaluation of the electron transmission coefficient through the asymmetric potential barrier. It is shown that our model provides a good agreement with the available experimental data on single-electron charge-exchange processes. Moreover, it allows us to get an adequate description of multi-electron transfer processes. The first theoretical results on charge exchange between the fullerene ions and highly charged ions have been obtained.

  10. Catalysis: Quantifying charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Trevor E.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2016-02-01

    Improving the design of catalytic materials for clean energy production requires a better understanding of their electronic properties, which remains experimentally challenging. Researchers now quantify the number of electrons transferred from metal nanoparticles to an oxide support as a function of particle size.

  11. Momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions yield fragments (Delta-Z = + 1) whose longitudinal momentum distributions are downshifted by larger values than those associated with the remaining fragments (Delta-Z = 1, -2,...). Kinematics alone cannot account for the observed downshifts; therefore, an additional contribution from collision dynamics must be included. In this work, an optical model description of collision momentum transfer is used to estimate the additional dynamical momentum downshift. Good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data is obtained.

  12. Femtosecond laser field induced modifications of electron-transfer processes in Ne{sup +}-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhenzhong; Chen Deying; Fan Rongwei; Xia Yuanqin

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate the presence of femtosecond laser induced charge transfer in Ne{sup +}-He collisions. Electron transfer in ion-atom collisions is considerably modified when the collision is embedded in a strong laser field with the laser intensity of {approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The observed anisotropy of the He{sup +} angular distribution confirms the prediction of early work that the capture probability varies significantly with the laser polarization angle.

  13. Static charging by collisions with ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, A. J.; Caranti, J.

    Recent laboratory work will be described which gives considerable insight into the fundamental processes of charge flow and separation which operate when small ice particles impact upon metal surfaces or upon a second ice surface. This work suggests that the charge transfer when ice contacts metal or ice should be to some extent predictable and dependent upon the work function of the metal and the surface or contact potential of the ice. This contact potential is different for ice formed in the atmosphere by different natural methods.

  14. Contact charge-transfer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dharamsi, A.N.; Tulip, J.

    1981-07-01

    A mechanism for sustaining population inversions in contact charge-transfer complexes in which the ground electronic state is not bound is described. The mechanism relies on picosecond radiationless depletion of the lower laser state. This generates an inversion even when the ground-state potential curve, as plotted against the donor-acceptor distance, is not repulsive vertically below the excited state minimum. Contact charge-transfer lasers would offer high gain, high-energy density, and tunable sources of coherent radiation in the uv and visible. A method for pumping such a laser is examined and applied to the pyrrole-oxygen complex. A rate equation analysis is done and estimates for gain and energy density are presented.

  15. Charge Transfer Calculations and Database for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. G.; Stancil, P. C.; Rakovic, M.; Schultz, D. R.; Zygelman, B.

    2002-01-01

    A variety of theoretical approaches, having different but overlapping energy ranges of applicability, are applied to investigate charge transfer processes for collisions of atomic ions with atoms and molecules. The methods include quantal molecular-orbital close-coupling, classical trajectory Monte Carlo, and continuum distorted wave methods. Recent collision systems studied include S(+4) + H, S(+4) + He, N(+7) + He, H2O, CO, and CO2, O(+q)(q = 1 - 8) + H, H2, and S(+q)(q = 1 - 16) + H2. The database effort is concentrating on astrophysically important reactions of atomic ions X(+q)(X=H-Zn, q=1-4, and selected higher charges) with H, He, various metal atoms, H2, and other selected molecular targets. Existing data, much of it produced by us, has been compiled and critically evaluated. Data for many reactions missing in the literature are estimated using the multichannel Landau-Zener approximation. Fits to cross sections and rate coefficients using standard functions are provided as well as tabulations of the raw data. The database is available on the World Wide Web at cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/astro/ps/data.

  16. Charge-Transfer Versus Charge-Transfer-Like Excitations Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Barry; Sun, Haitao; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-07-14

    Criteria to assess charge-transfer (CT) and `CT-like' character of electronic excitations are examined. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with non-hybrid, hybrid, and tuned long-range corrected (LC) functionals is compared with with coupled-cluster (CC) benchmarks. The test set includes an organic CT complex, two `push-pull' donor-acceptor chromophores, a cyanine dye, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Proper CT is easily identified. Excitations with significant density changes upon excitation within regions of close spatial proximity can also be diagnosed. For such excitations, the use of LC functionals in TDDFT sometimes leads to dramatic improvements of the singlet energies, similar to proper CT, which has led to the concept of `CT-like' excitations. However, `CT-like' excitations are not like charge transfer, and the improvements are not obtained for the right reasons. The triplet excitation energies are underestimated for all systems, often severely. For the `CT-like' candidates, when going from a non-hybrid to an LC functional the error in the singlet-triplet (S/T) separation changes from negative to positive, providing error compensation. For the cyanine, the S/T separation is too large with all functionals, leading to the best error compensation for non-hybrid functionals.

  17. Chemical activation through super energy transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan M; Nikow, Matthew; Ma, Jianqiang; Wilhelm, Michael J; Han, Yong-Chang; Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2014-02-05

    Can a molecule be efficiently activated with a large amount of energy in a single collision with a fast atom? If so, this type of collision will greatly affect molecular reactivity and equilibrium in systems where abundant hot atoms exist. Conventional expectation of molecular energy transfer (ET) is that the probability decreases exponentially with the amount of energy transferred, hence the probability of what we label "super energy transfer" is negligible. We show, however, that in collisions between an atom and a molecule for which chemical reactions may occur, such as those between a translationally hot H atom and an ambient acetylene (HCCH) or sulfur dioxide, ET of chemically significant amounts of energy commences with surprisingly high efficiency through chemical complex formation. Time-resolved infrared emission observations are supported by quasi-classical trajectory calculations on a global ab initio potential energy surface. Results show that ∼10% of collisions between H atoms moving with ∼60 kcal/mol energy and HCCH result in transfer of up to 70% of this energy to activate internal degrees of freedom.

  18. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  19. Neutral Collisions and Charge Exchange in Titan's Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillanpää, I.; Johnson, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Results from new hybrid simulations for Titan are presented. These simulations take into account the elastic collisions between ions and neutral gas as well as the charge exchange reactions for protons and oxygen ions. We used SRIM [1] cross sections for hydrogen and oxygen ions in nitrogen gas to calculate cross sections for the five ions species used in the HYB-Titan hybrid model [2, see also 3] (H+, H2+, O+, CH4+, and N2+). The N2 density profile used was from INMS measurements over a dozen flybys. In addition, we are studying the effect the charge transfer (CT) reactions for H+ and O+ leading to simple CT, dissociative CT and CT with ionization. All reaction cross sections are energy dependent. Neutral particles are not created, but the total ENA energy is recorded as well as the resulting reaction rates. The results show that both of neutral collisions and CT processes have a significant role in the development and shape of Titan's ionotail and wake structure. Results will be described in detail as well as the implications of the ion-neutral collisions for the heating of Titan's neutral corona and atmospheric escape [4]. References [1] Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM), Monte Carlo software by James F. Ziegler (online at http://www.srim.org/ ) [2] Sillanpää, I., Hybrid Modelling of Titan's Interaction with the Magnetosphere of Saturn, Ph.D. dissertation, Finnish Meteorological Contributions, 68, Yliopistopaino, Helsinki, 2008. (online at http://urn.fi/URN:ISBN:978-951-697-660-3) [3] Sillanpää, I., D. Young, F. Crary, M. Thomsen, D. Reisenfeld, J-E.Wahlund, C. Bertucci, E. Kallio, R. Jarvinen, and P. Janhunen, Cassini Plasma Spectro:meter and Hybrid Model Study on Titan's Interaction: Effect of Oxygen Ions, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA016443, 2011. [4] Johnson, R.E., O.J. Tucker, M. Michael, E.C. Sittler, H.T. Smith, D.T. Young, and J.H. Waite, Mass Loss Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere, Chap. 15 in "Titan from Cassini-Huygens" (eds

  20. Charge-exchange collisions of C 60z+ : a probe of the ion charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Douglas B.; Parks, Joel H.

    1997-06-01

    We present Paul trap measurements of charge-exchange collisions of Li, Cs and C 60 with C 60z+ ions ( z = 1-3) at thermal energies. Surprisingly, the measured charge-exchange rates for each neutral species are not proportional to the ion charge z as would be expected for Langevin collisions involving a uniformly charged ion. The relative rates can be reproduced by a model based on a symmetric distribution of point charges that are free to move on the ion surface during the neutral trajectory. Such behavior can be attributed to static and possibly dynamic Jahn-Teller effects in C 60z+ ions.

  1. Opposites Attract: Organic Charge Transfer Salts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Wouw, Heidi L.; Chamorro, Juan; Quintero, Michael; Klausen, Rebekka S.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that introduces second-year undergraduate organic chemistry students to organic electronic materials. The discovery of metallic conductivity in the charge transfer salt tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) is a landmark result in the history of organic electronics. The charge transfer…

  2. On-line LC-MS approach combining collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron-transfer dissociation (ETD), and CID of an isolated charge-reduced species for the trace-level characterization of proteins with post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Hühmer, Andreas F R; Hao, Zhiqi; Karger, Barry L

    2007-11-01

    We have expanded our recent on-line LC-MS platform for large peptide analysis to combine collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron-transfer dissociation (ETD), and CID of an isolated charge-reduced (CRCID) species derived from ETD to determine sites of phosphorylation and glycosylation modifications, as well as the sequence of large peptide fragments (i.e., 2000-10,000 Da) from complex proteins, such as beta-casein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) at the low femtomol level. The incorporation of an additional CID activation step for a charge-reduced species, isolated from ETD fragment ions, improved ETD fragmentation when precursor ions with high m/z (approximately >1000) were automatically selected for fragmentation. Specifically, the identification of the exact phosphorylation sites was strengthened by the extensive coverage of the peptide sequence with a near-continuous product ion series. The identification of N-linked glycosylation sites in EGFR and an O-linked glycosylation site in t-PA were also improved through the enhanced identification of the peptide backbone sequence of the glycosylated precursors. The new strategy is a good starting survey scan to characterize enzymatic peptide mixtures over a broad range of masses using LC-MS with data-dependent acquisition, as the three activation steps can provide complementary information to each other. In general, large peptides can be extensively characterized by the ETD and CRCID steps, including sites of modification from the generated, near-continuous product ion series, supplemented by the CID-MS2 step. At the same time, small peptides (e.g.,

  3. Collision integrals for charged-charged interaction in two-temperature non-equilibrium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorui, S.; Das, A. K.

    2013-09-15

    Choice of an appropriate form of shielding distance in the estimation of collision integrals under screened coulomb potential for two-temperature non-equilibrium plasma is addressed. Simple expressions for collision integrals for charged-charged interactions are derived. It is shown that while some of the formalisms used earlier completely ignore the presence of ions, the others incorporating it may result in negative collision integrals for the interactions involving particles at higher charged states. The parametric regimes of concern and impact of different formalisms on the computed transport properties are investigated with specific reference to nitrogen plasma. A revised definition of the shielding distance is proposed, which incorporates both electrons and ions, avoids the problem of negative collision integrals in all practical regimes of interest and results in calculated property values in close agreement with experimentally observed results.

  4. Charge transfer in algebraic quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jill Dianne

    We discuss aspects of the algebraic structure of quantum field theory. We take the view that the superselection structure of a theory should be determinable from the vacuum representation of the observable algebra, and physical properties of the charge. Hence one determines the nature of the charge transfer operations: the automorphisms of the observable algebra corresponding to the movement of charge along space-time paths. New superselection sectors are obtained from the vacuum sector by an automorphism which is a limit of charge transfer operations along paths with an endpoint tending to spacelike infinity. Roberts has shown that for a gauge theory of the first kind, the charge transfer operations for a given charge form a certain kind of 1-cocycle over Minkowski space. The local 1-cohomology group of their equivalence classes corresponds to the superselection structure. The exact definition of the cohomology group depends on the properties of the charge. Using displaced Fock representations of free fields, we develop model field theories which illustrate this structure. The cohomological classification of displaced Fock representations has been elucidated by Araki. For more general representations, explicit determination of the cohomology group is a hard problem. Using our models, we can illustrate ways in which fields with reasonable physical properties depart fromthe abovementioned structure. In 1+1 dimensions, we use the Streater-Wilde model to illustrate explicitly the representation-dependence of the cohomology structure, and the direction-dependence of the limiting charge transfer operation. The cohomology structure may also be representation-dependent in higher-dimensional theories without strict localization of charge, for example the electromagnetic field. The algebraic structure of the electromagnetic field has many other special features, which we discuss in relation to the concept of charge transfer. We also give some indication of the modifications

  5. Experimental and theoretical studies of charge transfer and deuterium ion transfer between D2O+ and C2H4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Cai, Xiaohui; Li, Yue; Richards O'Grady, Elizabeth; Farrar, James M.

    2004-08-01

    The charge transfer and deuterium ion transfer reactions between D2O+ and C2H4 have been studied using the crossed beam technique at relative collision energies below one electron volt and by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Both direct and rearrangement charge transfer processes are observed, forming C2H4+ and C2H3D+, respectively. Independent of collision energy, deuterium ion transfer accounts for approximately 20% of the reactive collisions. Between 22 and 36 % of charge transfer collisions occur with rearrangement. In both charge transfer processes, comparison of the internal energy distributions of products with the photoelectron spectrum of C2H4 shows that Franck-Condon factors determine energy disposal in these channels. DFT calculations provide evidence for transient intermediates that undergo H/D migration with rearrangement, but with minimal modification of the product energy distributions determined by long range electron transfer. The cross section for charge transfer with rearrangement is approximately 103 larger than predicted from the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus isomerization rate in transient complexes, suggesting a nonstatistical mechanism for H/D exchange. DFT calculations suggest that reactive trajectories for deuterium ion transfer follow a pathway in which a deuterium atom from D2O+ approaches the π-cloud of ethylene along the perpendicular bisector of the C-C bond. The product kinetic energy distributions exhibit structure consistent with vibrational motion of the D-atom in the bridged C2H4D+ product perpendicular to the C-C bond. The reaction quantitatively transforms the reaction exothermicity into internal excitation of the products, consistent with mixed energy release in which the deuterium ion is transferred in a configuration in which both the breaking and the forming bonds are extended.

  6. Charge-dependent anisotropic flow in Cu + Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niida, Takafumi

    2016-12-01

    We present the first measurements of charge-dependent directed flow in Cu+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV. The directed flow has been measured as functions of the transverse momentum and pseudorapidity with the STAR detector. The results show a small but finite difference between positively and negatively charged particles. The difference is qualitatively explained by the patron-hadron-string-dynamics (PHSD) model including the effect of the electric field, but much smaller than the model calculation, which indicates only a small fraction of all final state quarks are created within the lifetime of the initial electric field. Higher-order azimuthal anisotropic flow is also presented up to the fourth-order for unidentified charged particles and up to the third-order for identified charged particles (π, K, and p). For unidentified particles, the results are reasonably described by the event-by-event viscous hydrodynamic model with η / s = 0.08 - 0.16. The trends observed for identified particles in Cu+Au collisions are similar to those observed in symmetric (Au+Au) collisions.

  7. Ultrafast charge transfer and atomic orbital polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Deppe, M.; Foehlisch, A.; Hennies, F.; Nagasono, M.; Beye, M.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Echenique, P. M.; Wurth, W.

    2007-11-07

    The role of orbital polarization for ultrafast charge transfer between an atomic adsorbate and a substrate is explored. Core hole clock spectroscopy with linearly polarized x-ray radiation allows to selectively excite adsorbate resonance states with defined spatial orientation relative to the substrate surface. For c(4x2)S/Ru(0001) the charge transfer times between the sulfur 2s{sup -1}3p*{sup +1} antibonding resonance and the ruthenium substrate have been studied, with the 2s electron excited into the 3p{sub perpendicular}* state along the surface normal and the 3p{sub parallel}* state in the surface plane. The charge transfer times are determined as 0.18{+-}0.07 and 0.84{+-}0.23 fs, respectively. This variation is the direct consequence of the different adsorbate-substrate orbital overlap.

  8. Charge Transfer in Iridate-Manganite Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Satoshi; Nichols, John; Sohn, Changhee; Kim, So Yeun; Noh, Tae Won; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2017-03-07

    Charge transfer in superlattices consisting of SrIrO3 and SrMnO3 is investigated using density functional theory. Despite the nearly identical work function and nonpolar interfaces between SrIrO3 and SrMnO3, rather large charge transfer was experimentally reported at the interface between them. Here, we report a microscopic model that captures the mechanism behind this phenomenon, providing a qualitative understanding of the experimental observation. This leads to unique strain dependence of such charge transfer in iridate-manganite superlattices. The predicted behavior is consistently verified by experiment with soft X-ray and optical spectroscopy. Our work thus demonstrates a new route to control electronic states in nonpolar oxide heterostructures.

  9. Universal characteristics of transverse momentum transfer in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Townsend, L. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    A microscopic optical model formalism for estimating momentum transfer in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions predicts universal behavior of the transverse component. In particular, for symmetric systems heavier than niobium, it appears that values of P(perpendicular)/A are independent of the mass and charge of the colliding nuclei and vary only with impact parameter and incident beam energy. This suggests that momentum transfer per nucleon saturates to some limiting value with increasing mass.

  10. Spacecraft Charging in Geostationary Transfer Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L. N.; Minow, J. I.

    2014-12-01

    The 700 km x 5.8 Re orbit of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft provide a unique opportunity to investigate surface charging in geostationary transfer orbits. We use records from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) plasma spectrometer to identify candidate surface charging events based on the "ion line" charging signature in the ion records. We summarize the energetic particle environment and the conditions necessary for charging to occur in this environment. We discuss the altitude, duration, and magnitude of events observed in the Van Allen Probes from the beginning of the mission to present time. In addition, we explore what information the dual satellites provide on the spatial and temporal variations in the charging environments.

  11. Biological charge transfer via flickering resonance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqi; Liu, Chaoren; Balaeff, Alexander; Skourtis, Spiros S.; Beratan, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Biological electron-transfer (ET) reactions are typically described in the framework of coherent two-state electron tunneling or multistep hopping. However, these ET reactions may involve multiple redox cofactors in van der Waals contact with each other and with vibronic broadenings on the same scale as the energy gaps among the species. In this regime, fluctuations of the molecular structures and of the medium can produce transient energy level matching among multiple electronic states. This transient degeneracy, or flickering electronic resonance among states, is found to support coherent (ballistic) charge transfer. Importantly, ET rates arising from a flickering resonance (FR) mechanism will decay exponentially with distance because the probability of energy matching multiple states is multiplicative. The distance dependence of FR transport thus mimics the exponential decay that is usually associated with electron tunneling, although FR transport involves real carrier population on the bridge and is not a tunneling phenomenon. Likely candidates for FR transport are macromolecules with ET groups in van der Waals contact: DNA, bacterial nanowires, multiheme proteins, strongly coupled porphyrin arrays, and proteins with closely packed redox-active residues. The theory developed here is used to analyze DNA charge-transfer kinetics, and we find that charge-transfer distances up to three to four bases may be accounted for with this mechanism. Thus, the observed rapid (exponential) distance dependence of DNA ET rates over distances of ≲15 Å does not necessarily prove a tunneling mechanism. PMID:24965367

  12. Radiative charge transfer in He(+) + H2 collisions in the milli- to nano-electron-volt range: a theoretical study within state-to-state and optical potential approaches.

    PubMed

    Mrugała, Felicja; Kraemer, Wolfgang P

    2013-03-14

    The paper presents a theoretical study of the low-energy dynamics of the radiative charge transfer (RCT) reaction He(+)((2)S)+H2(X(1)Σg (+))→He((1)S)+H2 (+)(X(2)Σg (+))+hν extending our previous studies on radiative association of HeH2 (+) [F. Mrugała, V. Špirko, and W. P. Kraemer, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 10547 (2003); F. Mrugała and W. P. Kraemer, ibid. 122, 224321 (2005)]. The calculations account for the vibrational and rotational motions of the H2/H2 (+) diatomics and for the atom-diatom complex formation in the reactant and the product channels of the RCT reaction. Continuum states of He(+) + H2(v = 0, j = 0) in the collision energy range ~10(-7)-18.6 meV and all quasi-bound states of the He(+) - H2(para; v = 0) complex formed in this range are taken into account. Close-coupling calculations are performed to determine rates of radiative transitions from these states to the continuum and quasi-bound states of the He + H2 (+) system in the energy range extending up to ~0.16 eV above the opening of the HeH(+) + H arrangement channel. From the detailed state-to-state calculated characteristics global functions of the RCT reaction, such as cross-section σ(E), emission intensity I(ν, T), and rate constant k(T) are derived, and are presented together with their counterparts for the radiative association (RA) reaction He(+)((2)S) + H2(X(1)Σg (+))→ HeH2 (+)(X(2)A('))+hν. The rate constant k(RCT) is approximately 20 times larger than k(RA) at the considered temperatures, 0.1 μK-50 K. Formation of rotational Feshbach resonances in the reactant channel plays an important role in both reactions. Transitions mediated by these resonances contribute more than 70% to the respective rates. An extension of the one-dimensional optical potential model is developed to allow inclusion of all three vibrational modes in the atom-diatom system. This three-dimensional optical potential model is used to check to which extent the state-to-state RCT rate constant is influenced

  13. Radiative charge transfer in He{sup +}+ H{sub 2} collisions in the milli- to nano-electron-volt range: A theoretical study within state-to-state and optical potential approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Mrugala, Felicja; Kraemer, Wolfgang P.

    2013-03-14

    The paper presents a theoretical study of the low-energy dynamics of the radiative charge transfer (RCT) reaction He{sup +}({sup 2}S)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields}He({sup 1}S)+H{sub 2}{sup +}(X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +})+h{nu} extending our previous studies on radiative association of HeH{sub 2}{sup +} [F. Mrugala, V. Spirko, and W. P. Kraemer, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 10547 (2003); F. Mrugala and W. P. Kraemer, ibid. 122, 224321 (2005)]. The calculations account for the vibrational and rotational motions of the H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}{sup +} diatomics and for the atom-diatom complex formation in the reactant and the product channels of the RCT reaction. Continuum states of He{sup +}+ H{sub 2}(v= 0, j= 0) in the collision energy range {approx}10{sup -7}-18.6 meV and all quasi-bound states of the He{sup +}- H{sub 2}(para;v= 0) complex formed in this range are taken into account. Close-coupling calculations are performed to determine rates of radiative transitions from these states to the continuum and quasi-bound states of the He +H{sub 2}{sup +} system in the energy range extending up to {approx}0.16 eV above the opening of the HeH{sup +}+ H arrangement channel. From the detailed state-to-state calculated characteristics global functions of the RCT reaction, such as cross-section {sigma}(E), emission intensity I({nu}, T), and rate constant k(T) are derived, and are presented together with their counterparts for the radiative association (RA) reaction He{sup +}({sup 2}S) +H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields} HeH{sub 2}{sup +}(X{sup 2}A{sup Prime })+h{nu}. The rate constant k{sup RCT} is approximately 20 times larger than k{sup RA} at the considered temperatures, 0.1 {mu}K-50 K. Formation of rotational Feshbach resonances in the reactant channel plays an important role in both reactions. Transitions mediated by these resonances contribute more than 70% to the respective rates. An extension of the one-dimensional optical potential model is

  14. Charge transfer states of the reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, P. O. J.; Fischer, Sighart F.

    1998-08-01

    The energies of the low lying charge transfer states relevant for the photoinduced charge separation are analysed for Rps. viridis. The main prosthetic groups consisting of the special pair dimer P, the two adjacent monomers BL, and BM and the two pheophytines HL and HM are treated together with the surrounding residues quantum mechanically within a supermolecule approach on the basis of an INDO approximation. High order configuration interactions are incorporated to account for polarization effects and long range electrostatic effects of the protein are considered. The results are analyzed with regard to symmetry breaking effects between the L- and the M-branch. Internal reorganization effects within the dimer are also discussed.

  15. Energy Gain in Collisions of Highly Charged Ions with C_60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Uwe; Bárány, Anders; Cederquist, Henrik

    1997-04-01

    Within the dynamical classical over--barrier model for charge transfer in soft ion--cluster collisions [1], we have simulated [2] the kinetic energy gain Q of 3.3 q keV Ar^q+ ions in collisions with neutral C_60 targets. Our semi--classical theory allows for the calculation of Q in two different ways, either as difference of electronic binding energies before and after the collision or by integrating the dynamically changing force between the collision partners along the trajectory. A comparison between the two ways provides an intrinsic test of the model calculation. Comparison with recent experimental data [3] shows good agreement in the main features of the energy gain spectra and facilitates their interpretation in terms of the number and final states of transferred electrons. [1] U. Thumm, J. Phys. B27 3515 (1994); Phys. Rev. A55 (Jan.1997). [2] U. Thumm, A. Bárány and H. Cederquist, to be published. [3] N. Selberg et al., Phys. Rev. A 53, 874 (1996). description U.T. is supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Basis Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research, U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. Elastic, excitation, ionization and charge transfer cross sections of current interest in fusion energy research

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S.

    1996-12-31

    Due to the present interest in modeling and diagnosing the edge and divertor plasma regions in magnetically confined fusion devices, we have sought to provide new calculations regarding the elastic, excitation, ionization, and charge transfer cross sections in collisions among relevant ions, neutrals, and isotopes in the low- to intermediate-energy regime. We summarize here some of our recent work.

  17. Charge transfer reactions in Xe plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, C. Q.; Garscadden, A.; Ganguly, B. N.

    2007-04-15

    Charge transfer reactions of fast Xe ions with hydrocarbons including methane (CH{sub 4}), ethene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}), and propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) are studied by adding these hydrocarbon gases into a cross flowing Xe plasma expansion. Branching ratios and relative reaction rates for the charge transfers of fast Xe{sup +} with each of the three hydrocarbon gases are measured under different rf powers of the inductively coupled Xe discharge. For CH{sub 4}/Xe system, we find that fast Xe{sup +} reacts readily with CH{sub 4} generating CH{sub 4}{sup +} and CH{sub 3}{sup +} in a ratio of 1:0.56, with an estimated rate coefficient of (2.3{+-}0.3)x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}/s at 75 W rf power which slowly increases to (2.9{+-}0.3)x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}/s at 250 W (error bars reflect only the uncertainties due to the unknown extent of the ion recombination that follows the charge transfer reaction). These observed charge transfer reactions are made possible by the kinetically excited Xe ions produced by free expansion of the plasma. For the C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/Xe system product ions C{sub 2}H{sub 4}{sup +} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}{sup +} are observed, and for C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/Xe, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}{sup +} and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup +} and minor product ions including C{sub 2}H{sub 2}{sup +} and C{sub 3}H{sub 7}{sup +} are observed.

  18. Ab initio molecular treatment for charge transfer by P{sup 3+} ions on hydrogen and helium

    SciTech Connect

    Moussa, A.; Zaidi, A.; Lahmar, S.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.

    2010-02-15

    A theoretical treatment of charge-transfer processes induced by collision of phosphorus P{sup 3+}(3s{sup 2}){sup 1}S ions on atomic hydrogen and helium has been carried out using ab initio potential-energy curves and couplings at the multireference configuration interaction level of theory. The cross sections calculated by means of semiclassical collision methods show the existence of a significant charge transfer in the 0.1-700-keV laboratory energy range. Radial and rotational coupling interactions were analyzed for both collision systems.

  19. Comprehensive comparison of collision induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Molina, Henrik; Matthiesen, Rune; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2008-07-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is a recently introduced mass spectrometric technique which has proven to be an excellent tool for the elucidation of labile post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation of serine and threonine residues. However, unlike collision induced dissociation (CID), which has been studied for decades, the intricacies of ETD-based fragmentation have not yet been firmly established or systematically addressed. In this analysis, we have systematically compared the CID and ETD fragmentation patterns for the large majority of the peptides that do not contain such labile modifications. Using a standard 48 protein mix, we were able to measure false-positive rates for the experiments and also assess a large number of peptides for a detailed comparison of CID and ETD fragmentation pattern. Analysis of approximately 19,000 peptides derived from both standard proteins and complex protein samples revealed that (i) CID identified 50% more peptides than ETD; (ii) ETD resulted in approximately 20% increase in amino acid sequence coverage over CID; and (iii) combining CID and ETD fragmentation increased the sequence coverage for an average tryptic peptide to 92%. Interestingly, our analysis revealed that nearly 60% of all ETD-identified peptides carried two positive charges, which is in sharp contrast to what has been generally accepted. We also present a novel strategy for automatic validation of peptide assignments based on identification of a peptide by consecutive CID and ETD fragmentation in an alternating mode.

  20. Coronene-based charge-transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yukihiro; Isomura, Kazuhide; Kumagai, Yoshihide; Maesato, Mitsuhiko; Kishida, Hideo; Mizuno, Motohiro; Saito, Gunzi

    2016-08-01

    Recent developments in the arena of charge-transfer complexes composed of the D 6h-symmetric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, coronene, are highlighted with emphasis on the structural and physical properties of these complexes. Because of the dual electron-donating and -accepting abilities of coronene, this group involves structurally-defined four cation salts and three anion salts. The Jahn-Teller distortions and in-plane motion of coronene molecules in the solids, both of which are closely associated with the high symmetry of coronene molecules, and syntheses of clathrate-type complexes are also presented.

  1. Pattern classification using charge transfer devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using charge transfer devices in the classification of multispectral imagery was investigated by evaluating particular devices to determine their suitability in matrix multiplication subsystem of a pattern classifier and by designing a protype of such a system. Particular attention was given to analog-analog correlator devices which consist of two tapped delay lines, chip multipliers, and a summed output. The design for the classifier and a printed circuit layout for the analog boards were completed and the boards were fabricated. A test j:g for the board was built and checkout was begun.

  2. Multiple scattering and charged-particle - hydrogen-atom collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Thomas, B. K.

    1979-01-01

    Glauber-approximation scattering amplitudes for charged-particle - hydrogen-atom elastic and inelastic collisions are derived directly in terms of the known particle-electron and particle-proton Coulomb scattering amplitudes and the known hydrogen-atom form factors. It is shown that the particle-hydrogen amplitude contains no single-scattering term. The double-scattering term is obtained as a two-dimensional integral in momentum space. It is demonstrated how the result can be used as the starting point for an alternative and relatively simple derivation, in closed form, of the Glauber particle-hydrogen scattering amplitude for transitions from the ground state to an arbitrary (nlm) state.

  3. Charge exchange collisions of slow C6 + with atomic and molecular H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bidhan C.; Guevara, Nicolais L.; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, Erik; Öhrn, Yngve

    2016-04-01

    Charge exchange in collisions of C6+ ions with H and H2 is investigated theoretically at projectile energies 0.1 < E < 10 keV/amu, using electron nuclear dynamics (END) - a semi-classical approximation which not only includes electron translation factors for avoiding spurious couplings but also employs full dynamical trajectories to treat nuclear motions. Both the total and partial cross sections are reported for the collision of C6+ ions with atomic and molecular hydrogen. A comparison with other theoretical and experimental results shows, in general good agreement except at very low energy, considered here. For H2, the one- and two-electron charge exchange cross sections are calculated and compared with other theoretical and experimental results. Small but non-negligible isotope effects are found at the lowest energy studied in the charge transfer of C6+ with H. In low energy region, it is observed that H2 has larger isotope effects than H atom due to the polarizability effect which is larger than the mass effect.

  4. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Prytkova, Tatiana; Beratan, David N.

    2007-12-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH--containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH-, upon photo-excitation of FADH- with 350-450 nm light. We compute the lowest singlet excited states of FADH- in DNA photolyase using INDO/S configuration interaction, time-dependent density-functional, and time-dependent Hartree-Fock methods. The calculations identify the lowest singlet excited state of FADH- that is populated after photo-excitation and that acts as the electron donor. For this donor state we compute conformationally-averaged tunneling matrix elements to empty electron-acceptor states of a thymine dimer bound to photolyase. The conformational averaging involves different FADH--thymine dimer confromations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. The tunneling matrix element computations use INDO/S-level Green's function, energy splitting, and Generalized Mulliken-Hush methods. These calculations indicate that photo-excitation of FADH- causes a π→π* charge-transfer transition that shifts electron density to the side of the flavin isoalloxazine ring that is adjacent to the docked thymine dimer. This shift in electron density enhances the FADH--to-dimer electronic coupling, thus inducing rapid electron transfer.

  5. Momentum transfer collision frequency of O(+)-O. [interactions between ions and neutral particles in planetary ionospheres and thermospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Omidvar, Kazem; Hoegy, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of the thermosphere and ionosphere is largely governed by collisions between ions and neutral particles. On Venus and the Earth, O(+) is a dominant ion, and atomic O dominates throughout much of the thermosphere; therefore an accurate O(+)-O cross section is an important prerequisite for understanding the dynamics of planetary upper atmospheres. The cross section and momentum transfer collision frequency are calculated with a quantum mechanical code which includes resonance charge exchange, polarization, and charge-quadrupole effects. Our results agree well with earlier calculations of Stubbe (1968) and Stallcop et al. (1991).

  6. Molecular Structures and Momentum Transfer Cross Sections: The Influence of the Analyte Charge Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Meggie N.; Bleiholder, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Structure elucidation by ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry methods is based on the comparison of an experimentally measured momentum transfer cross-section to cross-sections calculated for model structures. Thus, it is imperative that the calculated cross-section must be accurate. However, it is not fully understood how important it is to accurately model the charge distribution of an analyte ion when calculating momentum transfer cross-sections. Here, we calculate and compare momentum transfer cross-sections for carbon clusters that differ in mass, charge state, and mode of charge distribution, and vary temperature and polarizability of the buffer gas. Our data indicate that the detailed distribution of the ion charge density is intimately linked to the contribution of glancing collisions to the momentum transfer cross-section. The data suggest that analyte ions with molecular mass 3 kDa or momentum transfer cross-section 400-500 Å2 would be significantly influenced by the charge distribution in nitrogen buffer gas. Our data further suggest that accurate structure elucidation on the basis of IMS-MS data measured in nitrogen buffer gas must account for the molecular charge distribution even for systems as large as C960 ( 12 kDa) when localized charges are present and/or measurements are conducted under cryogenic temperatures. Finally, our data underscore that accurate structure elucidation is unlikely if ion mobility data recorded in one buffer gas is converted into other buffer gases when electronic properties of the buffer gases differ.

  7. An activation-collision mechanism for cholesterol transfer between membranes.

    PubMed

    Steck, T L; Kezdy, F J; Lange, Y

    1988-09-15

    We report the results of experiments which show that cholesterol transfer between membranes cannot proceed by aqueous diffusion, as widely held, but must involve a more complex mechanism. (a) The rate of transfer of [3H]cholesterol from red blood cells was found to vary inversely with the size of the acceptor particle (ghosts, vesicles of ghosts, liposomes, and plasma lipoproteins). (b) The transfer of [3H]cholesterol from red blood cells to ghosts was accelerated by the presence of plasma, even though the plasma competed with the ghosts as an acceptor. (c) The rate of transfer of [3H]cholesterol from red blood cells to ghosts decreased to zero with increasing dilution but was not simply second-order. (d) The cholesterol in retinal rod disc membranes is not at equilibrium with plasma lipoproteins in that disc cholesterol increased when the homogenates were incubated in vitro with plasma. (e) The kinetics of cholesterol transfer cannot be limited by unstirred layer effects since the transfer of lysolecithin in the same system was faster than that of cholesterol by 3 orders of magnitude. The simplest model compatible with all the data suggests a two-step pathway involving a first-order followed by a second-order process. The first step could be a unimolecular activation event, perhaps the movement of the sterol in the donor particle to a more exposed (hydrated) position. In the second step, the activated sterol would be transferred during transient collisions between donor and acceptor particles. When collision is not rate-limiting, the overall process would appear to be simply first-order, hence kinetically indistinguishable from the aqueous diffusion mechanism. The activation-collision model thus not only rationalizes our data but is also consistent with the simpler kinetics previously reported for the transfer of both membrane phospholipids and sterols.

  8. Charge exchange in slow collisions of Si3+ with H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, D. C.; Saha, B. C.

    2010-10-01

    Low energy electron capture from atomic hydrogen by multi-charged ions continues to be of interest and has wide applications including both magnetically confined^ fusion and astrophysical plasmas. The charge exchange process reported here, Si^3+ + H -- Si^2+ + H^+ is an important destruction mechanism of Si^3+ in photo-ionized gas. The soft X-ray emission from comets has been explained by charge transfer of solar wind ions, among them Si^3+, with neutrals in the cometary gas vapor. The state selective cross sections are evaluated using the semi-classical molecular orbital close coupling (MOCC) [1] methods. Adiabatic potentials and wave functions for a number of low-lying singlet and triplet states are calculated using the MRD-CI package [2]. Details will be presented at the conference. [1] M. Kimura and N. F. Lane, At. Mol. Opt. Phys 26, 79 (1990). [3] R. J. Buenker, ``Current Aspects of Quantum Chemistry'' 1981, Vol 21, edited by R. Carbo (Elsevier, Amsterdam) p 17.

  9. Near resonant charge transfer in the reaction F(+) + CO - F + CO(+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusunoki, I.; Ishikawa, T.

    1985-06-01

    Charge transfer reactions in the F(+) + CO system were investigated using a F(+) ion beam in the energy range 10-300 eVlab. The electronically excited product CO(+) A2Pi(i) was observed by the emission from the A-X transitions. At low collisional energy the dominant product is in the vibrational level v' = 5. The reaction cross section sigma(5) is about 1 A-sq at 12 eVc.m. and decreases with increasing collision energy. The large cross section at v' = 5 can be interpreted by near-resonant charge-transfer reactions. The rotational temperature of the product is about 300 K, which is the temperature of the reactant CO gas. For the resonant charge transfer, the translational energy is not effective, but the electronic and vibrational energy couple with each other strongly.

  10. Mass transfer during ice particle collisions in planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, J. S. B.; Hatzes, A.; Bridges, F.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from laboratory environment simulations of the ice particle collisional properties defining the structure and dynamical evolution of planetary rings. It is inferred from these data that there is a dependence of the interacting volume on the impact velocity. Although the volume fraction exchanged during a collision is small, the net amount of material transferred can be substantially smaller. Attention is given to the implications of these determinations for planetary ring structure and evolution.

  11. DNA charge transfer: Hot holes break the speed limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beratan, D. N.; Waldeck, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    Charge transfer through DNA has been well studied over recent decades from both a biological and electronics perspective. It has now been shown that charge transfer can be accelerated one hundredfold by using highly energetic 'hot holes', revealing a new mechanism that could help to create useful electronic biomaterials.

  12. Ion imaging study of dissociative charge transfer in the N2(+) + CH4 system.

    PubMed

    Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M

    2013-03-28

    The velocity map ion imaging method is applied to the dissociative charge transfer reactions of N2(+) with CH4 studied in crossed beams. The velocity space images are collected at four collision energies between 0.5 and 1.5 eV, providing both product kinetic energy and angular distributions for the reaction products CH3(+) and CH2(+). The general shapes of the images are consistent with long range electron transfer from CH4 to N2(+) preceding dissociation, and product kinetic energy distributions are consistent with energy resonance in the initial electron transfer step. The branching ratio for CH3(+):CH2(+) is 85:15 over the full collision energy range, consistent with literature reports.

  13. Proton Transfer Reactivity of Large Multiply Charged Ions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    Charge-charge interactions dramatically influence the dissociation and proton transfer reactivity of large multiply protonated ions. In combination with tandem mass spectrometry, proton transfer reactions have been used to determine the charge state of an ion and to increase the effective mass resolution of electrospray ionization mass spectra. A model for the proton transfer reactivity of multiply protonated ions, in which protons are assigned to specific sites in an ion based on the intrinsic reactivity of the site and the sum of point-charge Coulomb interactions between charges, is discussed. In combination with experimentally measured rates of proton transfer to bases of known gas-phase basicity, information about the intramolecular electrostatic interactions, gas-phase ion conformation and maximum charge state of an ion produced by electrospray ionization can be obtained. PMID:8799309

  14. Calculation of total cross sections for charge exchange in molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, J.

    1979-01-01

    Areas of investigation summarized include nitrogen ion-nitrogen molecule collisions; molecular collisions with surfaces; molecular identification from analysis of cracking patterns of selected gases; computer modelling of a quadrupole mass spectrometer; study of space charge in a quadrupole; transmission of the 127 deg cylindrical electrostatic analyzer; and mass spectrometer data deconvolution.

  15. An instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L.; Bao, N.; Jiang, Y.; Han, K.; Zhou, J.

    2016-01-01

    It universally exists in moving particular systems that particles can be electrified, in which the particles are chemically identical, just as toner particles, coal dust, and pharmaceutical powders. However, owing to the limit of experimental instruments, so far, there are yet no experiments to illustrate whether a particle can be electrified due to a single collision between two spherical particles, and there are also no experiments to measure the charge carried by a single particle due to a single collision between two particles. So we have developed an instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spheres. The instrument consists of two-sphere collision device, collision charge measurement apparatus, and particles' trajectory tracking system. By using this instrument, we can investigate the collision contact electrification due to a single collision between two spheres and simultaneously record the moving trajectories of spheres after the collision to calculate the rebound angles to identify the contribution of the triboelectrification due to the rubbing between the contact surfaces and the collision contact electrification due to the normal pressure between the contact surfaces.

  16. An instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Xie, L; Bao, N; Jiang, Y; Han, K; Zhou, J

    2016-01-01

    It universally exists in moving particular systems that particles can be electrified, in which the particles are chemically identical, just as toner particles, coal dust, and pharmaceutical powders. However, owing to the limit of experimental instruments, so far, there are yet no experiments to illustrate whether a particle can be electrified due to a single collision between two spherical particles, and there are also no experiments to measure the charge carried by a single particle due to a single collision between two particles. So we have developed an instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spheres. The instrument consists of two-sphere collision device, collision charge measurement apparatus, and particles' trajectory tracking system. By using this instrument, we can investigate the collision contact electrification due to a single collision between two spheres and simultaneously record the moving trajectories of spheres after the collision to calculate the rebound angles to identify the contribution of the triboelectrification due to the rubbing between the contact surfaces and the collision contact electrification due to the normal pressure between the contact surfaces.

  17. The effects of collision energy, vibrational mode, and vibrational angular momentum on energy transfer and dissociation in NO2+-rare gas collisions: an experimental and trajectory study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbo; Uselman, Brady W; Boyle, Jason M; Anderson, Scott L

    2006-10-07

    A combined experimental and trajectory study of vibrationally state-selected NO2+ collisions with Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe is presented. Ne, Ar, and Kr are similar in that only dissociation to the excited singlet oxygen channel is observed; however, the appearance energies vary by approximately 4 eV between the three rare gases, and the variation is nonmonotonic in rare gas mass. Xe behaves quite differently, allowing efficient access to the ground triplet state dissociation channel. For all four rare gases there are strong effects of NO2+ vibrational excitation that extend over the entire collision energy range, implying that vibration influences the efficiency of collision to internal energy conversion. Bending excitation is more efficient than stretching; however, bending angular momentum partially counters the enhancement. Direct dynamics trajectories for NO2+ + Kr reproduce both the collision energy and vibrational state effects observed experimentally and reveal that intracomplex charge transfer is critical for the efficient energy transfer needed to drive dissociation. The strong vibrational effects can be rationalized in terms of bending, and to a lesser extent, stretching distortion enhancing transition to the Kr+ -NO2 charge state.

  18. Precursor charge state prediction for electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vagisha; Eng, Jimmy K; Feldman, Sergey; von Haller, Priska D; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William S

    2010-10-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) induces fragmentation along the peptide backbone by transferring an electron from a radical anion to a protonated peptide. In contrast with collision-induced dissociation, side chains and modifications such as phosphorylation are left intact through the ETD process. Because the precursor charge state is an important input to MS/MS sequence database search tools, the ability to accurately determine the precursor charge is helpful for the identification process. Furthermore, because ETD can be applied to large, highly charged peptides, the need for accurate precursor charge state determination is magnified. Otherwise, each spectrum must be searched repeatedly using a large range of possible precursor charge states. To address this problem, we have developed an ETD charge state prediction tool based on support vector machine classifiers that is demonstrated to exhibit superior classification accuracy while minimizing the overall number of predicted charge states. The tool is freely available, open source, cross platform compatible, and demonstrated to perform well when compared with an existing charge state prediction tool. The program is available from http://code.google.com/p/etdz/.

