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Sample records for charge-free etching process

  1. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.; Gerardo, James B.

    1989-01-01

    The surfaces of solid ionic substrates are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing an ionic substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g. a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrance of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic salt substrates, e.g., a solid inorganic salt such as LiNbO.sub.3, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  2. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.; Gerardo, J.B.

    1987-08-25

    The surfaces of solids are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing a substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g., a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrence of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic substrates, e.g., LiNbO/sub 3/, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  3. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Ginley, D.S.

    1994-10-18

    An etching process is described using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstrom range may be achieved by this method. 1 fig.

  4. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Ginley, David S.

    1994-01-01

    An etching process using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstom range may be achieved by this method.

  5. Study on the etching process GaAs-based VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuan; Liu, Guojun; Hao, Yongqin; Yan, Changling; Zhang, Jiabin; Li, Yang; Li, Zaijin

    2016-11-01

    Wet etching process is a key technology in fabrication of VCSEL and their array in order to improve opto-electric characteristics of high-power VCSEL, devices with multi-ring distribution hole VCSEL is fabricated. The H3PO4 etching solution was used in the wet etching progress and etching rate is studied by changing etching solution concentration and etching time. The optimum technological conditions were determined by studying the etching morphology and etching depth of the GaAs-VCSEL. The tested results show that the complete morphology and the appropriate depth can be obtained by using the concentration ratio of 1:1:10, which can meet the requirements of GaAs-based VCSEL micro- structure etching process.

  6. Study on sapphire microstructure processing technology based on wet etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying-Qi; Qi, Hong; Ma, Yun-Long; Wu, Ya-Lin; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Aiming at the problem that sapphire surface roughness is quite large after wet etching in sapphire microstructure processing technology, we optimize the wet etching process parameters, study on the influences of concentration and temperature of etching solution and etching time on the sapphire surface roughness and etching rate, choose different process parameters for the experiment and test and analyze the sapphire results after wet etching. Aiming at test results, we also optimize the process parameters and do experiment. Experimental results show that, after optimizing the parameters of etching solution, surface roughness of etched sapphire is 0.39 nm, effectively with reduced surface roughness, improved light extraction efficiency and meeting the production requirements of high-precision optical pressure sensor.

  7. Dry etched SiO2 Mask for HgCdTe Etching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Deng, L. G.; Zhang, S.; Xing, W.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-09-01

    A highly anisotropic etching process with low etch-induced damage is indispensable for advanced HgCdTe (MCT) infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) detectors. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) enhanced reactive ion etching technique has been widely adopted in manufacturing HgCdTe IRFPA devices. An accurately patterned mask with sharp edges is decisive to accomplish pattern duplication. It has been reported by our group that the SiO2 mask functions well in etching HgCdTe with high selectivity. However, the wet process in defining the SiO2 mask is limited by ambiguous edges and nonuniform patterns. In this report, we patterned SiO2 with a mature ICP etching technique, prior to which a thin ZnS film was deposited by thermal evaporation. The SiO2 film etching can be terminated at the auto-stopping point of the ZnS layer thanks to the high selectivity of SiO2/ZnS in SF6 based etchant. Consequently, MCT etching was directly performed without any other treatment. This mask showed acceptable profile due to the maturity of the SiO2 etching process. The well-defined SiO2 pattern and the etched smooth surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. This new mask process could transfer the patterns exactly with very small etch-bias. A cavity with aspect-ratio (AR) of 1.2 and root mean square roughness of 1.77 nm was achieved first, slightly higher AR of 1.67 was also get with better mask profile. This masking process ensures good uniformity and surely benefits the delineation of shrinking pixels with its high resolution.

  8. Automated process control for plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeown, Margaret; Arshak, Khalil I.; Murphy, Eamonn

    1992-06-01

    This paper discusses the development and implementation of a rule-based system which assists in providing automated process control for plasma etching. The heart of the system is to establish a correspondence between a particular data pattern -- sensor or data signals -- and one or more modes of failure, i.e., a data-driven monitoring approach. The objective of this rule based system, PLETCHSY, is to create a program combining statistical process control (SPC) and fault diagnosis to help control a manufacturing process which varies over time. This can be achieved by building a process control system (PCS) with the following characteristics. A facility to monitor the performance of the process by obtaining and analyzing the data relating to the appropriate process variables. Process sensor/status signals are input into an SPC module. If trends are present, the SPC module outputs the last seven control points, a pattern which is represented by either regression or scoring. The pattern is passed to the rule-based module. When the rule-based system recognizes a pattern, it starts the diagnostic process using the pattern. If the process is considered to be going out of control, advice is provided about actions which should be taken to bring the process back into control.

  9. Alternative process for thin layer etching: Application to nitride spacer etching stopping on silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Posseme, N. Pollet, O.; Barnola, S.

    2014-08-04

    Silicon nitride spacer etching realization is considered today as one of the most challenging of the etch process for the new devices realization. For this step, the atomic etch precision to stop on silicon or silicon germanium with a perfect anisotropy (no foot formation) is required. The situation is that none of the current plasma technologies can meet all these requirements. To overcome these issues and meet the highly complex requirements imposed by device fabrication processes, we recently proposed an alternative etching process to the current plasma etch chemistries. This process is based on thin film modification by light ions implantation followed by a selective removal of the modified layer with respect to the non-modified material. In this Letter, we demonstrate the benefit of this alternative etch method in term of film damage control (silicon germanium recess obtained is less than 6 A), anisotropy (no foot formation), and its compatibility with other integration steps like epitaxial. The etch mechanisms of this approach are also addressed.

  10. Electrolytic etching process provides effective bonding surface on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Electrolytic etching process prepares surfaces of a stainless steel shell for reliable, high strength adhesive bonding to dielectric materials. The process uses a 25 percent aqueous solution of phosphoric acid.

  11. Chemical etching for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical etching for automatic processing of integrated circuits is discussed. The wafer carrier and loading from a receiving air track into automatic furnaces and unloading onto a sending air track are included.

  12. Process development for dry etching polydimethylsiloxane for neural electrodes.

    PubMed

    Anenden, Melissa P; Svehla, Martin; Lovell, Nigel H; Suaning, Gregg J

    2011-01-01

    In order to create high density electrode arrays, a reactive ion (dry) etching process was developed using sulphur hexafluoride (SF(6)) and oxygen (O(2)) plasma to pattern micro-structures in medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The surface topography and etch performance were analyzed by employing surface profilometry, scanning electron micrographs (SEM) and atomic force miscroscopy (AFM). The maximum etch rate was approximately 0.22 μm/min. The chemical modification of the PDMS structure in SF(6) and O(2) plasma was investigated through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Micro-scale openings in PDMS were achieved using a dry etching method to allow charge injection at the electrode-tissue interface.

  13. Advanced Simulation Technology to Design Etching Process on CMOS Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Prediction and control of plasma-induced damage is needed to mass-produce high performance CMOS devices. In particular, side-wall (SW) etching with low damage is a key process for the next generation of MOSFETs and FinFETs. To predict and control the damage, we have developed a SiN etching simulation technique for CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma processes using a three-dimensional (3D) voxel model. This model includes new concepts for the gas transportation in the pattern, detailed surface reactions on the SiN reactive layer divided into several thin slabs and C-F polymer layer dependent on the H/N ratio, and use of ``smart voxels''. We successfully predicted the etching properties such as the etch rate, polymer layer thickness, and selectivity for Si, SiO2, and SiN films along with process variations and demonstrated the 3D damage distribution time-dependently during SW etching on MOSFETs and FinFETs. We confirmed that a large amount of Si damage was caused in the source/drain region with the passage of time in spite of the existing SiO2 layer of 15 nm in the over etch step and the Si fin having been directly damaged by a large amount of high energy H during the removal step of the parasitic fin spacer leading to Si fin damage to a depth of 14 to 18 nm. By analyzing the results of these simulations and our previous simulations, we found that it is important to carefully control the dose of high energy H, incident energy of H, polymer layer thickness, and over-etch time considering the effects of the pattern structure, chamber-wall condition, and wafer open area ratio. In collaboration with Masanaga Fukasawa and Tetsuya Tatsumi, Sony Corporation. We thank Mr. T. Shigetoshi and Mr. T. Kinoshita of Sony Corporation for their assistance with the experiments.

  14. Photoresist 3D profile related etch process simulation and its application to full chip etch compact modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-En; Yang, Wayne; Luan, Lan; Song, Hua

    2015-03-01

    The optical proximity correction (OPC) model and post-OPC verification that takes the developed photoresist (PR) 3D profile into account is needed in the advanced 2Xnm node. The etch process hotspots caused by poor resist profile may not be fully identified during the lithography inspection but will only be observed after the subsequent etch process. A complete mask correction that targets to final etch CD requires not only a lithography R3D profile model but also a etch process compact model. The drawback of existing etch model is to treat the etch CD bias as a function of visibility and pattern density which do not contain the information of resist profile. One important factor to affect the etch CD is the PR lateral erosion during the etch process due to non-vertical PR side wall angle (SWA) and anisotropy of etch plasma source. A simple example is in transferring patterns from PR layer to thin hard mask (HM) layer, which is frequently used in the double pattern (DPT) process. The PR lateral erosion contributes an extra HM etch CD bias which is deviated from PR CD defined by lithography process. This CD bias is found to have a nontrivial dependency on the PR profile and cannot be described by the pattern density or visibility. In this report, we study the etch CD variation to resist SWA under various etch conditions. Physical effects during etch process such as plasma ion reflection and source anisotropy, which modify the local etch rate, are taken into considerations in simulation. The virtual data are generated by Synopsys TCAD tool Sentaurus Topography 3D using Monte Carlo engine. A simple geometry compact model is applied first to explain the behavior of virtual data, however, it works to some extent but lacks accuracy when plasma ion reflection comes into play. A modified version is proposed, for the first time, by including the effects of plasma ion reflection and source anisotropy. The new compact model fits the nonlinear etch CD bias very well for a wide

  15. The wettability between etching solutions and the surface of multicrystalline silicon wafer during metal-assisted chemical etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y. C.; Liu, Z.; Liu, X. J.; Gao, Y.; Lin, W. L.; Liu, H. T.; Jiang, Y. S.; Ren, X. K.

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate the wettability of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) with the etching solutions during metal-assisted chemical etching process, different surface structures were fabricated on the p-type multi-wire slurry sawn mc-Si wafers, such as as-cut wafers, polished wafers, and wafers etched in different solutions. The contact angles of different etching solutions on the surfaces of the wafers were measured. It was noted that all contact angles of etching solutions were smaller than the corresponding ones of deionized water, but the contact angles of different etching solutions were quite different. Among the contact angles of the etching solutions of AgNO3-HF, H2O2-HF, TMAH and HNO3-HF, the contact angle of TMAH solution was much larger than the others and that of HNO3-HF solution was much smaller. It is suggested that the larger contact angle may lead to an unevenly etching of silicon wafer due to the long retention of big bubbles on the wafers in the etching reaction, which should be paid attention to and overcome.

  16. Surface etching and roughening in integrated processing of thermal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offenberg, M.; Liehr, M.; Rubloff, G. W.

    1991-04-01

    A multichamber UHV processing and analysis system has been used to study integrated thermal oxide processing, in which the final precleaning process and the thermal oxidation process are integrated by employing transfer of the wafers through ultraclean, inert ambients (purified, dry N2 and then ultrahigh vacuum). The Al-gate MOS capacitors show high breakdown fields (approximately 12 MV/cm) when a thin oxide passivation layer is present prior to oxidation, but low fields (less than 6 MV/cm) when the Si surface is initially oxygen free. This contrasting behavior is caused by the etching of Si surfaces which occurs at elevated temperature in the presence of trace concentration (approximately 100 ppb) of oxygen (e.g., 2 Si + O2 yields 2SiO2), leading to surface roughening and then field enhancement at asperities in the structure. Oxide surface passivation prevents etching and assures the dielectric integrity of the structure.

  17. Etch modeling for accurate full-chip process proximity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Daniel F.; Shiely, James P.

    2005-05-01

    The challenges of the 65 nm node and beyond require new formulations of the compact convolution models used in OPC. In addition to simulating more optical and resist effects, these models must accommodate pattern distortions due to etch which can no longer be treated as small perturbations on photo-lithographic effects. (Methods for combining optical and process modules while optimizing the speed/accuracy tradeoff were described in "Advanced Model Formulations for Optical and Process Proximity Correction", D. Beale et al, SPIE 2004.) In this paper, we evaluate new physics-based etch model formulations that differ from the convolution-based process models used previously. The new models are expressed within the compact modeling framework described by J. Stirniman et al. in SPIE, vol. 3051, p469, 1997, and thus can be used for high-speed process simulation during full-chip OPC.

  18. Carrier-lifetime-controlled selective etching process for semiconductors using photochemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Myers, David R.

    1992-01-01

    The minority carrier lifetime is significantly much shorter in semiconductor materials with very high impurity concentrations than it is in semiconductor materials with lower impurity concentration levels. This phenomenon of reduced minority carrier lifetime in semiconductor materials having high impurity concentration is utilized to advantage for permitting highly selective semiconductor material etching to be achieved using a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. Various means may be employed for increasing the local impurity concentration level in specific near-surface regions of a semiconductor prior to subjecting the semiconductor material to a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. The regions having the localized increased impurity concentration form a self-aligned mask inhibiting photochemical etching at such localized regions while the adjacent regions not having increased impurity concentrations are selectively photochemically etched. Liquid- or gas-phase etching may be performed.

  19. VUV and Optical Emission Characterization of Fluorocarbon SiO2 Etch Processes and Correlation to Etch Feature Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, H.; Dandapani, E.; McGrath, R.; Messier, R.; Ji, B.; Karwacki, E.

    2000-10-01

    Fluorocarbon discharges used for SiO2 etch were characterized using optical (OES) and VUV emission spectroscopy. Actinometry was used to monitor atomic fluorine concentration (N_F) as power, pressure and gas mix were varied. Thermal oxide films were photolithographically patterned to define 0.5-2.0 μ m trench features, and then etched in an AMAT Mark II reactor. Etch rate, selectivity and feature critical dimension were measured using SEM and other techniques. DC self-bias was also recorded for each set of process conditions. Good etch features, etch rates of 1175 Åmin, and selectivity of 7.9 were obtained for reactor operation at 750 W, 80 mTorr, and with a gas mixture of CF_4/CHF_3/Ar at 85/10/5 sccm. Etch rate, selectivity and feature critical dimensions observed have been correlated to actinometric estimates of N_F, to self-bias voltage and to OES and VUV emissions. While varying process conditions around the reference values defined above, NF was found to increase monotonically between 0.75 and 1.2x10^13/cm^3 as pressure was increased from 70 to 100 mTorr, as power was increased from 650 to 850 W, and as CF4 gas fraction was increased from 5the reference gas mixture, etch rate was found to increase (1150 to 1550 Åmin) with increasing power, and to decrease (1550 to 550 Åmin) with increasing pressure. In these cases, etch rate trend tracked the self-bias voltage established. However, when CF4 gas fraction was increased from 5Åmin, while NF concentration increased by only 15self-bias varied by only 8feature profiles, and associated reaction processes will be presented.

  20. Defect transfer from immersion exposure process to etching process using novel immersion exposure and track system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Osamu; Kosugi, Hitoshi; Dunn, Shannon; van Dommelen, Youri; Grouwstra, Cedric

    2008-11-01

    For lithography technology to support the scaling down of semiconductor devices, 193-nm immersion exposure processing is being introduced to mass-production at a rapid pace. At the same time, there are still many unclear areas and many concerns to be addressed with regards to defects in 193-nm immersion lithography. To make 193-nm immersion lithography technology practical for mass production, it is essential that the defect problems be solved. Importance must be attached to understanding the conditions that give rise to defects and their transference in the steps between lithography and etching processes. It is apparent that double patterning (DP) will be the mainstream technology below 40nm node. It can be assumed that the risk of the defect generation will rise, because the number of the litho processing steps will be increased in DP. Especially, in the case of Litho-Etch-Litho-Etch (LELE) process, the concept of defect transfer becomes more important because etch processing is placed between each litho processing step. In this paper, we use 193-nm immersion lithography processing to examine the defect transference from lithography through the etching process for a representative 45nm metal layer substrate stack for device manufacturing. It will be shown which types of defects transfer from litho to etch and become killer defects.

  1. Aerosol chemistry in Titan's ionosphere: simultaneous growth and etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Cernogora, Guy; Jomard, François; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Vigneron, Jackie

    2016-10-01

    Since the Cassini-CAPS measurements, organic aerosols are known to be present and formed at high altitudes in the diluted and partially ionized medium that is Titan's ionosphere [1]. This unexpected chemistry can be further investigated in the laboratory with plasma experiments simulating the complex ion-neutral chemistry starting from N2-CH4 [2]. Two sorts of solid organic samples can be produced in laboratory experiments simulating Titan's atmospheric reactivity: grains in the volume and thin films on the reactor walls. We expect that grains are more representative of Titan's atmospheric aerosols, but films are used to provide optical indices for radiative models of Titan's atmosphere.The aim of the present study is to address if these two sorts of analogues are chemically equivalent or not, when produced in the same N2-CH4 plasma discharge. The chemical compositions of both these materials are measured by using elemental analysis, XPS analysis and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. We find that films are homogeneous but significantly less rich in nitrogen and hydrogen than grains produced in the same experimental conditions. This surprising difference in their chemical compositions is explained by the efficient etching occurring on the films, which stay in the discharge during the whole plasma duration, whereas the grains are ejected after a few minutes [3]. The impact for our understanding of Titan's aerosols chemical composition is important. Our study shows that chemical growth and etching process are simultaneously at stake in Titan's ionosphere. The more the aerosols stay in the ionosphere, the more graphitized they get through etching process. In order to infer Titan's aerosols composition, our work highlights a need for constraints on the residence time of aerosols in Titan's ionosphere. [1] Waite et al. (2009) Science , 316, p. 870[2] Szopa et al. (2006) PSS, 54, p. 394[3] Carrasco et al. (2016) PSS, 128, p. 52

  2. Porous siliconformation and etching process for use in silicon micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.; Kelly, Michael J.; Martin, Jr., Samuel B.; Stevenson, Joel O.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    A reproducible process for uniformly etching silicon from a series of micromechanical structures used in electrical devices and the like includes providing a micromechanical structure having a silicon layer with defined areas for removal thereon and an electrochemical cell containing an aqueous hydrofluoric acid electrolyte. The micromechanical structure is submerged in the electrochemical cell and the defined areas of the silicon layer thereon are anodically biased by passing a current through the electrochemical cell for a time period sufficient to cause the defined areas of the silicon layer to become porous. The formation of the depth of the porous silicon is regulated by controlling the amount of current passing through the electrochemical cell. The micromechanical structure is then removed from the electrochemical cell and submerged in a hydroxide solution to remove the porous silicon. The process is subsequently repeated for each of the series of micromechanical structures to achieve a reproducibility better than 0.3%.

  3. Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) of High Aspect Ratio SiC Microstructures using a Time-Multiplexed Etch-Passivate Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.; Beheim, Glenn M.

    2006-01-01

    High aspect ratio silicon carbide (SiC) microstructures are needed for microengines and other harsh environment micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Previously, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of low aspect ratio (AR less than or = 1) deep (greater than 100 micron) trenches in SiC has been reported. However, existing DRIE processes for SiC are not well-suited for definition of high aspect ratio features because such simple etch-only processes provide insufficient control over sidewall roughness and slope. Therefore, we have investigated the use of a time-multiplexed etch-passivate (TMEP) process, which alternates etching with polymer passivation of the etch sidewalls. An optimized TMEP process was used to etch high aspect ratio (AR greater than 5) deep (less than 100 micron) trenches in 6H-SiC. Power MEMS structures (micro turbine blades) in 6H-SiC were also fabricated.

  4. Thermal compression chip interconnection using organic solderability preservative etched substrate by plasma processing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Won; Choi, JoonYoung; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-12-01

    The solderability of copper organic solderbility preservative (CuOSP) finished substrate was enhanced by the plasma etching. To improve the solderability of TC interconnection with the CuOSP finished substrate, the plasma etching process is used. An Oxygen-Hydrogen plasma treatment process is performed to remove OSP material. To prevent the oxidation by oxygen plasma treatment, hydrogen reducing process is also performed before TC interconnection process. The thickness of OSP material after plasma etching is measured by optical reflection method and the component analysis by Auger Electron Spectroscopy is performed. From the lowered thickness, the bonding force of TC interconnection after OSP etching process is lowered. Also the electrical open/short test was performed after assembling the completed semiconductor packaging. The improved yield due to the plasma etching process is achieved.

  5. Summary of Chalcogenide Glass Processing: Wet-Etching and Photolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a study designed to explore the different properties of two different chalcogenide materials, As2S3 and As24S38Se38, when subjected to photolithographic wet-etching techniques. Chalcogenide glasses are made by combining chalcogen elements S, Se, and Te with Group IV and/or V elements. The etchant was selected from the literature and was composed of sodium hydroxide, isopropyl alcohol, and deionized water and the types of chalcogenide glass for study were As2S3 and As24S38Se38. The main goals here were to obtain a single variable etch rate curve of etch depth per time versus NaOH overall solution concentration in M and to see the difference in etch rate between a given etchant when used on the different chalcogenide stoichiometries. Upon completion of these two goals, future studies will begin to explore creating complex, integrated photonic devices via these methods.

  6. Investigation of etching techniques for superconductive Nb/Al-Al2O3/Nb fabrication processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberger, A. W.; Lea, D. M.; Lloyd, F. L.

    1993-01-01

    Wet etching, CF4 and SF6 reactive ion etching (RIE), RIE/wet hybrid etching, Cl-based RIE, ion milling, and liftoff techniques have been investigated for use in superconductive Nb/Al-Al2O3/Nb fabrication processes. High-quality superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junctions have been fabricated using a variety of these etching methods; however, each technique offers distinct tradeoffs for a given process an wafer design. In particular, it was shown that SF6 provides an excellent RIE chemistry for low-voltage anisotropic etching of Nb with high selectivity to Al. The SF6 tool has greatly improved the trilevel resist junction insulation process. Excellent repeatability, selectivity with respect to quartz, and submicron resolution make Cl2 + BCl3 + CHCl3 RIE a very attractive process for trilayer patterning.

  7. Deep Etching Process Developed for the Fabrication of Silicon Carbide Microsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn M.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), because of its superior electrical and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, is a nearly ideal material for the microminiature sensors and actuators that are used in harsh environments where temperatures may reach 600 C or greater. Deep etching using plasma methods is one of the key processes used to fabricate silicon microsystems for more benign environments, but SiC has proven to be a more difficult material to etch, and etch depths in SiC have been limited to several micrometers. Recently, the Sensors and Electronics Technology Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field developed a plasma etching process that was shown to be capable of etching SiC to a depth of 60 mm. Deep etching of SiC is achieved by inductive coupling of radiofrequency electrical energy to a sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) plasma to direct a high flux of energetic ions and reactive fluorine atoms to the SiC surface. The plasma etch is performed at a low pressure, 5 mtorr, which together with a high gas throughput, provides for rapid removal of the gaseous etch products. The lateral topology of the SiC microstructure is defined by a thin film of etch-resistant material, such as indium-tin-oxide, which is patterned using conventional photolithographic processes. Ions from the plasma bombard the exposed SiC surfaces and supply the energy needed to initiate a reaction between SiC and atomic fluorine. In the absence of ion bombardment, no reaction occurs, so surfaces perpendicular to the wafer surface (the etch sidewalls) are etched slowly, yielding the desired vertical sidewalls.

  8. Influence of etch process on contact hole local critical dimension uniformity in extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, Gian F.; Mao, Ming; Reijnen, Liesbeth; Viatkina, Katja; Knops, Roel; Rispens, Gijsbert; Fliervoet, Timon

    2015-03-01

    Contact Hole (CH) Local Critical Dimension Uniformity (LCDU) has a direct impact on device performance. As a consequence, being able to understand and quantifying the different LCDU contributors and the way they evolve during the various process steps is critical. In this work the impact of etch process on LCDU for different resists and stacks is investigated on ASML NXE:3100 and NXE:3300. LCDU is decomposed into shot noise, mask, and metrology components. The design of the experiment is optimized to minimize the decomposition error. CD and LCDU are monitored and found to be stable. We observed that the net effect of the etch process is to improve LCDU, although the final LCDU is both stack- and resist-dependent. Different resists demonstrate the same LCDU improvement, so that the LCDU after etch will depend on the initial resist performance. Using a stack different from the one used to set up the etch process can undermine the LCDU improvement. The impact of the various etch steps is investigated in order to identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the LCDU improvement through etch. Both top-down and cross section Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) are used. The step-by-step analysis of the etch process showed that the main LCDU improvement is achieved during oxide etch, while the other process steps are either ineffective or detrimental in terms of LCDU. The main cause of the LCDU improvement is then attributed to the polymerization of the CH surface happening during the oxide etch. Finally, the LCDU improvement caused by the etch process is investigated as a function of the initial LCDU after litho in a relatively broad range (2-15nm). The ratio between LCDU after litho over LCDU after etch is investigated as a function of the initial LCDU after litho for two different resists. The results indicate that the impact of etch on LCDU is characterized by a single curve, specific to the etch process in use and independent of the resist type. In addition, we

  9. Performance improvements of binary diffractive structures via optimization of the photolithography and dry etch processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Kevin; Leonard, Jerry; Jones, Richard D.

    2010-08-01

    Increasingly stringent requirements on the performance of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) used in wafer scanner illumination systems are driving continuous improvements in their associated manufacturing processes. Specifically, these processes are designed to improve the output pattern uniformity of off-axis illumination systems to minimize degradation in the ultimate imaging performance of a lithographic tool. In this paper, we discuss performance improvements in both photolithographic patterning and RIE etching of fused silica diffractive optical structures. In summary, optimized photolithographic processes were developed to increase critical dimension uniformity and featuresize linearity across the substrate. The photoresist film thickness was also optimized for integration with an improved etch process. This etch process was itself optimized for pattern transfer fidelity, sidewall profile (wall angle, trench bottom flatness), and across-wafer etch depth uniformity. Improvements observed with these processes on idealized test structures (for ease of analysis) led to their implementation in product flows, with comparable increases in performance and yield on customer designs.

  10. Process for Smoothing an Si Substrate after Etching of SiO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Tasha; Wu, Chi

    2003-01-01

    A reactive-ion etching (RIE) process for smoothing a silicon substrate has been devised. The process is especially useful for smoothing those silicon areas that have been exposed by etching a pattern of holes in a layer of silicon dioxide that covers the substrate. Applications in which one could utilize smooth silicon surfaces like those produced by this process include fabrication of optical waveguides, epitaxial deposition of silicon on selected areas of silicon substrates, and preparation of silicon substrates for deposition of adherent metal layers. During etching away of a layer of SiO2 that covers an Si substrate, a polymer becomes deposited on the substrate, and the substrate surface becomes rough (roughness height approximately equal to 50 nm) as a result of over-etching or of deposition of the polymer. While it is possible to smooth a silicon substrate by wet chemical etching, the undesired consequences of wet chemical etching can include compromising the integrity of the SiO2 sidewalls and undercutting of the adjacent areas of the silicon dioxide that are meant to be left intact. The present RIE process results in anisotropic etching that removes the polymer and reduces height of roughness of the silicon substrate to less than 10 nm while leaving the SiO2 sidewalls intact and vertical. Control over substrate versus sidewall etching (in particular, preferential etching of the substrate) is achieved through selection of process parameters, including gas flow, power, and pressure. Such control is not uniformly and repeatably achievable in wet chemical etching. The recipe for the present RIE process is the following: Etch 1 - A mixture of CF4 and O2 gases flowing at rates of 25 to 75 and 75 to 125 standard cubic centimeters per minute (stdcm3/min), respectively; power between 44 and 55 W; and pressure between 45 and 55 mtorr (between 6.0 and 7.3 Pa). The etch rate lies between approximately equal to 3 and approximately equal to 6 nm/minute. Etch 2 - O2 gas

  11. A Silicon-Based, Sequential Coat-and-Etch Process to Fabricate Nearly Perfect Substrate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkarimi, P B; Spiller, E; Baker, S L; Stearns, D G; Robinson, J C; Olynick, D L; Salmassi, F; Liddle, J A; Liang, T; Stivers, A R

    2005-07-05

    For many thin-film applications substrate imperfections such as particles, pits, scratches, and general roughness, can nucleate film defects which can severely detract from the coating's performance. Previously we developed a coat-and-etch process, termed the ion beam thin film planarization process, to planarize substrate particles up to {approx} 70 nm in diameter. The process relied on normal incidence etching; however, such a process induces defects nucleated by substrate pits to grow much larger. We have since developed a coat-and-etch process to planarize {approx}70 nm deep by 70 nm wide substrate pits; it relies on etching at an off-normal incidence angle, i.e., an angle of {approx} 70{sup o} from the substrate normal. However, a disadvantage of this pit smoothing process is that it induces defects nucleated by substrate particles to grow larger. Combining elements from both processes we have been able to develop a silicon-based, coat-and-etch process to successfully planarize {approx}70 nm substrate particles and pits simultaneously to at or below 1 nm in height; this value is important for applications such as extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) masks. The coat-and-etch process has an added ability to significantly reduce high-spatial frequency roughness, rendering a nearly perfect substrate surface.

  12. Multi-Step Deep Reactive Ion Etching Fabrication Process for Silicon-Based Terahertz Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung-Kubiak, Cecile (Inventor); Reck, Theodore (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Perez, Jose Vicente Siles (Inventor); Lin, Robert H. (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Cooper, Ken B. (Inventor); Peralta, Alejandro (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A multi-step silicon etching process has been developed to fabricate silicon-based terahertz (THz) waveguide components. This technique provides precise dimensional control across multiple etch depths with batch processing capabilities. Nonlinear and passive components such as mixers and multipliers waveguides, hybrids, OMTs and twists have been fabricated and integrated into a small silicon package. This fabrication technique enables a wafer-stacking architecture to provide ultra-compact multi-pixel receiver front-ends in the THz range.

  13. Characterization of Plasma Etch Processes for Wide Bandgap Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-07

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS REPORT NUMBER CENTER FOR RESEARCH INC 2385 IRVING HILL ROAD LAWRENCE KS 66045-7563 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING... Langmuir probe results, which show that the electron temperature does indeed increase with the addition of helium to SF6. The design of the Langmuir probe...complexities of the etch mechanisms. The plasma diagnostic tools we will be using include mass spectrometry, optical emission spectroscopy, and Langmuir

  14. Design of experiment characterization of microneedle fabrication processes based on dry silicon etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, J.; Gaspar, J.; Ruther, P.; Hagner, M.; Cismak, A.; Heilmann, A.; Paul, O.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports on the characterization of dry etching-based processes for the fabrication of silicon microneedles using a design of experiment (DoE) approach. The possibility of using such microneedles as protruding microelectrodes able to electroporate adherently growing cells and record intracellular potentials motivates the systematic analysis of the influence of etching parameters on the needle shape. Two processes are characterized: a fully isotropic etch process and a three-step etching approach. In the first case, the shape of the microneedles is defined by a single etch step. For the stepped method, the structures are realized using the following sequence: a first, isotropic step defines the tip; this is followed by anisotropic etching that increases the height of the needle; a final isotropic procedure thins the microneedle and sharpens its tip. From the various process parameters tested, it is concluded that the isotropic fabrication is influenced mostly by four process parameters, whereas six parameters dominantly govern the outcome of the stepped etching technique. The dependence of the needle shape on the etch mask diameter is also investigated. Microneedles with diameters down to the sub-micrometer range and heights below 10 µm are obtained. The experimental design is performed using the D-optimal method. The resulting geometry, i.e. heights, diameters and radii of curvature measured at different positions, is extracted from scanning electron micrographs of needle cross-sections obtained from cuts by focused ion beam. The process parameters are used as inputs and the geometry features of the microneedles as outputs for the analysis of the process.

  15. The influence of laser-induced surface modifications on the backside etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, K.; Böhme, R.; Ruthe, D.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2007-05-01

    Spectroscopic measurements in the UV/VIS region show reduced transmission through laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) of fused silica. Absorption coefficients of up to 10 5 cm -1 were calculated from the transmission measurements for a solid surface layer of about 50 nm. The temperatures near the interface caused by laser pulse absorption, which were analytically calculated using a new thermal model considering interface and liquid volume absorption, can reach 10 4 K at typical laser fluences. The high absorption coefficients and the extreme temperatures give evidence for an ablation-like process that is involved in the LIBWE process causing the etching of the modified near-surface region. The confinement of the ablation/etching process to the modified near-surface material region can account for the low etch rates observed in comparison to front-side ablation.

  16. Effect of wet etching process on the morphology and transmittance of fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triana, S. L.; Kusumandari; Suryana, R.

    2016-11-01

    Wet etching process was performed on the surface of FTO. The FTO coated glasses subtrates with size of 2×2 cm covered by screen were patterned using zinc powder and concentrated hydrochloric acid (1 M). The substrates were then cleaned in ultrasonic baths of special detergent(helmanex) diluted in deionized water and isopropanol in sequence. The screens with various of hole size denotes by T32, T49 and T55 were used in order to create a pattern of surface textured. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) image revealed that wet etching process changes the morphology of FTO. It indicates that texturization occured. Moreover, from the UV-Vis Spectrophotometer measurement, the transmittance of FTO increase after wet etching process. The time of etching and pattern of screen were affect to the morphology and the transmittance of FTO.

  17. EUV process establishment through litho and etch for N7 node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Yuhei; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Kubota, Minoru; Matsunaga, Koichi; Nafus, Kathleen; Foubert, Philippe; Mao, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technology is steadily reaching high volume manufacturing for 16nm half pitch node and beyond. However, some challenges, for example scanner availability and resist performance (resolution, CD uniformity (CDU), LWR, etch behavior and so on) are remaining. Advance EUV patterning on the ASML NXE:3300/ CLEAN TRACK LITHIUS Pro Z- EUV litho cluster is launched at imec, allowing for finer pitch patterns for L/S and CH. Tokyo Electron Ltd. and imec are continuously collabo rating to develop manufacturing quality POR processes for NXE:3300. TEL's technologies to enhance CDU, defectivity and LWR/LER can improve patterning performance. The patterning is characterized and optimized in both litho and etch for a more complete understanding of the final patterning performance. This paper reports on post-litho CDU improvement by litho process optimization and also post-etch LWR reduction by litho and etch process optimization.

  18. Control of the anodic aluminum oxide barrier layer opening process by wet chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Han, Catherine Y; Willing, Gerold A; Xiao, Zhili; Wang, H Hau

    2007-01-30

    In this work, it has been shown that, through a highly controlled process, the chemical etching of the anodic aluminum oxide membrane barrier layer can be performed in such a way as to achieve nanometer-scale control of the pore opening. As the barrier layer is etched away, subtle differences revealed through AFM phase imaging in the alumina composition in the barrier layer give rise to a unique pattern of hexagonal walls surrounding each of the barrier layer domes. These nanostructures observed in both topography and phase images can be understood as differences in the oxalate anion contaminated alumina versus pure alumina. This information bears significant implication for catalysis, template synthesis, and chemical sensing applications. From the pore opening etching studies, the etching rate of the barrier layer (1.3 nm/min) is higher than that of the inner cell wall (0.93 nm/min), both of which are higher than the etching rate of pure alumina layer (0.5-0.17 nm/min). The established etching rates together with the etching temperature allow one to control the pore diameter systematically from 10 to 95 nm.

  19. New Deep Reactive Ion Etching Process Developed for the Microfabrication of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.; Beheim, Glenn M.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising material for harsh environment sensors and electronics because it can enable such devices to withstand high temperatures and corrosive environments. Microfabrication techniques have been studied extensively in an effort to obtain the same flexibility of machining SiC that is possible for the fabrication of silicon devices. Bulk micromachining using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) is attractive because it allows the fabrication of microstructures with high aspect ratios (etch depth divided by lateral feature size) in single-crystal or polycrystalline wafers. Previously, the Sensors and Electronics Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center developed a DRIE process for SiC using the etchant gases sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and argon (Ar). This process provides an adequate etch rate of 0.2 m/min and yields a smooth surface at the etch bottom. However, the etch sidewalls are rougher than desired, as shown in the preceding photomicrograph. Furthermore, the resulting structures have sides that slope inwards, rather than being precisely vertical. A new DRIE process for SiC was developed at Glenn that produces smooth, vertical sidewalls, while maintaining an adequately high etch rate.

  20. Electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Myers, D.R.; Vook, F.L.

    1988-06-16

    An electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process for carrying out patterning and selective removing of material in semiconductor device fabrication includes the steps of selective ion implanting, photochemical dry etching, and thermal annealing, in that order. In the selective ion implanting step, regions of the semiconductor material in a desired pattern are damaged and the remainder of the regions of the material not implanted are left undamaged. The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is increased in the damaged regions of the pattern compared to undamaged regions. In the photochemical dry etching step which follows ion implanting step, the material in the undamaged regions of the semiconductor are removed substantially faster than in the damaged regions representing the pattern, leaving the ion-implanted, damaged regions as raised surface structures on the semiconductor material. After completion of photochemical dry etching step, the thermal annealing step is used to restore the electrical conductivity of the damaged regions of the semiconductor material.

  1. Electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Myers, David R.; Vook, Frederick L.

    1989-01-01

    An electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process for carrying out patterning and selective removing of material in semiconductor device fabrication includes the steps of selective ion implanting, photochemical dry etching, and thermal annealing, in that order. In the selective ion implanting step, regions of the semiconductor material in a desired pattern are damaged and the remainder of the regions of the material not implanted are left undamaged. The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is increased in the damaged regions of the pattern compared to undamaged regions. In the photochemical dry etching step which follows ion implanting step, the material in the undamaged regions of the semiconductor are removed substantially faster than in the damaged regions representing the pattern, leaving the ion-implanted, damaged regions as raised surface structures on the semiconductor material. After completion of photochemical dry etching step, the thermal annealing step is used to restore the electrical conductivity of the damaged regions of the semiconductor material.

  2. Investigation of the neutral-solution etch process for refractive SOE antireflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Maish, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    Antireflection of optically clear glass used in photovoltaic concentrator refractive secondary optical elements (SOE's) was investigated using the neutral-solution etch process developed by Schott Glass. Test coupons and SOE's made from barium zinc glass, which does not solarize under ultraviolet exposure, were successfully etched at the center point process variable conditions of 87{degrees}C and 24 hours. Reflectance of the plano-plano dropped from 7.7% to 0.8%, with a corresponding increase in transmission from 91.7% to 98.5%. The etching process uses non-hydrofluoric, relatively non-toxic chemicals in a low-cost process well suited for use by photovoltaic system manufacturers during production. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Effect of SRAF placement on process window for technology nodes that uses variable etch bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoud, Ahmed M.; Tawfik, Tamer M.

    2009-10-01

    As technology advances to 45 nm node and below, the induced effects of etch process have an increasing contribution to the device critical dimension error budget. Traditionally, original design target shapes are drawn based on the etch target. During mask correction, etch modeling is essential to predict the new resist target that will print on the wafer. This step is known as "Model Based Retargeting" (MBR). During the initial phase of process characterization, the sub-resolution assist features (SRAF) are optimized whether based on the original design target shapes or based on a biased version of the design target (resist target). The goal of the work is to study the different possibilities of SRAF placement to maximize the accuracy and process window immunity of the final resist contour image. We will, statistically, analyze and compare process window simulation results due to various SRAFs placements by changing the reference layer used during placement.

  4. Dry etching of metallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollinger, D.

    1983-01-01

    The production dry etch processes are reviewed from the perspective of microelectronic fabrication applications. The major dry etch processes used in the fabrication of microelectronic devices can be divided into two categories - plasma processes in which samples are directly exposed to an electrical discharge, and ion beam processes in which samples are etched by a beam of ions extracted from a discharge. The plasma etch processes can be distinguished by the degree to which ion bombardment contributes to the etch process. This, in turn is related to capability for anisotropic etching. Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) and Ion Beam Etching are of most interest for etching of thin film metals. RIE is generally considered the best process for large volume, anisotropic aluminum etching.

  5. Optimization of plasma deposition and etching processes for commercial multicrystalline silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, D.S.; Wilbanks, W.L.; Fleddermann, C.B.; Rosenblum, M.D.; Roncin, S.; Narayanan, S.

    1996-06-01

    The authors conducted an investigation of plasma deposition and etching processes on full-size multicrystalline (mc-Si) cells processed in commercial production lines, so that any improvements obtained will be immediately relevant to the PV industry. In one case, the authors performed a statistically designed multiparameter experiment to determine the optimum PECVD-nitride deposition conditions specific to EFG silicon from ASE Americas, Inc. In a related effort, they studied whether plasma-etching techniques can use standard screen-printed gridlines as etch masks to form self-aligned, patterned-emitter profiles on mc-Si cells from Solarex Corp. Initial results found a statistically significant improvement of about half an absolute percentage point in cell efficiency when the self-aligned emitter etchback was combined with the PECVD-nitride surface passivation treatment. Additional improvement is expected when the successful bulk passivation treatment is also added to the process.

  6. HF-based etching processes for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Steele, R A; Shen, N; Monticelli, M V; Feit, M D; Laurence, T A; Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Wong, L L

    2010-02-23

    The effect of various HF-based etching processes on the laser damage resistance of scratched fused silica surfaces has been investigated. Conventionally polished and subsequently scratched fused silica plates were treated by submerging in various HF-based etchants (HF or NH{sub 4}F:HF at various ratios and concentrations) under different process conditions (e.g., agitation frequencies, etch times, rinse conditions, and environmental cleanliness). Subsequently, the laser damage resistance (at 351 or 355 nm) of the treated surface was measured. The laser damage resistance was found to be strongly process dependent and scaled inversely with scratch width. The etching process was optimized to remove or prevent the presence of identified precursors (chemical impurities, fracture surfaces, and silica-based redeposit) known to lead to laser damage initiation. The redeposit precursor was reduced (and hence the damage threshold was increased) by: (1) increasing the SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-} solubility through reduction in the NH4F concentration and impurity cation impurities, and (2) improving the mass transport of reaction product (SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-}) (using high frequency ultrasonic agitation and excessive spray rinsing) away from the etched surface. A 2D finite element crack-etching and rinsing mass transport model (incorporating diffusion and advection) was used to predict reaction product concentration. The predictions are consistent with the experimentally observed process trends. The laser damage thresholds also increased with etched amount (up to {approx}30 {micro}m), which has been attributed to: (1) etching through lateral cracks where there is poor acid penetration, and (2) increasing the crack opening resulting in increased mass transport rates. With the optimized etch process, laser damage resistance increased dramatically; the average threshold fluence for damage initiation for 30 {micro}m wide scratches increased from 7 to 41 J/cm{sup 2}, and the statistical

  7. Carbon nanotube thin film transistors fabricated by an etching based manufacturing compatible process.

    PubMed

    Tian, Boyuan; Liang, Xuelei; Xia, Jiye; Zhang, Han; Dong, Guodong; Huang, Qi; Peng, Lianmao; Xie, Sishen

    2017-03-17

    Carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFTs) have been regarded as strong competitors to currently commercialized TFT technologies. Though much progress has been achieved recently, CNT-TFT research is still in the stage of laboratory research. One critical challenge for commercializing CNT-TFT technology is that the commonly used device fabrication method is a lift-off based process, which is not suitable for mass production. In this paper, we report an etching based fabrication process for CNT-TFTs, which is fully manufacturing compatible. In our process, the CNT thin film channel was patterned by dry etching, while wet etching was used for patterning the layers of metal and insulator. The CNT-TFTs were successfully fabricated on a 4 inch wafer in both top-gate and buried-gate geometries with low Schottky barrier contact and pretty uniform performance. High output current (>1.2 μA μm(-1)), high on/off current ratio (>10(5)) and high mobility (>30 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) were obtained. Though the fabrication process still needs to be optimized, we believe our research on the etching fabrication process pushes CNT-TFT technology a step forward towards real applications in the near future.

  8. A Simple Single Step diffusion and Emitter Etching Process for High Efficiency Gallium Antimonide Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rajagopalan; N.S. Reddy; E. Ehsani; I.B. Bhat; P.S. Dutta; R.J. Gutmann; G. Nichols; G.W. Charache; O. Sulima

    2003-08-29

    A single step diffusion followed by precise etching of the diffused layer has been developed to obtain a diffusion profile appropriate for high efficiency GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells. The junction depth was controlled through monitoring of light current-voltage (I-V) curves (photovoltaic response) during the post diffusion emitter etching process. The measured photoresponses (prior to device fabrication) have been correlated with the quantum efficiencies and the open circuit voltages in the fabricated devices. An optimum junction depth for obtaining highest quantum efficiency and open circuit voltage is presented based on diffusion lengths (or monitoring carrier lifetimes), carrier mobility and typical diffused impurity profile in GaSb.

  9. Optimization of an electron cyclotron resonance plasma etch process for n{sup +} polysilicon: HBr process chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, G.D.; Blain, M.G.; Westerfield, P.L.; Trutna, L.S.; Maxwell, K.L.

    1993-08-01

    Designed experiments were employed to characterize a process for etching phosphorus doped polycrystalline silicon with HBr in a close-coupled ECR plasma reactor configured for 200 mm wafers. A fractional factorial screening experiment was employed to determine the principal input factors and the main etch effects. Linear models of the process responses indicate RF power, O{sub 2} flow rate, and the position of the resonance zone (with respect to the wafer) as the three strongest factors influencing process performance. Response surfaces generated using data from a follow-on response surface methodology (RSM) experiment predicted an optimum operating region characterized by relatively low RF power, a small O{sub 2} flow, and a resonance zone position close to the wafer. The optimized process demonstrated a polysilicon etch rate of 270 nm/min, an etch rate non-uniformity of 2.2% (1s), an etch selectivity to oxide greater than 100:1, and anisotropic profiles. Particle test results for the optimized process indicated that careful selection of the O{sub 2} fraction is required to avoid polymer deposition and particle formation.

  10. Modeling a Dry Etch Process for Large-Area Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, R.J.; Hebner, G.A.; Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.

    1999-07-28

    There has been considerable interest in developing dry processes which can effectively replace wet processing in the manufacture of large area photovoltaic devices. Environmental and health issues are a driver for this activity because wet processes generally increase worker exposure to toxic and hazardous chemicals and generate large volumes of liquid hazardous waste. Our work has been directed toward improving the performance of screen-printed solar cells while using plasma processing to reduce hazardous chemical usage.

  11. Development of a gate metal etch process for gallium arsenide wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bammi, Rahul; Cale, Timothy S.; Grivna, Gordon

    1994-12-01

    The reactive ion etching of TiWN, which is used as a gate metal on gallium-arsenide device wafers, was studied in a parallel-plate, single-wafer plasma reactor operating at a frequency of 13.56 MHz. We discuss our experimental program designed to develop a highly uniform TiWN etch process with low linewidth loss for 100 mm GaAs wafers, using a sulfur hexafluoride, trifluoromethane, helium chemistry. The effects of different gas compositions, plasma power, inter-electrode gap, chamber pressure, and electrode temperature on the TiWN etch rate, linewidth loss, and etch uniformity were determined. The effects of adding oxygen and/or nitrogen to the above mixture were also studied. In preliminary experiments on Si wafers, standard design of experiments methods were used to narrow the ranges of parameters for further experiments to develop an optimum process for Si wafers. The results of these experiments guided us to the optimum process for GaAs wafers. The optimum conditions, for both Si and GaAs wafers, are presented.

  12. Optimization of an electron cyclotron resonance plasma etch process for [ital n][sup +] polysilicon: HBr process chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, G.D.; Blain, M.G. ); Westerfield, P.L.; Trutna, L.S.; Maxwell, K.L. )

    1994-01-01

    Designed experiments were employed to characterize a process for etching phosphorus doped polycrystalline silicon with HBr in a close-coupled electron cyclotron resonance plasma reactor configured for 200 mm wafers. A fractional factorial screening experiment was employed to determine the principal input factors and the main etch effects. Linear models of the process responses indicate rf power, O[sub 2] flow rate, and the position of the resonance zone (with respect to the wafer) as the three strongest factors influencing process performance. Response surfaces generated using data from a follow-on response surface methodology experiment predicted an optimum operating region characterized by relatively low rf power, a small O[sub 2] flow, and a resonance zone position close to the wafer. One operating point in this region demonstrated a polysilicon etch rate of 270 nm/min, an etch rate nonuniformity of 2.2% (1 std. dev.), an etch selectivity to oxide greater than 100:1, and anisotropic profiles. Particle test results for the optimized process indicated that careful selection of the O[sub 2] fraction is required to avoid residue deposition and particle formation.

  13. Similarity ratio analysis for early stage fault detection with optical emission spectrometer in plasma etching process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; McArdle, Conor; Daniels, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    A Similarity Ratio Analysis (SRA) method is proposed for early-stage Fault Detection (FD) in plasma etching processes using real-time Optical Emission Spectrometer (OES) data as input. The SRA method can help to realise a highly precise control system by detecting abnormal etch-rate faults in real-time during an etching process. The method processes spectrum scans at successive time points and uses a windowing mechanism over the time series to alleviate problems with timing uncertainties due to process shift from one process run to another. A SRA library is first built to capture features of a healthy etching process. By comparing with the SRA library, a Similarity Ratio (SR) statistic is then calculated for each spectrum scan as the monitored process progresses. A fault detection mechanism, named 3-Warning-1-Alarm (3W1A), takes the SR values as inputs and triggers a system alarm when certain conditions are satisfied. This design reduces the chance of false alarm, and provides a reliable fault reporting service. The SRA method is demonstrated on a real semiconductor manufacturing dataset. The effectiveness of SRA-based fault detection is evaluated using a time-series SR test and also using a post-process SR test. The time-series SR provides an early-stage fault detection service, so less energy and materials will be wasted by faulty processing. The post-process SR provides a fault detection service with higher reliability than the time-series SR, but with fault testing conducted only after each process run completes.

  14. Quantum cascade laser based monitoring of CF2 radical concentration as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, M.; Lang, N.; Zimmermann, S.; Schulz, S. E.; Buchholtz, W.; Röpcke, J.; van Helden, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric etching plasma processes for modern interlevel dielectrics become more and more complex by the introduction of new ultra low-k dielectrics. One challenge is the minimization of sidewall damage, while etching ultra low-k porous SiCOH by fluorocarbon plasmas. The optimization of this process requires a deeper understanding of the concentration of the CF2 radical, which acts as precursor in the polymerization of the etch sample surfaces. In an industrial dielectric etching plasma reactor, the CF2 radical was measured in situ using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) around 1106.2 cm-1. We measured Doppler-resolved ro-vibrational absorption lines and determined absolute densities using transitions in the ν3 fundamental band of CF2 with the aid of an improved simulation of the line strengths. We found that the CF2 radical concentration during the etching plasma process directly correlates to the layer structure of the etched wafer. Hence, this correlation can serve as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes. Applying QCL based absorption spectroscopy opens up the way for advanced process monitoring and etching controlling in semiconductor manufacturing.

  15. Process optimization for lattice-selective wet etching of crystalline silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald G.; Guthrie, William F.; Allen, Richard A.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Cresswell, Michael W.; Murabito, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Lattice-selective etching of silicon is used in a number of applications, but it is particularly valuable in those for which the lattice-defined sidewall angle can be beneficial to the functional goals. A relatively small but important niche application is the fabrication of tip characterization standards for critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs). CD-AFMs are commonly used as reference tools for linewidth metrology in semiconductor manufacturing. Accurate linewidth metrology using CD-AFM, however, is critically dependent upon calibration of the tip width. Two national metrology institutes and at least two commercial vendors have explored the development of tip calibration standards using lattice-selective etching of crystalline silicon. The National Institute of Standards and Technology standard of this type is called the single crystal critical dimension reference material. These specimens, which are fabricated using a lattice-plane-selective etch on (110) silicon, exhibit near vertical sidewalls and high uniformity and can be used to calibrate CD-AFM tip width to a standard uncertainty of less than 1 nm. During the different generations of this project, we evaluated variations of the starting material and process conditions. Some of our starting materials required a large etch bias to achieve the desired linewidths. During the optimization experiment described in this paper, we found that for potassium hydroxide etching of the silicon features, it was possible to independently tune the target linewidth and minimize the linewidth nonuniformity. Consequently, this process is particularly well suited for small-batch fabrication of CD-AFM linewidth standards.

  16. Single and multilayered materials processing by argon ion beam etching: study of ion angle incidence and defect formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, N.; Boufnichel, M.; Bahette, E.; Khalfaoui, W.; Ljazouli, R.; Grimal-Perrigouas, V.; Dussart, R.

    2015-09-01

    Ion beam etching (IBE) is a very promising technique in microelectronics because of its capability to etch small patterns with a high resolution and inert materials. In this study, the angular incidence of an argon ion beam on the etch rate and uniformity is discussed in the case of several materials often used in microelectronics. The capability of the IBE technique to etch multilayered stack samples with positive anisotropic profiles was demonstrated on TiNiAu, TiNiCuAu, BST and PZT. Two typical defects involved in IBE processing (fences and not etched pattern foots) due to shadow masking and redeposition effect, are explained and solutions are presented to avoid them. Deep IBE was performed on GaN with an etch depth as high as 10 μm, using a 8 μm thick SiO2 mask. The etching of other mask materials, such as TiN, was investigated in order to improve the selectivity. Using a TiN mask, a selectivity to GaN as high as 5 is reported. Finally, the etch rate enhancement needed for deep etching was studied.

  17. Challenges in the Plasma Etch Process Development in the sub-20nm Technology Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kaushik

    2013-09-01

    For multiple generations of semiconductor technologies, RF plasmas have provided a reliable platform for critical and non-critical patterning applications. The electron temperature of processes in a RF plasma is typically several electron volts. A substantial portion of the electron population is within the energy range accessible for different types of electron collision processes, such as electron collision dissociation and dissociative electron attachment. When these electron processes occur within a small distance above the wafer, the neutral species, radicals and excited molecules, generated from these processes take part in etching reactions impacting selectivity, ARDE and micro-loading. The introduction of finFET devices at 22 nm technology node at Intel marks the transition of planar devices to 3-dimensional devices, which add to the challenges to etch process in fabricating such devices. In the sub-32 nm technology node, Back-end-of-the-line made a change with the implementation of Trench First Metal Hard Mask (TFMHM) integration scheme, which has hence gained traction and become the preferred integration of low-k materials for BEOL. This integration scheme also enables Self-Aligned Via (SAV) patterning which prevents via CD growth and confines via by line trenches to better control via to line spacing. In addition to this, lack of scaling of 193 nm Lithography and non-availability of EUV based lithography beyond concept, has placed focus on novel multiple patterning schemes. This added complexity has resulted in multiple etch schemes to enable technology scaling below 80 nm Pitches, as shown by the memory manufacturers. Double-Patterning and Quad-Patterning have become increasingly used techniques to achieve 64 nm, 56 nm and 45 nm Pitch technologies in Back-end-of-the-line. Challenges associated in the plasma etching of these multiple integration schemes will be discussed in the presentation. In collaboration with A. Ranjan, TEL Technology Center, America

  18. Investigating the process of white etching crack initiation in bearing steel

    DOE PAGES

    Gould, Benjamin; Greco, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    White etching cracks (WECs) have been identified as a dominant mode of premature failure within wind turbine gearbox bearings. Though WECs have been reported in the field for over a decade, the conditions leading to WECs, and the process by which this failure culminates, are both highly debated. In previously published work, the generation of WECs on a benchtop scale was linked to sliding at the surface of the test sample, it was also postulated that the generation of WECs was dependent on the cumulative energy that had been applied to the sample over the entirety of the test. Inmore » this paper, a three ring on roller bench top test rig is used to systematically alter the cumulative energy that a sample experiences through changes in normal load, sliding, and run time, in an attempt to correlate cumulative energy with the formation of WECs. It was determined that, in the current test setup, the presence of WECs can be predicted by this energy criterion. The authors then used this information to study the process by which WECs initiate. Lastly, it was found that, under the current testing conditions, the formation of a dark etching microstructure precedes the formation of a crack, and a crack precedes the formation of white etching microstructure.« less

  19. Investigating the process of white etching crack initiation in bearing steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Benjamin; Greco, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    White etching cracks (WECs) have been identified as a dominant mode of premature failure within wind turbine gearbox bearings. Though WECs have been reported in the field for over a decade, the conditions leading to WECs, and the process by which this failure culminates, are both highly debated. In previously published work, the generation of WECs on a benchtop scale was linked to sliding at the surface of the test sample, it was also postulated that the generation of WECs was dependent on the cumulative energy that had been applied to the sample over the entirety of the test. In this paper, a three ring on roller bench top test rig is used to systematically alter the cumulative energy that a sample experiences through changes in normal load, sliding, and run time, in an attempt to correlate cumulative energy with the formation of WECs. It was determined that, in the current test setup, the presence of WECs can be predicted by this energy criterion. The authors then used this information to study the process by which WECs initiate. Lastly, it was found that, under the current testing conditions, the formation of a dark etching microstructure precedes the formation of a crack, and a crack precedes the formation of white etching microstructure.

  20. Endpoint in plasma etch process using new modified w-multivariate charts and windowed regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakour, Sihem Ben; Taleb, Hassen

    2017-02-01

    Endpoint detection is very important undertaking on the side of getting a good understanding and figuring out if a plasma etching process is done in the right way, especially if the etched area is very small (0.1%). It truly is a crucial part of supplying repeatable effects in every single wafer. When the film being etched has been completely cleared, the endpoint is reached. To ensure the desired device performance on the produced integrated circuit, the high optical emission spectroscopy (OES) sensor is employed. The huge number of gathered wavelengths (profiles) is then analyzed and pre-processed using a new proposed simple algorithm named Spectra peak selection (SPS) to select the important wavelengths, then we employ wavelet analysis (WA) to enhance the performance of detection by suppressing noise and redundant information. The selected and treated OES wavelengths are then used in modified multivariate control charts (MEWMA and Hotelling) for three statistics (mean, SD and CV) and windowed polynomial regression for mean. The employ of three aforementioned statistics is motivated by controlling mean shift, variance shift and their ratio (CV) if both mean and SD are not stable. The control charts show their performance in detecting endpoint especially W-mean Hotelling chart and the worst result is given by CV statistic. As the best detection of endpoint is given by the W-Hotelling mean statistic, this statistic will be used to construct a windowed wavelet Hotelling polynomial regression. This latter can only identify the window containing endpoint phenomenon.

  1. The magnetic properties and microstructure of Co-Pt thin films using wet etching process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyoung; Cho, Young-Lae; Lee, Won-Pyo; Suh, Su-Jeong

    2014-11-01

    Perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) is a promising candidate for high density magnetic recording and has already been applied to hard disk drive (HDD) systems. However, media noise still limits the recording density. To reduce the media noise and achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in hard disk media, the grains of the magnetic layer must be magnetically isolated from each other. This study examined whether sputter-deposited Co-Pt thin films can have adjacent grains that are physically isolated. To accomplish this, the effects of the sputtering conditions and wet etching process on magnetic properties and the microstructure of the films were investigated. The film structure was Co-Pt (30 nm)/Ru (30 nm)/NiFe (10 nm)/Ta (5 nm). The composition of the Co-Pt thin films was Co-30.7 at.% Pt. The Co-Pt thin films were deposited in Ar gas at 5, 10, 12.5, and 15 mTorr. Wet etching process was performed using 7% nitric acid solution at room temperature. These films had high out-of-plane coercivity of up to 7032 Oe, which is twice that of the as-deposited film. These results suggest that wet etched Co-Pt thin films have weaker exchange coupling and enhanced out-of-plane coercivity, which would reduce the medium noise.

  2. Silicon microstructure fabricated by laser micro-patterning method combined with wet etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, T.; Goto, M.; Pihosh, Y.; Kasahara, A.; Tosa, M.

    2005-02-01

    A simple method for silicon microfabrication has been successfully developed. Polypropylene (PP) film as a resist was prepared on a surface of silicon (Si) (1 0 0) plate by an rf magnetron sputtering method. A pulsed laser light was focused and irradiated to the PP film and a part of the film was removed by laser ablation process in the spot at certain laser intensity. When the sample was immersed in a potassium hydroxide solution, etching occurred only at the part that the PP film was removed by laser ablation. These results raise the possibility of this method as a process for Si microfabrication.

  3. Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    NREL scientists have invented the 'black silicon' nanocatalytic wet-chemical etch, an inexpensive, one-step process that literally turns the solar cells black, allowing them to absorb more than 98% of incident sunlight. The process costs just a few cents per watt of solar-cell power-producing capacity. Increases in manufactured cell efficiencies of up to 0.8% are possible because of the reduced reflectance of black silicon. This would reduce silicon solar module costs by $5-$10 per module.

  4. Nanotexturing process on microtextured surfaces of silicon solar cells by SF6/O2 reactive ion etching.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hyungyong; Choi, Jaeho; Lim, Gyoungho; Parida, Bhaskar; Kim, Keunjoo; Jo, Jung Hee; Kim, Hong Seub

    2013-12-01

    We investigated a nanotexturing process on the microtextured surface of single crystalline silicon solar cell by the reactive ion etching process in SF6/O2 mixed gas ambient. P-type Si wafer samples were prepared using a chemical wet etching process to address saw damage removal and achieve microtexturing. The microtextured wafers were further processed for nanotexturing by exposure to reactive ions within a circular tray of wafer carrier containing many small holes for uniform etching. As the dry etching times were increased to 2, 4 and finally to 8 min, surface structures were observed in a transition from nanoholes to nanorods, and a variation in wafer color from dark blue to black. The surface nanostructures showed a lowered photoreflectance and enhanced quantum efficiency within the visible light region with wavelengths of less than 679 nm. The nanohole structure etched for 2 min showed enhanced conversion efficiency when compared to the bare sample; however, the nanorod structure etched for 8 min exhibited the decreased efficiency with a reduced short circuit current, indicating that the surface nanostructural damage with the enlarged nanoperimetric surface area is sensitive to surface passivation from the surface recombination process.

  5. Characterization of the high density plasma etching process of CCTO thin films for the fabrication of very high density capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamore, C.; Tringali, C.; Sparta', N.; Di Marco, S.; Grasso, A.; Ravesi, S.

    2010-02-01

    In this work the feasibility of CCTO (Calcium Copper Titanate) patterning by etching process is demonstrated and fully characterized in a hard to etch materials etcher. CCTO sintered in powder shows a giant relative dielectric constant (105) measured at 1 MHz at room temperature. This feature is furthermore coupled with stability from 101 Hz to 106 Hz in a wide temperature range (100K - 600K). In principle, this property can allow to fabricate very high capacitance density condenser. Due to its perovskite multi-component structure, CCTO can be considered a hard to etch material. For high density capacitor fabrication, CCTO anisotropic etching is requested by using high density plasma. The behavior of etched CCTO was studied in a HRe- (High Density Reflected electron) plasma etcher using Cl2/Ar chemistry. The relationship between the etch rate and the Cl2/Ar ratio was also studied. The effects of RF MHz, KHz Power and pressure variation, the impact of HBr addiction to the Cl2/Ar chemistry on the CCTO etch rate and on its selectivity to Pt and photo resist was investigated.

  6. New Etch Monitoring Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christina; Adamcyk, Martin; Levy, Yuval; Tiedje, Tom; Young, Jeff F.; Kelson, Itzhak

    2000-05-01

    Plasma etching is an important tool for the development of various types of nanostructures. The development of specific plasma etching procedures is often time-consuming. We will describe an new technique for IN-SITU monitoring of the etch rate and sidewall profile of 1D GRATINGS in a remote plasma etcher. The technique involves monitoring the energy loss of alpha particles that propagate through the layer being etched. Samples to be etched are impregnated by a thin near-surface layer of 224Ra nuclei that decay by alpha particle emission. The energy spectrum of the alpha particles is acquired at intervals in the etch process. The etch rate on flat surfaces can be determined quite simply by measuring the change in the peak energy of the transmitted particles. By using a simple geometric model that employs the Bethe Bloch formula for energy loss of charges particles the etch profile of masked samples can also be inferred.

  7. Etching process for improving the strength of a laser-machined silicon-based ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Copley, S.M.; Tao, H.; Todd-Copley, J.A.

    1991-06-11

    A process is disclosed for improving the strength of laser-machined articles formed of a silicon-based ceramic material such as silicon nitride, in which the laser-machined surface is immersed in an etching solution of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid for a duration sufficient to remove substantially all of a silicon film residue on the surface but insufficient to allow the solution to unduly attack the grain boundaries of the underlying silicon nitride substrate. This effectively removes the silicon film as a source of cracks that otherwise could propagate downwardly into the silicon nitride substrate and significantly reduce its strength. 1 figure.

  8. Etching process for improving the strength of a laser-machined silicon-based ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Copley, Stephen M.; Tao, Hongyi; Todd-Copley, Judith A.

    1991-01-01

    A process for improving the strength of laser-machined articles formed of a silicon-based ceramic material such as silicon nitride, in which the laser-machined surface is immersed in an etching solution of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid for a duration sufficient to remove substantially all of a silicon film residue on the surface but insufficient to allow the solution to unduly attack the grain boundaries of the underlying silicon nitride substrate. This effectively removes the silicon film as a source of cracks that otherwise could propagate downwardly into the silicon nitride substrate and significantly reduce its strength.

  9. Pattern scaling with directed self assembly through lithography and etch process integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathsack, Benjamen; Somervell, Mark; Hooge, Josh; Muramatsu, Makoto; Tanouchi, Keiji; Kitano, Takahiro; Nishimura, Eiichi; Yatsuda, Koichi; Nagahara, Seiji; Hiroyuki, Iwaki; Akai, Keiji; Hayakawa, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) has the potential to extend scaling for both line/space and hole patterns. DSA has shown the capability for pitch reduction (multiplication), hole shrinks, CD self-healing as well as a pathway towards line edge roughness (LER) and pattern collapse improvement [1-4]. The current challenges for industry adoption are materials maturity, practical process integration, hardware capability, defect reduction and design integration. Tokyo Electron (TEL) has created close collaborations with customers, consortia and material suppliers to address these challenges with the long term goal of robust manufacturability. This paper provides a wide range of DSA demonstrations to accommodate different device applications. In collaboration with IMEC, directed line/space patterns at 12.5 and 14 nm HP are demonstrated with PS-b-PMMA (poly(styrene-b-methylmethacrylate)) using both chemo and grapho-epitaxy process flows. Pre-pattern exposure latitudes of >25% (max) have been demonstrated with 4X directed self-assembly on 300 mm wafers for both the lift off and etch guide chemo-epitaxy process flows. Within TEL's Technology Development Center (TDC), directed selfassembly processes have been applied to holes for both CD shrink and variation reduction. Using a PS-b-PMMA hole shrink process, negative tone developed pre-pattern holes are reduced to below 30 nm with critical dimension uniformity (CDU) of 0.9 nm (3s) and contact edge roughness (CER) of 0.8 nm. To generate higher resolution beyond a PS-b-PMMA system, a high chi material is used to demonstrate 9 nm HP line/ space post-etch patterns. In this paper, TEL presents process solutions for both line/space and hole DSA process integrations.

  10. Study on closed recycling regeneration process of FeCl3 waste etching solution and recovery of Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, X. F.; Zhou, X. T.; Wang, R. X.; Zhai, D. H.; Ran, H. H.

    2016-08-01

    FeCl3 etching solution is widely used in etching processes due to its strong oxidation and corrosion properties. However, significant amounts of waste etching solution is produced, which pollutes the environment and wastes materials. Aiming to address problems related to the use of recycled FeCl3 waste etching solution containing Cu, the crystallization regeneration process in an enterprise was improved and the copper element was recovered in the form of copper chloride crystal. Based on the original process, a hydrocyclone was added to preseparate the slurry. By investigating the change of the inlet flow rate and separation efficiency of the hydrocyclone with inlet pressure under different concentrations, the optimal inlet pressure was determined to be approximately 0.25Mpa. Experimental results indicated that the workload of the centrifuge was reduced by approximately 80%, the average specific surface area of the copper chloride crystal was decreased by 50%, the production of copper chloride crystal byproducts after washing process was increased by approximately 20% and regeneration of FeCl3 waste etching solution was also realized.

  11. Alkaline etch system qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Goldammer, S.E.; Pemberton, S.E.; Tucker, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    Based on the data from this qualification activity, the Atotech etch system, even with minimum characterization, was capable of etching production printed circuit products as good as those from the Chemcut system. Further characterization of the Atotech system will improve its etching capability. In addition to the improved etch quality expected from further characterization, the Atotech etch system has additional features that help reduce waste and provide for better consistency in the etching process. The programmable logic controller and computer will allow operators to operate the system manually or from pre-established recipes. The evidence and capabilities of the Atotech system made it as good as or better than the Chemcut system for etching WR products. The Printed Wiring Board Engineering Department recommended that the Atotech system be released for production. In December 1995, the Atotech system was formerly qualified for production.

  12. Comparison of Process Performance and Emission Gases during Oxide Etch using Octafluoro-cyclobutane and Perfluoro-2-butene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chang-Jin; Miura, Yoshizo; Nakata, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Akinori; Sekine, Makoto

    2001-03-01

    Octafluorocyclobutane(c-C4F8) gas has been widely used in the high-aspect-ratio, highly selective contact-hole etching process. However, c-C4F8 gas is one of the PFC (perfluoro-compounds) gases that have a very high global warming potential (GWP). We investigated perfluoro-2-butene (linear-C4F8) as an alternative gas and studied the process performance and emission gases during oxide etching. A parallel-plate dual-frequency etcher was used with the gas chemistries c-C4F8/O2 /Ar or l-C4F8/O2 /Ar at a chamber pressure of 25 mTorr. The etch rate and profile of contact holes were measured by SEM. The emission gases were analyzed by a QMS and FTIR spectrometer. Etching results show that, though the profiles of etched contact holes are almost the same for both gas chemistries, the etch rate and nitride selectivity of l-C4F8 based plasma were higher than those of c-C4F8 based plasma. In the analysis of emission gases, it was found that, during contact hole etching, the decomposed c-C4F8 and linear-C4F8 gases were converted into C2F4, CF4, CHF3 and C2F6 gases, and small amounts of C3F8, C4F6 and C4F10 were also generated. Furthermore, some toxic gases such as CO, HF, and COF2 were also detected. This work was performed under the auspices of MITI's R&D program supported by NEDO.

  13. XAFS studies of monodisperse Au nanoclusters formation in the etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Huang, Ting; Liu, Wei; Bao, Jie; Huang, Yuanyuan; Cao, Yuanjie; Yao, Tao; Sun, Zhihu; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the formation mechanism of gold nanoclusters is essential to the development of their synthetic chemistry. Here, by using x-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, UV-Vis and MS spectra, the formation process of monodisperse Au13 nanoclusters is investigated. We find that a critical step involving the formation of smaller Au8-Au11 metastable intermediate clusters induced by the HCl + HSR etching of the polydisperse Aun precursor clusters occurs firstly. Then these intermediate species undergo a size-growth to Au13 cores, followed by a slow structure rearrangement to reach the final stable structure. This work enriches the understanding of cluster formation chemistry and may guide the way towards the design and the controllable synthesis of nanoclusters.

  14. Charge-free method of forming nanostructures on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Hoffbauer; Mark , Akhadov; Elshan

    2010-07-20

    A charge-free method of forming a nanostructure at low temperatures on a substrate. A substrate that is reactive with one of atomic oxygen and nitrogen is provided. A flux of neutral atoms of least one of oxygen and nitrogen is generated within a laser-sustained-discharge plasma source and a collimated beam of energetic neutral atoms and molecules is directed from the plasma source onto a surface of the substrate to form the nanostructure. The energetic neutral atoms and molecules in the beam have an average kinetic energy in a range from about 1 eV to about 5 eV.

  15. High speed optical metrology solution for after etch process monitoring and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charley, Anne-Laure; Leray, Philippe; Pypen, Wouter; Cheng, Shaunee; Verma, Alok; Mattheus, Christine; Wisse, Baukje; Cramer, Hugo; Niesing, Henk; Kruijswijk, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring and control of the various processes in the semiconductor require precise metrology of relevant features. Optical Critical Dimension metrology (OCD) is a non-destructive solution, offering the capability to measure profiles of 2D and 3D features. OCD has an intrinsic averaging over a larger area, resulting in good precision and suppression of local variation. We have studied the feasibility of process monitoring and control in AEI (after etch inspection) applications, using the same angular resolved scatterometer as used for CD, overlay and focus metrology in ADI (after develop inspection) applications1. The sensor covers the full azimuthal-angle range and a large angle-of-incidence range in a single acquisition. The wavelength can be selected between 425nm and 700nm, to optimize for sensitivity for the parameters of interest and robustness against other process variation. In this paper we demonstrate the validity of the OCD data through the measurement and comparison with the reference metrology of multiple wafers at different steps of the imec N14 fabrication process in order to show that this high precision OCD tool can be used for process monitoring and control.

  16. Realization of tellurium-based all dielectric optical metamaterials using a multi-cycle deposition-etch process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Dominguez, Jason; Gonzales, Edward F.; Eric Bower, John; Bruce Burckel, D.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2013-04-01

    Tellurium (Te) dielectric resonator metamaterials for thermal infrared applications were fabricated using a multi-cycle deposition-etch process that circumvents pinch-off issues during deposition. Deposition and etching of Te were studied in detail. Metamaterial samples with varying resonator dimensions were fabricated using this technique. All the samples showed two transmission minima corresponding to magnetic and electric dipole resonances. Longer resonant wavelengths were observed as the resonator dimension was increased. Observation of spectral overlap between magnetic and electric resonances gives us the potential opportunity to realize a negative refractive index material.

  17. Temporal evolution of surface structure and morphology in thin-film growth and etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drotar, Jason Todd

    The temporal evolution of surface structure and morphology in growth and etching processes is of great importance to the understanding of such processes. For example, by looking at the time dependence of the surface roughness, one can often discover the scaling symmetries inherent in a process. In addition to providing clues about what mechanisms might be at work, these symmetries are also of practical interest. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the basic mechanisms that influence the temporal scaling of such systems, many systems still cannot be explained in terms of the known universality classes. Studies of both continuum and discrete models of surface roughening are presented. The temporal scaling of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (KS) equation has been studied using direct numerical integration, and the existence of two distinct scaling regimes is observed. The results are discussed in the context of previous computational and analytical results and compared to existing experimental studies of ion sputtering. It is found that low-energy ion sputtering experiments are consistent with the early-time KS scaling regime; while high-energy ion sputtering experiments are consistent with asymptotic Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) behavior. Next, the temporal scaling behavior of a line-of-sight model of surface roughening has been studied. The model can be applied to both growth and etching processes. Several different limiting cases for the sticking coefficients have been examined using analytical arguments and computational techniques, and it is found that the scaling exponents are, in some cases, universal. The predicted scaling exponents, in some cases, do not belong to any of the known universality classes and therefore define a new universality class. In another case, the exponents are identical to the exponents predicted by the Edwards-Wilkinson equation. The newly discovered universality classes are used to explain experimentally observed behavior of

  18. The etching process of boron nitride by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides under high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, W.; Ma, H.A.; Jia, X.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Appropriate etch processes of hBN and cBN under HPHT are proposed. • The degree of the crystallization of hBN was decreased. • A special cBN growth mechanism with a triangular unit is proposed. • Plate-shape cBN crystals with large ratio of length to thickness were obtained. • A strategy provides useful guidance for controlling the cBN morphology. - Abstract: Some new etching processes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) under high pressure and high temperature in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth fluorides have been discussed. It is found that hBN is etched distinctly by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the morphology of hBN is significantly changed from plate-shape to spherical-shape. Based on the “graphitization index” values of hBN, the degree of the crystallization of hBN under high pressure and high temperature decreases in the sequence of LiF > CaF{sub 2} > MgF{sub 2}. This facilitates the formation of high-quality cBN single crystals. Different etch steps, pits, and islands are observed on cBN surface, showing the strong etching by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the tendency of layer-by-layer growth. A special layer growth mechanism of cBN with a triangular unit has been found. Furthermore, the morphologies of cBN crystals are apparently affected by a preferential surface etching of LiF, CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2}. Respectively, the plate-shape and tetrahedral cBN crystals can be obtained in the presence of different alkali and alkaline earth fluorides.

  19. A Dry-Etch Process for Low Temperature Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors for Far Infrared Bolometer Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christine A.; Chervenak, James A.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; McClanahan, Richard A.; Miller, Timothy M.; Mitchell, Robert; Moseley, S. Harvey; Staguhn, Johannes; Stevenson, Thomas R.

    2003-01-01

    The next generation of ultra-low power bolometer arrays, with applications in far infrared imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry, utilizes a superconducting bilayer as the sensing element to enable SQUID multiplexed readout. Superconducting transition edge sensors (TES s) are being produced with dual metal systems of superconductinghormal bilayers. The transition temperature (Tc) is tuned by altering the relative thickness of the superconductor with respect to the normal layer. We are currently investigating MoAu and MoCu bilayers. We have developed a dry-etching process for MoAu TES s with integrated molybdenum leads, and are working on adapting the process to MoCu. Dry etching has the advantage over wet etching in the MoAu system in that one can achieve a high degree of selectivity, greater than 10, using argon ME, or argon ion milling, for patterning gold on molybdenum. Molybdenum leads are subsequently patterned using fluorine plasma.. The dry-etch technique results in a smooth, featureless TES with sharp sidewalls, no undercutting of the Mo beneath the normal metal, and Mo leads with high critical current. The effects of individual processing parameters on the characteristics of the transition will be reported.

  20. Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    The NREL "black silicon" nanocatalytic wet-chemical etch is an inexpensive, one-step method to minimize reflections from crystalline silicon solar cells. The technology enables high-efficiency solar cells without the use of expensive antireflection coatings.

  1. Efficient process development for bulk silicon etching using cellular automata simulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, James; He, Yie; Than, Olaf; Akkaraju, Sandeep

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes cellular automata simulation techniques used to predict the anisotropic etching of single-crystal silicon. In particular, this paper will focus on the application of wet etching of silicon wafers using typical anisotropic etchants such as KOH, TMAH, and EDP. Achieving a desired final 3D geometry of etch silicon wafers often is difficult without requiring a number of fabrication design iterations. The result is wasted time and resources. AnisE, a tool to simulate anisotropic etching of silicon wafers using cellular automata simulation, was developed in order to efficiently prototype and manufacture MEMS devices. AnisE has been shown to effectively decrease device development time and costs by up to 50% and 60%, respectively.

  2. Hydrothermal etching preparation and growth process of γ-MnOOH with novel hexagram morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xing; Zhou, Haiyan; Lv, Jing; Kang, Liping; Lei, Zhibin; Liu, Zong-huai

    2015-04-01

    Well-defined single crystal γ-MnOOH with novel hexagram morphology was prepared by hydrothermal treating a suspension of ethyl acetate and KMnO4 at 200 °C for 48 h, and its formation process had been investigated on the basis of XRD, FESEM, TEM, HRTEM, and SAED analyses. In keeping hydrothermal treatment temperature and reaction time, ethyl acetate played an important role in controlling the crystal phase and morphology of the obtained materials, which was used as both reducing agent and etchant. It hydrolyzed into acetic acid and ethanol slowly and caused an acidic reaction environment accompanied with hydrothermal reaction. The acetic acid was adsorbed on the lateral of γ-MnOOH with multiple branched nanorods, which caused a soft etching process and the lateral of the multiple branched nanorods became sharper and thinner and finally transformed into γ-MnOOH with hexagram morphology. The prepared γ-MnOOH with novel hexagram morphology is expected to be used for a fundamental study in surface science and for potential applications such as adsorbent, electro-catalyst, sensing and so on.

  3. Investigations on diamond nanostructuring of different morphologies by the reactive-ion etching process and their potential applications.

    PubMed

    Kunuku, Srinivasu; Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Tsai, Cheng-Yen; Chang, Wen-Hao; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan

    2013-08-14

    We report the systematic studies on the fabrication of aligned, uniform, and highly dense diamond nanostructures from diamond films of various granular structures. Self-assembled Au nanodots are used as a mask in the self-biased reactive-ion etching (RIE) process, using an O2/CF4 process plasma. The morphology of diamond nanostructures is a close function of the initial phase composition of diamond. Cone-shaped and tip-shaped diamond nanostructures result for microcrystalline diamond (MCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films, whereas pillarlike and grasslike diamond nanostructures are obtained for Ar-plasma-based and N2-plasma-based ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films, respectively. While the nitrogen-incorporated UNCD (N-UNCD) nanograss shows the most-superior electron-field-emission properties, the NCD nanotips exhibit the best photoluminescence properties, viz, different applications need different morphology of diamond nanostructures to optimize the respective characteristics. The optimum diamond nanostructure can be achieved by proper choice of granular structure of the initial diamond film. The etching mechanism is explained by in situ observation of optical emission spectrum of RIE plasma. The preferential etching of sp(2)-bonded carbon contained in the diamond films is the prime factor, which forms the unique diamond nanostructures from each type of diamond films. However, the excited oxygen atoms (O*) are the main etching species of diamond film.

  4. Quantum cascade laser based monitoring of CF{sub 2} radical concentration as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hübner, M.; Lang, N.; Röpcke, J.; Helden, J. H. van; Zimmermann, S.; Schulz, S. E.; Buchholtz, W.

    2015-01-19

    Dielectric etching plasma processes for modern interlevel dielectrics become more and more complex by the introduction of new ultra low-k dielectrics. One challenge is the minimization of sidewall damage, while etching ultra low-k porous SiCOH by fluorocarbon plasmas. The optimization of this process requires a deeper understanding of the concentration of the CF{sub 2} radical, which acts as precursor in the polymerization of the etch sample surfaces. In an industrial dielectric etching plasma reactor, the CF{sub 2} radical was measured in situ using a continuous wave quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) around 1106.2 cm{sup −1}. We measured Doppler-resolved ro-vibrational absorption lines and determined absolute densities using transitions in the ν{sub 3} fundamental band of CF{sub 2} with the aid of an improved simulation of the line strengths. We found that the CF{sub 2} radical concentration during the etching plasma process directly correlates to the layer structure of the etched wafer. Hence, this correlation can serve as a diagnostic tool of dielectric etching plasma processes. Applying QCL based absorption spectroscopy opens up the way for advanced process monitoring and etching controlling in semiconductor manufacturing.

  5. Absolute intensities of the vacuum ultraviolet spectra in oxide etch plasma processing discharges

    SciTech Connect

    WOODWORTH,JOSEPH R.; RILEY,MERLE E.; AMATUCCI,VINCENT A.; HAMILTON,THOMAS W.; ARAGON,BEN P.

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, the authors report the absolute intensities of ultraviolet light between 4.9 eV and 24 eV ( 250 nm to 50 mn ) striking a silicon wafer in a number of oxide-etch processing discharges. The emphasis is on photons with energies greater than 8.8 eV, which have enough energy to damage SiO{sub 2}. These discharges were in an inductively-driven Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell which had been modified to more closely resemble commercial etching tools. Comparisons of measurements made through a side port in the cell and through a hole in the wafer indicate that the VUV light in these discharges is strongly trapped. For the pure halocarbon gases examined in these experiments (C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, CHF{sub 3}, C{sub 4}F{sub 8}), the fluxes of VUV photons to the wafer varied from 1 x 10{sup 15} to 3 x 10{sup 15} photons/cm{sup 2} sec or equivalently from 1.5 to 5 mW/cm{sup 2}. These measurements imply that 0.1% to 0.3% of the rf source power to these discharges ends up hitting the wafer as VUV photons for the typical 20 mT, 200 W rf discharges. For typical ashing discharges containing pure oxygen, the VUV intensities are slightly higher--about 8 mW/cm{sup 2} . As argon or hydrogen diluents are added to the fluorocarbon gases, the VUV intensities increase dramatically, with a 10/10/10 mixture of Ar/C{sub 2}F{sub 6}/H{sub 2} yielding VUV fluxes on the wafer 26 mW/cm{sup 2} and pure argon discharges yielding 52 mW/cm{sup 2} . Adding an rf bias to the wafer had only a small effect on the VUV observed through a side-port of the GEC cell.

  6. Subtractive Plasma-Assisted-Etch Process for Developing High Performance Nanocrystalline Zinc-Oxide Thin-Film-Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    Computer Engineering Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air Education and...Unfortunately, techniques for device scaling of ZnO TFTs have been restricted due to the processing and lithographic methods used for device fabrication...etching, or metal lift-off fabrication processes, resulting in relatively long channel length devices [21]. Shadow mask techniques offer little

  7. Charging-free electrochemical system for harvesting low-grade thermal energy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuan; Lee, Seok Woo; Ghasemi, Hadi; Loomis, James; Li, Xiaobo; Kraemer, Daniel; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi; Chen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and low-cost systems are needed to harvest the tremendous amount of energy stored in low-grade heat sources (<100 °C). Thermally regenerative electrochemical cycle (TREC) is an attractive approach which uses the temperature dependence of electrochemical cell voltage to construct a thermodynamic cycle for direct heat-to-electricity conversion. By varying temperature, an electrochemical cell is charged at a lower voltage than discharge, converting thermal energy to electricity. Most TREC systems still require external electricity for charging, which complicates system designs and limits their applications. Here, we demonstrate a charging-free TREC consisting of an inexpensive soluble Fe(CN)63−/4− redox pair and solid Prussian blue particles as active materials for the two electrodes. In this system, the spontaneous directions of the full-cell reaction are opposite at low and high temperatures. Therefore, the two electrochemical processes at both low and high temperatures in a cycle are discharge. Heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 2.0% can be reached for the TREC operating between 20 and 60 °C. This charging-free TREC system may have potential application for harvesting low-grade heat from the environment, especially in remote areas. PMID:25404325

  8. Charging-free electrochemical system for harvesting low-grade thermal energy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Lee, Seok Woo; Ghasemi, Hadi; Loomis, James; Li, Xiaobo; Kraemer, Daniel; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi; Chen, Gang

    2014-12-02

    Efficient and low-cost systems are needed to harvest the tremendous amount of energy stored in low-grade heat sources (<100 °C). Thermally regenerative electrochemical cycle (TREC) is an attractive approach which uses the temperature dependence of electrochemical cell voltage to construct a thermodynamic cycle for direct heat-to-electricity conversion. By varying temperature, an electrochemical cell is charged at a lower voltage than discharge, converting thermal energy to electricity. Most TREC systems still require external electricity for charging, which complicates system designs and limits their applications. Here, we demonstrate a charging-free TREC consisting of an inexpensive soluble Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) redox pair and solid Prussian blue particles as active materials for the two electrodes. In this system, the spontaneous directions of the full-cell reaction are opposite at low and high temperatures. Therefore, the two electrochemical processes at both low and high temperatures in a cycle are discharge. Heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 2.0% can be reached for the TREC operating between 20 and 60 °C. This charging-free TREC system may have potential application for harvesting low-grade heat from the environment, especially in remote areas.

  9. Simulation of Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Paul; Moroz, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Plasma is an indispensable tool in materials processing. It provides chemically and physically active species and directional flows of energetic species enabling deep etching with good straight profiles required by the industry. At present time, the only feasible methods of simulating the resulting feature profiles are those which fall within the scope of feature-scale (FS) simulation methods, utilizing engineering-type of reactions of incoming species with solid materials. At the same time, the molecule dynamics (MD) methods are emerging as an important alternative approach to simulating extremely small features with sizes below of a few nanometers. In our presentation, we discuss both FS methods implemented into the FPS3D code and MD methods implemented into the MDSS code. We also discuss the ways of extracting information about the reactions and interactions used in FS codes from the MD simulations utilizing the approach of interatomic potentials. For this presentation, we selected two types of simulation cases for etching. The first type considers simulation of mostly etching and implantation, such as during Si etching by chlorine-argon plasma. The second type considers ALE (atomic layer etch) when etching is done by a cyclic process of surface passivation/activation with the following process of etching/removal of a single atomic layer per cycle or per a few cycles, allowing ultimate processing accuracy. The simulations are carried out with both FS and MD codes to provide the data for relation and comparison between those two very different approaches.

  10. Chemical downstream etching of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Jarecki, R.L.; Simonson, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The downstream etching of tungsten and tungsten oxide has been investigated. Etching of chemical vapor deposited tungsten and e-beam deposited tungsten oxide samples was performed using atomic fluorine generated by a microwave discharge of argon and NF{sub 3}. Etching was found to be highly activated with activation energies approximated to be 6.0{plus_minus}0.5thinspkcal/mol and 5.4{plus_minus}0.4thinspkcal/mol for W and WO{sub 3}, respectively. In the case of F etching of tungsten, the addition of undischarged nitric oxide (NO) directly into the reaction chamber results in the competing effects of catalytic etch rate enhancement and the formation of a nearly stoichiometric WO{sub 3} passivating tungsten oxide film, which ultimately stops the etching process. For F etching of tungsten oxide, the introduction of downstream NO reduces the etch rate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  11. Etching and Growth of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seabaugh, A. C.; Mattauch, R., J.

    1983-01-01

    In-place process for etching and growth of gallium arsenide calls for presaturation of etch and growth melts by arsenic source crystal. Procedure allows precise control of thickness of etch and newly grown layer on substrate. Etching and deposition setup is expected to simplify processing and improve characteristics of gallium arsenide lasers, high-frequency amplifiers, and advanced integrated circuits.