  19. Ab initio treatment of ion-induced charge transfer dynamics of isolated 2-deoxy-D-ribose.

    PubMed

    Bacchus-Montabonel, Marie-Christine

    2014-08-21

    Modeling-induced radiation damage in biological systems, in particular, in DNA building blocks, is of major concern in cancer therapy studies. Ion-induced charge-transfer dynamics may indeed be involved in proton and hadrontherapy treatments. We have thus performed a theoretical approach of the charge-transfer dynamics in collision of C(4+) ions and protons with isolated 2-deoxy-D-ribose in a wide collision energy range by means of ab initio quantum chemistry molecular methods. The comparison of both projectile ions has been performed with regard to previous theoretical and experimental results. The charge transfer appears markedly less efficient with the 2-deoxy-D-ribose target than that with pyrimidine nucleobases, which would induce an enhancement of the fragmentation process in agreement with experimental measurements. The mechanism has been analyzed with regard to inner orbital excitations, and qualitative tendencies have been pointed out for studies on DNA buiding block damage.

  20. Rovibrationally selected ion-molecule collision study using the molecular beam vacuum ultraviolet laser pulsed field ionization-photoion method: charge transfer reaction of N2(+)(X 2Σg+; v+ = 0-2; N+ = 0-9) + Ar.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yih Chung; Xu, Yuntao; Lu, Zhou; Xu, Hong; Ng, C Y

    2012-09-14

    We have developed an ion-molecule reaction apparatus for state-selected absolute total cross section measurements by implementing a high-resolution molecular beam vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser pulsed field ionization-photoion (PFI-PI) ion source to a double-quadrupole double-octopole ion-guide mass spectrometer. Using the total cross section measurement of the state-selected N(2)(+)(v(+), N(+)) + Ar charge transfer (CT) reaction as an example, we describe in detail the design of the VUV laser PFI-PI ion source used, which has made possible the preparation of reactant N(2)(+)(X (2)Σ(g)(+), v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9) PFI-PIs with high quantum state purity, high intensity, and high kinetic energy resolution. The PFI-PIs and prompt ions produced in the ion source are shown to have different kinetic energies, allowing the clean rejection of prompt ions from the PFI-PI beam by applying a retarding potential barrier upstream of the PFI-PI source. By optimizing the width and amplitude of the pulsed electric fields employed to the VUV-PFI-PI source, we show that the reactant N(2)(+) PFI-PI beam can be formed with a laboratory kinetic energy resolution of ΔE(lab) = ± 50 meV. As a result, the total cross section measurement can be conducted at center-of-mass kinetic energies (E(cm)'s) down to thermal energies. Absolute total rovibrationally selected cross sections σ(v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9) for the N(2)(+)(X (2)Σ(g)(+); v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9) + Ar CT reaction have been measured in the E(cm) range of 0.04-10.0 eV, revealing strong vibrational enhancements and E(cm)-dependencies of σ(v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9). The thermochemical threshold at E(cm) = 0.179 eV for the formation of Ar(+) from N(2)(+)(X; v(+) = 0, N(+)) + Ar was observed by the measured σ(v(+) = 0), confirming the narrow ΔE(cm) spread achieved in the present study. The σ(v(+) = 0-2; N(+)) values obtained here are compared with previous experimental and theoretical results. The theoretical predictions

  1. Charge Transfer and Catalysis at the Metal Support Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Lawrence Robert

    2012-07-31

    Kinetic, electronic, and spectroscopic characterization of model Pt–support systems are used to demonstrate the relationship between charge transfer and catalytic activity and selectivity. The results show that charge flow controls the activity and selectivity of supported metal catalysts. This dissertation builds on extensive existing knowledge of metal–support interactions in heterogeneous catalysis. The results show the prominent role of charge transfer at catalytic interfaces to determine catalytic activity and selectivity. Further, this research demonstrates the possibility of selectively driving catalytic chemistry by controlling charge flow and presents solid-state devices and doped supports as novel methods for obtaining electronic control over catalytic reaction kinetics.

  2. Improved Charge-Transfer Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Improved charge-transfer fluorescent dyes have been developed for use as molecular probes. These dyes are based on benzofuran nuclei with attached phenyl groups substituted with, variously, electron donors, electron acceptors, or combinations of donors and acceptors. Optionally, these dyes could be incorporated as parts of polymer backbones or as pendant groups or attached to certain surfaces via self-assembly-based methods. These dyes exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields -- ranging from 0.2 to 0.98, depending upon solvents and chemical structures. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes of the fluorescence emitted by these dyes vary with (and, hence, can be used as indicators of) the polarities of solvents in which they are dissolved: In solvents of increasing polarity, fluorescence spectra shift to longer wavelengths, fluorescence quantum yields decrease, and fluorescence lifetimes increase. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes are also expected to be sensitive to viscosities and/or glass-transition temperatures. Some chemical species -- especially amines, amino acids, and metal ions -- quench the fluorescence of these dyes, with consequent reductions in intensities, quantum yields, and lifetimes. As a result, the dyes can be used to detect these species. Another useful characteristic of these dyes is a capability for both two-photon and one-photon absorption. Typically, these dyes absorb single photons in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum (wavelengths < 400 nm) and emit photons in the long-wavelength ultraviolet, visible, and, when dissolved in some solvents, near-infrared regions. In addition, these dyes can be excited by two-photon absorption at near-infrared wavelengths (600 to 800 nm) to produce fluorescence spectra identical to those obtained in response to excitation by single photons at half the corresponding wavelengths (300 to 400 nm). While many prior fluorescent dyes exhibit high quantum yields

  3. Ytterbocene charge-transfer molecular wire complexes.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Christin N; Kuehl, Christopher J; Da Re, Ryan E; Veauthier, Jacqueline M; Schelter, Eric J; Milligan, Ashley E; Scott, Brian L; Bauer, Eric D; Thompson, J D; Morris, David E; John, Kevin D

    2006-06-07

    A systematic study of the novel charge-transfer [(f)14-(pi)0-(f)14 --> (f)13-(pi)2-(f)13] electronic state found in 2:1 metal-to-ligand adducts of the type [(Cp)2Yb](BL)[Yb(Cp)2] [BL = tetra(2-pyridyl)pyrazine (tppz) (1), 6',6' '-bis(2-pyridyl)-2,2':4',4'':2'',2'''-quaterpyridine (qtp) (2), 1,4-di(terpyridyl)-benzene (dtb) (3), Cp = (C5Me5)] has been conducted with the aim of determining the effects of increased Yb-Yb separation on the magnetic and electronic properties of these materials. The neutral [(f)13-(pi)2-(f)13], cationic [(f)13-(pi)1-(f)13] and dicationic [(f)13-(pi)0-(f)13] states of these complexes were studied by cyclic voltammetry, UV-vis-NIR electronic absorption spectroscopy, NMR, X-ray crystallography, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The spectroscopic and magnetic data for the neutral bimetallic complexes is consistent with an [(f)13(pi)2(f)13] ground-state electronic configuration in which each ytterbocene fragment donates one electron to give a singlet dianionic bridging ligand with two paramagnetic Yb(III) centers. The voltammetric data demonstrate that the electronic interaction in the neutral molecular wires 1-3, as manifested in the separation between successive metal reduction waves, is large compared to analogous transition metal systems. Electronic spectra for the neutral and monocationic bimetallic species are dominated by pi-pi and pi-pi transitions, masking the f-f bands that are expected to best reflect the electronic metal-metal interactions. However, these metal-localized transitions are observed when the electrons are removed from the bridging ligand via chemical oxidation to yield the dicationic species, and they suggest very little electronic interaction between metal centers in the absence of pi electrons on the bridging ligands. Analysis of the magnetic data reveals that the qtp complex displays antiferromagnetic coupling of the type Yb(alpha)(alphabeta)Yb(beta) at approximately 13 K.

  4. Energy Transfer of a Shaped Charge.

    SciTech Connect

    Milinazzo, Jared Joseph

    2016-11-01

    A cylinder of explosive with a hollow cavity on one and a detonator at the other is considered a hollow charge. When the explosive is detonated the detonation products form a localized intense force. If the hollow charge is placed near or in contact with a steel plate then the damage to the plate is greater than a solid cylinder of explosive even though there is a greater amount of explosive in the latter charge. The hollow cavity can take almost any geometrical shape with differing amounts of damage associated with each shape. This phenomenon is known in the United States as the Munroe effect.

  5. Charged particle multiplicities in ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2006-01-01

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  6. Charge exchange and ionization in hydrogen atom-fully stripped ion collisions in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Wang, J. G.; He, B.; Qiu, Y. B.; Janev, R. K.

    2007-05-15

    The processes of charge exchange and ionization in collisions of ground state hydrogen atom with fully stripped ions in a weakly coupled plasma are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method in the collision energy range 10-900 keV/amu. The interparticle interactions are described by the Debye-Hueckel model with inclusion of dynamical effects associated with the projectile velocity. The microcanonical distribution of initial state electronic coordinates and momenta has been determined by inclusion of plasma screening effects. The cross section dependencies on plasma parameters and ion charge and velocity are investigated. It is shown that plasma effects on charge exchange and ionization cross sections are significant and particularly pronounced at low collision velocities. The results of systematic cross section calculations for different values of Debye screening length (in the range 1-50a{sub 0}) and ion charges (in the range 1-14) are presented.

  7. Charge transfer reactions in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R. |; Galili, T.; Levanon, H.

    1998-07-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption studies of intramolecular photoinduced charge separation and thermal charge recombination were carried out on a molecule consisting of a 4-(N-pyrrolidino)naphthalene-1,8-imide donor (PNI) covalently attached to a pyromellitimide acceptor (PI) dissolved in the liquid crystal 4{prime}-(n-pentyl)-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). The temperature dependencies of the charge separation and recombination rates were obtained at temperatures above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of 5CB, where ordered microdomains exist and scattering of visible light by these domains is absent. The authors show that excited state charge separation is dominated by molecular reorientation of 5CB perpendicular to the director within the liquid crystal microdomains. They also show that charge recombination is adiabatic and is controlled by the comparatively slow collective reorientation of the liquid crystal microdomains relative to the orientation of PNI{sup +}-PI{sup {minus}}. They also report the results of time resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) studies of photoinduced charge separation in a series of supramolecular compounds dissolved in oriented liquid crystal solvents. These studies permit the determination of the radical pair energy levels as the solvent reorganization energy increases from the low temperature crystalline phase, through the soft glass phase, to the nematic phase of the liquid crystal.

  8. Interfacial charge transfer absorption: Application to metal molecule assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutz, Carol; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Sutin, Norman

    2006-05-01

    Optically induced charge transfer between adsorbed molecules and a metal electrode was predicted by Hush to lead to new electronic absorption features, but has been only rarely observed experimentally. Interfacial charge transfer absorption (IFCTA) provides information concerning the barriers to charge transfer between molecules and the metal/semiconductor and the magnitude of the electronic coupling and could thus provide a powerful tool for understanding interfacial charge-transfer kinetics. Here, we utilize a previously published model [C. Creutz, B.S. Brunschwig, N. Sutin, J. Phys. Chem. B 109 (2005) 10251] to predict IFCTA spectra of metal-molecule assemblies and compare the literature observations to these predictions. We conclude that, in general, the electronic coupling between molecular adsorbates and the metal levels is so small that IFCTA is not detectable. However, few experiments designed to detect IFCTA have been done. We suggest approaches to optimizing the conditions for observing the process.

  9. Femtochemistry of Intramolecular Charge and Proton Transfer Reactions in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Douhal, Abderrazzak; Sanz, Mikel; Carranza, Maria Angeles; Organero, Juan Angel; Tormo, Laura

    2005-03-17

    We report on the first observation of ultrafast intramolecular charge- and proton-transfer reactions in 4'-dimethylaminoflavonol (DAMF) in solution. Upon femtosecond excitation of a non-planar structure of DMAF in apolar medium, the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) does not occur, and a slow (2 ps) proton motion takes place. However, in polar solvents, the ICT is very fast (100-200 fs) and the produced structure is stabilized that proton motion takes place in few or tens of ps.

  10. Screen charge transfer by grounded tip on ferroelectric surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Kim, J.; Buhlmann, S.; Hong, S.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, S.-H.; No, K.; Materials Science Division; Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology; Samsung Advanced Inst. of Technology; Inostek Inc.

    2008-03-01

    We have investigated polarization reversal and charge transfer effects by a grounded tip on 50 nm thick ferroelectric thin films using piezoelectric force microscopy and Kelvin force microscopy. We observed the polarization reversal in the center of written domains, and also identified another mechanism, which is the transfer of screen charges toward the grounded tip. In order to overcome these phenomena, we successfully applied a modified read/write scheme featuring a bias voltage.

  11. Molecular Structures and Momentum Transfer Cross Sections: The Influence of the Analyte Charge Distribution.

    PubMed

    Young, Meggie N; Bleiholder, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Structure elucidation by ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry methods is based on the comparison of an experimentally measured momentum transfer cross-section to cross-sections calculated for model structures. Thus, it is imperative that the calculated cross-section must be accurate. However, it is not fully understood how important it is to accurately model the charge distribution of an analyte ion when calculating momentum transfer cross-sections. Here, we calculate and compare momentum transfer cross-sections for carbon clusters that differ in mass, charge state, and mode of charge distribution, and vary temperature and polarizability of the buffer gas. Our data indicate that the detailed distribution of the ion charge density is intimately linked to the contribution of glancing collisions to the momentum transfer cross-section. The data suggest that analyte ions with molecular mass ~3 kDa or momentum transfer cross-section 400-500 Å(2) would be significantly influenced by the charge distribution in nitrogen buffer gas. Our data further suggest that accurate structure elucidation on the basis of IMS-MS data measured in nitrogen buffer gas must account for the molecular charge distribution even for systems as large as C960 (~12 kDa) when localized charges are present and/or measurements are conducted under cryogenic temperatures. Finally, our data underscore that accurate structure elucidation is unlikely if ion mobility data recorded in one buffer gas is converted into other buffer gases when electronic properties of the buffer gases differ. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Discrete electrostatic charge transfer by the electrophoresis of a charged droplet in a dielectric liquid.

    PubMed

    Im, Do Jin; Ahn, Myung Mo; Yoo, Byeong Sun; Moon, Dustin; Lee, Dong Woog; Kang, In Seok

    2012-08-14

    We have experimentally investigated the electrostatic charging of a water droplet on an electrified electrode surface to explain the detailed inductive charging processes and use them for the detection of droplet position in a lab-on-a-chip system. The periodic bouncing motion of a droplet between two planar electrodes has been examined by using a high-resolution electrometer and an image analysis method. We have found that this charging process consists of three steps. The first step is inductive charge accumulation on the opposite electrode by the charge of a droplet. This induction process occurs while the droplet approaches the electrode, and it produces an induction current signal at the electrometer. The second step is the discharging of the droplet by the accumulated induced charge at the moment of contact. For this second step, there is no charge-transfer detection at the electrometer. The third step is the charging of the neutralized droplet to a certain charged state while the droplet is in contact with the electrode. The charge transfer of the third step is detected as the pulse-type signal of an electrometer. The second and third steps occur simultaneously and rapidly. We have found that the induction current by the movement of a charged droplet can be accurately used to measure the charge of the droplet and can also be used to monitor the position of a droplet under actuation. The implications of the current findings for understanding and measuring the charging process are discussed.

  13. INTRAMOLECULAR CHARGE AND ENERGY TRANSFER IN MULTICHROMOPHORIC AROMATIC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward C. Lim

    2008-09-09

    A concerted experimental and computational study of energy transfer in nucleic acid bases and charge transfer in dialkylaminobenzonitriles, and related electron donor-acceptor molecules, indicate that the ultrafast photoprocesses occur through three-state conical interactions involving an intermediate state of biradical character.

  14. Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, J.J.

    1993-12-01

    The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

  15. Cross sections for charge transfer between mercury ions and other metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vroom, D. A.; Rutherford, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for charge transfer between several ions and metals of interest to the NASA electro propulsion program have been measured. Specifically, the ions considered were Hg(+), Xe(+) and Cs(+) and the metals Mo, Fe, Al, Ti, Ta, and C. Measurements were made in the energy regime from 1 to 5,000 eV. In general, the cross sections for charge transfer were found to be less than 10 to the minus 15 power sq cm for most processes over the total energy range. Exceptions are Hg(+) in collision with Ti and Ta. The results obtained for each reaction are given in both graphical and numerical form in the text. For quick reference, the data at several ion velocities are condensed into one table given in the summary.

  16. Charged-Particle Pseudorapidity Density Distributions from Au+Au Collisions at

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.

    2001-09-03

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} has been measured for Au+Au collisions at s{sub NN}=130 GeV at RHIC, using the PHOBOS apparatus. The total number of charged particles produced for the 3% most-central Au+Au collisions for |{eta}|{<=}5.4 is found to be 4200{+-}470 . The evolution of dN{sub ch}/d{eta} with centrality is discussed, and compared to model calculations and to data from proton-induced collisions. The data show an enhancement in charged-particle production at midrapidity, while in the fragmentation regions, the results are consistent with expectations from pp and pA scattering.

  17. Simulations of ion velocity distribution functions taking into account both elastic and charge exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huihui; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir S.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Mustafaev, Alexander S.

    2017-02-01

    Based on accurate representation of the He+-He angular differential scattering cross sections consisting of both elastic and charge exchange collisions, we performed detailed numerical simulations of the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) by Monte Carlo collision method (MCC). The results of simulations are validated by comparison with the experimental data of the ion mobility and the transverse diffusion. The IVDF simulation study shows that due to significant effect of scattering in elastic collisions IVDF cannot be separated into product of two independent IVDFs in the transverse and parallel to the electric field directions.

  18. The study of surface acoustic wave charge transfer device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanicolaou, N.; Lin, H. C.

    1978-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave-charge transfer device, consisting of an n-type silicon substrate, a thermally grown silicon dioxide layer, and a sputtered film of piezoelectric zinc oxide is proposed as a means of circumventing problems associated with charge-coupled device (CCD) applications in memory, signal processing, and imaging. The proposed device creates traveling longitudinal electric fields in the silicon and replaces the multiphase clocks in CCD's. The traveling electric fields create potential wells which carry along charges stored there. These charges may be injected into the wells by light or by using a p-n junction as in conventional CCD's.

  19. Collision phenomena involving highly-charged ions in astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.

    2001-01-01

    A description of the role of highly charged ions in various astronomical objects; includes the use of critical quantities such as cross sections for excitation, charge-exchange, X-ray emission, radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR); and lifetimes, branching ratios, and A-values.

  20. Collision Induced Dissociation and Energy Transfer in Molecular Hydroge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandy, Margot E.

    2006-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen is a significant constituent in giant molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. Shocks in these clouds are associated with star formation. The cooling of the shocks is governed by competition of collisional energy transfer and dissociation with radiative cooling by quadrupole emission. Thus a detailed understanding of collisional behaviour of molecular hydrogen is needed. Work in this group has examined energy transfer and dissociation in molecular energy transfer as the result of collisions with H, D, He, and H2. Using quasiclassical trajectories and chemically accurate ab initio potentials state-to-state rate coefficients have been determined. The uncertainties of the cross sections are propagated rigourously to give uncertainties of the rate coefficients and the rate coefficients are parameterized as a function of temperature. Comparisons with quantum calculations are discussed and the proposed website is described.This work was supported by a grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. The calculations were carried out using the high performance computing facility jointly supported by the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, the British Columbia Knowledge Development Fund, and Silicon Graphics at the University of Northern British Columbia.

  1. Electronic excitation and charge transfer processes in collisions of H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 3}{sup +} ions with carbon monoxide at typical solar-wind velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Werbowy, S.; Pranszke, B.

    2014-01-10

    Luminescence in the 200-580 nm spectral region was observed in the collisions of H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 3}{sup +} with CO in the 50-1000 eV projectile energy range. Using computer simulations, we have identified emission of the following products in the observed spectra: the CO{sup +}(A-X) comet-tail system, CO{sup +}(B-X) first negative system, CO{sup +}(B-A) Baldet-Johnson system, and CO(b-a) third positive system. Also, an emission from atomic hydrogen (H{sub β} line at 486nm) has been observed. From the analysis of the experimental spectra, we have determined the absolute emission cross-sections for the formation of the observed products. Computer simulations gave the excited-product population distributions over vibrational and rotational energy levels. The vibrational level distribution from the CO{sup +}(A-X) comet-tail system is compared with the data for CO excited by 100 eV electrons and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) photons. We have used these data to analyze the excitation conditions in the comet Humason (1961e). From the vibrational population distributions observed in the comet, we found that this distribution can be reproduced if electrons produce 25%, protons 70%, and XUV photons produce 5% of the emitting molecules. We find that the ratio of the CO{sup +}(B-X) emission to the sum of two main emissions (CO{sup +}(A-X)+CO{sup +}(B-X)) is velocity dependent and does not depend on the projectile ion type. For small velocities (below 100 km s{sup –1}) the ratio is about 5%, while for higher velocities it increases to 30%. For these data, we have found an empirical formula that satisfactorily describes the experimental data: R = R {sub max}(1 – v {sub th}/v), (where R {sub max} = 33%, v {sub th} = 87 km s{sup –1}). This could be used to infer the velocity of ions producing the observed emission of CO{sup +} products.

  2. Imaging charge and energy transfer in molecules using free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Charge and energy transfer reactions drive numerous important processes in physics, chemistry and biology, with applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics. Experimentally, the central goal in studies of transfer phenomena is to trace the spatial localization of charge at a given time. Because of their element and site sensitivity, ultrafast X-rays provide a promising tool to address this goal. In this talk I will discuss several experiments where free-electron lasers were employed to study charge and energy transfer dynamics in fragmenting molecules. In a first example, we used intense, 70 femtosecond 1.5 keV pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study distance dependence of electron transfer in laser-dissociated methyl iodide molecules. Inducing well-localized positive charge on the heavy iodine atom, we observe signature of electron transition from the separated methyl group up to the distances of 35 atomic units. In a complementary experiment, we studied charge exchange between two partners in a dissociating molecular iodine employing a pump-probe arrangement with two identical 90 eV pulses from the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). In both cases, the effective spatial range of the electron transfer can be reasonably described by a classical over-the-barrier model developed for ion-atom collisions. Finally, I will discuss a time-resolved measurement on non-local relaxation mechanism based on a long-range energy transfer, the so-called interatomic Coulombic decay. This work was supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy and by the Kansas NSF ``First Award'' program.

  3. Emergence of Chaos in nano-electromechanical shuttles with hard-wall collision: Nonanalytic charge transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2015-03-01

    We develop a theory for charge transport in nano-electromechanical shuttles in the presence of hard-wall collision. We show that, in certain regimes, the time-averaged charge current is not predictable and is not an analytic function of applied voltage. The rectified electric current and its non-analyticity emerge from a non-Markovian process in the presence of the hard-wall collision, which causes chaotic motion of the shuttle. This work was supported by research fund of KIAS and Chungnam National University. Computations was supported by the CAC of KIAS.

  4. Theoretical investigation of charge transfer between N{sup 6+} and atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Stancil, P. C.; Liebermann, H. P.; Funke, P.; Rai, S. N.; Buenker, R. J.; Schultz, D. R.; Hui, Y.; Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-08-15

    Charge transfer due to collisions of ground-state N{sup 6+}(1s {sup 2} S) with atomic hydrogen has been investigated theoretically using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) method, in which the adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic couplings were obtained using the multireference single- and double-excitation configuration-interaction (MRDCI) approach. Total, n-, l-, and S-resolved cross sections have been obtained for energies between 10 meV/u and 10 keV/u. The QMOCC results were compared to available experimental and theoretical data as well as to merged-beams measurements and atomic-orbital close-coupling and classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations. The accuracy of the QMOCC charge-transfer cross sections was found to be sensitive to the accuracy of the adiabatic potentials and couplings. Consequently, we developed a method to optimize the atomic basis sets used in the MRDCI calculations for highly charged ions. Since cross sections, especially those that are state selective, are necessary input for x-ray emission simulation of heliospheric and Martian exospheric spectra arising from solar wind ion-neutral gas collisions, a recommended set of state-selective cross sections, based on our evaluation of the calculations and measurements, is provided.

  5. Theoretical Investigation of Charge Transfer between N6+ and atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Stancil, P C; Liebermann, H. P.; Funke, P.; Rai, S. N.; Buenker, R. J.; Schultz, David Robert; Hui, Yawei; Draganic, Ilija N; Havener, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Charge transfer due to collisions of ground-state N{sup 6+}(1s{sup 2} S) with atomic hydrogen has been investigated theoretically using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) method, in which the adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic couplings were obtained using the multireference single- and double-excitation configuration-interaction (MRDCI) approach. Total, n-, l-, and S-resolved cross sections have been obtained for energies between 10 meV/u and 10 keV/u. The QMOCC results were compared to available experimental and theoretical data as well as to merged-beams measurements and atomic-orbital close-coupling and classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations. The accuracy of the QMOCC charge-transfer cross sections was found to be sensitive to the accuracy of the adiabatic potentials and couplings. Consequently, we developed a method to optimize the atomic basis sets used in the MRDCI calculations for highly charged ions. Since cross sections, especially those that are state selective, are necessary input for x-ray emission simulation of heliospheric and Martian exospheric spectra arising from solar wind ion-neutral gas collisions, a recommended set of state-selective cross sections, based on our evaluation of the calculations and measurements, is provided.

  6. Theoretical investigation of electron transfer and detachment processes in low energy H- + Li and Li- + H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Lin, X. H.; Yan, B.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2016-02-01

    The charge exchange and collisional detachment processes in H- + Li and Li- + H collisions have been studied by using the quantal molecular orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) method in the energy ranges of about 0.12-1000 eV u-1 and 0.1 meV-1000 eV, respectively, and the inelastic collision cross sections and rate coefficients have been computed and presented. It is found that the electron transfer process in the H- + Li and Li- + H collisions is due to the Demkov coupling between the 12Σ+ and 22Σ+ states at internuclear distances of about 15a0. The collisional electron detachment in the considered collision system is due to the excitation of the remaining six states, which are all unstable against autodetachment. These states are populated through a series of Landau-Zener couplings of the 22Σ+ state with upper 2Σ+ states and by the rotational 2Σ+-2Π couplings at small internuclear distances. The cross sections for electron transfer in H- + Li and Li- + H collisions in the energy range of 10-1000 eV u-1 attain values in the range of 10-16-10-15 cm2 (reaching their maximum values of about 5 × 10-15 cm2 at 500-600 eV u-1), while the values of the corresponding electron detachment cross sections in this energy range attain generally smaller values.

  7. What Controls the Rate of Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Charge Separation Efficiency in Organic Photovoltaic Blends.

    PubMed

    Jakowetz, Andreas C; Böhm, Marcus L; Zhang, Jiangbin; Sadhanala, Aditya; Huettner, Sven; Bakulin, Artem A; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H

    2016-09-14

    In solar energy harvesting devices based on molecular semiconductors, such as organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and artificial photosynthetic systems, Frenkel excitons must be dissociated via charge transfer at heterojunctions to yield free charges. What controls the rate and efficiency of charge transfer and charge separation is an important question, as it determines the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of these systems. In bulk heterojunctions between polymer donor and fullerene acceptors, which provide a model system to understand the fundamental dynamics of electron transfer in molecular systems, it has been established that the first step of photoinduced electron transfer can be fast, of order 100 fs. But here we report the first study which correlates differences in the electron transfer rate with electronic structure and morphology, achieved with sub-20 fs time resolution pump-probe spectroscopy. We vary both the fullerene substitution and donor/fullerene ratio which allow us to control both aggregate size and the energetic driving force for charge transfer. We observe a range of electron transfer times from polymer to fullerene, from 240 fs to as short as 37 fs. Using ultrafast electro-optical pump-push-photocurrent spectroscopy, we find the yield of free versus bound charges to be weakly dependent on the energetic driving force, but to be very strongly dependent on fullerene aggregate size and packing. Our results point toward the importance of state accessibility and charge delocalization and suggest that energetic offsets between donor and acceptor levels are not an important criterion for efficient charge generation. This provides design rules for next-generation materials to minimize losses related to driving energy and boost PCE.

  8. Intramolecular Charge Transfer States in the Condensed Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. F.; Herbert, J. M.

    2009-06-01

    Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) with long range corrected functionals can give accurate results for the energies of electronically excited states involving Intramolecular Charge Transfer (ICT) in large molecules. If this is combined with a Molecular Mechanics (MM) representation of the surrounding solvent this technique can be used to interpret the results of condensed phase UV-Vis Spectroscopy. Often the MM region is represented by a set of point charges, however this means that the solvent cannot repolarize to adapt to the new charge distribution as a result of ICT and so the excitation energies to ICT states are overestimated. To solve this problem an algorithm that interfaces TDDFT with the polarizable force-field AMOEBA is presented; the effect of solvation on charge transfer in species such as 4,4'dimethylaminobenzonitrile (DMABN) is discussed. M.A. Rohrdanz, K.M. Martins, and J.M. Herbert, J. Chem. Phys. 130 034107 (2008).

  9. Charge transfer properties of pentacene adsorbed on silver: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    N, Rekha T.; Rajkumar, Beulah J. M.

    2015-06-24

    Charge transfer properties of pentacene adsorbed on silver is investigated using DFT methods. Optimized geometry of pentacene after adsorption on silver indicates distortion in hexagonal structure of the ring close to the silver cluster and deviations in co-planarity of carbon atoms due to the variations in bond angles and dihedral angles. Theoretically simulated absorption spectrum has a symmetric surface plasmon resonance peak around 486nm corresponding to the transfer of charge from HOMO-2 to LUMO. Theoretical SERS confirms the process of adsorption, tilted orientation of pentacene on silver surface and the charge transfers reported. Localization of electron density arising from redistribution of electrostatic potential together with a reduced bandgap of pentacene after adsorption on silver suggests its utility in the design of electro active organic semiconducting devices.

  10. Charge transfer in helium-rich supernova plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.

    1994-01-01

    Charge transfer rate coefficients are estimated using Landau-Zener and modified Demkov approximations. The coefficients, augmented by those available from the literature, are used in statistical equilibrium equations describing the state of helium-rich supernova plasma. Such a plasma may describe both Type Ib and Type Ic supernova ejecta. The hypothesis that extensive mixing of metals with helium in Type Ic supernovae may provide a catalyst for rapid charge transfer that weakens the helium line emission by altering the excitation balance is tested. It is shown that charge transfer as a mechanism for suppressing helium line emission is ineffective unless the metal abundance is comparable to or larger than the helium abundance. This result supports an earlier conclusion that Type Ic supernovae must be helium poor relative to Type Ib events.

  11. Rotational And Rovibrational Energy Transfer In Electron Collisions With Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Air flows around a hypervelocity reentry vehicle undergo dissociation, rovibrational excitation and ionization. More specifically the air, initially 80% N2 and 20% O2, in the shock layer consists of species such as N, O, N2, O2, NO, N+, O+, N+, O+, NO+ and 2 free electrons. It was pointed out in multi temperature models'' that the temperature of the rotational energy modes and the gas-kinetic translational temperature are quickly equilibrated by a few collisions and rise rapidly to high temperatures as 50000K before falling off to equilibrium value of 10000K. Contrary, the electronic and vibrational temperatures state energy distributions remain low (less than 15000K) because of the slow equilibration. Electron vibrational energy transfer is thought to play a crucial role in such a ionizing flow regime since chemical reaction rates and dissociation depend strongly on the vibrational temperatures. Modeling of these flowfields in principle require the rovibrational excitation and de-excitation cross section data for average electron energies from threshold up to several eV (leV=11605.4 K). In this lecture we focus on theoretical description of rotational effects i.e. energy transfer of electrons to molecules such that the molecular rotational (vojo goes to voj) or vibrational and rotational (v(sub 0)j(sub 0) goes to vj) states are changed. Excitation and de-excitation of electronic states was discussed in a previous talk at this conference.

  12. A collision cross-section database of singly-charged peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lei; McLean, Janel R; McLean, John A; Russell, David H

    2007-07-01

    A database of ion-neutral collision cross-sections for singly-charged peptide ions is presented. The peptides included in the database were generated by enzymatic digestion of known proteins using three different enzymes, resulting in peptides that differ in terms of amino acid composition as well as N-terminal and C-terminal residues. The ion-neutral collision cross-sections were measured using ion mobility (IM) spectrometry that is directly coupled to a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The ions were formed by a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) ion source operated at pressures (He bath gas) of 2 to 3 torr. The majority (63%) of the peptide ion collision cross-sections correlate well with structures that are best described as charge-solvated globules, but a significant number of the peptide ions exhibit collision cross-sections that are significantly larger or smaller than the average, globular mobility-mass correlation. Of the peptide ions having larger than average collision cross-sections, approximately 71% are derived from trypsin digestion (C-terminal Arg or Lys residues) and most of the peptide ions that have smaller (than globular) collision cross-sections are derived from pepsin digestion (90%).

  13. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.; FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-18

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  14. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.; FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  15. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-18

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  16. Near-resonant versus nonresonant chemiluminescent charge-transfer reactions of atomic ions with HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenewinkel-Meyer, Th.; Ottinger, Ch.

    1994-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions of C+, O+, F+, Ar+ and some other atomic ions with hydrogen chloride were investigated at collision energies between <1 eV and 1 keV. The electronically excited products HCl+ (A 2Σ+) were detected by means of the A 2Σ+→X 2Πi optical emission. In some cases the spectra showed, at low collision energies, an enhanced excitation of specific vibrational HCl+(A,v') levels: for C+, v'=1; for O+, v'=3 as well as v'=1; and for F+, v'=6. These levels are populated in near-resonant, slightly exothermic processes. Their rotational temperature was on the order of 600-700 K. For the other vibrational levels the excitation is off-resonance, mostly endothermic, and here the rotational temperature was 1000-4000 K. Corresponding data are also given for DCl. The selectivity for certain vibrational states is explained by crossings between the vibronic entrance and exit state energy surfaces, calculated from classical electrostatic multipole potentials. The cross sections for the near-resonant reactions decrease monotonically with increasing collision energy, while for the endothermic channels they rise steeply from threshold to a plateau. With argon ions the excitation function exhibits an unusual shape. Here the charge-transfer cross sections for all vibrational levels go through a maximum just above threshold, which is followed by a distinct minimum at about 10 eVc.m.. This may be due to formation of a long-lived collision complex (Ar-HCl)+.

  17. Multiple-charge transfer and trapping in DNA dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, Sabine; Bulla, Ralf; Anders, Frithjof B.; Zwicknagl, Gertrud

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the charge transfer characteristics of one and two excess charges in a DNA base-pair dimer using a model Hamiltonian approach. The electron part comprises diagonal and off-diagonal Coulomb matrix elements such a correlated hopping and the bond-bond interaction, which were recently calculated by Starikov [E. B. Starikov, Philos. Mag. Lett. 83, 699 (2003)10.1080/0950083031000151374] for different DNA dimers. The electronic degrees of freedom are coupled to an ohmic or a superohmic bath serving as dissipative environment. We employ the numerical renormalization group method in the nuclear tunneling regime and compare the results to Marcus theory for the thermal activation regime. For realistic parameters, the rate that at least one charge is transferred from the donor to the acceptor in the subspace of two excess electrons significantly exceeds the rate in the single charge sector. Moreover, the dynamics is strongly influenced by the Coulomb matrix elements. We find sequential and pair transfer as well as a regime where both charges remain self-trapped. The transfer rate reaches its maximum when the difference of the on-site and intersite Coulomb matrix element is equal to the reorganization energy which is the case in a guanine/cytosine (GC)-dimer. Charge transfer is completely suppressed for two excess electrons in adenine/thymine (AT)-dimer in an ohmic bath and replaced by damped coherent electron-pair oscillations in a superohmic bath. A finite bond-bond interaction W alters the transfer rate: it increases as function of W when the effective Coulomb repulsion exceeds the reorganization energy (inverted regime) and decreases for smaller Coulomb repulsion.

  18. Coincidence studies of capture and ionization in highly charged Iq+-He and Uq+-He collisions at medium velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datz, S.; Hippler, R.; Andersen, L. H.; Dittner, P. F.; Knudsen, H.; Krause, H. F.; Miller, P. D.; Pepmiller, P. L.; Rosseel, T.; Schuch, R.; Stolterfoht, N.; Yamazaki, Y.; Vane, C. R.

    1990-04-01

    Electron capture and ionization processes were investigated for Iq+-He and Uq+-He collisions at incident energies 0.1-1.0 MeV/nucleon and for incident charge states q=5-44. Cross sections for single-electron capture, transfer ionization, single ionization, and double ionization were obtained using a projectile-ion recoil-ion coincidence technique. A pronounced interplay among the different electronic processes was observed. Cross sections for single ionization show a rather weak charge-state dependence, in disagreement with recent calculations of McKenzie and Olson [Phys. Rev. A 35, 2863 (1987)]. In a second experiment, photon recoil-ion coincidences were measured to obtain partial cross sections for capture into certain projectile n states. These measurements provide strong evidence that transfer ionization populates lower projectile n states than does single-electron capture. Zero-degree electron spectroscopy, coincident with charge capture for 0.5 MeV/nucleon U30+ projectiles revealed that the free electron in transfer ionization is released from the projectile to its continuum and from high-lying Rydberg states of the projectile.

  19. Charge transfer to a semi-esterified bifunctional phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, O.; Hermann, R.; Orthner, H.

    1996-03-01

    The charge transfer from solvent radical cations of n-butyl chloride and cyclohexane to 2-butyl-6(3'-t-butyl-2'-hydroxy-5'-methylbenzyl)-4-methyl-phenylacrylate (GM) yields in the first step phenoxyl radicals as well as acrylate radical cations of this semi-acrylated bifunctional phenol. Subsequently an intramolecular charge transfer from the acrylate radical cation to the phenol group takes place. Because of the instability of phenol radical cations, under our experimental conditions (nanosecond pulse radiolysis, non-polar solvents, room temperature) phenoxyl radicals are the only observable products of phenol ionization.

  20. Two components in charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylinkin, A. A.; Chernyavskaya, N. S.; Rostovtsev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions are considered in terms of a recently introduced Two Component parameterization combining exponential ("soft") and power-law ("hard") functional forms. The charged hadron densities calculated separately for them are plotted versus number of participating nucleons, Npart. The obtained dependences are discussed and the possible link between the two component parameterization introduced by the authors and the two component model historically used for the case of heavy-ion collisions is established. Next, the variations of the parameters of the introduced approach with the center of mass energy and centrality are studied using the available data from RHIC and LHC experiments. The spectra shapes are found to show universal dependences on Npart for all investigated collision energies.

  1. Ultrafast investigation of photoinduced charge transfer in aminoanthraquinone pharmaceutical product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Sun, Simei; Zhou, Miaomiao; Wang, Lian; Zhang, Bing

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the mechanism of intramolecular charge transfer and the following radiationless dynamics of the excited states of 1-aminoanthraquinone using steady state and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy combined with quantum chemical calculations. Following photoexcitation with 460 nm, conformational relaxation via twisting of the amino group, charge transfer and the intersystem crossing (ISC) processes have been established to be the major relaxation pathways responsible for the ultrafast nonradiative of the excited S1 state. Intramolecular proton transfer, which could be induced by intramolecular hydrogen bonding is inspected and excluded. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations reveal the change of the dipole moments of the S0 and S1 states along the twisted coordinate of the amino group, indicating the mechanism of twisted intra-molecular charge transfer (TICT). The timescale of TICT is measured to be 5 ps due to the conformational relaxation and a barrier on the S1 potential surface. The ISC from the S1 state to the triplet manifold is a main deactivation pathway with the decay time of 28 ps. Our results observed here have yield a physically intuitive and complete picture of the photoinduced charge transfer and radiationless dynamics in anthraquinone pharmaceutial products.

  2. Ultrafast investigation of photoinduced charge transfer in aminoanthraquinone pharmaceutical product

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Song; Sun, Simei; Zhou, Miaomiao; Wang, Lian; Zhang, Bing

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism of intramolecular charge transfer and the following radiationless dynamics of the excited states of 1-aminoanthraquinone using steady state and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy combined with quantum chemical calculations. Following photoexcitation with 460 nm, conformational relaxation via twisting of the amino group, charge transfer and the intersystem crossing (ISC) processes have been established to be the major relaxation pathways responsible for the ultrafast nonradiative of the excited S1 state. Intramolecular proton transfer, which could be induced by intramolecular hydrogen bonding is inspected and excluded. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations reveal the change of the dipole moments of the S0 and S1 states along the twisted coordinate of the amino group, indicating the mechanism of twisted intra-molecular charge transfer (TICT). The timescale of TICT is measured to be 5 ps due to the conformational relaxation and a barrier on the S1 potential surface. The ISC from the S1 state to the triplet manifold is a main deactivation pathway with the decay time of 28 ps. Our results observed here have yield a physically intuitive and complete picture of the photoinduced charge transfer and radiationless dynamics in anthraquinone pharmaceutial products. PMID:28233835

  3. CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION AT HIGH RAPIDITY IN p+p COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DEBBE,R.

    2006-05-30

    This report describes the recent analysis of identified charged particle production at high rapidity performed on data collected from p+p collisions at RHIC ({radical}s = 200 GeV). The extracted invariant cross-sections compare well to NLO pQCD calculations. However, a puzzling high yield of protons at high rapidity and p{sub T} has been found.

  4. Transverse momentum dependence of inclusive primary charged-particle production in p-Pb collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhuo, Zhou; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-09-01

    The transverse momentum ($p_{\\mathrm T}$) distribution of primary charged particles is measured at midrapidity in minimum-bias p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=5.02$ TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC in the range $0.15collision scaling of particle production in pp collisions, leading to a nuclear modification factor consistent with unity for $p_{\\mathrm T}$ larger than 2 GeV/$c$, with a weak indication of a Cronin-like enhancement for $p_{\\rm T}$ around 4 GeV/$c$. The measurement is compared to theoretical calculations and to data in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76$ TeV.

  5. [Dynamics of charge transfer along an oligonucleotide at finite temperature].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Fialko, N S

    2004-01-01

    The quantum-statistical approach was used to describe the charge transfer in nucleotide sequences. The results of numerical modeling for hole transfer in the GTTGGG sequence with background temperature noise are given. It was shown that, since guanine has an oxidation potential lower than thymine, the hole created at the G donor in this sequence passes through the thymine barrier into the guanine triplet (acceptor) at a time of approximately 10 ps at a temperature of 37 degrees C.

  6. Search for fractionally charged particles in pp collisions at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.

    2013-05-01

    A search is presented for free heavy long-lived fractionally charged particles produced in pp collisions at s=7TeV. The data sample was recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. Candidate fractionally charged particles are identified by selecting tracks with associated low charge measurements in the silicon tracking detector. Observations are found to be consistent with expectations for background processes. The results of the search are used to set upper limits on the cross section for pair production of fractionally charged, massive spin-1/2 particles that are neutral under SU(3)C and SU(2)L. We exclude at 95% confidence level such particles with electric charge ±2e/3 with masses below 310 GeV, and those with charge ±e/3 with masses below 140 GeV.

  7. Simultaneous collision induced dissociation of the charge reduced parent ion during electron capture dissociation.

    PubMed

    Bushey, Jared M; Baba, Takashi; Glish, Gary L

    2009-08-01

    A method of performing collision induced dissociation (CID) on the charge-reduced parent ion as it is formed during electron capture dissociation (ECD), called ECD+CID, is described. In ECD+CID, the charge-reduced parent ion is selectively activated using resonant excitation and collisions with the helium bath gas inside a linear quadrupole ion trap ECD device (ECD(LIT)). It has been observed that ECD+CID can improve the sequence coverage for beta-endorphin over performing ECD alone (i.e., from 72 to 97%). Perhaps just as important, ECD+CID can be used to reduce the extent of multiple electron capture events observed when performing ECD in the ECD(LIT). Consequently, the abundance of mass-to-charge ratios corresponding to ECD product ions that contain neutralized protons is decreased, simplifying the interpretation of the product ion spectrum.

  8. Charge-Asymmetry Dependence of Proton Elliptic Flow in 200 GeV Au +Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rachel; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The chiral magnetic wave (CMW) is predicted to manifest a finite electric quadrupole moment in the quark-gluon plasma produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. This quadrupole moment generates a divergence in the azimuthal anisotropy (v2) of positively and negatively charged particles such that v2(+) < v2(-). This effect is proportional to the apparent charge asymmetry (Ach) of particles in the same rapidity window. The Ach dependence of v 2 has already been observed in the cases of charged pions and kaons. We present preliminary STAR measurements of v 2 for protons and anti-protons as a function of Ach from √sNN = 200 GeV Au +Au collisions for different centrality classes. The results are then compared with the previously reported results of pions and kaons. For the STAR Collaboration.