  12. Fabrication of combined-scale nano- and microfluidic polymer systems using a multilevel dry etching, electroplating and molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzi, Simone; Østergaard, Peter Friis; Matteucci, Marco; Lehrmann Christiansen, Thomas; Cech, Jiri; Marie, Rodolphe; Taboryski, Rafael

    2012-11-01

    Microfabricated single-cell capture and DNA stretching devices have been produced by injection molding. The fabrication scheme employed deep reactive ion etching in a silicon substrate, electroplating in nickel and molding in cyclic olefin polymer. This work proposes technical solutions to fabrication challenges associated with chip sealing and demolding of polymer high-volume replication methods. UV-assisted thermal bonding was found to ensure a strong seal of the microstructures in the molded part without altering the geometry of the channels. In the DNA stretching device, a low aspect ratio nanoslit (1/200) connecting two larger micro-channels was used to stretch a 168.5 kbp DNA molecule, while in the other device single-HeLa cells were captured against a micro-aperture connecting two larger microfluidic channels. Different dry etching processes have been investigated for the master origination of the cell-capture device. The combination of a modified Bosch process and an isotropic polysilicon etch was found to ensure the ease of demolding by resulting in slightly positively tapered sidewalls with negligible undercut at the mask interface.

  13. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes.

    PubMed

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11kg/m(3) of copper and 1.35kg/m(3) of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100-500nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process.

  14. Agile dry etching of compound semiconductors for science-based manufacturing using in-situ process control

    SciTech Connect

    ASHBY,CAROL I.; VAWTER,GREGORY A.; BREILAND,WILLIAM G.; BRUSKAS,LARRY A.; WOODWORTH,JOSEPH R.; HEBNER,GREGORY A.

    2000-02-01

    In-situ optical diagnostics and ion beam diagnostics for plasma-etch and reactive-ion-beam etch (RIBE) tools have been developed and implemented on etch tools in the Compound Semiconductor Research Laboratory (CSRL). The optical diagnostics provide real-time end-point detection during plasma etching of complex thin-film layered structures that require precision etching to stop on a particular layer in the structure. The Monoetch real-time display and analysis program developed with this LDRD displays raw and filtered reflectance signals that enable an etch system operator to stop an etch at the desired depth within the desired layer. The ion beam diagnostics developed with this LDRD will permit routine analysis of critical ion-beam profile characteristics that determine etch uniformity and reproducibility on the RIBE tool.

  15. Enhancing hydrophilicity and water permeability of PET track-etched membranes by advanced oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, Ilya V.; Mashentseva, Anastassiya A.; Güven, Olgun; Zdorovets, Maxim V.; Taltenov, Abzal A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present results on the application of advanced oxidation systems for effective and non-toxic oxidation of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track-etched membranes (PET TeMs) to improve their wettability and water transport properties. Two oxidizing systems: H2O2 under UV irradiation (H2O2/UV) and Fenton system under visible light (Fenton/H2O2/Vis) were compared. The surface of functionalized PET TeMs was characterized by using colorimetric assay, contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results clearly showed that water permeability of PET TeMs treated with H2O2/UV was improved by 28 ± 5% compared with etched-only membrane, the same parameter was found to increase by 13 ± 4% in the case of Fenton/H2O2/Vis treatment. The proposed oxidation technique is very simple, environment friendly and not requiring special equipment or expensive chemicals. The surface hydrophilicity of the membranes stored for 360 days in air between paper sheets was analyzed by contact angle test, colorimetric assay to measure concentration of carboxylic groups on the surface with toluidine blue and XPS analysis. The hydrophilic properties of oxidized PET TeMs were found to be stable for a long period of time.

  16. Photomask etch system and process for 10nm technology node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrachood, Madhavi; Grimbergen, Michael; Yu, Keven; Leung, Toi; Tran, Jeffrey; Chen, Jeff; Bivens, Darin; Yalamanchili, Rao; Wistrom, Richard; Faure, Tom; Bartlau, Peter; Crawford, Shaun; Sakamoto, Yoshifumi

    2015-10-01

    While the industry is making progress to offer EUV lithography schemes to attain ultimate critical dimensions down to 20 nm half pitch, an interim optical lithography solution to address an immediate need for resolution is offered by various integration schemes using advanced PSM (Phase Shift Mask) materials including thin e-beam resist and hard mask. Using the 193nm wavelength to produce 10nm or 7nm patterns requires a range of optimization techniques, including immersion and multiple patterning, which place a heavy demand on photomask technologies. Mask schemes with hard mask certainly help attain better selectivity and hence better resolution but pose integration challenges and defectivity issues. This paper presents a new photomask etch solution for attenuated phase shift masks that offers high selectivity (Cr:Resist > 1.5:1), tighter control on the CD uniformity with a 3sigma value approaching 1 nm and controllable CD bias (5-20 nm) with excellent CD linearity performance (<5 nm) down to the finer resolution. The new system has successfully demonstrated capability to meet the 10 nm node photomask CD requirements without the use of more complicated hard mask phase shift blanks. Significant improvement in post wet clean recovery performance was demonstrated by the use of advanced chamber materials. Examples of CD uniformity, linearity, and minimum feature size, and etch bias performance on 10 nm test site and production mask designs will be shown.

  17. Direct fabrication of compound-eye microlens array on curved surfaces by a facile femtosecond laser enhanced wet etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Hao; Wei, Yang; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Fan; Du, Guangqing; Yong, Jiale; Hou, Xun

    2016-11-01

    We report a direct fabrication of an omnidirectional negative microlens array on a curved substrate by a femtosecond laser enhanced chemical etching process, which is utilized as a molding template for duplicating bioinspired compound eyes. The femtosecond laser treatment of the curved glass substrate employs a common x-y-z stage without rotating the sample surface perpendicular to the laser beam, and uniform, omnidirectional-aligned negative microlenses are generated after a hydrofluoric acid etching. Using the negative microlens array on the concave glass substrate as a molding template, we fabricate an artificial compound eye with 3000 positive microlenses of 95-μm diameter close-packed on a 5-mm polymer hemisphere. Compared to the transferring process, the negative microlenses directly fabricated on the curved mold by our method are distortion-free, and the duplicated artificial eye presents clear and uniform imaging capabilities. This work provides a facile and efficient route to the fabrication of microlenses on any curved substrates without complicated alignment and motion control processes, which has the potential for the development of new microlens-based devices and systems.

  18. Prediction of UV spectra and UV-radiation damage in actual plasma etching processes using on-wafer monitoring technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinnai, Butsurin; Fukuda, Seiichi; Ohtake, Hiroto; Samukawa, Seiji

    2010-02-01

    UV radiation during plasma processing affects the surface of materials. Nevertheless, the interaction of UV photons with surface is not clearly understood because of the difficulty in monitoring photons during plasma processing. For this purpose, we have previously proposed an on-wafer monitoring technique for UV photons. For this study, using the combination of this on-wafer monitoring technique and a neural network, we established a relationship between the data obtained from the on-wafer monitoring technique and UV spectra. Also, we obtained absolute intensities of UV radiation by calibrating arbitrary units of UV intensity with a 126 nm excimer lamp. As a result, UV spectra and their absolute intensities could be predicted with the on-wafer monitoring. Furthermore, we developed a prediction system with the on-wafer monitoring technique to simulate UV-radiation damage in dielectric films during plasma etching. UV-induced damage in SiOC films was predicted in this study. Our prediction results of damage in SiOC films shows that UV spectra and their absolute intensities are the key cause of damage in SiOC films. In addition, UV-radiation damage in SiOC films strongly depends on the geometry of the etching structure. The on-wafer monitoring technique should be useful in understanding the interaction of UV radiation with surface and in optimizing plasma processing by controlling UV radiation.

  19. Damage-free top-down processes for fabricating two-dimensional arrays of 7 nm GaAs nanodiscs using bio-templates and neutral beam etching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan-Yu; Huang, Chi-Hsien; Tsukamoto, Rikako; Mortemousque, Pierre-Andre; Itoh, Kohei M; Ohno, Yuzo; Samukawa, Seiji

    2011-09-07

    The first damage-free top-down fabrication processes for a two-dimensional array of 7 nm GaAs nanodiscs was developed by using ferritin (a protein which includes a 7 nm diameter iron core) bio-templates and neutral beam etching. The photoluminescence of GaAs etched with a neutral beam clearly revealed that the processes could accomplish defect-free etching for GaAs. In the bio-template process, to remove the ferritin protein shell without thermal damage to the GaAs, we firstly developed an oxygen-radical treatment method with a low temperature of 280 °C. Then, the neutral beam etched the defect-free nanodisc structure of the GaAs using the iron core as an etching mask. As a result, a two-dimensional array of GaAs quantum dots with a diameter of ∼ 7 nm, a height of ∼ 10 nm, a high taper angle of 88° and a quantum dot density of more than 7 × 10(11) cm(-2) was successfully fabricated without causing any damage to the GaAs.

  20. Individualized Learning Package about Etching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Michael J.

    An individualized learning package provides step-by-step instruction in the fundamentals of the etching process. Thirteen specific behavioral objectives are listed. A pretest, consisting of matching 15 etching terms with their definitions, is provided along with an answer key. The remainder of the learning package teaches the 13 steps of the…

  1. Enhancement on photocatalytic activity of an amorphous titanium oxide film with nano-textured surface by selective-fluorination etching process

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Pin-Chun; Huang, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Tai-Hong; Lai, Li-Wen; Lu, Yi-Shan; Liu, Day-Shan

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • The amorphous TiO{sub x} film surface was modified via selective fluorination etching process. • The resulting nano-textured surface markedly enriched the specific surface area and surface acidity. • The photocatalytic activity was comparable to an annealed TiO{sub x} film with anatase structure. - Abstract: A selective-fluorination etching process achieved by an UV light pre-irradiation and the subsequently fluorination etching was developed to enhance the photocatalytic activity of a low-temperature deposited amorphous titanium oxide (a-TiO{sub x}) film. Textured surface on the a-TiO{sub x} films formed by this process were investigated using atomic force microscope and field emission scanning electron microscope. Evidence of the fluorine ions introduced into the a-TiO{sub x} films was examined using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The etching thickness of the a-TiO{sub x} film was found to be deeply relevant to the film pre-irradiated by the UV light. An a-TiO{sub x} film with nano-textured surface, which was favorable to enlarge the specific surface area, thus was obtainable from the notable etching selectivity of the film pre-irradiated by UV light through a nano-sized mask. In addition, the surface acidity of the a-TiO{sub x} film was enhanced by the formation of the Ti-F chemical bonds originating from the fluorination etching process, which also was functional to facilitate the production of surface OH free radicals. Accordingly, the resulting fluorinated a-TiO{sub x} film with nano-textured surface performed a quality photocatalytic activity comparable to that of the high-temperature achieved TiO{sub x} film with anatase structures.

  2. Ion beam sputter etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1986-01-01

    An ion beam etching process which forms extremely high aspect ratio surface microstructures using thin sputter masks is utilized in the fabrication of integrated circuits. A carbon rich sputter mask together with unmasked portions of a substrate is bombarded with inert gas ions while simultaneous carbon deposition occurs. The arrival of the carbon deposit is adjusted to enable the sputter mask to have a near zero or even slightly positive increase in thickness with time while the unmasked portions have a high net sputter etch rate.

  3. Ion beam etching process for high-density spintronic devices and its damage recovery by the oxygen showering post-treatment process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Junho; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2017-04-01

    The electric short fail trend of the perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs) caused by the ion beam etching (IBE) process is studied at various ion beam angles and cell-to-cell space widths. The number of electric short fails increases markedly at an ion beam angle greater than 35° and a cell-to-cell space width less than 30 nm at the assumed MTJ height including a hard mask (HM) of 20 nm. In order to recover these electric short fails, we propose the selective oxidation process called the oxygen showering post-treatment (OSP). By the OSP process, the number of electric short fails in sub-30-nm-spaced MTJ arrays is reduced from 25 to 0.8%, and the magnetoresistance (MR) is increased from 99 to 120%. By this result, we can verify that the damaged layer is recovered successfully by the OSP, and that the OSP can be a universal post-treatment process even beyond the 20 nm design rule for use in both reactive ion etching and IBE schemes.

  4. Ge and GeOx films as sacrificial layer for MEMS technology based on piezoelectric AlN: etching and planarization processes (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangrador, J.; Olivares, J.; Iborra, E.; Vergara, L.; Clement, M.; Sanz-Hervas, A.

    2005-07-01

    In this article we present a study of deposition and etching techniques of germanium (Ge) and amorphous oxygen germanium (GeOx) films, with the aim of using them as sacrificial layer in the fabrication of AlN-based MEMS by surface micromachining processes. The Ge and GeOx layers were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering in Ar and Ar/O2 atmospheres. By controlling the process parameters we were able to set the final composition of the GeOx films, which was assessed by FTIR measurements. We have studied the etch rates of GeOx films with x ranging from 0 to 1 in H2O2 and H2O2/acid solutions. Depending on the etching temperature and the oxygen content in the layers, etch rates ranging from 0.2 to 2 μm/min were obtained. Nearly stoichiometric germanium oxide (GeO2) was etched in pure H2O at very high rate (>1 μm/min at room temperature). We have also developed a chemomechanical polishing (CMP) process for the planarization of Ge and GeOx. The influence of the slurries containing diverse powders (CeO2, Al2O3) and chemical agents (NH4OH, HCl), the different pads, and the various process parameters on the removal rate and the final sample topography has been studied. Finally, we have analysed the compatibility of the materials involved in the process flow with the processes of planarization and removal of the sacrificial layers.

  5. Submicron patterned metal hole etching

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.; Contolini, Robert J.; Liberman, Vladimir; Morse, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    A wet chemical process for etching submicron patterned holes in thin metal layers using electrochemical etching with the aid of a wetting agent. In this process, the processed wafer to be etched is immersed in a wetting agent, such as methanol, for a few seconds prior to inserting the processed wafer into an electrochemical etching setup, with the wafer maintained horizontal during transfer to maintain a film of methanol covering the patterned areas. The electrochemical etching setup includes a tube which seals the edges of the wafer preventing loss of the methanol. An electrolyte composed of 4:1 water: sulfuric is poured into the tube and the electrolyte replaces the wetting agent in the patterned holes. A working electrode is attached to a metal layer of the wafer, with reference and counter electrodes inserted in the electrolyte with all electrodes connected to a potentiostat. A single pulse on the counter electrode, such as a 100 ms pulse at +10.2 volts, is used to excite the electrochemical circuit and perform the etch. The process produces uniform etching of the patterned holes in the metal layers, such as chromium and molybdenum of the wafer without adversely effecting the patterned mask.

  6. Etching process mills PH 14-8 Mo alloy steel to precise tolerances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, B. L.; Mulland, P. W.

    1966-01-01

    Chemical milling process, which combines an aqua regia etchant with a sulfonate wetting agent, produces finishes on PH 14-8 molybdenum alloy steel to precise tolerances. This process permits precision removal of excess metal from the steel in annealed and/or aged conditions.

  7. Influence of etching processes on electronic transport in mesoscopic InAs/GaSb quantum well devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Atindra Nath; Müller, Susanne; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Tschirky, Thomas; Charpentier, Christophe; Wegscheider, Werner

    2015-07-15

    We report the electronic characterization of mesoscopic Hall bar devices fabricated from coupled InAs/GaSb quantum wells sandwiched between AlSb barriers, an emerging candidate for two-dimensional topological insulators. The electronic width of the etched structures was determined from the low field magneto-resistance peak, a characteristic signature of partially diffusive boundary scattering in the ballistic limit. In case of dry-etching the electronic width was found to decrease with electron density. In contrast, for wet etched devices it stayed constant with density. Moreover, the boundary scattering was found to be more specular for wet-etched devices, which may be relevant for studying topological edge states.

  8. Design and fabrication of MEMS devices using the integration of MUMPs, trench-refilled molding, DRIE and bulk silicon etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mingching; Fang, Weileun

    2005-03-01

    This work integrates multi-depth DRIE etching, trench-refilled molding, two poly-Si layers MUMPs and bulk releasing to improve the variety and performance of MEMS devices. In summary, the present fabrication process, named MOSBE II, has three merits. First, this process can monolithically fabricate and integrate poly-Si thin-film structures with different thicknesses and stiffnesses, such as the flexible spring and the stiff mirror plate. Second, multi-depth structures, such as vertical comb electrodes, are available from the DRIE processes. Third, a cavity under the micromachined device is provided by the bulk silicon etching process, so that a large out-of-plane motion is allowed. In application, an optical scanner driven by the self-aligned vertical comb actuator was demonstrated. The poly-Si micromachined components fabricated by MOSBE II can further integrate with the MUMPs devices to establish a more powerful MOEMS platform.

  9. Selective Si Etching Using HCl Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isheden, C.; Hellström, P. E.; Radamson, H. H.; Zhang, S.-L.; Östling, M.

    2004-01-01

    Selective Si etching using HCl in a reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor in the temperature range 800 1000°C is investigated. At 900°C, the etch process is anisotropic, exhibiting the densely packed (100), (311) and (111) surfaces. This behavior indicates that the etch process is limited by surface reaction, since the etch rate in the directions with higher atomic concentration is lower. When the temperature is decreased to 800°C, etch pits occur. A more isotropic etch is obtained at 1000°C, however at this temperature the masking oxide is attacked and the etch surface is rough. Thus the temperature has to be under the present process conditions, confined to a narrow window to yield desirable properties.

  10. Plasma etching of cesium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Hopwood, J.; Tipnis, S.; Nagarkar, V.; Gaysinskiy, V.

    2002-01-01

    Thick films of cesium iodide (CsI) are often used to convert x-ray images into visible light. Spreading of the visible light within CsI, however, reduces the resolution of the resulting image. Anisotropic etching of the CsI film into an array of micropixels can improve the image resolution by confining light within each pixel. The etching process uses a high-density inductively coupled plasma to pattern CsI samples held by a heated, rf-biased chuck. Fluorine-containing gases such as CF4 are found to enhance the etch rate by an order of magnitude compared to Ar+ sputtering alone. Without inert-gas ion bombardment, however, the CF4 etch becomes self-limited within a few microns of depth due to the blanket deposition of a passivation layer. Using CF4+Ar continuously removes this layer from the lateral surfaces, but the formation of a thick passivation layer on the unbombarded sidewalls of etched features is observed by scanning electron microscopy. At a substrate temperature of 220 °C, the minimum ion-bombardment energy for etching is Ei~50 eV, and the rate depends on Ei1/2 above 65 eV. In dilute mixtures of CF4 and Ar, the etch rate is proportional to the gas-phase density of atomic fluorine. Above 50% CF4, however, the rate decreases, indicating the onset of net surface polymer deposition. These observations suggest that anisotropy is obtained through the ion-enhanced inhibitor etching mechanism. Etching exhibits an Arrhenius-type behavior in which the etch rate increases from ~40 nm/min at 40 °C to 380 nm/min at 330 °C. The temperature dependence corresponds to an activation energy of 0.13+/-0.01 eV. This activation energy is consistent with the electronic sputtering mechanism for alkali halides.

  11. Preface: Special Topic on Atomic and Molecular Layer Processing: Deposition, Patterning, and Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, James R.; Kummel, Andrew C.

    2017-02-01

    Thin film processing technologies that promise atomic and molecular scale control have received increasing interest in the past several years, as traditional methods for fabrication begin to reach their fundamental limits. Many of these technologies involve at their heart phenomena occurring at or near surfaces, including adsorption, gas-surface reactions, diffusion, desorption, and re-organization of near-surface layers. Moreover many of these phenomena involve not just reactions occurring under conditions of local thermodynamic equilibrium but also the action of energetic species including electrons, ions, and hyperthermal neutrals. There is a rich landscape of atomic and molecular scale interactions occurring in these systems that is still not well understood. In this Special Topic Issue of The Journal of Chemical Physics, we have collected recent representative examples of work that is directed at unraveling the mechanistic details concerning atomic and molecular layer processing, which will provide an important framework from which these fields can continue to develop. These studies range from the application of theory and computation to these systems to the use of powerful experimental probes, such as X-ray synchrotron radiation, probe microscopies, and photoelectron and infrared spectroscopies. The work presented here helps in identifying some of the major challenges and direct future activities in this exciting area of research involving atomic and molecular layer manipulation and fabrication.

  12. Preface: Special Topic on Atomic and Molecular Layer Processing: Deposition, Patterning, and Etching.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, James R; Kummel, Andrew C

    2017-02-07

    Thin film processing technologies that promise atomic and molecular scale control have received increasing interest in the past several years, as traditional methods for fabrication begin to reach their fundamental limits. Many of these technologies involve at their heart phenomena occurring at or near surfaces, including adsorption, gas-surface reactions, diffusion, desorption, and re-organization of near-surface layers. Moreover many of these phenomena involve not just reactions occurring under conditions of local thermodynamic equilibrium but also the action of energetic species including electrons, ions, and hyperthermal neutrals. There is a rich landscape of atomic and molecular scale interactions occurring in these systems that is still not well understood. In this Special Topic Issue of The Journal of Chemical Physics, we have collected recent representative examples of work that is directed at unraveling the mechanistic details concerning atomic and molecular layer processing, which will provide an important framework from which these fields can continue to develop. These studies range from the application of theory and computation to these systems to the use of powerful experimental probes, such as X-ray synchrotron radiation, probe microscopies, and photoelectron and infrared spectroscopies. The work presented here helps in identifying some of the major challenges and direct future activities in this exciting area of research involving atomic and molecular layer manipulation and fabrication.

  13. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Koontz, Steven L.; Cross, Jon B.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2-20 eV, preferably 1-10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal (kinetic energy>1 eV) oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask-protected areas.

  14. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Cross, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by hyperthermal atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2 to 20 eV, preferably 1 to 10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask protected areas.

  15. Electrode-selective deposition/etching processes using an SiF4/H2/Ar plasma chemistry excited by sawtooth tailored voltage waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. K.; Johnson, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the electrode-selective deposition and etching of hydrogenated silicon thin films using a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process excited by sawtooth-shaped tailored voltage waveforms (TVWs). The slope asymmetry of such waveforms leads to a different rate of sheath expansion and contraction at each electrode, and therefore different electron power absorption near each electrode. This effect was employed with an SiF4/H2/Ar plasma chemistry, as the surface processes that result from this gas mixture depend strongly on the local balance between multiple precursors. For a specific gas flow ratio, a deposition rate of 0.82 Å s-1 on one electrode and an etching rate of 1.2 Å s-1 on the other were achieved. Moreover, this deposition/etching balance is controlled by the H2 flow rate, which limits the deposition rate at low flows. When the H2 injection is sufficiently high, the processes are then limited by the dissociation of SiF4, and the relative rate of the surface processes on the two electrodes are reversed, i.e. a higher net deposition rate is observed on the electrode where the fast sheath contraction occurs due to the electronegative character of the plasma.

  16. Effects of HSQ e-beam Resist Processing on the Fabrication of ICP-RIE Etched TiO2 Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotovy, Ivan; Kostic, Ivan; Predanocy, Martin; Nemec, Pavol; Rehacek, Vlastimil

    2016-12-01

    Patterning of metal oxide nanostructures with different shapes and well-defined size may play an important role in the improvement of MEMS systems, sensors and optical devices. We investigated the effects of HSQ e-beam resist processing on the fabrication of sputtered TiO2 nanostructures. They were patterned using direct write e-beam lithography combined with ICP-RIE etching in CF4/Ar plasma. Experimental results confirmed that the HSQ resist with a thickness of about 600 nm is suitable as a masking material for optimal etching process and allows patterning of the dots array in TiO2 sputtered films with a thickness up 150 nm. TiO2 arrays with a minimal dots diameter of 180 nm and spacing of 1000 nm were successfully developed.

  17. Metal etching composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otousa, Joseph E. (Inventor); Thomas, Clark S. (Inventor); Foster, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a chemical etching composition for etching metals or metallic alloys. The composition includes a solution of hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, ethylene glycol, and an oxidizing agent. The etching composition is particularly useful for etching metal surfaces in preparation for subsequent fluorescent penetrant inspection.

  18. Finite-size effect on the charging free energy of protein in explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Ekimoto, Toru; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2015-01-13

    The finite-size effect in periodic system is examined for the charging free energy of protein in explicit solvent over a variety of charged states. The key to the finite-size correction is the self-energy, which is defined as the interaction energy of the solute with its own periodic images and the neutralizing background. By employing the thermodynamic-integration method with systematically varied sizes of the unit cell of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we show for ubiquitin that the self-energy corrects the finite-size effect on the charging free energy within 1 kcal/mol at total charges of -5e, -1e, neutral, and +1e and within 5 kcal/mol even for a highly charged state with +8e. We then sought the additional correction from the solvation effect using the numerical solution to the Poisson equation of the protein with implicit solvent. This correction reduces the cell-size dependence of the charging free energy at +8e to 3 kcal/mol and is well expressed as the self-energy divided by the dielectric constant of solvent water.

  19. Deep-UV positive resist image by dry etching (DUV PRIME): a robust process for 0.3-μm contact holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Didier; Laporte, Philippe; Molle, Pascale; Ullmann, H.

    1994-05-01

    Classical positive resist process for DUV is not yet available and stabilized. We noticed various limiting points such as the delay time for resist material, the limitation of thickness related to ultimate resolution, and the bulk effect. P.R.I.M.E. (Positive Resist Image by dry Etching) process technology using DUV 248 nm exposure wavelength improve solutions for each process parameters, for example, a well known and stable resist (J.S.R- U.C.B PLASMASK 200G) is used with Hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) as silylated compound. The combination of DUV exposure and top surface imaging P.R.I.M.E. process can open contact holes down to 0.3 micrometers with a large process window and a good wafer uniformity. This publication will show the improvement of each process parameter. Extended information will be given for process latitude (focus and exposure). We demonstrated and verified the feasibility of the contact holes process by etching 1 micrometers oxide (BPSG + USG) through the PRIME process lithography.

  20. In-Plasma Photo-Assisted Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Demetre

    2015-09-01

    A methodology to precisely control the ion energy distribution (IED) on a substrate allowed the study of silicon etching as a function of ion energy at near-threshold energies. Surprisingly, a substantial etching rate was observed, independent of ion energy, when the ion energy was below the ion-assisted etching threshold (~ 16 eV for etching silicon with chlorine plasma). Careful experiments led to the conclusion that this ``sub-threshold'' etching was due to photons, predominately at wavelengths <1700 Å. Among the plasmas investigated, photo-assisted etching (PAE) was lowest in Br2/Ar gas mixtures and highest in HBr/Cl2/Ar. Above threshold etching rates scaled with the square root of ion energy. PAE rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy (SEM and AFM) revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. In-plasma PAE may be be a complicating factor for processes that require low ion energies, such as atomic layer etching. On the other hand PAE could produce sub-10 nm high aspect ratio (6:1) features by highly selective plasma etching to transfer nascent nanopatterns in silicon. Work supported by DOE Plasma Science Center and NSF.

  1. Advanced plasma etch technologies for nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Rich

    2012-03-01

    Advances in patterning techniques have enabled the extension of immersion lithography from 65/45nm through 14/10nm device technologies. A key to this increase in patterning capability has been innovation in the subsequent dry plasma etch processing steps. Multiple exposure techniques such as litho-etch-litho-etch, sidewall image transfer, line/cut mask and self-aligned structures have been implemented to solution required device scaling. Advances in dry plasma etch process control, across wafer uniformity and etch selectivity to both masking materials and have enabled adoption of vertical devices and thin film scaling for increased device performance at a given pitch. Plasma etch processes such as trilayer etches, aggressive CD shrink techniques, and the extension of resist trim processes have increased the attainable device dimensions at a given imaging capability. Precise control of the plasma etch parameters affecting across design variation, defectivity, profile stability within wafer, within lot, and across tools have been successfully implemented to provide manufacturable patterning technology solutions. IBM has addressed these patterning challenges through an integrated Total Patterning Solutions team to provide seamless and synergistic patterning processes to device and integration internal customers. This paper will discuss these challenges and the innovative plasma etch solutions pioneered by IBM and our alliance partners.

  2. Advanced plasma etch technologies for nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Rich

    2013-10-01

    Advances in patterning techniques have enabled the extension of immersion lithography from 65/45 nm through 14/10 nm device technologies. A key to this increase in patterning capability has been innovation in the subsequent dry plasma etch processing steps. Multiple exposure techniques, such as litho-etch-litho-etch, sidewall image transfer, line/cut mask, and self-aligned structures, have been implemented to solution required device scaling. Advances in dry plasma etch process control across wafer uniformity and etch selectivity to both masking materials have enabled adoption of vertical devices and thin film scaling for increased device performance at a given pitch. Plasma etch processes, such as trilayer etches, aggressive critical dimension shrink techniques, and the extension of resist trim processes, have increased the attainable device dimensions at a given imaging capability. Precise control of the plasma etch parameters affecting across-design variation, defectivity, profile stability within wafer, within lot, and across tools has been successfully implemented to provide manufacturable patterning technology solutions. IBM has addressed these patterning challenges through an integrated total patterning solutions team to provide seamless and synergistic patterning processes to device and integration internal customers. We will discuss these challenges and the innovative plasma etch solutions pioneered by IBM and our alliance partners.

  3. Method of etching zirconium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, L.S.; Kwiatkowski, B.

    1988-03-31

    The invention described herein may be manufactured, used, and licensed by or for the Government for governmental purposes without the payment to us of any royalty thereon. This invention relates in general to a method of etching, zirconium diboride(ZrB/sub 2/) and, in particular, to a method of dry etching a thin film of ZrB/sub 2/ that has been deposited onto a substrate and patterned using photolithography. U.S. patent application S.N. 156, 124, filed 16 February, 1988, of Linda S. Heath for Method of Etching Titanium Diboride and assigned to a common assignee and with which this application is copending describes and claims a method of etching titanium diboride with a dry etch. Zirconium diboride, like titanium diboride, TiB/sub 2/, has become of interest in laboratory research because of its resistance to change or degradation at high temperatures. By adjusting the process parameters, one is able to attain etch rates of 67 to 140 A/min for ZrB/sub 2/. This is useful for patterning ZrB/sub 2/ as a diffusion barrier or a Schottky contact to semiconductors. The ZrB/sub 2/ film may be on a GaAs substrate.

  4. Radicals Are Required for Thiol Etching of Gold Particles.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Timothy A; Ackerson, Christopher J

    2015-08-03

    Etching of gold with an excess of thiol ligand is used in both synthesis and analysis of gold particles. Mechanistically, the process of etching gold with excess thiol is unclear. Previous studies have obliquely considered the role of oxygen in thiolate etching of gold. Herein, we show that oxygen or a radical initiator is a necessary component for efficient etching of gold by thiolates. Attenuation of the etching process by radical scavengers in the presence of oxygen, and the restoration of activity by radical initiators under inert atmosphere, strongly implicate the oxygen radical. These data led us to propose an atomistic mechanism in which the oxygen radical initiates the etching process.

  5. A Multi-Scale Study on Silicon-Oxide Etching Processes in C4F8/Ar Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Jiaxing; Zhang, Saiqian; Liu, Zeng; Yan, Jun; Dai, Zhongling

    2016-06-01

    A multi-scale numerical method coupled with the reactor, sheath and trench model is constructed to simulate dry etching of SiO2 in inductively coupled C4F8 plasmas. Firstly, ion and neutral particle densities in the reactor are decided using the CFD-ACE+ commercial software. Then, the ion energy and angular distributions (IEDs and IADs) are obtained in the sheath model with the sheath boundary conditions provided with CFD-ACE+. Finally, the trench profile evolution is simulated in the trench model. What we principally focus on is the effects of the discharge parameters on the etching results. It is found that the discharge parameters, including discharge pressure, radio-frequency (rf) power, gas mixture ratios, bias voltage and frequency, have synergistic effects on IEDs and IADs on the etched material surface, thus further affecting the trench profiles evolution. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11375040) and the Important National Science & Technology Specific Project of China (No. 2011ZX02403-002)

  6. SAXS study on the morphology of etched and un-etched ion tracks in apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadzri, A.; Schauries, D.; Afra, B.; Rodriguez, M. D.; Mota-Santiago, P.; Muradoglu, S.; Hawley, A.; Kluth, P.

    2015-04-01

    Natural apatite samples were irradiated with 185 MeV Au and 2.3 GeV Bi ions to simulate fission tracks. The resulting track morphology was investigated using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements before and after chemical etching. We present preliminary results from the SAXS measurement showing the etching process is highly anisotropic yielding faceted etch pits with a 6-fold symmetry. The measurements are a first step in gaining new insights into the correlation between etched and unetched fission tracks and the use of SAXS as a tool for studying etched tracks.

  7. Dry etching technologies for reflective multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Yoshinori; Karyu, Makoto; Ita, Hirotsugu; Kase, Yoshihisa; Yoshimori, Tomoaki; Muto, Makoto; Nonaka, Mikio; Iwami, Munenori

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a highly integrated methodology for patterning Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) mask, which has been highlighted for the lithography technique at the 14nm half-pitch generation and beyond. The EUV mask is characterized as a reflective-type mask which is completely different compared with conventional transparent-type of photo mask. And it requires not only patterning of absorber layer without damaging the underlying multi reflective layers (40 Si/Mo layers) but also etching multi reflective layers. In this case, the dry etch process has generally faced technical challenges such as the difficulties in CD control, etch damage to quartz substrate and low selectivity to the mask resist. Shibaura Mechatronics ARESTM mask etch system and its optimized etch process has already achieved the maximal etch performance at patterning two-layered absorber. And in this study, our process technologies of multi reflective layers will be evaluated by means of optimal combination of process gases and our optimized plasma produced by certain source power and bias power. When our ARES™ is used for multilayer etching, the user can choose to etch the absorber layer at the same time or etch only the multilayer.

  8. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., George W.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  9. Ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires fabricated with plasma etching: plasma processing, mechanical stability analysis against adhesion and capillary forces and oleophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeniou, A.; Ellinas, K.; Olziersky, A.; Gogolides, E.

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature deep Si etching using time-multiplexed deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) processes is investigated to fabricate ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires (SiNWs) perpendicular to the silicon substrate. Nanopatterning is achieved using either top-down techniques (e.g. electron beam lithography) or colloidal polystyrene (PS) sphere self-assembly. The latter is a faster and more economical method if imperfections in diameter and position can be tolerated. We demonstrate wire radii from below 100 nm to several micrometers, and aspect ratios (ARs) above 100:1 with etching rates above 1 μm min-1 using classical mass flow controllers with pulsing rise times of seconds. The mechanical stability of these nanowires is studied theoretically and experimentally against adhesion and capillary forces. It is shown that above ARs of the order of 50:1 for spacing 1 μm, SiNWs tend to bend due to adhesion forces between them. Such large adhesion forces are due to the high surface energy of silicon. Wetting the SiNWs with water and drying also gives rise to capillary forces. We find that capillary forces may be less important for SiNW collapse/bending compared to adhesion forces of dry SiNWs, contrary to what is observed for polymeric nanowires/nanopillars which have a much lower surface energy compared to silicon. Finally we show that SiNW arrays have oleophobic and superoleophobic properties, i.e. they exhibit excellent anti-wetting properties for a wide range of liquids and oils due to the re-entrant profile produced by the DRIE process and the well-designed spacing.

  10. Ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires fabricated with plasma etching: plasma processing, mechanical stability analysis against adhesion and capillary forces and oleophobicity.

    PubMed

    Zeniou, A; Ellinas, K; Olziersky, A; Gogolides, E

    2014-01-24

    Room-temperature deep Si etching using time-multiplexed deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) processes is investigated to fabricate ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires (SiNWs) perpendicular to the silicon substrate. Nanopatterning is achieved using either top-down techniques (e.g. electron beam lithography) or colloidal polystyrene (PS) sphere self-assembly. The latter is a faster and more economical method if imperfections in diameter and position can be tolerated. We demonstrate wire radii from below 100 nm to several micrometers, and aspect ratios (ARs) above 100:1 with etching rates above 1 μm min(-1) using classical mass flow controllers with pulsing rise times of seconds. The mechanical stability of these nanowires is studied theoretically and experimentally against adhesion and capillary forces. It is shown that above ARs of the order of 50:1 for spacing 1 μm, SiNWs tend to bend due to adhesion forces between them. Such large adhesion forces are due to the high surface energy of silicon. Wetting the SiNWs with water and drying also gives rise to capillary forces. We find that capillary forces may be less important for SiNW collapse/bending compared to adhesion forces of dry SiNWs, contrary to what is observed for polymeric nanowires/nanopillars which have a much lower surface energy compared to silicon. Finally we show that SiNW arrays have oleophobic and superoleophobic properties, i.e. they exhibit excellent anti-wetting properties for a wide range of liquids and oils due to the re-entrant profile produced by the DRIE process and the well-designed spacing.

  11. Copper-assisted, anti-reflection etching of silicon surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard

    2014-08-26

    A method (300) for etching a silicon surface (116) to reduce reflectivity. The method (300) includes electroless deposition of copper nanoparticles about 20 nanometers in size on the silicon surface (116), with a particle-to-particle spacing of 3 to 8 nanometers. The method (300) includes positioning (310) the substrate (112) with a silicon surface (116) into a vessel (122). The vessel (122) is filled (340) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface (116). The etching solution (124) includes an oxidant-etchant solution (146), e.g., an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silicon surface (116) is etched (350) by agitating the etching solution (124) with, for example, ultrasonic agitation, and the etching may include heating (360) the etching solution (124) and directing light (365) onto the silicon surface (116). During the etching, copper nanoparticles enhance or drive the etching process.

  12. Geometric characteristics of silicon cavities etched in EDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Hui; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Sasaki, Minoru; Hane, Kazuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2007-05-01

    Etching characteristics of hexagonal and triangular cavities on a lang1 1 1rang-oriented silicon wafer in the etchant of ethylene diamine, pyrocatechol and water (EDP/EPW) were investigated. The patterns are aligned to keep the sides perpendicular to lang1 1 0rang crystal orientations, in order that the sidewalls of cavities are parallel to {1 1 0} crystalline planes. RIE-ICP etching is used to define the depth of the triangular and hexagonal cavities, and EDP etching is followed for different etching times. The final self-etch-stop profiles of cavities are determined by the dimension of mask patterns and the depth of cavities in the wafer. The etching process of the hexagon and triangle cavities is modeled, based on the crystal structure and wet etching principle. The results of etched cavities confirm the condition to determine the final etching profiles.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Black silicon method X: a review on high speed and selective plasma etching of silicon with profile control: an in-depth comparison between Bosch and cryostat DRIE processes as a roadmap to next generation equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, H V; de Boer, M J; Unnikrishnan, S; Louwerse, M C; Elwenspoek, M C

    2009-03-01

    An intensive study has been performed to understand and tune deep reactive ion etch (DRIE) processes for optimum results with respect to the silicon etch rate, etch profile and mask etch selectivity (in order of priority) using state-of-the-art dual power source DRIE equipment. The research compares pulsed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. Bosch technique) and mixed-mode DRIE processes (e.g. cryostat technique). In both techniques, an inhibitor is added to fluorine-based plasma to achieve directional etching, which is formed out of an oxide-forming (O2) or a fluorocarbon (FC) gas (C4F8 or CHF3). The inhibitor can be introduced together with the etch gas, which is named a mixed-mode DRIE process, or the inhibitor can be added in a time-multiplexed manner, which will be termed a pulsed-mode DRIE process. Next, the most convenient mode of operation found in this study is highlighted including some remarks to ensure proper etching (i.e. step synchronization in pulsed-mode operation and heat control of the wafer). First of all, for the fabrication of directional profiles, pulsed-mode DRIE is far easier to handle, is more robust with respect to the pattern layout and has the potential of achieving much higher mask etch selectivity, whereas in a mixed-mode the etch rate is higher and sidewall scalloping is prohibited. It is found that both pulsed-mode CHF3 and C4F8 are perfectly suited to perform high speed directional etching, although they have the drawback of leaving the FC residue at the sidewalls of etched structures. They show an identical result when the flow of CHF3 is roughly 30 times the flow of C4F8, and the amount of gas needed for a comparable result decreases rapidly while lowering the temperature from room down to cryogenic (and increasing the etch rate). Moreover, lowering the temperature lowers the mask erosion rate substantially (and so the mask selectivity improves). The pulsed-mode O2 is FC-free but shows only tolerable anisotropic results at -120 °C. The

  14. Facile large-scale synthesis of brain-like mesoporous silica nanocomposites via a selective etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Qihua; Wang, Tingmei

    2015-10-01

    The core-shell structured mesoporous silica nanomaterials (MSNs) are experiencing rapid development in many applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, bio-imaging and drug delivery wherein a large pore volume is desirable. We develop a one-pot method for large-scale synthesis of brain-like mesoporous silica nanocomposites based on the reasonable change of the intrinsic nature of the -Si-O-Si- framework of silica nanoparticles together with a selective etching strategy. The as-synthesized products show good monodispersion and a large pore volume of 1.0 cm3 g-1. The novelty of this approach lies in the use of an inorganic-organic hybrid layer to assist the creation of large-pore morphology on the outermost shell thereby promoting efficient mass transfer or storage. Importantly, the method is reliable and grams of products can be easily prepared. The morphology on the outermost silica shell can be controlled by simply adjusting the VTES-to-TEOS molar ratio (VTES: triethoxyvinylsilane, TEOS: tetraethyl orthosilicate) as well as the etching time. The as-synthesized products exhibit fluorescence performance by incorporating rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC) covalently into the inner silica walls, which provide potential application in bioimaging. We also demonstrate the applications of as-synthesized large-pore structured nanocomposites in drug delivery systems and stimuli-responsive nanoreactors for heterogeneous catalysis.The core-shell structured mesoporous silica nanomaterials (MSNs) are experiencing rapid development in many applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, bio-imaging and drug delivery wherein a large pore volume is desirable. We develop a one-pot method for large-scale synthesis of brain-like mesoporous silica nanocomposites based on the reasonable change of the intrinsic nature of the -Si-O-Si- framework of silica nanoparticles together with a selective etching strategy. The as-synthesized products show good monodispersion and a large pore volume

  15. Simulation of Etching Profiles Using Level Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Using plasma discharges to etch trenches and via holes in substrates is an important process in semiconductor manufacturing. Ion enhanced etching involves both neutral fluxes, which are isotropic, and ion fluxes, which are anisotropic. The angular distributions for the ions determines the degree of vertical etch, while the amount of the neutral fluxes determines the etch rate. We have developed a 2D profile evolution simulation which uses level set methods to model the plasma-substrate interface. Using level sets instead of traditional string models avoids the use of complicated delooping algorithms. The simulation calculates the etch rate based on the fluxes and distribution functions of both ions and neutrals. We will present etching profiles of Si substrates in low pressure (10s mTorr) Ar/Cl2 discharges for a variety of incident ion angular distributions. Both ion and neutral re-emission fluxes are included in the calculation of the etch rate, and their contributions to the total etch profile will be demonstrated. In addition, we will show RIE lag effects as a function of different trench aspect ratios. (For sample profiles, please see http://www.ipt.arc.nasa.gov/hwangfig1.html)

  16. Preparation of multifunctional Al-Mg alloy surface with hierarchical micro/nanostructures by selective chemical etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Tian; Kong, Jianyi; Wang, Xingdong; Li, Xuewu

    2016-12-01

    A superamphiphobic aluminum magnesium alloy surface with enhanced anticorrosion behavior has been prepared in this work via a simple and low-cost method. By successively polishing, etching and boiling treatments, the multifunctional hierarchical binary structures composed of the labyrinth-like concave-convex microstructures and twisty nanoflakes have been prepared. Results indicate that a superhydrophobic contact angle of 160.5° and superoleophobic contact angle larger than 150° as well as low adhesive property to liquids are achieved after such structures being modified with fluoroalkyl-silane. Furthermore, the anticorrosion behaviors in seawater of as-prepared samples are characterized by electrochemical tests including the impedance spectroscopies, equivalent circuits fittings and polarization curves. It is found that the hierarchical micro/nanostructures accompanying with the modified coating are proved to possess the maximal coating coverage rate of 90.0% larger than microstructures of 85.9%, nanostructures of 83.8% and bare polished surface of 67.1% suggesting the optimal anticorrosion. Finally, a great potential application in concentrators for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) analysis of toxic and pollutive ions on the superamphiphobic surface is also confirmed. This work has wider significance in extending further applications of alloys in engineering and environmental detecting fields.

  17. Characterization of silicon isotropic etch by inductively coupled plasma etcher for microneedle array fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jing; Tay, Francis E. H.; Miao, Jianmin; Sun, Jianbo

    2006-04-01

    This work investigates the isotropic etching properties in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher for microneedle arrays fabrication. The effects of process variables including powers, gas and pressure on needle structure generation are characterized by factorial design of experiment (DOE). The experimental responses of vertical etching depth, lateral etching length, ratio of vertical etching depth to lateral etching length and photoresist etching rate are reported. The relevance of the etching variables is also presented. The obtained etching behaviours for microneedle structure generation will be applied to develop recipes to fabricate microneedles in designed dimensions.

  18. Fe-catalyzed etching of graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guangjun; Calizo, Irene; Hight Walker, Angela; PML, NIST Team

    We investigate the Fe-catalyzed etching of graphene layers in forming gas. Fe thin films are deposited by sputtering onto mechanically exfoliated graphene, few-layer graphene (FLG), and graphite flakes on a Si/SiO2 substrate. When the sample is rapidly annealed in forming gas, particles are produced due to the dewetting of the Fe thin film and those particles catalyze the etching of graphene layers. Monolayer graphene and FLG regions are severely damaged and that the particles catalytically etch channels in graphite. No etching is observed on graphite for the Fe thin film annealed in nitrogen. The critical role of hydrogen indicates that this graphite etching process is catalyzed by Fe particles through the carbon hydrogenation reaction. By comparing with the etched monolayer and FLG observed for the Fe film annealed in nitrogen, our Raman spectroscopy measurements identify that, in forming gas, the catalytic etching of monolayer and FLG is through carbon hydrogenation. During this process, Fe particles are catalytically active in the dissociation of hydrogen into hydrogen atoms and in the production of hydrogenated amorphous carbon through hydrogen spillover.

  19. High density plasma etching of magnetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kee Bum

    Magnetic materials such as NiFe (permalloy) or NiFeCo are widely used in the data storage industry. Techniques for submicron patterning are required to develop next generation magnetic devices. The relative chemical inertness of most magnetic materials means they are hard to etch using conventional RIE (Reactive Ion Etching). Therefore ion milling has generally been used across the industry, but this has limitations for magnetic structures with submicron dimensions. In this dissertation, we suggest high density plasmas such as ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) and ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma) for the etching of magnetic materials (NiFe, NiFeCo, CoFeB, CoSm, CoZr) and other related materials (TaN, CrSi, FeMn), which are employed for magnetic devices like magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAM), magnetic read/write heads, magnetic sensors and microactuators. This research examined the fundamental etch mechanisms occurring in high density plasma processing of magnetic materials by measuring etch rate, surface morphology and surface stoichiometry. However, one concern with using Cl2-based plasma chemistry is the effect of residual chlorine or chlorinated etch residues remaining on the sidewalls of etched features, leading to a degradation of the magnetic properties. To avoid this problem, we employed two different processing methods. The first one is applying several different cleaning procedures, including de-ionized water rinsing or in-situ exposure to H2, O2 or SF6 plasmas. Very stable magnetic properties were achieved over a period of ˜6 months except O2 plasma treated structures, with no evidence of corrosion, provided chlorinated etch residues were removed by post-etch cleaning. The second method is using non-corrosive gas chemistries such as CO/NH3 or CO2/NH3. There is a small chemical contribution to the etch mechanism (i.e. formation of metal carbonyls) as determined by a comparison with Ar and N2 physical sputtering. The discharge should be NH3

  20. Enhanced ferro-actuator with a porosity-controlled membrane using the sol-gel process and the HF etching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, KiSu; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a ferro-actuator using a porous polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane. In detail, we fabricated the silica-embedded PVDF membrane using a sol-gel process with PVDF solution and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) solution, where the size of the silica was determined by the ratio of the PVDF and TEOS solutions. Using hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching, the silica were removed from the silica-embedded PVDF membrane, and porous PVDF membranes with different porosities were obtained. Finally, through absorption of a ferrofluid on the porous PVDF membrane, the proposed ferro-actuator using porous PVDF membranes with different porosities was fabricated. We executed the characterization and actuation test as follows. First, the silica size of the silica-embedded PVDF membrane and the pore size of the porous PVDF membrane were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. Second, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis showed that the silica had clearly been removed from the silica-embedded PVDF membrane by HF etching. Third, through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) of the ferro-actuators, we found that more ferrofluids were absorbed by the porous PVDF membrane when the pore of the membrane was smaller and uniformly distributed. Finally, we executed tip displacement and a blocking force test of the proposed ferro-actuator using the porous PVDF membrane. Similar to the VSM result, the ferro-actuator that used a porous PVDF membrane with smaller pores exhibited better actuation performance. The ferro-actuator that used a porous PVDF membrane displayed a tip displacement that was about 7.2-fold better and a blocking force that was about 6.5-fold better than the ferro-actuator that used a pure PVDF membrane. Thus, we controlled the pore size of the porous PVDF membrane and enhanced the actuation performance of the ferro-actuator using a porous PVDF membrane.

  1. Semiconductor structure and recess formation etch technique

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Bin; Sun, Min; Palacios, Tomas Apostol

    2017-02-14

    A semiconductor structure has a first layer that includes a first semiconductor material and a second layer that includes a second semiconductor material. The first semiconductor material is selectively etchable over the second semiconductor material using a first etching process. The first layer is disposed over the second layer. A recess is disposed at least in the first layer. Also described is a method of forming a semiconductor structure that includes a recess. The method includes etching a region in a first layer using a first etching process. The first layer includes a first semiconductor material. The first etching process stops at a second layer beneath the first layer. The second layer includes a second semiconductor material.

  2. Chemically assisted ion beam etching of polycrystalline and (100)tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles

    1987-01-01

    A chemically assisted ion-beam etching technique is described which employs an ion beam from an electron-bombardment ion source and a directed flux of ClF3 neutrals. This technique enables the etching of tungsten foils and films in excess of 40 microns thick with good anisotropy and pattern definition over areas of 30 sq mm, and with a high degree of selectivity. (100) tungsten foils etched with this process exhibit preferred-orientation etching, while polycrystalline tungsten films exhibit high etch rates. This technique can be used to pattern the dispenser cathode surfaces serving as electron emitters in traveling-wave tubes to a controlled porosity.

  3. Structure dependent hydrogen induced etching features of graphene crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraja, Amutha; Shinde, Sachin M.; Kalita, Golap; Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Sharma, Kamal P.; Tanemura, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    H2 induced etching of graphene is of significant interest to understand graphene growth process as well as to fabricate nanoribbons and various other structures. Here, we demonstrate the structure dependent H2 induced etching behavior of graphene crystals. We synthesized graphene crystals on electro-polished Cu foil by an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition process, where some of the crystals showed hexagonal shaped snowflake-dendritic morphology. Significant differences in H2 induced etching behavior were observed for the snowflake-dendritic and regular graphene crystals by annealing in a gas mixture of H2 and Ar. The regular graphene crystals were etched anisotropically creating hexagonal holes with pronounced edges, while etching of all the dendritic crystals occurred from the branches of lobs creating symmetrical fractal structures. The etching behavior provides important clue of graphene nucleation and growth as well as their selective etching to fabricate well-defined structures for nanoelectronics.

  4. The Effects of Using a Commercial Grade Plasma Etching Chamber to Etch Anodized Niobium Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epperson, Christiana; Drake, Dereth; Winska, Kalina

    2015-11-01

    Anodized niobium surfaces are used in particle accelerators for construction of the superconducting cavities. These surfaces must be cleaned regularly to remove containments and maintain the surface smoothness. The most common method used is that of chemically etching the surface using acid baths; however, this process can affect the smoothness of the layer and is extremely time consuming and hazardous. Plasma etching is one alternative that has shown great promise. We are using a commercial grade plasma etching chamber to clean anodized niobium samples that have varying oxide layer thicknesses. Spectral profiles of the surfaces of the samples are taken before and after etching. All measured results are compared to a simple theoretical model in order to determine the effects of the etching process on each surface.

  5. Surface engineering of SiC via sublimation etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokubavicius, Valdas; Yazdi, Gholam R.; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei; Iakimov, Tihomir; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Yakimova, Rositsa

    2016-12-01

    We present a technique for etching of SiC which is based on sublimation and can be used to modify the morphology and reconstruction of silicon carbide surface for subsequent epitaxial growth of various materials, for example graphene. The sublimation etching of 6H-, 4H- and 3C-SiC was explored in vacuum (10-5 mbar) and Ar (700 mbar) ambient using two different etching arrangements which can be considered as Si-C and Si-C-Ta chemical systems exhibiting different vapor phase stoichiometry at a given temperature. The surfaces of different polytypes etched under similar conditions are compared and the etching mechanism is discussed with an emphasis on the role of tantalum as a carbon getter. To demonstrate applicability of such etching process graphene nanoribbons were grown on a 4H-SiC surface that was pre-patterned using the thermal etching technique presented in this study.

  6. Bulk Etch Rate and Swell Rate of CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, David; Ume, Rubab; Sheets, Rebecca; Regan, Sean; Sangster, Craig; Padalino, Stephen; McLean, James

    2016-10-01

    The use of CR-39 plastic as a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector is an effective technique for obtaining data in high-energy particle experiments including inertial confinement fusion. To reveal particle tracks after irradiation, CR-39 is chemically etched in NaOH at 80°C, producing micron-scale signal pits at the nuclear track sites. The development of these pits depends on both the bulk etch rate and the faster etch rate along the track, and is complicated by swelling as water is absorbed. Contrary to common etching models, we find the bulk etch rate to be depth dependent within 15 μ m of the surface, as revealed by swelling TASTRACK CR-39 pieces to their maximum capacity prior to etching. The bulk etch rate was measured using the standard mass method as well as the fission fragment track diameter method. Combining models of swelling and etching rates predicts the progress of bulk etching during a standard etch, without pre-swelling. This result has implications for the understanding the chemistry of the etch process, as well as the outcome of CR-39 surface preparation methods. Funded in part by a LLE contract through the DOE.

  7. Metal assisted anodic etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chang Quan; Zheng, Wen; Choi, W. K.; Thompson, Carl V.

    2015-06-01

    Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P+-type and N+-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed, including solid Si nanowires, porous Si nanowires, a porous Si layer without Si nanowires, and porous Si nanowires on a thick porous Si layer. Formation of wires was the result of selective etching at the Au-Si interface. It was found that when the anodic contact was made through P-type or P+-type Si, regular anodic etching due to electronic hole injection leads to formation of porous silicon simultaneously with metal assisted anodic etching. When the anodic contact was made through N-type or N+-type Si, generation of electronic holes through processes such as impact ionization and tunnelling-assisted surface generation were required for etching. In addition, it was found that metal assisted anodic etching of Si with the anodic contact made through the patterned Au film essentially reproduces the phenomenology of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE), in which holes are generated through metal assisted reduction of H2O2 rather than current flow. These results clarify the linked roles of electrical and chemical processes that occur during electrochemical etching of Si.Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P+-type and N+-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed

  8. Black Germanium fabricated by reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steglich, Martin; Käsebier, Thomas; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    A reactive ion etching technique for the preparation of statistical "Black Germanium" antireflection surfaces, relying on self-organization in a Cl2 etch chemistry, is presented. The morphology of the fabricated Black Germanium surfaces is the result of a random lateral distribution of pyramidal etch pits with heights around (1450 ± 150) nm and sidewall angles between 80° and 85°. The pyramids' base edges are oriented along the <110> crystal directions of Germanium, indicating a crystal anisotropy of the etching process. In the Vis-NIR, the tapered Black Germanium surface structure suppresses interface reflection to <2.5 % for normal incidence and still to <6 % at an angle of incidence of 70°. The presented Black Germanium might find applications as low-cost AR structure in optoelectronics and IR optics.

  9. Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Weckwerth, Mark V.; Baca, Wes E.

    2000-01-01

    A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

  10. Application of Fresnel diffraction from phase steps to measurement of etching rate of transparent materials.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Ali

    2015-09-10

    Based on Fresnel diffraction from phase steps, we present an optical method for real-time monitoring and measurement of thickness during the wet etching of transparent materials. It is shown experimentally that during the etching process, the visibility of diffraction fringes varies periodically with time (thickness) and the rate the etching is measured. Using dilute etching solutions, we measured an average etching rate of 5.3  nm/s for glass.

  11. Application of an RF Biased Langmuir Probe to Etch Reactor Chamber Matching, Fault Detection and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Douglas; Booth, Jean-Paul; Benjamin, Neil; Thorgrimsson, Chris; Brooks, Mitchell; Nagai, Mikio; Albarede, Luc; Kim, Jung

    2008-10-01

    Semiconductor device manufacturing typically occurs in an environment of both increasing equipment costs and per unit sale price shrinkage. Profitability in such a conflicted economic environment depends critically on yield, throughput and cost-of-ownership. This has resulted in increasing interest in improved fault detection, process diagnosis, and advanced process control. Achieving advances in these areas requires an integrated understanding of the basic physical principles driving the processes of interest and the realities of commercial manufacturing. Following this trend, this work examines the usefulness of an RF-biased planar Langmuir probe^1. This method delivers precise real-time (10 Hz) measurements of ion flux and tail weighted electron temperature. However, it is also mechanically non-intrusive, reliable and insensitive to contamination and deposition on the probe. Since the measured parameters are closely related to physical processes occurring at the wafer-plasma interface, significant improvements in process control, chamber matching and fault detection are achieved. Examples illustrating the improvements possible will be given. ^1J.P. Booth, N. St. J. Braithwaite, A. Goodyear and P. Barroy, Rev.Sci.Inst., Vol.71, No.7, July 2000, pgs. 2722-2727.

  12. Metal assisted anodic etching of silicon.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang Quan; Zheng, Wen; Choi, W K; Thompson, Carl V

    2015-07-07

    Metal assisted anodic etching (MAAE) of Si in HF, without H2O2, is demonstrated. Si wafers were coated with Au films, and the Au films were patterned with an array of holes. A Pt mesh was used as the cathode while the anodic contact was made through either the patterned Au film or the back side of the Si wafer. Experiments were carried out on P-type, N-type, P(+)-type and N(+)-type Si wafers and a wide range of nanostructure morphologies were observed, including solid Si nanowires, porous Si nanowires, a porous Si layer without Si nanowires, and porous Si nanowires on a thick porous Si layer. Formation of wires was the result of selective etching at the Au-Si interface. It was found that when the anodic contact was made through P-type or P(+)-type Si, regular anodic etching due to electronic hole injection leads to formation of porous silicon simultaneously with metal assisted anodic etching. When the anodic contact was made through N-type or N(+)-type Si, generation of electronic holes through processes such as impact ionization and tunnelling-assisted surface generation were required for etching. In addition, it was found that metal assisted anodic etching of Si with the anodic contact made through the patterned Au film essentially reproduces the phenomenology of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE), in which holes are generated through metal assisted reduction of H2O2 rather than current flow. These results clarify the linked roles of electrical and chemical processes that occur during electrochemical etching of Si.

  13. Modeling of plasma etch profiles with ions and reactive neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chungdar Daniel

    1999-11-01

    The simulation of plasma etch profiles of semiconductor trenches in the wafer processing of integrated circuits is developed in a mixed analytic/numerical approach. The main contributions of this study are the derivation and use of explicit analytical expressions for the etch rates and the computation of the etch profiles by standard computer packages. The computation of the etch profiles is efficient, is used as a benchmark for more complex numerical computer codes and illuminates the parameter dependence. The etch rate due to the ions is assumed proportional to the ion energy flux as suggested by experimental evidence. The shadowing due to the mask is included in the simplified derivation of the ion energy flux in cylindrical velocity coordinates for a two-temperature ion drifting Maxwellian. Neutrals with varying sticking coefficients are modeled by interpolation between the etch rate for shadowed neutrals with unity sticking coefficients and isotropic neutrals. The etch profiles are determined by the method of characteristics from the nonlinear evolution equation for the etch profile surface. Standard Matlab packages for the graphics and integration of the ordinary differential equations for the characteristics make the computation of etch profiles more efficient and more transparent than many complicated computer codes. The SEM images for trenches etched in silicon in a SF6 plasma in a RIE reactor are modeled by the simulation method for etch profiles. The etch rate is a linear combination of the etch rates of ions and neutrals in the ion flux-limited regime. Monte Carlo simulation of ion distribution functions in a chlorine plasma are fit by a simulated annealing procedure to a set of two-temperature drifting Maxwellians. The Monte Carlo simulations are noisy due to insufficient numbers of simulation particles. Smoothing of the distribution functions produces the expected bimodal ion distribution functions in the ICP reactor. The resultant etch profiles for

  14. Fabrication and characterization of back-side illuminated InGaN/GaN solar cells with periodic via-holes etching and Bragg mirror processes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-An; Chen, Fang-Ming; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Chang, Ching-Wen; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Li, Shan-Rong; Lu, Tien-Chang; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Kuo, Yen-Kuang; Yu, Peichen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Tu, Li-Wei

    2014-08-25

    In this study, the design and fabrication schemes of back-side illuminated InGaN/GaN solar cells with periodic via-holes etching and Bragg mirror processes are presented. Compared to typical front-side illuminated solar cells, the improvements of open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) from 1.88 to 1.94 V and short-circuit current density (J(sc)) from 0.84 to 1.02 mA/cm(2) are observed. Most significantly, the back-side illuminated InGaN/GaN solar cells exhibit an extremely high fill factor up to 85.5%, leading to a conversion efficiency of 1.69% from 0.66% of typical front-side illuminated solar cells under air mass 1.5 global illuminations. Moreover, the effects of bottom Bragg mirrors on the photovoltaic characteristics of back-side illuminated solar cells are studied by an advanced simulation program. The results show that the J(sc) could further be improved with a factor of 10% from the original back-side illuminated solar cell by the structure optimization of bottom Bragg mirrors.

  15. Solvothermal-Etching Process Induced Ti-Doped Fe2O3 Thin Film with Low Turn-On Voltage for Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dawei; Dong, Bitao; Liang, Jin; Zhou, Han; Pang, Yuanchao; Ding, Shujiang

    2016-09-21

    In this work, a thinning process of hematite film accompanied by simultaneous titanium (Ti) doping has been demonstrated. Ti(4+) ion was incorporated into ultrathin Fe2O3 film by solvothermally etching a hematite film fabricated on titanium nanorod array substrate. As a consequence, the onset potential (Von) of oxygen evolution reaction for final ultrathin Ti-doped Fe2O3 film shifted toward cathodic substantially, a very low Von of 0.48 VRHE was realized, approximately 0.53 V cathodic shift of the hematite film. Working mechanisms were investigated from both kinetic and thermodynamic ways. The ultrathin Ti-doped Fe2O3 film exhibited reduced Tafel slope and higher generated photovoltage than the pristine Fe2O3 electrode. Moreover, the highly doped Fe2O3 resulted in significant reduction of charge-transfer resistance at the Fe2O3∥electrolyte interface. The drastic cathodic-shift Von is believed to be a result of combined factors including thermodynamic contribution, improved surface reaction kinetics, as well as facilitated charge transfer across bulk and interface.

  16. Anisotropic etching of silicon in solutions containing tensioactive compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubel, Irena

    2016-12-01

    The results of investigations concerning anisotropic etching in 3M KOH and 25% TMAH solutions modified by tensioactive compounds such as alcohols, diols and a typical surfactant Triton X100 have been compared. Etching anisotropy was assessed on the basis of etch rates ratio V(110)/V(100). It was stated that the relation between surface tension of the solutions and etch rates of particular planes depend not only on the kind of surfactant but also on the kind of etching solution (KOH, TMAH). It points out an important role of TMA+ ions in the etching process, probably in the process of forming an adsorption layer, consisting of the molecules of tensioactive compounds on Si surface, which decides about etch rate. We have observed that this phenomenon occurs only at high concentration of TMA+ ions (25% TMAH). Reduction of TMAH concentration changes the properties of surfactant containing TMAH solutions. From all investigated solutions, the solutions that assured developing of (110) plane inclined at the angle of 45° to (100) substrate were selected. Such planes can be used as micromirrors in MOEMS structures. The solutions provide the etch rate ratio V(110)/V(100)<0.7, thus they were selected from hydroxide solutions containing surfactants. A simple way for etch rate anisotropy V(110)/V(100) assessment based on microscopic images etched structures has been proposed.

  17. Use of lower-end technology etch platforms for high-etch loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemelka, Jefferson O.

    2003-12-01

    In order to meet the needs of multiple customers with varying design specifications, merchant photomask suppliers need to provide photomasks for a wide range of design patterns. Some masks require etching less than 1% of the total mask film, while others require etching over 80% of the mask. Etching masks with these extremes in pattern loads can often require upgrading existing tool sets, particularly as the mask specifications become tighter. One alternative to upgrading tools is to develop new load-specific processes on existing lower-end tools, which requires a substantial amount of development work. Dry etching MoSi Embedded Attenuating Phase Shift Material using sulfur hexafluoride and helium under all etch loads presents challenges in the Unaxis Generation II mask etch platform. Etch processes developed for low load masks cannot always be used for high load masks due to problems in maintaining a stable process with good performance. In order to improve the etch performance for high MoSi loads (> 70% clear), a Gen II specific hardware design which can adversely affect uniformity at high loads was identified and eliminated as a dominant source of non-uniformity. A DOE studying total gas flow, He/SF6 ratio, pressure, ICP, and RIE power was then used to identify a stable process window for high MoSi loads. Another DOE studying the effects of pressure, ICP power, and RIE power on process uniformity was then carried out within the stable process window. Process conditions were identified which produced highly loaded 248nm and 193nm EAPSM masks with phase uniformity below 3°. Sidewall profiles were vertical for 193nm MoSi films but were slightly tapered for 248nm MoSi films, both with less than 5nm of CD bias.

  18. Experiment and Results on Plasma Etching of SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Im, Do; Peshl, J.; Vuskovic, Leposova; Popovic, Svetozar; Valente, Anne-Marie; Phillips, H. Lawrence

    2015-09-01

    The inner surfaces of SRF cavities are currently chemically treated (etched or electropolished) to achieve the state of the art RF performance. We designed an apparatus and developed a method for plasma etching of the inner surface for SRF cavities. The process parameters (pressure, power, gas concentration, diameter and shape of the inner electrode, temperature and positive dc bias at inner electrode) are optimized for cylindrical geometry. The etch rate non-uniformity has been overcome by simultaneous translation of the gas point-of-entry and the inner electrode during the processing. A single cell SRF cavity has been centrifugally barrel polished, chemically etched and RF tested to establish a baseline performance. This cavity is plasma etched and RF tested afterwards. The effect of plasma etching on the RF performance of this cavity will be presented and discussed.

  19. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  20. Extreme ultraviolet lithography mask etch study and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Banqiu; Kumar, Ajay; Chandrachood, Madhavi; Sabharwal, Amitabh

    2013-04-01

    An overview of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask etch is presented and a EUVL mask etch study was carried out. Today, EUVL implementation has three critical challenges that hinder its adoption: extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source power, resist resolution-line width roughness-sensitivity, and a qualified EUVL mask. The EUVL mask defect challenges result from defects generated during blank preparation, absorber and multilayer deposition processes, as well as patterning, etching and wet clean processes. Stringent control on several performance criteria including critical dimension (CD) uniformity, etch bias, micro-loading, profile control, defect control, and high etch selectivity requirement to capping layer is required during the resist pattern duplication on the underlying absorber layer. EUVL mask absorbers comprise of mainly tantalum-based materials rather than chrome- or MoSi-based materials used in standard optical masks. Compared to the conventional chrome-based absorbers and phase shift materials, tantalum-based absorbers need high ion energy to obtain moderate etch rates. However, high ion energy may lower resist selectivity, and could introduce defects. Current EUVL mask consists of an anti-reflective layer on top of the bulk absorber. Recent studies indicate that a native oxide layer would suffice as an anti-reflective coating layer during the electron beam inspection. The absorber thickness and the material properties are optimized based on optical density targets for the mask as well as electromagnetic field effects and optics requirements of the patterning tools. EUVL mask etch processes are modified according to the structure of the absorber, its material, and thickness. However, etch product volatility is the fundamental requirement. Overlapping lithographic exposure near chip border may require etching through the multilayer, resulting in challenges in profile control and etch selectivity. Optical proximity correction is applied to further

  1. ICP etching of silicon for micro and nanoscale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Michael David

    The physical structuring of silicon is one of the cornerstones of modern microelectronics and integrated circuits. Typical structuring of silicon requires generating a plasma to chemically or physically etch silicon. Although many tools have been created to do this, the most finely honed tool is the Inductively Couple Plasma Reactive Ion Etcher. This tool has the ability to finesse structures from silicon unachievable on other machines. Extracting structures such as high aspect ratio silicon nanowires requires more than just this tool, however. It requires etch masks which can adequately protect the silicon without interacting with the etching plasma and highly tuned etch chemistry able to protect the silicon structures during the etching process. In the work presented here, three highly tuned etches for silicon, and its oxide, will be described in detail. The etches presented utilize a type of etch chemistry which provides passivation while simultaneously etching, thus permitting silicon structures previously unattainable. To cover the range of applications, one etch is tuned for deep reactive ion etching of high aspect ratio micro-structures in silicon, while another is tuned for high aspect ratio nanoscale structures. The third etch described is tuned for creating structures in silicon dioxide. Following the description of these etches, two etch masks for silicon will be described. The first mask will detail a highly selective etch mask uniquely capable of protecting silicon for both etches described while being compatible with mainstream semiconductor fabrication facilities. This mask is aluminum oxide. The second mask detailed permits for a completely dry lithography on the micro and nanoscale, FIB implanted Ga etch masks. The third chapter will describe the fabrication and in situ electrical testing of silicon nanowires and nanopillars created using the methods previously described. A unique method for contacting these nanowires is also described which has

  2. LDRD final report : on the development of hybrid level-set/particle methods for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Musson, Lawrence Cale

    2005-01-01

    Two methods for creating a hybrid level-set (LS)/particle method for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes are developed and tested. The first method supplements the LS method by introducing Lagrangian marker points in regions of high curvature. Once both the particle set and the LS function are advanced in time, minimization of certain objective functions adjusts the LS function so that its zero contour is in closer alignment with the particle locations. It was found that the objective-minimization problem was unexpectedly difficult to solve, and even when a solution could be found, the acquisition of it proved more costly than simply expanding the basis set of the LS function. The second method explored is a novel explicit marker-particle method that we have named the grid point particle (GPP) approach. Although not a LS method, the GPP approach has strong procedural similarities to certain aspects of the LS approach. A key aspect of the method is a surface rediscretization procedure--applied at each time step and based on a global background mesh--that maintains a representation of the surface while naturally adding and subtracting surface discretization points as the surface evolves in time. This method was coded in 2-D, and tested on a variety of surface evolution problems by using it in the ChISELS computer code. Results shown for 2-D problems illustrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight some notable advantages in accuracy over the LS method. Generalizing the method to 3D is discussed but not implemented.

  3. On the dynamic response of pressure transmission lines in the research of helium-charged free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric L.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1989-01-01

    In free piston Stirling engine research the integrity of both amplitude and phase of the dynamic pressure measurements is critical to the characterization of cycle dynamics and thermodynamics. It is therefore necessary to appreciate all possible sources of signal distortion when designing pressure measurement systems for this type of research. The signal distortion inherent to pressure transmission lines is discussed. Based on results from classical analysis, guidelines are formulated to describe the dynamic response properties of a volume-terminated transmission tube for applications involving helium-charged free piston Stirling engines. The scope and limitations of the dynamic response analysis are considered.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of CF4 Produced in the SiO2 Etching Process Using c-C4F8, C3F8, and C2F6 Plasmas by In Situ Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Kenji; Hatano, Yoshihiko

    2004-01-01

    The use of CF32+ as a specific product ion to selectively quantify CF4 produced in the SiO2 etching process using plasmas of perfluorocompounds (PFCs), such as c-C4F8, C3F8, and C2F6, has been proposed and investigated in the present experiments by measuring mass spectra inside and outside the plasmas. It is known that the CF32+ ion does not appear in the mass spectra of any stable PFCs, except for CF4. It is confirmed in the present experiments that the quantity of CF32+ originating from the CF3 radical in the mass spectra measured in situ is negligible. Other unstable chemical species in the plasmas are too small in quantity to explain the intensity of CF32+ appearing in the mass spectra measured in situ, even if they could produce stable CF32+ by ionization. It is therefore concluded that CF32+ can be used as a fingerprint of CF4 in mass spectrometry. Application of this new method for the quantitative analysis of CF4 produced in the SiO2 etching process using PFC plasmas results in CF4 production advancing significantly not only in the etching region of SiO2 but also in the downstream region of the plasmas.

  5. Isotropic plasma etching of Ge Si and SiNx films

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Michael David; Douglas, Erica Ann

    2016-08-31

    This study reports on selective isotropic dry etching of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Ge thin film, release layers using a Shibaura chemical downstream etcher (CDE) with NF3 and Ar based plasma chemistry. Relative etch rates between Ge, Si and SiNx are described with etch rate reductions achieved by adjusting plasma chemistry with O2. Formation of oxides reducing etch rates were measured for both Ge and Si, but nitrides or oxy-nitrides created using direct injection of NO into the process chamber were measured to increase Si and SiNx etch rates while retarding Ge etching.

  6. Isotropic plasma etching of Ge Si and SiNx films

    DOE PAGES

    Henry, Michael David; Douglas, Erica Ann

    2016-08-31

    This study reports on selective isotropic dry etching of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Ge thin film, release layers using a Shibaura chemical downstream etcher (CDE) with NF3 and Ar based plasma chemistry. Relative etch rates between Ge, Si and SiNx are described with etch rate reductions achieved by adjusting plasma chemistry with O2. Formation of oxides reducing etch rates were measured for both Ge and Si, but nitrides or oxy-nitrides created using direct injection of NO into the process chamber were measured to increase Si and SiNx etch rates while retarding Ge etching.

  7. Pulsed plasma etching for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-07-01

    Power-modulated (pulsed) plasmas have demonstrated several advantages compared to continuous wave (CW) plasmas. Specifically, pulsed plasmas can result in a higher etching rate, better uniformity, and less structural, electrical or radiation (e.g. vacuum ultraviolet) damage. Pulsed plasmas can also ameliorate unwanted artefacts in etched micro-features such as notching, bowing, micro-trenching and aspect ratio dependent etching. As such, pulsed plasmas may be indispensable in etching of the next generation of micro-devices with a characteristic feature size in the sub-10 nm regime. This work provides an overview of principles and applications of pulsed plasmas in both electropositive (e.g. argon) and electronegative (e.g. chlorine) gases. The effect of pulsing the plasma source power (source pulsing), the electrode bias power (bias pulsing), or both source and bias power (synchronous pulsing), on the time evolution of species densities, electron energy distribution function and ion energy and angular distributions on the substrate is discussed. The resulting pulsed plasma process output (etching rate, uniformity, damage, etc) is compared, whenever possible, to that of CW plasma, under otherwise the same or similar conditions.

  8. In-situ diagnostics and characterization of etch by-product deposition on chamber walls during halogen etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastgar, Neema; Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Marsh, Ricky; Paterson, Alex

    2014-10-01

    Plasma etching is a critical technology for nanoelectronics fabrication, but the use of a vacuum chamber limits the number of in-situ, real-time diagnostics measurements that can be performed during an etch process. Byproduct deposition on chamber walls during etching can affect the run-to-run performance of an etch process if there is build-up or change of wall characteristics with time. Knowledge of chamber wall evolution and the composition of wall-deposited films are critical to understanding the performance of plasma etch processes, and an in-situ diagnostics measurement is useful for monitoring the chamber walls in real time. We report the use of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to perform in-situ diagnostics of a vacuum chamber's walls during plasma etching. Using ATR-FTIR, we are able to monitor the relative thickness and makeup of chamber wall deposits in real time. We then use this information to develop a chamber wall cleaning process in order to maintain reproducible etching conditions from wafer to wafer. In particular, we report mid-IR (4000-650 cm-1) absorption spectra of chamber wall-deposited silicon byproducts formed during halogen etching of silicon wafers.

  9. Three step deep reactive ion etch for high density trench etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lips, B.; Puers, R.

    2016-10-01

    A three step Deep Reactive Ion Etch (DRIE) process is developed to etch trenches of 10μm wide to a depth of 130μm into silicon with an etch rate of 2.5μm min-1. The aim of this process is to obtain sidewalls with an angle close to 90°. The process allows the etching of multiple trenches with high aspect ratios that are closely placed together. A three step approach is used as opposed to the more conventional two step approach in an attempt to improve the etching selectivity with respect to the masking material. By doing so, a simple AZ6632 positive photoresist could be used instead of the more commonly used metal masks which are harder to remove afterwards. In order to develop this process, four parameters, which are the bias power, processing pressure, step times and number of cycles, are evaluated an optimized on a PlasmaPro 300 Cobra DRIE tool from Oxford Plasma Technology.

  10. Silicon nanowire photodetectors made by metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; Ni, Chuan; Sarangan, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Silicon nanowires have unique optical effects, and have potential applications in photodetectors. They can exhibit simple optical effects such as anti-reflection, but can also produce quantum confined effects. In this work, we have fabricated silicon photodetectors, and then post-processed them by etching nanowires on the incident surface. These nanowires were produced by a wet-chemical etching process known as the metal-assisted-chemical etching, abbreviated as MACE. N-type silicon substrates were doped by thermal diffusion from a solid ceramic source, followed by etching, patterning and contact metallization. The detectors were first tested for functionality and optical performance. The nanowires were then made by depositing an ultra-thin film of gold below its percolation thickness to produce an interconnected porous film. This was then used as a template to etch high aspect ratio nanowires into the face of the detectors with a HF:H2O2 mixture.

  11. Litho-freeze-litho-etch (LFLE) enabling dual wafer flow coat/develop process and freeze CD tuning bake for >200wph immersion ArF photolithography double patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczulewski, Charles N.; Rosslee, Craig A.

    2009-12-01

    The SOKUDO DUO track system incorporates a dual-path wafer flow to reduce the burden on the wafer handling unit and enables high-throughput coat/develop/bake processing in-line with semiconductor photolithography exposure (scanner) equipment. Various photolithography-based double patterning process flows were modeled on the SOKUDO DUO system and it was confirmed to be able to process both Litho-Process-Litho-Etch (LPLE)*2 and negative-tone develop process wafers at greater than 200 wafer-per-hour (wph) capability for each litho-pass through the in-line exposure tool. In addition, it is demonstrated that Biased Hot Plates (BHP) with "cdTune" software improves litho pattern #1 and litho pattern #2 within wafer CD uniformity. Based primarily on JSR Micro materials for Litho-Freeze- Litho-Etch (LFLE) the coat, develop and bake process CD uniformity improvement results are demonstrated on the SOKUDO RF3S immersion track in-line with ASML XT:1900Gi system at IMEC, Belgium.

  12. Technique for etching monolayer and multilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Conley, Raymond P.; Divan, Ralu; Macrander, Albert

    2015-10-06

    A process is disclosed for sectioning by etching of monolayers and multilayers using an RIE technique with fluorine-based chemistry. In one embodiment, the process uses Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) alone or in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) using fluorine-based chemistry alone and using sufficient power to provide high ion energy to increase the etching rate and to obtain deeper anisotropic etching. In a second embodiment, a process is provided for sectioning of WSi.sub.2/Si multilayers using RIE in combination with ICP using a combination of fluorine-based and chlorine-based chemistries and using RF power and ICP power. According to the second embodiment, a high level of vertical anisotropy is achieved by a ratio of three gases; namely, CHF.sub.3, Cl.sub.2, and O.sub.2 with RF and ICP. Additionally, in conjunction with the second embodiment, a passivation layer can be formed on the surface of the multilayer which aids in anisotropic profile generation.

  13. Chemical etching and organometallic chemical vapor deposition on varied geometries of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Results of micron-spaced geometries produced by wet chemical etching and subsequent OMCVD growth on various GaAs surfaces are presented. The polar lattice increases the complexity of the process. The slow-etch planes defined by anisotropic etching are not always the same as the growth facets produced during MOCVD deposition, especially for deposition on higher-order planes produced by the hex groove etching.

  14. Anisotropic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} waveguide etching using inductively coupled plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Muttalib, Muhammad Firdaus A. Chen, Ruiqi Y.; Pearce, Stuart J.; Charlton, Martin D. B.

    2014-07-01

    Smooth and vertical sidewall profiles are required to create low loss rib and ridge waveguides for integrated optical device and solid state laser applications. In this work, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching processes are developed to produce high quality low loss tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) waveguides. A mixture of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} and O{sub 2} gas are used in combination with chromium (Cr) hard mask for this purpose. In this paper, the authors make a detailed investigation of the etch process parameter window. Effects of process parameters such as ICP power, platen power, gas flow, and chamber pressure on etch rate and sidewall slope angle are investigated. Chamber pressure is found to be a particularly important factor, which can be used to tune the sidewall slope angle and so prevent undercut.

  15. Consideration of VT5 etch-based OPC modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, ChinTeong; Temchenko, Vlad; Kaiser, Dieter; Meusel, Ingo; Schmidt, Sebastian; Schneider, Jens; Niehoff, Martin

    2008-03-01

    Including etch-based empirical data during OPC model calibration is a desired yet controversial decision for OPC modeling, especially for process with a large litho to etch biasing. While many OPC software tools are capable of providing this functionality nowadays; yet few were implemented in manufacturing due to various risks considerations such as compromises in resist and optical effects prediction, etch model accuracy or even runtime concern. Conventional method of applying rule-based alongside resist model is popular but requires a lot of lengthy code generation to provide a leaner OPC input. This work discusses risk factors and their considerations, together with introduction of techniques used within Mentor Calibre VT5 etch-based modeling at sub 90nm technology node. Various strategies are discussed with the aim of better handling of large etch bias offset without adding complexity into final OPC package. Finally, results were presented to assess the advantages and limitations of the final method chosen.

  16. Metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon: a review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhipeng; Geyer, Nadine; Werner, Peter; de Boor, Johannes; Gösele, Ulrich

    2011-01-11

    This article presents an overview of the essential aspects in the fabrication of silicon and some silicon/germanium nanostructures by metal-assisted chemical etching. First, the basic process and mechanism of metal-assisted chemical etching is introduced. Then, the various influences of the noble metal, the etchant, temperature, illumination, and intrinsic properties of the silicon substrate (e.g., orientation, doping type, doping level) are presented. The anisotropic and the isotropic etching behaviors of silicon under various conditions are presented. Template-based metal-assisted chemical etching methods are introduced, including templates based on nanosphere lithography, anodic aluminum oxide masks, interference lithography, and block-copolymer masks. The metal-assisted chemical etching of other semiconductors is also introduced. A brief introduction to the application of Si nanostructures obtained by metal-assisted chemical etching is given, demonstrating the promising potential applications of metal-assisted chemical etching. Finally, some open questions in the understanding of metal-assisted chemical etching are compiled.

  17. Reactive ion etching of quartz and Pyrex for microelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeze, D. A.; Forrest, R. D.; Carey, J. D.; Cox, D. C.; Robertson, I. D.; Weiss, B. L.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2002-10-01

    The reactive ion etching of quartz and Pyrex substrates was carried out using CF4/Ar and CF4/O2 gas mixtures in a combined radio frequency (rf)/microwave (μw) plasma. It was observed that the etch rate and the surface morphology of the etched regions depended on the gas mixture (CF4/Ar or CF4/O2), the relative concentration of CF4 in the gas mixture, the rf power (and the associated self-induced bias) and microwave power. An etch rate of 95 nm/min for quartz was achieved. For samples covered with a thin metal layer, ex situ high resolution scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging indicated that, during etching, surface roughness is produced on the surface beneath the thin metallic mask. Near vertical sidewalls with a taper angle greater than 80° and smooth etched surfaces at the nanometric scale were fabricated by carefully controlling the etching parameters and the masking technique. A simulation of the electrostatic field distribution was carried out to understand the etching process using these masks for the fabrication of high definition features.

  18. Dry etching technologies for the advanced binary film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Yoshinori; Karyu, Makoto; Ita, Hirotsugu; Yoshimori, Tomoaki; Azumano, Hidehito; Muto, Makoto; Nonaka, Mikio

    2011-11-01

    ABF (Advanced Binary Film) developed by Hoya as a photomask for 32 (nm) and larger specifications provides excellent resistance to both mask cleaning and 193 (nm) excimer laser and thereby helps extend the lifetime of the mask itself compared to conventional photomasks and consequently reduces the semiconductor manufacturing cost [1,2,3]. Because ABF uses Ta-based films, which are different from Cr film or MoSi films commonly used for photomask, a new process is required for its etching technology. A patterning technology for ABF was established to perform the dry etching process for Ta-based films by using the knowledge gained from absorption layer etching for EUV mask that required the same Ta-film etching process [4]. Using the mask etching system ARES, which is manufactured by Shibaura Mechatronics, and its optimized etching process, a favorable CD (Critical Dimension) uniformity, a CD linearity and other etching characteristics were obtained in ABF patterning. Those results are reported here.

  19. Box 13: Silicon Micro/Nano-Fabrication Using Proton Beam Writing and Electrochemical Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwood, Daniel J.; Teo, Ee Jin

    The fabrication of 3D structures in silicon is at the heart of many state-of-the-art technologies. Conventional etching technologies require multiple processing steps to fabricate free-standing multilevel structures [1, 2]. The two main wet chemistry procedures are chemical etching in KOH, which is unfortunately isotropic with very slow etching of <111> planes, and electrochemical etching in HF [3]. The electrochemical etching rate is proportional to the flux of holes to the silicon/electrolyte interface, i.e., the applied current density, so it is easy to control and anisotropic. Etching Si in HF at low current densities produces porous silicon, which can be selectively removed by KOH. The low cost and easy implementation of electrochemical etching has made it an attractive alternative to dry etching.

  20. Deep and vertical silicon bulk micromachining using metal assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedinejad, Mohammad; Delaram Farimani, Saeed; Khaje, Mahdi; Mehrara, Hamed; Erfanian, Alireza; Zeinali, Firooz

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a newfound and simple silicon bulk micromachining process based on metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) is proposed which opens a whole new field of research in MEMS technology. This method is anisotropic and by controlling the etching parameters, deep vertical etching, relative to substrate surface, can be achieved in micrometer size for <1 0 0> oriented Si wafer. By utilizing gold as a catalyst and a photoresist layer as the single mask layer for etching, 60 µm deep gyroscope micromachined structures have been fabricated for 2 µm features. The results indicate that MaCE could be the only wet etching method comparable to conventional dry etching recipes in terms of achievable etch rate, aspect ratio, verticality and side wall roughness. It also does not need a vacuum chamber and the other costly instruments associated with dry etching techniques.

  1. High temperature reactive ion etching of iridium thin films with aluminum mask in CF4/O2/Ar plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Pin; Lisker, Marco; Kalkofen, Bodo; Burte, Edmund P.

    2016-08-01

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) technology for iridium with CF4/O2/Ar gas mixtures and aluminum mask at high temperatures up to 350 °C was developed. The influence of various process parameters such as gas mixing ratio and substrate temperature on the etch rate was studied in order to find optimal process conditions. The surface of the samples after etching was found to be clean under SEM inspection. It was also shown that the etch rate of iridium could be enhanced at higher process temperature and, at the same time, very high etching selectivity between aluminum etching mask and iridium could be achieved.

  2. Structural and magnetic etch damage in CoFeB

    SciTech Connect

    Krayer, L.; Lau, J. W.; Kirby, B. J.

    2014-05-07

    A detailed understanding of the interfacial properties of thin films used in magnetic media is critical for the aggressive component scaling required for continued improvement in storage density. In particular, it is important to understand how common etching and milling processes affect the interfacial magnetism. We have used polarized neutron reflectometry and transmission electron microscopy to characterize the structural and magnetic properties of an ion beam etched interface of a CoFeB film. We found that the etching process results in a sharp magnetic interface buried under a nanometer scale layer of non-magnetic, compositionally distinct material.

  3. Evaluation of Pentafluoroethane and 1,1-Difluoroethane for a Dielectric Etch Application in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Etch Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karecki, Simon; Chatterjee, Ritwik; Pruette, Laura; Reif, Rafael; Sparks, Terry; Beu, Laurie; Vartanian, Victor

    2000-07-01

    In this work, a combination of two hydrofluorocarbon compounds, pentafluoroethane (FC-125, C2HF5) and 1,1-difluoroethane (FC-152a, CF2H-CH3), was evaluated as a potential replacement for perfluorocompounds in dielectric etch applications. A high aspect ratio oxide via etch was used as the test vehicle for this study, which was conducted in a commercial inductively coupled high density plasma etch tool. Both process and emissions data were collected and compared to those provided by a process utilizing a standard perfluorinated etch chemistry (C2F6). Global warming (CF4, C2F6, CHF3) and hygroscopic gas (HF, SiF4) emissions were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FC-125/FC-152a was found to produce significant reductions in global warming emissions, on the order of 68 to 76% relative to the reference process. Although etch stopping, caused by a high degree of polymer deposition inside the etched features, was observed, process data otherwise appeared promising for an initial study, with good resist selectivity and etch rates being achieved.

  4. Photo-assisted etching of silicon in chlorine- and bromine-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weiye; Sridhar, Shyam; Liu, Lei; Hernandez, Eduardo; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-05-01

    Cl2, Br2, HBr, Br2/Cl2, and HBr/Cl2 feed gases diluted in Ar (50%-50% by volume) were used to study etching of p-type Si(100) in a rf inductively coupled, Faraday-shielded plasma, with a focus on the photo-assisted etching component. Etching rates were measured as a function of ion energy. Etching at ion energies below the threshold for ion-assisted etching was observed in all cases, with Br2/Ar and HBr/Cl2/Ar plasmas having the lowest and highest sub-threshold etching rates, respectively. Sub-threshold etching rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Etching rates measured under MgF2, quartz, and opaque windows showed that sub-threshold etching is due to photon-stimulated processes on the surface, with vacuum ultraviolet photons being much more effective than longer wavelengths. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. Photo-assisted etching in Cl2/Ar plasmas resulted in the formation of 4-sided pyramidal features with bases that formed an angle of 45° with respect to ⟨110⟩ cleavage planes, suggesting that photo-assisted etching can be sensitive to crystal orientation.