  9. Potential energy curves crossing and low-energy charge transfer dynamics in (BeH2O)2+ complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, QiXiang; Yan, Bing

    2012-07-01

    The singlet rigid Be—O dissociation potential energy curves correlating to the first four molecular limits of (BeH2O)2+ complex were calculated using the multi-reference single and double excitation configuration interaction theory. The radial couplings of three low-lying 1A1 states were calculated and combined with adiabatic potential energy curves to investigate and charge-transfer collision dynamics by using quantum-mechanical molecular orbital close-coupling methods. It is found that the total charge-transfer cross sections are dominated by the Be+(2S)+H2O+(Ã2A1) channel. The rate coefficients in the range of 10-17-10-12 cm3/s are very sensitive to temperature below 1000 K. The complexation energy without charge-transfer was determined to be 143.6 kcal/mol, including zero-point vibration energy corrections. This is in good agreement with the previous results.

  10. Enhancing SERS by Means of Supramolecular Charge Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Eric; Flood, Amar; Morales, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    In a proposed method of sensing small quantities of molecules of interest, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy would be further enhanced by means of intermolecular or supramolecular charge transfer. There is a very large potential market for sensors based on this method for rapid detection of chemical and biological hazards. In SERS, the Raman signals (vibrational spectra) of target molecules become enhanced by factors of the order of 108 when those molecules are in the vicinities of nanostructured substrate surfaces that have been engineered to have plasmon resonances that enhance local electric fields. SERS, as reported in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles and elsewhere, has remained a research tool and has not yet been developed into a practical technique for sensing of target molecules: this is because the short range (5 to 20 nm) of the field enhancement necessitates engineering of receptor molecules to attract target molecules to the nanostructured substrate surfaces and to enable reliable identification of the target molecules in the presence of interferants. Intermolecular charge-transfer complexes have been used in fluorescence-, photoluminescence-, and electrochemistry-based techniques for sensing target molecules, but, until now, have not been considered for use in SERS-based sensing. The basic idea of the proposed method is to engineer receptor molecules that would be attached to nanostructured SERS substrates and that would interact with the target molecules to form receptor-target supramolecular charge-transfer complexes wherein the charge transfer could be photoexcited.

  11. Charge transfer devices. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-04-01

    The technology, design, fabrication, and applications of charge transfer devices are presented in the cited research reports. Applications include imaging, signal processing, detectors, filters, amplifiers, and memory devices. This updated bibliography contains 107 abstracts, all of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  12. Primary cells utilize halogen-organic charge transfer complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, F.; Hermann, A. M.; Rembaum, A.

    1966-01-01

    Electrochemical cells with solid state components employ charge transfer complexes or donor-acceptor complexes in which the donor component is an organic compound and the acceptor component is a halogen. A minor proportion of graphite added to these composition helps reduce the resistivity.

  13. Correlating electronic and vibrational motions in charge transfer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Munira

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.

  14. An electrostatic charge measurement of blowing snow particles focusing on collision frequency to the snow surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omiya, S.; Sato, A.

    2010-12-01

    Blowing snow particles are known to have an electrostatic charge. This charge may be a contributing factor in the formation of snow drifts and snow cornices and changing of the trajectory of blowing snow particles. These formations and phenomena can cause natural disaster such as an avalanche and a visibility deterioration, and obstruct transportation during winter season. Therefore, charging phenomenon of the blowing snow particles is an important issue in terms of not only precise understanding of the particle motion but disaster prevention. The primary factor of charge accumulation to the blowing snow particles is thought to be due to “saltation” of them. The “saltation” is one of movement forms of blowing snow: when the snow particles are transported by the wind, they repeat frictional collisions with the snow surface. In previous studies, charge-to-mass ratios measured in the field were approximately -50 to -10 μC/kg, and in the wind tunnel were approximately -0.8 to -0.1 μC/kg. While there were qualitatively consistent in sign, negative, there were huge gaps quantitatively between them. One reason of those gaps is speculated to be due to differences in fetch. In other words, the difference of the collision frequency of snow particles to the snow surface has caused the gaps. But it is merely a suggestion and that has not been confirmed. The purpose of this experiment is to measure the charge of blowing snow particles focusing on the collision frequency and clarify the relationship between them. Experiments were carried out in the cryogenic wind tunnel of Snow and Ice Research Center (NIED, JAPAN). A Faraday cage and an electrometer were used to measure the charge of snow particles. These experiments were conducted over the hard snow surface condition to prevent the erosion of the snow surface and the generation of new snow particles from the surface. The collision frequency of particle was controlled by changing the wind velocity (4.5 to 7 m/s) under

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy of Charge Transfer Complexes of Purines and Pyrimidines

    SciTech Connect

    Rathod, Pravinsinh I.; Oza, A. T.

    2011-10-20

    The FTIR spectra of charge transfer complexes of purines and pyrimidines with organic acceptors such as TCNQ, TCNE, DDQ, chloranil and iodine are obtained and studied in the present work. Adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine and uracil are the purines and pyrimidines which are found as constituent of DNA and RNA. Charge transfer induced hydrogen bonding is concluded on the basis of indirect transitions observed in the infrared range in these CTCs. Some CTCs show gaussian bands revealing delocalization of charge carriers. The CTCs show interband transition in three-dimensions rather than two-dimensions unlike CTCs of amino acids. There is no extended hydrogen bonded network spanning the whole crystal. This leads to indirect transition due to locally deformed lattice furnishing a phonon-assisted transition.

  16. Effect of Aperiodicity on the Charge Transfer Through DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Angsula; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab

    The effect of aperiodicity on the charge transfer process through DNA molecules is investigated using a tight-binding model. Single-stranded aperiodic Fibonacci polyGC and polyAT sequences along with aperiodic Rudin-Shapiro poly(GCAT) sequences are used in the study. Based on the tight-binding model, molecular orbital calculations of the DNA chains are performed and ionization potentials compared, as this might be relevant to understanding the charge transfer process. Charges migrate through the sequences in a multistep hopping process. Results for current conduction through aperiodic sequences are compared with those for the corresponding periodic sequences. We find that dinucleotide aperiodic Fibonacci sequences decrease the current while tetranucleotide aperiodic Rudin-Shapiro sequences increase the current when compared with the corresponding periodic sequences. The conductance in all cases decays exponentially as the sequence length increases.

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy of Charge Transfer Complexes of Purines and Pyrimidines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Pravinsinh I.; Oza, A. T.

    2011-10-01

    The FTIR spectra of charge transfer complexes of purines and pyrimidines with organic acceptors such as TCNQ, TCNE, DDQ, chloranil and iodine are obtained and studied in the present work. Adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine and uracil are the purines and pyrimidines which are found as constituent of DNA and RNA. Charge transfer induced hydrogen bonding is concluded on the basis of indirect transitions observed in the infrared range in these CTCs. Some CTCs show gaussian bands revealing delocalization of charge carriers. The CTCs show interband transition in three-dimensions rather than two-dimensions unlike CTCs of amino acids. There is no extended hydrogen bonded network spanning the whole crystal. This leads to indirect transition due to locally deformed lattice furnishing a phonon-assisted transition.

  18. Influence of microhydration on the structures and proton-induced charge transfer in RNA intermediates.

    PubMed

    Bacchus-Montabonel, M C; Calvo, F

    2016-11-01

    Solvation effects are of major interest in the context of radiation damage, due to their potential applications in cancer therapy. Reliable modeling of the solvent is, however, quite challenging, and numerous studies have been devoted to isolated biomolecules and stepwise-hydrated molecules in which the amount of solvent is controlled one molecule at a time. The influence of stepwise hydration on radiation damage is investigated here using the example of proton-induced charge transfer in two biomolecular targets. Uracil has been widely investigated both experimentally and theoretically in this context, and 2-aminooxazole was recently shown to be a potentially important intermediate in prebiotic chemistry. Focusing here on doubly hydrated biomolecules, stable structures and infrared spectra were obtained by combining the results of molecular dynamics simulations with those of quantum chemistry calculations performed at the density-functional theory level with the double hybrid M06-2X functional. The charge-transfer cross-sections upon proton impact were obtained from ab initio molecular calculations and after applying a semi-classical approach to investigate the collision. Our results suggest a significant relationship between the detailed hydration structure and the efficacy of proton-induced charge transfer, highlighting the competing roles of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

  19. Observation of vibrationally resolved charge transfer in H + +H2 at ECM=20 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedner, G.; Noll, M.; Toennies, J. P.; Schlier, Ch.

    1987-09-01

    The doubly differential cross sections for both the scattered protons and H atoms have been measured at ELAB=30 eV (ECM=20 eV) from θLAB=0° to 12° (θCM=0° to 18°) for the reactions H++H2(v=0)→H++H2(vf) and →H+H+2(vf) . The energy resolution is sufficient to resolve final vibrational states in both channels. The comparison of both the angular and energy loss distributions for the two product channels provides the first clear experimental evidence of a two-step charge transfer mechanism: Vibrational excitation on the lower H++H2 surface is followed by charge transfer in the outgoing collision for only those H2 molecules which are excited vibrationally high enough (vf≥4) to overcome the endoergic barrier (ΔE=1.83 eV). The final vibrational distributions of H+2 appear to be very similar to those of H2 for vf≥4 indicating that for the angular range observed the charge transfer probability is the same for all vibrational states with vf≥4. The comparison with classical trajectory surface hopping (TSH) calculations points to some disagreement which probably can be attributed to the potential surface used.

  20. Ab initio calculation of H+He{sup +} charge-transfer cross sections for plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Loreau, J.; Vaeck, N.; Lauvergnat, D.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.

    2010-07-15

    The charge-transfer in low-energy (0.25 to 150 eV/amu) H(nl)+He{sup +}(1s) collisions is investigated using a quasimolecular approach for the n=2,3 as well as the first two n=4 singlet states. The diabatic potential energy curves of the HeH{sup +} molecular ion are obtained from the adiabatic potential energy curves and the nonadiabatic radial coupling matrix elements using a two-by-two diabatization method, and a time-dependent wave-packet approach is used to calculate the state-to-state cross sections. We find a strong dependence of the charge-transfer cross section on the principal and orbital quantum numbers n and l of the initial or final state. We estimate the effect of the nonadiabatic rotational couplings, which is found to be important even at energies below 1 eV/amu. However, the effect is small on the total cross sections at energies below 10 eV/amu. We observe that to calculate charge-transfer cross sections in an n manifold, it is only necessary to include states with n{sup '{<=}}n, and we discuss the limitations of our approach as the number of states increases.

  1. Graphene nonvolatile memory prototype based on charge-transfer mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hongming; Wu, Huaqiang; Huang, Can; Wang, Yuda; Qian, He

    2014-04-01

    A graphene nonvolatile memory (GNVM) prototype based on charge transfer between the graphene layer and the NH2(CH2)3Si(OEt)3 (APTES) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is demonstrated. Graphene was transferred to an APTES-SAM-engineered SiO2 substrate and patterned into bottom-gate transistors. Owing to the charge trapping/detrapping property of the nitrogen atoms in APTES, a significant and reproducible transfer curve hysteresis is observed. Memory performance metrics, including retention and endurance, are reported. Comparisons between vacuum and ambient environment test results indicate air absorbates’ detrimental effect. Loss of nonvolatile storage is explained on the basis of a two-layer tunneling junction model, which sheds light on further device improvement through aminosilane molecule structure optimization.

  2. Identified charged hadron production in pp and Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Maria

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear matter under extreme conditions can be investigated in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The measurement of transverse momentum distributions and yields of identified particles is a fundamental step in understanding collective and thermal properties of the matter produced in such collisions. The ALICE Experiment results on identified charged hadron production are presented for pp collisions at √s = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV and for Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV. Spectral shapes, production yields and nuclear modification factors are shown and compared to previous experiments and Monte Carlo predictions. The spectral shapes in Pb-Pb collisions indicate a strong increase of the radial flow velocity with respect to RHIC energies, which in hydrodynamic models is expected as a consequence of the increasing particle density. The observed suppression of high transverse momentum particles in central Pb-Pb collisions provides evidence for strong parton energy loss in the hot and dense medium.

  3. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  4. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  5. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  6. Charge-transfer crystallites as molecular electrical dopants

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Henry; Heimel, Georg; Winkler, Stefanie; Frisch, Johannes; Opitz, Andreas; Sauer, Katrein; Wegner, Berthold; Oehzelt, Martin; Röthel, Christian; Duhm, Steffen; Többens, Daniel; Koch, Norbert; Salzmann, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Ground-state integer charge transfer is commonly regarded as the basic mechanism of molecular electrical doping in both, conjugated polymers and oligomers. Here, we demonstrate that fundamentally different processes can occur in the two types of organic semiconductors instead. Using complementary experimental techniques supported by theory, we contrast a polythiophene, where molecular p-doping leads to integer charge transfer reportedly localized to one quaterthiophene backbone segment, to the quaterthiophene oligomer itself. Despite a comparable relative increase in conductivity, we observe only partial charge transfer for the latter. In contrast to the parent polymer, pronounced intermolecular frontier-orbital hybridization of oligomer and dopant in 1:1 mixed-stack co-crystallites leads to the emergence of empty electronic states within the energy gap of the surrounding quaterthiophene matrix. It is their Fermi–Dirac occupation that yields mobile charge carriers and, therefore, the co-crystallites—rather than individual acceptor molecules—should be regarded as the dopants in such systems. PMID:26440403

  7. Theoretical Evidence for Multiple Charge Transfer Pathways in Bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choongkeun; Mertz, Blake

    2016-04-12

    The development of molecular-scale junctions utilizing biomolecules is a challenging field that requires intimate knowledge of the relationship between molecular structure and conductance characteristics. One of the key parameters to understanding conductance efficiency is the charge mobility, which strongly influences the response time of electronic devices. The charge mobility of bacteriorhodopsin (bR), a membrane protein that has been studied experimentally in detail, was theoretically investigated using extended Marcus-Hush theory. Charge mobilities of 1.3 × 10(-2) and 9.7 × 10(-4) cm(2)/(V s) for hole and electron transfer, respectively, were determined. The computed electron mobility is comparable to experimentally measured values (9 × 10(-4) cm(2)/(V s)). Interestingly, the pathways for hole and electron hopping were very distinct from each other, utilizing different transmembrane helices to traverse the protein. In particular, only the electron transfer pathway involved the retinal chromophore, indicating that the efficiency of charge transfer is directly affected by the tertiary arrangement of proteins. Our results provide a template for obtaining the molecular and electronic-level details that can reveal fundamental insights into experimental studies on protein electron transport and inform efficient design of biomolecular-based junctions on the nanoscale.

  8. An optical model description of momentum transfer in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, J. W.; Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    An optical model description of momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. The imaginary component of the complex momentum transfer, which comes from the absorptive part of the optical potential, is identified as the longitudinal momentum downshift of the projectile. Predictions of fragment momentum distribution observables are made and compared with experimental data. Use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is discussed.

  9. Optical model description of momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Norbury, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    An optical model description of momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. The imaginary component of the complex momentum transfer, which comes from the absorptive part of the optical potential, is identified as the longitudinal momentum downshift of the projectile. Predictions of fragment momentum distribution observables are made and compared with experimental data. Use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is discussed.

  10. Multistep hopping and extracellular charge transfer in microbial redox chains.

    PubMed

    Pirbadian, Sahand; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2012-10-28

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria are microorganisms that gain energy by transferring respiratory electrons to extracellular solid-phase electron acceptors. In addition to its importance for physiology and natural environmental processes, this form of metabolism is being investigated for energy conversion and fuel production in bioelectrochemical systems, where microbes are used as biocatalysts at electrodes. One proposed strategy to accomplish this extracellular charge transfer involves forming a conductive pathway to electrodes by incorporating redox components on outer cell membranes and along extracellular appendages known as microbial nanowires within biofilms. To describe extracellular charge transfer in microbial redox chains, we employed a model based on incoherent hopping between sites in the chain and an interfacial treatment of electrochemical interactions with the surrounding electrodes. Based on this model, we calculated the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and found the results to be in good agreement with I-V measurements across and along individual microbial nanowires produced by the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Based on our analysis, we propose that multistep hopping in redox chains constitutes a viable strategy for extracellular charge transfer in microbial biofilms.

  11. Charge transfer induced polarity switching in carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Klinke, Christian; Chen, Jia; Afzali, Ali; Avouris, Phaedon

    2005-03-01

    We probed the charge transfer interaction between the amine-containing molecules hydrazine, polyaniline, and aminobutyl phosphonic acid and carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs). We successfully converted p-type CNTFETs to n-type and drastically improved the device performance in both the ON- and OFF-transistor states, utilizing hydrazine as dopant. We effectively switched the transistor polarity between p- and n- type by accessing different oxidation states of polyaniline. We also demonstrated the flexibility of modulating the threshold voltage (Vth) of a CNTFET by engineering various charge-accepting and -donating groups in the same molecule.

  12. Charged particle production in p+Pb collisions measured by the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, Evgeny; ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Per-event charged particle spectra and nuclear modification factors are measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in p+Pb interactions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. Results are presented as a function of transverse momentum, rapidity, and in different intervals of collision centrality, which is characterised in p+Pb collisions by the total transverse energy measured over the pseudorapidity interval ‑3.2 < η < ‑4.9 in the direction of the lead beam. Three different calculations of the number of nucleons participating in p+Pb collisions have been performed, assuming the Glauber model and its Glauber-Gribov Colour Fluctuation extensions. The results using different models are compared with each other, as well as with other measurements made under the same conditions and also with centrality definition based on different rapidity intervals.

  13. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in asymmetric and deformed nuclear collisions in the wounded quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, O. S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Kumar, Ashwini; Singh, B. K.

    2016-12-01

    The charged particle multiplicity (n_{ch}) and pseudorapidity density (dn_{ch}/dη) are key observables to characterize the properties of matter created in heavy-ion collisions. The dependence of these observables on collision energy and the collision geometry are a key tool to understand the underlying particle production mechanism. Recently much interest has been focused on asymmetric and deformed nuclei collisions since these collisions can provide a deeper understanding about the nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). From the phenomenological perspective, a unified model which describes the experimental data coming from various kinds of collision experiments is much needed to provide physical insights on the production mechanism. In this paper, we have calculated the charged hadron multiplicities for nucleon-nucleus, such as proton-lead ( p-Pb) and asymmetric nuclei collisions like deutron-gold ( d-Au), and copper-gold (Cu-Au) within a new version of the wounded quark model (WQM) and we have shown their variation with respect to centrality. Further we have used a suitable density function within our WQM to calculate pseudorapidity density of charged hadrons at midrapidity in the collisions of deformed uranium nuclei. We found that our model with suitable density functions describes the experimental data for symmetric, asymmetric and deformed nuclei collisions simultaneously over a wide range of the collision energy.

  14. What is the "best" atomic charge model to describe through-space charge-transfer excitations?

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Denis; Le Bahers, Tangui; Adamo, Carlo; Ciofini, Ilaria

    2012-04-28

    We investigate the efficiency of several partial atomic charge models (Mulliken, Hirshfeld, Bader, Natural, Merz-Kollman and ChelpG) for investigating the through-space charge-transfer in push-pull organic compounds with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory approaches. The results of these models are compared to benchmark values obtained by determining the difference of total densities between the ground and excited states. Both model push-pull oligomers and two classes of "real-life" organic dyes (indoline and diketopyrrolopyrrole) used as sensitisers in solar cell applications have been considered. Though the difference of dipole moments between the ground and excited states is reproduced by most approaches, no atomic charge model is fully satisfactory for reproducing the distance and amount of charge transferred that are provided by the density picture. Overall, the partitioning schemes fitting the electrostatic potential (e.g. Merz-Kollman) stand as the most consistent compromises in the framework of simulating through-space charge-transfer, whereas the other models tend to yield qualitatively inconsistent values.

  15. Energy transfer in reactive and non-reactive H/sub 2/ + OH collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rashed, O.; Brown, N.J.

    1985-04-01

    We have used the methods of quasi-classical dynamics to compute energy transfer properties of non-reactive and reactive H/sub 2/ + OH collisions. Energy transfer has been investigated as function of translational temperature, reagent rotational energy, and reagent vibrational energy. The energy transfer mechanism is complex with ten types of energy transfer possible, and evidence was found for all types. There is much more exchange between the translational degree of freedom and the H/sub 2/ vibrational degree of freedom than there is between translation and OH vibration. Translational energy is transferred to the rotational degrees of freedom of each molecule. There is a greater propensity for the transfer of translation to OH rotation than H/sub 2/ rotation. In reactive collisions, increases in reagent translational temperature predominantly appear as vibrational energy in the water molecule. Energy transfer in non-reactive and reactive collisions does not depend strongly on the initial angular momentum in either molecule. In non-reactive collisions, vibrational energy is transferred to translation, to the rotational degree of freedom of the same molecule, and to the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of the other molecule. In reactive collisions, the major effect of increasing the vibrational energy in reagent molecules is that, on the average, the vibrational energy of the reagents appears as product vibrational energy. 18 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Multiply Charged Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    2003-01-01

    The laser ablation/ion storage facility at the UNLV Physics Department has been dedicated to the study of atomic and molecular processes in low temperature plasmas. Our program focuses on the charge transfer (electron capture) of multiply charged ions and neutrals important in astrophysics. The electron transfer reactions with atoms and molecules is crucial to the ionization condition of neutral rich photoionized plasmas. With the successful deployment of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and the Chandra X-ray Observatory by NASA high resolution VUV and X-ray emission spectra fiom various astrophysical objects have been collected. These spectra will be analyzed to determine the source of the emission and the chemical and physical environment of the source. The proper interpretation of these spectra will require complete knowledge of all the atomic processes in these plasmas. In a neutral rich environment, charge transfer can be the dominant process. The rate coefficients need to be known accurately. We have also extended our charge transfer measurements to KeV region with a pulsed ion beam. The inclusion of this facility into our current program provides flexibility in extending the measurement to higher energies (KeV) if needed. This flexibility enables us to address issues of immediate interest to the astrophysical community as new observations are made by high resolution space based observatories.

  17. Single ionization in highly charged ion-atom collisions at low to intermediate velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Mohammad Abdallah

    1998-11-01

    Single electron ejection from neutral targets (He and Ne) by the impact of low to highly charged ions (p, He+,/ Ne+,/ He2+,/ C6+,/ O8+, and Ne10+) at low to intermediate impact velocities is studied. A novel technique of electron momentum imaging is implemented. In this technique two-dimensional electron momentum distributions are produced in coincidence with recoil ions and projectile ions. In first generation experiments we studied the ejected electron momentum distributions without analyzing recoil ions momentum. This series of experiments revealed a charge-state dependence and velocity dependence that are contradictory to a dominant saddle point ionization mechanism at intermediate velocities. It showed a possibility of an agreement with a saddle centered distributions for low charge states at low collision velocities. To pursue the problem in more detail, we developed a second generation spectrometer which allowed us to fully determine the recoil ions momentum. This allowed us to determine the collision plane, energy loss (Q-value), and impact parameter for every collision that resulted in a single (target) electron ejection. This series of experiments revealed for the first time very marked structure in electron spectra that were impossible to observe in other experiments. These structures indicate the quasi-molecular nature of the collision process even at velocities comparable to the electron 'classical' orbital velocity. For the collisions of p, He+, and He2+ with He, a π-orbital shape of the electron momentum distribution is observed. This indicates the importance of the rotational coupling 2p/sigma/to2p/pi in the initial promotion of the ground state electron. This is followed by further promotions to the continuum. This agrees with the 'classical' description implied by the saddle-point ionization mechanism picture.

  18. Time-dependence ion charge state distributions of vacuum arcs: An interpretation involving atoms and charge exchange collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2004-08-27

    Experimentally observed charge state distributions are known to be higher at the beginning of each arc discharge. Up to know, this has been attributed to cathode surface effects in terms of changes of temperature, chemical composition and spot mode. Here it is shown that the initial decay of charge states of cathodic arc plasmas may at least in part due to charge exchange collisions of ions with neutrals that gradually fill the discharge volume. Sources of neutrals may include evaporated atoms from macroparticles and still-hot craters of previously active arc spots. More importantly, atoms are also produced by energetic condensation of the cathodic arc plasma. Self-sputtering is significant when ions impact with near-normal angle of incidence, and ions have low sticking probability when impacting at oblique angle of incidence. Estimates show that the characteristic time for filling the near-cathode discharge volume agrees well with the charge state decay time, and the likelihood of charge exchange is reasonably large to be taken into account.

  19. Exit charge state dependence of convoy electron production in heavy-ion solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Huelskoetter, H.P.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Sellin, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    The dependence of the yield of convoy electrons emitted near the forward direction in collisions involving fast ions and thin solid targets on the emergent projectile charge state is presented and described in terms of primary electron loss events in the solid. The data include a large array of projectiles, projectile energies and charge states, as well as targets ranging in thickness from the non-equilibrium well into the equilibrium thickness region. The description presented is consistent with other experimental and theoretical results indicating that the convoy electron production is closely linked to the ELC process observed in binary ion-atom collisions, with the dominant contribution to the convoy yield stemming from excited states of the projectiles. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  20. The thermochromic behavior of aromatic amine-SO2 charge transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monezi, Natália M.; Borin, Antonio C.; Santos, Paulo S.; Ando, Rômulo A.

    2017-02-01

    The distinct thermochromism observed in solutions containing N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) and N,N-diethylaniline (DEA) and SO2 was investigated by resonance Raman spectroscopy in a wide range of temperatures. The results indicate in addition to the charge transfer (CT) complexes DMA-SO2 and DEA-SO2, the presence of collision complexes involving the CT complexes and excess DMA and DEA molecules. The latter in fact is the chromophore responsible for the long wavelength absorption originating the color. The Raman signature of the collision complex was attributed to the distinct enhancement of a band at 1140 cm- 1 assigned to νs(SO2), in contrast to the same mode in the 1:1 complex at 1115 cm- 1. The intensity of such band, assigned to the collision complex is favored at high temperatures and depends on the steric hindrance associated to amines, as well as the SO2 molar fraction. Quantum chemical calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) support the proposed interpretation.

  1. The thermochromic behavior of aromatic amine-SO2 charge transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Monezi, Natália M; Borin, Antonio C; Santos, Paulo S; Ando, Rômulo A

    2017-02-15

    The distinct thermochromism observed in solutions containing N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) and N,N-diethylaniline (DEA) and SO2 was investigated by resonance Raman spectroscopy in a wide range of temperatures. The results indicate in addition to the charge transfer (CT) complexes DMA-SO2 and DEA-SO2, the presence of collision complexes involving the CT complexes and excess DMA and DEA molecules. The latter in fact is the chromophore responsible for the long wavelength absorption originating the color. The Raman signature of the collision complex was attributed to the distinct enhancement of a band at 1140cm(-1) assigned to νs(SO2), in contrast to the same mode in the 1:1 complex at 1115cm(-1). The intensity of such band, assigned to the collision complex is favored at high temperatures and depends on the steric hindrance associated to amines, as well as the SO2 molar fraction. Quantum chemical calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) support the proposed interpretation.

  2. Charge transfer to ground-state ions produces free electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, D.; Fukuzawa, H.; Sakakibara, Y.; Takanashi, T.; Ito, Y.; Maliyar, G. G.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Asa, K.; Sato, Y.; Saito, N.; Oura, M.; Schöffler, M.; Kastirke, G.; Hergenhahn, U.; Stumpf, V.; Gokhberg, K.; Kuleff, A. I.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Ueda, K.

    2017-01-01

    Inner-shell ionization of an isolated atom typically leads to Auger decay. In an environment, for example, a liquid or a van der Waals bonded system, this process will be modified, and becomes part of a complex cascade of relaxation steps. Understanding these steps is important, as they determine the production of slow electrons and singly charged radicals, the most abundant products in radiation chemistry. In this communication, we present experimental evidence for a so-far unobserved, but potentially very important step in such relaxation cascades: Multiply charged ionic states after Auger decay may partially be neutralized by electron transfer, simultaneously evoking the creation of a low-energy free electron (electron transfer-mediated decay). This process is effective even after Auger decay into the dicationic ground state. In our experiment, we observe the decay of Ne2+ produced after Ne 1s photoionization in Ne-Kr mixed clusters.

  3. Charge transfer to ground-state ions produces free electrons

    PubMed Central

    You, D.; Fukuzawa, H.; Sakakibara, Y.; Takanashi, T.; Ito, Y.; Maliyar, G. G.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Asa, K.; Sato, Y.; Saito, N.; Oura, M.; Schöffler, M.; Kastirke, G.; Hergenhahn, U.; Stumpf, V.; Gokhberg, K.; Kuleff, A. I.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Ueda, K

    2017-01-01

    Inner-shell ionization of an isolated atom typically leads to Auger decay. In an environment, for example, a liquid or a van der Waals bonded system, this process will be modified, and becomes part of a complex cascade of relaxation steps. Understanding these steps is important, as they determine the production of slow electrons and singly charged radicals, the most abundant products in radiation chemistry. In this communication, we present experimental evidence for a so-far unobserved, but potentially very important step in such relaxation cascades: Multiply charged ionic states after Auger decay may partially be neutralized by electron transfer, simultaneously evoking the creation of a low-energy free electron (electron transfer-mediated decay). This process is effective even after Auger decay into the dicationic ground state. In our experiment, we observe the decay of Ne2+ produced after Ne 1s photoionization in Ne–Kr mixed clusters. PMID:28134238

  4. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  5. Exciton strings in an organic charge-transfer crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata-Gonokami, M.; Peyghambarian, N.; Meissner, K.; Fluegel, B.; Sato, Y.; Ema, K.; Shimano, R.; Mazumdar, S.; Guo, F.; Tokihiro, T.; Ezaki, H.; Hanamura, E.

    1994-01-01

    COLLECTIVE excitations resulting from many-body Coulomb interactions have been studied extensively in the solid state1: for example, the exchange interaction between the electrons in two excitons (bound electron-hole pairs) can bind the excitons together, forming a biexciton. At the other extreme, if the number of excitons is sufficiently large (~106), they can condense into a degenerate 'liquid' phase known as an electron-hole drop. But in conventional semiconductors, intermediate bound states, consisting of more than two excitons, are not formed. We show here, both theoretically and experimentally, that bound states of multiple excitons can form in the organic charge-transfer solid anthracene-(pyromellitic acid dianhydride). Coulomb interactions along the one-dimensional stacks of this material can stabilize trains of several charge-transfer excitons, and we refer to the resulting collective excitations as exciton strings.

  6. Charge Transfer Plasmons: Optical Frequency Conductances and Tunable Infrared Resonances.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fangfang; Zhang, Yue; Gottheim, Samuel; King, Nicholas S; Zhang, Yu; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2015-06-23

    A charge transfer plasmon (CTP) appears when an optical-frequency conductive pathway between two metallic nanoparticles is established, enabling the transfer of charge between nanoparticles when the plasmon is excited. Here we investigate the properties of the CTP in a nanowire-bridged dimer geometry. Varying the junction geometry controls its conductance, which modifies the resonance energies and scattering intensities of the CTP while also altering the other plasmon modes of the nanostructure. Reducing the junction conductance shifts this resonance to substantially lower energies in the near- and mid-infrared regions of the spectrum. The CTP offers both a high-information probe of optical frequency conductances in nanoscale junctions and a new, unique approach to controllably engineering tunable plasmon modes at infrared wavelengths.

  7. Charge transfer magnetoexciton formation at vertically coupled quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is presented on the properties of charge transfer excitons at vertically coupled semiconductor quantum dots in the presence of electric and magnetic fields directed along the growth axis. Such excitons should have two interesting characteristics: an extremely long lifetime and a permanent dipole moment. We show that wave functions and the low-lying energies of charge transfer exciton can be found exactly for a special morphology of quantum dots that provides a parabolic confinement inside the layers. To take into account a difference between confinement potentials of an actual structure and of our exactly solvable model, we use the Galerkin method. The density of energy states is calculated for different InAs/GaAs quantum dots’ dimensions, the separation between layers, and the strength of the electric and magnetic fields. A possibility of a formation of a giant dipolar momentum under external electric field is predicted. PMID:23092373

  8. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two π-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5'-GG-3' and 5'-GT-3'. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  9. Raman scattering from molecular conduction junctions: Charge transfer mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Michal; Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2012-03-01

    We present a model for the charge transfer contribution to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in a molecular junction. The model is a generalization of the equilibrium scheme for SERS of a molecule adsorbed on a metal surface [B. N. J. Persson. Chem. Phys. Lett.CHPLBC0009-261410.1016/0009-2614(81)85441-3 82, 561 (1981)]. We extend the same physical consideration to a nonequilibrium situation in a biased molecular junction and to nonzero temperatures. Two approaches are considered and compared: a semiclassical approach appropriate for nonresonance Raman scattering, and a quantum approach based on the nonequilibrium Green's function method. Nonequilibrium effects on this contribution to SERS are demonstrated with numerical examples. It is shown that the semiclassical approach provides an excellent approximation to the full quantum calculation as long as the molecular electronic state is outside the Fermi window, that is, as long as the field-induced charge transfer is small.

  10. Charge transfer and interface properties in inorganic superstructures and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyagina, I. S.; Petrov, A. A.; Pervov, V. S.

    2016-06-01

    The processes of charge transfer and electronic reconstruction at interfaces of inorganic superstructures and composites have not yet been adequately investigated. This review integrates and analyzes the results of theoretical and experimental studies of structural and electronic effects at interfaces of metal oxide or chalcogenide superstructures and composites. Charge transfer and, hence, change in interface properties compared to the properties of substructures are shown to be determined by the preparation method of composites and chemical nature of the superstructures, incommensurability of structural parameters and valence states of the constituent metals. The changes are maximal for nanoheterostructures, and the degree of change is related to electronic conductivity of substructures. The macroscopic properties of the composite materials depend on the amount of interfaces in their bulk. The bibliography includes 66 references.

  11. Fragmentation of amino acids induced by collisions with low-energy highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarski, D. G.; Maclot, S.; Domaracka, A.; Adoui, L.; Alcamí, M.; Rousseau, P.; Díaz-Tendero, S.; Huber, B. A.; Martín, F.

    2014-04-01

    Fragmentation of amino acids NH2-(CH2)n-COOH (n=1 glycine; n=2 β-alanine and n=3 γ-aminobutyric acid GABA) following collisions with slow highly charged ions has been studied in the gas phase by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. In the experiments, a multi-coincidence detection method was used to deduce the charge state of the molecules before fragmentation. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out in the basis of the density functional theory and ab initio molecular dynamics. The combination of both methodologies is essential to unambiguously unravel the different fragmentation pathways.

  12. Charge-Transfer Interactions between Transition Metal Hexafluorides and Xenon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    HEXAFLUORIDES AND XENON’. by J. D./Webb M E. R./Bernstein\\ Prepared for Publication in the Journal of the American Chemical Society DTIE Department of...Metal Hexafluorides ar. Xenon" " 6. PERFORMIKG ORG REPk)RT NUMODE . CONTRACT OR GNANT NUMBLR(e) J. D. Webb and E. R. Bernstein N00014-75-C-1179 9...neceoswy and Idenifil by block numbet) charge transfer electron affinities Transitio Metal Hexafluorides Xencn electronegativities 4,AGSTRACT Coninue an

  13. Interfacial Charge Transfer States in Condensed Phase Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewal, Koen

    2016-05-01

    Intermolecular charge transfer (CT) states at the interface between electron-donating (D) and electron-accepting (A) materials in organic thin films are characterized by absorption and emission bands within the optical gap of the interfacing materials. CT states efficiently generate charge carriers for some D-A combinations, and others show high fluorescence quantum efficiencies. These properties are exploited in organic solar cells, photodetectors, and light-emitting diodes. This review summarizes experimental and theoretical work on the electronic structure and interfacial energy landscape at condensed matter D-A interfaces. Recent findings on photogeneration and recombination of free charge carriers via CT states are discussed, and relations between CT state properties and optoelectronic device parameters are clarified.

  14. Accumulative electron transfer: multiple charge separation in artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Susanne; Boixel, Julien; Pellegrin, Yann; Blart, Errol; Becker, Hans-Christian; Odobel, Fabrice; Hammarström, Leif

    2012-01-01

    To achieve artificial photosynthesis it is necessary to couple the single-electron event of photoinduced charge separation with the multi-electron reactions of fuel formation and water splitting. Therefore, several rounds of light-induced charge separation are required to accumulate enough redox equivalents at the catalytic sites for the target chemistry to occur, without any sacrificial donors or acceptors other than the catalytic substrates. Herein, we discuss the challenges of such accumulative electron transfer in molecular systems. We present a series of closely related systems base on a Ru(II)-polypyridine photosensitizer with appended triaryl-amine or oligo-triaryl-amine donors, linked to nanoporous TiO2 as the acceptor. One of the systems, based on dye 4, shows efficient accumulative electron transfer in high overall yield resulting in the formation of a two-electron charge-separated state upon successive excitation by two photons. In contrast, the other systems do not show accumulative electron transfer because of different competing reactions. This illustrates the difficulties in designing successful systems for this still largely unexplored type of reaction scheme.

  15. Energy and charge transfer in ionized argon coated water clusters.

    PubMed

    Kočišek, J; Lengyel, J; Fárník, M; Slavíček, P

    2013-12-07

    We investigate the electron ionization of clusters generated in mixed Ar-water expansions. The electron energy dependent ion yields reveal the neutral cluster composition and structure: water clusters fully covered with the Ar solvation shell are formed under certain expansion conditions. The argon atoms shield the embedded (H2O)n clusters resulting in the ionization threshold above ≈15 eV for all fragments. The argon atoms also mediate more complex reactions in the clusters: e.g., the charge transfer between Ar(+) and water occurs above the threshold; at higher electron energies above ~28 eV, an excitonic transfer process between Ar(+)* and water opens leading to new products Ar(n)H(+) and (H2O)(n)H(+). On the other hand, the excitonic transfer from the neutral Ar* state at lower energies is not observed although this resonant process was demonstrated previously in a photoionization experiment. Doubly charged fragments (H2O)(n)H2(2+) and (H2O)(n)(2+) ions are observed and Intermolecular Coulomb decay (ICD) processes are invoked to explain their thresholds. The Coulomb explosion of the doubly charged cluster formed within the ICD process is prevented by the stabilization effect of the argon solvent.

  16. Energy and charge transfer in nanoscale hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Basché, Thomas; Bottin, Anne; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Kim, Jeong-Hee; Sohn, Byeong-Hyeok; Prabhakaran, Prem; Lee, Kwang-Sup

    2015-06-01

    Hybrid materials composed of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots and π-conjugated organic molecules and polymers have attracted continuous interest in recent years, because they may find applications in bio-sensing, photodetection, and photovoltaics. Fundamental processes occurring in these nanohybrids are light absorption and emission as well as energy and/or charge transfer between the components. For future applications it is mandatory to understand, control, and optimize the wide parameter space with respect to chemical assembly and the desired photophysical properties. Accordingly, different approaches to tackle this issue are described here. Simple organic dye molecules (Dye)/quantum dot (QD) conjugates are studied with stationary and time-resolved spectroscopy to address the dynamics of energy and ultra-fast charge transfer. Micellar as well as lamellar nanostructures derived from diblock copolymers are employed to fine-tune the energy transfer efficiency of QD donor/dye acceptor couples. Finally, the transport of charges through organic components coupled to the quantum dot surface is discussed with an emphasis on functional devices.

  17. Energy and charge transfer in ionized argon coated water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kočišek, J. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz Lengyel, J.; Fárník, M. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz; Slavíček, P. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz

    2013-12-07

    We investigate the electron ionization of clusters generated in mixed Ar-water expansions. The electron energy dependent ion yields reveal the neutral cluster composition and structure: water clusters fully covered with the Ar solvation shell are formed under certain expansion conditions. The argon atoms shield the embedded (H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters resulting in the ionization threshold above ≈15 eV for all fragments. The argon atoms also mediate more complex reactions in the clusters: e.g., the charge transfer between Ar{sup +} and water occurs above the threshold; at higher electron energies above ∼28 eV, an excitonic transfer process between Ar{sup +}* and water opens leading to new products Ar{sub n}H{sup +} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sup +}. On the other hand, the excitonic transfer from the neutral Ar* state at lower energies is not observed although this resonant process was demonstrated previously in a photoionization experiment. Doubly charged fragments (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sub 2}{sup 2+} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup 2+} ions are observed and Intermolecular Coulomb decay (ICD) processes are invoked to explain their thresholds. The Coulomb explosion of the doubly charged cluster formed within the ICD process is prevented by the stabilization effect of the argon solvent.

  18. Efficient charge generation by relaxed charge-transfer states at organic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewal, Koen; Albrecht, Steve; Hoke, Eric T.; Graham, Kenneth R.; Widmer, Johannes; Douglas, Jessica D.; Schubert, Marcel; Mateker, William R.; Bloking, Jason T.; Burkhard, George F.; Sellinger, Alan; Fréchet, Jean M. J.; Amassian, Aram; Riede, Moritz K.; McGehee, Michael D.; Neher, Dieter; Salleo, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Interfaces between organic electron-donating (D) and electron-accepting (A) materials have the ability to generate charge carriers on illumination. Efficient organic solar cells require a high yield for this process, combined with a minimum of energy losses. Here, we investigate the role of the lowest energy emissive interfacial charge-transfer state (CT1) in the charge generation process. We measure the quantum yield and the electric field dependence of charge generation on excitation of the charge-transfer (CT) state manifold via weakly allowed, low-energy optical transitions. For a wide range of photovoltaic devices based on polymer:fullerene, small-molecule:C60 and polymer:polymer blends, our study reveals that the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is essentially independent of whether or not D, A or CT states with an energy higher than that of CT1 are excited. The best materials systems show an IQE higher than 90% without the need for excess electronic or vibrational energy.

  19. Efficient charge generation by relaxed charge-transfer states at organic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Vandewal, Koen; Albrecht, Steve; Hoke, Eric T; Graham, Kenneth R; Widmer, Johannes; Douglas, Jessica D; Schubert, Marcel; Mateker, William R; Bloking, Jason T; Burkhard, George F; Sellinger, Alan; Fréchet, Jean M J; Amassian, Aram; Riede, Moritz K; McGehee, Michael D; Neher, Dieter; Salleo, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Interfaces between organic electron-donating (D) and electron-accepting (A) materials have the ability to generate charge carriers on illumination. Efficient organic solar cells require a high yield for this process, combined with a minimum of energy losses. Here, we investigate the role of the lowest energy emissive interfacial charge-transfer state (CT1) in the charge generation process. We measure the quantum yield and the electric field dependence of charge generation on excitation of the charge-transfer (CT) state manifold via weakly allowed, low-energy optical transitions. For a wide range of photovoltaic devices based on polymer:fullerene, small-molecule:C60 and polymer:polymer blends, our study reveals that the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is essentially independent of whether or not D, A or CT states with an energy higher than that of CT1 are excited. The best materials systems show an IQE higher than 90% without the need for excess electronic or vibrational energy.

  20. Charge States of y Ions in the Collision-Induced Dissociation of Doubly Charged Tryptic Peptide Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neta, Pedatsur; Stein, Stephen E.

    2011-05-01

    Bonds that break in collision-induced dissociation (CID) are often weakened by a nearby proton, which can, in principle, be carried away by either of the product fragments. Since peptide backbone dissociation is commonly charge-directed, relative intensities of charge states of product y- and b-ions depend on the final location of that proton. This study examines y-ion charge distributions for dissociation of doubly charged peptide ions, using a large reference library of peptide ion fragmentation generated from ion-trap CID of peptide ions from tryptic digests. Trends in relative intensities of y2+ and y1+ ions are examined as a function of bond cleavage position, peptide length (n), residues on either side of the bond and effects of residues remote from the bond. It is found that yn-2/b2 dissociation is the most sensitive to adjacent amino acids, that y2+/y1+ steadily increase with increasing peptide length, that the N-terminal amino acid can have a major influence in all dissociations, and in some cases other residues remote from the bond cleavage exert significant effects. Good correlation is found between the values of y2+/y1+ for the peptide and the proton affinities of the amino acids present at the dissociating peptide bond. A few deviations from this correlation are rationalized by specific effects of the amino acid residues. These correlations can be used to estimate trends in y2+/y1+ ratios for peptide ions from amino acid proton affinities.

  1. Quantum information transfer between topological and conventional charge qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Li; Yan, Zou

    2016-02-01

    We propose a scheme to realize coherent quantum information transfer between topological and conventional charge qubits. We first consider a hybrid system where a quantum dot (QD) is tunnel-coupled to a semiconductor Majorana-hosted nanowire (MNW) via using gated control as a switch, the information encoded in the superposition state of electron empty and occupied state can be transferred to each other through choosing the proper interaction time to make measurements. Then we consider another system including a double QDs and a pair of parallel MNWs, it is shown that the entanglement information transfer can be realized between the two kinds of systems. We also realize long distance quantum information transfer between two quantum dots separated by an MNW, by making use of the nonlocal fermionic level formed with the pared Majorana feimions (MFs) emerging at the two ends of the MNW. Furthermore, we analyze the teleportationlike electron transfer phenomenon predicted by Tewari et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 027001 (2008)] in our considered system. Interestingly, we find that this phenomenon exactly corresponds to the case that the information encoded in one QD just returns back to its original place during the dynamical evolution of the combined system from the perspective of quantum state transfer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304031).

  2. A model for energy transfer in collisions of atoms with highly excited molecules.

    PubMed

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    A model for energy transfer in the collision between an atom and a highly excited target molecule has been developed on the basis of classical mechanics and turning point analysis. The predictions of the model have been tested against the results of trajectory calculations for collisions of five different target molecules with argon or helium under a variety of temperatures, collision energies, and initial rotational levels. The model predicts selected moments of the joint probability distribution, P(Jf,ΔE) with an R(2) ≈ 0.90. The calculation is efficient, in most cases taking less than one CPU-hour. The model provides several insights into the energy transfer process. The joint probability distribution is strongly dependent on rotational energy transfer and conservation laws and less dependent on vibrational energy transfer. There are two mechanisms for rotational excitation, one due to motion normal to the intermolecular potential and one due to motion tangential to it and perpendicular to the line of centers. Energy transfer is found to depend strongly on the intermolecular potential and only weakly on the intramolecular potential. Highly efficient collisions are a natural consequence of the energy transfer and arise due to collisions at "sweet spots" in the space of impact parameter and molecular orientation.

  3. Dual Fluorescence in GFP Chromophore Analogues: Chemical Modulation of Charge Transfer and Proton Transfer Bands.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tanmay; Mandal, Mrinal; Das, Ananya; Bhattacharyya, Kalishankar; Datta, Ayan; Mandal, Prasun K

    2016-04-14

    Dual fluorescence of GFP chromophore analogues has been observed for the first time. OHIM (o-hydroxy imidazolidinone) shows only a charge transfer (CT) band, CHBDI (p-cyclicamino o-hydroxy benzimidazolidinone) shows a comparable intensity CT and PT (proton transfer) band, and MHBDI (p-methoxy o-hydroxy benzimidazolidinone) shows a higher intensity PT band. It could be shown that the differential optical behavior is not due to conformational variation in the solid or solution phase. Rather, control of the excited state electronic energy level and excited state acidity constant by functional group modification could be shown to be responsible for the differential optical behavior. Chemical modification-induced electronic control over the relative intensity of the charge transfer and proton transfer bands could thus be evidenced. Support from single-crystal X-ray structure, NMR, femtosecond to nanosecond fluorescence decay analysis, and TDDFT-based calculation provided important information and thus helped us understand the photophysics better.

  4. Theory of ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer: Contributions of direct charge transfer excitations to the absorbance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Luxia; Willig, Frank; May, Volkhard

    2007-04-07

    Absorption spectra related to heterogeneous electron transfer are analyzed with the focus on direct charge transfer transition from the surface attached molecule into the semiconductor band states. The computations are based on a model of reduced dimensionality with a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate but a complete account for the continuum of conduction band states. The applicability of this model to perylene on TiO{sub 2} has been demonstrated in a series of earlier papers. Here, based on a time-dependent formulation, the absorbance is calculated with the inclusion of charge transfer excitations. A broad parameter set inspired by the perylene TiO{sub 2} systems is considered. In particular, the description generalizes the Fano effect to heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. Preliminary simulations of measured spectra are presented for perylene-catechol attached to TiO{sub 2}.

  5. Charged particle production in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with the ALICE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floris, M.

    2013-08-01

    The ALICE collaboration measured charged particle production in √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC. We report on results on charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum spectra. All the results are presented as a function of the centrality of the collision, estimated with a Glauber Monte Carlo fit to multiplicity distributions reconstructed in various detectors. The applicability of the Glauber model at LHC energies, the precision of the centrality determination and the related systematic uncertainties are discussed in detail. Particles are tracked in the pseudorapidity window | η | ≲ 0.9 with the silicon Inner Tracking System (ITS) and the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), over the range 0.15 charged particle multiplicity is measured in | η | < 0.5 to be dNch /d η = 1601 ± 60 in 5% most central Pb-Pb collisions, indicating an energy density a factor ∼ 3 higher than at RHIC. Its evolution with centrality shows a pattern strikingly similar to the one measured at RHIC. Intermediate (5 ≲pT ≲ 15 GeV / c) transverse momentum particles are found to be most strongly suppressed with respect to pp collisions, consistent with a large energy loss of hardscattered partons in the hot and dense medium. The results are presented in terms of the nuclear modification factor RAA and compared to theoretical expectations.

  6. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: Charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection

    SciTech Connect

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2013-07-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D{sub 6h} Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D{sub 2} eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} (N{sup +}-Phenyl, N-Phenyl{sup +}). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled

  7. A local collision probability approximation for predicting momentum transfer cross sections.

    PubMed

    Bleiholder, Christian

    2015-10-21

    The local collision probability approximation (LCPA) method is introduced to compute molecular momentum transfer cross sections for comparison to ion mobility experiments. The LCPA replaces the (non-local) scattering trajectory used in the trajectory method to describe the collision process by a (local) collision probability function. This momentum transfer probability is computed using the exact same analyte-buffer interaction potential as used in the trajectory method. Subsequently, the momentum transfer cross section ΩLCPA(T) is calculated in a projection-type manner (corrected for shape effects through a shape factor). Benchmark calculations on a set of 208 carbon clusters with a range of molecular size and degree of concavity demonstrate that LCPA and trajectory calculations agree closely with one another. The results discussed here indicate that the LCPA is suitable to efficiently calculate momentum transfer cross sections for use in ion mobility spectrometry in conjunction with different buffer gases.

  8. Super-iron Nanoparticles with Facile Cathodic Charge Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    M Farmand; D Jiang; B Wang; S Ghosh; D Ramaker; S Licht

    2011-12-31

    Super-irons contain the + 6 valence state of iron. One advantage of this is that it provides a multiple electron opportunity to store additional battery charge. A decrease of particle size from the micrometer to the nanometer domain provides a higher surface area to volume ratio, and opportunity to facilitate charge transfer, and improve the power, voltage and depth of discharge of cathodes made from such salts. However, super-iron salts are fragile, readily reduced to the ferric state, with both heat and contact with water, and little is known of the resultant passivating and non-passivating ferric oxide products. A pathway to decrease the super-iron particle size to the nano-domain is introduced, which overcomes this fragility, and retains the battery capacity advantage of their Fe(VI) valence state. Time and power controlled mechanosynthesis, through less aggressive, dry ball milling, leads to facile charge transfer of super-iron nanoparticles. Ex-situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy is used to explore the oxidation state and structure of these iron oxides during discharge and shows the significant change in stability of the ferrate structure to lower oxidation state when the particle size is in the nano-domain.

  9. Metastable charge-transfer state of californium(iii) compounds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guokui; Cary, Samantha K; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2015-06-28

    Among a series of anomalous physical and chemical properties of Cf(iii) compounds revealed by recent investigations, the present work addresses the characteristics of the optical spectra of An(HDPA)3·H2O (An = Am, Cm, and Cf), especially the broadband photoluminescence from Cf(HDPA)3·H2O induced by ligand-to-metal charge transfer (CT). As a result of strong ion-ligand interactions and the relative ease of reducing Cf(iii) to Cf(ii), a CT transition occurs at low energy (<3 eV) via the formation of a metastable Cf(ii) state. It is shown that the systematic trend in CT transitions of the lanthanide series is not paralleled by actinide elements lighter than Cf(iii), and californium represents a turning point in the periodicity of the actinide series. Analyses and modeling of the temperature-dependent luminescence dynamics indicate that the metastable Cf(ii) charge-transfer state undergoes radiative and non-radiative relaxations. Broadening of the CT transition arises from strong vibronic coupling and hole-charge interactions in the valence band. The non-radiative relaxation of the metastable CT state results from a competition between phonon-relaxation and thermal tunneling that populates the excited states of Cf(iii).

  10. Search for Fractional Charges Produced in Heavy-Ion Collisions at 1.9 GeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Michael A.; Joyce, David C.; Abrams, Peter C.; Bland, Roger W.; Johnson, Robert T.; Knoop, Tanya D.; Savage, Maureen H.; Scholz, Marion H.; Young, Betty A.; Hodges, Christopher L.; Hahn, Alan A.; Shaw, Gordon L.; Lackner, Klaus S.; Pugh, Howel G.; Slansky, Richard

    1983-10-01

    An experiment was performed to capture fractionally charged particles produced in heavy-ion collisions and to concentrate them in samples suitable for analysis by various techniques. Two of the samples so produced have been searched, with use of an automated version of Millikan's oil-drop apparatus. The beam was 56Fe at 1.9 GeV/nucleon, incident on a lead target. Less than one fractional charge per 1.0×104 Fe-Pb collisions was found to be produced, and, with further assumptions, less than one per 2.0×106 collisions.

  11. Polaron assisted charge transfer in model biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangqi; Movaghar, Bijan

    2016-11-01

    We use a tight binding Hamiltonian to simulate the electron transfer from an initial charge-separating exciton to a final target state through a two-arm transfer model. The structure is copied from the model frequently used to describe electron harvesting in photosynthesis (photosystems I). We use this network to provide proof of principle for dynamics, in quantum system/bath networks, especially those involving interference pathways, and use these results to make predictions on artificially realizable systems. Each site is coupled to the phonon bath via several electron-phonon couplings. The assumed large energy gaps and weak tunneling integrals linking the last 3 sites give rise to"Stark Wannier like" quantum localization; electron transfer to the target cluster becomes impossible without bath coupling. As a result of the electron-phonon coupling, local electronic energies relax when the site is occupied, and transient polaronic states are formed as photo-generated electrons traverse the system. For a symmetric constructively interfering two pathway network, the population is shared equally between two sets of equivalent sites and therefore the polaron energy shift is smaller. The smaller energy shift however makes the tunnel transfer to the last site slower or blocks it altogether. Slight disorder (or thermal noise) can break the symmetry, permitting essentially a "one path", and correspondingly more efficient transfer.

  12. Cross sections for inelastic collisions of fast charged particles with atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, Mitio

    1985-01-01

    A large volume of data of these cross sections are required for solving problems of radiological physics and dosimetry, as well as for detailed analysis of the earliest stage of radiation actions on matter (including the biological cell and substances constituting it). Current experimental data of the cross sections are far from being complete or even satisfactory for tentative applications. One practical approach to the cross-section determination is to test experimental data with general criteria. For example, the Bethe theory indicates a close connection between photoabsorption and energy absorption by glancing collisions. Development and use of these data constraints, first put forth by Platzman, can now be demonstrated in many examples. More recent studies concern the determination of the analytic expression most suitable for fitting the data on the oscillator-strength distribution or the energy distribution of secondary electrons from ionizing collisions of charged particles. There are three areas to which major efforts should be directed. First, methods of absolute cross-section measurements both for electron and ionic collisions must be thoroughly reviewed so that sources of systematic errors may be identified and corrected. Second, efforts should be devoted to the understanding of the data systematics, viz., the trends of cross sections for a series of molecules. Finally, electron and ionic collisions with molecules in condensed phases will be an important topic of study for years to come; initial reports on efforts toward this direction are encouraging. 46 refs.

  13. Electron removal from H0(n) in fast collisions with multiply charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Meyer, F. W.

    1982-09-01

    The cross sections for electron removal from highly excited (n=9-24) hydrogen atoms in fast collisions with multiply charged (q=1-5) N, O, and Ar ions were investigated in an ion-atom crossed-beams experiment. The ion-atom collisions occurred inside a deflector where a moderate electrostatic field of up to 1.8 kV/cm was applied. The range of collision velocity (vc) investigated is vc=1.0v1-2.0v1, where v1=2.2×108 cm/s is the Bohr velocity. The electron-removal cross section was found to be independent of ion species for a given q and vc, to increase as q2 for a given vc, and to decrease as v-2c for a given q. These q and vc dependences of the experimental cross section are in accord with classical Coulomb ionization theories. The experimental n dependence of the cross section differs significantly from the theoretically predicted dependence, but the difference can be accounted for if we assume the presence of the external electric field in the collision volume reduces the ionization energy.

  14. Highly Twisted Triarylamines for Photoinduced Intramoleculer ChargeTransfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chudomel, J. M.; Yang, B. Q.; Barnes, M. D.; Achermann, M.; Mague, J. T.; Lahti, P. M.

    2011-08-04

    9-(N,N-Dianisylamino)anthracene (9DAAA), 9-(N,N-dianisylamino)dinaphth([1,2-a:2'-1'-j]-anthracene (9DAAH), and 9,10-bis(N,N-dianisylamino)anthracene (910BAA) were synthesized as highly twisted triarylamines with potential for photoexcited internal charge transfer. Crystallography of 9DAAA shows its dianisylamino group to be twisted nearly perpendicular to its anthracene unit, similar to a report for 910BAA. The solution fluorescence spectra show strong bathochromic shifts for each of the three molecular systems with strongly decreased quantum efficiency in higher polarity solvents. Solution-phase (ensemble) time-resolved photoluminescence measurements show up to 4-fold decreases in fluorescence lifetime in acetonitrile compared to hexane. The combined results are consistent with photoinduced, transient intramolecular charge-transfer from the bis-anisylamine unit to the polycyclic aromatic unit. Computational modeling is in accord with intramolecular transfer of electron density from the bis-anisylamino unit to the anthracene, based on in comparisons of HOMO and LUMO.

  15. Dielectric Properties of Organic Charge-Transfer Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J. K. H.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Krohns, S.; Manna, R. S.; Hartmann, B.; Schubert, H.; Lang, M.; Müller, J.; Schlueter, J. A.; Mézière, C.; Batail, P.; Loidl, A.

    The BEDT-TTF-based charge-transfer salts have attracted considerable attention due to their often intriguing dielectric properties. An example is κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N(CN)2]Cl. It was recently found to exhibit multiferroicity, for which a new electric-dipole driven mechanism was proposed. The polar moment in this system was suggested to arise from the dimerization of the BEDT-TTF molecules, combined with charge order. Another interesting recent example is α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3, which shows the signature of relaxor-ferroelectric behavior. Here, we will present an overview of the dielectric properties of the above systems and provide new results on κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Hg(SCN)2Cl, which also seems to show relaxor-ferroelectric behavior in its charge-ordered state. In addition, we present measurements of δ-(EDT-TTF-CONMe2)2Br. This compound lacks dimerization, but exhibits charge order already at room temperature.

  16. Enhancement of IR and VCD intensities due to charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Nicu, Valentin Paul; Autschbach, Jochen; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2009-03-14

    Donor-acceptor interactions such as the one between the Cl(-) base and the N-H sigma* acceptor orbitals encountered in the complexation of Cl(-) counterions to the [Co(en)(3)](3+) transition metal complex, have been shown to cause huge enhancement (between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude) of the VCD intensities of N-H stretching modes. This effect has been fully analyzed, and could be attributed to increased charge flow from the Cl(-) donors when the N-H bonds become stretched. The transfer of charge counteracts the movement of negative electronic charge that happens along with the motion of the H nuclei, effectively reversing the electronic part of the electric dipole transition moment (EDTM) in the direction of the charge flow (z, say), and of the magnetic transition dipole moment (MDTM) in the perpendicular direction. The consequences for the IR and VCD intensity follow: IR intensity is strongly increased if the EDTM is polarized in the z direction, e.g. in A(2) modes, but not so much if it is polarized in the xy plane (E modes), the VCD is strongly enhanced if the EDTM and MTDM are polarized in the xy plane (in E modes), but less so when they are polarized in the z direction (in A(2) modes). The explanation holds generally for complexation phenomena of this sort, including the donor-acceptor part of hydrogen bonding interactions, e.g. with solvent molecules.

  17. Tunable charge transfer properties in metal-phthalocyanine heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siles, P. F.; Hahn, T.; Salvan, G.; Knupfer, M.; Zhu, F.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2016-04-01

    Organic materials such as phthalocyanine-based systems present a great potential for organic device applications due to the possibility of integrating films of different organic materials to create organic heterostructures which combine the electrical capabilities of each material. This opens the possibility to precisely engineer and tune new electrical properties. In particular, similar transition metal phthalocyanines demonstrate hybridization and charge transfer properties which could lead to interesting physical phenomena. Although, when considering device dimensions, a better understanding and control of the tuning of the transport properties still remain in the focus of research. Here, by employing conductive atomic force microscopy techniques, we provide an insight about the nanoscale electrical properties and transport mechanisms of MnPc and fluorinated phthalocyanines such as F16CuPc and F16CoPc. We report a transition from typical diode-like transport mechanisms for pure MnPc thin films to space-charge-limited current transport regime (SCLC) for Pc-based heterostructures. The controlled addition of fluorinated phthalocyanine also provides highly uniform and symmetric-polarized transport characteristics with conductance enhancements up to two orders of magnitude depending on the polarization. We present a method to spatially map the mobility of the MnPc/F16CuPc structures with a nanoscale resolution and provide theoretical calculations to support our experimental findings. This well-controlled nanoscale tuning of the electrical properties for metal transition phthalocyanine junctions stands as key step for future phthalocyanine-based electronic devices, where the low dimension charge transfer, mediated by transition metal atoms could be intrinsically linked to a transfer of magnetic moment or spin.Organic materials such as phthalocyanine-based systems present a great potential for organic device applications due to the possibility of integrating films of

  18. Beam-Energy Dependence of Charge Separation along the Magnetic Field in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a quark-gluon plasma which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect. The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this Letter, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au +Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. This implies the dominance of hadronic interactions over partonic ones at lower collision energies.

  19. Polarization and charge transfer in the hydration of chloride ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Zhen; Rogers, David M.; Beck, Thomas L.

    2010-01-07

    A theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of the chloride ion and water molecules in the first hydration shell is presented. The calculations are performed on an ensemble of configurations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of a single chloride ion in bulk water. The simulations utilize the polarizable AMOEBA force field for trajectory generation and MP2-level calculations are performed to examine the electronic structure properties of the ions and surrounding waters in the external field of more distant waters. The ChelpG method is employed to explore the effective charges and dipoles on the chloride ions and first-shell waters. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is further utilized to examine charge transfer from the anion to surrounding water molecules. The clusters extracted from the AMOEBA simulations exhibit high probabilities of anisotropic solvation for chloride ions in bulk water. From the QTAIM analysis, 0.2 elementary charges are transferred from the ion to the first-shell water molecules. The default AMOEBA model overestimates the average dipole moment magnitude of the ion compared to the quantum mechanical value. The average magnitude of the dipole moment of the water molecules in the first shell treated at the MP2-level, with the more distant waters handled with an AMOEBA effective charge model, is 2.67 D. This value is close to the AMOEBA result for first-shell waters (2.72 D) and is slightly reduced from the bulk AMOEBA value (2.78 D). The magnitude of the dipole moment of the water molecules in the first solvation shell is most strongly affected by the local water-water interactions and hydrogen bonds with the second solvation shell, rather than by interactions with the ion.

  20. Tunable charge transfer properties in metal-phthalocyanine heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Siles, P F; Hahn, T; Salvan, G; Knupfer, M; Zhu, F; Zahn, D R T; Schmidt, O G

    2016-04-28

    Organic materials such as phthalocyanine-based systems present a great potential for organic device applications due to the possibility of integrating films of different organic materials to create organic heterostructures which combine the electrical capabilities of each material. This opens the possibility to precisely engineer and tune new electrical properties. In particular, similar transition metal phthalocyanines demonstrate hybridization and charge transfer properties which could lead to interesting physical phenomena. Although, when considering device dimensions, a better understanding and control of the tuning of the transport properties still remain in the focus of research. Here, by employing conductive atomic force microscopy techniques, we provide an insight about the nanoscale electrical properties and transport mechanisms of MnPc and fluorinated phthalocyanines such as F16CuPc and F16CoPc. We report a transition from typical diode-like transport mechanisms for pure MnPc thin films to space-charge-limited current transport regime (SCLC) for Pc-based heterostructures. The controlled addition of fluorinated phthalocyanine also provides highly uniform and symmetric-polarized transport characteristics with conductance enhancements up to two orders of magnitude depending on the polarization. We present a method to spatially map the mobility of the MnPc/F16CuPc structures with a nanoscale resolution and provide theoretical calculations to support our experimental findings. This well-controlled nanoscale tuning of the electrical properties for metal transition phthalocyanine junctions stands as key step for future phthalocyanine-based electronic devices, where the low dimension charge transfer, mediated by transition metal atoms could be intrinsically linked to a transfer of magnetic moment or spin.

  1. Flow-background subtraction in the charge-separation measurements in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fufang

    2016-09-01

    Recent azimuthal-angle correlation measurements in high-energy heavy-ion collisions have observed charge-separation signals perpendicular to the reaction plane, and the observations have been related to the chiral magnetic effect (CME). However, the correlation signal is contaminated with the background contributions due to the collective motion (flow) of the collision system, and it remains elusive to effectively remove the background from the correlation. In this poster, we present a method study with a simple Monte Carlo simulation and the AMPT model. We develop a scheme to reveal the true CME signal via the event-shape engineering with the magnitude of the flow vector, Q: the flow-background is removed at Q = 0. Artificial signal/background effects will also be discussed.

  2. H type of hidden crossings in atomic collisions involving highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jakimovski, D.; Savichev, V.I.; Solovev, E.A. ||

    1996-10-01

    We examine the structure of the hidden crossings of the adiabatic potential curves {ital E}({ital R}) in the problem of two Coulomb centers with charges {ital Z}{sub 2} and {ital Z}{sub 1}, when {ital Z}{sub 2}{gt}{ital Z}{sub 1}. In this case we observe a new type of hidden crossing between the states ({ital n},{ital l},{ital m})-({ital n},{ital l}+1,{ital m}), where {ital n}, {ital l}, and {ital m} are the spherical quantum numbers of the united atom. This leads to the appearance of a mechanism of nonadiabatic transitions in hydrogen{emdash}multicharged ion collisions. As an example of this mechanism we present results of a calculation of inelastic transitions in O{sup 7+}(1{ital s})+H collisions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Line strengths, collision strengths and excitation rates for multiply-charged silicon ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J.; Kepple, P. C.; Blaha, M.

    1977-01-01

    In the present paper, the line strengths, collision strengths, and rate coefficients are calculated for a variety of transitions in multiply charged silicon ions from Si(VI) to Si(XIV). The line strengths are obtained by using Clementi wave functions for the ground-state configuration, and excited-state wave functions generated by a semiempirical method. The collision strengths are calculated in an LS coupling scheme in the distorted-wave approximation, neglecting exchange except for the helium-like transitions. These results are then integrated over a Maxwellian velocity distribution function to yield rate coefficients. The rates are presented graphically and also in terms of a two-parameter fit.

  4. Energy dependence of the transverse momentum distributions of charged particles in pp collisions measured by ALICE.

    PubMed

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Vergara, S; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Viinikainen, J; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Vinogradov, Y; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Völkl, M A; Voloshin, S; Voloshin, K; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vorobyev, I; Vranic, D; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, B; Wagner, V; Wagner, J; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, M; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Weber, M; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, G; Wilkinson, J; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Winn, M; Xiang, C; Yaldo, C G; Yamaguchi, Y; Yang, H; Yang, P; Yang, S; Yano, S; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yoo, I-K; Yushmanov, I; Zaccolo, V; Zach, C; Zampolli, C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zgura, I S; Zhalov, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, Y; Zhang, H; Zhang, X; Zhou, D; Zhou, Y; Zhou, F; Zhu, X; Zhu, J; Zhu, J; Zhu, H; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, M B; Zimmermann, A; Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M; Zyzak, M

    Differential cross sections of charged particles in inelastic pp collisions as a function of pT have been measured at [Formula: see text] at the LHC. The pT spectra are compared to NLO-pQCD calculations. Though the differential cross section for an individual [Formula: see text] cannot be described by NLO-pQCD, the relative increase of cross section with [Formula: see text] is in agreement with NLO-pQCD. Based on these measurements and observations, procedures are discussed to construct pp reference spectra at [Formula: see text] up to pT=50 GeV/c as required for the calculation of the nuclear modification factor in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions.

  5. Fluctuations of conserved charges in relativistic heavy ion collisions: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Masayuki; Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2016-09-01

    Bulk fluctuations of conserved charges measured by event-by-event analysis in relativistic heavy ion collisions are observables which are believed to carry significant amount of information on the hot medium created by the collisions. Active studies have been done recently experimentally, theoretically, and on the lattice. In particular, non-Gaussianity of the fluctuations has acquired much attention recently. In this review, we give a pedagogical introduction to these issues, and survey recent developments in this field of research. Starting from the definition of cumulants, basic concepts in fluctuation physics, such as thermal fluctuations in statistical mechanics and time evolution of fluctuations in diffusive systems, are described. Phenomena which are expected to occur in finite temperature and/or density QCD matter and their measurement by event-by-event analyses are also elucidated.

  6. SELF-CONSISTENT LANGEVIN SIMULATION OF COULOMB COLLISIONS IN CHARGED-PARTICLE BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    J. QIANG; R. RYNE; S. HABIB

    2000-05-01

    In many plasma physics and charged-particle beam dynamics problems, Coulomb collisions are modeled by a Fokker-Planck equation. In order to incorporate these collisions, we present a three-dimensional parallel Langevin simulation method using a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach implemented on high-performance parallel computers. We perform, for the first time, a fully self-consistent simulation, in which the friction and diffusion coefficients are computed from first principles. We employ a two-dimensional domain decomposition approach within a message passing programming paradigm along with dynamic load balancing. Object oriented programming is used to encapsulate details of the communication syntax as well as to enhance reusability and extensibility. Performance tests on the SGI Origin 2000 and the Cray T3E-900 have demonstrated good scalability. Work is in progress to apply our technique to intrabeam scattering in accelerators.

  7. Modulating unimolecular charge transfer by exciting bridge vibrations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhiwei; Lawrence, Candace M; Xiao, Dequan; Kireev, Victor V; Skourtis, Spiros S; Sessler, Jonathan L; Beratan, David N; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2009-12-23

    Ultrafast UV-vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate how vibrational excitation of the bridge changes photoinduced electron transfer between donor (dimethylaniline) and acceptor (anthracene) moieties bridged by a guanosine-cytidine base pair (GC). The charge-separated (CS) state yield is found to be lowered by high-frequency bridge mode excitation. The effect is linked to a dynamic modulation of the donor-acceptor coupling interaction by weakening of H-bonding and/or by disruption of the bridging base-pair planarity.

  8. Intramolecular charge transfer in donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Slama-Schwok, A.; Blanchard-Desce, M.; Lehn, J.M. )

    1990-05-17

    The photophysical properties of donor-acceptor molecules, push-pull polyenes and carotenoids, have been studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds bear various acceptor and donor groups, linked together by chains of different length and structure. The position of the absorption and fluorescence maxima and their variation in solvents of increasing polarity are in agreement with long-distance intramolecular charge-transfer processes, the linker acting as a molecular wire. The effects of the linker length and structure and of the nature of acceptor and donor are presented.

  9. Negative thermal expansion induced by intermetallic charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Masaki; Oka, Kengo; Nabetani, Koichiro

    2015-06-01

    Suppression of thermal expansion is of great importance for industry. Negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials which shrink on heating and expand on cooling are therefore attracting keen attention. Here we provide a brief overview of NTE induced by intermetallic charge transfer in A-site ordered double perovskites SaCu3Fe4O12 and LaCu3Fe4-x Mn x O12, as well as in Bi or Ni substituted BiNiO3. The last compound shows a colossal dilatometric linear thermal expansion coefficient exceeding -70 × 10(-6) K(-1) near room temperature, in the temperature range which can be controlled by substitution.

  10. Ion-neutral collisions and dust grain charging in the presence of electromagnetic radiation in the Earth's Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopnin, Sergey; Popel, Sergey; Morzhakova, Anastasia

    2010-05-01

    Ion-neutral collisions in dust particle charging process in the presence of electromagnetic radiation in Earth's "dusty" ionosphere are taken into account. These collisions can result in a charge exchange between a fast ion and a slow neutral. The slow neutrals become slow positively charged ions which interact effectively with positively charged dust grains. As a result a microscopic ion current on the dust grains decreases in comparison with the case when ion-neutral collisions are not taken into account in the dust grain charging process. The microscopic ion current on the positively charged dust grains is derived. A condition on neutral density is obtained for which the influence of ion-neutral collisions on dust particle charging process is important. It is shown that the effect of ion-neutral collisions should be taken into account when considering the charging of nano- and microsize dust grains in Noctilucent Clouds, Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes, meteoritic dust, active geophysical rocket experiments such as Fluxus 1 and 2. We discuss also the effect of electrons with energies of the order of 1 eV which are produced as a result of photoelectric effect during the charging process, which can result in an increase of the electron temperature in plasmas. The most important effect resulting in cooling of such electrons is that of electron-ion collisions. We found a condition on the neutral density when the electron temperature in Earth's "dusty" ionosphere can become of the order of 1 eV. The importance of this effect for ionospheric plasmas is discussed. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project no. 06-05-64826-а. S.I.P. acknowledges financial support of the Dynasty Foundation.

  11. Photoinduced charge-transfer materials for nonlinear optical applications

    DOEpatents

    McBranch, Duncan W.

    2006-10-24

    A method using polyelectrolyte self-assembly for preparing multi-layered organic molecular materials having individual layers which exhibit ultrafast electron and/or energy transfer in a controlled direction occurring over the entire structure. Using a high molecular weight, water-soluble, anionic form of poly-phenylene vinylene, self-assembled films can be formed which show high photoluminescence quantum efficiency (QE). The highest emission QE is achieved using poly(propylene-imine) (PPI) dendrimers as cationic binders. Self-quenching of the luminescence is observed as the solid polymer film thickness is increased and can be reversed by inserting additional spacer layers of transparent polyelectrolytes between each active conjugated layer, such that the QE grows with thickness. A red shift of the luminescence is also observed as additional PPV layers are added. This effect persists as self-quenching is eliminated. Charge transfer superlattices can be formed by additionally incorporating C.sub.60 acceptor layers.

  12. Characterization and control of charge transfer in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabelli, Julien; Thibault, Karl; Gasse, Gabriel; Lupien, Christian; Reulet, Bertrand

    2017-03-01

    Charge transfer in a tunnel junction is studied under dc and ac voltage bias using quantum shot noise. Under dc voltage bias $V$, spectral density of noise measured within a very large bandwidth enables to deduce the current-current correlator in the time domain by Fourier transform. This correlator exhibits regular oscillations proving that electrons try to cross the junction regularly, every $h/eV$. Using harmonic and bi-harmonic ac voltage bias, we then show that quasiparticles excitations can be transferred through the junction in a controlled way. By measuring the reduction of the excess shot noise, we are able to determine the number of electron-hole pairs surrounding the injected electrons and demonstrate that bi-harmonic voltage pulses realize an on-demand electron source with a very small admixture of electron-hole pairs.

  13. Measurement of charged jet suppression in Pb-Pb collisions at = 2 .76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A. Ahmad; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Pedrosa, F. Baltasar Dos Santos; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Boehmer, F. V.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Roman, V. Canoa; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Díaz, A. Casanova; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; del Valle, Z. Conesa; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Cortese, P.; Maldonado, I. Cortés; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Albino, R. Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dorheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Majumdar, A. K. Dutta; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Corral, G. Herrera; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ianigro, J.-C.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Ketzer, B.; Khan, M. Mohisin.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; de Guevara, P. Ladron; Fernandes, C. Lagana; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; Monzón, I. León; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Torres, E. López; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Gago, A. M.; Jacobs, P. M.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Cervantes, I. Maldonado; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; García, G. Martínez; Blanco, J. Martin; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazumder, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Pérez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Zetina, L. Montaño; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; De Godoy, D. A. Moreira; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Velasquez, A. Ortiz; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Da Costa, H. Pereira; De Oliveira Filho, E. Pereira; Peresunko, D.; Lara, C. E. Pérez; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Ploskon, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Cahuantzi, M. Rodríguez; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Montero, A. J. Rubio; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Castro, X. Sanchez; Rodríguez, F. J. Sánchez; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Vasquez, M. A. Subieta; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Takaki, J. D. Tapia; Peloni, A. Tarantola; Martinez, A. Tarazona; Tauro, A.; Muñoz, G. Tejeda; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Ter Minasyan, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; Vallero, S.; Vyvre, P. Vande; Vannucci, L.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Limón, S. Vergara; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-03-01

    A measurement of the transverse momentum spectra of jets in Pb-Pb collisions at = 2 .76TeV is reported. Jets are reconstructed from charged particles using the anti- k T jet algorithm with jet resolution parameters R of 0 .2 and 0 .3 in pseudo-rapidity | η| < 0 .5. The transverse momentum p T of charged particles is measured down to 0 .15 GeV/ c which gives access to the low p T fragments of the jet. Jets found in heavy-ion collisions are corrected event-by-event for average background density and on an inclusive basis (via unfolding) for residual background fluctuations and detector effects. A strong suppression of jet production in central events with respect to peripheral events is observed. The suppression is found to be similar to the suppression of charged hadrons, which suggests that substantial energy is radiated at angles larger than the jet resolution parameter R = 0 .3 considered in the analysis. The fragmentation bias introduced by selecting jets with a high p T leading particle, which rejects jets with a soft fragmentation pattern, has a similar effect on the jet yield for central and peripheral events. The ratio of jet spectra with R = 0 .2 and R = 0 .3 is found to be similar in Pb-Pb and simulated PYTHIA pp events, indicating no strong broadening of the radial jet structure in the reconstructed jets with R < 0 .3. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Theoretical investigation of collisions between highly-charged N5+ and N6+ with He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Liu, L.; Yan, L. L.; Zhang, C. L.; Wang, J. G.; Stancil, P. C.; Liebermann, H. P.; Buenker, R. J.

    2013-05-01

    For X-rays and/or EUV photons observed in cometary and planetary atmospheres and from the heliosphere, a primary production mechanism is charge exchange (CX) due to the collision between highly charged solar wind ions and ambient neutral species. In the present work, CX due to N6+ (1 s2 S)-He and N5+ (1s21 S)-He collisions has been investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) and the atomic-orbital close-coupling (AOCC) methods. For the high charged N5+ and N6+, the electrons of He will be captured to very highly excited or doubly-excited states, which may lie in continua of various quasi-molecular channels. The multi-reference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction approach (MRDCI) has been applied and a large number of important configurations have been selected to compute the adiabatic potential and nonadiabatic couplings. Total and state-selective cross sections are calculated for energies between 10 meV/u and 10 keV/u and the autoionization process has been treated quasi-classically. The QMOCC results are compared to available experimental and theoretical data as well AOCC calculations. Partially supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (2013CB922200), the National Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 1097007, 11025417, and NASA grant NNX09AV46G.

  15. Ultrafast charge transfer via a conical intersection in dimethylaminobenzonitrile.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Werner; Pushpa, Kumbil Kuttan; Rettig, Wolfgang; Schmid, Wolfram E; Trushin, Sergei A

    2002-04-01

    The L(a)-like S2 state (2A) of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile was pumped at 267 nm in the gas phase at 130 degrees C. Nonresonant multiphoton ionization at 800 nm with mass-selective detection then probed the subsequent processes. Whereas ionization at the Franck-Condon geometry only gave rise to the parent ion, fragmentation increased on motion towards the charge-transfer (CT) state. This useful difference is ascribed to a geometry-dependent resonance in the ion. The time constants found are interpreted by ultrafast (approximately 68 fs) relaxation through a conical intersection to both the CT and the L(b)-type S1 state (1B). Then the population equilibrates between these two states within 1 ps. From there the molecule relaxes within 90 ps to a lower excited state which can only be a triplet state (T(n)) and then decomposes within 300 ps. Previous experiments either investigated only 1B --> CT relaxation-which does not take place in the gas phase or nonpolar solvents for energetic reasons--or, starting from S2 excitation, typically had insufficient time resolution (>1 ps) to detect the temporary charge transfer. Only recently temporary population of the CT state was found in a nonpolar solvent (Kwok et al., J. Phys. Chem. A. 2000, 104, 4188), a result fully consistent with our mechanism. We also show that S2 --> S1 relaxation does not occur vertically but involves an intermediate strong geometrical distortion, passing through a conical intersection.

  16. Charge transfer interactions in oligomer coated gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newmai, M. Boazbou; Kumar, Pandian Senthil

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoclusters were synthesized by a bottom-up synergistic approach of in-situ oligomerization of the monomer, N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP) and simultaneous weak reduction of Au-NVP complexes in the absence of any other external energy sources, thereby making these tiny gold clusters as the most elemental building blocks to construct further novel nano/microstructures with application potentials. It is well-known that metal clusters with less than 2 nm size do not show the usual surface plasmon band, because of the presence of a band-gap at the fermi level. Nevertheless, our present oligomer coated gold clusters show a discrete intense band at around 630 nm, which could very well be attributed to the charge transfer between the oligomer chain and the surface Au atoms. Such kind of sacrificial plasmon induced charge transfer interaction, observed for the very first time to the best of our knowledge, were also strongly corroborated through the enhancement / shifting of specific vibrational / rotational peaks as observed from the FTIR and Raman measurements as a function of the metal oxidation states, thus representing a new prototype for an efficient solar energy conversion probe.

  17. Nuclear fragmentation energy and momentum transfer distributions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Khan, Ferdous

    1989-01-01

    An optical model description of energy and momentum transfer in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. Transverse and longitudinal momentum transfers to the projectile are shown to arise from the real and absorptive part of the optical potential, respectively. Comparisons of fragment momentum distribution observables with experiments are made and trends outlined based on our knowledge of the underlying nucleon-nucleon interaction. Corrections to the above calculations are discussed. Finally, use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is indicated.

  18. Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hei, T K; Chen, D J; Brenner, D J; Hall, E J

    1988-07-01

    The mutagenic potential of charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) was assessed using the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus (HGPRT) in primary human fibroblasts. Exponentially growing cultures of early passaged fibroblasts were grown as monolayers on thin mylar sheets and were irradiated with accelerated protons, deuterons or helium-3 ions. The mutation rates were compared with those generated by 137Cs gamma-rays. LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, using the track segment mode, ranged from 10 to 150 keV/micron. After irradiation, cells were trypsinized, subcultured and assayed for both cytotoxicity and 6-thioguanine resistance. For gamma-rays, and for the charged particles of lower LET, the dose-response curves for cell survival were characterized by a marked initial shoulder, but approximated to an exponential function of dose for higher LETs. Mutation frequencies, likewise, showed a direct correlation to LET over the dose range examined. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for mutagenesis, based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, ranged from 1.30 for 10 keV/micron protons to 9.40 for 150 keV/micron helium-3 ions. Results of the present studies indicate that high-LET radiations, apart from being efficient inducers of cell lethality, are even more efficient in mutation induction as compared to low-LET ionizing radiation. These data are consistent with results previously obtained with both rodent and human fibroblast cell lines.

  19. Deeply virtual Compton scattering and its beam charge asymmetry in e±p collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H1 Collaboration; Aaron, F. D.; Martin, M. Aldaya; Alexa, C.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J. C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deák, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jönsson, L.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2009-11-01

    A measurement of elastic deeply virtual Compton scattering γ∗p→γp using e+p and e-p collision data recorded with the H1 detector at HERA is presented. The analysed data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 306 pb-1, almost equally shared between both beam charges. The cross section is measured as a function of the virtuality Q2 of the exchanged photon and the centre-of-mass energy W of the γ∗p system in the kinematic domain 6.5transfer at the proton vertex. The cross section is determined differentially in t for different Q2 and W values and exponential t-slope parameters are derived. Using e+p and e-p data samples, a beam charge asymmetry is extracted for the first time in the low Bjorken x kinematic domain. The observed asymmetry is attributed to the interference between Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. Experimental results are discussed in the context of two different models, one based on generalised parton distributions and one based on the dipole approach.

  20. Tailoring of ion species composition in complex plasmas with charge exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrikov, K.

    2005-06-01

    A generic approach towards tailoring of ion species composition in reactive plasmas used for nanofabrication of various functional nanofilms and nanoassemblies, based on a simplified model of a parallel-plate rf discharge, is proposed. The model includes an idealized reactive plasma containing two neutral and two ionic species interacting via charge exchange collisions in the presence of a microdispersed solid component. It is shown that the number densities of the desired ionic species can be efficiently managed by adjusting the dilution of the working gas in a buffer gas, rates of electron impact ionization, losses of plasma species on the discharge walls, and surfaces of fine particles, charge exchange rates, and efficiency of three-body recombination processes in the plasma bulk. The results are relevant to the plasma-aided nanomanufacturing of ordered patterns of carbon nanotip and nanopyramid microemitters.

  1. Measurement of the W boson production charge asymmetry in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bo-Young

    2008-01-01

    We present a measurement of the W boson production charge asymmetry using the W → ev decay channel. We use data collected the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected up to February 2006 (Run II) and represent an integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1. The experimental measurement of W production charge asymmetry is compared to higher order QCD predictions generated using MRST2006 and CTEQ6 parton distribution functions (PDF). The asymmetry provides new input on the momentum fraction dependence of the u and d quark parton distribution functions (PDF) within the proton over the fraction of proton's momentum range from 0.002 < x < 0.8 corresponding to -3.0 < yW < 3.0 at Q2 ~ MW2.

  2. Transfer RNA: a dancer between charging and mis-charging for protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Wang, Enduo

    2013-10-01

    Transfer RNA plays a fundamental role in the protein biosynthesis as an adaptor molecule by functioning as a biological link between the genetic nucleotide sequence in the mRNA and the amino acid sequence in the protein. To perform its role in protein biosynthesis, it has to be accurately recognized by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) to generate aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs). The correct pairing between an amino acid with its cognate tRNA is crucial for translational quality control. Production and utilization of mis-charged tRNAs are usually detrimental for all the species, resulting in cellular dysfunctions. Correct aa-tRNAs formation is collectively controlled by aaRSs with distinct mechanisms and/or other trans-factors. However, in very limited instances, mis-charged tRNAs are intermediate for specific pathways or essential components for the translational machinery. Here, from the point of accuracy in tRNA charging, we review our understanding about the mechanism ensuring correct aa-tRNA generation. In addition, some unique mis-charged tRNA species necessary for the organism are also briefly described.

  3. Efficient Super Energy Transfer Collisions Through Reactive-Complex Formation: H + SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jonathan M.; Wilhelm, Michael J.; Ma, Jianqiang; Dai, HAI-LUNG

    2015-06-01

    Translational-to-vibrational energy transfer (ET) from a hyperthermal H atom to ambient SO2 was characterized using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy. Vibrational excitation of SO2, following collisions with H atoms containing 59 kcal/mol of kinetic energy, generated from the 193 nm photolysis of HBr, is detected in two distinct energy distributions: one with excitation predominantly at the fundamental vibrational levels is attributable to classical impulsive collisions, while the other, accounting for 80% of the excited SO2 with vibrational energy as high as 14,000 wn, is proposed to arise from the formation of a transient reactive-complex during the collision. The cross-section for this super ET collision is determined to be 0.53±0.05 Å2, or roughly 2% of all hard sphere collisions. This observation reveals that in collisions between a hyperthermal atom and an ambient molecule, for which a reactive-complex exists on the potential energy surface, a large quantity of translational energy can be transferred to the molecule with high efficiency.

  4. Fluctuations in charged particle multiplicities in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Basu, Sumit; Choudhury, Subikash; Nayak, Tapan K.

    2016-08-01

    Multiplicity distributions of charged particles and their event-by-event fluctuations have been compiled for relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the available experimental data at Brookhaven National Laboratory and CERN and also by the use of an event generator. Multiplicity fluctuations are sensitive to QCD phase transition and to the presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram. In addition, multiplicity fluctuations provide baselines for other event-by-event measurements. Multiplicity fluctuation expressed in terms of the scaled variance of the multiplicity distribution is an intensive quantity, but is sensitive to the volume fluctuation of the system. The importance of the choice of narrow centrality bins and the corrections of the centrality bin-width effect for controlling volume fluctuations have been discussed. It is observed that the mean and width of the multiplicity distributions monotonically increase as functions of increasing centrality at all collision energies, whereas the multiplicity fluctuations show minimal variations with centrality. The beam-energy dependence shows that the multiplicity fluctuations have a slow rise at lower collision energies and remain constant at higher energies.

  5. Vibrationally resolved charge transfer of O{sup 3+} with molecular hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.G.; Stancil, P.C.; Turner, A.R.; Cooper, D.L.