  5. System for etching thick aluminum layers minimizes bridging and undercutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Four step photoresist process for etching thick aluminum layers for semiconductor device contacts produces uniform contact surfaces, eliminates bridging, minimizes undercutting, and may be used on various materials of any thickness.

  6. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOEpatents

    Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Tarte, L.A.

    1996-01-23

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment. 6 figs.

  7. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOEpatents

    Contolini, Robert J.; Mayer, Steven T.; Tarte, Lisa A.

    1996-01-01

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment.

  8. Etch Profile Simulation Using Level Set Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Etching and deposition of materials are critical steps in semiconductor processing for device manufacturing. Both etching and deposition may have isotropic and anisotropic components, due to directional sputtering and redeposition of materials, for example. Previous attempts at modeling profile evolution have used so-called "string theory" to simulate the moving solid-gas interface between the semiconductor and the plasma. One complication of this method is that extensive de-looping schemes are required at the profile corners. We will present a 2D profile evolution simulation using level set theory to model the surface. (1) By embedding the location of the interface in a field variable, the need for de-looping schemes is eliminated and profile corners are more accurately modeled. This level set profile evolution model will calculate both isotropic and anisotropic etch and deposition rates of a substrate in low pressure (10s mTorr) plasmas, considering the incident ion energy angular distribution functions and neutral fluxes. We will present etching profiles of Si substrates in Ar/Cl2 discharges for various incident ion energies and trench geometries.

  9. Ultrasonic metal etching for metallographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.

    1971-01-01

    Ultrasonic etching delineates microstructural features not discernible in specimens prepared for metallographic analysis by standard chemical etching procedures. Cavitation bubbles in ultrasonically excited water produce preferential damage /etching/ of metallurgical phases or grain boundaries, depending on hardness of metal specimens.

  10. Spectrometric analysis of process etching solutions of the photovoltaic industry--determination of HNO3, HF, and H2SiF6 using high-resolution continuum source absorption spectrometry of diatomic molecules and atoms.

    PubMed

    Bücker, Stefan; Acker, Jörg

    2012-05-30

    The surface of raw multicrystalline silicon wafers is treated with HF-HNO(3) mixtures in order to remove the saw damage and to obtain a well-like structured surface of low reflectivity, the so-called texture. The industrial production of solar cells requires a consistent level of texturization for tens of thousands of wafers. Therefore, knowing the actual composition of the etch bath is a key element in process control in order to maintain a certain etch rate through replenishment of the consumed acids. The present paper describes a novel approach to quantify nitric acid (HNO(3)), hydrofluoric acid (HF), and hexafluosilicic acid (H(2)SiF(6)) using a high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace absorption spectrometer. The concentrations of Si (via Si atom absorption at the wavelength 251.611 nm, m(0),(Si)=130 pg), of nitrate (via molecular absorption of NO at the wavelength 214.803 nm, [Formula: see text] ), and of total fluoride (via molecular absorption of AlF at the wavelength 227.46 nm, m(0,F)=13 pg) were measured against aqueous standard solutions. The concentrations of H(2)SiF(6) and HNO(3) are directly obtained from the measurements. The HF concentration is calculated from the difference between the total fluoride content, and the amount of fluoride bound as H(2)SiF(6). H(2)SiF(6) and HNO(3) can be determined with a relative uncertainty of less than 5% and recoveries of 97-103% and 96-105%, respectively. With regards to HF, acceptable results in terms of recovery and uncertainty are obtained for HF concentrations that are typical for the photovoltaic industry. The presented procedure has the unique advantage that the concentration of both, acids and metal impurities in etch solutions, can be routinely determined by a single analytical instrument.

  11. The effect of a zinc-tin-oxide layer used as an etch-stopper layer on the bias stress stability of solution-processed indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul Ho; Rim, You Seung; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the bias stress stability of solution-processed indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors (IGZO TFTs) using zinc-tin-oxide (ZTO) as the etch-stopper layer, the so-called dual-active-layered ZTO/IGZO TFT (DALZI TFT). The DALZI TFT can use a low-cost back-channel-etch structure because of the high chemical stability of the upper ZTO layer. The DALZI TFT exhibited only a threshold voltage shift of -1.86 V under negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) conditions (stress time = 1000 s), while the unpassivated IGZO TFT suffered from a threshold voltage shift of -19.59 V under NBIS conditions (stress time = 1000 s). The superior bias stress stability of the DALZI TFT is attributed not only to the densification effect by the multi-stacking process but also to the lower sensitivity to ambient gases (e.g., oxygen and water vapour) due to the low oxygen vacancy in the upper ZTO layer.

  12. Layer by layer etching of LaAlSiOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hisataka

    2016-09-01

    In order to fabricate a gate transistor with high-k oxide materials, removal of high-k oxide films after gate electrode etching is necessary for the formation of ohmic contacts on source and drain regions. It is crucial that the removal process of high-k oxide film by dry etching is highly selective to and low in damage to the Si substrate in order to avoid the degradation of device performances. Sasaki et al. have achieved a high LaAlSiOx-to-Si selectivity of 6.7 using C4F8/Ar/H2 plasma. In the LaAlSiOx etching process using C4F8/Ar/H2 plasma, H2 plays a role in breaking the metal-oxygen bond to enhance etching of LaAlSiOx. Based on this result, the process was decomposed into two steps: a surface modification step using H2 plasma to break the metal-oxygen bond, and a removal step using C4F8/Ar plasma. A sequential layer by layer etching could realize low damage etching, similar to atomic layer etching. Therefore, a sequential LaAlSiOx etching process using a H2 surface modification step followed by a removal step using C4F8/Ar plasma is investigated. Experiments were carried out on 300 mm diameter wafers using the 100/13.56 MHz dual frequency superimposed capacitively coupled plasma reactor. The etching gases were H2 and C4F8/Ar for each step, respectively. Plasma process conditions were 100 MHz power of 1000 W (plasma generation), 13.56MHz power varied from 0 W to 300W (ion energy control). The substrate temperature was 40 °C. 15nm thick LaAlSiOx blanket film was used for evaluation of the etched amount. Film thickness was measured by X-ray fluorescent analysis thickness meter before and after plasma exposure. The etched amount of LaAlSiOx by the C4F8/Ar plasma step doubled with H2 modification. It is confirmed that when the C4F8/Ar plasma treatment time is sufficient to remove the surface modification layer, a self-limiting reaction is realized. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the etched amount per step can be controlled by control of the ion energy of H2

  13. Optical properties of micromachined polysilicon reflective surfaces with etching holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Byrne, Colin; Liu, Chang; Brady, David J.

    1998-08-01

    MUMPS (Multi-User MEMS Process) is receiving increasingly wide use in micro optics. We have investigated the optical properties of the polysilicon reflective surface in a typical MUMPS chip within the visible light spectrum. The effect of etching holes on the reflected laser beam is studied. The reflectivity and diffraction patterns at five different wavelengths have been measured. The optical properties of the polysilicon reflective surface are greatly affected by the surface roughness, the etching holes, as well as the material. The etching holes contribute to diffraction and reduction of reflectivity. This study provides a basis for optimal design of micromachined free-space optical systems.

  14. Ion beam sputtering of fluoropolymers. [etching polymer films and target surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Ion beam sputter processing rates as well as pertinent characteristics of etched targets and films are described. An argon ion beam source was used to sputter etch and deposit the fluoropolymers PTFE, FEP, and CTFE. Ion beam energy, current density, and target temperature were varied to examine effects on etch and deposition rates. The ion etched fluoropolymers yield cone or spire-like surface structures which vary depending upon the type of polymer, ion beam power density, etch time, and target temperature. Sputter target and film characteristics documented by spectral transmittance measurements, X-ray diffraction, ESCA, and SEM photomicrographs are included.

  15. Plasma etching for advanced polymer optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitting, Donald S.

    Plasma etching is a common microfabrication technique which can be applied to polymers as well as glasses, metals, and semiconductors. The fabrication of low loss and reliable polymer optical devices commonly makes use of advanced microfabrication processing techniques similar in nature to those utilized in standard semiconductor fabrication technology. Among these techniques, plasma/reactive ion etching is commonly used in the formation of waveguiding core structures. Plasma etching is a powerful processing technique with many potential applications in the emerging field of polymer optical device fabrication. One such promising application explored in this study is in the area of thin film-substrate adhesion enhancement. Two approaches involving plasma processing were evaluated to improve substrate-thin film adhesion in the production of polymer waveguide optical devices. Plasma treatment of polymer substrates such as polycarbonate has been studied to promote the adhesion of fluoropolymer thin film coatings for waveguide device fabrication. The effects of blanket oxygen plasma etchback on substrate, microstructural substrate feature formation, and the long term performance and reliability of these methods were investigated. Use of a blanket oxygen plasma to alter the polycarbonate surface prior to fluoropolymer casting was found to have positive but limited capability to improve the adhesive strength between these polymers. Experiments show a strong correlation between surface roughness and adhesion strength. The formation of small scale surface features using microlithography and plasma etching on the polycarbonate surface proved to provide outstanding adhesion strength when compared to any other known treatment methods. Long term environmental performance testing of these surface treatment methods provided validating data. Test results showed these process approaches to be effective solutions to the problem of adhesion between hydrocarbon based polymer

  16. Novel spin-on organic hardmask with high plasma etch resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chang-Il; Lee, Jin-Kuk; Kim, Min-Soo; Yoon, Kyong-Ho; Cheon, Hwan-Sung; Tokareva, Nataliya; Song, Jee-Yun; Kim, Jong-Seob; Chang, Tu-Won

    2008-03-01

    In recent years for memory devices under 70nm using ArF lithography, spin-on organic hardmask has become an attractive alternative process to amorphous carbon layer hardmark (ACL) in mass production due to ACL hardmask's limited capacity, high cost-of-ownership, and low process efficiency in spite of its excellent etch performance. However, insufficient plasma etch resistance of spin-on hardmask makes the etch process an issue resulting in inadequate vertical profiles, large CD bias, and narrow etch process window compared to ACL hardmask. In order to be able to apply these spin on hardmasks to varies layers including critical layers, the aforementioned problems need to be resolved and verified using several evaluation methods including etch pattern evaluation. In this paper, we report the synthesis of novel organic spin-on hardmasks (C-SOH) that incorporate various fused aromatic moieties into polymer chain and the evaluation of etch performance using dry etch tools. Organic spin-on hardmasks with 79-90 wt% carbon contents were synthesized in-house. Oxygen and fluorine based plasma etch processes were used to evaluate the etch resistance of the C-SOH. The results show our 3rd generation C-SOH has etch profiles comparable to that of ACL in a 1:1 dense pattern.

  17. Northern Arabia Etched Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 23 May 2002) The Science Many places on Mars display scabby, eroded landscapes that commonly are referred to as etched terrain. These places have a ragged, tortured look that reveals a geologic history of intense deposition and erosion. This THEMIS image shows such a place. Here a 10 km diameter crater is superposed on the floor of a 40 km diameter crater, most of which is outside of the image but apparent in the MOLA context image. The rugged crater rim material intermingles with low, flat-topped mesas and layers with irregular outlines along with dune-like ridges on many of the flat surfaces. The horizontal layers that occur throughout the scene at different elevations are evidence of repeated episodes of deposition. The apparent ease with which these deposits have been eroded, most likely by wind, suggests that they are composed of poorly consolidated material. Air-fall sediments are the likely candidate for this material rather than lava flows. The dune-like ridges are probably inactive granule ripples produced from the interaction of wind and erosional debris. The large interior crater displays features that are the result of deposition and subsequent erosion. Its raised rim is barely discernable due to burial while piles and blocks of slumped material along the interior circumference attest to the action of erosion. Some of the blocks retain the same texture as the surrounding undisrupted surface. It appears as if the crater had been buried long enough for the overlying material to be eroded into the texture seen today. Then at some point this overburden foundered and collapsed into the crater. Continuing erosion has caused the upper layer to retreat back from what was probably the original rim of the crater, producing the noncircular appearance seen today. The length of time represented by this sequence of events as well as the conditions necessary to produce them are unknown. The Story Have you ever seen an ink etching, where the artistic cross

  18. Note: Electrochemical etching of cylindrical nanoprobes using a vibrating electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yufeng; Zeng, Yongbin Qu, Ningsong; Zhu, Di

    2015-07-15

    An electrochemical etching process using a vibrating electrolyte of potassium hydroxide to prepare tungsten cylindrical nanotips is developed. The vibrating electrolyte eases the effects of a diffusion layer and extends the etching area, which aid in the production of cylindrical nanotips. Larger amplitudes and a vibration frequency of 35 Hz are recommended for producing cylindrical nanotips. Nanotips with a tip radius of approximately 43 nm and a conical angle of arctan 0.0216 are obtained.

  19. Controlled in situ etch-back

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Seabaugh, A. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A controlled in situ etch-back technique is disclosed in which an etch melt and a growth melt are first saturated by a source-seed crystal and thereafter etch-back of a substrate takes place by the slightly undersaturated etch melt, followed by LPE growth of a layer by the growth melt, which is slightly supersaturated.

  20. Etching Of Semiconductor Wafer Edges

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.; Piwczyk, Bernhard P.

    2003-12-09

    A novel method of etching a plurality of semiconductor wafers is provided which comprises assembling said plurality of wafers in a stack, and subjecting said stack of wafers to dry etching using a relatively high density plasma which is produced at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is focused magnetically and said stack is rotated so as to expose successive edge portions of said wafers to said plasma.

  1. Vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Porter, John D.; Yoshiyama, James M.; Contolini, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    A process involving vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials for creating high aspect ratio (i.e., length much greater than diameter), isolated cylindrical holes in dielectric materials that have been exposed to high-energy atomic particles. The process includes cleaning the surface of the tracked material and exposing the cleaned surface to a vapor of a suitable etchant. Independent control of the temperatures of the vapor and the tracked materials provide the means to vary separately the etch rates for the latent track region and the non-tracked material. As a rule, the tracked regions etch at a greater rate than the non-tracked regions. In addition, the vapor-etched holes can be enlarged and smoothed by subsequent dipping in a liquid etchant. The 20-1000 nm diameter holes resulting from the vapor etching process can be useful as molds for electroplating nanometer-sized filaments, etching gate cavities for deposition of nano-cones, developing high-aspect ratio holes in trackable resists, and as filters for a variety of molecular-sized particles in virtually any liquid or gas by selecting the dielectric material that is compatible with the liquid or gas of interest.

  2. Influence of copper foil polycrystalline structure on graphene anisotropic etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kamal P.; Mahyavanshi, Rakesh D.; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic etching of graphene and other two dimensional materials is an important tool to understand the growth process as well as enabling fabrication of various well-defined structures. Here, we reveal the influence of copper foil polycrystalline structure on anisotropic etching process of as-synthesized graphene. Graphene crystals were synthesized on the polycrystalline Cu foil by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system. Microscopic analysis shows difference in shape, size and stripes alignment of graphene crystals with dissimilar nucleation within closure vicinity of neighboring Cu grains. Post-growth etching of such graphene crystals also significantly affected by the crystallographic nature of Cu grains as observed by the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis. Hexagonal hole formation with anisotropic etching is observed to be independent of the stripes and wrinkles in the synthesized graphene. We also observed variation in etched pattern of the graphene depending on the base Cu grain orientations, attributing to difference in nucleation and growth process. The findings can facilitate to understand the nature of microscopic etched pattern depending on metal catalyst crystallographic structure.

  3. Level Set Approach to Anisotropic Wet Etching of Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Radjenović, Branislav; Radmilović-Radjenović, Marija; Mitrić, Miodrag

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a methodology for the three dimensional (3D) modeling and simulation of the profile evolution during anisotropic wet etching of silicon based on the level set method is presented. Etching rate anisotropy in silicon is modeled taking into account full silicon symmetry properties, by means of the interpolation technique using experimentally obtained values for the etching rates along thirteen principal and high index directions in KOH solutions. The resulting level set equations are solved using an open source implementation of the sparse field method (ITK library, developed in medical image processing community), extended for the case of non-convex Hamiltonians. Simulation results for some interesting initial 3D shapes, as well as some more practical examples illustrating anisotropic etching simulation in the presence of masks (simple square aperture mask, convex corner undercutting and convex corner compensation, formation of suspended structures) are shown also. The obtained results show that level set method can be used as an effective tool for wet etching process modeling, and that is a viable alternative to the Cellular Automata method which now prevails in the simulations of the wet etching process. PMID:22399916

  4. Dry Ice Etches Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Every year seasonal carbon dioxide ice, known to us as 'dry ice,' covers the poles of Mars. In the south polar region this ice is translucent, allowing sunlight to pass through and warm the surface below. The ice then sublimes (evaporates) from the bottom of the ice layer, and carves channels in the surface.

    The channels take on many forms. In the subimage shown here (figure 1) the gas from the dry ice has etched wide shallow channels. This region is relatively flat, which may be the reason these channels have a different morphology than the 'spiders' seen in more hummocky terrain.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003364_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.5 km (157.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.2 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:57 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 75 degrees, thus the sun was about 15 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 219.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  5. Photonic Crystal Fabrication in Lithium Nobate via Pattern Transfer Through Wet and Dry Etched Chromium Mask

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-02

    sizes is important to the development of optoelectronic devices. This paper reports a fabrication process to dry etch X -cut LN at a submicron scale using...mission of light depending on the desired application. Production of photonic crystals in X -cut LN requires efficient and reliable fabrication...deposition of LiF during the etching process.7,8 In fabrication of dry-etched LN photonic crystals, the fab - rication methods can be summarized as the

  6. Etching of silicon surfaces using atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzelt, H.; Böhm, G.; Arnold, Th

    2015-04-01

    Local plasma-assisted etching of crystalline silicon by fine focused plasma jets provides a method for high accuracy computer controlled surface waviness and figure error correction as well as free form processing and manufacturing. We investigate a radio-frequency powered atmospheric pressure He/N2/CF4 plasma jet for the local chemical etching of silicon using fluorine as reactive plasma gas component. This plasma jet tool has a typical tool function width of about 0.5 to 1.8 mm and a material removal rate up to 0.068 mm3 min-1. The relationship between etching rate and plasma jet parameters is discussed in detail regarding gas composition, working distance, scan velocity and RF power. Surface roughness after etching was characterized using atomic force microscopy and white light interferometry. A strong smoothing effect was observed for etching rough silicon surfaces like wet chemically-etched silicon wafer backsides. Using the dwell-time algorithm for a deterministic surface machining by superposition of the local removal function of the plasma tool we show a fast and efficient way for manufacturing complex silicon structures. In this article we present two examples of surface processing using small local plasma jets.

  7. Effect of chemical etching and aging in boiling water on the corrosion resistance of Nitinol wires with black oxide resulting from manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Shabalovskaya, S; Rondelli, G; Anderegg, J; Simpson, B; Budko, S

    2003-07-15

    The effect of chemical etching in a HF/HNO(3) acid solution and aging in boiling water on the corrosion resistance of Nitinol wires with black oxide has been evaluated with the use of potentiodynamic, modified potentiostatic ASTM F746, and scratch tests. Scanning-electron microscopy, elemental XPS, and Auger analysis were employed to characterize surface alterations induced by surface treatment and corrosion testing. The effect of aging in boiling water on the temperatures of martensitic transformations and shape recovery was evaluated by means of measuring the wire electroresistance. After corrosion tests, as-received wires revealed uniformly cracked surfaces reminiscent of the stress-corrosion-cracking phenomenon. These wires exhibited negative breakdown potentials in potentiostatic tests and variable breakdown potentials in potentiodynamic tests (- 100 mV to + 400 mV versus SCE). Wires with treated surfaces did not reveal cracking or other traces of corrosion attacks in potentiodynamic tests up to + 900-1400-mV potentials and no pitting after stimulation at + 800 mV in potentiostatic tests. They exhibited corrosion behavior satisfactory for medical applications. Significant improvement of corrosion parameters was observed on the reverse scans in potentiodynamic tests after exposure of treated wires to potentials > 1000 mV. In scratch tests, the prepared surfaces repassivated only at low potentials, comparable to that of stainless steel. Tremendous improvement of the corrosion behavior of treated Nitinol wires is associated with the removal of defect surface material and the growth of stable TiO(2) oxide. The role of precipitates in the corrosion resistance of Nitinol-scratch repassivation capacity in particular-is emphasized in the discussion.

  8. Hierarchical micro-nano structured Ti6Al4V surface topography via two-step etching process for enhanced hydrophilicity and osteoblastic responses.

    PubMed

    Moon, Byeong-Seok; Kim, Sungwon; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Jang, Tae-Sik

    2017-04-01

    Hierarchical micro-nano (HMN) surface structuring of dental implants is a fascinating strategy for achieving fast and mechanically stable fixation due to the synergetic effect of micro- and nano-scale surface roughness with surrounding tissues. However, the introduction of a well-defined nanostructure on a microstructure having complex surface geometry is still challenging. As a means of fabricating HMN surface on Ti6Al4V-ELI, target-ion induced plasma sputtering (TIPS) was used onto a sand-blasted, large-grit and acid-etched substrate. The HMN surface topography was simply controlled by adjusting the tantalum (Ta) target power of the TIPS technique, which is directly related to the Ta ion flux and the surface chemical composition of the substrate. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and laser scanning microscopy (LSM) verified that well-defined nano-patterned surface structures with a depth of ~300 to 400nm and a width of ~60 to 70nm were uniformly distributed and followed the complex micron-sized surface geometry. In vitro cellular responses of pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) were assessed by attachment and proliferation of cells on flat, nano-roughened, micro-roughened, and an HMN surface structure of Ti6Al4V-ELI. Moreover, an in vivo dog mandible defect model study was used to investigate the biological effect of the HMN surface structure compared with the micro-roughened surface. The results showed that the surface nanostructure significantly increased the cellular activities of flat and micro-roughened Ti, and the bone-to-implant contact area and new bone volume were significantly improved on the HMN surface structured Ti. These results support the idea that an HMN surface structure on Ti6Al4V-ELI alloy has great potential for enhancing the biological performance of dental implants.

  9. High-precision structure fabrication based on an etching resistance layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Man; Deng, Qiling; Shi, Lifang; Cao, Axiu; Pang, Hui; Liu, Xin; Wang, Jiazhou; Hu, Song

    2016-10-01

    The high-precision fabrication of micro-/nano-structure is a challenge. In this paper, we proposed a new fabrication method of high-precision structure based on an etching resistance layer. The high-precision features were fabricated by photolithography technique, followed by the etching process to transfer the features to the substrate. During this process, the etching uniformity and error lead to the feature distortion. We introduced an etching resistance layer between feature layer and substrate. The etching process will stop when arriving at the resistance layer. Due to the high precision of the plating film, the high-precision structure depth was achieved. In our experiment, we introduced aluminum trioxide as the etching resistance layer. The structures with low depth error of less than 5% were fabricated.

  10. Inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching of III-nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. P.; Laskar, M. R.; Rahman, A. A.; Gokhale, M. R.; Bhattacharya, A.

    2013-02-01

    III-Nitride semiconductor materials are resistant to most wet chemical etch processes, and hence the only viable alternative is to use dry etching for device processing. However, the conventional Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process results in very slow etch-rates because of low reactive ion density, and larger surface damage due to high energy ion bombardment. Using Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) RIE, a very fast etch-rate and smooth morphology is achieved due to independent control of ion density and ion energy. In this paper, we present our results on ICP-RIE of epitaxial III-N materials, namely c-plane and a-plane oriented GaN, AlN, AlxGa1-xN using various chlorine plasma chemistries based on Cl2 and BCl3. We have examined the role of BCl3 deoxidising pre-treatment on the etching of AlGaN alloys.

  11. Cryogenic Etching of High Aspect Ratio 400 nm Pitch Silicon Gratings.

    PubMed

    Miao, Houxun; Chen, Lei; Mirzaeimoghri, Mona; Kasica, Richard; Wen, Han

    2016-10-01

    The cryogenic process and Bosch process are two widely used processes for reactive ion etching of high aspect ratio silicon structures. This paper focuses on the cryogenic deep etching of 400 nm pitch silicon gratings with various etching mask materials including polymer, Cr, SiO2 and Cr-on-polymer. The undercut is found to be the key factor limiting the achievable aspect ratio for the direct hard masks of Cr and SiO2, while the etch selectivity responds to the limitation of the polymer mask. The Cr-on-polymer mask provides the same high selectivity as Cr and reduces the excessive undercut introduced by direct hard masks. By optimizing the etching parameters, we etched a 400 nm pitch grating to ≈ 10.6 μm depth, corresponding to an aspect ratio of ≈ 53.

  12. A wet etching technique for accurate etching of GaAs/AlAs distributed Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bacher, K.; Harris, J.S. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    The authors have demonstrated a wet etching technique capable of producing accurate and uniform etch depths in distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and other GaAs/AlAs superlattice structures. The process utilizes two selective etchants, citric acid/hydrogen peroxide in a 4:1 ratio and phosphoric acid/hydrogen peroxide/water in a 3:1:50 ratio, to sequentially etch away each pair of superlattice layers. The authors have used this technique to expose a 680 {angstrom} thick conduction GaAs layer buried beneath a 15 period, 2.1 {micro}m thick, undoped GaAs/AlAs DBR mirror. Transmission line measurements pads were formed on the exposed layer to determine the contact and sheet resistance. Comparison with a similar layer on the surface of the wafer reveals that the exposed layer is easily contacted with only a slight increase in sheet resistance indicating less than 125 {angstrom} of overetching, 0.6% of the total etch depth.

  13. ZERODUR: bending strength data for etched surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Leys, Antoine; Carré, Antoine; Kerz, Franca; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    In a continuous effort since 2007 a considerable amount of new data and information has been gathered on the bending strength of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR®. By fitting a three parameter Weibull distribution to the data it could be shown that for homogenously ground surfaces minimum breakage stresses exist lying much higher than the previously applied design limits. In order to achieve even higher allowable stress values diamond grain ground surfaces have been acid etched, a procedure widely accepted as strength increasing measure. If surfaces are etched taking off layers with thickness which are comparable to the maximum micro crack depth of the preceding grinding process they also show statistical distributions compatible with a three parameter Weibull distribution. SCHOTT has performed additional measurement series with etch solutions with variable composition testing the applicability of this distribution and the possibility to achieve further increase of the minimum breakage stress. For long term loading applications strength change with time and environmental media are important. The parameter needed for prediction calculations which is combining these influences is the stress corrosion constant. Results from the past differ significantly from each other. On the basis of new investigations better information will be provided for choosing the best value for the given application conditions.

  14. Seeking Methods to Reduce the Aspect Ratio Dependence in Deep Silicon Etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Robert L.; Goeckner, M. J.; Overzet, L. J.

    2012-10-01

    We are examining how to reduce the Aspect Ratio Dependence (ARD) of deep silicon etch processes while maintaining both smooth sidewalls and an acceptable etch rate. In particular, SF6/O2/Ar and SF6/C4F8/Ar plasmas have both been shown to etch silicon with good anisotropy in a continuous etch process producing good sidewall profiles and at acceptable etch rates. Unfortunately, these processes also suffer from significant ARD. We are proposing to use an ARD deposition process to balance the ARD of the etch process and thereby find a reasonably AR independent process having an acceptable overall etch rate. To do this, we propose to examine both the ARD deposition rate into various AR trenches and the ARD etch rate of the passivation layer in those trenches. We are pursuing this in part because other researchers have shown that the etch rate of low AR features can be reduced (by depositing a passivation layer) and allow larger AR features to ``catch up.'' As a result, the same depth trench can be obtained [1]. The work is being carried out in a Plasma-Therm Versaline reactor in the UTD clean room. [4pt] [1] See for example: S. Lai, D. Johnson & R. Westerman, J.Vac. Sci. Tech. A, 24, 1283, (2006).

  15. Formation of plasma induced surface damage in silica glass etching for optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, D. S.; Jung, S. T.

    2004-06-01

    Ge, B, P-doped silica glass films are widely used as optical waveguides because of their low losses and inherent compatibility with silica optical fibers. These films were etched by ICP (inductively coupled plasma) with chrome etch masks, which were patterned by reactive ion etching (RIE) using chlorine-based gases. In some cases, the etched surfaces of silica glass were very rough (root-mean square roughness greater than 100 nm) and we call this phenomenon plasma induced surface damage (PISD). Rough surface cannot be used as a platform for hybrid integration because of difficulty in alignment and bonding of active devices. PISD reduces the etch rate of glass and it is very difficult to remove residues on a rough surface. The objective of this study is to elucidate the mechanism of PISD formation. To achieve this goal, PISD formation during different etching conditions of chrome etch mask and silica glass was investigated. In most cases, PISD sources are formed on a glass surface after chrome etching, and metal compounds are identified in theses sources. Water rinse after chrome etching reduces the PISD, due to the water solubility of metal chlorides. PISD is decreased or even disappeared at high power and/or low pressure in glass etching, even if PISD sources were present on the glass surface before etching. In conclusion, PISD sources come from the chrome etching process, and polymer deposition on these sources during the silica etching cause the PISD sources to grow. In the area close to the PISD source there is a higher ion flux, which causes an increase in the etch rate, and results in the formation of a pit.

  16. Uniform vertical trench etching on silicon with high aspect ratio by metal-assisted chemical etching using nanoporous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Liyi; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Xueying; Lin, Ziyin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2014-01-08

    Recently, metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) has been proposed as a promising wet-etching method for the fabrication of micro- and nanostructures on silicon with low cost. However, uniform vertical trench etching with high aspect ratio is still of great challenge for traditional MaCE. Here we report an innovated MaCE method, which combined the use of a nanoporous gold thin film as the catalyst and a hydrofluoric acid (HF)-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) mixture solution with a low HF-to-H2O2 concentration ratio (ρ) as the etchant. The reported method successfully fabricated vertical trenches on silicon with a width down to 2 μm and an aspect ratio of 16. The geometry of the trenches was highly uniform throughout the 3D space. The vertical etching direction was favored on both (100)- and (111)-oriented silicon substrates. The reported method was also capable of producing multiple trenches on the same substrate with individually-tunable lateral geometry. An etching mechanism including a through-catalyst mass-transport process and an electropolishing-favored charge-transport process was identified by a comparative study. The novel method fundamentally solves the problems of distortion and random movement of isolated catalysts in MaCE. The results mark a breakthrough in high-quality silicon trench-etching technology with a cost of more than 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the currently available methods.

  17. High-density plasma etching of aluminum copper on titanium tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Kim

    1999-09-01

    A multi-step high density plasma etch process, based on chlorine and sulfur hexafluoride chemistry (SF6), for LRC single wafer metal etcher was developed, characterized and optimized to anisotropically etch the metal stack which consists of a thin titanium tungsten ARC, hot deposited aluminum copper over titanium tungsten. The titanium tungsten used in the metal structure presents unique constraints on etch selectivity to underlying film while simultaneously requiring clearing metal stringers. The etching was further complicated by lateral etching of aluminum copper (AlCu) during titanium tungsten (TiW) etch and overetch steps. With the help of design-of-experiment techniques, multi-variable factorial experiments were conducted to determine the optimum processes for the bulk metal etch, barrier metal layer etch and overetch steps. Characterization parameters include the metal etch rate, etch selectivity, CD line-width, metal resistance and plasma charging damages. Special attention was paid to the overetch window since the metal quality is very sensitive to the overetch conditions. Insufficient overetch may leave metal stingers or metal shorts. Excessive overetch may cause severe CD undercutting and great loss of TEOS oxide under-layer.

  18. Innovative, Inexpensive Etching Technique Developed for Polymer Electro- Optical Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-optic, polymer-based integrated optic devices for high-speed communication and computing applications offer potentially significant advantages over conventional inorganic electro-optic crystals. One key area of integrated optical technology--primary processing and fabrication--may particularly benefit from the use of polymer materials. However, as efforts concentrate on the miniaturization of electro-integrated circuit pattern geometries, the ability to etch fine features and smoothly sloped sidewalls is essential to make polymers useful for electro-integrated circuit applications. There are many existing processes available to etch polymer materials, but they all yield nearly vertical sidewalls. Vertical sidewalls are too difficult to reliably cover with a metal layer, and incomplete metalization degrades microwave performance, particularly at high frequency. However, obtaining a very sloped sidewall greatly improves the deposition of metal on the sidewall, leading to low-loss characteristics, which are essential to integrating these devices in highspeed electro-optic modulators. The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed in-house an inexpensive etching technique that uses a photolithography method followed by a simple, wet chemical etching process to etch through polymer layers. In addition to being simpler and inexpensive, this process can be used to fabricate smoothly sloped sidewalls by using a commercial none rodible mask: Spin-On-Glass. A commercial transparent material, Spin-On-Glass, uses processes and equipment similar to that for photoresist techniques.

  19. High rate dry etching of (BiSb)2Te3 film by CH4/H2-based plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Junqiang; Shi, Xun; Chen, Lidong

    2014-10-01

    Etching characteristics of p-type (BiSb)2Te3 films were studied with CH4/H2/Ar gas mixture using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-reactive ion etching (RIE) system. The effects of gas mixing ratio, working pressure and gas flow rate on the etch rate and the surface morphology were investigated. The vertical etched profile with the etch rate of 600 nm/min was achieved at the optimized processing parameters. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed the non-uniform etching of (BiSb)2Te3 films due to disparate volatility of the etching products. Micro-masking effects caused by polymer deposition and Bi-rich residues resulted in roughly etched surfaces. Smooth surfaces can be obtained by optimizing the CH4/H2/Ar mixing ratio.

  20. Regenerative Electroless Etching of Silicon.

    PubMed

    Kolasinski, Kurt W; Gimbar, Nathan J; Yu, Haibo; Aindow, Mark; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno

    2017-01-09

    Regenerative electroless etching (ReEtching), described herein for the first time, is a method of producing nanostructured semiconductors in which an oxidant (Ox1 ) is used as a catalytic agent to facilitate the reaction between a semiconductor and a second oxidant (Ox2 ) that would be unreactive in the primary reaction. Ox2 is used to regenerate Ox1 , which is capable of initiating etching by injecting holes into the semiconductor valence band. Therefore, the extent of reaction is controlled by the amount of Ox2 added, and the rate of reaction is controlled by the injection rate of Ox2 . This general strategy is demonstrated specifically for the production of highly luminescent, nanocrystalline porous Si from the reaction of V2 O5 in HF(aq) as Ox1 and H2 O2 (aq) as Ox2 with Si powder and wafers.

  1. Method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Qiu, Weibin; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2012-12-25

    A method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors includes providing a process chamber and a source electrode adjacent to the process chamber. The process chamber contains a sample comprising a Ga-based compound semiconductor. The sample is in contact with a platen which is electrically connected to a first power supply, and the source electrode is electrically connected to a second power supply. The method includes flowing SiCl.sub.4 gas into the chamber, flowing Ar gas into the chamber, and flowing H.sub.2 gas into the chamber. RF power is supplied independently to the source electrode and the platen. A plasma is generated based on the gases in the process chamber, and regions of a surface of the sample adjacent to one or more masked portions of the surface are etched to create a substantially smooth etched surface including features having substantially vertical walls beneath the masked portions.

  2. Development and Research on the Mechanism of Novel Mist Etching Method for Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Hirao, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    A novel etching process with etchant mist was developed and applied to oxide thin films such as zinc oxide (ZnO), zinc magnesium oxide (ZnMgO), and indium tin oxide (ITO). By using this process, it was shown that precise control of the etching characteristics is possible with a reasonable etching rate, for example, in the range of 10-100 nm/min, and a fine pattern of high accuracy can also be realized, even though this is usually very difficult by conventional wet etching processes, for ZnO and ZnMgO. The mist etching process was found to be similarly and successfully applied to ITO. The mechanism of mist etching has been studied by examining the etching temperature dependence of pattern accuracy, and it was shown that the mechanism was different from that of conventional liquid-phase spray etching. It was ascertained that fine pattern etching was attained using mist droplets completely (or partly) gasified by the heat applied to the substrate. This technique was applied to the fabrication of a ZnO thin-film transistor (TFT) with a ZnO active channel length of 4 µm. The electrical properties of the TFT were found to be excellent with fine uniformity over the entire 4-in. wafer.

  3. Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on the magnetic flux of a high moment write pole material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jinqiu; Liu Feng; Chen Lifan; Miloslavsky, Lena

    2010-05-15

    Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on NiFe magnetic properties was investigated. Experimental data showed 40% magnetic property degradation for F-containing gas etching, 10% degradation for O-containing gas etching, and 5% degradation for Cl-containing gas etching processes. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the crystallographic orientation remained the same upon the reactive gas etching, which is due to the low ion energy in plasma etching process as opposed to ion milling process with high input energy. It is proposed that the reported magnetic property degradation was mainly caused by the nonmagnetic dead layer formation, rather than the changes in the crystallographic orientation. The dead layer was determined by the NiFe thickness dependence of remnant magnetic flux variations between pre-etched and postetched samples. The dead layer remained nearly constant for O-containing gas etching process with increasing plasma processing time. The nonmagnetic dead layer of {approx}40-50 A formed in O-containing etching gas was observed in transmission electron microscopy cross-sectional image and was in very good agreement with the calculated value based on magnetic flux measurements. Combined magnetic and physical characterizations suggest that the dead layer thickness saturates at the initial stage of the plasma etching and magnetic property remained unchanged with increasing etching duration upon formation of the dead layer.

  4. Decontamination of metals using chemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Lerch, Ronald E.; Partridge, Jerry A.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to chemical etching process for reclaiming contaminated equipment wherein a reduction-oxidation system is included in a solution of nitric acid to contact the metal to be decontaminated and effect reduction of the reduction-oxidation system, and includes disposing a pair of electrodes in the reduced solution to permit passage of an electrical current between said electrodes and effect oxidation of the reduction-oxidation system to thereby regenerate the solution and provide decontaminated equipment that is essentially radioactive contamination-free.

  5. Understanding anisotropic plasma etching of two-dimensional polystyrene opals for advanced materials fabrication.

    PubMed

    Akinoglu, Eser M; Morfa, Anthony J; Giersig, Michael

    2014-10-21

    Anisotropic deformation of polystyrene particles in an oxygenated (O2/Ar) plasma is observed for radio frequency (rf) plasma and inductively coupled plasma (ICP). A facile model based on a ratio of completely isotropic and completely anisotropic etching is presented to describe the anisotropy of the etching process and is implemented to determine the height of the spheroid-shaped polystyrene particles. In our systems, we find the plasma etching to be 54% isotropic in the rf plasma and 79% isotropic in the ICP. With this model, the maximum material deposition thickness for nanofabrication with plasma-etched nanosphere lithography or colloid lithography can be predicted. Moreover, the etching of polystyrene particles in an oxygenated plasma is investigated versus the etching time, gas flow, gas composition, temperature, substrate material, and particle size. The results of this study allow precise shape tuning during the fabrication of nanostructured surfaces with size-dependent properties for bionic, medical, and photonic applications.

  6. A highly selective, chlorofluorocarbon-free GaAs on AlGaAs etch

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.E. . Solid State Technology Center)

    1993-07-01

    A highly selective reactive ion etching process using SiCl[sub 4], CF[sub 4], O[sub 2], and He is reported. The selectivity of the etch, which is adjustable, ranges from 308:1 to 428:1 for GaAs to Al[sub 0.11]Ga[sub 0.89]As. This variability in selectivity is achieved by adjusting the helium flow rate. One very attractive feature of this etch is that it uses no chlorofluorocarbons and therefore complies with future bans on these substances imposed at both federal and corporate levels. The etch is demonstrated on a GaAs field effect transistor structure with an underlying Al[sub 0.11]Ga[sub 0.89]As stop-etch layer. The etch can be used for both anisotropic and isotropic applications.

  7. CF3Br plasma cryo etching of low-k porous dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, I.; Koehler, N.; Miakonkikh, A.; Zimmermann, S.; Schulz, S. E.; Rudenko, K.

    2016-08-01

    Process of plasma etching of CVD low-k dielectric was studied. We used CF3Br low pressure ICP plasma for etching at cryo temperatures (-20°C — -100°C), pressures (5-20 mTorr) and RF bias with effective DC voltage 80-140 V. Refractive index of film and its thickness were measured by spectral ellipsometry. Ellipsometric porosimetry was employed to compare pore size distribution before and after etching of films. Measurements show increasing of etch rate increase with decreasing sample temperature.

  8. Reduced threshold all-optical bistability in etched quantum well microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, T.; Ladan, F. R.; Izrael, A.; Azoulay, R.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Oudar, J. L.

    1994-02-01

    Etched vertical microresonators made of GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells produced by reactive ion etching was investigated to study the optical bistability phenomena. Reactive ion etching was preferred because of smooth vertical and minimization of density of surface recombination centers. A high cavity finesse was observed in the microresonators producing an optical bistability with wide hysteresis loops. A low threshold power of 70 microwatts was measured due to carrier confinement and vertical walls. The low bistability threshold power was attributed to self passivation happening during etching process, which produced a small surface recombination rate.

  9. Semiconductor etching by hyperthermal neutral beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K. (Inventor); Giapis, Konstantinos P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An at-least dual chamber apparatus and method in which high flux beams of fast moving neutral reactive species are created, collimated and used to etch semiconductor or metal materials from the surface of a workpiece. Beams including halogen atoms are preferably used to achieve anisotropic etching with good selectivity at satisfactory etch rates. Surface damage and undercutting are minimized.

  10. Methods for dry etching semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Todd; Gross, Andrew John; Clews, Peggy J.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2016-11-01

    The present invention provides methods for etching semiconductor devices, such aluminum nitride resonators. The methods herein allow for devices having improved etch profiles, such that nearly vertical sidewalls can be obtained. In some examples, the method employs a dry etch step with a primary etchant gas that omits BCl.sub.3, a common additive.

  11. Modeling aluminum etch chemistry in high density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, E.; Ho, P.; Buss, R.

    1997-08-01

    The authors have assembled a chemical reaction mechanism that describes the BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasma etch of Al metallization layers. The reaction set for gas-phase and surface processes was derived either from literature data or estimated from data on related systems. A well-mixed reactor model was used to develop the mechanism and test it against experimental measurements of plasma species and etch-rates in processing reactors. Finally, use of reduced chemistry mechanisms are demonstrated in 2-D simulations for a complex reactor geometry.

  12. Photo-assisted etching of silicon in chlorine- and bromine-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weiye; Sridhar, Shyam; Liu, Lei; Hernandez, Eduardo; Donnelly, Vincent M. Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-05-28

    Cl{sub 2}, Br{sub 2}, HBr, Br{sub 2}/Cl{sub 2}, and HBr/Cl{sub 2} feed gases diluted in Ar (50%–50% by volume) were used to study etching of p-type Si(100) in a rf inductively coupled, Faraday-shielded plasma, with a focus on the photo-assisted etching component. Etching rates were measured as a function of ion energy. Etching at ion energies below the threshold for ion-assisted etching was observed in all cases, with Br{sub 2}/Ar and HBr/Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas having the lowest and highest sub-threshold etching rates, respectively. Sub-threshold etching rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Etching rates measured under MgF{sub 2}, quartz, and opaque windows showed that sub-threshold etching is due to photon-stimulated processes on the surface, with vacuum ultraviolet photons being much more effective than longer wavelengths. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. Photo-assisted etching in Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas resulted in the formation of 4-sided pyramidal features with bases that formed an angle of 45° with respect to 〈110〉 cleavage planes, suggesting that photo-assisted etching can be sensitive to crystal orientation.

  13. Study of surfactant-added TMAH for applications in DRIE and wet etching-based micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, B.; Shikida, M.; Sato, K.; Pal, P.; Amakawa, H.; Hida, H.; Fukuzawa, K.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, etching anisotropy is evaluated for a number of different crystallographic orientations of silicon in a 0.1 vol% Triton-X-100 added 25 wt% tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution using a silicon hemisphere. The research is primarily aimed at developing advanced applications of wet etching in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The etching process is carried out at different temperatures in the range of 61-81 °C. The etching results of silicon hemisphere and different shapes of three-dimensional structures in {1 0 0}- and {1 1 0}-Si surfaces are analyzed. Significantly important anisotropy, different from a traditional etchant (e.g. pure KOH and TMAH), is investigated to extend the applications of the wet etching process in silicon bulk micromachining. The similar etching behavior of exact and vicinal {1 1 0} and {1 1 1} planes in TMAH + Triton is utilized selectively to remove the scalloping from deep reactive-ion etching (DRIE) etched profiles. The direct application of the present research is demonstrated by fabricating a cylindrical lens with highly smooth etched surface finish. The smoothness of a micro-lens at different locations is measured qualitatively by a scanning electron microscope and quantitatively by an atomic force microscope. The present paper provides a simple and effective fabrication method of the silicon micro-lens for optical MEMS applications.

  14. UV Enhancement of CR-39 Nuclear Track Detector Etch Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traynor, Nathan; McLauchlin, Christopher; Dodge, Kenneth; McLean, James; Padalino, Stephen; Burke, Michelle; Sangster, Craig

    2014-03-01

    CR-39 plastic is an effective and commonly used solid state nuclear track detector. High-energy charged particles leave tracks of chemical damage. When CR-39 is chemically etched with NaOH at elevated temperatures, pits are produced at the track sites that are measurable by an optical microscope. We have shown that by exposing the CR-39 to high intensity UV light between nuclear irradiation and chemical etching, the rate at which the pits grow during etching is increased. The effect has been observed for wavelengths shorter than 350 nm, to at least 250 nm. Heating of samples during UV exposure dramatically increases the etch rates, although heating alone does not produce the effect. The pit enhancement is the result of an increase in both the bulk and track etch rates, while the ratio of these rates (which determines sensitivity to particles) remains roughly constant. By determining the best processing parameters, this effect promises to significantly reduce the time required to process CR-39 track detectors. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  15. Characteristics of silicon etching by silicon chloride ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tomoko; Karahashi, Kazuhiro; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Kang, Song-Yun

    2013-05-15

    Plasmas generated from halogen-containing gases, such as Cl{sub 2} or HBr, have been widely used in gate etching processes for semiconductor chip manufacturing. Such plasmas may contain silicon halide ions formed by the ionization of etching products that enter the plasma. In this study, to illustrate Si etching by such silicon halide ions, the sputtering yield of Si by SiCl{sub x}{sup +} (with x = 1 or 3) ions has been obtained as a function of the incident ion energy by using a mass-selected ion beam injection system. It has been found that, at sufficiently low energy, the incidence of SiCl{sup +} ions leads to the deposition of Si which may affect profile control in microelectronic device fabrication processes.

  16. Selective Plasma Etching of Polymeric Substrates for Advanced Applications.

    PubMed

    Puliyalil, Harinarayanan; Cvelbar, Uroš

    2016-06-07

    In today's nanoworld, there is a strong need to manipulate and process materials on an atom-by-atom scale with new tools such as reactive plasma, which in some states enables high selectivity of interaction between plasma species and materials. These interactions first involve preferential interactions with precise bonds in materials and later cause etching. This typically occurs based on material stability, which leads to preferential etching of one material over other. This process is especially interesting for polymeric substrates with increasing complexity and a "zoo" of bonds, which are used in numerous applications. In this comprehensive summary, we encompass the complete selective etching of polymers and polymer matrix micro-/nanocomposites with plasma and unravel the mechanisms behind the scenes, which ultimately leads to the enhancement of surface properties and device performance.

  17. Selective Plasma Etching of Polymeric Substrates for Advanced Applications

    PubMed Central

    Puliyalil, Harinarayanan; Cvelbar, Uroš

    2016-01-01

    In today’s nanoworld, there is a strong need to manipulate and process materials on an atom-by-atom scale with new tools such as reactive plasma, which in some states enables high selectivity of interaction between plasma species and materials. These interactions first involve preferential interactions with precise bonds in materials and later cause etching. This typically occurs based on material stability, which leads to preferential etching of one material over other. This process is especially interesting for polymeric substrates with increasing complexity and a “zoo” of bonds, which are used in numerous applications. In this comprehensive summary, we encompass the complete selective etching of polymers and polymer matrix micro-/nanocomposites with plasma and unravel the mechanisms behind the scenes, which ultimately leads to the enhancement of surface properties and device performance. PMID:28335238

  18. Fabrication of sub-15 nm aluminum wires by controlled etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan-Wall, T.; Hughes, H. J.; Hartman, N.; McQueen, T. M.; Marković, N.

    2014-04-01

    We describe a method for the fabrication of uniform aluminum nanowires with diameters below 15 nm. Electron beam lithography is used to define narrow wires, which are then etched using a sodium bicarbonate solution, while their resistance is simultaneously measured in-situ. The etching process can be stopped when the desired resistance is reached, and can be restarted at a later time. The resulting nanowires show a superconducting transition as a function of temperature and magnetic field that is consistent with their smaller diameter. The width of the transition is similar to that of the lithographically defined wires, indicating that the etching process is uniform and that the wires are undamaged. This technique allows for precise control over the normal state resistance and can be used to create a variety of aluminum nanodevices.

  19. Self-organization of hydrogen gas bubbles rising above laser-etched metallic aluminum in a weakly basic aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Barmina, E V; Kuzmin, P G; Shafeev, G A

    2011-10-01

    Self-organization of hydrogen bubbles is reported under etching of metallic Aluminum in a weakly basic solution. The ascending gas bubbles drift to the areas with higher density of bubbles. As a result, ascending bubbles form various stationary structures whose symmetry is determined by the symmetry of the etched area. Bubbles are aligned along the bisectors of the contour of the etched area. The special laser-assisted profiling of the etched area in shape of a vortex induces a torque in the fluid above the etched area. The process is interpreted on the basis of Bernoulli equation.

  20. Characterization of reactive ion etching of sol-gel SiO2 using Taguchi optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Terence C.; Ooi, Boon Siew; Zhou, Yan; Chan, Yuen Chuen; Lam, Yee Loy

    1999-11-01

    SiO2 films prepared using sol-gel technique have found enormous potential applications in photonics, electronics and sensor devices. However, the feasibility of the devices utilizing sol-gel technology lies on the ease of the fabrication processes such as patterns transfer using wet or dry etchings. Dry etching is preferred over wet etching as it is able to produce finer features with high anisotropic etch profile. In this paper, we report the development of a dry reactive ion etching process for sol-gel SiO2 using a mixture of CF4 and O2 plasma. Parameters such as RF power, chamber pressure, CF4 and O2 flow rate, were optimized using a statistical method called Taguchi Technique. Etch rate of as high as 50nm/min, with high anisotropy etched profile, has been obtained.

  1. Release etch modeling analysis and the use of laser scanning microscopy for etch time prediction of micromachined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matamis, George; Gogoi, Bishnu P.; Monk, David J.; McNeil, Andrew; Burrows, Veronica A.

    2000-08-01

    An alternative non-destructive analysis method using laser scanning microscopy (LSM) was used to study etch release distances in MEMS pressure sensor. The LSM method eliminates samples preparation and is easy to implement in a MEMS manufacturing environment. In this study, various diaphragm structures were etched using a highly concentrated HF based solution. Experimental etch data were obtained for both SiO2 and PSG films under these various structures. Both the height and the width of the sacrificial layer port/channel had a significant effect on etch rate for both films. As expected, a non-linear etch rate was obtained for both SiO2 and PSG films. Since the HF concentration changes over time in a manufacturing bath process, careful selection of processing time is required in order to fully release MEMS structures. Future theoretical modeling with the assistance of experimental data obtained in this study is being pursued to strengthen past work done by Eaton et al, Monk et al, and Liu et al.

  2. A Reactive-Ion Etch for Patterning Piezoelectric Thin Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Wild, Larry

    2003-01-01

    Reactive-ion etching (RIE) under conditions described below has been found to be a suitable means for patterning piezoelectric thin films made from such materials as PbZr(1-x)Ti(x)O3 or Ba(x)Sr(1.x)TiO3. In the original application for which this particular RIE process was developed, PbZr(1-x)Ti(x)O3 films 0.5 microns thick are to be sandwiched between Pt electrode layers 0.1 microns thick and Ir electrode layers 0.1 microns thick to form piezoelectric capacitor structures. Such structures are typical of piezoelectric actuators in advanced microelectromechanical systems now under development or planned to be developed in the near future. RIE of PbZr(1-x)Ti(x)O3 is usually considered to involve two major subprocesses: an ion-assisted- etching reaction, and a sputtering subprocess that removes reactive byproducts. RIE is favored over other etching techniques because it offers a potential for a high degree of anisotropy, high-resolution pattern definition, and good process control. However, conventional RIE is not ideal for patterning PbZr(1-x)Ti(x)O3 films at a thickness as great as that in the original intended application. In order to realize the potential benefits mentioned above, it is necessary to optimize process conditions . in particular, the composition of the etching gas and the values of such other process parameters as radio-frequency power, gas pressure, gas-flow rate, and duration of the process. Guidelines for determining optimum conditions can be obtained from experimental determination of etch rates as functions of these parameters. Etch-gas mixtures of BCl3 and Cl2, some also including Ar, have been found to offer a high degree of selectivity as needed for patterning of PbZr(1-x)Ti(x)O3 films on top of Ir electrode layers in thin-film capacitor structures. The selectivity is characterized by a ratio of approx.10:1 (rate of etching PbZr(1-x)Ti(x)O3 divided by rate of etching Ir and IrO(x)). At the time of reporting the information for this article

  3. Copper dry etching by sub-atmospheric-pressure pure hydrogen glow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Hiromasa; Sato, Jumpei; Hirano, Tatsuya; Kubota, Yusuke; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Copper (Cu) dry etching is demonstrated using a narrow-gap hydrogen plasma generated at 13.3 kPa (100 Torr) for applications in the Cu wiring technology of integrated circuits. A localized hydrogen plasma is generated around the apex of a fine pipe electrode. The Cu etching can be observed only when the process gas contains hydrogen, and the etching rates decrease with decreased hydrogen concentration. The plasma heating effect owing to plasma localization is negligible for the Cu etching because no etching occurs in the presence of pure N2 plasma whose volume is almost equal to that of the pure H2 plasma. Furthermore, the influences of physical sputtering and vacuum ultraviolet irradiation on the Cu etching are confirmed to be insignificant by exposing the samples to rare-gas plasma. The maximum Cu etching rate of 500 nm/min can be achieved at a stage temperature of 0 °C. However, the Cu etching rate has no obvious dependence on the stage temperature in a range from -20 to 330 °C. In contrast, the etching rates for Si and SiO2 at a stage temperature of 0 °C are 100 μm/min and 50 nm/min, respectively. The Cu etching rate is 10 times higher than that of SiO2, which implies that this etching technique has potential applications for Cu wiring on an SiO2 layer. The Cu surface etched by the hydrogen plasma is roughened and exhibits many round pits and bumps, which seems to be owing to excessive incorporation of the diffused hydrogen in the Cu bulk.

  4. A statistical approach to optimization of alumina etching in a high density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiao; Gupta, Subhadra; Highsmith, Alton; Paranjpe, Ajit; Rook, Katrina

    2008-08-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactive ion etching of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with fluorine-based gas chemistry in a high density plasma reactor was carried out in an initial investigation aimed at data storage applications. A statistical design of experiments was implemented to optimize etch performance with respect to process variables such as ICP power, platen power, direct current (dc) bias, and pressure. Both soft photoresist masks and hard metal masks were investigated in terms of etch selectivity and surface properties. The reverse power dependence of dc bias on the ratio of ICP to platen power was elucidated. Etch mechanisms in terms of physical and ion enhanced chemical etchings were discussed. The F-based chemistry greatly enhances the etch rate of alumina compared to purely physical processes such as ion milling. Etch rates as high as 150 nm/min were achieved using this process. A practical process window was developed for high etch rates, with reasonable selectivity to hard masks, with the desired profile, and with low substrate bias for minimal damage.

  5. Fabrication Characteristics of Silicon Nanowires via the Electrochemical Electroless Etching Method.

    PubMed

    Kang, ByeongSu; Jeong, Chae Hwan; Kim, Changheon; Kim, Min-Young; Choi, Bum Ho; Lee, Moo Sung; Kim, Ho-Sung

    2015-07-01

    A silicon nanowire structure was fabricated using the electrochemical electroless etching method, involving electroless plating and the electrochemical etching process. The reflection of the absorption layer with the nanowires' structure was about 5%, which is better than a bulk-type solar cell (10%).

  6. Ion-beam-assisted etching of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efremow, N. N.; Geis, M. W.; Flanders, D. C.; Lincoln, G. A.; Economou, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity, low RF loss, and inertness of diamond make it useful in traveling wave tubes operating in excess of 500 GHz. Such use requires the controlled etching of type IIA diamond to produce grating like structures tens of micrometers deep. Previous work on reactive ion etching with O2 gave etching rates on the order of 20 nm/min and poor etch selectivity between the masking material (Ni or Cr) and the diamond. An alternative approach which uses a Xe(+) beam and a reactive gas flux of NO2 in an ion-beam-assisted etching system is reported. An etching rate of 200 nm/min was obtained with an etching rate ratio of 20 between the diamond and an aluminum mask.

  7. Improvement in etching rate for epilayer lift-off with surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fan-Lei; Horng, Ray-Hua; Lu, Jian-Heng; Chen, Chun-Li; Kao, Yu-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the GaAs epilayer is quickly separated from GaAs substrate by epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process with mixture etchant solution. The HF solution mixes with surfactant as mixture etchant solution to etch AlAs sacrificial layer for the selective wet etching of AlAs sacrificial layer. Addiction surfactants etchant significantly enhance the etching rate in the hydrofluoric acid etching solution. It is because surfactant provides hydrophilicity to change the contact angle with enhances the fluid properties of the mixture etchant between GaAs epilayer and GaAs substrate. Arsine gas was released from the etchant solution because the critical reaction product in semiconductor etching is dissolved arsine gas. Arsine gas forms a bubble, which easily displaces the etchant solution, before the AlAs layer was undercut. The results showed that acetone and hydrofluoric acid ratio of about 1:1 for the fastest etching rate of 13.2 μm / min. The etching rate increases about 4 times compared with pure hydrofluoric acid, moreover can shorten the separation time about 70% of GaAs epilayer with GaAs substrate. The results indicate that etching ratio and stability are improved by mixture etchant solution. It is not only saving the epilayer and the etching solution exposure time, but also reducing the damage to the epilayer structure.

  8. Fabrication of polymer nanowires via maskless O2 plasma etching.

    PubMed

    Du, Ke; Wathuthanthri, Ishan; Liu, Yuyang; Kang, Yong Tae; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2014-04-25

    In this paper, we introduce a simple fabrication technique which can pattern high-aspect-ratio polymer nanowire structures of photoresist films by using a maskless one-step oxygen plasma etching process. When carbon-based photoresist materials on silicon substrates are etched by oxygen plasma in a metallic etching chamber, nanoparticles such as antimony, aluminum, fluorine, silicon or their compound materials are self-generated and densely occupy the photoresist polymer surface. Such self-masking effects result in the formation of high-aspect-ratio vertical nanowire arrays of the polymer in the reactive ion etching mode without the necessity of any artificial etch mask. Nanowires fabricated by this technique have a diameter of less than 50 nm and an aspect ratio greater than 20. When such nanowires are fabricated on lithographically pre-patterned photoresist films, hierarchical and hybrid nanostructures of polymer are also conveniently attained. This simple and high-throughput fabrication technique for polymer nanostructures should pave the way to a wide range of applications such as in sensors, energy storage, optical devices and microfluidics systems.

  9. Dry etch development of W/WSi short Gate MESFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Sherwin, M.E.; Baca, A.G.; Zolper, J.C.; Rieger, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of refractory metal thin films in the fabrication of high-speed, high-density GaAs field effect transistors (FETs) are prominent with applications as interconnects, via plugs, and ohmic and Schottky contacts. Tungsten and tungsten silicide can be used in a self-aligned gate process as the ion implantation mask during the formation of source and drain regions for metal-semiconductor FETs (MESFETs). The gate etch must be highly anisotropic to accurately define the implant region. Reactive ion etch (RIE) techniques have been used to etch W and WSi films in fluorine-based discharges. The etch mechanism tends to be very chemical and often results in severe undercutting of the feature due to the lateral attack of the refractory metal. The undercut is often so severe that critical dimensions are not maintained and gate profiles do not properly align to the implant region resulting in poor device characteristics. As device design rules shrink, the etch requirements and patterning techniques become even more critical.

  10. Wafer edge protection kit for MEMS and TSV Si-etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, Robert; Nguyen, K.; Seidelmann, U.; Scholz, M.; Schrag, G.

    2015-05-01

    A new process kit for a SPTS Pegasus DRIE Si-Etch tool has been developed and tested for several different process regimes, e.g. bulk-Si cavity etching and TSV (through-Silicon-Via) etching with high aspect ratios <10:1, using the socalled Bosch process. Additionally, Si-etch back (recess etching) with a single step process has been tested as well. The especially developed "edge protection kit", consisting of Al2O3 material and optionally of PEEK material, covers the edge of a wafer, preventing it from being etched or even being etched away. However, placing such a part on top of the cathode, results in changes of the electric field distribution and the gas flow behavior compared to the standard process kit supplied by SPTS. The consequences may be altered Si-etch rates combined with changes of the tilt and side wall taper of the etched structures, mainly near the outside regions of the wafer. To this end, extensive investigations on the mask and bulk-Si etch rates, the tilt and taper angle of various MEMS test structures and their respective uniformity over the wafer surface have been performed. Additionally, simulations applying Comsol Multiphysics have been carried out to visualize the potential impact of the new process kit on the electrical field distribution. A simplex-optimization was carried out, varying the platen power and source power, in order to improve the tilt and to maintain the proper taper angle. One major advantage of the new process kit design compared to the original one is the reduction of movable parts to a minimum.

  11. Study of etching rate uniformity in SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Janardan Upadhyay, Svetozar Popovic, Leposova Vuskovic, H. Phillips, Anne-Marie Valente

    2012-07-01

    Plasma based surface modification is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The crucial aspect of the technology development is dependence of the etching rate and surface roughness on the frequency of the power supply, pressure, power level, driven electrode shape and chlorine concentration in the gas mixture during plasma processing. To optimize the plasma parameters, we are using a single cell cavity with 20 sample holders symmetrically distributed over the cell. These holders are used as diagnostic ports for the measurement of the plasma parameters and as holders for the samples to be etched. The plasma properties are highly correlated with the shape of the driven electrode and chlorine concentration in the Argon/Chlorine gas mixtures.

  12. Method of plasma etching GA-based compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Qiu, Weibin; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2013-01-01

    A method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors includes providing a process chamber and a source electrode adjacent thereto. The chamber contains a Ga-based compound semiconductor sample in contact with a platen which is electrically connected to a first power supply, and the source electrode is electrically connected to a second power supply. SiCl.sub.4 and Ar gases are flowed into the chamber. RF power is supplied to the platen at a first power level, and RF power is supplied to the source electrode. A plasma is generated. Then, RF power is supplied to the platen at a second power level lower than the first power level and no greater than about 30 W. Regions of a surface of the sample adjacent to one or more masked portions of the surface are etched at a rate of no more than about 25 nm/min to create a substantially smooth etched surface.

  13. Polymeric mask protection for alternative KOH silicon wet etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavese, G.; Marasso, S. L.; Quaglio, M.; Cocuzza, M.; Ricciardi, C.; Pirri, C. F.

    2007-07-01

    A new cost-effective setup for silicon bulk micromachining is presented which makes use of a polymeric protective coating, ProTEK® B2 coating, instead of a conventional hardmask. Different concentrations of KOH and bath conditions (pure, with surfactant, with stirrer, with both surfactant and stirrer) have been considered. ProTEK® B2 coating exhibits good adhesion to Si substrates, no degradation, etching rates and surface roughness comparable to literature data, and etching times greater than 180 min without damaging front side microstructures. Microcantilevers have also been fabricated using two different process flows in order to demonstrate the suitability of such a protective coating in microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology.

  14. Design of an etch-resistant cyclic olefin photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Robert D.; Opitz, Juliann; Wallow, Thomas I.; Di Pietro, Richard A.; Hofer, Donald C.; Jayaraman, Saikumar; Hullihan, Karen A.; Rhodes, Larry F.; Goodall, Brian L.; Shick, Robert A.

    1998-06-01

    In the quest for a high performance 193 nm photoresist with robust plasma etching resistance equivalent to or better than the DUV resists of today, we have focused on the use of cyclic olefin polymers. In this paper, we will discuss monomer synthesis, polymerization approaches, polymer properties and early lithographic results of 193 nm photoresists formulated from cyclic olefin polymeric materials made from a metal-catalyzed addition polymerization process. The goal of this work is to produce a 193 nm photoresist with excellent imaging performance and etch resistance exceeding DUV resists, and in fact approaching novolak-based photoresists.

  15. Etching high aspect ratio structures in silicon using sulfur hexafluoride/oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen, Rodolfo Jun

    Plasma etching of high aspect ratio structures in Si is an important step in manufacturing capacitors for memory devices and integrated components of microelectromechanical systems. In these applications, the goal is to etch deep features anisotropically with high etch rates and selectivities to the mask while maintaining good uniformity and reproducibility. This study investigates the etching of deep sub-half-micron diameter holes in Si using SF6/O 2 plasma. Etching experiments and plasma diagnostics are combined with modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of the etching and passivation kinetics and mechanism necessary in developing and scaling-up processes. Etching experiments are conducted in an inductively coupled plasma reactor with a planar coil. The substrate electrode is biased with a separate rf power supply to achieve independent control of the ion flux and energy. The effects of pressure, rf-bias and SF6-to-O2 ratio in the feed gas on the etch rate, selectivity and feature profile shape are studied using Si wafers patterned with 0.35 mum-diameter holes in a SiO2 mask. Visualization of profiles using scanning electron microscopy is complemented by plasma diagnostics such as mass spectrometry and actinometry. Simultaneous with experiments, reactor-scale and feature-scale models are developed to quantify the etching and passivation kinetics and identify the important kinetic parameters that affect feature profile evolution. Information from plasma diagnostics and previously published data are used to reduce the degrees of freedom in the model. Experiments are designed to directly measure kinetic parameters such as the chemical etch rate constant and the incidence angle dependence of the etching yield. Experimentally inaccessible parameters such as the sticking coefficients, etching yield and ion scattering parameters are determined through feature profile simulation. The key internal plasma parameters that affect profile evolution are the F-to-O and F

  16. Reactive ion etching of sputtered silicon carbide and tungsten thin films for device applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.S.; Steck, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    For high-temperature processing and device applications, refractory materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and tungsten (W), are actively considered or evaluated as the basic semiconductor and metallization materials for future generations of integrated circuits. In order to pattern fine lines in SiC and W thin films, a selective and anisotropic etching technique needs to be developed for future device applications. Therefore, the etching process including basic mechanisms and process requirement have been chosen as the overall research goals of this project. Reactive ion etching (RIE) of SiC thin films in a variety of fluorinated gas plasmas, such as SF{sub 6}, CBrF{sub 3} and CHF{sub 3} mixed with oxygen was investigated in depth. The best anisotropic profile was observed by using CHF{sub 3} gas in the RIE mode. A typical DC bias, -300V, is concluded from etching experiments to determine the dependence of SiC etch rate and physical reaction under RIE mode. Reactive ion etching of tungsten (W) thin film was also investigated by using the different fluorinated gas plasmas, such as CF{sub 4}, SF{sub 6}, CBrF{sub 3} and CHF{sub 3} mixed with oxygen. The obtaining of anisotropic etching profiles in W etching was suggested and the mechanisms were also studied.

  17. Plasma etching of high-resolution features in a fullerene molecular resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manyam, J.; Manickam, M.; Preece, J. A.; Palmer, R. E.; Robinson, A. P. G.

    2011-04-01

    As resist films become thinner, so as to reduce problems of aspect ratio related pattern collapse at high-resolution, it is becoming increasingly difficult to transfer patterns with useful aspect ratio by directly etching the resist. It has become common to use the photoresist to pattern an intermediate hardmask, which then protects the silicon substrate during etching, allowing useful aspect ratios but adding process complexity. We have previously described a fullerene based electron beam lithography resist capable of 20 nm halfpitch and 12 nm sparse features, at a sensitivity of less than 10 μC/cm2 at 20 keV. The fullerene resist has high etch durability - comparable to that of commercial novolac resists - and has previously demonstrated an etch selectivity of 3:1 to silicon using electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma etching with SF6. Here a study of the capabilities of this resist when using Inductively Coupled Plasma etching is presented. Line-space patterns with half-pitches in the range 25 nm to 100 nm, together with sparse features (~20 nm linewidth on a 200 nm pitch) were produced in ~30 nm thick resist films using electron beam lithography, and transferred to silicon using an inductively coupled plasma etcher. Several combinations of SF6, CF4, CHF3 and C4F8process gases were explored. Etch selectivity and anisotropy were studied as a range of etching parameters, such as ICP and RF power, gas flow rate, pressure and temperature were varied. Etch selectivities in excess of 9:1 were demonstrated. Techniques for minimizing aspect ratio dependent etching effects in dense features, including the use of ashing or high etching pressures were also examined.

  18. Etching of glass microchips with supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Karásek, Pavel; Grym, Jakub; Roth, Michal; Planeta, Josef; Foret, František

    2015-01-07

    A novel method of etching channels in glass microchips with the most tunable solvent, water, was tested as an alternative to common hydrogen fluoride-containing etchants. The etching properties of water strongly depend on temperature and pressure, especially in the vicinity of the water critical point. The chips were etched at the subcritical, supercritical and critical temperature of water, and the resulting channel shape, width, depth and surface morphology were studied by scanning electron microscopy and 3D laser profilometry. Channels etched with the hot water were compared with the chips etched with standard hydrogen fluoride-containing solution. Depending on the water pressure and temperature, the silicate dissolved from the glass could be re-deposited on the channel surface. This interesting phenomenon is described together with the conditions necessary for its utilization. The results illustrate the versatility of pure water as a glass etching and surface morphing agent.

  19. Etching method for photoresists or polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Narcinda R. (Inventor); Wydeven, Theodore J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method for etching or removing polymers, photoresists, and organic contaminants from a substrate is disclosed. The method includes creating a more reactive gas species by producing a plasma discharge in a reactive gas such as oxygen and contacting the resulting gas species with a sacrificial solid organic material such as polyethylene or polyvinyl fluoride, reproducing a highly reactive gas species, which in turn etches the starting polymer, organic contaminant, or photoresist. The sample to be etched is located away from the plasma glow discharge region so as to avoid damaging the substrate by exposure to high energy particles and electric fields encountered in that region. Greatly increased etching rates are obtained. This method is highly effective for etching polymers such as polyimides and photoresists that are otherwise difficult or slow to etch downstream from an electric discharge in a reactive gas.

  20. Etching radical controlled gas chopped deep reactive ion etching

    DOEpatents

    Olynick, Deidre; Rangelow, Ivo; Chao, Weilun

    2013-10-01

    A method for silicon micromachining techniques based on high aspect ratio reactive ion etching with gas chopping has been developed capable of producing essentially scallop-free, smooth, sidewall surfaces. The method uses precisely controlled, alternated (or chopped) gas flow of the etching and deposition gas precursors to produce a controllable sidewall passivation capable of high anisotropy. The dynamic control of sidewall passivation is achieved by carefully controlling fluorine radical presence with moderator gasses, such as CH.sub.4 and controlling the passivation rate and stoichiometry using a CF.sub.2 source. In this manner, sidewall polymer deposition thicknesses are very well controlled, reducing sidewall ripples to very small levels. By combining inductively coupled plasmas with controlled fluorocarbon chemistry, good control of vertical structures with very low sidewall roughness may be produced. Results show silicon features with an aspect ratio of 20:1 for 10 nm features with applicability to nano-applications in the sub-50 nm regime. By comparison, previous traditional gas chopping techniques have produced rippled or scalloped sidewalls in a range of 50 to 100 nm roughness.

  1. Selective etching of silicon carbide films

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Di; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya

    2006-12-19

    A method of etching silicon carbide using a nonmetallic mask layer. The method includes providing a silicon carbide substrate; forming a non-metallic mask layer by applying a layer of material on the substrate; patterning the mask layer to expose underlying areas of the substrate; and etching the underlying areas of the substrate with a plasma at a first rate, while etching the mask layer at a rate lower than the first rate.

  2. Results from modeling and simulation of chemical downstream etch systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, E.; Vosen, S.R.; Shon, J.W.; Larson, R.S.; Fox, C.A.; Buchenauer

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes modeling work performed at Sandia in support of Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) benchmark and tool development programs under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with SEMATECH. The Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) Modeling Project supports SEMATECH Joint Development Projects (JDPs) with Matrix Integrated Systems, Applied Materials, and Astex Corporation in the development of new CDE reactors for wafer cleaning and stripping processes. These dry-etch reactors replace wet-etch steps in microelectronics fabrication, enabling compatibility with other process steps and reducing the use of hazardous chemicals. Models were developed at Sandia to simulate the gas flow, chemistry and transport in CDE reactors. These models address the essential components of the CDE system: a microwave source, a transport tube, a showerhead/gas inlet, and a downstream etch chamber. The models have been used in tandem to determine the evolution of reactive species throughout the system, and to make recommendations for process and tool optimization. A significant part of this task has been in the assembly of a reasonable set of chemical rate constants and species data necessary for successful use of the models. Often the kinetic parameters were uncertain or unknown. For this reason, a significant effort was placed on model validation to obtain industry confidence in the model predictions. Data for model validation were obtained from the Sandia Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) experiments, from the literature, from the CDE Benchmark Project (also part of the Sandia/SEMATECH CRADA), and from the JDP partners. The validated models were used to evaluate process behavior as a function of microwave-source operating parameters, transport-tube geometry, system pressure, and downstream chamber geometry. In addition, quantitative correlations were developed between CDE tool performance and operation set points.

  3. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Esherick, P.; Parmeter, J.E.; Rieger, D.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-09-29

    A method for dry etching of transition metals is disclosed. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing {pi}-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the {pi}-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the {pi}-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex.

  4. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Baca, Albert G.; Esherick, Peter; Parmeter, John E.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Shul, Randy J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  5. Post-synthetic Anisotropic Wet-Chemical Etching of Colloidal Sodalite ZIF Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Civan; Ariñez-Soriano, Javier; Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Guillerm, Vincent; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the shape of metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals is important for understanding their crystallization and useful for myriad applications. However, despite the many advances in shaping of inorganic nanoparticles, post-synthetic shape control of MOFs and, in general, molecular crystals remains embryonic. Herein we report using a simple wet-chemistry process at room temperature to control the anisotropic etching of colloidal ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 crystals. Our work enables uniform reshaping of these porous materials into unprecedented morphologies, including cubic and tetrahedral crystals, and even hollow boxes, via acid-base reaction and subsequent sequestration of leached metal ions. Etching tests on these ZIFs reveal that etching occurs preferentially in the crystallographic directions richer in metal-ligand bonds; that, among these directions, the etching rate tends to be faster on the crystal surfaces of higher dimensionality; and that the etching can be modulated by adjusting the pH of the etchant solution. PMID:26458081

  6. Post-Synthetic Anisotropic Wet-Chemical Etching of Colloidal Sodalite ZIF Crystals.

    PubMed

    Avci, Civan; Ariñez-Soriano, Javier; Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Guillerm, Vincent; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2015-11-23

    Controlling the shape of metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals is important for understanding their crystallization and useful for myriad applications. However, despite the many advances in shaping of inorganic nanoparticles, post-synthetic shape control of MOFs and, in general, molecular crystals remains embryonic. Herein, we report using a simple wet-chemistry process at room temperature to control the anisotropic etching of colloidal ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 crystals. Our work enables uniform reshaping of these porous materials into unprecedented morphologies, including cubic and tetrahedral crystals, and even hollow boxes, by an acid-base reaction and subsequent sequestration of leached metal ions. Etching tests on these ZIFs reveal that etching occurs preferentially in the crystallographic directions richer in metal-ligand bonds; that, along these directions, the etching rate tends to be faster on the crystal surfaces of higher dimensionality; and that the etching can be modulated by adjusting the pH of the etchant solution.

  7. Reactive ion etching of indium-tin oxide films by CCl4-based Inductivity Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneja, Sucheta; Poletayev, Sergey D.; Fomchenkov, Sergey; Khonina, Svetlana N.; Skidanov, Roman V.; Kazanskiy, Nikolay L.

    2016-08-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films have been a subject of extensive studies in fabrication of micro-electronic devices for opto-electronic applications ranging from anti-reflection coatings to transparent contacts in photovoltaic devices. In this paper, a new and effective way of reactive ion etching of a conducting indium-tin oxide (ITO) film with Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) has been investigated. CCl4 plasma containing an addition of gases mixture of dissociated argon and oxygen were used. Oxygen is added to increase the etchant percentage whereas argon was used for stabilization of plasma. The etching characteristics obtained with these gaseous mixtures were explained based on plasma etch chemistry and etching regime of ITO films. An etch rate as high as ∼20 nm/min can be achieved with a controlled process parameter such as power density, total flow rate, composition of reactive gases gas and pressure. Our Investigation represents some of the extensive work in this area.

  8. ALTERNATIVE TO CHROME ETCHING PROCESSES FOR METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several industries, including the National Center for Manufacturing Science have initiated programs for chrome abatement. The programs, however, generally focus on chrome reduction by use of existing technologies and do not address the elimination of chrome in pretreatment proces...

  9. Crystallographic anisotropy of growth and etch rates of CVD diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, M; Biener, J; El-dasher, B S; Biener, M M; Hamza, A V; Kriele, A; Wild, C

    2008-08-05

    The investigation of orientation dependent crystal growth and etch processes can provide deep insights into the underlying mechanisms and thus helps to validate theoretical models. Here, we report on homoepitaxial diamond growth and oxygen etch experiments on polished, polycrystalline CVD diamond wafers by use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and white-light interferometry (WLI). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to provide additional atomic scale surface morphology information. The main advantage of using polycrystalline diamond substrates with almost random grain orientation is that it allows determining the orientation dependent growth (etch) rate for different orientations within one experiment. Specifically, we studied the effect of methane concentration on the diamond growth rate, using a microwave plasma CVD process. At 1 % methane concentration a maximum of the growth rate near <100> and a minimum near <111> is detected. Increasing the methane concentration up to 5 % shifts the maximum towards <110> while the minimum stays at <111>. Etch rate measurements in a microwave powered oxygen plasma reveal a pronounced maximum at <111>. We also made a first attempt to interpret our experimental data in terms of local micro-faceting of high-indexed planes.

  10. Etching of CVD diamond films using oxygen ions in ECR plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhibin; Wu, Jun; Shen, Wulin; Yan, Lei; Pan, Xin; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Etching with oxygen ions produced by ECR plasma with an asymmetric magnetic mirror field was investigated as a potential technique for polishing CVD diamond. The morphology, structure and roughness of the diamond film surface before and after etching were analyzed respectively using scanning electron microscope (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and surface roughness measuring instrument. It was found that the ridges on diamond surface had been preferentially etched away and thereby the surface roughness decreased from 3.061 to 1.083 μm after 4 h etching. Meanwhile, non-diamond phase appeared on surface and dramatically increased with the extending of etching time. In order to fundamentally understand the etching mechanism, an etching model of diamond film was reasonably proposed on the ground of the experimental results and the theory of plasma physics. The as-generated ions taking screw movement are firstly accelerated along the magnetic field lines in the plasma and collisional presheath, and then deflected from their route towards the diamond film in the MP. When coming into Debye sheath, the motion of ions will be deflected further and strongly accelerated by electric field in the direction normal to the (1 1 1) crystal facets. This process gave rise to energetic ion bombardment towards every (1 1 1) crystal face, and thereby caused preferential etching of pyramidal crystallites.

  11. Reactive ion etching of tellurite and chalcogenide waveguides using hydrogen, methane, and argon

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, K. T.; Madden, S. J.

    2011-01-15

    The authors report in detail on the reactive plasma etching properties of tellurium and demonstrate a high quality etching process using hydrogen, methane, and argon. Very low loss planar ridge waveguides are demonstrated. Optical losses in tellurium dioxide waveguides below 0.1 dB/cm in most of the near infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum and at 1550 nm have been achieved--the lowest ever reported by more than an order of magnitude and clearly suitable for planar integrated devices. The etch process is also shown to be suitable for chalcogenide glasses which may be of importance in applications such as phase change memory devices and nonlinear integrated optics.

  12. Etch modeling in RET synthesis and verification flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Daniel F.; Shiely, James P.

    2005-06-01

    The challenges of the 65 nm node and beyond require new formulations of the compact convolution models used in OPC. In addition to simulating more optical and resist effects, these models must accommodate pattern distortions due to etch which can no longer be treated as small perturbations on photo-lithographic effects. (Methods for combining optical and process modules while optimizing the speed/accuracy tradeoff were described in "Advanced Model Formulations for Optical and Process Proximity Correction", D. Beale et al, SPIE 2004.) In this paper, we evaluate new physics-based etch model formulations that differ from the convolution-based process models used previously. The new models are expressed within the compact modeling framework described by J. Stirniman et al. in SPIE, vol. 3051, p469, 1997, and thus can be used for high-speed process simulation during full-chip OPC.

  13. Charging effect simulation model used in simulations of plasma etching of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ishchuk, Valentyn; Volland, Burkhard E.; Hauguth, Maik; Rangelow, Ivo W.; Cooke, Mike

    2012-10-15

    Understanding the consequences of local surface charging on the evolving etching profile is a critical challenge in high density plasma etching. Deflection of the positively charged ions in locally varying electric fields can cause profile defects such as notching, bowing, and microtrenching. We have developed a numerical simulation model capturing the influence of the charging effect over the entire course of the etching process. The model is fully integrated into ViPER (Virtual Plasma Etch Reactor)-a full featured plasma processing simulation software developed at Ilmenau University of Technology. As a consequence, we show that local surface charge concurrently evolves with the feature profile to affect the final shape of the etched feature. Using gas chopping (sometimes called time-multiplexed) etch process for experimental validation of the simulation, we show that the model provides excellent fits to the experimental data and both, bowing and notching effects are captured-as long as the evolving profile and surface charge are simultaneously simulated. In addition, this new model explains that surface scallops, characteristic of gas chopping technique, are eroded and often absent in the final feature profile due to surface charging. The model is general and can be applied across many etching chemistries.

  14. Microelectrode array fabrication by electrical discharge machining and chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Fofonoff, Timothy A; Martel, Sylvain M; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G; Donoghue, John P; Hunter, Ian W

    2004-06-01

    Wire electrical discharge machining (EDM), with a complementary chemical etching process, is explored and assessed as a method for developing microelectrode array assemblies for intracortically recording brain activity. Assembly processes based on these methods are highlighted, and results showing neural activity successfully recorded from the brain of a mouse using an EDM-based device are presented. Several structures relevant to the fabrication of microelectrode arrays are also offered in order to demonstrate the capabilities of EDM.

  15. Fundamental Technical Elements of Freeze-fracture/Freeze-etch in Biological Electron Microscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freeze-fracture/freeze-etch describes a process whereby specimens, typically biological or nanomaterial in nature, are frozen, fractured, and replicated to generate a carbon/platinum "cast" intended for examination by transmission electron microscopy. Specimens are subjected to u...

  16. Funnel-type etched ion tracks in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, D.; Vacík, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Muñoz, G. H.; Alfonta, L.; Klinkovich, I.

    2010-05-01

    It is shown that conical track etching is a much more complicated process than generally assumed. The choice of the corresponding parameters (i.e. the ratios of concentrations and diffusion coefficients of both etchant (e.g. NaOH) and stopping solutions (e.g. HCl) and the etching temperature) determines the ratio of polymer dissolution to etchant penetration. The latter value controls the counterplay of diffusion, etching, ionic conductivity, field emission and capacitive effects, which is decisive for both the final track shapes and their electronic properties. The stages of track evolution during etching under different conditions are outlined in detail. Both transparent conical nanopores and "funnel-type" tracks can be obtained, the latter consisting of a shorter cone and a residual latent track. Depending on the internal structure of that latent track segment, such funnel-type tracks either allow smooth transmission of the rectified currents or they emit unipolar current spikes. Not only the study of electronic properties of single ion tracks, but also of a multitude of tracks makes sense. Depending on the applied parameters, the individual track properties may either just add up, or new effects may be found that emerge from the interaction of the tracks among each other. This is preferentially the case for spike-emitting tracks, where effects such as phase-locked spike synchronization can be found as described by neural network theory.

  17. Roughness kinetic and multiaffinity of anisotropic etched silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinabadi, S.; Rajabi, M.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of etching time (20-200 min) on surface roughness, statistical and fractal properties of silicon wafers during anisotropic chemical etching by KOH is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The evolution of surface morphology of silicon wafers during an anisotropic chemical etching is investigated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and statistical methods. FESEM investigation shows the formation of pyramid like silicon micro structures that disappear in large time scales. The surface roughness increases and decreases periodically in time with a decreasing exponentially trend. The statistical analysis were performed by calculating the roughness and correlation length, distribution of height fluctuations and two-dimensional multifractal detrending moving average (MFDMA). The fractal nature of silicon wafer changes from mono fractal to multi fractal scaling by etching process and formation of pyramid like silicon nanostructures on it. The strength of multi-fractallity has not an increasing monotonic behavior. The enhancement of irregularities could be a reason for reduction of surface roughness and structure downfall.

  18. Plasma-etched nanostructures for optical applications (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Ulrike; Rickelt, Friedrich; Munzert, Peter; Kaiser, Norbert

    2015-08-01

    A basic requirement for many optical applications is the reduction of Fresnel-reflections. Besides of interference coatings, nanostructures with sub-wavelength size as known from the eye of the night-flying moth can provide antireflective (AR) properties. The basic principle is to mix a material with air on a sub-wavelength scale to decrease the effective refractive index. To realize AR nanostructures on polymers, the self-organized formation of stochastically arranged antireflective structures using a low-pressure plasma etching process was studied. An advanced procedure involves the use of additional deposition of a thin oxide layer prior etching. A broad range of different structure morphologies exhibiting antireflective properties can be generated on almost all types of polymeric materials. For applications on glass, organic films are used as a transfer medium. Organic layers as thin film materials were evaluated to identify compounds suitable for forming nanostructures by plasma etching. The vapor deposition and etching of organic layers on glass offers a new possibility to achieve antireflective properties in a broad spectral range and for a wide range of light incidence.

  19. Low damage etching method of low-k material with a neutral beam for interlayer dielectric of semiconductor device

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jong Kyu; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Jin Woo; Yeom, Geun Young

    2015-03-15

    To reduce the cross-talk between nanoscale devices, low-k materials such as methyl silsesquioxane (MSQ), which is damaged easily during plasma etching, are introduced as an intermetallic dielectric material in addition to the use of copper as the conducting material for the reduction of parasitic resistance and capacitance. In this study, beam techniques such as neutral/ion beams were used in the etching of MSQ and the effect of these beam techniques on the reduction of the degradation of the MSQ were investigated. When MSQ was etched using the same CF{sub 4} etch gas at the similar etch rate as that used for conventional MSQ etching using inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), the neutral/ion beam etching showed lower F contents and lower penetration depth of F, indicating decreased degradation by fluorination of MSQ during etching using the beam techniques. Especially, the neutral beam etching technique showed the lowest F contamination and the lower penetration depth of F among the etch methods. When the dielectric constant was measured after the etching of the same depth, the MSQ etched with the neutral beam showed the lowest change of the dielectric constant, while that etched using the ICP showed the highest change of dielectric constant. The lower degradation, that is, the lower chemical modification of MSQ material with the beam technique is believed to be related to the decreased concentration of radical species in the processing chamber reacting with the MSQ surface, while the lowest degradation using the neutral beam is believed to be due to the lower reaction rate of the reactive neutral compared to reactive ions.

  20. Mechanisms of Hydrocarbon Based Polymer Etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Barton; Ventzek, Peter; Matsukuma, Masaaki; Suzuki, Ayuta; Koshiishi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Dry etch of hydrocarbon based polymers is important for semiconductor device manufacturing. The etch mechanisms for oxygen rich plasma etch of hydrocarbon based polymers has been studied but the mechanism for lean chemistries has received little attention. We report on an experimental and analytic study of the mechanism for etching of a hydrocarbon based polymer using an Ar/O2 chemistry in a single frequency 13.56 MHz test bed. The experimental study employs an analysis of transients from sequential oxidation and Ar sputtering steps using OES and surface analytics to constrain conceptual models for the etch mechanism. The conceptual model is consistent with observations from MD studies and surface analysis performed by Vegh et al. and Oehrlein et al. and other similar studies. Parameters of the model are fit using published data and the experimentally observed time scales.

  1. Etch-a-Sketch Nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy

    2009-10-01

    The popular children's toy Etch-a-Sketch has motivated the invention of a new material capable of writing and erasing wires so small they approach the spacing between atoms. The interface between two normally insulating materials, strontium titanate and lanthanum aluminate, can be switched between the insulating and conducting state with the use of the sharp metallic probe of an atomic-force microscope. By ``sketching'' this probe in various patterns, one can create electronic materials with remarkably diverse properties. This material system shows promise both for ultra-high density storage and as possible replacements for silicon-based logic (CMOS). This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Army Research Office and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  2. Nanoscale etching and flattening of metals with ozone water.

    PubMed

    Hatsuki, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Takatoki

    2012-06-13

    Etchants used for metal etching are generally harmful to the environment. We propose an environmentally friendly method that uses ozone water to etch metals. We measured the dependencies of ozone water etching on the temperature and ozone concentration for several metals and evaluated the surface roughness of the etched surfaces. The etching rate was proportional to the dissolved ozone concentration, and the temperature and the surfaces were smoothed by etching.