    2004-06-01

    Charge transfer due to collisions of ground state O{sup 3+}(2s{sup 2}2p {sup 2}P{sup o}) ions with molecular hydrogen are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital (QMO) coupled-channel method. The QMO calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach for a representative range of orientation angles and diatom internuclear separations. Vibrationally resolved cross sections for nondissociative single electron capture are obtained for energies between 0.1 eV/u and 10 keV/u for H{sub 2} in its ground vibrational level using the infinite order sudden approximation (IOSA). Two further approximations are considered in which the electronic radial couplings are assumed to be independent of the diatom stretching. In the first case, vibrational motion is taken into account by multiplying the electronic radial couplings by Franck-Condon (FC) ionization factors while in the second, vibrational motion is completely neglected. We refer to these two approaches as the vibrational sudden approximation (VSA) and the electronic approximation (EA), respectively. In the latter, the resulting cross sections for electronic transitions are multiplied by FC factors to obtain relative vibrationally resolved cross sections which are independent of the collision energy (the centroid approximation). Comparison with existing experimental data for total and electronic state-selective cross sections shows best agreement with IOSA and VSA, but discrepancies for EA. The triplet-singlet electronic cross section ratio reveals a departure at low collision energies from the statistical value.

  6. Latest results of charged hadron flow measurements in CuAu collisions at RHIC-PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagomi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Measurements of azimuthal anisotropic flow vn for inclusive charged hadrons and identified particles at mid rapidity in Cu+Au collisions at √sNN = 200GeV are presented. The data were recorded by the PHENIX experiment at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider(RHIC). Directed, elliptic and triangular flow as a function of transverse momentum pT are measured with respect to event planes. The inclusive charged hadron vi shows the negative value at high pT. The v2 and v3 are compared to those in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions. We find the v 2 and v3 follow an empirical scaling with 1/(ɛnN1/3 part). We also compare the v2 and v3 to hydrodynamical predictions. The identified particles v2 and v3 show a mass ordering in low pT region and baryon and meson splitting in high pT region. However the identified hadron v1 only shows mass ordering in mid pT region.

  7. Comparison of different coupling schemes between counterions and charged nanoparticles in multiparticle collision dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahirel, Vincent; Zhao, Xudong; Jardat, Marie

    2016-08-01

    We applied the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) simulation technique to highly asymmetric electrolytes in solution, i.e., charged nanoparticles and their counterions in a solvent. These systems belong to a domain of solute size which ranges between the electrolyte and the colloidal domains, where most analytical theories are expected to fail, and efficient simulation techniques are still missing. MPC is a mesoscopic simulation method which mimics hydrodynamics properties of a fluid, includes thermal fluctuations, and can be coupled to a molecular dynamics of solutes. We took advantage of the size asymmetry between nanoparticles and counterions to treat the coupling between solutes and the solvent bath within the MPC method. Counterions were coupled to the solvent bath during the collision step and nanoparticles either through a direct interaction force or with stochastic rotation rules which mimic stick boundary conditions. Moreover, we adapted the simulation procedure to address the issue of the strong electrostatic interactions between solutes of opposite charges. We show that the short-ranged repulsion between counterions and nanoparticles can be modeled by stochastic reflection rules. This simulation scheme is very efficient from a computational point of view. We have also computed the transport coefficients for various densities. The diffusion of counterions was found in one case to increase slightly with the volume fraction of nanoparticles. The deviation of the electric conductivity from the ideal behavior (solutes at infinite dilution without any direct interactions) is found to be strong.

  8. Search for charged Higgs bosons in e(+)e(-) collisions at [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Abbiendi, G; Ainsley, C; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, R J; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, S; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, M; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwé, M; Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Krämer, T; Krasznahorkay, A; Krieger, P; von Krogh, J; Kuhl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lu, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Okpara, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycień, M; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan, E K G; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spano, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vértesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, J; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    A search is made for charged Higgs bosons predicted by Two-Higgs-Doublet extensions of the Standard Model (2HDM) using electron-positron collision data collected by the OPAL experiment at [Formula: see text], corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 600 pb(-1). Charged Higgs bosons are assumed to be pair-produced and to decay into [Formula: see text], τντ or AW(±). No signal is observed. Model-independent limits on the charged Higgs-boson production cross section are derived by combining these results with previous searches at lower energies. Under the assumption [Formula: see text], motivated by general 2HDM type II models, excluded areas on the [Formula: see text] plane are presented and charged Higgs bosons are excluded up to a mass of 76.3 GeV at 95 % confidence level, independent of the branching ratio BR(H(±)→τντ ). A scan of the 2HDM type I model parameter space is performed and limits on the Higgs-boson masses [Formula: see text] and mA are presented for different choices of tanβ.

  9. Absolute Charge Exchange Cross Sections for ^3He^2+ Collisions with ^4He and H_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Greenwood, J.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2002-05-01

    The JPL charge exchange beam-line(J.B. Greenwood, et al., Phys. Rev A 63), 062707 (2001) was modified to increase the forward acceptance angle and enable the measurement of total charge-exchange cross sections for slow, light, highly-charged ion collisions with neutral targets(R. E. Olson and M. Kimura, J. Phys. B 15), 4231 (1982). Data are presented for single charge exchange cross sections for ^3He^2+ nuclei scattered by ^4He and H2 in the energy range 0.33-4.67 keV/amu. For both targets there is good agreement with Kusakabe, et al.(T. Kusakabe, et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 59), 1218 (1990). Angular collection is studied by a comparison with differential measurements(D. Bordenave-Montesquieu and R. Dagnac, J. Phys. B 27), 543 (1994), as well as with earlier JPL results(J.B. Greenwood, et al., Ap. J. 533), L175 (2000), ibid. 529, 605 (2000) using heavier projectiles and targets. This work was carried out at JPL/Caltech, and was supported through contract with NASA. RJM thanks the NRC for a Senior Associateship at JPL.

  10. Elastic, charge transfer, and related transport cross sections for proton impact of atomic hydrogen for astrophysical and laboratory plasma modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, D. R.; Ovchinnikov, S. Yu; Stancil, P. C.; Zaman, T.

    2016-04-01

    Updating and extending previous work (Krstić and Schultz 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3458 and other references) comprehensive calculations were performed for elastic scattering and charge transfer in proton—atomic hydrogen collisions. The results, obtained for 1301 collision energies in the center-of-mass energy range of 10-4-104 eV, are provided for integral and differential cross sections relevant to transport modeling in astrophysical and other plasma environments, and are made available through a website. Use of the data is demonstrated through a Monte Carlo transport simulation of solar wind proton propagation through atomic hydrogen gas representing a simple model of the solar wind interaction with heliospheric neutrals.

  11. Determination of Energy-Transfer Distributions in Ionizing Ion-Molecule Collisions.

    PubMed

    Maclot, S; Delaunay, R; Piekarski, D G; Domaracka, A; Huber, B A; Adoui, L; Martín, F; Alcamí, M; Avaldi, L; Bolognesi, P; Díaz-Tendero, S; Rousseau, P

    2016-08-12

    The ionization and fragmentation of the nucleoside thymidine in the gas phase has been investigated by combining ion collision with state-selected photoionization experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. The comparison between the mass spectra measured in both types of experiments allows us to accurately determine the distribution of the energy deposited in the ionized molecule as a result of the collision. The relation of two experimental techniques and theory shows a strong correlation between the excited states of the ionized molecule with the computed dissociation pathways, as well as with charge localization or delocalization.

  12. Luminescent charge-transfer platinum(II) metallacycle.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fei; Kinayyigit, Solen; Rachford, Aaron A; Shikhova, Elena A; Goeb, Sébastien; Cable, John R; Adams, Christopher J; Kirschbaum, Kristin; Pinkerton, A Alan; Castellano, Felix N

    2007-10-15

    The photophysical and electrochemical properties of a platinum(II) diimine complex bearing the bidentate diacetylide ligand tolan-2,2'-diacetylide (tda), Pt(dbbpy)(tda) [dbbpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine] (1), are compared with two reference compounds, Pt(dbbpy)(C[triple bond]CPh)(2) (2) and Pt(dppp)tda [dppp = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane] (3), respectively. The X-ray crystal structure of 1 is reported, which illustrates the nearly perfect square planarity exhibited by this metallacycle. Chromophore 2 possesses low-lying charge-transfer excited states analogous to 1, whereas structure 3 lacks such excited states but features a low-lying platinum-perturbed tda intraligand triplet manifold. In CH(2)Cl(2), 1 exhibits a broad emission centered at 562 nm at ambient temperature, similar to 2, but with a higher photoluminescence quantum yield and longer excited-state lifetime. In both instances, the photoluminescence is consistent with triplet-charge-transfer excited-state parentage. The rigidity imposed by the cyclic diacetylide ligand in 1 leads to a reduction in nonradiative decay, which enhances its room-temperature photophysical properties. By comparison, 3 radiates highly structured tda-localized triplet-state phosphorescence at room temperature. The 77 K emission spectrum of 1 in 4:1 EtOH/MeOH becomes structured and is quantitatively similar to that measured for 3 under the same conditions. Because the 77 K spectra are nearly identical, the emissions are assigned as (3)tda in nature, implying that the charge-transfer states are raised in energy, relative to the (3)tda levels in 1 in the low-temperature glass. Nanosecond transient absorption spectrometry and ultrafast difference spectra were determined for 1-3 in CH(2)Cl(2) and DMF at ambient temperature. In 1 and 2, the major absorption transients are consistent with the one-electron reduced complexes, corroborated by reductive spectroelectrochemical measurements performed at room temperature. As 3

  13. Negative thermal expansion induced by intermetallic charge transfer

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Masaki; Oka, Kengo; Nabetani, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of thermal expansion is of great importance for industry. Negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials which shrink on heating and expand on cooling are therefore attracting keen attention. Here we provide a brief overview of NTE induced by intermetallic charge transfer in A-site ordered double perovskites SaCu3Fe4O12 and LaCu3Fe4−xMnxO12, as well as in Bi or Ni substituted BiNiO3. The last compound shows a colossal dilatometric linear thermal expansion coefficient exceeding −70 × 10−6 K−1 near room temperature, in the temperature range which can be controlled by substitution. PMID:27877801

  14. Charge transfer processes: the role of optimized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Benjamin; Domingo, Alex; Krah, Tim; Robert, Vincent

    2014-08-07

    The influence of the molecular orbitals on charge transfer (CT) reactions is analyzed through wave function-based calculations. Characteristic CT processes in the organic radical 2,5-di-tert-butyl-6-oxophenalenoxyl linked with tetrathiafulvalene and the inorganic crystalline material LaMnO3 show that changes in the inner shells must be explicitly taken into account. Such electronic reorganization can lead to a reduction of the CT vertical transition energy up to 66%. A state-specific approach accessible through an adapted CASSCF (complete active space self-consistent field) methodology is capable of reaching good agreement with the experimental spectroscopy of CT processes. A partitioning of the relaxation energy in terms of valence- and inner-shells is offered and sheds light on their relative importance. This work paves the way to the intimate description of redox reactions using quantum chemistry methods.

  15. The charge-transfer complex trans-STB-TCNQF4.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Okada, M; Saito, K; Sorai, M

    2001-05-01

    In the crystal structure of the title charge-transfer complex, namely trans-stilbene-2,2'-(2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzene-1,4-diylidene)propanedinitrile (1/1) (trans-STB-TCNQF(4)), C(14)H(12).C(12)F(4)N(4), the planar STB and TCNQF(4) molecules are stacked alternately. The structure is not isostructural with that of STB-TCNQ. No anomaly was found in the displacement parameters of any atoms, while the bond length of the central C=C moiety was shorter than the corresponding bond in ethylene. This suggests that the central C=C moiety of the STB molecule vibrates with a large amplitude, similar to the case in free STB and STB-TCNQ.

  16. Charge transfer in heterostructures of strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Lopez Del Castillo, Ivan; Okamoto, Satoshi; Yunoki, Seiji; Moreo, Adriana; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2008-01-01

    In this work, recent theoretical investigations by the authors in the area of oxide multilayers are briefly reviewed. The calculations were carried out using model Hamiltonians and a variety of non-perturbative techniques. Moreover, new results are also included here. They correspond to the generation of a metallic state by mixing insulators in a multilayer geometry, using the Hubbard and double-exchange models. For the latter, the resulting metallic state is also ferromagnetic. This illustrates how electron or hole doping via transfer of charge in multilayers can lead to the study of phase diagrams of transition metal oxides in the clean limit. Currently, these phase diagrams are much affected by the disordering standard chemical doping procedure, which introduces quenched disorder in the material.

  17. Charge transfer in heterostructures of strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    González, I; Okamoto, S; Yunoki, S; Moreo, A; Dagotto, E

    2008-07-02

    In this work, recent theoretical investigations by the authors in the area of oxide multilayers are briefly reviewed. The calculations were carried out using model Hamiltonians and a variety of non-perturbative techniques. Moreover, new results are also included here. They correspond to the generation of a metallic state by mixing insulators in a multilayer geometry, using the Hubbard and double-exchange models. For the latter, the resulting metallic state is also ferromagnetic. This illustrates how electron or hole doping via transfer of charge in multilayers can lead to the study of phase diagrams of transition metal oxides in the clean limit. Currently, these phase diagrams are much affected by the disordering standard chemical doping procedure, which introduces quenched disorder in the material.

  18. Charge transfer between O{sup +} ions and helium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.B.; Stancil, P.C.; Liebermann, H.P.; Funke, P.; Buenker, R.J.

    2005-06-15

    The charge-transfer processes O{sup +}({sup 4}S{sup 0},{sup 2}D{sup 0},{sup 2}P{sup 0})+He{yields}O({sup 3}P)+He{sup +} have been investigated by using a fully quantal molecular-orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) approach. Cross sections are presented for ion energies from 0.5 to 10 keV and compared with those from recent experiments and semiclassical theory. Good agreement is found between the QMOCC results and the measurements. Particular attention is given to addressing the metastable component of the experimental ion beams. We further argue that the so-called 'suppressed electron-capture effect' for metastable ions proposed by Wolfrum et al. is not a viable mechanism to explain their measurements. However, the current QMOCC calculations were found to reproduce neither the ground-state nor metastable-state cross sections predicted by the semiclassical method.

  19. HST WFC3/UVIS: charge transfer efficiency monitoring and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia M.; Sosey, Megan L.; Anderson, Jay; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Bourque, Matthew; Bajaj, Varun; Khandrika, Harish G.; Martlin, Catherine; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Sabbi, Elena; WFC3 Team

    2016-01-01

    The harsh low-earth orbit environment is known to damage CCD devices and the HST WFC3/UVIS camera is no exception. One consequence of the radiation damage is charge-transfer efficiency (CTE) loss over time. We summarize the level of the CTE losses, the effect on science data, and the pre- and post-observation mitigation options available. Among them is the pixel-based CTE correction, which has been incorporated into the HST automatic data processing pipeline. The pipeline now provides both standard and CTE-corrected data products; observers with older data can re-retrieve their images via the the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to obtain the new products.

  20. Charge transfer emission of ytterbium-doped oxyborates.

    PubMed

    Sablayrolles, J; Jubera, V; Guillen, F; Garcia, A

    2008-03-01

    The ultraviolet spectroscopic properties of trivalent ytterbium have been studied at low temperature in one borate and two oxyborates in the ternary diagram Li(2)O-Y(2)O(3)-B(2)O(3). The UV luminescence was detected in the two ytterbium-doped oxyborates. The evolution of these emissions was studied as a function of the temperature. A determination of the configurational coordinate diagrams based on the Struck and Fonger model is proposed to calculate the position in energy of the charge transfer band afforded by the simulation of spectral distribution of these excitation and emission bands. The strong correlation between the luminescent properties and the environments of the rare earth is pointed out.

  1. Photoinduced Charge Transfer from Titania to Surface Doping Site

    PubMed Central

    Inerbaev, Talgat; Hoefelmeyer, James D.; Kilin, Dmitri S.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate a theoretical model in which Ru is substituting for Ti at the (100) surface of anatase TiO2. Charge transfer from the photo-excited TiO2 substrate to the catalytic site triggers the photo-catalytic event (such as water oxidation or reduction half-reaction). We perform ab-initio computational modeling of the charge transfer dynamics on the interface of TiO2 nanorod and catalytic site. A slab of TiO2 represents a fragment of TiO2 nanorod in the anatase phase. Titanium to ruthenium replacement is performed in a way to match the symmetry of TiO2 substrate. One molecular layer of adsorbed water is taken into consideration to mimic the experimental conditions. It is found that these adsorbed water molecules saturate dangling surface bonds and drastically affect the electronic properties of systems investigated. The modeling is performed by reduced density matrix method in the basis of Kohn-Sham orbitals. A nano-catalyst modeled through replacement defect contributes energy levels near the bottom of the conduction band of TiO2 nano-structure. An exciton in the nano-rod is dissipating due to interaction with lattice vibrations, treated through non-adiabatic coupling. The electron relaxes to conduction band edge and then to the Ru cite with faster rate than hole relaxes to the Ru cite. These results are of the importance for an optimal design of nano-materials for photo-catalytic water splitting and solar energy harvesting. PMID:23795229

  2. Charge-Transfer Emitting Triarylborane π-Electron Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Yong; Sun, Zuo-Bang; Zhao, Cui-Hua

    2017-02-06

    Triarylboranes have attracted significantly increasing research interest as a remarkable class of photoelectronic π-electron materials. Because of the presence of vacant p orbital on the B center, the boryl group is a very unique electron acceptor that exhibits not only electron-accepting ability through p-π* conjugation but also high Lewis acidity to coordinate with Lewis bases and steric bulk arising from the aryl substituent on the B center to get enough kinetic stability. Thus, the incorporation of a trivalent B element into π-conjugated systems is an efficient strategy to tune the electronic and stereo structures and thus the photoelectronic properties of π-electron systems. When an electron-donating group, such as amino, is present, triarylboranes would likely display intramolecular charge-transfer transitions. These kinds of molecules are often highly emissive. In addition, the geometry of the molecules has a great impact on the emission properties. In this Forum Article, we herein describe our recent progress on the charge-transfer emitting triarylborane π-electron systems with novel geometries, which include the lateral boryl-substituted π-system with amino groups at the terminal positions, the o,o'-substituted biaryl π-system with boryl and amino groups at the o,o'-positions, a triarylborane-based BODIPY system, and a B,N/S-bridged ladder-type π-system. We mainly put the emphasis on the molecular design concept, structure-property relationships, intriguing emission properties and great applications of the corresponding triarylborane π-systems.

  3. Native-Like and Denatured Cytochrome c Ions Yield Cation-to-Anion Proton Transfer Reaction Products with Similar Collision Cross-Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Buckner, John H.; Munger, Eleanor B.; Bush, Matthew F.

    2017-02-01

    The relationship between structures of protein ions, their charge states, and their original structures prior to ionization remains challenging to decouple. Here, we use cation-to-anion proton transfer reactions (CAPTR) to reduce the charge states of cytochrome c ions in the gas phase, and ion mobility to probe their structures. Ions were formed using a new temperature-controlled nanoelectrospray ionization source at 25 °C. Characterization of this source demonstrates that the temperature of the liquid sample is decoupled from that of the atmospheric pressure interface, which is heated during CAPTR experiments. Ionization from denaturing conditions yields 18+ to 8+ ions, which were each isolated and reacted with monoanions to generate all CAPTR products with charge states of at least 3+. The highest, intermediate, and lowest charge-state products exhibit collision cross-section distributions that are unimodal, multimodal, and unimodal, respectively. These distributions depend strongly on the charge state of the product, although those for the intermediate charge-state products also depend on that of the precursor. The distributions of the 3+ products are all similar, with averages that are less than half that of the 18+ precursor ions. Ionization of cytochrome c from native-like conditions yields 7+ and 6+ ions. The 3+ CAPTR products from these precursors have slightly more compact collision cross-section distributions that are indistinguishable from those for the 3+ CAPTR products from denaturing conditions. More broadly, these results indicate that the collision cross-sections of ions of this single domain protein depend strongly on charge state for charge states greater than 4.

  4. Laser Studies of - and Charge-Transfer Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Jay Robert

    This thesis presents the results of three experiments which use lasers to investigate energy-transfer and charge -transfer dynamics. The dynamical processes studied include nanosecond vibrational energy transfer in molecules, subpicosecond electron relaxation in semiconductors, and subpicosecond initiation of surface bimolecular reactions on a metal crystal. In experiments using time-resolved coherent Raman spectroscopy to probe infrared multiphoton excited molecules, we study CO_2-laser excited SO _2 and SF_6. In SO _2 we observe direct nu _1-mode excitation and distinguish between this process and excitation of the nearly resonant nu_2-mode overtone. In SF _6, we directly observe nu _3-mode excitation followed by collisional energy redistribution to a heat bath of non-pumped modes. Quantitative modeling of the SF_6^ectra yields excited vibrational population distributions and resolves some long-standing inconsistencies between different previously published reports. In an experiment using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we observe the subpicosecond evolution of an optically-excited nonequilibrium electron distribution in silicon. We observe an electron thermalization time of less than 120 fs, electron equilibration with the lattice in 1 ps, and an energy-dependent electron cooling rate consistent with published calculations of the electron -phonon scattering rate. The results indicate the formation, in 1 ps, of a surface space-charge electron layer with an electron density two orders of magnitude greater than the bulk electron density. In an experiment using 100-fs laser pulses to induce desorption of O_2 and reaction of O_2+CO to form CO_2 on a Pt(111) surface, we present desorption and reaction data obtained over an absorbed fluence range of 1-20 mJ/cm_2 at wavelengths of 800, 400, and 266 nm. We observe a highly nonlinear desorption and reaction yield fluence dependence; the data are fit by a power law model in which the yield is proportional to

  5. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  6. Charge Transfer and Support Effects in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hervier, Antoine

    2011-12-21

    The kinetic, electronic and spectroscopic properties of two-dimensional oxide-supported catalysts were investigated in order to understand the role of charge transfer in catalysis. Pt/TiO2 nanodiodes were fabricated and used as catalysts for hydrogen oxidation. During the reaction, the current through the diode, as well as its I-V curve, were monitored, while gas chromatography was used to measure the reaction rate. The current and the turnover rate were found to have the same temperature dependence, indicating that hydrogen oxidation leads to the non-adiabatic excitation of electrons in Pt. A fraction of these electrons have enough energy to ballistically transport through Pt and overcome the Schottky barrier at the interface with TiO2. The yield for this phenomenon is on the order of 10-4 electrons per product molecule formed, similar to what has been observed for CO oxidation and for the adsorption of many different molecules. The same Pt/TiO2 system was used to compare currents in hydrogen oxidation and deuterium oxidation. The current through the diode under deuterium oxidation was found to be greater than under hydrogen oxidation by a factor of three. Weighted by the difference in turnover frequencies for the two isotopes, this would imply a chemicurrent yield 5 times greater for D2 compared to H2, contrary to what is expected given the higher mass of D2. Reversible changes in the rectification factor of the diode are observed when switching between D2 and H2. These changes are a likely cause for the differences in current between the two isotopes. In the nanodiode experiments, surface chemistry leads to charge flow, suggesting the possibility of creating charge flow to tune surface chemistry. This was done first by exposing a Pt/Si diode to visible light while using it as a catalyst for H2 oxidation. Absorption of the light in the Si, combined with

  7. The maximum momentum transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    The upper limit of momentum transfer by a proton to K-shell electrons is calculated in a restricted three-body classical model. The model shows that the infinite upper limit used in practice, is generally good except for low energy protons passing through an extremely rarefied gas.

  8. Experiments with an ion-neutral hybrid trap: cold charge-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. W.; Goodman, D. S.; Sivarajah, I.; Wells, J. E.; Banerjee, S.; Côté, R.; Michels, H. H.; Mongtomery, J. A.; Narducci, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their large trap depths (˜1 eV or 10,000 K), versatility, and ease of construction, Paul traps have important uses in high-resolution spectroscopy, plasma physics, and precision measurements of fundamental constants. An ion-neutral hybrid trap consisting of two separate but spatially concentric traps [a magneto-optic trap (MOT) for the neutral species and a mass-selective linear Paul trap for the ionic species] is an ideal apparatus for sympathetic cooling. However, over the past few years, hybrid traps have proven most useful in measuring elastic and charge-exchange rate constants of ion-neutral collisions over a wide temperature range from kilo-Kelvin to nano-Kelvin. We report some initially surprising results from a hybrid trap system in our laboratory where we have loaded the Paul trap with Ca+ ions in the presence of a Na MOT (localized dense gas of cold Na atoms). We find a strong loss of Ca+ ions with MOT exposure, attributed to an exothermic, non-resonant ion-neutral charge-exchange process with an activation barrier, which leads to the formation of Na+ ions. We propose a detailed mechanism for this process. We obtain an estimated measure of the rate constant for this charge exchange of ˜2 × 10-11 cm3/s, much less than the Langevin rate, which suggests that the Langevin assumption of unit efficiency in the reaction region is not correct in this case.

  9. Simulation of Neutron Wall and Charged Particle Veto Wall for Heavy Ion Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiashen

    2016-09-01

    Comparison of neutrons and protons emitted in heavy ion collisions is an observable to probe the density dependence of symmetry energy. The dimension of Neutron Wall (NW) at NSCL is about 2x2 m2 which is made of 25 Pyrex tubes filled with liquid Scintillator NE213 that detects recoil protons when neutron interacts with the scintillator. Although it attains excellent discrimination of γ - μ and neutron using Pulse Shape Discrimination method, it fails to discriminate charged particles from neutrons. To ensure 100% rejection of charged particles, we plan to build a Charged Particle Veto wall (VW), which will consist of 25 1-cm thick plastic scintillator bars placed directly in front of NW. Simulations using NPTool have been performed to determine the exact design of the VW. To make sure the VW completely covers the NW, overlap of alternate bars is needed. In the poster, I will show the advantage and disadvantage of the positioning plastic bars in a horizontal versus a vertical position as well as position correlation between NW and VW for signal matching. US NSF Grant No. PHY 1102511 and SURE programme, CUHK.

  10. The importance of momentum transfer in collision-induced breakups in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Robert C.; Lillie, Brian J.

    1991-01-01

    Although there is adequate information on larger objects in low Earth orbit, specifically those objects larger than about 10 cm in diameter, there is little direct information on objects from this size down to 1 mm. Yet, this is the sized regime where objects acting as projectiles represent the ability to seriously damage or destroy a functioning spacecraft if they collide with it. The observed consequences of known collisional breakups in orbit indicates no significant momentum transfer in the resulting debris cloud. The position taken in this paper is that this is an observational selection effect: what is seen in these events is an explosion-like breakup of the target structure arising from shock waves introduced into the structure by the collision, but one that occurs significantly after the collision processes are completed; the collision cloud, in which there is momentum transfer, consists of small, unobserved fragments. Preliminary computations of the contribution of one known collisional breakup, Solwind at 500 km in 1985, and Cosmos 1275 in 1981, assume no momentum transfer on breakup and indicate that these two events are the dominant contributors to the current millimeter and centimeter population. A different story would emerge if momentum transfer was taken into account. The topics covered include: (1) observation of on-orbit collisional breakups; (2) a model for momentum transfer; and (3) velocity space representation of breakup clouds.

  11. Chemical Dynamics Simulations of Intermolecular Energy Transfer: Azulene + N2 Collisions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsik; Paul, Amit K; Pratihar, Subha; Hase, William L

    2016-07-14

    Chemical dynamics simulations were performed to investigate collisional energy transfer from highly vibrationally excited azulene (Az*) in a N2 bath. The intermolecular potential between Az and N2, used for the simulations, was determined from MP2/6-31+G* ab initio calculations. Az* is prepared with an 87.5 kcal/mol excitation energy by using quantum microcanonical sampling, including its 95.7 kcal/mol zero-point energy. The average energy of Az* versus time, obtained from the simulations, shows different rates of Az* deactivation depending on the N2 bath density. Using the N2 bath density and Lennard-Jones collision number, the average energy transfer per collision ⟨ΔEc⟩ was obtained for Az* as it is collisionally relaxed. By comparing ⟨ΔEc⟩ versus the bath density, the single collision limiting density was found for energy transfer. The resulting ⟨ΔEc⟩, for an 87.5 kcal/mol excitation energy, is 0.30 ± 0.01 and 0.32 ± 0.01 kcal/mol for harmonic and anharmonic Az potentials, respectively. For comparison, the experimental value is 0.57 ± 0.11 kcal/mol. During Az* relaxation there is no appreciable energy transfer to Az translation and rotation, and the energy transfer is to the N2 bath.

  12. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T.

    2008-05-14

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  13. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Bell, Alexis T; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-14

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  14. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Bell, Alexis T.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  15. Energy Transfer Collisional Process Involving Heteromolecular Collisions Between Methyl Fluoride and N_2, Ar, He, CO_2, and Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Dane J.; Everitt, Henry O.

    2013-06-01

    Time resolved IR/THz double resonance (DR) spectroscopy has been performed with a Q-switched CO_2 laser and heterodyne THz detection. The rate constants associated with allowed rotational- and vibrational-state changing collisions of CH_3F with N_2, Ar, He, CO_2, and air are measured by monitoring the temporal evolution of the absorption strength for numerous rotational transitions as a function of pressure. Collision partner dependent energy transfer processes are studied and compared with homomolecular collisions. Energy transfer maps and associated collisional cross sections will be presented for each collision partner.

  16. Vibrational population distributions of the product of the chemiluminescent charge transfer reaction: O + (2D)+HCl --> O+HCl + (A 2Sigma + )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Yasushi; Kusunoki, Isao

    1987-12-01

    The chemiluminescent charge transfer reaction of O+ (2 D)ions with HCl has been studied in the energy range of 7 to 100 eVc.m. . The vibrational population distributions of the HCl+(A 2 Σ+,v') product have been analyzed from the emission spectra of the A→X transition. At low collision energy the distribution has a peak at v'=3. The partial reaction cross section σ(3) for this level increases with decreasing collision energy. The features of the reaction are very similar to the F+ +CO→ F+CO+ (A) reaction reported previously. The mechanism has been discussed on the basis of curve crossing between the initial and final states along the HCl vibrational coordinate in the asymptotic region of the [O-HCl]+ system. The projectile ions C+ and N+ have also been tested for the charge transfer reaction of HCl(X)→HCl+(A).

  17. Scaling laws for charge transfer in multiply bridged donor/acceptor molecules in a dissipative environment.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Randall H; Wasielewski, Michael R; Ratner, Mark A

    2007-10-31

    The ability of multiple spatial pathways to sum coherently and facilitate charge transfer is examined theoretically. The role of multiple spatial pathways in mediating charge transfer has been invoked several times in the recent literature while discussing charge transfer in proteins, while multiple spatial pathways are known to contribute to charge transport in metal-molecule-metal junctions. We look at scaling laws for charge transfer in donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) molecules and show that these scaling laws change significantly when environment-induced dephasing is included. In some cases, D-B-A systems are expected to show no enhancement in the rate of charge transfer with the addition of multiple degenerate pathways. The origins of these different scaling laws are investigated by looking at which Liouville space pathways are active in different dephasing regimes.

  18. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Silicon and Iron Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1996-01-01

    Charge transfer at electron-volt energies between multiply charged atomic ions and neutral atoms and molecules is of considerable importance in astrophysics, plasma physics, and in particular, fusion plasmas. In the year covered by this report, several major tasks were completed. These include: (1) the re-calibration of the ion gauge to measure the absolute particle densities of H2, He, N2, and CO for our current measurements; (2) the analysis of data for charge transfer reactions of N(exp 2 plus) ion and He, H2, N2, and CO; (3) measurement and data analysis of the charge transfer reaction of (Fe(exp 2 plus) ion and H2; (4) charge transfer measurement of Fe(exp 2 plus) ion and H2; and (5) redesign and modification of the ion detection and data acquisition system for the low energy beam facility (reflection time of flight mass spectrometer) dedicated to the study of state select charge transfer.

  19. Scaling for state-selective charge exchange due to collisions of multicharged ions with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge, A.; Illescas, Clara; Miraglia, J. E.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we evaluate state-resolved charge exchange cross sections for Be{}4+, {{{B}}}5+, {{{C}}}6+, {{{N}}}7+, and {{{O}}}8+ projectiles colliding with atomic hydrogen employing two different methods: the classical trajectory Monte Carlo and the eikonal impulse approximations. These cross sections are used to extend previously derived scaling laws for n-, nl-, and nlm-distributions to highly excited final levels with 4≤slant n≤slant 9, covering energies in the range 50-2000 {{keV}}/ amu. Present total and partial capture cross sections are in agreement with available experimental and theoretical data for these collision systems. Besides, the proposed scaling rules are also verified by other theories, becoming a useful instrument for plasma research.

  20. Scaling for state-selective charge exchange due to collisions of multicharged ions with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge, A.; Illescas, Clara; Miraglia, J. E.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    In this article we evaluate state-resolved charge exchange cross sections for Be{}4+, {{{B}}}5+, {{{C}}}6+, {{{N}}}7+, and {{{O}}}8+ projectiles colliding with atomic hydrogen employing two different methods: the classical trajectory Monte Carlo and the eikonal impulse approximations. These cross sections are used to extend previously derived scaling laws for n-, nl-, and nlm-distributions to highly excited final levels with 4≤slant n≤slant 9, covering energies in the range 50-2000 {{keV}}/ amu. Present total and partial capture cross sections are in agreement with available experimental and theoretical data for these collision systems. Besides, the proposed scaling rules are also verified by other theories, becoming a useful instrument for plasma research.

  1. Mechanisms of proton transfer in proteins: Localized charge transfer versus delocalized soliton transfer

    PubMed Central

    Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2010-01-01

    Proton translocation coupled to redox chemistry is ubiquitous for membrane enzymes involved in energy generation in cells. In such enzymes, proton transport occurs in special proton conducting channels, which consist of a series of protonatable groups of the protein connected by chains of mobile water molecules. Here we discuss two possible mechanisms of proton transport along such structures: diffusion of a localized charge and delocalized soliton transitions, in which several protons are collectively shifted along a chain of hydrogen bonds. PMID:19391991

  2. Detection of Orbital Debris Collision Risks for the Automated Transfer Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peret, L.; Legendre, P.; Delavault, S.; Martin, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general collision risk assessment method, which has been applied through numerical simulations to the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) case. During ATV ascent towards the International Space Station, close approaches between the ATV and objects of the USSTRACOM catalog will be monitored through collision rosk assessment. Usually, collision risk assessment relies on an exclusion volume or a probability threshold method. Probability methods are more effective than exclusion volumes but require accurate covariance data. In this work, we propose to use a criterion defined by an adaptive exclusion area. This criterion does not require any probability calculation but is more effective than exclusion volume methods as demonstrated by our numerical experiments. The results of these studies, when confirmed and finalized, will be used for the ATV operations.

  3. Electron Transfer-Induced Fragmentation in (Bio)Molecules by Atom-Molecule Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limão-Vieira, Paulo; da Silva, Filipe Ferreira; Gómez-Tejedor, Gustavo García

    Ion-pair formation to gas phase molecules induced by electron transfer has been studied by investigating the products of collisions between fast potassium atoms and target molecules using a crossed molecular-beam technique. The negative ions formed in such collisions are TOF mass analysed. As far as (bio)molecules are concerned, TOF mass spectra at different collision energies reveal interesting anionic patterns with reduced fragmentation at lower impact energies. In the unimolecular decomposition of the temporary negative ion (TNI), complex internal rearrangement may involve the cleavage and formation of new bonds. In this chapter we report some of the recent achievements in negative ion formation of some polyatomic molecules with the special attention to biological relevant targets.

  4. Bond patterns and charge-order amplitude in quarter-filled charge-transfer solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, R. T.; Ward, A. B.; Gomes, N.; Mazumdar, S.

    2017-03-01

    Most quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) quarter-filled organic charge-transfer solids (CTS) with insulating ground states have two thermodynamic transitions: a high-temperature metal-insulator transition followed by a low-temperature magnetic transition. This sequence of transitions can be understood within the 1D Peierls-extended Hubbard (PEH) model. However, in some quasi-1D CTS both transitions occur simultaneously in a direct metal to spin-gapped insulator transition. In this second class of materials the organic stack bond distortion pattern does not follow the pattern of a second dimerization of a dimer lattice. These materials also display charge ordering of a large amplitude below the transition. Using quantum Monte Carlo methods we show that the same PEH model can be used to understand both classes of materials, however, within different parameter regions. We discuss the relevance of our work to experiments on several quarter-filled conductors, focusing in particular on the materials (EDO-TTF)2X and (DMEDO-TTF)2X .

  5. Ab initio Determination of Formation Energies and Charge Transfer Levels of Charged Ions in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatti, Anoop Kishore; Todorova, Mira; Neugebauer, Joerg

    The ability to describe the complex atomic and electronic structure of liquid water and hydrated ions on a microscopic level is a key requirement to understand and simulate electro-chemical and biological processes. Identifying theoretical concepts which enable us to achieve an accurate description in a computationally efficient way is thereby of central importance. Aiming to unravel the importance and influence of different contributions on the hydration energy of ions we perform extensive ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations for charged and neutral cations (Zn, Mg) and anions (Cl, Br, I) in water. The structural correlations and electronic properties of the studied ions are analysed and compared to experimental observations. Following an approach inspired by the defect chemistry in semiconductors and aligning the water band edges on an absolute scale allows us to benchmark the calculated formation energies, identify transition states and compare the results to experiment. Based on these results we discuss the performance of various DFT xc-functionals to predict charge transfer levels and photo-emission experiments.

  6. The thermodynamics of charge transfer in DNA photolyase: using thermodynamic integration calculations to analyse the kinetics of electron transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Krapf, Sebastian; Koslowski, Thorsten; Steinbrecher, Thomas

    2010-08-28

    DNA Photolyases are light sensitive oxidoreductases present in many organisms that participate in the repair of photodamaged DNA. They are capable of electron transfer between a bound cofactor and a chain of tryptophan amino acid residues. Due to their unique mechanism and important function, photolyases have been subject to intense study in recent times, with both experimental and computational efforts. In this work, we present a novel application of classical molecular dynamics based free energy calculations, combined with quantum mechanical computations, to biomolecular charge transfer. Our approach allows for the determination of all reaction parameters in Marcus' theory of charge transport. We were able to calculate the free energy profile for the movement of a positive charge along protein sidechains involved in the biomolecule's function as well as charge-transfer rates that are in good agreement with experimental results. Our approach to simulate charge-transfer reactions explicitly includes the influence of protein flexibility and solvent dynamics on charge-transfer energetics. As applied here to a biomolecular system of considerable scientific interest, we believe the method to be easily adaptable to the study of charge-transfer phenomena in biochemistry and other fields.

  7. Satellite lines at the ionization threshold in charge transfer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardermann, W.; von Niessen, W.

    1992-01-01

    This article deals with the possibility of low-energy ionizations of reduced intensity for larger organic molecules. Possible mechanisms which may lead to this phenomenon are outlined and the necessary structural features are discussed. The lowest ionization energies of some organic unsaturated nitro and nitroso compounds are calculated by the ADC(3) ab initio many-body Green's function method. The π-electron system consists either of fused five- and six-membered rings or of two fused five-membered rings with a variable number of heteroatoms. Some of the molecules contain exocylic double bonds and some are substituted with the donor groups -NH 2, -OH and -NHOH. The strongest many-body effects are found for the nitroso compounds, where in one case the spectral line at the ionization threshold has lost more than 40% of its intensity to satellites. We study the many-body effects at or close to the ionization threshold for these compounds. A particular mechanism which involves the screening of localized valence holes by charge transfer excitations appears to be capable of influencing the profile and intensities of the ionization spectrum already at the ionization threshold. The effect leads to strongly reduced relative intensities of the bands and may cause the appearance of satellite bands nearly at the ionization threshold. The spectral changes in the outermost valence region are discussed by using a simple model calculation in terms of ground-state electronic properties of the molecules.

  8. Dynamic Peptide Library for the Discovery of Charge Transfer Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Berdugo, Cristina; Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Javid, Nadeem; Escuder, Beatriu; Miravet, Juan F; Ulijn, Rein V

    2015-11-25

    Coupling of peptide self-assembly to dynamic sequence exchange provides a useful approach for the discovery of self-assembling materials. In here, we demonstrate the discovery and optimization of aqueous, gel-phase nanostructures based on dynamically exchanging peptide sequences that self-select to maximize charge transfer of n-type semiconducting naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide bioconjugates with various π-electron-rich donors (dialkoxy/hydroxy/amino-naphthalene or pyrene derivatives). These gel-phase peptide libraries are characterized by spectroscopy (UV-vis and fluorescence), microscopy (TEM), HPLC, and oscillatory rheology and it is found that, of the various peptide sequences explored (tyrosine Y-NDI with tyrosine Y, phenylalanine F, leucine L, valine V, alanine A or glycine G-NH2), the optimum sequence is tyrosine-phenylalanine in each case; however, both its absolute and relative yield amplification is dictated by the properties of the donor component, indicating cooperativity of peptide sequence and donor/acceptor pairs in assembly. The methodology provides an in situ discovery tool for nanostructures that enable dynamic interfacing of supramolecular electronics with aqueous (biological) systems.

  9. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds;

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G. K.; Deifel, N. P.; Cahill, C. L.

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3{sigma} ground state into the f{sub {delta}{phi}}, orbitals of uranyl. The Huang-Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck-Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  10. Charge transfer vibronic transitions in uranyl tetrachloride compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guokui; Deifel, Nicholas P.; Cahill, Christopher L.; Zhurov, Vladimir V.; Pinkerton, A. Alan

    2012-01-01

    The electronic and vibronic interactions of uranyl (UO₂)2+ in three tetrachloride crystals have been investigated with spectroscopic experiments and theoretical modeling. Analysis and simulation of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra have resulted in a quantitative understanding of the charge transfer vibronic transitions of uranyl in the crystals. The spectra obtained at liquid helium temperature consist of extremely narrow zero-phonon lines (ZPL) and vibronic bands. The observed ZPLs are assigned to the first group of the excited states formed by electronic excitation from the 3σ ground state into the fδ,Φ orbitals of uranyl. The Huang–Rhys theory of vibronic coupling is modified successfully for simulating both the absorption and luminescence spectra. It is shown that only vibronic coupling to the axially symmetric stretching mode is Franck–Condon allowed, whereas other modes are involved through coupling with the symmetric stretching mode. The energies of electronic transitions, vibration frequencies of various local modes, and changes in the O=U=O bond length of uranyl in different electronic states and in different coordination geometries are evaluated in empirical simulations of the optical spectra. Multiple uranyl sites derived from the resolution of a superlattice at low temperature are resolved by crystallographic characterization and time- and energy-resolved spectroscopic studies. The present empirical simulation provides insights into fundamental understanding of uranyl electronic interactions and is useful for quantitative characterization of uranyl coordination.

  11. Quantum ferroelectricity in charge-transfer complex crystals

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Sachio; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kumai, Reiji; Minami, Nao; Kagawa, Fumitaka; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Quantum phase transition achieved by fine tuning the continuous phase transition down to zero kelvin is a challenge for solid state science. Critical phenomena distinct from the effects of thermal fluctuations can materialize when the electronic, structural or magnetic long-range order is perturbed by quantum fluctuations between degenerate ground states. Here we have developed chemically pure tetrahalo-p-benzoquinones of n iodine and 4–n bromine substituents (QBr4–nIn, n=0–4) to search for ferroelectric charge-transfer complexes with tetrathiafulvalene (TTF). Among them, TTF–QBr2I2 exhibits a ferroelectric neutral–ionic phase transition, which is continuously controlled over a wide temperature range from near-zero kelvin to room temperature under hydrostatic pressure. Quantum critical behaviour is accompanied by a much larger permittivity than those of other neutral–ionic transition compounds, such as well-known ferroelectric complex of TTF–QCl4 and quantum antiferroelectric of dimethyl–TTF–QBr4. By contrast, TTF–QBr3I complex, another member of this compound family, shows complete suppression of the ferroelectric spin-Peierls-type phase transition. PMID:26076656

  12. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; ...

    2016-05-10

    Here, the success of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures, made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides, and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that vdW heterostructues can exhibit ultra-fast charge transfer despite the weak binding of the heterostructure. Using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, we identify a strong dynamic coupling between the vdW layers associated with charge transfer. This dynamic coupling results in rapid nonlinear coherentmore » charge oscillations which constitute a purely electronic phenomenon and are shown to be a general feature of vdW heterostructures provided they have a critical minimum dipole coupling. Application to MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiment, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the

  13. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai; Liang, Linagbo

    2016-05-10

    Here, the success of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures, made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides, and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that vdW heterostructues can exhibit ultra-fast charge transfer despite the weak binding of the heterostructure. Using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, we identify a strong dynamic coupling between the vdW layers associated with charge transfer. This dynamic coupling results in rapid nonlinear coherent charge oscillations which constitute a purely electronic phenomenon and are shown to be a general feature of vdW heterostructures provided they have a critical minimum dipole coupling. Application to MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiment, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the interface

  14. Quantum Plasmonics: Optical Monitoring of DNA-Mediated Charge Transfer in Plasmon Rulers.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Sarah; Reinhard, Björn M

    2016-03-09

    Plasmon coupling between DNA-tethered gold nanoparticles is investigated by correlated single-particle spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy for interparticle separations between 0.5 and 41 nm. Spectral characterization reveals a weakening of the plasmon coupling due to DNA-mediated charge transfer for separations up to 2.8 nm. Electromagnetic simulations indicate a coherent charge transfer across the DNA.

  15. A Model for the Coalescence of Abraded Nucleons in Heavy Charged Particle Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wet, Wouter; Townsend, Lawrence; Werneth, Charles; Ford, William

    2016-09-01

    Accurate nuclear reaction models are required by the radiation transport codes used to predict the radiation field behind shielding in the space radiation environment. The resulting particle spectra and their corresponding biological response functions are used to estimate radiation risk to astronauts. Radiation transport codes use nuclear fragmentation models to describe the breakup of heavy charged particles in collisions with constituent nuclei of spacecraft and astronauts. The Relativistic Abrasion-Ablation and De-Excitation Fragmentation code, or RAADFRG, uses an abrasion-ablation reaction mechanism to calculate total and isotopic production cross sections of fragment species from a projectile nucleus. In this reaction mechanism, a fraction of nucleons, which sheared from the projectile nucleus during the abrasion step, coalesce to form various light ions. As with its predecessors, the Nuclear Fragmentation (NUCFRG) series, RAADFRG is being developed for implementation in NASA's deterministic High Charge (Z) and Energy radiation TRaNsport code, HZETRN. In this work, we derive the formalism used in RAADFRG to handle this process. Also, characterization of the model and its sensitivity to the coalescence radius parameterization are investigated. Work supported by NASA Grant NNX10AD18A.

  16. Quantifying the intrinsic surface charge density and charge-transfer resistance of the graphene-solution interface through bias-free low-level charge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinglei; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2016-07-01

    Liquid-based bio-applications of graphene require a quantitative understanding of the graphene-liquid interface, with the surface charge density of adsorbed ions, the interfacial charge transfer resistance, and the interfacial charge noise being of particular importance. We quantified these properties through measurements of the zero-bias Faradaic charge-transfer between graphene electrodes and aqueous solutions of varying ionic strength using a reproducible, low-noise, minimally perturbative charge measurement technique. The measurements indicated that the adsorbed ions had a negative surface charge density of approximately -32.8 mC m-2 and that the specific charge transfer resistance was 6.5 ± 0.3 MΩ cm2. The normalized current noise power spectral density for all ionic concentrations tested collapsed onto a 1/fα characteristic with α = 1.1 ± 0.2. All the results are in excellent agreement with predictions of the theory for the graphene-solution interface. This minimally perturbative method for monitoring charge-transfer at the sub-pC scale exhibits low noise and ultra-low power consumption (˜fW), making it suitable for use in low-level bioelectronics in liquid environments.

  17. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Liangbo; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-05-10

    The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the interface. Application to the MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiments, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs.

  18. Crystal growth of new charge-transfer salts based on π-conjugated donor molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morherr, Antonia; Witt, Sebastian; Chernenkaya, Alisa; Bäcker, Jan-Peter; Schönhense, Gerd; Bolte, Michael; Krellner, Cornelius

    2016-09-01

    New charge transfer crystals of π-conjugated, aromatic molecules (phenanthrene and picene) as donors were obtained by physical vapor transport. The melting behavior, optimization of crystal growth and the crystal structure are reported for charge transfer salts with (fluorinated) tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ-Fx, x=0, 2, 4), which was used as acceptor material. The crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Growth conditions for different vapor pressures in closed ampules were applied and the effect of these starting conditions for crystal size and quality is reported. The process of charge transfer was investigated by geometrical analysis of the crystal structure and by infrared spectroscopy on single crystals. With these three different acceptor strengths and the two sets of donor materials, it is possible to investigate the distribution of the charge transfer systematically. This helps to understand the charge transfer process in this class of materials with π-conjugated donor molecules.

  19. ARCHITECTURE OF A CHARGE-TRANSFER STATE REGULATING LIGHT HARVESTING IN A PLANT ANTENNA PROTEIN

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Graham; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-04-02

    Energy-dependent quenching of excess absorbed light energy (qE) is a vital mechanism for regulating photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. All of the physiological characteristics of qE have been positively correlated with charge-transfer between coupled chlorophyll and zeaxanthin molecules in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, we present evidence for charge-transfer quenching in all three of the individual minor antenna complexes of PSII (CP29, CP26, and CP24), and we conclude that charge-transfer quenching in CP29 involves a de-localized state of an excitonically coupled chlorophyll dimer. We propose that reversible conformational changes in CP29 can `tune? the electronic coupling between the chlorophylls in this dimer, thereby modulating the energy of the chlorophylls-zeaxanthin charge-transfer state and switching on and off the charge-transfer quenching during qE.

  20. The role of collective motion in the ultrafast charge transfer in van der Waals heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Bang, Junhyeok; Sun, Yiyang; Liang, Liangbo; West, Damien; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-01-01

    The success of van der Waals heterostructures made of graphene, metal dichalcogenides and other layered materials, hinges on the understanding of charge transfer across the interface as the foundation for new device concepts and applications. In contrast to conventional heterostructures, where a strong interfacial coupling is essential to charge transfer, recent experimental findings indicate that van der Waals heterostructues can exhibit ultrafast charge transfer despite the weak binding of these heterostructures. Here we find, using time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics, that the collective motion of excitons at the interface leads to plasma oscillations associated with optical excitation. By constructing a simple model of the van der Waals heterostructure, we show that there exists an unexpected criticality of the oscillations, yielding rapid charge transfer across the interface. Application to the MoS2/WS2 heterostructure yields good agreement with experiments, indicating near complete charge transfer within a timescale of 100 fs. PMID:27160484

  1. Switching of the fluorescence emission of single molecules between the locally excited and charge transfer states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeles Izquierdo, M.; Bell, Toby D. M.; Habuchi, Satoshi; Fron, Eduard; Pilot, Roberto; Vosch, Tom; De Feyter, Steven; Verhoeven, Jan; Jacob, Josemon; Müllen, Klaus; Hofkens, Johan; De Schryver, Frans C.

    2005-01-01

    A novel perylene imide and oligo-pentaphenyl bisfluorene containing molecule is shown to undergo electron transfer to form an emissive charge transfer state in di-benzyl ether and THF. At the single molecule level in a PMMA film, fluorescence spectra characteristic of both emissive states (locally excited and charge transfer) are observed with 44% of the molecules studied showing switching between the two states. These results demonstrate that charge transfer fluorescence from single molecules can be used to report on the properties and dynamics of a molecule's immediate surroundings or nano-environment.

  2. Vibrationally enhanced charge transfer and mode/bond-specific H{sup +} and D{sup +} transfer in the reaction of HOD{sup +} with N{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, David M.; Anderson, Scott L.

    2013-09-21

    The reaction of HOD{sup +} with N{sub 2}O was studied over the collision energy (E{sub col}) range from 0.20 eV to 2.88 eV, for HOD{sup +} in its ground state and in each of its fundamental vibrational states: bend (010), OD stretch (100), and OH stretch (001). The dominant reaction at low E{sub col} is H{sup +} and D{sup +} transfer, but charge transfer becomes dominant for E{sub col} > 0.5 eV. Increasing E{sub col} enhances charge transfer only in the threshold region (E{sub col} < 1 eV), but all modes of HOD{sup +} vibrational excitation enhance this channel over the entire energy range, by up to a factor of three. For reaction of ground state HOD{sup +}, the H{sup +} and D{sup +} transfer channels have similar cross sections, enhanced by increasing collision energy for E{sub col} < 0.3 eV, but suppressed by E{sub col} at higher energies. OD stretch excitation enhances D{sup +} transfer by over a factor of 2, but has little effect on H{sup +} transfer, except at low E{sub col} where a modest enhancement is observed. Excitation of the OH stretch enhances H{sup +} transfer by up to a factor of 2.5, but actually suppresses D{sup +} transfer over most of the E{sub col} range. Excitation of the bend mode results in ∼60% enhancement of both H{sup +} and D{sup +} transfer at low E{sub col} but has little effect at higher energies. Recoil velocity distributions at high E{sub col} are strongly backscattered in the center-of-mass frame, indicating direct reaction dominated by large impact parameter collisions. At low E{sub col} the distributions are compatible with mediation by a short-lived collision complex. Ab initio calculations find several complexes that may be important in this context, and RRKM calculations predict lifetimes and decay branching that is consistent with observations. The recoil velocity distributions show that HOD{sup +} vibrational excitation enhances reactivity in all collisions at low E{sub col}, while for high E{sub col} with enhancement comes

  3. Charge transfer of He2 + with H in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Lei; Zou, Shi-Yang; He, Bin; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2015-09-01

    By solving a time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), we studied the electron capture process in the He2 + +H collision system under a strong magnetic field in a wide projectile energy range. The strong enhancement of the total charge transfer cross section is observed for the projectile energy below 2.0 keV/u. With the projectile energy increasing, the cross sections will reduce a little and then increase again, compared with those in the field-free case. The cross sections to the states with different magnetic quantum numbers are presented and analyzed where the influence due to Zeeman splitting is obviously found, especially in the low projectile energy region. The comparison with other models is made and the tendency of the cross section varying with the projectile energy is found closer to that from other close coupling models. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11104017, 11025417, 11275029, and 11474032), the National Basic Research Programm of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200), and the Foundation for the Development of Science and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2014B09036 and 2013A0102005).

  4. Proton impact charge transfer on hydantoin - Prebiotic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus-Montabonel, Marie-Christine

    2016-11-01

    Formation and destruction of prebiotic compounds in astrophysical environments is a major issue in reactions concerning the origin of life. Detection of hydantoin in laboratory irradiation of interstellar ice analogues has confirmed evidence of this prebiotic compound and its stability to UV radiation or collisions may be crucial. Considering the different astrophysical environments, we have investigated theoretically proton-induced collisions with hydantoin in a wide energy range, from eV in the interstellar medium, up to keV for processes involving solar wind or supernovae shock-waves protons. Results are compared to previous investigations and qualitative trends on damage under spatial radiations are suggested.

  5. Charge-recombination processes in organic solar cells: the impact of charge-transfer states (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coropceanu, Veaceslav

    2016-09-01

    We study the role of electron-vibration coupling, electronic polarization, molecular packing, system size and electron delocalization on the nature of the charge-transfer states in model donor-acceptor systems. The morphologies we consider range from a bilayer with flat interface to a bilayer with rough interface and bulk heterojunctions with coarse and fine intercalated domains of donor and acceptor molecules. The implications of the charge-transfer states, active material morphology, density of states and charge carrier concentration on non-geminate recombination kinetics is investigated by means of a three-dimensional reaction-diffusion lattice model with the charge carrier hopping rate described by the Miller-Abrahams formalism.

  6. Kinetic theory of current and density drift instabilities with weak charged-neutral collisions. [in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the linear kinetic theory of electrostatic instabilities driven by a density gradient drift and a magnetic-field-aligned current in a plasma with weak charged neutral collisions. The configuration is that of a uniform magnetic field B, a weak, uniform density gradient in the x direction and a weak, uniform electric field in the z direction. Collisions are represented by the BGK model. The transition from the (kinetic) universal density drift instability to the (fluidlike) current convective instability is studied in detail, and the short wavelength properties of the latter mode are investigated.

  7. A three-step kinetic model for electrochemical charge transfer in the hopping regime.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xing; Wierzbinski, Emil; Lu, Hao; Bezer, Silvia; de Leon, Arnie R; Davis, Kathryn L; Achim, Catalina; Waldeck, David H

    2014-09-04

    Single-step nonadiabatic electron tunneling models are widely used to analyze electrochemical rates through self-assembled monolayer films (SAMs). For some systems, such as nucleic acids, long-range charge transfer can occur in a "hopping" regime that involves multiple charge transfer events and intermediate states. This report describes a three-step kinetic scheme to model charge transfer in this regime. Some of the features of the three-step model are probed experimentally by changing the chemical composition of the SAM. This work uses the three-step model and a temperature dependence of the charge transfer rate to extract the charge injection barrier for a SAM composed of a 10-mer peptide nucleic acid that operates in the hopping regime.

  8. Using quantum dynamics simulations to follow the competition between charge migration and charge transfer in polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinlove, K. E.; Vacher, M.; Bearpark, M.; Robb, M. A.; Worth, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent work, particularly by Cederbaum and co-workers, has identified the phenomenon of charge migration, whereby charge flow occurs over a static molecular framework after the creation of an electronic wavepacket. In a real molecule, this charge migration competes with charge transfer, whereby the nuclear motion also results in the re-distribution of charge. To study this competition, quantum dynamics simulations need to be performed. To break the exponential scaling of standard grid-based algorithms, approximate methods need to be developed that are efficient yet able to follow the coupled electronic-nuclear motion of these systems. Using a simple model Hamiltonian based on the ionisation of the allene molecule, the performance of different methods based on Gaussian Wavepackets is demonstrated.

  9. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  10. Unravelling the dissociation pathways of acetic acid upon electron transfer in potassium collisions: experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Meneses, G; Widmann, C; Cunha, T; Gil, A; Ferreira da Silva, F; Calhorda, M J; Limão-Vieira, P

    2017-01-04

    Electron transfer in alkali-molecule collisions with gas phase acetic acid and its deuterated analogues resulting in OH(-) formation requires considerable internal rearrangement in the temporary negative ion. At a collision energy well above the threshold of negative ion formation, electron transfer from potassium to CH3COOH/CH3COOD and CD3COOH results not only in H transfer from CH3 to COOH/COOD, but also in H release from COOH and subsequent rearrangement to eliminate OH(-). These processes are also investigated by theoretical post-Hartree-Fock and DFT calculations. The combination of both studies reveals that the most favourable intermediate mechanism occurs via diol formation. Such intramolecular H transfer is reported here for the first time in the context of electron transfer induced dissociation experiments in alkali-molecule collisions. A comprehensive fragmentation study is presented and dissociation mechanisms are suggested.

  11. Measurement of kinetic energy release in CO fragmentation by charge-changing collisions of fast heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Yamada, T.; Tsuchida, H.; Itoh, A.; Nakai, Y.

    2010-01-15

    We study ionization and fragmentation of CO in electron loss and capture collisions of B{sup 2+}, O{sup 2+}, and Si{sup 2+} ions at an energy of 71.4 keV/u (v=1.69 a.u.). Coincidence measurements of fragment ions from CO and charge-selected ions were performed by means of a momentum three-dimensional imaging technique. Production cross sections of CO{sup r+} and branching ratios into various fragmentation channels were obtained for r=1-4. We also measured kinetic energy release (KER) in individual fragmentation channels. The KER spectra for r<=2 are found to be different for electron loss and capture collisions, while the difference becomes small for r>=3. As a measure of the degree of molecular fragmentation, the magnitude of the binding energy of the relevant electronic states seems the important parameter both in loss and capture collisions.

  12. Reptation Quantum Monte Carlo Calculation of Charge Transfer in The Na-Cl Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yi; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-03-01

    Reptation Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations are performed to describe the charge transfer behavior in a NaCl dimer. Influence of fixed node approximation on the charge transfer was examined by obtaining electron density via reputation QMC. We employ Slater-Jastrow wavefunction as the trial wavefunction, and the fermion nodes are obtained from single particle orbitals of Hartree-Fock and Density Functional Theory (DFT) with several exchange-correlation approximations. We will discuss our QMC results together with DFT calculations to give insights into observed dependence of the charge transfer behavior on the fixed-node approximation.

  13. Dynamical Treatment of Charge Transfer through Duplex Nucleic Acids Containing Modified Adenines

    PubMed Central

    Brancolini, Giorgia; Migliore, Agostino; Corni, Stefano; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Luque, F. Javier; Di Felice, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    We address the issue of whether chemical alterations of nucleobases are an effective tool to modulate charge transfer through DNA molecules. Our investigation uses a multi-level computational approach based on classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry. We find yet another evidence that structural fluctuations are a key factor to determine the electronic structure of double-stranded DNA. We argue that the electronic structure and charge transfer ability of flexible polymers is the result of a complex intertwining of various structural, dynamical and chemical factors. Chemical intuition may be used to design molecular wires, but this is not the sole component in the complex charge transfer mechanism through DNA. PMID:24060008

  14. An electron energy-loss study of picene and chrysene based charge transfer salts

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Eric; Mahns, Benjamin; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-05-14

    The electronic excitation spectra of charge transfer compounds built from the hydrocarbons picene and chrysene, and the strong electron acceptors F{sub 4}TCNQ (2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethan) have been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The corresponding charge transfer compounds have been prepared by co-evaporation of the pristine constituents. We demonstrate that all investigated combinations support charge transfer, which results in new electronic excitation features at low energy. This might represent a way to synthesize low band gap organic semiconductors.

  15. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, February 16, 1990--February 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from February 16, 1990 through February 15, 1993. This work involves the experimental investigation of atomic interactions in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron-correlation effects. The processes studied are of interest both from fundamental and applied points of view. In the latter case, results are obtained which are relevant to the understanding of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, highly-excited (Rydberg) and continuum states of atoms and ions, atomic structure effects, the interaction of ions with surfaces, and the development of heavy-ion storage-rings. The results obtained have provided the basis for several M.A. thesis projects at Western Michigan and several Ph.D. dissertation projects are currently underway. Summaries of work completed and work in progress are given below in Section II. This research has resulted in 26 papers (in print and in press), 12 invited presentations at national and international meetings, and 28 contributed presentations as detailed in Section III.

  16. Improved Charge Transfer by Thin Metal Oxide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan

    The field of electronics has an immense impact on our day to day life. Efficient charge transfer at the semiconductor and electrode interface is one of the most crucial issues for the performance of any electronic device. A lot of effort has been spent to address this issue. A counter intuitive phenomenon of insertion of a thin metal oxide film at the semiconductor and electrode interface has gained momentum recently. In the current thesis, based on results of several experiments, I will propose a prominent mechanism of performance improvement with such insertions. I will also demonstrate the applicability of such metal oxide thin films in many other systems. First, I will introduce the scope of the thesis in detail. I will also introduce the background to understand the electronic structure of organic semiconductors, along with the interface formation at the semiconductor/metal interface. Then, I will discuss the measurement techniques. I will start the discussion on results with the insertion of a thin layer of MoOx (a transition metal oxide) between indium tin oxide (ITO) and two well studied organic semiconductors. I will also demonstrate that the optimum insertion layer thickness is just a few nanometers. I will illustrate the importance of high vacuum during the deposition of such insertion layers. I will also discuss the method to recover work function of air exposed MoOx films. I will further demonstrate that a thin layer of MoOx can be utilized to dope C60 strongly p-type. Then, I will discuss the application of MoO x insertion layer in CdTe based solar cells. I will further show the application of MoOx and organic double-inter-layer in organic devices. At the end, I will discuss an intense oxygen plasma treatment on ITO films and demonstrate a method to achieve high work function ITO films. The mechanism of high work function and application in devices will also be explained in detail. Finally, I will summarize the thesis.

  17. Proton-transfer mediated quenching of pyrene/indole charge-transfer states in isooctane solutions.

    PubMed

    Altamirano, Marcela S; Bohorquez, María del Valle; Previtali, Carlos M; Chesta, Carlos A

    2008-01-31

    The fluorescence quenching of pyrene (Py) by a series of N-methyl and N-H substituted indoles was studied in isooctane at 298 K. The fluorescence quenching rate constants were evaluated by mean of steady-state and time-resolved measurements. In all cases, the quenching process involves a charge-transfer (CT) mechanism. The I(o)/I and tau(o)/tau Stern-Volmer plots obtained for the N-H indoles show a very unusual upward deviation with increasing concentration of the quenchers. This behavior is attributed to the self-quenching of the CT intermediates by the free indoles in solution. The efficiency of quenching of the polyaromatic by the N-H indoles increases abruptly in the presence of small amount of added pyridine (or propanol). A detailed analysis of the experimental data obtained in the presence of pyridine provides unambiguous evidence that the self-quenching process involves proton transfer from the CT states to indoles.

  18. Ultrafast dynamics of a charge-transfer dimer as a model for the photoinduced phase transition of charge-transfer compounds.

    PubMed

    Lüer, Larry; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2007-07-13

    By applying ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy with 15 fs temporal resolution to (TMTTF(+))(2) dimers we provide a full picture of the structural relaxation following photoexcitation of their CT transition. Both population and coherent phonon dynamics allow tracking wave packet motion onto the multidimensional excited state potential energy surface, as obtained by density functional theory calculations. We show that the vibrations that are strongly coupled to the charge-transfer transition of the dimer correspond to those driving the photoinduced phase transition occurring in charge-transfer crystalline solids.

  19. Electron transfer, excitation, and ionization in {alpha}-H collisions studied with a Sturmian basis

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Thomas G.

    2007-12-15

    Cross sections have been determined for electron transfer, direct excitation, and ionization in collisions between {alpha} particles and H(1s) atoms at {alpha} energies 3 keV-38.4 MeV, extending earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 25, 697 (1982)] restricted to total transfer at 20-200 keV. Transfer as well as excitation cross sections into individual states up to 3d have been determined with several coupled-Sturmian pseudostate bases, and tests of basis sensitivity have been carried out. These and ionization cross sections have been compared with existing experimental and other coupled-state results. Structure is observed in the lower-energy excitation cross sections, which is believed not to be an artifact of the bases used. Ionization and excitation cross sections have also been compared with corresponding Born results at higher energies.

  20. Thunderstorm Electrification and Raindrop Collisions and Disjection in an Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Gunn, R

    1965-11-12

    Raindrop collisions in an electric field selectively transfer charges of one sign to the larger disjected drops. The disjected drops, falling away from the smaller drops, separate free charge to establish electric fields as large as those observed in thunderstorms.

  1. Deep-hole transfer leads to ultrafast charge migration in DNA hairpins.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Nicolas; Harris, Michelle A; Singh, Arunoday P N; Berlin, Yuri A; Ratner, Mark A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Lewis, Frederick D; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-11-01

    Charge transport through the DNA double helix is of fundamental interest in chemistry and biochemistry, but also has potential technological applications such as for DNA-based nanoelectronics. For the latter, it is of considerable interest to explore ways to influence or enhance charge transfer. In this Article we demonstrate a new mechanism for DNA charge transport, namely 'deep-hole transfer', which involves long-range migration of a hole through low-lying electronic states of the nucleobases. Here, we demonstrate, in a combined experimental and theoretical study, that it is possible to achieve such transfer behaviour by changing the energetics of charge injection. This mechanism leads to an enhancement in transfer rates by up to two orders of magnitude and much weaker distance dependence. This transfer is faster than relaxation to the lowest-energy state, setting this mechanism apart from those previously described. This opens up a new direction to optimize charge transfer in DNA with unprecedented charge-transfer rates.

  2. Charge-Dependent Directed Flow in Cu+Au Collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; ...

    2017-01-05

    Here we present the first measurement of charge-dependent directed flow in Cu + Au collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$$_ {NN}$$ = 200 GeV . The results are presented as a function of the particle transverse momentum and pseudorapidity for different centralities. A finite difference between the directed flow of positive and negative charged particles is observed that qualitatively agrees with the expectations from the effects of the initial strong electric field between two colliding ions with different nuclear charges. The measured difference in directed flow is much smaller than that obtained from the parton-hadron-string-dynamics model, which suggests that most of the electric charges, i.e., quarks and antiquarks, have not yet been created during the lifetime of the strong electric field, which is of the order of, or less than, 1fm / c .« less

  3. Charged-particle multiplicity pp collisions at square root of (s) = 1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Akopian, A; Albrow, M G; Amaral, P; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berge, J P; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bokhari, W; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van Brink, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Connolly, A; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Gris, P; Groer, L; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes De Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C Y; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Plunkett, R; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thompson, A S; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tollestrup, A; Tonelli, D; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; de Troconiz, J F; Tseng, J; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von Der Mey, M; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wallace, N B; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, M J; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Webb, R; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Worm, S; Wu, X; Wyss, J; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yoh, J; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2001-11-19

    We report on a measurement of the mean charged-particle multiplicity of jets in dijet events with dijet masses in the range 80-630 GeV/c(2), produced at the Tevatron in pp collisions with square root (s) = 1.8 TeV and recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The data are fit to perturbative-QCD calculations carried out in the framework of the modified leading log approximation and the hypothesis of local parton-hadron duality. The fit yields values for two parameters in that framework: the ratio of parton multiplicities in gluon and quark jets, r identical withN(g-jet)(partons)/N(q-jet)(partons) = 1.7+/-0.3, and the ratio of the number of charged hadrons to the number of partons in a jet, K(charged)(LPHD) identical with N(charged)(hadrons)/N(partons) = 0.57+/-0.11.

  4. Charge-Dependent Directed Flow in Cu +Au Collisions at √{sN N } =200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, T.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Luo, S.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, Z.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, F.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, N.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present the first measurement of charge-dependent directed flow in Cu +Au collisions at √{sN N }=200 GeV . The results are presented as a function of the particle transverse momentum and pseudorapidity for different centralities. A finite difference between the directed flow of positive and negative charged particles is observed that qualitatively agrees with the expectations from the effects of the initial strong electric field between two colliding ions with different nuclear charges. The measured difference in directed flow is much smaller than that obtained from the parton-hadron-string-dynamics model, which suggests that most of the electric charges, i.e., quarks and antiquarks, have not yet been created during the lifetime of the strong electric field, which is of the order of, or less than, 1 fm /c .

  5. Direct Measurement of the W Production Charge Asymmetry in p pmacr Collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-05-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the W production charge asymmetry as a function of the W boson rapidity yW in p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV. We use a sample of W→eν events in data from 1fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected using the CDF II detector. In the region |yW|<3.0, this measurement is capable of constraining the ratio of up- and down-quark momentum distributions in the proton more directly than in previous measurements of the asymmetry that are functions of the charged-lepton pseudorapidity.

  6. Integer versus Fractional Charge Transfer at Metal(/Insulator)/Organic Interfaces: Cu(/NaCl)/TCNE

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Semilocal and hybrid density functional theory was used to study the charge transfer and the energy-level alignment at a representative interface between an extended metal substrate and an organic adsorbate layer. Upon suppressing electronic coupling between the adsorbate and the substrate by inserting thin, insulating layers of NaCl, the hybrid functional localizes charge. The laterally inhomogeneous charge distribution resulting from this spontaneous breaking of translational symmetry is reflected in observables such as the molecular geometry, the valence and core density of states, and the evolution of the work function with molecular coverage, which we discuss for different growth modes. We found that the amount of charge transfer is determined, to a significant extent, by the ratio of the lateral spacing of the molecules and their distance to the metal. Therefore, charge transfer does not only depend on the electronic structure of the individual components but, just as importantly, on the interface geometry. PMID:25905769

  7. Topological Effects of Charge Transfer in Telomere G-Quadruplex Mechanism on Telomerase Activation and Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Liang, Shi-Dong

    2013-02-01

    We explore the charge transfer in the telomere G-Quadruplex (TG4) DNA theoretically by the nonequilibrium Green's function method, and reveal the topological effect of the charge transport in TG4 DNA. The consecutive TG4 (CTG4) is semiconducting with 0.2 0.3 eV energy gap. Charges transfer favorably in the CTG4, but are trapped in the nonconsecutive TG4 (NCTG4). The global conductance is inversely proportional to the local conductance for NCTG4. The topological structure transition from NCTG4 to CTG4 induces abruptly 3nA charge current, which provide a microscopic clue to understand the telomerase activated or inhibited by TG4. Our findings reveal the fundamental property of charge transfer in TG4 and its relationship with the topological structure of TG4.

  8. Proposal of Simplified Method of Analysis of Charge Transfer Associated with Return Strokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michishita, Koji; Umehara, Satoshi; Kawamoto, Shinji; Maeda, Koji

    Charge transfer is one of the most important parameters when one discusses the damage to the equipments on a power line due to the energy of the lightning. The amount of charge transfer associated with a lightning flash or individual strokes can be estimated by using the electric field change measured with a slow antenna. In this letter, the authors propose a simplified method of analysis of charge transfer associated with cloud-to-ground strokes along with estimation of the height of a charge in the point charge model. The height is evaluated by the product of the average speed of the downward propagating stepped leader and the time difference between the beginning of the preliminary breakdown and the onset of a return stroke.

  9. Charge transfer polarisation wave and carrier pairing in the high T(sub c) copper oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraverty, B. K.

    1990-01-01

    The High T(sub c) oxides are highly polarizable materials and are charge transfer insulators. The charge transfer polarization wave formalism is developed in these oxides. The dispersion relationships due to long range dipole-dipole interaction of a charge transfer dipole lattice are obtained in 3-D and 2-D. These are high frequency bosons and their coupling with carriers is weak and antiadiabatic in nature. As a result, the mass renormalization of the carriers is negligible in complete contrast to conventional electron-phonon interaction, that give polarons and bipolarons. Both bound and superconducting pairing is discussed for a model Hamiltonian valid in the antiadiabatic regime, both in 3-D and 2-D. The stability of the charge transfer dipole lattice has interesting consequences that are discussed.

  10. Charge transfer between sensing and targeted metal nanoparticles in indirect nanoplasmonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Langhammer, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    In indirect nanoplasmonic sensors, the plasmonic metal nanoparticles are adjacent to the material of interest, and the material-related changes of their optical properties are used to probe that material. If the latter itself represents another metal in the form of nanoparticles, its deposition is accompanied by charge transfer to or from the plasmonic nanoparticles in order to equalize the Fermi levels. We estimate the value of the transferred charge and show on the two examples, nanoparticle sintering and hydride formation, that the charge transfer has negligible influence on the probed processes, because the effect of charge transfer is less important than that of nanoparticle surface energy. This further corroborates the non-invasive nature of nanoplasmonic sensors.

  11. Product distributions for some thermal energy charge transfer reactions of rare gas ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, V. G.; Laudenslager, J. B.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.; Futrell, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance methods were used to measure the product distributions for thermal-energy charge-transfer reactions of He(+), Ne(+), and Ar(+) ions with N2, O2, CO, NO, CO2, and N2O. Except for the He(+)-N2 reaction, no molecular ions were formed by thermal-energy charge transfer from He(+) and Ne(+) with these target molecules. The propensity for dissociative ionization channels in these highly exothermic charge-transfer reactions at thermal energies contrasts with the propensity for formation of parent molecular ions observed in photoionization experiments and in high-energy charge-transfer processes. This difference is explained in terms of more stringent requirements for energy resonance and favorable Franck-Condon factors at thermal ion velocities.

  12. Observations of the Bowen fluorescence mechanism and charge transfer in planetary nebulae. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Wei; Danziger, John; Murdin, Paul

    1993-06-01

    The study compares measurements of O(2+) Bowen fluorescence and charge transfer lines in nine planetary nebulae with theoretical predictions, taking into account contributions from the Bowen fluorescence mechanism, the charge transfer reaction between O(3+) and H(0), and radiative and dielectronic recombination. In general, good agreement is found. It is shown that excitation by absorption of the stellar continuum UV radiation is negligible for these lines. There is a good positive correlation between the strength of the charge transfer reaction and the degree of excitation of the nebulae. The relative charge transfer rate coefficients into singlet and triplet levels of O(2+), k(2p3p3DJ)/k(2p3p1P)(J = 1, 2, 3), are derived and on average are equal to 1.2, independent of the statistical weight 2J + 1 of the fine-structure level.

  13. Lowest energy Frenkel and charge transfer exciton intermixing in one-dimensional copper phthalocyanine molecular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, I. V.; Popescu, A.; Younts, R. A.; Hoffman, B.; McAfee, T.; Dougherty, D. B.; Gundogdu, K.; Ade, H. W.

    2016-11-01

    We report the results of the combined experimental and theoretical studies of the low-lying exciton states in crystalline copper phthalocyanine. We derive the eigen energy spectrum for the two lowest intramolecular Frenkel excitons coupled to the intermolecular charge transfer exciton state and compare it with temperature dependent optical absorption spectra measured experimentally, to obtain the parameters of the Frenkel-charge-transfer exciton intermixing. The two Frenkel exciton states are spaced apart by 0.26 eV, and the charge transfer exciton state is 50 meV above the lowest Frenkel exciton. Both Frenkel excitons are strongly mixed with the charge transfer exciton, showing the coupling constant 0.17 eV which agrees with earlier experimental measurements. These results can be used for the proper interpretation of the physical properties of crystalline phthalocyanines.

  14. Modeling noncovalent radical-molecule interactions using conventional density-functional theory: beware erroneous charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erin R; Salamone, Michela; Bietti, Massimo; DiLabio, Gino A

    2013-02-07

    Conventional density-functional theory (DFT) has the potential to overbind radical-molecule complexes because of erroneous charge transfer. We examined this behavior by exploring the ability of various DFT approximations to predict fractional charge transfer and by quantifying the overbinding in a series of complexes. It is demonstrated that too much charge is transferred from molecules to radicals when the radical singly unoccupied molecular orbitals are predicted to be erroneously too low in energy relative to the molecule highest occupied molecular orbitals, leading to excessive Coulombic attraction. In this respect, DFT methods formulated with little or no Hartree-Fock exchange perform most poorly. The present results illustrate that the charge-transfer problem is much broader than may have been previously expected and is not limited to conventional (i.e., molecule-molecule) donor-acceptor complexes.

  15. On the HSAB based estimate of charge transfer between adsorbates and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokalj, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of the HSAB based electron charge transfer parameter, Δ N, is analyzed for molecular and atomic adsorbates on metal surfaces by means of explicit DFT calculations. For molecular adsorbates Δ N gives reasonable trends of charge transfer if work function is used for electronegativity of metal surface. For this reason, calculated work functions of low Miller index surfaces for 11 different metals are reported. As for reactive atomic adsorbates, e.g., N, O, and Cl, the charge transfer is proportional to the adatom valence times the electronegativity difference between the metal surface and the adatom, where the electronegativity of metal is represented by a linear combination of atomic Mulliken electronegativity and the work function of metal surface. It is further shown that the adatom-metal bond strength is linearly proportional to the metal-to-adatom charge transfer thus making the Δ N parameter a useful indicator to anticipate the corresponding adsorption energy trends.

  16. Transfer of phosphatidic acid from liposomes to cells is collision dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Longmuir, K.J.; Malinick, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    The kinetics of lipid transfer from unilamellar liposomes to cells in monolayer culture were determined for a fluorescent phosphatidic acid, 1-palmitoyl-2-(6-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)aminocaproyl) -sn-glycerol 3-phosphate (C6-NBD-PA), and for the analogous phosphatidic acid without the fluorescent NBD group, 1-palmitoyl-2-caproyl-sn-(U-14C) glycerol 3-phosphate (C6-(14C)PA). Initial rates of liposome-to-cell transfer were measured at 2 degrees C under conditions in which the concentration of diffusible monomer in the aqueous medium was constant during the course of an experiment and was independent of total liposome concentration. Rates were similar for C6-NBD-PA and C6-(14C)PA, indicating that the NBD group does not significantly alter the transfer kinetics. It was found that liposome-to-cell transfer was dependent on 1) the mole fraction of diffusible lipid in the liposomes, 2) the liposome concentration, and 3) the cell density. The dependence of rate on the liposome concentration (observed under conditions in which aqueous monomer concentration remained constant) cannot be explained by a liposome-to-cell transfer mechanism involving the free diffusion of monomers through the aqueous medium. Instead, the data are consistent with a collision-dependent mechanism of monomer transfer that occurs when liposome and cell membranes come into contact but do not fuse.

  17. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  18. A Cold Atom Measurement of Charge Exchange Collisions between Trapped Yb^+ and Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Andrew; Cetina, Marko; Orucevic, Fedja; Vuletic, Vladan

    2008-05-01

    We measure the collisional cross-section and rate constant of the ^174Yb and ^172Yb^+ charge-transfer process. The neutral atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) resonant with their 399 nm, ^1S0->^1P1 transition and are near the Doppler-limited temperature of 680 μK. The ions are confined in a planar Paul trap with a secular frequency of 39 kHz, Doppler cooled, and spatially overlapped with the neutral atoms. The collisional energy is varied from 4 meV to 100s of neV by varying the micromotion energy of the ions by displacement from the center of the Paul trap. We report the rate constant in comparison to that derived from the Langevin cross-section.

  19. On the structure of iodine charge-transfer complexes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Larry A., II; Pullen, Stuart; Donovan, Brent; Sension, Roseanne J.

    1995-08-01

    Femtosecond transient absorption studies of charge-transfer complexes of I 2 with hexamethylbenzene have been performed in a series of noncomplexing solvents. Anisotropy measurements of the bleach of the charge-transfer absorption band indicate that the geometry and electronic structure of the complex is dependent upon the solvent environment. The results are interpreted as favoring an oblique, nearly axial, geometry in alkanes and a resting geometry in chlorinated methanes.

  20. Charge Compensation and Electrostatic Transferability in Three Entropy Stabilized Oxides: Results from Density Functional Theory Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-06

    Charge compensation and electrostatic transferability in three entropy-stabilized oxides: Results from density functional theory calculations Zs. Rak...North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7907, USA 2Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Center for...random structures. For J14, Bader charges are transferable between the binary, ternary, and random structures. For J14þSc and J14þLi, average Bader

  1. Charge Transfer Efficiency modeling/measurements as function of CCD pixel rate

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.; Pena, C.; Zagarino, P.

    1995-09-01

    We have developed a charge transport model for predicting the effects on Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) of Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) as functions of number of transfers, pixel charge flow rate, and magnitude in the CCD`s vertical and horizontal charge transport mediums. The model uses carrier lifetime an mobility criteria to establish pixel speed arguments and limitations for various CCD architectures. The model is compared with experimental measurements obtained using strobed single pixel illumination and a variant of the deferred charge tail technique while independently varying the CCD pixel rates for both the vertical and horizontal readout phases. The generic model is discussed and applied to specific real CCDs. Agreement between predicted performance and actual measured performance is presented.

  2. Spectroscopy of equilibrium and nonequilibrium charge transfer in semiconductor quantum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, C.; Burkhard, S.; Krähenmann, T.; Röösli, M.; Märki, P.; Basset, J.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate equilibrium and nonequilibrium charge-transfer processes by performing high-resolution transport spectroscopy. Using electrostatically defined quantum dots for energy-selective emission and detection, we achieved very high spectral resolution and a high degree of tunability of relevant experimental parameters. Most importantly, we observe that the spectral width of elastically transferred electrons can be substantially smaller than the linewidth of a thermally broadened Coulomb peak. This finding indicates that the charge-transfer process is fast compared to the electron-phonon interaction time. By drawing an analogy to double quantum dots, we argue that the spectral width of the elastic resonance is determined by the lifetime broadening hΓ of the emitter and detector states. Good agreement with the model is found also in an experiment in which the charge transfer is in the regime hΓ≫kBT. By performing spectroscopy below the Fermi energy, we furthermore observe elastic and inelastic transfer of holes.

  3. Deep-hole transfer leads to ultrafast charge migration in DNA hairpins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Nicolas; Harris, Michelle A.; Singh, Arunoday P. N.; Berlin, Yuri A.; Ratner, Mark A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Lewis, Frederick D.; Grozema, Ferdinand C.

    2016-11-01

    Charge transport through the DNA double helix is of fundamental interest in chemistry and biochemistry, but also has potential technological applications such as for DNA-based nanoelectronics. For the latter, it is of considerable interest to explore ways to influence or enhance charge transfer. In this Article we demonstrate a new mechanism for DNA charge transport, namely ‘deep-hole transfer’, which involves long-range migration of a hole through low-lying electronic states of the nucleobases. Here, we demonstrate, in a combined experimental and theoretical study, that it is possible to achieve such transfer behaviour by changing the energetics of charge injection. This mechanism leads to an enhancement in transfer rates by up to two orders of magnitude and much weaker distance dependence. This transfer is faster than relaxation to the lowest-energy state, setting this mechanism apart from those previously described. This opens up a new direction to optimize charge transfer in DNA with unprecedented charge-transfer rates.

  4. Proton transfer to charged platinum electrodes. A molecular dynamics trajectory study.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Florian; Schmickler, Wolfgang; Spohr, Eckhard

    2010-05-05

    A recently developed empirical valence bond (EVB) model for proton transfer on Pt(111) electrodes (Wilhelm et al 2008 J. Phys. Chem. C 112 10814) has been applied in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a water film in contact with a charged Pt surface. A total of seven negative surface charge densities σ between -7.5 and -18.9 µC cm(-2) were investigated. For each value of σ, between 30 and 84 initial conditions of a solvated proton within a water slab were sampled, and the trajectories were integrated until discharge of a proton occurred on the charged surfaces. We have calculated the mean rates for discharge and for adsorption of solvated protons within the adsorbed water layer in contact with the metal electrode as a function of surface charge density. For the less negative values of σ we observe a Tafel-like exponential increase of discharge rate with decreasing σ. At the more negative values this exponential increase levels off and the discharge process is apparently transport limited. Mechanistically, the Tafel regime corresponds to a stepwise proton transfer: first, a proton is transferred from the bulk into the contact water layer, which is followed by transfer of a proton to the charged surface and concomitant discharge. At the more negative surface charge densities the proton transfer into the contact water layer and the transfer of another proton to the surface and its discharge occur almost simultaneously.

  5. Time delay and integration detectors using charge transfer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, D. H.; White, M. H.; Turly, A. P.

    1981-07-01

    An imaging system comprises a multi-channel matrix array of CCD devices wherein a number of sensor cells (pixels) in each channel are subdivided and operated in discrete intercoupled groups of subarrays with a readout CCD shift register terminating each end of the channels. Clock voltages, applied to the subarrays, selectively cause charge signal flow in each subarray in either direction independent of the other subarrays. By selective application of four phase clock voltages, either one, two or all three of the sections subarray sections cause charge signal flow in one direction, while the remainder cause charge signal flow in the opposite direction. This creates a form of selective electronic exposure control which provides an effective variable time delay and integration of three, six or nine sensor cells or integration stages. The device is constructed on a semiconductor sustrate with a buried channel and is adapted for front surface imaging through transparent doped tin oxide gates.

  6. Resonant Enhancement of Ground State H2+ Formation in Low Energy Charge Transfer between Protons and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianarijaona, V. M.; King, J. G.; Martin, M. F.; de Ruette, N.; Urbain, X.

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the charge transfer (CT) from an H2 or D2 target to various fast atomic/molecular ions for a wide span of collision energies in the laboratory frame (eV to keV). Vibrationally resolved cross sections have been obtained on a relative scale, by dissociative charge transfer of the product H2+ ions with potassium atoms, and 3-D imaging of the fragments. An absolute value of the total CT cross section has been inferred from the measured ratio of the CT yield for protons and H2+, combined with the recommended H2+ + H2 cross section (ORNL). Our results on the (H2, H+) system benchmark state-to-state calculations at 10eV and above (Phys. Rev. A 75 032703, 2007 and J. Phys. B 42, 105207 2009). In particular, they confirm the vibrational excitation mechanism responsible for the resonance at 50eV, characterized by a dominant population of the ground vibrational state of H2++. The spectra for the isotopic system (D2, H+) will be also presented along with the results of CT performed with H2++ and D2+ projectiles. Research supported by the Fund for Scientific Research - FNRS through IISN Grant No. 4.4504.10, and the National Science Foundation through Grant No. PHY-106887.

  7. State-resolved rotational energy transfer in open shell collisions: Cl((2)P3/2) + HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.Q.; Chapman, W.B.; Nesbitt, D.J.

    1995-05-06

    A detailed understanding of the state-to-state quantum dynamics of both reactive and inelastic collision phenomena has long been a focus of the chemical physics community. With recent advances in experimental methods for state preparation and interrogation, there is now a wealth of studies which permit the monitoring of `full collision` dynamics at a completely state-resolved level of detail. High resolution supersonic jet spectroscopies have been successfully exploited to extend these energy transfer studies into the `half-collision` regime by probing weakly bound complexes trapped in potential wells due to van der Waals and/or hydrogen bond interactions. Reactive H-atom transfer events from this half-collision perspective have been studied in detail by Neumark and co-workers via photodetachment of corresponding anionic complexes.

  8. Probing charge transfer and hot carrier dynamics in organic solar cells with terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Paul D.; Lane, Paul A.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Esenturk, Okan; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS) was used to explore charge generation, transfer, and the role of hot carriers in organic solar cell materials. Two model molecular photovoltaic systems were investigated: with zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) or alpha-sexathiophene (α-6T) as the electron donors and buckminsterfullerene (C60) as the electron acceptor. TRTS provides charge carrier conductivity dynamics comprised of changes in both population and mobility. By using time-resolved optical spectroscopy in conjunction with TRTS, these two contributions can be disentangled. The sub-picosecond photo-induced conductivity decay dynamics of C60 were revealed to be caused by auto-ionization: the intrinsic process by which charge is generated in molecular solids. In donor-acceptor blends, the long-lived photo-induced conductivity is used for weight fraction optimization of the constituents. In nanoscale multilayer films, the photo-induced conductivity identifies optimal layer thicknesses. In films of ZnPc/C60, electron transfer from ZnPc yields hot charges that localize and become less mobile as they thermalize. Excitation of high-lying Franck Condon states in C60 followed by hole-transfer to ZnPc similarly produces hot charge carriers that self-localize; charge transfer clearly precedes carrier cooling. This picture is contrasted to charge transfer in α-6T/C60, where hole transfer takes place from a thermalized state and produces equilibrium carriers that do not show characteristic signs of cooling and self-localization. These results illustrate the value of terahertz spectroscopic methods for probing charge transfer reactions.