  3. Controlled Patterning of Vertical Silicon Structures Using Polymer Lithography and Wet Chemical Etching.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Jung; Lee, Su-Han; Lee, Jihye; Lee, Eung-Sug; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Jung, Joo-Yun; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Choi, Dae-Geun

    2015-06-01

    In order to improve their performance for various applications, a facile method for the wafer-scale fabrication of micro/nano-patterned vertical silicon (Si) structures such as silicon nanowires (SiNWs), silicon nanorods (SiNRs), and porous silicon (p-Si) was developed. The method is based on the combination of lithography techniques (photolithography, thermal nano-imprint lithography, nanosphere lithography) and wet chemical etching (electro-chemical etching, metal-assisted chemical etching) processes. Micro-patterned p-Si with various pore diameters from 30 nm to 1.2 um were fabricated via electro-chemical etching. Micro/nano-patterned Si microstructures, nanorods, and nanowires were also successfully fabricated by changing the thickness of the metal layer of 5 nm or 20 nm in the metal-assisted chemical etching process. This study also investigated the effect of the etching time and patterning on the etched SiNWs length. This method provides advantages of simplicity, speed, large-scale production, easy size and shape manipulation, and low cost.

  4. Suboxide/subnitride formation on Ta masks during magnetic material etching by reactive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hu; Muraki, Yu; Karahashi, Kazuhiro; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2015-07-15

    Etching characteristics of tantalum (Ta) masks used in magnetoresistive random-access memory etching processes by carbon monoxide and ammonium (CO/NH{sub 3}) or methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) plasmas have been examined by mass-selected ion beam experiments with in-situ surface analyses. It has been suggested in earlier studies that etching of magnetic materials, i.e., Fe, Ni, Co, and their alloys, by such plasmas is mostly due to physical sputtering and etch selectivity of the process arises from etch resistance (i.e., low-sputtering yield) of the hard mask materials such as Ta. In this study, it is shown that, during Ta etching by energetic CO{sup +} or N{sup +} ions, suboxides or subnitrides are formed on the Ta surface, which reduces the apparent sputtering yield of Ta. It is also shown that the sputtering yield of Ta by energetic CO{sup +} or N{sup +} ions has a strong dependence on the angle of ion incidence, which suggests a correlation between the sputtering yield and the oxidation states of Ta in the suboxide or subnitride; the higher the oxidation state of Ta, the lower is the sputtering yield. These data account for the observed etch selectivity by CO/NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}OH plasmas.

  5. Characterization of Thermal and Photo-Enhanced Remote Plasma Etching of Gallium Arsenide and Indium Phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishan, David George

    The desire to shrink dimensions and improve performance of devices has focused attention on fabrication processes that induce a minimum of material damage. A technique which accomplishes this goal involves the utilization of remote plasma etching. In this work, the design of a flexible, high vacuum, remote plasma dry etch processing chamber with multiple in situ analytical capabilities is described. With this new chamber, a systematic study of temperature and flux dependence using hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine (Cl_2) to etch GaAs and InP is performed. Reactant flux limited etching was observed using HCl. These results agree qualitatively with thermodynamic predictions and provide a more complete understanding of reactant flux and product desorption dynamics. Along with the insight into the mechanisms associated with halogen etching of III-V materials, the control, low damage, and material selectivity aspects of remote plasma etching are discussed using as examples, photochemical enhanced etching, fabrication of quantum wires, and in situ real time current monitoring.

  6. Ultradeep fused silica glass etching with an HF-resistant photosensitive resist for optical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarah, John M.; Wagenaar, Daniel A.

    2012-03-01

    Microfluidic and optical sensing platforms are commonly fabricated in glass and fused silica (quartz) because of their optical transparency and chemical inertness. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) solutions are the etching media of choice for deep etching into silicon dioxide substrates, but processing schemes become complicated and expensive for etching times greater than 1 h due to the aggressiveness of HF migration through most masking materials. We present here etching into fused silica more than 600 µm deep while keeping the substrate free of pits and maintaining a polished etched surface suitable for biological imaging. We utilize an HF-resistant photosensitive resist (HFPR) which is not attacked in 49% HF solution. Etching characteristics are compared for substrates masked with the HFPR alone and the HFPR patterned on top of Cr/Au and polysilicon masks. We used this etching process to fabricate suspended fused silica membranes, 8-16 µm thick, and show that imaging through the membranes does not negatively affect image quality of fluorescence microscopy of biological tissue. Finally, we realize small through-pore arrays in the suspended membranes. Such devices will have applications in planar electrophysiology platforms, especially where optical imaging is required.

  7. Control over the permeation of silica nanoshells by surface-protected etching with water.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongxing; Zhang, Qiao; Goebl, James; Zhang, Tierui; Yin, Yadong

    2010-10-14

    We demonstrate a water-based etching strategy for converting solid silica shells into porous ones with controllable permeability. It overcomes the challenges of the alkaline-based surface-protected etching process that we previously developed for the production of porous and hollow silica nanostructures. Mild etching around the boiling point of water partially breaks the imperfectly condensed silica network and forms soluble monosilicic acid, eventually producing mesoscale pores in the silica structures. With the surface protection from poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP), it is possible to maintain the overall shape of the silica structures while at the same time to create porosity inside. By using bulky PVP molecules which only protect the near-surface region, we are able to completely remove the interior silica and produce hollow particles. Because the etching is mild and controllable, this process is particularly useful for treating small silica particles or core-shell particles with very thin silica shells for which the alkaline-based etching method has been difficult to control. We demonstrated the precise control of the permeation of the chemical species through the porous silica shells by using a model reaction which involves the etching of Ag encapsulated inside Ag@SiO(2) by a halocarbon. It is expected that the water-based surface-protected etching method can be conveniently extended to the production of various porous silica shells containing functional materials whose diffusion to outside and/or reaction with outside species can be easily controlled.

  8. Using an energized oxygen micro-jet for improved graphene etching by focused electron beam

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-12-07

    We report on an improved Focused Electron Beam Induced Etching (FEBIE) process, which exploits heated oxygen delivery via a continuous supersonic micro-jet resulting in faster graphene patterning and better etch feature definition. Positioning a micro-jet in close proximity to a graphene surface with minimal jet spreading due to a continuous regime of gas flow at the exit of the 10 micrometer inner diameter capillary allows for focused exposure of the surface to reactive oxygen at high mass flux and impingement energy of a supersonic gas stream localized to a small etching area exposed to electron beam. These unique benefits ofmore » focused supersonic oxygen delivery to the surface enable a dramatic increase in the etch rate of graphene with no parasitic carbon ‘halo’ deposition due to secondary electrons (SE) from backscattered electrons (BSE) in the area surrounding the etched regions. Increase of jet temperature via local nozzle heating provides means for enhancing kinetic energy of impinging oxygen molecules, which further speed up the etch, thus minimizing the beam exposure time and required electron dose, before parasitic carbon film deposition due to BSE mediated decomposition of adsorbed hydrocarbon contaminants has a measurable impact on quality of graphene etched features. Interplay of different physical mechanisms underlying an oxygen micro-jet assisted FEBIE process is discussed with support from experimental observations.« less

  9. Using an energized oxygen micro-jet for improved graphene etching by focused electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-12-07

    We report on an improved Focused Electron Beam Induced Etching (FEBIE) process, which exploits heated oxygen delivery via a continuous supersonic micro-jet resulting in faster graphene patterning and better etch feature definition. Positioning a micro-jet in close proximity to a graphene surface with minimal jet spreading due to a continuous regime of gas flow at the exit of the 10 micrometer inner diameter capillary allows for focused exposure of the surface to reactive oxygen at high mass flux and impingement energy of a supersonic gas stream localized to a small etching area exposed to electron beam. These unique benefits of focused supersonic oxygen delivery to the surface enable a dramatic increase in the etch rate of graphene with no parasitic carbon ‘halo’ deposition due to secondary electrons (SE) from backscattered electrons (BSE) in the area surrounding the etched regions. Increase of jet temperature via local nozzle heating provides means for enhancing kinetic energy of impinging oxygen molecules, which further speed up the etch, thus minimizing the beam exposure time and required electron dose, before parasitic carbon film deposition due to BSE mediated decomposition of adsorbed hydrocarbon contaminants has a measurable impact on quality of graphene etched features. Interplay of different physical mechanisms underlying an oxygen micro-jet assisted FEBIE process is discussed with support from experimental observations.

  10. Using an energized oxygen micro-jet for improved graphene etching by focused electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-12-07

    We report on an improved Focused Electron Beam Induced Etching (FEBIE) process, which exploits heated oxygen delivery via a continuous supersonic micro-jet resulting in faster graphene patterning and better etch feature definition. Positioning a micro-jet in close proximity to a graphene surface with minimal jet spreading due to a continuous regime of gas flow at the exit of the 10 μm inner diameter capillary allows for focused exposure of the surface to reactive oxygen at high mass flux and impingement energy of a supersonic gas stream localized to a small etching area exposed to electron beam. These unique benefits of focused supersonic oxygen delivery to the surface enable a dramatic increase in the etch rate of graphene with no parasitic carbon “halo” deposition due to secondary electrons from backscattered electrons (BSE) in the area surrounding the etched regions. Increase of jet temperature via local nozzle heating provides means for enhancing kinetic energy of impinging oxygen molecules, which further speed up the etch, thus minimizing the beam exposure time and required electron dose, before parasitic carbon film deposition due to BSE mediated decomposition of adsorbed hydrocarbon contaminants has a measurable impact on quality of graphene etched features. Interplay of different physical mechanisms underlying an oxygen micro-jet assisted FEBIE process is discussed with support from experimental observations.

  11. Dry etching of CdTe/GaAs epilayers using CH{sub 4}H{sub 2} gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Neswal, M.; Gresslehner, K.H.; Lischka, K.

    1993-05-01

    A CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} gas mixture has been used for the dry etching of (100) and (111) oriented CdTe epilayers in a barrel reactor. The effects of various process parameters on etch rate and surface morphology were studied with special attention paid to the gas composition and the total chamber pressure as well as the crystallographic orientation of the sample. Clear evidence is found for both isotropic and preferential etching along crystalolographic planes depending on the set of etch parameters used. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Modeling and profile simulation of silicon and metal etching in integrated circuit manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie

    1998-12-01

    Plasma etching is one of the semiconductor processing technologies, which has advanced tremendously over the last decade in order to meet the demands of ever increasing density of devices manufacturable in integrated circuits. A plasma etch process is usually based on a combination of chemical and physical mechanisms and has to be developed case by case in order to meet the specific demands of a process flow. Most of these processes have been accomplished by using low pressure discharge plasma systems. However, because of the complexities of such systems and our limited understanding of the many types of discharge plasmas and plasma surface interactions, a good amount of the process development work has been done on an empirical basis. This thesis is built upon the development and applications of SPEEDIE, the Stanford etching and deposition profile simulator, which is aimed at helping process engineers to develop and understand plasma etch processes. It starts with an introduction to semiconductor processing, which focuses on etching and discusses about the many requirements a good etching process has to meet. A detailed description of etching plasmas and the etching plasma systems follows after this introduction. We then give an overview of the SPEEDIE program, which covers the flow structure, the physics and the mathematics behind the basic part of the codes and the surface movement algorithm. The rest of the thesis is a demonstration of how SPEEDIE can be applied to various cases such as silicon and metal etching. These applications have lead to the discovery of the effect of the pre-sheath of a discharge plasma on the ion angular and energy distributions at the wafer surface. We have also clarified a few concepts associated with energetic ion assisted surface reactions. We have found that the surface catalyzed reactive species recombination is crucial to explain the strong aspect ratio dependency during metal etching. SPEEDIE is shown here to produce many

  13. Role of metal nanoparticles on porosification of silicon by metal induced etching (MIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shailendra K.; Yogi, Priyanka; Yadav, Pooja; Mishra, Suryakant; Pandey, Haardik; Rai, Hari Mohan; Kumar, Vivek; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Porosification of silicon (Si) by metal induced etching (MIE) process has been studied here to understand the etching mechanism. The etching mechanism has been discussed on the basis of electron transfer from Si to metal ion (Ag+) and metal to H2O2. Role of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the etching process has been investigated by studying the effect of AgNPs coverage on surface porosity. A quantitative analysis of SEM images, done using Image J, shows a direct correlation between AgNPs coverage and surface porosity after the porosification. Density of Si nanowires (NWs) also varies as a function of AgNPs fractional coverage which reasserts the fact that AgNPs governs the porosification process during MIE. The Raman and PL spectrum show the presence of Si NSs in the samples.

  14. Flux based modeling and simulation of dry etching for fabrication of silicon deep trench structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Rizwan; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Liu, Shiyuan

    2011-02-01

    Deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process is a key growth for fabrication of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) devices. Due to complexity of this process, including interaction of the process steps, full analytical modeling is complex. Plasma process holds deficiency of understanding because it is very easy to measure the results empirically. However, as device parameters shrink, this issue is more critical. In this paper, our process was modeled qualitatively based on "High Density Plasma Etch Model". Deep trench solutions of etch rate based on continuity equation were successfully generated first time through mathematical analysis. It was also proved that the product of fluorine and gas phase concentration in SF6 remains identical during both deposition and etching stages. The etching process was treated as a combination of isotropic, directional and angle-dependent component parts. It exploited a synergistic balance of chemical as well as physical etching for promoting silicon trenches and high aspect ratio structures. Simulations were performed for comprehensive analysis of fluxes coming towards the surface during chemical reaction of gas. It is observed that near the surface, the distribution of the arrival flux follows a cosine distribution. Our model is feasible to analyze various parameters like gas delivery, reactor volume and temperature that help to assert large scale effects and to optimize equipment design.

  15. Determination of nuclear tracks parameters on sequentially etched PADC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwacik, Tomasz; Bilski, Pawel; Koerner, Christine; Facius, Rainer; Berger, Thomas; Nowak, Tomasz; Reitz, Guenther; Olko, Pawel

    Polyallyl Diglycol Carbonate (PADC) detectors find many applications in radiation protection. One of them is the cosmic radiation dosimetry, where PADC detectors measure the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles (from protons to heavy ions), supplementing TLD detectors in the role of passive dosemeter. Calibration exposures to ions of known LET are required to establish a relation between parameters of track observed on the detector and LET of particle creating this track. PADC TASTRAK nuclear track detectors were exposed to 12 C and 56 Fe ions of LET in H2 O between 10 and 544 keV/µm. The exposures took place at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan in the frame of the HIMAC research project "Space Radiation Dosimetry-Ground Based Verification of the MATROSHKA Facility" (20P-240). Detectors were etched in water solution of NaOH with three different temperatures and for various etching times to observe the appearance of etched tracks, the evolution of their parameters and the stability of the etching process. The applied etching times (and the solution's concentrations and temperatures) were: 48, 72, 96, 120 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 50 O C), 20, 40, 60, 80 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 60 O C) and 8, 12, 16, 20 hours (7N NaOH, 70 O C). The analysis of the detectors involved planimetric (2D) measurements of tracks' entrance ellipses and mechanical measurements of bulk layer thickness. Further track parameters, like angle of incidence, track length and etch rate ratio were then calculated. For certain tracks, results of planimetric measurements and calculations were also compared with results of optical track profile (3D) measurements, where not only the track's entrance ellipse but also the location of the track's tip could be directly measured. All these measurements have been performed with the 2D/3D measurement system at DLR. The collected data allow to create sets of V(LET in H2 O) calibration curves suitable for short, intermediate and

  16. Porous to Nonporous Transition in the Morphology of Metal Assisted Etched Silicon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotty, Olan; Petkov, Nikolay; Georgiev, Yordan M.; Holmes, Justin D.

    2012-11-01

    A single step metal assisted etching (MAE) process, utilizing metal ion-containing HF solutions in the absence of an external oxidant, has been developed to generate heterostructured Si nanowires with controllable porous (isotropically etched) and non-porous (anisotropically etched) segments. Detailed characterisation of both the porous and non-porous sections of the Si nanowires was provided by transmission electron microscopy studies, enabling the mechanism of nanowire roughening to be ascertained. The versatility of the MAE method for producing heterostructured Si nanowires with varied and controllable textures is discussed in detail.

  17. Nanoparticle-based etching of silicon surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard [Boulder, CO; Duda, Anna [Denver, CO; Ginley, David S [Evergreen, CO; Yost, Vernon [Littleton, CO; Meier, Daniel [Atlanta, GA; Ward, James S [Golden, CO

    2011-12-13

    A method (300) of texturing silicon surfaces (116) such to reduce reflectivity of a silicon wafer (110) for use in solar cells. The method (300) includes filling (330, 340) a vessel (122) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface 116) of a wafer or substrate (112). The etching solution (124) is made up of a catalytic nanomaterial (140) and an oxidant-etchant solution (146). The catalytic nanomaterial (140) may include gold or silver nanoparticles or noble metal nanoparticles, each of which may be a colloidal solution. The oxidant-etchant solution (146) includes an etching agent (142), such as hydrofluoric acid, and an oxidizing agent (144), such as hydrogen peroxide. Etching (350) is performed for a period of time including agitating or stirring the etching solution (124). The etch time may be selected such that the etched silicon surface (116) has a reflectivity of less than about 15 percent such as 1 to 10 percent in a 350 to 1000 nanometer wavelength range.

  18. Galvanic etch stop for Si in KOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, E. J.; French, P. J.; Xia, X. H.; Kelly, J. J.

    2004-08-01

    Etch stops and etch-stopping techniques are essential 'tools' for 2D and 3D MEMS devices. Until now, use of a galvanic etch stop (ES) for micromachining in alkaline solutions was usually prohibited due to the large Au:Si area needed and/or high oxygen content required to achieve the ES. We report a new galvanic ES which requires a Au:exposed silicon area ratio of only ~1. Thus for the first time a practical galvanic ES for KOH has been achieved. The ES works by adding small amounts of sodium hypochlorite, NaOCl, to KOH solutions. Essentially the NaOCl increases the oxygen content in the KOH etchant. The dependancy of the galvanic ES on KOH concentration and temperature is investigated. Also, we report on the effects of the added NaOCl on etch rates. SEM images are used to examine the galvanically etch-stopped membranes and their surface morphology. For 33% KOH solutions the galvanic etch stop worked well, producing membranes with uniform thickness ~6 µm (i.e. slightly greater than the deposited epilayer). For 20% KOH solutions, the galvanic etch stop still worked, but the resulting membranes were a little thicker (~10 µm).

  19. Etch Characteristics of GaN using Inductively Coupled Cl2 Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Siti Azlina; Aziz, A. Abdul

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the plasma characteristics and GaN etch properties of inductively coupled Cl2/Ar plasmas were investigated. It has shown that the results of a study of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching of gallium nitride by using Cl2/Ar is possible to meet the requirement (anisotropy, high etch rate and high selectivity), simultaneously. We have investigated the etching rate dependency on the percentage of Argon in the gas mixture, the total pressure and DC voltage. We found that using a gas mixture with 20 sccm of Ar, the optimum etch rate of GaN was achieved. The etch rate were found to increase with voltage, attaining a maximum rate 2500 Å/min at -557 V. The addition of an inert gas, Ar is found to barely affect the etch rate. Surface morphology of the etched samples was verified by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. It was found that the etched surface was anisotropic and the smoothness of the etched surface is comparable to that of polished wafer.

  20. Bias-assisted KOH etching of macroporous silicon membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathwig, K.; Geilhufe, M.; Müller, F.; Gösele, U.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents an improved technique to fabricate porous membranes from macroporous silicon as a starting material. A crucial step in the fabrication process is the dissolution of silicon from the backside of the porous wafer by aqueous potassium hydroxide to open up the pores. We improved this step by biasing the silicon wafer electrically against the KOH. By monitoring the current-time characteristics a good control of the process is achieved and the yield is improved. Also, the etching can be stopped instantaneously and automatically by short-circuiting Si and KOH. Moreover, the bias-assisted etching allows for the controlled fabrication of silicon dioxide tube arrays when the silicon pore walls are oxidized and inverted pores are released.

  1. Mesoporous hollow sphere titanium dioxide photocatalysts through hydrothermal silica etching.

    PubMed

    Leshuk, Tim; Linley, Stuart; Baxter, George; Gu, Frank

    2012-11-01

    Robust, monodisperse, mesoporous titanium dioxide (TiO₂) submicrometer hollow spheres were synthesized through a single step hydrothermal silica etching reaction under mild conditions. Efficient silica (SiO₂) removal was achieved without the use of toxic reagents, and a unique controllable silica redeposition mechanism was identified, imparting the hollow spheres with excellent structural integrity. The parameters of the hydrothermal reaction affecting the etching process, including pH, temperature, and silica concentration, were systematically investigated and optimized for the production of silica-templated hollow structures. The resulting processing conditions yielded TiO₂ hollow spheres with a surface area of ∼300 m² g⁻¹ and anatase phase crystallization, which exhibited high adsorption capacity for methylene blue dye and good photocatalytic activity without requiring high-temperature calcination.

  2. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Shul, R.J.; Constantine, C.

    1997-04-29

    A dry etching method is disclosed. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators. 1 fig.

  3. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, Randy J.; Constantine, Christopher

    1997-01-01

    A dry etching method. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators.

  4. Method of sputter etching a surface

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The surface of a target is textured by co-sputter etching the target surface with a seed material adjacent thereto, while the target surface is maintained at a pre-selected temperature. By pre-selecting the temperature of the surface while sputter etching, it is possible to predetermine the reflectance properties of the etched surface. The surface may be textured to absorb sunlight efficiently and have minimal emittance in the infrared region so as to be well-suited for use as a solar absorber for photothermal energy conversion.

  5. Method of sputter etching a surface

    DOEpatents

    Henager, C.H. Jr.

    1984-02-14

    The surface of a target is textured by co-sputter etching the target surface with a seed material adjacent thereto, while the target surface is maintained at a pre-selected temperature. By pre-selecting the temperature of the surface while sputter etching, it is possible to predetermine the reflectance properties of the etched surface. The surface may be textured to absorb sunlight efficiently and have minimal emittance in the infrared region so as to be well-suited for use as a solar absorber for photothermal energy conversion. 4 figs.

  6. Electroless epitaxial etching for semiconductor applications

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2002-01-01

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon on insulator substrates using electroless etching for achieving efficient etch stopping on epitaxial silicon substrates. Microelectric circuits and devices are prepared on epitaxial silicon wafers in a standard fabrication facility. The wafers are bonded to a holding substrate. The silicon bulk is removed using electroless etching leaving the circuit contained within the epitaxial layer remaining on the holding substrate. A photolithographic operation is then performed to define streets and wire bond pad areas for electrical access to the circuit.

  7. Chemical etching behaviors of semipolar (11̄22) and nonpolar (11̄20) gallium nitride films.

    PubMed

    Jung, Younghun; Baik, Kwang Hyeon; Mastro, Michael A; Hite, Jennifer K; Eddy, Charles R; Kim, Jihyun

    2014-08-14

    Wet chemical etching using hot KOH and H3PO4 solutions was performed on semipolar (11̄22) and nonpolar (11̄20) GaN films grown on sapphire substrates. An alternating KOH/H3PO4/KOH etch process was developed to control the orientation of the facets on the thin-film surface. The initial etch step in KOH produced c- and m-plane facets on the surface of both semipolar (11̄22) and nonpolar (11̄20) GaN thin-films. A second etch step in H3PO4 solution additionally exposed a (̄1̄12̄2) plane, which is chemically stable in H3PO4 solution. By repeating the chemical etch with KOH solution, the m-plane facets as seen in the original KOH etch step were recovered. The etching methods developed in our work can be used to control the surface morphologies of nonpolar and semipolar GaN-based optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  8. A deep etching mechanism for trench-bridging silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Zuhal; Wollschläger, Nicole; Österle, Werner; Leblebici, Yusuf; Alaca, B Erdem

    2016-03-04

    Introducing a single silicon nanowire with a known orientation and dimensions to a specific layout location constitutes a major challenge. The challenge becomes even more formidable, if one chooses to realize the task in a monolithic fashion with an extreme topography, a characteristic of microsystems. The need for such a monolithic integration is fueled by the recent surge in the use of silicon nanowires as functional building blocks in various electromechanical and optoelectronic applications. This challenge is addressed in this work by introducing a top-down, silicon-on-insulator technology. The technology provides a pathway for obtaining well-controlled silicon nanowires along with the surrounding microscale features up to a three-order-of-magnitude scale difference. A two-step etching process is developed, where the first shallow etch defines a nanoscale protrusion on the wafer surface. After applying a conformal protection on the protrusion, a deep etch step is carried out forming the surrounding microscale features. A minimum nanowire cross-section of 35 nm by 168 nm is demonstrated in the presence of an etch depth of 10 μm. Nanowire cross-sectional features are characterized via transmission electron microscopy and linked to specific process steps. The technology allows control on all dimensional aspects along with the exact location and orientation of the silicon nanowire. The adoption of the technology in the fabrication of micro and nanosystems can potentially lead to a significant reduction in process complexity by facilitating direct access to the nanowire during surface processes such as contact formation and doping.

  9. Grafting of acrylic acid on etched latent tracks induced by swift heavy ions on polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzei, R.; Fernández, A.; García Bermúdez, G.; Torres, A.; Gutierrez, M. C.; Magni, M.; Celma, G.; Tadey, D.

    2008-06-01

    In order to continue with a systematic study that include different polymers and monomers, the residual active sites produced by heavy ion beams, that remain after the etching process, were used to start the grafting process. To produce tracks, foils of polypropylene (PP) were irradiated with 208Pb of 25.62 MeV/n. Then, these were etched and grafted with acrylic acid (AA) monomers. Experimental curves of grafting yield as a function of grafting time with the etching time as a parameter were measured. Also, the grating yield as a function of the fluence and etching time was obtained. In addition, the permeation of solutions, with different pH, through PP grafted foils was measured.

  10. In vitro evaluation of microleakage under orthodontic brackets using two different laser etching, self etching and acid etching methods.

    PubMed

    Hamamci, Nihal; Akkurt, Atilim; Başaran, Güvenç

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluated the microleakage of brackets bonded by four different enamel etching techniques. Forty freshly extracted human premolars were divided randomly into four equal groups and received the following treatment: group 1, acid etching; group 2, self-etching primer (SEP); group 3, erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser etching; and group 4, erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser etching. After photopolymerization, the teeth were kept in distilled water for 1 month and then subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then, the specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 h, sectioned, and examined under a stereomicroscope. In addition, they were scored for marginal microleakage at the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces from the incisal and gingival margins. Statistical analyses consisted of the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney U test with Bonferroni correction. Microleakage occurred between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces in all groups. For the adhesive-enamel surface, a significant difference was observed between group 1 and groups 2 (P = 0.011), 3 (P = 0.002), and 4 (P = 0.000) on the gingival side. Overall, significant differences were observed between group 1 and groups 3 (P = 0.003) and 4 (P = 0.000). In dental bonding procedures, acid etching was found to result in the least microleakage. Since etching with a laser decreases the risk of caries and is time-saving, it may serve as an alternative to acid etching.

  11. Silicon etching using only Oxygen at high temperature: An alternative approach to Si micro-machining on 150 mm Si wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Jessica; Walker, Glenn; Wang, Li; Massoubre, David; Tan, Say Hwa; Chaik, Kien; Hold, Leonie; Iacopi, Alan

    2015-12-01

    Using a combination of low-pressure oxygen and high temperatures, isotropic and anisotropic silicon (Si) etch rates can be controlled up to ten micron per minute. By varying the process conditions, we show that the vertical-to-lateral etch rate ratio can be controlled from 1:1 isotropic etch to 1.8:1 anisotropic. This simple Si etching technique combines the main respective advantages of both wet and dry Si etching techniques such as fast Si etch rate, stiction-free, and high etch rate uniformity across a wafer. In addition, this alternative O2-based Si etching technique has additional advantages not commonly associated with dry etchants such as avoiding the use of halogens and has no toxic by-products, which improves safety and simplifies waste disposal. Furthermore, this process also exhibits very high selectivity (>1000:1) with conventional hard masks such as silicon carbide, silicon dioxide and silicon nitride, enabling deep Si etching. In these initial studies, etch rates as high as 9.2 μm/min could be achieved at 1150 °C. Empirical estimation for the calculation of the etch rate as a function of the feature size and oxygen flow rate are presented and used as proof of concepts.

  12. Overview of atomic layer etching in the semiconductor industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kanarik, Keren J. Lill, Thorsten; Hudson, Eric A.; Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Tan, Samantha; Marks, Jeffrey; Vahedi, Vahid; Gottscho, Richard A.

    2015-03-15

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) is a technique for removing thin layers of material using sequential reaction steps that are self-limiting. ALE has been studied in the laboratory for more than 25 years. Today, it is being driven by the semiconductor industry as an alternative to continuous etching and is viewed as an essential counterpart to atomic layer deposition. As we enter the era of atomic-scale dimensions, there is need to unify the ALE field through increased effectiveness of collaboration between academia and industry, and to help enable the transition from lab to fab. With this in mind, this article provides defining criteria for ALE, along with clarification of some of the terminology and assumptions of this field. To increase understanding of the process, the mechanistic understanding is described for the silicon ALE case study, including the advantages of plasma-assisted processing. A historical overview spanning more than 25 years is provided for silicon, as well as ALE studies on oxides, III–V compounds, and other materials. Together, these processes encompass a variety of implementations, all following the same ALE principles. While the focus is on directional etching, isotropic ALE is also included. As part of this review, the authors also address the role of power pulsing as a predecessor to ALE and examine the outlook of ALE in the manufacturing of advanced semiconductor devices.

  13. Etch proximity correction through machine-learning-driven etch bias model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Seongbo; Shin, Youngsoo

    2016-03-01

    Accurate prediction of etch bias has become more important as technology node shrinks. A simulation is not feasible solution in full chip level due to excessive runtime, so etch proximity correction (EPC) often relies on empirically obtained rules or models. However, simple rules alone cannot accurately correct various pattern shapes, and a few empirical parameters in model-based EPC is still not enough to achieve satisfactory OCV. We propose a new approach of etch bias modeling through machine learning (ML) technique. A segment of interest (and its surroundings) are characterized by some geometric and optical parameters, which are received by an artificial neural network (ANN), which then outputs predicted etch bias of the segment. The ANN is used as our etch bias model for new EPC, which we propose in this paper. The new etch bias model and EPC are implemented in commercial OPC tool and demonstrated using 20nm technology DRAM gate layer.

  14. Freeze fracture and freeze etching.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Douglas E; Sharp, William P

    2014-01-01

    Freeze fracture depends on the property of frozen tissues or cells, when cracked open, to split along the hydrophobic interior of membranes, thus revealing broad panoramas of membrane interior. These large panoramas reveal the three-dimensional contours of membranes making the methods well suited to studying changes in membrane architecture. Freshly split membrane faces are visualized by platinum or tungsten shadowing and carbon backing to form a replica that is then cleaned of tissue and imaged by TEM. Etching, i.e., removal of ice from the frozen fractured specimen by sublimation prior to shadowing, can also reveal the true surfaces of the membrane as well as the extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal networks that contact the membranes. Since the resolution of detail in the metal replicas formed is 1-2 nm, these methods can also be used to visualize macromolecules or macromolecular assemblies either in situ or displayed on a mica surface. These methods are available for either specimens that have been chemically fixed or specimens that have been rapidly frozen without chemical intervention.

  15. Structuring of DLC:Ag nanocomposite thin films employing plasma chemical etching and ion sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulevičius, Tomas; Tamulevičienė, Asta; Virganavičius, Dainius; Vasiliauskas, Andrius; Kopustinskas, Vitoldas; Meškinis, Šarūnas; Tamulevičius, Sigitas

    2014-12-01

    We analyze structuring effects of diamond like carbon based silver nanocomposite (DLC:Ag) thin films by CF4/O2 plasma chemical etching and Ar+ sputtering. DLC:Ag films were deposited employing unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering of silver target with Ar+ in C2H2 gas atmosphere. Films with different silver content (0.6-12.9 at.%) were analyzed. The films (as deposited and exposed to plasma chemical etching) were characterized employing scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDS), optical microscopy, ultraviolet-visible light (UV-VIS) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. After deposition, the films were plasma chemically etched in CF4/O2 mixture plasma for 2-6 min. It is shown that optical properties of thin films and silver nano particle size distribution can be tailored during deposition changing the magnetron current and C2H2/Ar ratio or during following plasma chemical etching. The plasma etching enabled to reveal the silver filler particle size distribution and to control silver content on the surface that was found to be dependent on Ostwald ripening process of silver nano-clusters. Employing contact lithography and 4 μm period mask in photoresist or aluminum the films were patterned employing CF4/O2 mixture plasma chemical etching, direct Ar+ sputtering or combined etching processes. It is shown that different processing recipes result in different final grating structures. Selective carbon etching in CF4/O2 gas mixture with photoresist mask revealed micrometer range lines of silver nanoparticles, while Ar+ sputtering and combined processing employing aluminum mask resulted in nanocomposite material (DLC:Ag) micropatterns.

  16. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  17. Dislocation Etching Solutions for Mercury Cadmium Selenide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Dislocation Etching Solutions for Mercury Cadmium Selenide by Kevin Doyle and Sudhir Trivedi ARL-CR-0744 September 2014...Etching Solutions for Mercury Cadmium Selenide Kevin Doyle and Sudhir Trivedi Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL prepared by...Solutions for Mercury Cadmium Selenide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W811NF-12-2-0019 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kevin Doyle and

  18. Sensitivity Enhancement of RF Plasma Etch Endpoint Detection With K-means Cluster Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honyoung; Jang, Haegyu; Lee, Hak-Seung; Chae, Heeyeop

    2015-09-01

    Plasma etching process is the core process in semiconductor fabrication, and the etching endpoint detection is one of the essential FDC (Fault Detection and Classification) for yield management and mass production. In general, Optical emission spectrocopy (OES) has been used to detect endpoint because OES can be a non-invasive and real-time plasma monitoring tool. In OES, the trend of a few sensitive wavelengths is traced. However, in case of small-open area etch endpoint detection (ex. contact etch), it is at the boundary of the detection limit because of weak signal intensities of reaction reactants and products. Furthemore, the various materials covering the wafer such as photoresist, dielectric materials, and metals make the analysis of OES signals complicated. In this study, full spectra of optical emission signals were collected and the data were analyzed by a data-mining approach, modified K-means cluster analysis. The K-means cluster analysis is modified suitably to analyze a thousand of wavelength variables from OES. This technique can improve the sensitivity of EPD for small area oxide layer etching processes: about 1.0% oxide area. This technique is expected to be applied to various plasma monitoring applications including fault detections as well as EPD. Plasma Etch, EPD, K-means Cluster Analysis.

  19. Plasma etching: Yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Vincent M.; Kornblit, Avinoam

    2013-09-15

    The field of plasma etching is reviewed. Plasma etching, a revolutionary extension of the technique of physical sputtering, was introduced to integrated circuit manufacturing as early as the mid 1960s and more widely in the early 1970s, in an effort to reduce liquid waste disposal in manufacturing and achieve selectivities that were difficult to obtain with wet chemistry. Quickly, the ability to anisotropically etch silicon, aluminum, and silicon dioxide in plasmas became the breakthrough that allowed the features in integrated circuits to continue to shrink over the next 40 years. Some of this early history is reviewed, and a discussion of the evolution in plasma reactor design is included. Some basic principles related to plasma etching such as evaporation rates and Langmuir–Hinshelwood adsorption are introduced. Etching mechanisms of selected materials, silicon, silicon dioxide, and low dielectric-constant materials are discussed in detail. A detailed treatment is presented of applications in current silicon integrated circuit fabrication. Finally, some predictions are offered for future needs and advances in plasma etching for silicon and nonsilicon-based devices.

  20. Etch selectivity of a wet chemical formulation for premetal cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epton, Jeremy W.; Jarrett, Deborah L.; Doohan, Ian J.

    2001-04-01

    This paper examines the relative etching rates of doped and thermal silicon dioxide when using NSSL etchant, comprising of a mixture of ammonium fluoride, water and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate [(NH4)H2PO4] and investigates their dependence on both temperature and mixture composition. The possible reaction mechanism is discussed and compared with the known mechanism for standard buffered oxide etchants (BOE). The observed etch selectivity and mechanisms of BOE and NSSL are also compared with the behavior of a third chemical formulation, referred to as mixed oxide etchant, which comprises of ammonium fluoride (NH4F) solution, diammonium hydrogen phosphate [(NH4)2HPO4] and orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4). It is concluded that no major change in oxide selectivity is observed if either BOE or NSSL etchants are used in the metal pre-clean process.

  1. PFabrication of gold tips by chemical etching in aqua regia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorso, F.; Calogero, G.; Di Marco, G.; Maragò, O. M.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Giorgianni, U.; Channon, K.; Sabatino, G.

    2007-10-01

    We present a method to produce sharp gold tips for applications in apertureless near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy. Thin gold wires are tapered by chemical etching in aqua regia, covered by an isooctane protective layer. Tips with apical radii of curvature of <50 nm are obtained with a 40% yield. The tip performances have been checked by shear-force imaging of amyloid fibrils samples and compared to optical fiber probes. The analysis of the tip morphology, carried out by scanning electron microscopy, shows the existence of two different etching processes occurring in bulk and at the liquid-liquid interface. A simple analytical model is presented to describe the dynamics of the tip formation at the liquid-liquid meniscus interface that fits remarkably well the experimental results in terms of tip shape and length.

  2. Reduction of Aspect Ratio Dependency in Silicon Trench Etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Robert

    2013-09-01

    The etch rate of deep features in silicon, such as trenches and vias, can vary significantly with the changing aspect ratio (AR) of the feature. This work focused on using a continuous plasma process utilizing a gas mixture of SF6-C4F8-Ar to produce trenches of varying widths and depths. Optical and electrical diagnostics of percent flow, total flow and RF bias on trench profiles were investigated. Experiments were also performed to show that the etch rate of low AR features can be reduced through the deposition of a passivation layer and thereby allow larger AR features to ``catch up''. It is also possible to invert the ARDE in certain circumstances. Financial Support: TI/SRC Award # 2261.001.

  3. Investigation of Nitride Morphology After Self-Aligned Contact Etch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Keil, J.; Helmer, B. A.; Chien, T.; Gopaladasu, P.; Kim, J.; Shon, J.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Self-Aligned Contact (SAC) etch has emerged as a key enabling technology for the fabrication of very large-scale memory devices. However, this is also a very challenging technology to implement from an etch viewpoint. The issues that arise range from poor oxide etch selectivity to nitride to problems with post etch nitride surface morphology. Unfortunately, the mechanisms that drive nitride loss and surface behavior remain poorly understood. Using a simple langmuir site balance model, SAC nitride etch simulations have been performed and compared to actual etched results. This approach permits the study of various etch mechanisms that may play a role in determining nitride loss and surface morphology. Particle trajectories and fluxes are computed using Monte-Carlo techniques and initial data obtained from double Langmuir probe measurements. Etched surface advancement is implemented using a shock tracking algorithm. Sticking coefficients and etch yields are adjusted to obtain the best agreement between actual etched results and simulated profiles.

  4. Nonhomogeneous surface properties of parylene-C film etched by an atmospheric pressure He/O2 micro-plasma jet in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Yang, Chunsheng; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-10-01

    Surface properties of parylene-C film etched by an atmospheric pressure He/O2 micro-plasma jet in ambient air were investigated. The morphologies and chemical compositions of the etched surface were analyzed by optical microscopy, SEM, EDS, XPS and ATR-FTIR. The microscopy and SEM images showed the etched surface was nonhomogeneous with six discernable ring patterns from the center to the outside domain, which were composed of (I) a central region; (II) an effective etching region, where almost all of the parylene-C film was removed by the plasma jet with only a little residual parylene-C being functionalized with carboxyl groups (Cdbnd O, Osbnd Cdbnd O-); (III) an inner etching boundary; (IV) a middle etching region, where the film surface was smooth and partially removed; (V) an outer etching boundary, where the surface was decorated with clusters of debris, and (VI) a pristine parylene-C film region. The analysis of the different morphologies and chemical compositions illustrated the different localized etching process in the distinct regions. Besides, the influence of O2 flow rate on the surface properties of the etched parylene-C film was also investigated. Higher volume of O2 tended to weaken the nonhomogeneous characteristics of the etched surface and improve the etched surface quality.

  5. Comparative study of GaN mesa etch characteristics in Cl{sub 2} based inductively coupled plasma with Ar and BCl{sub 3} as additive gases

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Dipendra Singh Arora, Henika; Sehgal, Bhupender Kumar; Muralidharan, Rangarajan

    2014-05-15

    GaN thin film etching is investigated and compared for mesa formation in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) of Cl{sub 2} with Ar and BCl{sub 3} gas additives using photoresist mask. Etch characteristics are studied as a function of ICP process parameters, viz., ICP power, radio frequency (RF) power, and chamber pressure at fixed total flow rate. The etch rate at each ICP/RF power is 0.1–0.2 μm/min higher for Cl{sub 2}/Ar mixture mainly due to higher Cl dissociation efficiency of Ar additive that readily provides Cl ion/radical for reaction in comparison to Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3} mixture. Cl{sub 2}/Ar mixture also leads to better photoresist mask selectivity. The etch-induced roughness is investigated using atomic force microscopy. Cl{sub 2}/Ar etching has resulted in lower root-mean-square roughness of GaN etched surface in comparison to Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3} etching due to increased Ar ion energy and flux with ICP/RF power that enhances the sputter removal of etch product. The GaN surface damage after etching is also evaluated using room temperature photoluminescence and found to be increasing with ICP/RF power for both the etch chemistries with higher degree of damage in Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3} etching under same condition.

  6. Understanding and controlling the step bunching instability in aqueous silicon etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hailing

    Chemical etching of silicon has been widely used for more than half a century in the semiconductor industry. It not only forms the basis for current wafer cleaning processes, it also serves as a powerful tool to create a variety of surface morphologies for different applications. Its potential for controlling surface morphology at the atomic scale over micron-size regions is especially appealing. In spite of its wide usage, the chemistry of silicon etching is poorly understood. Many seemingly simple but fundamental questions have not been answered. As a result, the development of new etchants and new etching protocols are based on expensive and tedious trial-and-error experiments. A better understanding of the etching mechanism would direct the rational formulation of new etchants that produce controlled etch morphologies. Particularly, micron-scale step bunches spontaneously develop on the vicinal Si(111) surface etched in KOH or other anisotropic aqueous etchants. The ability to control the size, orientation, density and regularity of these surface features would greatly improve the performance of microelectromechanical devices. This study is directed towards understanding the chemistry and step bunching instability in aqueous anisotropic etching of silicon through a combination of experimental techniques and theoretical simulations. To reveal the cause of step-bunching instability, kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were constructed based on an atomistic model of the silicon lattice and a modified kinematic wave theory. The simulations showed that inhomogeneity was the origin of step-bunching, which was confirmed through STM studies of etch morphologies created under controlled flow conditions. To quantify the size of the inhomogeneities in different etchants and to clarify their effects, a five-parallel-trench pattern was fabricated. This pattern used a nitride mask to protect most regions of the wafer; five evenly spaced etch windows were opened to the Si(110

  7. A self-limiting layer-by-layer etching technique for 2H-MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choong Hee; Lee, Edwin W., II; McCulloch, William; Jamal-Eddine, Zane; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Newburger, Michael J.; Kawakami, Roland K.; Wu, Yiying; Rajan, Siddharth

    2017-03-01

    We report controlled layer-by-layer removal of large-area, sulfurized, single-crystal molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) films using a digital etching technique, which utilizes oxidation and removal of the oxidized layer. We demonstrate a self-limiting oxidation process where Mo oxide covered the surface of MoS2. A constant etching rate of one monolayer/cycle and the uniformity of the etching process were also verified. We show that the etching of an integer number of MoS2 layers can be precisely controlled. No noticeable film quality degradation was observed after multiple cycles of digital etching, as confirmed by Raman mapping of the ratio of the \\text{E}\\text{2g}1 and A1g peak intensities.

  8. Low-loss, submicron chalcogenide integrated photonics with chlorine plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Chiles, Jeff; Malinowski, Marcin; Rao, Ashutosh; Novak, Spencer; Richardson, Kathleen; Fathpour, Sasan

    2015-03-16

    A chlorine plasma etching-based method for the fabrication of high-performance chalcogenide-based integrated photonics on silicon substrates is presented. By optimizing the etching conditions, chlorine plasma is employed to produce extremely low-roughness etched sidewalls on waveguides with minimal penalty to propagation loss. Using this fabrication method, microring resonators with record-high intrinsic Q-factors as high as 450 000 and a corresponding propagation loss as low as 0.42 dB/cm are demonstrated in submicron chalcogenide waveguides. Furthermore, the developed chlorine plasma etching process is utilized to demonstrate fiber-to-waveguide grating couplers in chalcogenide photonics with high power coupling efficiency of 37% for transverse-electric polarized modes.

  9. Method for providing an arbitrary three-dimensional microstructure in silicon using an anisotropic deep etch

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela

    2004-06-15

    The present invention describes a method for fabricating an embossing tool or an x-ray mask tool, providing microstructures that smoothly vary in height from point-to-point in etched substrates, i.e., structure which can vary in all three dimensions. The process uses a lithographic technique to transfer an image pattern in the surface of a silicon wafer by exposing and developing the resist and then etching the silicon substrate. Importantly, the photoresist is variably exposed so that when developed some of the resist layer remains. The remaining undeveloped resist acts as an etchant barrier to the reactive plasma used to etch the silicon substrate and therefore provides the ability etch structures of variable depths.