  9. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also

  10. Experimental and theoretical investigations of rotational energy transfer in HBr + He collisions.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Md Humayun; Antonov, Ivan O; Merritt, Jeremy M; Heaven, Michael C

    2010-10-28

    Rotational relaxation rates for HBr(v = 1) colliding with helium atoms at room temperature have been measured using a time-resolved optical-optical double resonance technique. Rotational state selective excitation of v = 1 for rotational levels in the range J = 1-9 was achieved by stimulated Raman pumping. The population decay in the prepared states and the transfer of population to nearby rotational states was monitored via 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy using the g(3)Σ(-)-X(1)Σ(+) (0-1) band. Collision-induced population evolution for transfer events with |ΔJ| ≤ 8 was observed at pressures near 0.7 Torr. The experimental data were analyzed using fitting and scaling functions to generate state-to-state rotational energy transfer rate constant matrices. Total depopulation rate constants were found to be in the range (1.3 to 2.0) × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1). As a test of current computational methods, state-to-state rotational energy transfer rate constants were calculated using ab initio theory. The total removal rate constants were in good agreement with the measured values, but the transfer probabilities for events with |ΔJ| ≥ 3 were underestimated. Inspection of the anisotropic characteristics of the potential energy surface did not yield an obvious explanation for the discrepancies, but it is most likely that the problem stems from inaccuracies in the potential surface.

  11. Charge transfer emission in coumarin 343 sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle: A direct measurement of back electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, H.N.

    1999-11-25

    Electron injection and back electron transfer dynamics in coumarin 343 (C-343) adsorbed on TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are studied by picosecond transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The direct detection of electrons in the nanoparticles and the parent cation are monitored using picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, and the corresponding dynamics of the adsorbate are monitored by time-resolved absorption spectra of the cation radical of C-343 in the visible region. When the electron returns from the nanoparticles to the present cation, a low quantum yield red-shifted charge transfer emission is observed. Measuring the charge transfer emission lifetimes by a picosecond time-resolved fluorimeter, the author gets an exact rate of back electron transfer reaction from the nanoparticle to the parent cation.

  12. Near-resonant rotational energy transfer in HCl–H{sub 2} inelastic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, Mathieu; Lique, François; Kalugina, Yulia; Wiesenfeld, Laurent

    2014-02-14

    We present a new four-dimensional (4D) potential energy surface for the HCl–H{sub 2} van der Waals system. Both molecules were treated as rigid rotors. Potential energy surface was obtained from electronic structure calculations using a coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations method. The four atoms were described using the augmented correlation-consistent quadruple zeta basis set and bond functions were placed at mid-distance between the HCl and H{sub 2} centers of mass for a better description of the van der Waals interaction. The global minimum is characterized by the well depth of 213.38 cm{sup −1} corresponding to the T-shape structure with H{sub 2} molecule on the H side of the HCl molecule. The dissociation energies D{sub 0} are 34.7 cm{sup −1} and 42.3 cm{sup −1} for the complex with para- and ortho-H{sub 2}, respectively. These theoretical results obtained using our new PES are in good agreement with experimental values [D. T. Anderson, M. Schuder, and D. J. Nesbitt, Chem. Phys. 239, 253 (1998)]. Close coupling calculations of the inelastic integral rotational cross sections of HCl in collisions with para-H{sub 2} and ortho-H{sub 2} were performed at low and intermediate collisional energies. Significant differences exist between para- and ortho-H{sub 2} results. The strongest collision-induced rotational HCl transitions are the transitions with Δj = 1 for collisions with both para-H{sub 2} and ortho-H{sub 2}. Rotational relaxation of HCl in collision with para-H{sub 2} in the rotationally excited states j = 2 is dominated by near-resonant energy transfer.

  13. Near-resonant rotational energy transfer in HCl-H2 inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, Mathieu; Kalugina, Yulia; Wiesenfeld, Laurent; Lique, François

    2014-02-01

    We present a new four-dimensional (4D) potential energy surface for the HCl-H2 van der Waals system. Both molecules were treated as rigid rotors. Potential energy surface was obtained from electronic structure calculations using a coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations method. The four atoms were described using the augmented correlation-consistent quadruple zeta basis set and bond functions were placed at mid-distance between the HCl and H2 centers of mass for a better description of the van der Waals interaction. The global minimum is characterized by the well depth of 213.38 cm-1 corresponding to the T-shape structure with H2 molecule on the H side of the HCl molecule. The dissociation energies D0 are 34.7 cm-1 and 42.3 cm-1 for the complex with para- and ortho-H2, respectively. These theoretical results obtained using our new PES are in good agreement with experimental values [D. T. Anderson, M. Schuder, and D. J. Nesbitt, Chem. Phys. 239, 253 (1998)]. Close coupling calculations of the inelastic integral rotational cross sections of HCl in collisions with para-H2 and ortho-H2 were performed at low and intermediate collisional energies. Significant differences exist between para- and ortho-H2 results. The strongest collision-induced rotational HCl transitions are the transitions with Δj = 1 for collisions with both para-H2 and ortho-H2. Rotational relaxation of HCl in collision with para-H2 in the rotationally excited states j = 2 is dominated by near-resonant energy transfer.

  14. a Measurement of Cross-Sections for Charge Transfer in Proton + Helium ---> Helium Ion + Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, Michael Chadbourne

    A microwave-resonance, optical-detection technique is used to measure the cross sections for charge transfer into the n = 3,L,m(,L) states of hydrogen by protons colliding with a helium gas target at energies between 30 and 80 keV. The feeding of the n = 3 states by states in higher n manifolds created by the collisions has been taken into account for the first time in this type of measurement, with a significant effect on the results. The final cross sections are one of only two measurements of the L,m(,L) cross sections in this system, and the only one to be able to resolve the 3d cross sections. The. uncertainties are 10% to 30% of the cross sections at all energies. The results are (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). Energy (keV). 30 50 60 80. (sigma)(,3s). 10('-18)cm('2) 1.6(3) 2.4(5) 2.0(4) 1.4(3). 3s(,0) 1 1 1 1. p(,0) 0.58(8) 0.19(2) 0.18(2) 0.13(1). p(,1) 0.36(6) 0.08(1) 0.04(1) 0.05(1). TOTAL 0.94(10) 0.27(2) 0.22(2) 0.18(1). d(,0) 0.055(10) 0.017(4) 0.019(4) 0.013(3). d(,1) 0.046(7) 0.014(3) 0.014(3) 0.010(2). d(,2) 0.022(4) 0.001(2) -0.002(2) -0.002(2). TOTAL 0.123(12) 0.032(5) 0.031(5) 0.021(4). (TABLE ENDS).

  15. [Combined hopping-superexchange mechanism of charge transfer in DNA; a model with nearest interactions].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Sultanov, V B

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the earlier developed combined hopping-superexchange mechanism of charge transfer in DNA, a model with all nearest interactions between nucleobases is proposed. It is shown that the transfer rates for various types of nucleotide sequences calculated within this model are in a good agreement with experimental data.

  16. 33 CFR 127.301 - Persons in charge of shoreside transfer operations: Qualifications and certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LNG may not use the services of any person, as a person in charge of shoreside transfer operations, unless that person— (1) Has at least 48 hours of LNG transfer experience; (2) Knows the hazards of LNG... at the waterfront facility handling LNG....

  17. 33 CFR 127.301 - Persons in charge of shoreside transfer operations: Qualifications and certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LNG may not use the services of any person, as a person in charge of shoreside transfer operations, unless that person— (1) Has at least 48 hours of LNG transfer experience; (2) Knows the hazards of LNG... at the waterfront facility handling LNG....

  18. 33 CFR 127.301 - Persons in charge of shoreside transfer operations: Qualifications and certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LNG may not use the services of any person, as a person in charge of shoreside transfer operations, unless that person— (1) Has at least 48 hours of LNG transfer experience; (2) Knows the hazards of LNG... at the waterfront facility handling LNG....

  19. 33 CFR 127.301 - Persons in charge of shoreside transfer operations: Qualifications and certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LNG may not use the services of any person, as a person in charge of shoreside transfer operations, unless that person— (1) Has at least 48 hours of LNG transfer experience; (2) Knows the hazards of LNG... at the waterfront facility handling LNG....

  20. 33 CFR 127.301 - Persons in charge of shoreside transfer operations: Qualifications and certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LNG may not use the services of any person, as a person in charge of shoreside transfer operations, unless that person— (1) Has at least 48 hours of LNG transfer experience; (2) Knows the hazards of LNG... at the waterfront facility handling LNG....

  1. Measurement of the Electron Charge Asymmetry in Inclusive W Production in pp Collisions at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.

    2012-09-01

    A measurement of the electron charge asymmetry in inclusive pp→W+X→eν+X production at s=7TeV is presented based on data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 840pb-1. The electron charge asymmetry reflects the unequal production of W+ and W- bosons in pp collisions. The electron charge asymmetry is measured in bins of the absolute value of electron pseudorapidity in the range of |η|<2.4. The asymmetry rises from about 0.1 to 0.2 as a function of the pseudorapidity and is measured with a relative precision better than 7%. This measurement provides new stringent constraints for parton distribution functions.

  2. Review on charge transfer and chemical activity of TiO2: Mechanism and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yongqing; Feng, Yuan Ping

    2016-12-01

    Charge separation and transfer at the interface between two materials play a significant role in various atomic-scale processes and energy conversion systems. In this review, we present the mechanism and outcome of charge transfer in TiO2, which is extensively explored for photocatalytic applications in the field of environmental science. We list several experimental and computational methods to estimate the amount of charge transfer. The effects of the work function, defects and doping, and employment of external electric field on modulating the charge transfer are presented. The interplay between the band bending and carrier transport across the surface and interface consisting of TiO2 is discussed. We show that the charge transfer can also strongly affect the behavior of deposited nanoparticles on TiO2 through built-in electric field that it creates. This review encompasses several advances of composite materials where TiO2 is combined with two-dimensional materials like graphene, MoS2, phosphorene, etc. The charge transport in the TiO2-organohalide perovskite with respect to the electron-hole separation at the interface is also discussed.

  3. Giant quantum Hall plateaus generated by charge transfer in epitaxial graphene

    PubMed Central

    Alexander-Webber, J. A.; Huang, J.; Maude, D. K.; Janssen, T. J. B. M.; Tzalenchuk, A.; Antonov, V.; Yager, T.; Lara-Avila, S.; Kubatkin, S.; Yakimova, R.; Nicholas, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Epitaxial graphene has proven itself to be the best candidate for quantum electrical resistance standards due to its wide quantum Hall plateaus with exceptionally high breakdown currents. However one key underlying mechanism, a magnetic field dependent charge transfer process, is yet to be fully understood. Here we report measurements of the quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene showing the widest quantum Hall plateau observed to date extending over 50 T, attributed to an almost linear increase in carrier density with magnetic field. This behaviour is strong evidence for field dependent charge transfer from charge reservoirs with exceptionally high densities of states in close proximity to the graphene. Using a realistic framework of broadened Landau levels we model the densities of donor states and predict the field dependence of charge transfer in excellent agreement with experimental results, thus providing a guide towards engineering epitaxial graphene for applications such as quantum metrology. PMID:27456765

  4. System Size, Energy, and Centrality Dependence of Pseudorapidity Distributions of Charged Particles in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Chai, Z.; Holzman, B.; Nouicer, R.; Pak, R.; Sedykh, I.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Szostak, A.; Wyngaardt, S.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.

    2009-04-10

    We present the first measurements of the pseudorapidity distribution of primary charged particles in Cu+Cu collisions as a function of collision centrality and energy, {radical}(s{sub NN})=22.4, 62.4, and 200 GeV, over a wide range of pseudorapidity, using the PHOBOS detector. A comparison of Cu+Cu and Au+Au results shows that the total number of produced charged particles and the rough shape (height and width) of the pseudorapidity distributions are determined by the number of nucleon participants. More detailed studies reveal that a more precise matching of the shape of the Cu+Cu and Au+Au pseudorapidity distributions over the full range of pseudorapidity occurs for the same N{sub part}/2A rather than the same N{sub part}. In other words, it is the collision geometry rather than just the number of nucleon participants that drives the detailed shape of the pseudorapidity distribution and its centrality dependence at RHIC energies.

  5. Beam energy dependence of moments of the net-charge multiplicity distributions in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Barnovska, Z; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Grosnick, D; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-29

    We report the first measurements of the moments--mean (M), variance (σ(2)), skewness (S), and kurtosis (κ)--of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at seven energies, ranging from sqrt[sNN]=7.7 to 200 GeV, as a part of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC. The moments are related to the thermodynamic susceptibilities of net charge, and are sensitive to the location of the QCD critical point. We compare the products of the moments, σ(2)/M, Sσ, and κσ(2), with the expectations from Poisson and negative binomial distributions (NBDs). The Sσ values deviate from the Poisson baseline and are close to the NBD baseline, while the κσ(2) values tend to lie between the two. Within the present uncertainties, our data do not show nonmonotonic behavior as a function of collision energy. These measurements provide a valuable tool to extract the freeze-out parameters in heavy-ion collisions by comparing with theoretical models.

  6. Beam Energy Dependence of Moments of the Net-Charge Multiplicity Distributions in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.

    2014-08-01

    We report the first measurements of the moments—mean (M), variance (σ2), skewness (S), and kurtosis (κ)—of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at midrapidity in Au +Au collisions at seven energies, ranging from √sNN =7.7 to 200 GeV, as a part of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC. The moments are related to the thermodynamic susceptibilities of net charge, and are sensitive to the location of the QCD critical point. We compare the products of the moments, σ2/M, Sσ, and κσ2, with the expectations from Poisson and negative binomial distributions (NBDs). The Sσ values deviate from the Poisson baseline and are close to the NBD baseline, while the κσ2 values tend to lie between the two. Within the present uncertainties, our data do not show nonmonotonic behavior as a function of collision energy. These measurements provide a valuable tool to extract the freeze-out parameters in heavy-ion collisions by comparing with theoretical models.

  7. Improved numerical calculation of the generation of a neutral beam by charge transfer between chlorine ions/neutrals and a graphite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Ohtsuka, Shingo; Iwasaki, Takuya; Ono, Kohei; Iriye, Yasuroh; Samukawa, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    The charge transfer process between chlorine particles (ions or neutrals) and a graphite surface on collision was investigated by using a highly stable numerical simulator based on time-dependent density functional theory to understand the generation mechanism of a high-efficiency neutral beam developed by Samukawa et al (2001 Japan. J. Appl. Phys. 40 L779). A straightforward calculation was achieved by adopting a large enough unit cell. The dependence of the neutralization efficiency on the incident energy of the particle was investigated, and the trend of the experimental result was reproduced. It was also found that doping the electrons and holes into graphite could change the charge transfer process and neutralization probability. This result suggests that it is possible to develop a neutral beam source that has high neutralization efficiency for both positive and negative ions.

  8. Identified charged hadron production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, Giacomo

    2015-05-01

    The ALICE detector is dedicated to the study of strongly interacting matter in the extremely high temperature and energy density conditions reached in relativistic heavy-ions collisions at the LHC. ALICE has unique particle identification (PID) capabilities among the LHC experiments thanks to the use of the combination of different PID techniques, i.e. energy loss and time of flight measurements, Cherenkov and transition radiation detection, calorimetry and topological ID. The latest results on charged pions, kaons and (anti)protons transverse momentum (pT) spectra, ratios and integrated yields, measured in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV and √s = 2.76 TeV, Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV and p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV, will be presented. The nuclear modification factors as a function of pT, for Pb-Pb and p-Pb interactions, will be shown. The results from different colliding systems will be compared. These will also be compared with calculations from hydrodynamical and statistical hadronization models.

  9. The effects of charge transfer on the aqueous solvation of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W.

    2012-07-28

    Ab initio-based charge partitioning of ionic systems results in ions with non-integer charges. This charge-transfer (CT) effect alters both short- and long-range interactions. Until recently, the effects of CT have been mostly neglected in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The method presented in this paper for including charge transfer between ions and water is consistent with ab initio charge partitioning and does not add significant time to the simulation. The ions of sodium, potassium, and chloride are parameterized to reproduce dimer properties and aqueous structures. The average charges of the ions from MD simulations (0.900, 0.919, and -0.775 for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -}, respectively) are consistent with quantum calculations. The hydration free energies calculated for these ions are in agreement with experimental estimates, which shows that the interactions are described accurately. The ions also have diffusion constants in good agreement with experiment. Inclusion of CT results in interesting properties for the waters in the first solvation shell of the ions. For all ions studied, the first shell waters acquire a partial negative charge, due to the difference between water-water and water-ion charge-transfer amounts. CT also reduces asymmetry in the solvation shell of the chloride anion, which could have important consequences for the behavior of chloride near the air-water interface.

  10. Charged-particle multiplicity density at midrapidity in central Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt[S(NN)] = 2.76 TeV.

    PubMed

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Shahoyan, R; Sharma, N; Sharma, S; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siciliano, M; Sicking, E; Siemiarczuk, T; Silenzi, A; Silvermyr, D; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singhal, V; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Skjerdal, K; Smakal, R; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Søgaard, C; Soloviev, A; Soltz, R; Son, H; Song, J; Song, M; Soos, C; Soramel, F; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Stefanini, G; Steinbeck, T; Steinpreis, M; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stocco, D; Stock, R; Stokkevag, C H; Stolpovskiy, M; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Vásquez, M A Subieta; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhorukov, M; Sumbera, M; Susa, T; Swoboda, D; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarka, I; Szostak, A; Tagridis, C; Takahashi, J; Takaki, J D Tapia; Tauro, A; Tavlet, M; Muñoz, G Tejeda; Telesca, A; Terrevoli, C; Thäder, J; Thomas, D; Thomas, J H; Tieulent, R; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Toia, A; Torii, H; Toscano, L; Tosello, F; Traczyk, T; Truesdale, D; Trzaska, W H; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Turvey, A J; Tveter, T S; Ulery, J; Ullaland, K; Uras, A; Urbán, J; Urciuoli, G M; Usai, G L; Vacchi, A; Vajzer, M; Vala, M; Palomo, L Valencia; Vallero, S; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vande Vyvre, P; Vannucci, L; Vargas, A; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vechernin, V; Veldhoen, M; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Vergara, S; Vernekohl, D C; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Vikhlyantsev, O; Vilakazi, Z; Baillie, O Villalobos; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Vinogradov, Y; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Voloshin, K; Voloshin, S; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vranic, D; Øvrebekk, G; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, B; Wagner, V; Wan, R; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Watanabe, K; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, A; Wilk, G; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Karampatsos, L Xaplanteris; Yang, H; Yang, S; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yokoyama, H; Yoo, I-K; Yu, W; Yuan, X; Yushmanov, I; Zabrodin, E; Zach, C; Zampolli, C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zenin, A; Zgura, I; Zhalov, M; Zhang, X; Zhou, D; Zichichi, A; Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M

    2010-12-17

    The first measurement of the charged-particle multiplicity density at midrapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair √ S NN = 2.76 TeV is presented. For an event sample corresponding to the most central 5% of the hadronic cross section, the pseudorapidity density of primary charged particles at midrapidity is 1584 ± 4(stat) ± 76(syst), which corresponds to 8.3 ± 0.4(syst) per participating nucleon pair. This represents an increase of about a factor 1.9 relative to pp collisions at similar collision energies, and about a factor 2.2 to central Au-Au collisions at √ S NN = 2.76 TeV. This measurement provides the first experimental constraint for models of nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies.

  11. Analysis of incomplete charge transfer effects in a CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liqiang, Han; Suying, Yao; Jiangtao, Xu; Chao, Xu; Zhiyuan, Gao

    2013-05-01

    A method to judge complete charger transfer is proposed for a four-transistor CMOS image sensor with a large pixel size. Based on the emission current theory, a qualitative photoresponse model is established to the preliminary prediction. Further analysis of noise for incomplete charge transfer predicts the noise variation. The test pixels were fabricated in a specialized 0.18 μm CMOS image sensor process and two different processes of buried N layer implantation are compared. The trend prediction corresponds with the test results, especially as it can distinguish an unobvious incomplete charge transfer. The method helps us judge whether the charge transfer time satisfies the requirements of the readout circuit for the given process especially for pixels of a large size.

  12. Confronting fluctuations of conserved charges in central nuclear collisions at the LHC with predictions from Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun-Munzinger, P.; Kalweit, A.; Redlich, K.; Stachel, J.

    2016-12-01

    We construct net baryon number and strangeness susceptibilities as well as correlations between electric charge, strangeness and baryon number from experimental data on the particle production yields at midrapidity of the ALICE Collaboration at CERN. The data were taken in central Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV and cover one unit of rapidity. We show that the resulting fluctuations and correlations are consistent with Lattice QCD results at the chiral crossover pseudocritical temperature Tc ≃ 155 MeV. This agreement lends strong support to the assumption that the fireball created in these collisions is of thermal origin and exhibits characteristic properties expected in QCD at the transition from the quark gluon plasma to the hadronic phase. Since Lattice QCD calculations are performed at a baryochemical potential of μB = 0, the comparisons with LHC data are the most direct due to the vanishing baryon transport to midrapidity at these high energies.

  13. Zero-degree binary encounter electrons in fast collisions of highly charged F and O ions with H 2 targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. H.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Sanders, J. M.; Hidmi, H.; Richard, P.

    1993-06-01

    Doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) for binary encounter electrons (BEe) produced by 0.5-2 MeV/u highly-charged F and O ions in collisions with H 2 gas targets have been studied at 0° with respect to the ion beam direction. The measured DDCS of the broad binary encounter peak was well described by a simple impulse approximation (IA) treatment for bare ions, and was demonstrated to provide in situ detection efficiency of the electron spectrometer. The projectile energy dependence of the BEe production for nonbare (clothed) projectiles is found to follow a scaled IA prediction, in which a BEe enhancement is consistently exhibited for the collision energy range studied.

  14. Effect of collective response on electron capture and excitation in collisions of highly charged ions with fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Singh, Y P; Tribedi, Lokesh C

    2003-03-07

    Projectile deexcitation Lyman x-ray emission following electron capture and K excitation has been studied in collisions of bare and Li-like sulphur ions (of energy 110 MeV) with fullerenes (C(60)/C(70)) and different gaseous targets. The intensity ratios of different Lyman x-ray lines in collisions with fullerenes are found to be substantially lower than those for the gas targets, both for capture and excitation. This has been explained in terms of a model based on "solidlike" effect, namely, wakefield induced stark mixing of the excited states populated via electron capture or K excitation: a collective phenomenon of plasmon excitation in the fullerenes under the influence of heavy, highly charged ions.

  15. Total Cross Section Measurements and Velocity Distributions of Hyperthermal Charge Transfer in Xe2+ + N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, Michael; Prince, Benjamin; Bemish, Raymond

    Guided-ion beam measurements of the charge exchange (CEX) cross section for Xe2+ + N2 are reported for collision energies ranging from 0.3 to 100 eV in the center-of-mass frame. Measured total XS decrease from 69.5 +/-0.3 Angstroms2 (Angs.) at the lowest collision energies to 40 Angs.2at 100 eV. The product N2+CEX cross section is similar to the total CEX cross section while those of the dissociative product, N+, are less than 1Angs.2 for collision energies above 9 eV. The product N2+CEXcross section measured here are much larger than the total optical emission-excitation cross sections for the N2+(A) and (B) state products determined previously in the chemiluminescence study of Prince and Chiu suggesting that most of the N2+products are in the X state. Time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of both the Xe+ and N2+products suggest two different CEX product channels. The first leaves highly-vibrationally excited N2+products with forward scattered Xe+ (LAB frame) and releases between 0.35 to 0.6 eV translational energy for collisions below 17.6 eV. The second component decreases with collisional energy and leaves backscattered Xe+ and low-vibrational states of N2+.At collision energies above 17.6 eV, only charge exchange involving minimal momentum exchange remains in the TOF spectra. AFOSR 13RV07COR.

  16. Rotational Energy Transfer and Depolarization in Rare Gas + CN (˜X, v=0) Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Gregory; Forthomme, Damien; Sears, Trevor

    2014-06-01

    Rotational energy transfer and depolarization rates have been determined for fine-structure-selected rotational levels of the vibrationless ground state of CN (˜{X} ^2Σ +) radicals. Collisions with Ar, He and the photolytic precursor, {CH_3COCN have been studied with polarized transient frequency modulation (FM) absorption spectroscopy. Transient FM signals were recorded as a function of probe laser detuning across Doppler-broadened lines of the ˜{A}- ˜{X} (1-0) band, monitoring the saturation recovery kinetics after a tunable dye laser pulse selectively bleached the probed CN rotational level. The refilling kinetics of a hole in an otherwise thermalized state distribution is identical to the hypothetical decay of the corresponding isolated level in an empty manifold, even to the extent of displaying hyperfine quantum beats in the hole alignment. The Doppler-resolved kinetics reflect a competition between the speed-dependent rotational energy transfer rates, which tend to cool the velocity distribution of the hole, and velocity-changing collisions, which tend to rethermalize the velocity distribution. The observations are of relevance to speed-dependent effects in pressure broadening, but measured under Doppler-limited pressure conditions. Elastic depolarization contributes significantly to the observed signals at low rotational states, negligibly so at high J. A strongly J-dependent contribution to the relaxation kinetics due to small amounts of the photolytic precursor cannot be neglected when extracting the rare-gas-dependent rate coefficients from the observed kinetics. Some qualitative differences are thereby found with previously published energy transfer studies on He or Ar + CN (˜{X}, v=2) by Fei, et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 100, 1190 (1994); Chem. Phys. Lett. 232, 547 (1995)]. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic

  17. Pseudorapidity density of charged particles in p+Pb collisions at √(s(NN))=5.02 TeV.

    PubMed

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Kushpil, V; Kushpil, S; Kvaerno, H; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; La Pointe, S L; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; La Rocca, P; Lea, R; Lechman, M; Lee, K S; Lee, S C; Lee, G R; Legrand, I; Lehnert, J; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; León, H; Leoncino, M; León Monzón, I; León Vargas, H; Lévai, P; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Ljunggren, H M; Loenne, P I; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Lohner, D; Loizides, C; Loo, K K; Lopez, X; López Torres, E; Løvhøiden, G; Lu, X-G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luo, J; Luparello, G; Luzzi, C; Ma, K; Ma, R; Madagodahettige-Don, D M; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malinina, L; Mal'kevich, D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Mangotra, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Markert, C; Marquard, M; Martashvili, I; Martin, N A; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez Davalos, A; Martínez García, G; Martynov, Y; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastroserio, A; Matthews, Z L; Matyja, A; Mayer, C; Mazer, J; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mercado Pérez, J; Meres, M; Miake, Y; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miśkowiec, D; Mitu, C; Mizuno, S; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Montaño Zetina, L; Monteno, M; Montes, E; Moon, T; Morando, M; Moreira De Godoy, D A; Moretto, S; Morreale, A; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Müller, H; Munhoz, M G; Musa, L; Musso, A; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Nattrass, C; Navin, S; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nedosekin, A; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Nielsen, B S; Niida, T; Nikolaev, S; Nikolic, V; Nikulin, V; Nikulin, S; Nilsen, B S; Nilsson, M S; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A; Nyatha, A; Nygaard, C; Nystrand, J; Ochirov, A; Oeschler, H; Oh, S K; Oh, S; Oleniacz, J; Oliveira Da Silva, A C; Oppedisano, C; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Oskarsson, A; Ostrowski, P; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pachr, M; Padilla, F; Pagano, P; Paić, G; Painke, F; Pajares, C; Pal, S K; Palaha, A; Palmeri, A; Papikyan, V; Pappalardo, G S; Park, W J; Passfeld, A; Pastirčák, B; Patalakha, D I; Paticchio, V; Paul, B; Pavlinov, A; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Pereira Da Costa, H; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E; Peresunko, D; Pérez Lara, C E; Perini, D; Perrino, D; Peryt, W; Pesci, A; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Petráček, V; Petran, M; Petris, M; Petrov, P; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Piano, S; Piccotti, A; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Pitz, N; Piyarathna, D B; Planinic, M; Płoskoń, M; Pluta, J; Pocheptsov, T; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Polák, K; Polichtchouk, B; Pop, A; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Pospíšil, V; Potukuchi, B; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puddu, G; Punin, V; Putiš, M; Putschke, J; Quercigh, E; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Rademakers, A; Räihä, T S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Ramírez Reyes, A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rathee, D; Read, K F; Real, J S; Redlich, K; Reed, R J; Rehman, A; Reichelt, P; Reicher, M; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J-P; Reygers, K; Riccati, L; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M; Rodriguez Manso, A; Røed, K; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Rosnet, P; Rossegger, S; Rossi, A; Roy, C; Roy, P; Rubio Montero, A J; Rui, R; Russo, R; Ryabinkin, E; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Safařík, K; Sahoo, R; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Sakaguchi, H; Sakai, S; Sakata, D; Salgado, C A; Salzwedel, J; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sanchez Castro, X; Sándor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Sano, S; Santagati, G; Santoro, R; Sarkamo, J; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schreiner, S; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schuster, T; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, P A; Scott, R; Segato, G; Selyuzhenkov, I; Senyukov, S; Seo, J; Serci, S; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Shabetai, A; Shabratova, G; Shahoyan, R; Sharma, S; Sharma, N; Rohni, S; Shigaki, K; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siciliano, M; Sicking, E; Siddhanta, S; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Simatovic, G; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singha, S; Singhal, V; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Skjerdal, K; Smakal, R; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R J M; Søgaard, C; Soltz, R; Son, H; Song, J; Song, M; Soos, C; Soramel, F; Sputowska, I; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Steinpreis, M; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stiller, J H; Stocco, D; Stolpovskiy, M; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Subieta Vásquez, M A; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sultanov, R; Sumbera, M; Susa, T; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarka, I; Szczepankiewicz, A; Szostak, A; Szymański, M; Takahashi, J; Tapia Takaki, J D; Tarantola Peloni, A; Tarazona Martinez, A; Tauro, A; Tejeda Muñoz, G; Telesca, A; Terrevoli, C; Thäder, J; Thomas, D; Tieulent, R; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Toia, A; Torii, H; Toscano, L; Trubnikov, V; Truesdale, D; Trzaska, W H; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Ulery, J; Ullaland, K; Ulrich, J; Uras, A; Urbán, J; Urciuoli, G M; Usai, G L; Vajzer, M; Vala, M; Valencia Palomo, L; Vallero, S; Vande Vyvre, P; van Leeuwen, M; Vannucci, L; Vargas, A; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vechernin, V; Veldhoen, M; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Vergara, S; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, Y; Vinogradov, L; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Voloshin, K; Voloshin, S; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vorobyev, I; Vranic, D; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, V; Wagner, B; Wan, R; Wang, Y; Wang, M; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Watanabe, K; Weber, M; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, G; Wilk, A; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L; Yaldo, C G; Yamaguchi, Y; Yang, S; Yang, H; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yoo, I-K; Yoon, J; Yu, W; Yuan, X; Yushmanov, I; Zaccolo, V; Zach, C; Zampolli, C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zgura, I S; Zhalov, M; Zhang, H; Zhang, X; Zhou, F; Zhou, D; Zhou, Y; Zhu, J; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, X; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, A; Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M; Zyzak, M

    2013-01-18

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density measured over four units of pseudorapidity in nonsingle-diffractive p+Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair √(s(NN))=5.02 TeV is presented. The average value at midrapidity is measured to be 16.81±0.71 (syst), which corresponds to 2.14±0.17 (syst) per participating nucleon, calculated with the Glauber model. This is 16% lower than in nonsingle-diffractive pp collisions interpolated to the same collision energy and 84% higher than in d+Au collisions at s√(s(NN))=0.2 TeV. The measured pseudorapidity density in p+Pb collisions is compared to model predictions and provides new constraints on the description of particle production in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  18. Centrality dependence of charged-hadron transverse-momentum spectra in d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Back, B B; Baker, M D; Ballintijn, M; Barton, D S; Becker, B; Betts, R R; Bickley, A A; Bindel, R; Budzanowski, A; Busza, W; Carroll, A; Decowski, M P; García, E; Gburek, T; George, N; Gulbrandsen, K; Gushue, S; Halliwell, C; Hamblen, J; Harrington, A S; Henderson, C; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Hołyński, R; Holzman, B; Iordanova, A; Johnson, E; Kane, J L; Khan, N; Kulinich, P; Kuo, C M; Lee, J W; Lin, W T; Manly, S; Mignerey, A C; Noell, A; Nouicer, R; Olszewski, A; Pak, R; Park, I C; Pernegger, H; Reed, C; Remsberg, L P; Roland, C; Roland, G; Sagerer, J; Sarin, P; Sawicki, P; Sedykh, I; Skulski, W; Smith, C E; Steinberg, P; Stephans, G S F; Sukhanov, A; Teng, R; Tonjes, M B; Trzupek, A; Vale, C; van Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Verdier, R; Veres, G I; Wadsworth, B; Wolfs, F L H; Wosiek, B; Woźniak, K; Wuosmaa, A H; Wysłouch, B; Zhang, J

    2003-08-15

    We have measured transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The spectra were obtained for transverse momenta 0.25collision centrality is presented in comparison to p+pmacr; collisions at the same collision energy. With increasing centrality, the yield at high transverse momenta increases more rapidly than the overall particle density, leading to a strong modification of the spectral shape. This change in spectral shape is qualitatively different from observations in Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The results provide important information for discriminating between different models for the suppression of high-p(T) hadrons observed in Au+Au collisions.

  19. Strangeness production as a function of charged particle multiplicity in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Livio

    2016-12-01

    Recent measurements performed in high-multiplicity proton-proton (pp) and proton-lead (p-Pb) collisions have shown features that are reminiscent of those observed in lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions. These observations warrant a comprehensive measurement of the production of identified particles. We report on the production of KS0, Λ, Λ ‾, Ξ± and Ω± at mid-rapidity measured as a function of multiplicity in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV with the ALICE experiment. Spectral shapes studied both for individual particles and via particle ratios such as (Λ / KS0) as a function of pT exhibit an evolution with event multiplicity and the production rates of hyperons are observed to increase more strongly than those of non-strange hadrons. These phenomena are qualitatively similar to the ones observed in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions.

  20. Charge-Transfer Dynamics of Fluorescent Dye-Sensitized Electrodes under Applied Biases.

    PubMed

    Godin, Robert; Sherman, Benjamin D; Bergkamp, Jesse J; Chesta, Carlos A; Moore, Ana L; Moore, Thomas A; Palacios, Rodrigo E; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2015-07-16

    The development of dye-sensitized solar cells requires an in-depth understanding of the interfacial charge-transfer dynamics that take place between dye sensitizers and semiconductors. Here, we describe a prototype system to probe these dynamics by monitoring in real time the fluorescence of two organic sensitizers, a perylene and a squaraine, bound to a SnO2 semiconductor thin film as a function of potentiostatic control of the Fermi level. The two different sensitizer fluorophores characterized by vastly different redox potentials undergo similar fluorescence modulation with applied bias, an indication that the density of states of the semiconductor largely influences the charge-transfer dynamics while energetics play a minimal role. We further show that the rate of photodegradation of the perylene sensitizer with applied bias provides a suitable marker to study the rate of charge injection and charge recombination. Taken together, our results demonstrate a suitable platform to visualize and study charge-transfer dynamics on films and constitute a step toward achieving single-molecule resolution in our quest to decipher the static and dynamic heterogeneity of charge-transfer dynamics in dye-sensitized photoanodes.

  1. High charge state, ion-atom collision experiments using accel-decel

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.; Tanis, J.A.; Graham, W.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies of /sub 16/S/sup 13 +/ + He collisions between 2.5 and 200 MeV, which were made using the accel-decel technique with the Brookhaven National Laboratory coupled MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerators, are discussed. Cross sections were measured for single electron-capture and -loss as well as K x rays correlated to electron-capture. Other planned ion-atom collision experiments requiring accel-decel are also presented. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Bio-batteries and bio-fuel cells: leveraging on electronic charge transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Kannan, A M; Renugopalakrishnan, V; Filipek, S; Li, P; Audette, G F; Munukutla, L

    2009-03-01

    Bio-fuel cells are alternative energy devises based on bio-electrocatalysis of natural substrates by enzymes or microorganisms. Here we review bio-fuel cells and bio-batteries based on the recent literature. In general, the bio-fuel cells are classified based on the type of electron transfer; mediated electron transfer and direct electron transfer or electronic charge transfer (ECT). The ECT of the bio-fuel cells is critically reviewed and a variety of possible applications are considered. The technical challenges of the bio-fuel cells, like bioelectrocatalysis, immobilization of bioelectrocatalysts, protein denaturation etc. are highlighted and future research directions are discussed leveraging on the use of electron charge transfer proteins. In addition, the packaging aspects of the bio-fuel cells are also analyzed and the found that relatively little work has been done in the engineering development of bio-fuel cells.

  3. Electrostatic sensors applied to the measurement of electric charge transfer in gas solids pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhead, S. R.; Denham, J. C.; Armour-Chelu, D. I.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a number of electric charge sensors. The sensors have been developed specifically to investigate triboelectric charge transfer which takes place between particles and the pipeline wall, when powdered materials are conveyed through a pipeline using air. A number of industrial applications exist for such gas solids pipelines, including pneumatic conveyors, vacuum cleaners and dust extraction systems. The build-up of electric charge on pipelines and powdered materials can lead to electrostatic discharge and so is of interest from a safety viewpoint. The charging of powders can also adversely affect their mechanical handling characteristics and so is of interest to handling equipment engineers. The paper presents the design of the sensors, the design of the electric charge test rig and electric charge measurement test results.

  4. Ultrafast Charge- and Energy-Transfer Dynamics in Conjugated Polymer: Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystal Blends

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid nanocrystal–polymer systems are promising candidates for photovoltaic applications, but the processes controlling charge generation are poorly understood. Here, we disentangle the energy- and charge-transfer processes occurring in a model system based on blends of cadmium selenide nanocrystals (CdSe-NC) with poly[2-methoxy-5-(3′,7′-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MDMO-PPV) using a combination of time-resolved absorption and luminescence measurements. The use of different capping ligands (n-butylamine, oleic acid) as well as thermal annealing allows tuning of the polymer–nanocrystal interaction. We demonstrate that energy transfer from MDMO-PPV to CdSe-NCs is the dominant exciton quenching mechanism in nonannealed blends and occurs on ultrafast time scales (<1 ps). Upon thermal annealing electron transfer becomes competitive with energy transfer, with a transfer rate of 800 fs independent of the choice of the ligand. Interestingly, we find hole transfer to be much less efficient than electron transfer and to extend over several nanoseconds. Our results emphasize the importance of tuning the organic–nanocrystal interaction to achieve efficient charge separation and highlight the unfavorable hole-transfer dynamics in these blends. PMID:24490650

  5. Ultrafast charge- and energy-transfer dynamics in conjugated polymer: cadmium selenide nanocrystal blends.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Frederik S F; Rao, Akshay; Böhm, Marcus L; Kist, René J P; Vaynzof, Yana; Greenham, Neil C

    2014-02-25

    Hybrid nanocrystal-polymer systems are promising candidates for photovoltaic applications, but the processes controlling charge generation are poorly understood. Here, we disentangle the energy- and charge-transfer processes occurring in a model system based on blends of cadmium selenide nanocrystals (CdSe-NC) with poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MDMO-PPV) using a combination of time-resolved absorption and luminescence measurements. The use of different capping ligands (n-butylamine, oleic acid) as well as thermal annealing allows tuning of the polymer-nanocrystal interaction. We demonstrate that energy transfer from MDMO-PPV to CdSe-NCs is the dominant exciton quenching mechanism in nonannealed blends and occurs on ultrafast time scales (<1 ps). Upon thermal annealing electron transfer becomes competitive with energy transfer, with a transfer rate of 800 fs independent of the choice of the ligand. Interestingly, we find hole transfer to be much less efficient than electron transfer and to extend over several nanoseconds. Our results emphasize the importance of tuning the organic-nanocrystal interaction to achieve efficient charge separation and highlight the unfavorable hole-transfer dynamics in these blends.

  6. Centrality and energy dependence of charged-particle multiplicities in heavy ion collisions in the context of elementary reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Carroll, A.; Gushue, S.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Remsberg, L. P.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Betts, R. R.; Garcia, E.; Halliwell, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Kucewicz, W.; McLeod, D.

    2006-08-15

    The PHOBOS experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured the total multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of collision centrality in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})= 19.6, 130, and 200 GeV. An approximate independence of / on the number of participating nucleons is observed, reminiscent of 'wounded nucleon' scaling (N{sub ch}{proportional_to}N{sub part}) observed in proton-nucleus collisions. Unlike p+A, the constant of proportionality does not seem to be set by the pp/pp data at the same energy. Rather, there seems to be a surprising correspondence with the total multiplicity measured in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations, as well as the rapidity shape measured over a large range. The energy dependence of the integrated multiplicity per participant pair shows that e{sup +}e{sup -} and A+A data agree over a large range of center-of-mass energies ({radical}(s)>20 GeV), and pp/pp data can be brought to agree approximately with the e{sup +}e{sup -} data by correcting for the typical energy taken away by leading particles. This is suggestive of a mechanism for soft particle production that depends mainly on the amount of available energy. It is conjectured that the dominant distinction between A+A and p+p collisions is the multiple collisions per participant, which appears to be sufficient to substantially reduce the energy taken away by leading particles.

  7. Rovibrationally selected ion-molecule collision study using the molecular beam vacuum ultraviolet laser pulsed field ionization-photoion method: Charge transfer reaction of N{sub 2}{sup +}(X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}; v{sup +}= 0-2; N{sup +}= 0-9) + Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yih Chung; Xu Yuntao; Lu Zhou; Xu Hong; Ng, C. Y.

    2012-09-14

    We have developed an ion-molecule reaction apparatus for state-selected absolute total cross section measurements by implementing a high-resolution molecular beam vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser pulsed field ionization-photoion (PFI-PI) ion source to a double-quadrupole double-octopole ion-guide mass spectrometer. Using the total cross section measurement of the state-selected N{sub 2}{sup +}(v{sup +}, N{sup +}) + Ar charge transfer (CT) reaction as an example, we describe in detail the design of the VUV laser PFI-PI ion source used, which has made possible the preparation of reactant N{sub 2}{sup +}(X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}, v{sup +}= 0-2, N{sup +}= 0-9) PFI-PIs with high quantum state purity, high intensity, and high kinetic energy resolution. The PFI-PIs and prompt ions produced in the ion source are shown to have different kinetic energies, allowing the clean rejection of prompt ions from the PFI-PI beam by applying a retarding potential barrier upstream of the PFI-PI source. By optimizing the width and amplitude of the pulsed electric fields employed to the VUV-PFI-PI source, we show that the reactant N{sub 2}{sup +} PFI-PI beam can be formed with a laboratory kinetic energy resolution of {Delta}E{sub lab}={+-} 50 meV. As a result, the total cross section measurement can be conducted at center-of-mass kinetic energies (E{sub cm}'s) down to thermal energies. Absolute total rovibrationally selected cross sections {sigma}(v{sup +}= 0-2, N{sup +}= 0-9) for the N{sub 2}{sup +}(X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}; v{sup +}= 0-2, N{sup +}= 0-9) + Ar CT reaction have been measured in the E{sub cm} range of 0.04-10.0 eV, revealing strong vibrational enhancements and E{sub cm}-dependencies of {sigma}(v{sup +}= 0-2, N{sup +}= 0-9). The thermochemical threshold at E{sub cm}= 0.179 eV for the formation of Ar{sup +} from N{sub 2}{sup +}(X; v{sup +}= 0, N{sup +}) + Ar was observed by the measured {sigma}(v{sup +}= 0), confirming the narrow {Delta}E{sub cm} spread achieved in

  8. Surface charging and x-ray emission from insulator surfaces induced by collisions with highly charged ions : relevance to cometary and planetary sp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djuric, N.; Lozano, J. A.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2005-01-01

    Characteristic X-ray emission lines are detected from simulants of comet surfaces as they undergo collisions with highly charged ions (HCIs). The HCI projectiles are O+2-O+7. Ion energies are varied in the range (2-7)q keV, where q is the ion charge state. The targets are the insulator minerals olivine, augite, and quartz. It is found that the emission of characteristic K-L, K-M X-rays appears to proceed during positive charging of the surface by the HCI beam. When one uses low-energy, flood-gun electrons to neutralize the surface charge, the X-ray emission is eliminated or greatly reduced, depending on the flood-gun current. Acceleration of background electrons onto the charged surface results in excitation of elemental transitions, including the K-L2 and K-L3 target X-ray emission lines of Mg and Si located spectroscopically at 1253.6 and 1739.4 eV, respectively. Also observed are emission lines from O, Na, Ca, Al, and Fe atoms in the target and charge-exchange lines via surface extraction of electrons by the O+q electric field. Good agreement is found in the ratio of the measured X-ray yields for Mg and Si relative to the ratio of their electron-impact K-shell ionization cross sections. The present study may serve as a guide to astronomers as to specific observing X-ray energies indicative of solar/stellar wind or magnetospheric ion interactions with a comet, planetary surface, or circumstellar dust.

  9. Evaluation of Bulk Charging in Geostationary Transfer Orbit and Earth Escape Trajectories Using the Numit 1-D Charging Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Coffey, Victoria N.; Parker, Linda N.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.; Jun, Insoo; Garrett, Henry B.

    2007-01-01

    The NUMIT 1-dimensional bulk charging model is used as a screening to ol for evaluating time-dependent bulk internal or deep dielectric) ch arging of dielectrics exposed to penetrating electron environments. T he code is modified to accept time dependent electron flux time serie s along satellite orbits for the electron environment inputs instead of using the static electron flux environment input originally used b y the code and widely adopted in bulk charging models. Application of the screening technique ts demonstrated for three cases of spacecraf t exposure within the Earth's radiation belts including a geostationa ry transfer orbit and an Earth-Moon transit trajectory for a range of orbit inclinations. Electric fields and charge densities are compute d for dielectric materials with varying electrical properties exposed to relativistic electron environments along the orbits. Our objectiv e is to demonstrate a preliminary application of the time-dependent e nvironments input to the NUMIT code for evaluating charging risks to exposed dielectrics used on spacecraft when exposed to the Earth's ra diation belts. The results demonstrate that the NUMIT electric field values in GTO orbits with multiple encounters with the Earth's radiat ion belts are consistent with previous studies of charging in GTO orb its and that potential threat conditions for electrostatic discharge exist on lunar transit trajectories depending on the electrical proper ties of the materials exposed to the radiation environment.

  10. Spectrophotometric study of the charge transfer complex between 2-amino-4-picoline with chloranilic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghanmi, Reem M.; Al-Attas, Amirah S.; Habeeb, Moustafa M.

    2013-02-01

    Charge transfer complex formation between 2-amino-4-picoline (2A4P) as the electron donor with chloranilic acid (CLA) as the electron acceptor has been studied spectrophotometrically in different polar solvents included acetone (AcN), ethanol (EtOH) and acetonitrile (AN). The molecular composition of the formed complex was recognized utilizing Job's, photometric and conductometric titration methods to be 1:1. The formation constants and molecular extinction coefficients were estimated using Benesi-Hildebrand equation; they recorded high values confirming high stability of the formed complex. Moreover, the results showed that the complex is more stable in acetone with lower electric permittivity compared with ethanol or acetonitrile of higher ones. The values of some spectroscopic physical parameters like oscillator strength f, transition dipole moment μ, resonance energy RN, charge transfer energy ECT, dissociation energy W, ionization potential IP and standard free energy ΔGo were determined and evaluated. The solid complex was isolated and its molecular composition was determined by elemental analysis to be 1:1. Furthermore, the solid complex was characterized using FTIR and 1H NMR measurements. They confirmed the presence of proton transfer beside charge transfer in the obtained complex. Molecular orbital calculations utilizing GAMESS computations were carried out to predict infrared spectra. They also confirmed the presence of proton transfer beside charge transfer in the formed complex.

  11. Observation of Charge-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations in p -Pb Collisions and Its Implication for the Search for the Chiral Magnetic Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Dvornikov, O.; Makarenko, V.; Zykunov, V.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Sharma, A.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Sculac, T.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Mesic, B.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Susa, T.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Tsiakkouri, D.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Mohammed, Y.; Salama, E.; Kadastik, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Albert, A.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hamer, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Flügge, G.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Müller, T.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Arndt, T.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Eren, E.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baur, S.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Butz, E.; Caspart, R.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Freund, B.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kudella, S.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Shvetsov, I.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Makovec, A.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bahinipati, S.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Kumari, P.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Kole, G.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Hegde, V.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Pandey, S.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Behnamian, H.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Fienga, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Monteno, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Lee, A.; Kim, H.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Lee, H.; Oh, S. B.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Hwang, C.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Carpinteyro, S.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Saddique, A.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Calpas, B.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Chtchipounov, L.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Sulimov, V.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Markin, O.; Tarkovskii, E.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kaminskiy, A.; Kodolova, O.; Korotkikh, V.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Vardanyan, I.; Blinov, V.; Skovpen, Y.; Shtol, D.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Dordevic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Barrio Luna, M.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Suárez Andrés, I.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krammer, M.; Lange, C.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Merlin, J. 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I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Jesus, O.; Kwok, K. H. M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Spencer, E.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Bravo, C.; Cousins, R.; Dasgupta, A.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Mccoll, N.; Saltzberg, D.; Schnaible, C.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S. M. A.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Si, W.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. 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M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Forthomme, L.; Kenny, R. P.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Malta Rodrigues, A.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Kumar, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Mc Donald, J.; Medvedeva, T.; Mei, K.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Schulte, J. F.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Charge-dependent azimuthal particle correlations with respect to the second-order event plane in p -Pb and PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV have been studied with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement is performed with a three-particle correlation technique, using two particles with the same or opposite charge within the pseudorapidity range |η | <2.4 , and a third particle measured in the hadron forward calorimeters (4.4 <|η | <5 ). The observed differences between the same and opposite sign correlations, as functions of multiplicity and η gap between the two charged particles, are of similar magnitude in p -Pb and PbPb collisions at the same multiplicities. These results pose a challenge for the interpretation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in heavy ion collisions in terms of the chiral magnetic effect.

  12. Observation of Charge-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations in p-Pb Collisions and Its Implication for the Search for the Chiral Magnetic Effect.

    PubMed

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Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Savin, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    2017-03-24

    Charge-dependent azimuthal particle correlations with respect to the second-order event plane in p-Pb and PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV have been studied with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement is performed with a three-particle correlation technique, using two particles with the same or opposite charge within the pseudorapidity range |η|<2.4, and a third particle measured in the hadron forward calorimeters (4.4<|η|<5). The observed differences between the same and opposite sign correlations, as functions of multiplicity and η gap between the two charged particles, are of similar magnitude in p-Pb and PbPb collisions at the same multiplicities. These results pose a challenge for the interpretation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in heavy ion collisions in terms of the chiral magnetic effect.

  13. Charge separation relative to the reaction plane in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt[s(NN)] = 2.76 TeV.

    PubMed

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Ferreiro, E G; González-Trueba, L H; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Goswami, A; Gotovac, S; Grabski, V; Graczykowski, L K; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, A; Grigoryan, S; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Gros, P; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J-Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerra Gutierrez, C; Guerzoni, B; Guilbaud, M; Gulbrandsen, K; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Gutbrod, H; Haaland, Ø; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Han, B H; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harmanova, Z; Harris, J W; Hartig, M; Hasegan, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayrapetyan, A; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hille, P T; Hippolyte, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hřivnáčová, I; Huang, M; Humanic, T J; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Incani, E; Innocenti, G M; Innocenti, P G; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivan, C; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, A; Ivanov, V; Ivanytskyi, O; Jacobs, P M; Jang, H J; Janik, R; Janik, M A; Jayarathna, P H S Y; Jena, S; Jha, D M; Jimenez Bustamante, R T; Jirden, L; Jones, P G; Jung, H; Jusko, A; Kaidalov, A B; Kakoyan, V; Kalcher, S; Kaliňák, P; Kalliokoski, T; Kalweit, A; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Karasu Uysal, A; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kazantsev, A; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Khan, M M; Khan, P; Khan, S A; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kileng, B; Kim, J S; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, J H; Kim, T; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, B; Kim, S; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kliemant, M; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Knospe, A G; Koch, K; Köhler, M K; Kollegger, T; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskikh, A; Korneev, A; Kour, R; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G; Kral, J; Králik, I; Kramer, F; Kraus, I; Krawutschke, T; Krelina, M; Kretz, M; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Krus, M; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucheriaev, Y; Kugathasan, T; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kulakov, I; Kumar, J; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, A B; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, S; Kushpil, V; Kvaerno, H; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; La Pointe, S L; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; La Rocca, P; Lazzeroni, C; Lea, R; Le Bornec, Y; Lechman, M; Lee, S C; Lee, K S; Lee, G R; Lefèvre, F; Lehnert, J; Leistam, L; Lenti, V; León, H; Leoncino, M; León Monzón, I; León Vargas, H; Lévai, P; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, L; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Lohn, S; Lohner, D; Loizides, C; Loo, K K; Lopez, X; López Torres, E; Løvhøiden, G; Lu, X-G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luo, J; Luparello, G; Luquin, L; Luzzi, C; Ma, R; Ma, K; Madagodahettige-Don, D M; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malinina, L; Mal'kevich, D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Mangotra, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Marin Tobon, C A; Markert, C; Martashvili, I; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez Davalos, A; Martínez García, G; Martynov, Y; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastroserio, A; Matthews, Z L; Matyja, A; Mayer, C; Mazer, J; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mercado Pérez, J; Meres, M; Miake, Y; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miśkowiec, D; Mitu, C; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Montaño Zetina, L; Monteno, M; Montes, E; Moon, T; Morando, M; Moreira De Godoy, D A; Moretto, S; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Müller, H; Munhoz, M G; Musa, L; Musso, A; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Nattrass, C; Naumov, N P; Navin, S; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nazarov, G; Nedosekin, A; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Nielsen, B S; Niida, T; Nikolaev, S; Nikolic, V; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Nilsen, B S; Nilsson, M S; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A; Nyatha, A; Nygaard, C; Nystrand, J; Ochirov, A; Oeschler, H; Oh, S; Oh, S K; Oleniacz, J; Oppedisano, C; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Ortona, G; Oskarsson, A; Ostrowski, P; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pachr, M; Padilla, F; Pagano, P; Paić, G; Painke, F; Pajares, C; Pal, S K; Palaha, A; Palmeri, A; Papikyan, V; Pappalardo, G S; Park, W J; Passfeld, A; Pastirčák, B; Patalakha, D I; Paticchio, V; Pavlinov, A; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Pereira Da Costa, H; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E; Peresunko, D; Pérez Lara, C E; Perez Lezama, E; Perini, D; Perrino, D; Peryt, W; Pesci, A; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Petráček, V; Petran, M; Petris, M; Petrov, P; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Piano, S; Piccotti, A; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Pitz, N; Piyarathna, D B; Płoskoń, M; Pluta, J; Pocheptsov, T; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Polák, K; Polichtchouk, B; Pop, A; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Pospíšil, V; Potukuchi, B; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puchagin, S; Puddu, G; Pulvirenti, A; Punin, V; Putiš, M; Putschke, J; Quercigh, E; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Rademakers, A; Räihä, T S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Ramírez Reyes, A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rathee, D; Read, K F; Real, J S; Redlich, K; Reichelt, P; Reicher, M; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J-P; Reygers, K; Riccati, L; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Rodrigues Fernandes Rabacal, B; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M; Rodriguez Manso, A; Røed, K; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Rosnet, P; Rossegger, S; Rossi, A; Roy, P; Roy, C; Rubio Montero, A J; Rui, R; Russo, R; Ryabinkin, E; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Safařík, K; Sahoo, R; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Sakaguchi, H; Sakai, S; Sakata, D; Salgado, C A; Salzwedel, J; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sanchez Castro, X; Sándor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Sano, S; Santo, R; Santoro, R; Sarkamo, J; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schreiner, S; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, P A; Scott, R; Segato, G; Selyuzhenkov, I; Senyukov, S; Seo, J; Serci, S; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Shabetai, A; Shabratova, G; Shahoyan, R; Sharma, S; Sharma, N; Rohni, S; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siciliano, M; Sicking, E; Siddhanta, S; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Simatovic, G; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singha, S; Singhal, V; Sinha, T; Sinha, B C; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Skjerdal, K; Smakal, R; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R J M; Søgaard, C; Soltz, R; Son, H; Song, J; Song, M; Soos, C; Soramel, F; Sputowska, I; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Steinpreis, M; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stiller, J H; Stocco, D; Stolpovskiy, M; Strabykin, K; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Subieta Vásquez, M A; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhorukov, M; Sultanov, R; Sumbera, M; Susa, T; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarka, I; Szczepankiewicz, A; Szostak, A; Szymański, M; Takahashi, J; Tapia Takaki, J D; Tauro, A; Tejeda Muñoz, G; Telesca, A; Terrevoli, C; Thäder, J; Thomas, D; Thomas, J H; Tieulent, R; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Toia, A; Torii, H; Toscano, L; Truesdale, D; Trzaska, W H; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Ulery, J; Ullaland, K; Ulrich, J; Uras, A; Urbán, J; Urciuoli, G M; Usai, G L; Vajzer, M; Vala, M; Valencia Palomo, L; Vallero, S; van der Kolk, N; Vande Vyvre, P; van Leeuwen, M; Vannucci, L; Vargas, A; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vechernin, V; Veldhoen, M; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Vergara, S; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Vikhlyantsev, O; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, Y; Vinogradov, L; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Voloshin, K; Voloshin, S; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vranic, D; Ovrebekk, G; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, V; Wagner, B; Wan, R; Wang, Y; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Wang, M; Watanabe, K; Weber, M; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, G; Wilk, A; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L; Yaldo, C G; Yamaguchi, Y; Yang, H; Yang, S; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yoo, I-K; Yoon, J; Yu, W; Yuan, X; Yushmanov, I; Zach, C; Zampolli, C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zgura, I S; Zhalov, M; Zhang, H; Zhang, X; Zhou, Y; Zhou, D; Zhou, F; Zhu, J; Zhu, J; Zhu, X; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, A; Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M; Zyzak, M

    2013-01-04

    Measurements of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations with the ALICE detector at the LHC are reported for Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt[s(NN)] = 2.76 TeV. Two- and three-particle charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in the pseudorapidity range |η| < 0.8 are presented as a function of the collision centrality, particle separation in pseudorapidity, and transverse momentum. A clear signal compatible with a charge-dependent separation relative to the reaction plane is observed, which shows little or no collision energy dependence when compared to measurements at RHIC energies. This provides a new insight for understanding the nature of the charge-dependent azimuthal correlations observed at RHIC and LHC energies.

  14. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in pPb collisions and its implication for the search for the chiral magnetic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-10-02

    Charge-dependent azimuthal particle correlations with respect to the second-order event plane in pPb and PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV have been studied with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement is performed with a three-particle correlation technique, using two particles with the same or opposite charge within the pseudorapidity range abs(eta)<2.4, and a third particle measured in the hadron forward calorimeters (4.4< abs(eta)<5). The observed differences between the same and opposite sign correlations, as functions of multiplicity and eta gap between the two charged particles, are of similar magnitude in pPb and PbPb collisions at the same multiplicities. These results pose a challenge for the interpretation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in heavy ion collisions in terms of the chiral magnetic effect.

  15. Charge dependence and electric quadrupole effects on single-nucleon removal in relativistic and intermediate energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Single-nucleon removal in relativistic and intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is studied using a generalization of Weizsacker-Williams theory that treats each electromagnetic multipole separately. Calculations are presented for electric dipole and quadrupole excitations and incorporate a realistic minimum impact parameter, Coulomb recoil corrections, and the uncertainties in the input photonuclear data. Discrepancies are discussed. The maximum quadrupole effect to be observed in future experiments is estimated and also an analysis of the charge dependence of the electromagnetic cross sections down to energies as low as 100 MeV/nucleon is made.

  16. Charge Dependence and Electric Quadrupole Effects on Single-Nucleon Removal in Relativistic and Intermediate Energy Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Single nucleon removal in relativistic and intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is studied using a generalization of Weizsacker-Williams theory that treats each electromagnetic multipole separately. Calculations are presented for electric dipole and quadrupole excitations and incorporate a realistic minimum impact parameter, Coulomb recoil corrections, and the uncertainties in the input photonuclear data. Discrepancies are discussed. The maximum quadrupole effect to be observed in future experiments is estimated and also an analysis of the charge dependence of the electromagnetic cross sections down to energies as low as 100 MeV/nucleon is made.

  17. Shape, Transverse Size, and Charged Hadron Multiplicity of Jets in pp Collisions at 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-06-01

    Measurements of jet characteristics from inclusive jet production in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV are presented. The data sample was collected with the CMS detector at the LHC during 2010 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The mean charged hadron multiplicity, the differential and integral jet shape distributions, and two independent moments of the shape distributions are measured as functions of the jet transverse momentum for jets reconstructed with the anti-kT algorithm. The measured observables are corrected to the particle level and compared with predictions from various QCD Monte Carlo generators.

  18. Like-sign charged Higgs boson production in e{sup -}e{sup -} collisions at the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1995-10-01

    We consider the production of a pair of like-sign charged Higgs bosons in e{sup -} e{sup -} collisions at the NLC within the context of several electroweak models with extended symmetry breaking sectors. We find that the rate for this process, which proceeds through W{sup -}W{sup -} fusion, is a very sensitive probe of the nature of these extended Higgs sectors and that the corresponding cross sections can vary by as much as several orders of magnitude at NLC energies.

  19. Transverse-momentum and pseudorapidity distributions of charged hadrons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Er, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Vienna, OAW /CERN /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /Antwerp U., WISINF /Vrije U., Brussels /Brussels U. /Gent U. /Louvain U. /UMH, Mons /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /CHEP, Taegu /Chonnam Natl. U. /Korea U. /UCLA /CERN /UC, Riverside /Budapest, RMKI /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Caltech /Carnegie Mellon U. /Colorado U. /Cornell U. /Fairfield U.

    2010-05-01

    Charged-hadron transverse-momentum and pseudorapidity distributions in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV are measured with the inner tracking system of the CMS detector at the LHC. The charged-hadron yield is obtained by counting the number of reconstructed hits, hit-pairs, and fully reconstructed charged-particle tracks. The combination of the three methods gives a charged-particle multiplicity per unit of pseudorapidity dN{sub ch}/d{eta}|{eta}|<0.5 = 5.78 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.23 (syst.) for non-single-diffractive events, higher than predicted by commonly used models. The relative increase in charged-particle multiplicity from {radical}s = 0.9 to 7 TeV is 66.1% {+-} 1.0% (stat.) {+-} 4.2% (syst.). The mean transverse momentum is measured to be 0.545 {+-} 0.005 (stat.) {+-} 0.015 (syst.) GeV/c. The results are compared with similar measurements at lower energies.

  20. Charge transfer and electronic doping in nitrogen-doped graphene

    PubMed Central

    Joucken, Frédéric; Tison, Yann; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Tejeda, Antonio; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Conrad, Edward; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Ghijsen, Jacques; Sporken, Robert; Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, François; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the modification of the graphene’s electronic structure upon doping is crucial for enlarging its potential applications. We present a study of nitrogen-doped graphene samples on SiC(000) combining angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The comparison between tunneling and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra reveals the spatial inhomogeneity of the Dirac energy shift and that a phonon correction has to be applied to the tunneling measurements. XPS data demonstrate the dependence of the N 1s binding energy of graphitic nitrogen on the nitrogen concentration. The measure of the Dirac energy for different nitrogen concentrations reveals that the ratio usually computed between the excess charge brought by the dopants and the dopants’ concentration depends on the latter. This is supported by a tight-binding model considering different values for the potentials on the nitrogen site and on its first neighbors. PMID:26411651

  1. Charge transfer and mobility enhancement at CdO/SnTe heterointerfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nishitani, Junichi; Yu, Kin Man; Walukiewicz, Wladek

    2014-09-29

    We report a study of the effects of charge transfer on electrical properties of CdO/SnTe heterostructures. A series of structures with variable SnTe thicknesses were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. Because of an extreme type III band offset with the valence band edge of SnTe located at 1.5 eV above the conduction band edge of CdO, a large charge transfer is expected at the interface of the CdO/SnTe heterostructure. The electrical properties of the heterostructures are analyzed using a multilayer charge transport model. The analysis indicates a large 4-fold enhancement of the CdO electron mobility at the interface with SnTe. The mobility enhancement is attributed to reduction of the charge center scattering through neutralization of the donor-like defects responsible for the Fermi level pinning at the CdO/SnTe interface.

  2. NEW APPROACHES: Students' understanding of the transfer of charge between conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruswamy, Chitra; Somers, Mark D.; Hussey, R. G.

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation into students' understanding of the transfer of charge between two charged conductors. The research is based on interviews conducted with students in an algebra and trigonometry based physics course and on written tests administered both before and after instruction. Results from two tasks are reported, both of which involve a pair of identical conductors that are given an initial charge, are made to touch each other and are then separated. The test was also administered as a post test to other populations at the pre-college and college levels. It was found that a considerable number of students from the eighth grader to the college student in an advanced physics course were unable to predict the transfer of charge correctly from one conductor to another. Implications for instruction are also discussed.

  3. Charge transfer in strongly correlated systems: an exact diagonalization approach to model Hamiltonians.

    PubMed

    Schöppach, Andreas; Gnandt, David; Koslowski, Thorsten

    2014-04-07

    We study charge transfer in bridged di- and triruthenium complexes from a theoretical and computational point of view. Ab initio computations are interpreted from the perspective of a simple empirical Hamiltonian, a chemically specific Mott-Hubbard model of the complexes' π electron systems. This Hamiltonian is coupled to classical harmonic oscillators mimicking a polarizable dielectric environment. The model can be solved without further approximations in a valence bond picture using the method of exact diagonalization and permits the computation of charge transfer reaction rates in the framework of Marcus' theory. In comparison to the exact solution, the Hartree-Fock mean field theory overestimates both the activation barrier and the magnitude of charge-transfer excitations significantly. For triruthenium complexes, we are able to directly access the interruthenium antiferromagnetic coupling strengths.

  4. Charge transfer in strongly correlated systems: An exact diagonalization approach to model Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Schöppach, Andreas; Gnandt, David; Koslowski, Thorsten

    2014-04-07

    We study charge transfer in bridged di- and triruthenium complexes from a theoretical and computational point of view. Ab initio computations are interpreted from the perspective of a simple empirical Hamiltonian, a chemically specific Mott-Hubbard model of the complexes' π electron systems. This Hamiltonian is coupled to classical harmonic oscillators mimicking a polarizable dielectric environment. The model can be solved without further approximations in a valence bond picture using the method of exact diagonalization and permits the computation of charge transfer reaction rates in the framework of Marcus' theory. In comparison to the exact solution, the Hartree-Fock mean field theory overestimates both the activation barrier and the magnitude of charge-transfer excitations significantly. For triruthenium complexes, we are able to directly access the interruthenium antiferromagnetic coupling strengths.

  5. Spectrophotometric study of the charge-transfer complexes of iodine with antipyrine in organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasani, Masoumeh; Rezaei, Alireza

    2006-12-01

    The charge-transfer complex formation of iodine with antipyrine has been studied spectrophotometrically in chloroform, dichloromethane (DCM) and 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) solutions at 25 °C. The results indicate the formation of 1:1 charge-transfer complexes. The observed time dependence of the charge-transfer band and subsequent formation of I 3- in solution were related to the slow transformation of the initially formed 1:1 antipyrine:I 2 outer complex to an inner electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complex, followed by fast reaction of the inner complex with iodine to form a triiodide ion. The values of the equilibrium constant, K, are calculated for each complex and the influence of the solvent properties on the formation of EDA complexes and the rates of subsequent reaction is evaluated.

  6. Spectrophotometric study of the charge-transfer complexes of iodine with antipyrine in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hasani, Masoumeh; Rezaei, Alireza

    2006-12-01

    The charge-transfer complex formation of iodine with antipyrine has been studied spectrophotometrically in chloroform, dichloromethane (DCM) and 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) solutions at 25 degrees C. The results indicate the formation of 1:1 charge-transfer complexes. The observed time dependence of the charge-transfer band and subsequent formation of I(3)(-) in solution were related to the slow transformation of the initially formed 1:1 antipyrine:I(2) outer complex to an inner electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complex, followed by fast reaction of the inner complex with iodine to form a triiodide ion. The values of the equilibrium constant, K, are calculated for each complex and the influence of the solvent properties on the formation of EDA complexes and the rates of subsequent reaction is evaluated.

  7. Engineering the Charge Transfer in all 2D Graphene-Nanoplatelets Heterostructure Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Robin, A.; Lhuillier, E.; Xu, X. Z.; Ithurria, S.; Aubin, H.; Ouerghi, A.; Dubertret, B.

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional layered (i.e. van der Waals) heterostructures open up great prospects, especially in photodetector applications. In this context, the control of the charge transfer between the constituting layers is of crucial importance. Compared to bulk or 0D system, 2D materials are characterized by a large exciton binding energy (0.1–1 eV) which considerably affects the magnitude of the charge transfer. Here we investigate a model system made from colloidal 2D CdSe nanoplatelets and epitaxial graphene in a phototransistor configuration. We demonstrate that using a heterostructured layered material, we can tune the magnitude and the direction (i.e. electron or hole) of the charge transfer. We further evidence that graphene functionalization by nanocrystals only leads to a limited change in the magnitude of the 1/f noise. These results draw some new directions to design van der Waals heterostructures with enhanced optoelectronic properties. PMID:27143413

  8. Engineering the Charge Transfer in all 2D Graphene-Nanoplatelets Heterostructure Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, A.; Lhuillier, E.; Xu, X. Z.; Ithurria, S.; Aubin, H.; Ouerghi, A.; Dubertret, B.

    2016-05-01

    Two dimensional layered (i.e. van der Waals) heterostructures open up great prospects, especially in photodetector applications. In this context, the control of the charge transfer between the constituting layers is of crucial importance. Compared to bulk or 0D system, 2D materials are characterized by a large exciton binding energy (0.1–1 eV) which considerably affects the magnitude of the charge transfer. Here we investigate a model system made from colloidal 2D CdSe nanoplatelets and epitaxial graphene in a phototransistor configuration. We demonstrate that using a heterostructured layered material, we can tune the magnitude and the direction (i.e. electron or hole) of the charge transfer. We further evidence that graphene functionalization by nanocrystals only leads to a limited change in the magnitude of the 1/f noise. These results draw some new directions to design van der Waals heterostructures with enhanced optoelectronic properties.

  9. Polyoxometalate active charge-transfer material for mediated redox flow battery

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Travis Mark; Hudak, Nicholas; Staiger, Chad; Pratt, Harry

    2017-01-17

    Redox flow batteries including a half-cell electrode chamber coupled to a current collecting electrode are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, a separator is coupled to the half-cell electrode chamber. The half-cell electrode chamber comprises a first redox-active mediator and a second redox-active mediator. The first redox-active mediator and the second redox-active mediator are circulated through the half-cell electrode chamber into an external container. The container includes an active charge-transfer material. The active charge-transfer material has a redox potential between a redox potential of the first redox-active mediator and a redox potential of the second redox-active mediator. The active charge-transfer material is a polyoxometalate or derivative thereof. The redox flow battery may be particularly useful in energy storage solutions for renewable energy sources and for providing sustained power to an electrical grid.

  10. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Silicon and Iron Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1997-01-01

    The laser ablation/ion storage facility at the UNLV Physics Department is dedicated to the study of atomic processes in low temperature plasmas. Our current program is directed to the study of charge transfer of multiply charged ions and neutrals that are of importance to astrophysics at energies less than 1 eV (about 10(exp 4) K). Specifically, we measure the charge transfer rate coefficient of ions such as N(2+), Si(3+), Si(3+), with helium and Fe(2+) with molecular and atomic hydrogen. All these ions are found in a variety of astrophysical plasmas. Their electron transfer reactions with neutral atoms can affect the ionization equilibrium of the plasma.

  11. Fermi level pinning and the charge transfer contribution to the energy of adsorption at semiconducting surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krukowski, Stanisław; Kempisty, Paweł; Strak, Paweł; Sakowski, Konrad

    2014-01-28

    It is shown that charge transfer, the process analogous to formation of semiconductor p-n junction, contributes significantly to adsorption energy at semiconductor surfaces. For the processes without the charge transfer, such as molecular adsorption of closed shell systems, the adsorption energy is determined by the bonding only. In the case involving charge transfer, such as open shell systems like metal atoms or the dissociating molecules, the energy attains different value for the Fermi level differently pinned. The Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulation of species adsorption at different surfaces, such as SiC(0001) or GaN(0001) confirms these predictions: the molecular adsorption is independent on the coverage, while the dissociative process adsorption energy varies by several electronvolts.

  12. A two-dimensional position sensitive gas chamber with scanned charge transfer readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Lobato, R.; Mosquera, J.; Pardo, J.; Pena, J.; Pazos, A.; Pombar, M.; Rodríguez, A.

    2003-10-01

    We have constructed and tested a two-dimensional position sensitive parallel-plate gas ionization chamber with scanned charge transfer readout. The scan readout method described here is based on the development of a new position-dependent charge transfer technique. It has been implemented by using gate strips perpendicularly oriented to the collector strips. This solution reduces considerably the number of electronic readout channels needed to cover large detector areas. The use of a 25 μm thick kapton etched circuit allows high charge transfer efficiency with a low gating voltage, consequently needing a very simple commutating circuit. The present prototype covers 8×8 cm2 with a pixel size of 1.27×1.27 mm2. Depending on the intended use and beam characteristics a smaller effective pixel is feasible and larger active areas are possible. This detector can be used for X-ray or other continuous beam intensity profile monitoring.

  13. Single electron transfer in He+-He+ collision and production of helium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizan, Shima; Fathi, Reza; Shojaei, Farideh

    2017-02-01

    The four body Born distorted wave (BDW-4B) approximation with correct boundary condition is used for single electron transfer in He+-He+ collision. The post and prior total cross sections are obtained in the energy range 10-1000 keV/amu and the post-prior discrepancy is estimated. The sensitivity of the results with respect to the choice of the final helium-like ground state wave function is evaluated through two different wave functions. The importance of the dynamic electron correlations is tested as a function of impact energy. Additional experimental data at higher impact energies is needed for a better assessment of the validity of the present theory.

  14. A scaling law for energy transfer by inelastic electron-molecule collisions in mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienkowski, G. K.

    1976-01-01

    The equation governing the electron energy distribution in the presence of a spatially uniform electric field in a weakly ionized gas was reformulated into an integral equation for the logarithmic slope of the distribution function. For gas mixtures in which the dominant electron energy loss mechanism is by vibrational excitation of the molecules, this equation is suitable for approximate analysis and exact numerical solution by iteration. Superelastic collisions are easily included in this formulation, and do not seriously effect the convergence of the numerical scheme. The approximate analytical results are only qualitatively correct, but suggest appropriate parameters which correlate the exact numerical results very well. The distribution function as well as certain gross properties such as net energy transfer into vibration, mean energy, and drift velocity depend primarily on a single nondimensional parameter involving only E/N and the cross sections.

  15. Dynamics of transfer ionization in p -He collisions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, D. L.; Ma, X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Zhang, R. T.; Gao, Y.; Hai, B.; Zhang, M.; Qian, D. B.; Yan, S.; Zhang, P.

    2017-02-01

    We have performed a kinematically complete experiment for transfer ionization, i.e., the capture of one target electron by the projectile accompanied by the ejection of a second electron, for 50-100 keV p -He collisions by means of a reaction microscope. It was found that the electron momentum distribution projected onto the scattering plane is consistent with the prediction of an independent two-step mechanism involving a binary encounter. The deviation of the electron momentum distribution from the ideal binary ridge is attributed to binding energy effects and the interaction between the electron and the residual recoil ion. The good agreement between our measurements with the dynamic-screening classical trajectory Monte-Carlo calculations strongly suggests that electron-electron correlations play an important role in this two-electron process.

  16. Violation of detailed balance for charge-transfer statistics in Coulomb-blockade systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmann, Philipp; König, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the possibility to generate in Coulomb-blockade systems steady states that violate detailed balance. This includes both voltage biased and non-biased scenarios. The violation of detailed balance yields that the charge-transfer statistics for electrons tunneling into an island experiencing strong Coulomb interaction is different from the statistics for tunneling out. This can be experimentally tested by time-resolved measurement of the island's charge state. We demonstrate this claim for two model systems.

  17. Event-by-event charged-neutral fluctuations in Pb+Pb collisions at 158 A~GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    WA98, Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Charged particles and photons have been measured in central Pb + Pb collisions at 158 AGeV in a common ({eta}-{phi})-phase space region in the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS. The measured distributions have been analyzed to quantify the frequency with which phase space regions of varying sizes have either small or large neutral pion fraction. The measured results are compared with VENUS model simulated events and with mixed events. Events with both large and small charged-neutral fluctuations are observed to occur more frequently than expected statistically, as deduced from mixed events, or as predicted by model simulations, with the difference becoming more prominent with decreasing size of the {Delta}{eta}-{Delta}{phi} region.

  18. Event-by-Event Charged-Neutral Fluctuations in Pb + Pb Collisions at 158 A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Plasil, F; Silvermyr, David O; Stankus, Paul W; WA98, Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Charged particles and photons have been measured in central Pb + Pb collisions at 158 A GeV in a common ( )-phase space region in the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS. The measured distributions have been analyzed to quantify the frequency with which phase space regions of varying sizes have either small or large neutral pion fraction. The measured results are compared with VENUS model simulated events and with mixed events. Events with both large and small charged neutral fluctuations are observed to occur more frequently than expected statistically, as deduced from mixed events, or as predicted by model simulations, with the difference becoming more prominent with decreasing size of the region.

  19. Observation of Charge Asymmetry Dependence of Pion Elliptic Flow and the Possible Chiral Magnetic Wave in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present measurements of π- and π+ elliptic flow, v2, at midrapidity in Au +Au collisions at √{sNN }=200 , 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5, and 7.7 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry, Ach, based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that π- (π+) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins at √{sNN }=27 GeV and higher. At √{sNN }=200 GeV , the slope of the difference of v2 between π- and π+ as a function of Ach exhibits a centrality dependence, which is qualitatively similar to calculations that incorporate a chiral magnetic wave effect. Similar centrality dependence is also observed at lower energies.

  20. Observation of Charge Asymmetry Dependence of Pion Elliptic Flow and the Possible Chiral Magnetic Wave in Heavy-Ion Collisions.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, H Z; Huang, B; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, C; Li, N; Li, Z M; Li, X; Li, X; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, L; Ma, R; Ma, Y G; Ma, G L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B J; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbaek, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Y; Wang, G; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Q H; Xu, H; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, S; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J; Zhang, Z; Zhang, S; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J L; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-06-26

    We present measurements of π(-) and π(+) elliptic flow, v(2), at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at √[s(NN)]=200, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5, and 7.7 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry, A(ch), based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that π(-) (π(+)) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins at √[s(NN)]=27  GeV and higher. At √[s(NN)]=200  GeV, the slope of the difference of v(2) between π(-) and π(+) as a function of A(ch) exhibits a centrality dependence, which is qualitatively similar to calculations that incorporate a chiral magnetic wave effect. Similar centrality dependence is also observed at lower energies.

  1. A search for a doubly-charged Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 {TeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.

    2012-11-01

    A search for a doubly-charged Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV is presented. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb-1, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The search is performed using events with three or more isolated charged leptons of any flavor, giving sensitivity to the decays of pair-produced triplet components Φ ++ Φ -, and Φ ++ Φ - from associated production. No excess is observed compared to the background prediction, and upper limits at the 95 % confidence level are set on the Φ ++ production cross section, under specific assumptions on its branching fractions. Lower bounds on the Φ ++ mass are reported, providing significantly more stringent constraints than previously published limits.

  2. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  3. Photoinduced charge transfer involving a MoMo quadruply bonded complex to a perylene diimide.

    PubMed

    Alberding, Brian G; Brown-Xu, Samantha E; Chisholm, Malcolm H; Epstein, Arthur J; Gustafson, Terry L; Lewis, Sharlene A; Min, Yong

    2013-04-21

    Evidence, based on femtosecond transient absorption and time resolved infrared spectroscopy, is presented for photoinduced charge transfer from the Mo2δ orbital of the quadruply bonded molecule trans-Mo2(T(i)PB)2(BTh)2, where T(i)PB = 2,4,6-triisopropyl benzoate and BTh = 2,2'-bithienylcarboxylate, to di-n-octyl perylene diimide and di-n-hexylheptyl perylene diimide in thin films and solutions of the mixtures. The films show a long-lived charge separated state while slow back electron transfer, τBET ~ 500 ps, occurs in solution.

  4. UV Vis spectrum of simple hydrocarbons in a zeolite cavity. A supramolecular charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Luis A.; Díaz, Lourdes A.; Castillo, Norberto

    2002-09-01

    Experimental findings show that ethylene included in a zeolite cavity absorbs visible light to allow photochemical reactions. This evident supramolecular effect is explained in this Letter in terms of a charge transfer transition upon excitation. According a priori NDOL calculations the charge transfer of ethylene occurs between the HOMO, localized on the trapped molecule, and electronic states distributed on the zeolite network, together with a very perturbed intramolecular transition in ethylene. The cases of methane and ethane were also studied and a drop of about 4 eV is always observed in the first electronic transition energy when included in the zeolite cage with respect to the isolated molecules.

  5. Spectral and photophysical properties of intramolecular charge transfer fluorescence probe: 4'-Dimethylamino-2,5-dihydroxychalcone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhicheng; Bai, Guan; Dong, Chuan

    2005-12-01

    The spectral and photophysical properties of a new intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) probe, namely 4'-dimethylamino-2,5-dihydroxychalcone (DMADHC) were studied in different solvents by using steady-state absorption and emission spectroscopy. Whereas the absorption spectrum undergoes minor change with increasing polarity of the solvents, the fluorescence spectrum experiences a distinct bathochromic shift in the band position and the fluorescence quantum yield increases reaching a maximum before decrease with increasing the solvent polarity. The magnitude of change in the dipole moment was calculated based on the Lippert-Mataga equation. These results give the evidence about the intramolecular charge transfer character in the emitting singlet state of this compound.

  6. Elliptic and Hexadecapole Flow of Charged Hadrons in Au+Au Collisions at s_NN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Differential measurements of the elliptic (v{sub 2}) and hexadecapole (v{sub 4}) Fourier flow coefficients are reported for charged hadrons as a function of transverse momentum (p{sub T}) and collision centrality or number of participant nucleons (N{sub part}) for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The v{sub 2,4} measurements at pseudorapidity |{eta}| {le} 0.35, obtained with four separate reaction-plane detectors positioned in the range 1.0 < |{eta}| < 3.9, show good agreement, indicating the absence of significant {Delta}{eta}-dependent nonflow correlations. Sizable values for v{sub 4}(p{sub T}) are observed with a ratio v{sub 4}(p{sub T},N{sub part})/v{sub 2}{sup 2}(p{sub T},N{sub part}) {approx} 0.8 for 50 {le} N{sub part} {le} 200, which is compatible with the combined effects of a finite viscosity and initial eccentricity fluctuations. For N{sub part} {ge} 200 this ratio increases up to 1.7 in the most central collisions.

  7. Charged particle transverse momentum spectra in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-08-01

    The charged particle transverse momentum (pT) spectra are presented for pp collisions at sqrt(s)=0.9 and 7 TeV. The data samples were collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to integrated luminosities of 231 inverse microbarns and 2.96 inverse picobarns, respectively. Calorimeter-based high-transverse-energy triggers are employed to enhance the statistical reach of the high-pT measurements. The results are compared with both leading-order QCD and with an empirical scaling of measurements at different collision energies using the scaling variable xT = 2 pT/sqrt(s) over the pT range up to 200 GeV/c. Using a combination of xT scaling and direct interpolation at fixed pT, a reference transverse momentum spectrum at sqrt(s)=2.76 TeV is constructed, which can be used for studying high-pT particle suppression in the dense QCD medium produced in heavy-ion collisions at that centre-of-mass energy.

  8. Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Hybrid Exciton Formation in 2D/0D Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Wang, Kai; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Ivanov, Ilia; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Xiao, Kai; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-18

    We report that photoinduced interfacial charge transfer is at the heart of many applications, including photovoltaics, photocatalysis, and photodetection. With the emergence of a new class of semiconductors such as monolayer two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDs), charge transfer at the 2D/2D heterojunctions attracted several efforts due to the remarkable optical and electrical properties of 2D-TMDs. Unfortunately, in 2D/2D heterojunctions, for a given combination of two materials, the relative energy band alignment and the charge transfer efficiency are locked. Due to their large variety and broad size tunability, semiconductor quantum dots (0D-QDs) interfaced with 2D-TMDs may become an attractive heterostructure for optoelectronic applications. Here, we incorporate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to reveal the sub-45 fs charge transfer at a 2D/0D heterostructure composed of tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) and a single layer of cadmium selenide (CdSe)/zinc sulfide (ZnS) core/shell 0D-QDs. Furthermore, ultrafast dynamics and steady-state measurements suggested that following electron transfer from the 2D to the 0D, hybrid excitons (HXs), wherein the electron resides in the 0D and hole resides in the 2D-TMD monolayer, are formed with a binding energy on the order of ~140 meV, which is several times lower than that of tightly bound excitons in 2D-TMDs.

  9. Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Hybrid Exciton Formation in 2D/0D Heterostructures

    DOE PAGES

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Wang, Kai; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; ...

    2016-10-18

    We report that photoinduced interfacial charge transfer is at the heart of many applications, including photovoltaics, photocatalysis, and photodetection. With the emergence of a new class of semiconductors such as monolayer two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDs), charge transfer at the 2D/2D heterojunctions attracted several efforts due to the remarkable optical and electrical properties of 2D-TMDs. Unfortunately, in 2D/2D heterojunctions, for a given combination of two materials, the relative energy band alignment and the charge transfer efficiency are locked. Due to their large variety and broad size tunability, semiconductor quantum dots (0D-QDs) interfaced with 2D-TMDs may become an attractive heterostructure formore » optoelectronic applications. Here, we incorporate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to reveal the sub-45 fs charge transfer at a 2D/0D heterostructure composed of tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) and a single layer of cadmium selenide (CdSe)/zinc sulfide (ZnS) core/shell 0D-QDs. Furthermore, ultrafast dynamics and steady-state measurements suggested that following electron transfer from the 2D to the 0D, hybrid excitons (HXs), wherein the electron resides in the 0D and hole resides in the 2D-TMD monolayer, are formed with a binding energy on the order of ~140 meV, which is several times lower than that of tightly bound excitons in 2D-TMDs.« less

  10. Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Hybrid Exciton Formation in 2D/0D Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Wang, Kai; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Puretzky, Alexander A; Ivanov, Ilia; Rouleau, Christopher M; Xiao, Kai; Sumpter, Bobby G; Geohegan, David B

    2016-11-09

    Photoinduced interfacial charge transfer is at the heart of many applications, including photovoltaics, photocatalysis, and photodetection. With the emergence of a new class of semiconductors, i.e., monolayer two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDs), charge transfer at the 2D/2D heterojunctions has attracted several efforts due to the remarkable optical and electrical properties of 2D-TMDs. Unfortunately, in 2D/2D heterojunctions, for a given combination of two materials, the relative energy band alignment and the charge-transfer efficiency are locked. Due to their large variety and broad size tunability, semiconductor quantum dots (0D-QDs) interfaced with 2D-TMDs may become an attractive heterostructure for optoelectronic applications. Here, we incorporate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to reveal the sub-45 fs charge transfer at a 2D/0D heterostructure composed of tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) and a single layer of cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide core/shell 0D-QDs. Furthermore, ultrafast dynamics and steady-state measurements suggested that, following electron transfer from the 2D to the 0D, hybrid excitons, wherein the electron resides in the 0D and the hole resides in the 2D-TMD monolayer, are formed with a binding energy on the order of ∼140 meV, which is several times lower than that of tightly bound excitons in 2D-TMDs.

  11. Fluorinated aminoanthranilamides: non-native amino acids for bringing proteomic approaches to charge-transfer systems.

    PubMed

    Larsen-Clinton, Jillian M; Espinoza, Eli M; F Mayther, Maximillian; Clark, John; Tao, Christina; Bao, Duoduo; Larino, Christa M; Wurch, Michelle; Lara, Stephanie; Vullev, Valentine I

    2017-03-15

    The ability to control charge transfer at molecular and nanometer scales represents the ultimate level of electronic mastery, and its impacts cannot be overstated. As electrostatic analogues of magnets, electrets possess ordered electric dipoles that present key paradigms for directing transduction of electrons and holes. Herein we describe the design and development of fluorinated aminoanthranilamides, derivatives of non-native aromatic beta-amino acids, as building blocks for hole-transfer molecular electrets. A highly regio-selective nucleo