  10. Effect of Cl{sub 2}- and HBr-based inductively coupled plasma etching on InP surface composition analyzed using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchoule, S.; Vallier, L.; Patriarche, G.; Chevolleau, T.; Cardinaud, C.

    2012-05-15

    A Cl{sub 2}-HBr-O{sub 2}/Ar inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching process has been adapted for the processing of InP-based heterostructures in a 300-mm diameter CMOS etching tool. Smooth and anisotropic InP etching is obtained at moderate etch rate ({approx}600 nm/min). Ex situ x-ray energy dispersive analysis of the etched sidewalls shows that the etching anisotropy is obtained through a SiO{sub x} passivation mechanism. The stoichiometry of the etched surface is analyzed in situ using angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is observed that Cl{sub 2}-based ICP etching results in a significantly P-rich surface. The phosphorous layer identified on the top surface is estimated to be {approx}1-1.3-nm thick. On the other hand InP etching in HBr/Ar plasma results in a more stoichiometric surface. In contrast to the etched sidewalls, the etched surface is free from oxides with negligible traces of silicon. Exposure to ambient air of the samples submitted to Cl{sub 2}-based chemistry results in the complete oxidation of the P-rich top layer. It is concluded that a post-etch treatment or a pure HBr plasma step may be necessary after Cl{sub 2}-based ICP etching for the recovery of the InP material.

  11. Dry etching techniques for active devices based on hexagonal boron nitride epilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Grenadier, Samuel; Li, Jing; Lin, Jingyu; Jiang, Hongxing

    2013-11-15

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as a fundamentally and technologically important material system owing to its unique physical properties including layered structure, wide energy bandgap, large optical absorption, and neutron capture cross section. As for any materials under development, it is necessary to establish device processing techniques to realize active devices based on hBN. The authors report on the advancements in dry etching techniques for active devices based on hBN epilayers via inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The effect of ICP radio frequency (RF) power on the etch rate and vertical side wall profile was studied. The etching depth and angle with respect to the surface were measured using atomic force microscopy showing that an etching rate ∼1.25 μm/min and etching angles >80° were obtained. Profilometer data and scanning electron microscope images confirmed these results. This work demonstrates that SF{sub 6} is very suitable for etching hBN epilayers in RF plasma environments and can serve as a guide for future hBN device processing.

  12. Effects of etching conditions on surface morphology of periodic inverted trapezoidal patterned Si(100) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Yuan, Guo-dong; Wang, Qi; Wang, Ke-chao; Wu, Rui-wei; Liu, Zhi-qiang; Li, Jin-min; Wang, Jun-xi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the anisotropic etching process of Si(100) wafers in tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) is investigated in detail. An inverted trapezoidal pattern is developed. A series of experiments are performed by changing TMAH concentration, IPA concentration, etching temperature and etching time. The structure of inverted trapezoidal patterns and roughness of the bottom surface are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that with TMAH concentration increases, the roughness of bottom surface will decrease. The addition of IPA into TMAH solution improves the morphology of the bottom surface significantly. Low temperature is beneficial to get a smooth bottom surface. Furthermore, etching time can change the bottom surface roughness. A model is proposed to explain the etching processes. The hillock area ratio of the bottom surface has the same tendency as the etching area ratio. Finally, smooth silicon inverted trapezoidal patterns are obtained for epitaxial growth of GaN-based light emitting diode (LED) devices.

  13. Marginal sealing durability of two contemporary self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mansoori, Mahsa

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Sealing abilities of two self-etch adhesives were evaluated after two aging processes: storage in water and thermocycling. Materials and Methods. Cl V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual aspects of 48 human premolars, with cervical margins 1 mm below the CEJ. Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB) and BeautiBond (BB) (two-step and one-step self-etch adhesives, resp.) were applied, each to half of the cavities and restored with composite resin. Each group was randomly subdivided into 4 subgroups (n = 12) and evaluated for dye penetration after 24 hours, after 3000 thermocycling rounds, after a 6-month water storage, and after 3000 thermocycling rounds plus 6-month water storage, respectively. Data was analyzed using SPSS 11.5 and Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05). Results. There were no significant differences in enamel and dentin microleakage between the adhesives (P = 0.683; P = 0.154). Furthermore, no significant differences were observed in enamel microleakage of each one of CPB and BB (P = 0.061 and P = 0.318, resp.). However, significant decrease was observed in subgroups 3 and 4 (P = 0.001) for CPB dentinal margins. Conclusion. In this study, limited aging procedures had no influence on marginal integrity of composite resin restorations bonded with self-etch adhesives of CPB and BB. Furthermore, CPB dentinal sealing improved after aging.

  14. Ion etching of human adenovirus 2: structure of the core

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, W.W.; Boring, J.W.; Brown, J.C.

    1984-07-01

    The surface of human adenovirus 2 was etched by irradiating intact virions with low-energy (1-keV) Ar/sup +/ ions in a Technics Hummer V sputter coater. Viral structures exposed by the etching process were shadowed and then examined in the electron microscope. Periods of etching that were sufficient to reduce the viral diameter by 20 to 30 nm revealed distinct substructural elements in the virion core. Cores were found to consist of a cluster of 12 large, uniformly sized spheres which abutted one another in the intact virion. The spheres, for which we suggest the name adenosomes, had a diameter of 23.0 +/- 2.3 nm, and they were related to each other by two-, three-, and fivefold axes of rotational symmetry. The results support the view, originally suggested by Brown et al. that the adenovirus 2 core is composed of 12 large spheres packed tightly together in such a way that each is directed toward the vertex of an icosahedron. Such a structure, constructed of 23.0-nm-diameter spheres, would have an outside diameter (vertex-to-vertex distance) of 67.0 nm and a face-to-face distance of 58.2 nm. It could be accommodated inside the icosahedral adenovirus capsid if each large sphere were located beneath a capsid vertex.

  15. Marginal Sealing Durability of Two Contemporary Self-Etch Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mansoori, Mahsa

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Sealing abilities of two self-etch adhesives were evaluated after two aging processes: storage in water and thermocycling. Materials and Methods. Cl V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual aspects of 48 human premolars, with cervical margins 1 mm below the CEJ. Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB) and BeautiBond (BB) (two-step and one-step self-etch adhesives, resp.) were applied, each to half of the cavities and restored with composite resin. Each group was randomly subdivided into 4 subgroups (n = 12) and evaluated for dye penetration after 24 hours, after 3000 thermocycling rounds, after a 6-month water storage, and after 3000 thermocycling rounds plus 6-month water storage, respectively. Data was analyzed using SPSS 11.5 and Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05). Results. There were no significant differences in enamel and dentin microleakage between the adhesives (P = 0.683; P = 0.154). Furthermore, no significant differences were observed in enamel microleakage of each one of CPB and BB (P = 0.061 and P = 0.318, resp.). However, significant decrease was observed in subgroups 3 and 4 (P = 0.001) for CPB dentinal margins. Conclusion. In this study, limited aging procedures had no influence on marginal integrity of composite resin restorations bonded with self-etch adhesives of CPB and BB. Furthermore, CPB dentinal sealing improved after aging. PMID:22611501

  16. Pattern inspection of etched multilayer extreme ultraviolet mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Patterned mask inspection for an etched multilayer (ML) extreme ultraviolet mask was investigated. In order to optimize the mask structure from the standpoint of a pattern inspection the mask structure not only from the standpoint of a pattern inspection by using a projection electron microscope but also by using a projection electron microscope but also by considering the other fabrication processes using electron beam techniques such as critical dimension metrology and mask repair, we employed a conductive layer between the ML and substrate. By measuring the secondary electron emission coefficients of the candidate materials for the conductive layer, we evaluated the image contrast and the influence of the charging effect. In the cases of 40-pair ML, 16-nm-sized extrusion and intrusion defects were found to be detectable more than 10 sigma in half pitch 44, 40, and 32 nm line-and-space patterns. Reducing 40-pair ML to 20-pair ML degraded the image contrast and the defect detectability. However, by selecting B4C as a conductive layer, 16-nm-sized defects and etching residues remained detectable. The 16-nm-sized defects were also detected after the etched part was refilled with Si. A double-layer structure with 2.5-nm-thick B4C on metal film used as a conductive layer was found to have sufficient conductivity and also was found to be free from the surface charging effect and influence of native oxide.

  17. Kinetics of faceting of crystals in growth, etching, and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, D. G.; Schmidt, L. D.; Aris, R.

    1993-03-01

    The faceting of crystals in equilibrium with the gas phase and also during crystal growth and etching conditions is studied using the Monte Carlo method. The dynamics of the transformation of unstable crystallographic orientations into hill and valley structures and the spatial patterns that develop are examined as functions of surface temperature, crystallographic orientation, and strength of interatomic potential for two transport processes: adsorption-desorption and surface diffusion. The results are compared with the continuum theory for facet formation. Thermodynamically unstable orientations break into hill and valley structures, and faceting exhibits three time regimes: disordering, facet nucleation, and coarsening of small facets to large facets. Faceting is accelerated as temperature increases, but thermal roughening can occur at high temperatures. Surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism at short times and small facets but adsorption-desorption becomes important at long times and large facets. Growth and etching promote faceting for conditions close to equilibrium but induce kinetic roughening for conditions far from equilibrium. Simultaneous irreversible growth and etching conditions with fast surface diffusion result in enhanced faceting.

  18. Evidences for redox reaction driven charge transfer and mass transport in metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingyu; Dasgupta, Binayak; Ren, Yi; Mohseni, Parsian K.; Hong, Minghui; Li, Xiuling; Chim, Wai Kin; Chiam, Sing Yang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the transport processes governing the metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) of silicon (Si). We show that in the oxidation of Si during the MacEtch process, the transport of the hole charges can be accomplished by the diffusion of metal ions. The oxidation of Si is subsequently governed by a redox reaction between the ions and Si. This represents a fundamentally different proposition in MacEtch whereby such transport is understood to occur through hole carrier conduction followed by hole injection into (or electron extraction from) Si. Consistent with the ion transport model introduced, we showed the possibility in the dynamic redistribution of the metal atoms that resulted in the formation of pores/cracks for catalyst thin films that are ≲30 nm thick. As such, the transport of the reagents and by-products are accomplished via these pores/cracks for the thin catalyst films. For thicker films, we show a saturation in the etch rate demonstrating a transport process that is dominated by diffusion via metal/Si boundaries. The new understanding in transport processes described in this work reconcile competing models in reagents/by-products transport, and also solution ions and thin film etching, which can form the foundation of future studies in the MacEtch process. PMID:27824123

  19. Evidences for redox reaction driven charge transfer and mass transport in metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingyu; Dasgupta, Binayak; Ren, Yi; Mohseni, Parsian K.; Hong, Minghui; Li, Xiuling; Chim, Wai Kin; Chiam, Sing Yang

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the transport processes governing the metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) of silicon (Si). We show that in the oxidation of Si during the MacEtch process, the transport of the hole charges can be accomplished by the diffusion of metal ions. The oxidation of Si is subsequently governed by a redox reaction between the ions and Si. This represents a fundamentally different proposition in MacEtch whereby such transport is understood to occur through hole carrier conduction followed by hole injection into (or electron extraction from) Si. Consistent with the ion transport model introduced, we showed the possibility in the dynamic redistribution of the metal atoms that resulted in the formation of pores/cracks for catalyst thin films that are ≲30 nm thick. As such, the transport of the reagents and by-products are accomplished via these pores/cracks for the thin catalyst films. For thicker films, we show a saturation in the etch rate demonstrating a transport process that is dominated by diffusion via metal/Si boundaries. The new understanding in transport processes described in this work reconcile competing models in reagents/by-products transport, and also solution ions and thin film etching, which can form the foundation of future studies in the MacEtch process.

  20. Two modes of surface roughening during plasma etching of silicon: Role of ionized etch products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazaki, Nobuya; Tsuda, Hirotaka; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2014-12-01

    Atomic- or nanometer-scale surface roughening has been investigated during Si etching in inductively coupled Cl2 plasmas, as a function of rf bias power or ion incident energy Ei, by varying feed gas flow rate, wafer stage temperature, and etching time. The experiments revealed two modes of surface roughening which occur depending on Ei: one is the roughening mode at low Ei < 200-300 eV, where the root-mean-square (rms) roughness of etched surfaces increases with increasing Ei, exhibiting an almost linear increase with time during etching (t < 20 min). The other is the smoothing mode at higher Ei, where the rms surface roughness decreases substantially with Ei down to a low level < 0.4 nm, exhibiting a quasi-steady state after some increase at the initial stage (t < 1 min). Correspondingly, two different behaviors depending on Ei were also observed in the etch rate versus √{Ei } curve, and in the evolution of the power spectral density distribution of surfaces. Such changes from the roughening to smoothing modes with increasing Ei were found to correspond to changes in the predominant ion flux from feed gas ions Clx+ to ionized etch products SiClx+ caused by the increased etch rates at increased Ei, in view of the results of several plasma diagnostics. Possible mechanisms for the formation and evolution of surface roughness during plasma etching are discussed with the help of Monte Carlo simulations of the surface feature evolution and classical molecular dynamics simulations of etch fundamentals, including stochastic roughening and effects of ion reflection and etch inhibitors.

  1. Two modes of surface roughening during plasma etching of silicon: Role of ionized etch products

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazaki, Nobuya Tsuda, Hirotaka; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2014-12-14

    Atomic- or nanometer-scale surface roughening has been investigated during Si etching in inductively coupled Cl{sub 2} plasmas, as a function of rf bias power or ion incident energy E{sub i}, by varying feed gas flow rate, wafer stage temperature, and etching time. The experiments revealed two modes of surface roughening which occur depending on E{sub i}: one is the roughening mode at low E{sub i} < 200–300 eV, where the root-mean-square (rms) roughness of etched surfaces increases with increasing E{sub i}, exhibiting an almost linear increase with time during etching (t < 20 min). The other is the smoothing mode at higher E{sub i}, where the rms surface roughness decreases substantially with E{sub i} down to a low level < 0.4 nm, exhibiting a quasi-steady state after some increase at the initial stage (t < 1 min). Correspondingly, two different behaviors depending on E{sub i} were also observed in the etch rate versus √(E{sub i}) curve, and in the evolution of the power spectral density distribution of surfaces. Such changes from the roughening to smoothing modes with increasing E{sub i} were found to correspond to changes in the predominant ion flux from feed gas ions Cl{sub x}{sup +} to ionized etch products SiCl{sub x}{sup +} caused by the increased etch rates at increased E{sub i}, in view of the results of several plasma diagnostics. Possible mechanisms for the formation and evolution of surface roughness during plasma etching are discussed with the help of Monte Carlo simulations of the surface feature evolution and classical molecular dynamics simulations of etch fundamentals, including stochastic roughening and effects of ion reflection and etch inhibitors.

  2. Plasma etching a ceramic composite. [evaluating microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David R.; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma etching is found to be a superior metallographic technique for evaluating the microstructure of a ceramic matrix composite. The ceramic composite studied is composed of silicon carbide whiskers (SiC(sub W)) in a matrix of silicon nitride (Si3N4), glass, and pores. All four constituents are important in evaluating the microstructure of the composite. Conventionally prepared samples, both as-polished or polished and etched with molten salt, do not allow all four constituents to be observed in one specimen. As-polished specimens allow examination of the glass phase and porosity, while molten salt etching reveals the Si3N4 grain size by removing the glass phase. However, the latter obscures the porosity. Neither technique allows the SiC(sub W) to be distinguished from the Si3N4. Plasma etching with CF4 + 4 percent O2 selectively attacks the Si3N4 grains, leaving SiC(sub W) and glass in relief, while not disturbing the pores. An artifact of the plasma etching reaction is the deposition of a thin layer of carbon on Si3N4, allowing Si3N4 grains to be distinguished from SiC(sub W) by back scattered electron imaging.

  3. Fabrication of volcano-shaped nano-patterned sapphire substrates using colloidal self-assembly and wet chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chong; Zheng, Lu; Fang, Huajing; Yan, Qingfeng; Wei, Tongbo; Hao, Zhibiao; Wang, Xiaoqing; Shen, Dezhong

    2013-08-23

    Patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) have been widely used to enhance the light output power in GaN-based light emitting diodes. The shape and feature size of the pattern in a PSS affect its enhancement efficiency to a great degree. In this work we demonstrate the nanoscale fabrication of volcano-shaped PSS using a wet chemical etching approach in combination with a colloidal monolayer templating strategy. Detailed analysis by scanning electron microscopy reveals that the unique pattern shape is a result of the different corrosion-resistant abilities of silica masks of different effective heights during wet chemical etching. The formation of silica etching masks of different effective heights has been ascribed to the silica precursor solution in the interstice of the colloidal monolayer template being distributed unevenly after infiltration. In the subsequent wet chemical etching process, the active reaction sites altered as etching duration was prolonged, resulting in the formation of volcano-shaped nano-patterned sapphire substrates.

  4. Enhancement of Dimension Uniformity of Wet-Etched Thick Insulator Holes in Triode Carbon Nanotube Field-Emission Display Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsiao-Fen; Hsiue, Ging-Ho; Liu, Chin-Yh; Chen, Kuo-Feng

    2008-12-01

    A triode structure carbon nanotube field-emission display was fabricated using the thick-film process. The critical dimensional uniformity of wet-etched thick insulator holes was enhanced by changing the wet etching mechanism from vertical dip-etching to horizontal spray-etching. The profile of the insulator holes fabricated using the new etcher was similar to anisotropic. After optimizing the operation conditions of the new etcher, the dimensional uniformity of the insulator holes increased to 97.7%. The optimal concentration of etchant was 2.2 wt % for achieving the least side etching of the insulator holes. The carbon nanotube paste was pattern-printed into the insulator holes. The uniform size of the insulator holes implied that the carbon nanotube distribution was similarly among the insulator holes. This result showed an improved uniform field emission image over the panel from 59 to 83.85%.

  5. Anisotropic chemical etching of semipolar [1011]/[101+1] ZnO crystallographic planes: polarity versus dangling bonds.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Lidón, E; Pérez-García, B; Vennéguès, P; Colchero, J; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V; Zúñiga-Pérez, J

    2009-02-11

    ZnO thin films grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy along the nonpolar [formula: see text] direction and exhibiting semipolar [formula: see text] facets have been chemically etched with HCl. In order to get an insight into the influence of the ZnO wurtzite structure in the chemical reactivity of the material, Kelvin probe microscopy and convergent beam electron diffraction have been employed to unambiguously determine the absolute polarity of the facets, showing that [formula: see text] facets are unstable upon etching in an HCl solution and transform into [formula: see text] planes. In contrast, [formula: see text] facets undergo homogeneous chemical etching perpendicular to the initial crystallographic plane. The observed etching behavior has been explained in terms of surface oxygen dangling bond density, suggesting that the macroscopic polarity plays a secondary role in the etching process.

  6. Magnetic field sensor using the fiber loop ring-down technique and an etched fiber coated with magnetic fluid.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Feng, Yue; Sun, Binchao; Wei, Xinlao

    2016-02-01

    The fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy technique is introduced into the evanescent-field-based sensing scheme in order to create a new type of fiber-based magnetic field sensor. As a consequence, the sensitivity and stability of the magnetic field sensing system are significantly enhanced. The sensor head is constructed using a section of a single-mode fiber with its cladding partially etched. The process of fiber etching is described in detail, and the relationship between the diameter of the etched fiber and the etching time is experimentally investigated. After adopting the appropriate size of the etched fiber, the final experimental results show that the magnetic field strength has a well-defined linear relationship with the inverse of the ring-down time τ over a range of 30 mT with a sensitivity of 95.5 ns/mT.

  7. Back-etch method for plan view transmission electron microscopy sample preparation of optically opaque films.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bo; Coffey, Kevin R

    2008-04-01

    Back-etch methods have been widely used to prepare plan view transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples of thin films on membranes by removal of the Si substrate below the membrane by backside etching. The conventional means to determine when to stop the etch process is to observe the color of the light transmitted through the sample, which is sensitive to the remaining Si thickness. However, most metallic films thicker than 75 nm are opaque, and there is no detectable color change prior to film perforation. In this paper, a back-etch method based on the observation of an abrupt change of optical reflection contrast is introduced as a means to determine the etch endpoint to prepare TEM samples for these films. As the acid etchant removes the Si substrate material a rough interface is generated. This interface becomes a relatively smooth and featureless region when the etchant reaches the membrane (film/SiO2). This featureless region is caused by the mirror reflection of the film plane (film/SiO2 interface) through the optically transparent SiO2 layer. The lower etch rate of SiO2 (compared with Si) gives the operator enough time to stop the etching without perforating the film. A clear view of the morphology and control of Si roughness during etching are critical to this method, which are discussed in detail. The procedures of mounting wax removal and sample rinsing are also described in detail, as during these steps damage to the membrane may easily occur without appropriate consideration. As examples, the preparation of 100-nm-thick Fe-based amorphous alloy thin film and 160-nm-thick Cu-thin film samples for TEM imaging is described.

  8. Reduced Noise UV Enhancement of Etch Rates for Nuclear Tracks in CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheets, Rebecca; Clarkson, David; Ume, Rubab; Regan, Sean; Sangster, Craig; Padalino, Stephen; McLean, James

    2016-10-01

    The use of CR-39 plastic as a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector is an effective technique for obtaining data in high-energy particle experiments including inertial confinement fusion. To reveal particle tracks after irradiation, CR-39 is chemically etched in NaOH at 80°C for 6 hours, producing micron-scale signal pits at the nuclear track sites. Using CR-39 irradiated with 5.4 MeV alpha particles and 1.0 MeV protons, we show that exposing the CR-39 to high intensity UV light before etching, with wavelengths between 240 nm and 350 nm, speeds the etch process. Elevated temperatures during UV exposure amplifies this effect, with etch rates up to 50% greater than unprocessed conditions. CR-39 pieces exposed to UV light and heat can also exhibit heightened levels of etch-induced noise (surface features not caused by nuclear particles). By illuminating the CR-39 from the side opposite to the tracks, a similar level of etch enhancement was obtained with little to no noise. The effective wavelength range is reduced, due to strong attenuation of shorter wavelengths. Funded in part by a LLE contract through the DOE.

  9. Wet etching of InSb surfaces in aqueous solutions: Controlled oxide formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aureau, D.; Chaghi, R.; Gerard, I.; Sik, H.; Fleury, J.; Etcheberry, A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the wet etching of InSb surfaces by two different oxidant agents: Br2 and H2O2 and the consecutive oxides generation onto the surfaces. The strong dependence between the chemical composition of the etching baths and the nature of the final surface chemistry of this low band-gap III-V semiconductor will be especially highlighted. One aqueous etching solution combined hydrobromic acid and Bromine (HBr-Br2:H2O) with adjusted concentrations. The other solution combines orthophosphoric and citric acids with hydrogen peroxide (H3PO4-H2O2:H2O). Depending on its composition, each formulation gave rise to variable etching rate. The dosage of Indium traces in the etching solution by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) gives the kinetic variation of the dissolution process. The variations on etching rates are associated to the properties and the nature of the formed oxides on InSb surfaces. Surface characterization is specifically performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A clear evidence of the differences between the formed oxides is highlighted. Atomic force microscopy is used to monitor the surface morphology and pointed out that very different final morphologies can be reached. This paper presents new results on the strong variability of the InSb oxides in relation with the InSb reactivity toward environment interaction.

  10. Restoration of obliterated engraved marks on steel surfaces by chemical etching reagent.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingfang

    2015-05-01

    Chemical etching technique is widely used for restoration of obliterated engraved marks on steel surface in the field of public security. The consumed thickness of steel surface during restoration process is considered as a major criterion for evaluating the efficiency of the chemical etching reagent. The thinner the consumed thickness, the higher the restoration efficiency. According to chemical principles, maintaining the continuous oxidative capabilities of etching reagents and increasing the kinetic rate difference of the reaction between the engraved and non-engraved area with the chemical etching reagent can effectively reduce the consumed steel thickness. The study employed steel surface from the engine case of motorcycle and the car frame of automobile. The chemical etching reagents are composed of nitric acid as the oxidizer, hydrofluoric acid as the coordination agent and mixed with glacial acetic acid or acetone as the solvents. Based on the performance evaluation of three different etching reagents, the one composed of HNO3, HF and acetone gave the best result.

  11. Anisotropic etching on Si{1 1 0}: experiment and simulation for the formation of microstructures with convex corners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Prem; Gosalvez, Miguel A.; Sato, Kazuo; Hida, H.; Xing, Yan

    2014-12-01

    We combine experiment, theory and simulation to design and fabricate 3D structures with protected edges and corners on Si{1 1 0} using anisotropic wet chemical etching in 25 wt% tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) at 71 °C. In order to protect the convex corners formed by <1 1 2 > and <1 1 0 > directions, two methods are considered, namely, corner compensation and two-step etching. The mask design methodology for corner compensation is explained for various microstructures whose edges are aligned along different directions. The detailed geometry of each compensation pattern is shown to depend on the desired etch depth. The two-step wet etching process is explored in order to realize improved sharp convex corners. Using the same etchant concentration and temperature, the second etching is carried out after mask inversion from silicon nitride (Si3N4) to silicon dioxide (SiO2), obtained by local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) followed by nitride etching. Based on the use of the continuous cellular automaton (CCA), the simulation results for both corner undercutting and two-step etching show that the CCA is suitable for the analysis and prediction of anisotropic etching on Si{1 1 0} wafers.

  12. Silver ion mediated shape control of platinum nanoparticles: Removal of silver by selective etching leads to increased catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, Michael E.; Yue, Yao; Habas, Susan E.; Rioux, Robert M.; Teall, Chelsea I.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-01-09

    A procedure has been developed for the selective etching of Ag from Pt nanoparticles of well-defined shape, resulting in the formation of elementally-pure Pt cubes, cuboctahedra, or octahedra, with a largest vertex-to-vertex distance of {approx}9.5 nm from Ag-modified Pt nanoparticles. A nitric acid etching process was applied Pt nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica, as well as nanoparticles dispersed in aqueous solution. The characterization of the silica-supported particles by XRD, TEM, and N{sub 2} adsorption measurements demonstrated that the structure of the nanoparticles and the mesoporous support remained conserved during etching in concentrated nitric acid. Both elemental analysis and ethylene hydrogenation indicated etching of Ag is only effective when [HNO{sub 3}] {ge} 7 M; below this concentration, the removal of Ag is only {approx}10%. Ethylene hydrogenation activity increased by four orders of magnitude after the etching of Pt octahedra that contained the highest fraction of silver. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the unsupported particles after etching demonstrated that etching does not alter the surface structure of the Pt nanoparticles. High [HNO{sub 3}] led to the decomposition of the capping agent, polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP); infrared spectroscopy confirmed that many decomposition products were present on the surface during etching, including carbon monoxide.

  13. Patterning of Transparent Conducting Oxide Thin Films by Wet Etching for a-Si:H TFT-LCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, J. H.; Kanicki, J.; Catalano, A.; Keane, J.; Den Boer, W.; Gu, T.

    1996-12-01

    The patterning characteristics of the indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films having different microstructures were investigated. Several etching solutions (HCl, HBr, and their mixtures with HNO3) were used in this study. We have found that ITO films containing a larger volume fraction of the amorphous phase show higher etch rates than those containing a larger volume fraction of the crystalline phase. Also, the crystalline ITO fims have shown a very good uniformity in patterning, and following the etching no ITO residue (unetched ITO) formation has been observed. In contrast, ITO residues were found after the etching of the films containing both amorphous and crystalline phases. We have also developed a process for the fabrication of the ITO with a tapered edge profile. The taper angle can be controlled by varying the ratio of HNO3 to the HCl in the etching solutions. Finally, ITO films have been found to be chemically unstable in a hydrogen containing plasma environment. On the contrary, aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) films, having an optical transmittance and electrical resisitivity comparable to ITO films, are very stable in the same hydrogen containing plasma environment. In addition, a high etch rate, no etching residue formation, and a uniform etching have been found for the AZO films, which make them suitable for a-Si:H TFT-LCD applications.

  14. Pulsed Laser-Assisted Focused Electron-Beam-Induced Etching of Titanium with XeF 2 : Enhanced Reaction Rate and Precursor Transport

    DOE PAGES

    Noh, J. H.; Fowlkes, J. D.; Timilsina, R.; ...

    2015-01-28

    We introduce a laser-assisted focused electron-beam-induced etching (LA-FEBIE) process which is a versatile, direct write nanofabrication method that allows nanoscale patterning and editing; we do this in order to enhance the etch rate of electron-beam-induced etching. The results demonstrate that the titanium electron stimulated etch rate via the XeF2 precursor can be enhanced up to a factor of 6 times with an intermittent pulsed laser assist. Moreover, the evolution of the etching process is correlated to in situ stage current measurements and scanning electron micrographs as a function of time. Finally, the increased etch rate is attributed to photothermally enhancedmore » Ti–F reaction and TiF4 desorption and in some regimes enhanced XeF2 surface diffusion to the reaction zone.« less

  15. Pulsed Laser-Assisted Focused Electron-Beam-Induced Etching of Titanium with XeF 2 : Enhanced Reaction Rate and Precursor Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, J. H.; Fowlkes, J. D.; Timilsina, R.; Stanford, M. G.; Lewis, B. B.; Rack, P. D.

    2015-01-28

    We introduce a laser-assisted focused electron-beam-induced etching (LA-FEBIE) process which is a versatile, direct write nanofabrication method that allows nanoscale patterning and editing; we do this in order to enhance the etch rate of electron-beam-induced etching. The results demonstrate that the titanium electron stimulated etch rate via the XeF2 precursor can be enhanced up to a factor of 6 times with an intermittent pulsed laser assist. Moreover, the evolution of the etching process is correlated to in situ stage current measurements and scanning electron micrographs as a function of time. Finally, the increased etch rate is attributed to photothermally enhanced Ti–F reaction and TiF4 desorption and in some regimes enhanced XeF2 surface diffusion to the reaction zone.

  16. Pulsed laser-assisted focused electron-beam-induced etching of titanium with XeF2: enhanced reaction rate and precursor transport.

    PubMed

    Noh, J H; Fowlkes, J D; Timilsina, R; Stanford, M G; Lewis, B B; Rack, P D

    2015-02-25

    In order to enhance the etch rate of electron-beam-induced etching, we introduce a laser-assisted focused electron-beam-induced etching (LA-FEBIE) process which is a versatile, direct write nanofabrication method that allows nanoscale patterning and editing. The results demonstrate that the titanium electron stimulated etch rate via the XeF2 precursor can be enhanced up to a factor of 6 times with an intermittent pulsed laser assist. The evolution of the etching process is correlated to in situ stage current measurements and scanning electron micrographs as a function of time. The increased etch rate is attributed to photothermally enhanced Ti-F reaction and TiF4 desorption and in some regimes enhanced XeF2 surface diffusion to the reaction zone.

  17. ICP Etching of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Grow, J.M.; Lambers, E.S.; Ostling, M.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Wang, J.J.; Zetterling, C.-M.

    1999-02-04

    A number of different plasma chemistries, including NF{sub 3}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/Ar, ICl, IBr, Cl{sub 2}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/Ar and CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar, have been investigated for dry etching of 6H and 3C-SiC in a Inductively Coupled Plasma tool. Rates above 2,000 {angstrom} cm{sup {minus}1} are found with fluorine-based chemistries at high ion currents. Surprisingly, Cl{sub 2}-based etching does not provide high rates, even though the potential etch products (SiCi{sub 4} and CCl{sub 4}) are volatile. Photoresist masks have poor selectivity over SiC in F{sub 2}-based plasmas under normal conditions, and ITO or Ni are preferred.

  18. Etching of nanopatterns in silicon using nanopantography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lin; Nasrullah, Azeem; Chen, Zhiying; Jain, Manish; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2008-01-01

    Nanopantography is a technique for parallel writing of nanopatterns over large areas. A broad ion beam impinges on a substrate containing many microfabricated electrostatic lenses that focus ions to spots at the substrate surface. Here, etching of nanopatterns is demonstrated. The substrate was continuously titled about x and y axes with 0.11° precision, corresponding to a translation of the ion foci of 1.5nm on the substrate. With tilting in one direction, 15nm full width at half maximum trenches 45nm deep were etched into a Si wafer using an Ar+ beam in a Cl2 ambient. T-shaped patterns were etched by tilting the substrates in two directions.

  19. New type of dummy layout pattern to control ILD etch rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohland, Oliver; Spieker, Julie; Huang, Chih-Ta; Govindaswamy, Srikanth; Balasinski, Artur

    2007-12-01

    Adding dummy features (waffles) to drawn geometries of the circuit layout is a common practice to improve its manufacturability. As an example, local dummy pattern improves MOSFET line and space CD control by adjusting short range optical proximity and reducing the aggressiveness of its correction features (OPC) to widen the lithography process window. Another application of dummy pattern (waffles) is to globally equalize layout pattern density, to reduce long-range inter-layer dielectric (ILD) thickness variations after the CMP process and improve contact resistance uniformity over the die area. In this work, we discuss a novel type of dummy pattern with a mid-range interaction distance, to control the ILD composition driven by its deposition and etch process. This composition is reflected on sidewall spacers and depends on the topography of the underlying poly pattern. During contact etch, it impacts the etch rate of the ILD. As a result, the deposited W filling the damascene etched self-aligned trench contacts in the ILD may electrically short to the underlying gates in the areas of isolated poly. To mitigate the dependence of the ILD composition on poly pattern distribution, we proposed a special dummy feature generation with the interaction range defined by the ILD deposition and etch process. This helped equalize mid-range poly pattern density without disabling the routing capability with damascene trench contacts in the periphery which would have increased the layout footprint.

  20. Single beam determination of porosity and etch rate in situ during etching of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, S. E.; Kan, P. Y. Y.; Finstad, T. G.

    2005-06-01

    A laser reflection method has been developed and tested for analyzing the etching of porous silicon (PS) films. It allows in situ measurement and analysis of the time dependency of the etch rate, the thickness, the average porosity, the porosity profile, and the interface roughness. The interaction of an infrared laser beam with a layered system consisting of a PS layer and a substrate during etching results in interferences in the reflected beam which is analyzed by the short-time Fourier transform. This method is used for analysis of samples prepared with etching solutions containing different concentrations of HF and glycerol and at different current densities and temperatures. Variations in the etch rate and porosity during etching are observed, which are important effects to account for when optical elements in PS are made. The method enables feedback control of the etching so that PS films with a well-controlled porosity are obtainable. By using different beam diameters it is possible to probe interface roughness at different length scales. Obtained porosity, thickness, and roughness values are in agreement with values measured with standard methods.

  1. Plasma etch characteristics of aluminum nitride mask layers grown by low-temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition in SF{sub 6} based plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Perros, Alexander; Bosund, Markus; Sajavaara, Timo; Laitinen, Mikko; Sainiemi, Lauri; Huhtio, Teppo; Lipsanen, Harri

    2012-01-15

    The plasma etch characteristics of aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited by low-temperature, 200 deg. C, plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) was investigated for reactive ion etch (RIE) and inductively coupled plasma-reactive ion etch (ICP-RIE) systems using various mixtures of SF{sub 6} and O{sub 2} under different etch conditions. During RIE, the film exhibits good mask properties with etch rates below 10r nm/min. For ICP-RIE processes, the film exhibits exceptionally low etch rates in the subnanometer region with lower platen power. The AlN film's removal occurred through physical mechanisms; consequently, rf power and chamber pressure were the most significant parameters in PEALD AlN film removal because the film was inert to the SF{sub x}{sup +} and O{sup +} chemistries. The etch experiments showed the film to be a resilient masking material. This makes it an attractive candidate for use as an etch mask in demanding SF{sub 6} based plasma etch applications, such as through-wafer etching, or when oxide films are not suitable.

  2. The development of a method of producing etch resistant wax patterns on solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastirik, E.

    1980-01-01

    A potentially attractive technique for wax masking of solar cells prior to etching processes was studied. This technique made use of a reuseable wax composition which was applied to the solar cell in patterned form by means of a letterpress printing method. After standard wet etching was performed, wax removal by means of hot water was investigated. Application of the letterpress wax printing process to silicon was met with a number of difficulties. The most serious shortcoming of the process was its inability to produce consistently well-defined printed patterns on the hard silicon cell surface.

  3. SU-8 focus control mirrors released by XeF2 dry etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, Sarah J.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2011-03-01

    SU8-2002 deformable membrane mirrors for primary focus control and compensation of focus-induced spherical aberration have been fabricated using a surface micromachining process with dry etching of silicon in XeF2. This process has a higher yield and realizes larger mirrors with a twofold improvement in stroke, relative to a wet release etch process previously described. The use of 3 mm x 4.24 mm elliptical mirrors for 45° incidence focus control in microscopy is described.

  4. Back-channel-etch amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors: The impact of source/drain metal etch and final passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Manoj; Bhoolokam, Ajay; Steudel, Soeren; Chasin, Adrian; Myny, Kris; Maas, Joris; Groeseneken, Guido; Heremans, Paul

    2014-11-01

    We report on the impact of source/drain (S/D) metal (molybdenum) etch and the final passivation (SiO2) layer on the bias-stress stability of back-channel-etch (BCE) configuration based amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). It is observed that the BCE configurations TFTs suffer poor bias-stability in comparison to etch-stop-layer (ESL) TFTs. By analysis with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), as well as by a comparative analysis of contacts formed by other metals, we infer that this poor bias-stability for BCE transistors having Mo S/D contacts is associated with contamination of the back channel interface, which occurs by Mo-containing deposits on the back channel during the final plasma process of the physical vapor deposited SiO2 passivation.

  5. Chemically assisted ion beam etching of laser diode facets on nonpolar and semipolar orientations of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuritzky, L. Y.; Becerra, D. L.; Saud Abbas, A.; Nedy, J.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Cohen, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a vertical (<1° departure) and smooth (2.0 nm root mean square line-edge roughness (LER)) etch by chemically assisted Ar ion beam etching (CAIBE) in Cl2 chemistry that is suitable for forming laser diode (LD) facets on nonpolar and semipolar oriented III-nitride devices. The etch profiles were achieved with photoresist masks and optimized CAIBE chamber conditions including the platen tilt angle and Cl2 flow rate. Co-loaded studies showed similar etch rates of ˜60 nm min-1 for (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}),(20\\bar{2}1), and m-plane orientations. The etched surfaces of LD facets on these orientations are chemically dissimilar (Ga-rich versus N-rich), but were visually indistinguishable, thus confirming the negligible orientation dependence of the etch. Continuous-wave blue LDs were fabricated on the semipolar (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}) plane to compare CAIBE and reactive ion etch (RIE) facet processes. The CAIBE process resulted in LDs with lower threshold current densities due to reduced parasitic mirror loss compared with the RIE process. The LER, degree of verticality, and model of the 1D vertical laser mode were used to calculate a maximum uncoated facet reflection of 17% (94% of the nominal) for the CAIBE facet. The results demonstrate the suitability of CAIBE for forming high quality facets for high performance nonpolar and semipolar III-N LDs.

  6. Plasma etching of HfO{sub 2} at elevated temperatures in chlorine-based chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Helot, M.; Chevolleau, T.; Vallier, L.; Joubert, O.; Blanquet, E.; Pisch, A.; Mangiagalli, P.; Lill, T.

    2006-01-15

    Plasma etching of HfO{sub 2} at an elevated temperature is investigated in chlorine-based plasmas. Thermodynamic studies are performed in order to determine the most appropriate plasma chemistry. The theoretical calculations show that chlorocarbon gas chemistries (such as CCl{sub 4} or Cl{sub 2}-CO) can result in the chemical etching of HfO{sub 2} in the 425-625 K temperature range by forming volatile effluents such as HfCl{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}. The etching of HfO{sub 2} is first studied on blanket wafers in a high density Cl{sub 2}-CO plasma under low ion energy bombardment conditions (no bias power). Etch rates are presented and discussed with respect to the plasma parameters. The evolution of the etch rate as function of temperature follows an Arrhenius law indicating that the etching comes from chemical reactions. The etch rate of HfO{sub 2} is about 110 A /min at a temperature of 525 K with a selectivity towards SiO{sub 2} of 15. x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses (XPS) reveal that neither carbon nor chlorine is detected on the HfO{sub 2} surface, whereas a chlorine-rich carbon layer is formed on top of the SiO{sub 2} surface leading to the selectivity between HfO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}. A drift of the HfO{sub 2} etch process is observed according to the chamber walls conditioning due to chlorine-rich carbon coatings formed on the chamber walls in a Cl{sub 2}-CO plasma. To get a very reproducible HfO{sub 2} etch process, the best conditioning strategy consists in cleaning the chamber walls with an O{sub 2} plasma between each wafer. The etching of HfO{sub 2} is also performed on patterned wafers using a conventional polysilicon gate. The first result show a slight HfO{sub 2} foot at the bottom of the gate and the presence of hafnium oxide-based residues in the active areas.

  7. Angular dependence of etch rates in the etching of poly-Si and fluorocarbon polymer using SF6, C4F8, and O2 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Jae-Ho; Lee, Gyeo-Re; Lee, Jin-Kwan; Moon, Sang Heup; Kim, Chang-Koo

    2004-05-01

    The dependences of etch rates on the angle of ions incident on the substrate surface in four plasma/substrate systems that constitute the advanced Bosch process were investigated using a Faraday cage designed for the accurate control of the ion-incident angle. The four systems, established by combining discharge gases and substrates, were a SF6/poly-Si, a SF6/fluorocarbon polymer, an O2/fluorocarbon polymer, and a C4F8/Si. In the case of SF6/poly-Si, the normalized etch rates (NERs), defined as the etch rates normalized by the rate on the horizontal surface, were higher at all angles than values predicted from the cosine of the ion-incident angle. This characteristic curve shape was independent of changes in process variables including the source power and bias voltage. Contrary to the earlier case, the NERs for the O2/polymer decreased and eventually reached much lower values than the cosine values at angles between 30° and 70° when the source power was increased and the bias voltage was decreased. On the other hand, the NERs for the SF6/polymer showed a weak dependence on the process variables. In the case of C4F8/Si, which is used in the Bosch process for depositing a fluorocarbon layer on the substrate surface, the deposition rate varied with the ion incident angle, showing an S-shaped curve. These characteristic deposition rate curves, which were highly dependent on the process conditions, could be divided into four distinct regions: a Si sputtering region, an ion-suppressed polymer deposition region, an ion-enhanced polymer deposition region, and an ion-free polymer deposition region. Based on the earlier characteristic angular dependences of the etch (or deposition) rates in the individual systems, ideal process conditions for obtaining an anisotropic etch profile in the advanced Bosch process are proposed. .

  8. Anisotropic etching of platinum electrodes at the onset of cathodic corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Hersbach, Thomas J. P.; Yanson, Alexei I.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cathodic corrosion is a process that etches metal electrodes under cathodic polarization. This process is presumed to occur through anionic metallic reaction intermediates, but the exact nature of these intermediates and the onset potential of their formation is unknown. Here we determine the onset potential of cathodic corrosion on platinum electrodes. Electrodes are characterized electrochemically before and after cathodic polarization in 10 M sodium hydroxide, revealing that changes in the electrode surface start at an electrode potential of −1.3 V versus the normal hydrogen electrode. The value of this onset potential rules out previous hypotheses regarding the nature of cathodic corrosion. Scanning electron microscopy shows the formation of well-defined etch pits with a specific orientation, which match the voltammetric data and indicate a remarkable anisotropy in the cathodic etching process, favouring the creation of (100) sites. Such anisotropy is hypothesized to be due to surface charge-induced adsorption of electrolyte cations. PMID:27554398

  9. Anisotropic etching of platinum electrodes at the onset of cathodic corrosion.

    PubMed

    Hersbach, Thomas J P; Yanson, Alexei I; Koper, Marc T M

    2016-08-24

    Cathodic corrosion is a process that etches metal electrodes under cathodic polarization. This process is presumed to occur through anionic metallic reaction intermediates, but the exact nature of these intermediates and the onset potential of their formation is unknown. Here we determine the onset potential of cathodic corrosion on platinum electrodes. Electrodes are characterized electrochemically before and after cathodic polarization in 10 M sodium hydroxide, revealing that changes in the electrode surface start at an electrode potential of -1.3 V versus the normal hydrogen electrode. The value of this onset potential rules out previous hypotheses regarding the nature of cathodic corrosion. Scanning electron microscopy shows the formation of well-defined etch pits with a specific orientation, which match the voltammetric data and indicate a remarkable anisotropy in the cathodic etching process, favouring the creation of (100) sites. Such anisotropy is hypothesized to be due to surface charge-induced adsorption of electrolyte cations.

  10. Controlling line-edge roughness and reactive ion etch lag in sub-150 nm features in borophosphosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Panda, Siddhartha; Edleman, Nikki L.; Allen, Scott D.; Wise, Richard; Mahorowala, Arpan

    2007-04-01

    We have developed a reactive ion etch (RIE) process in borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) for 150 nm line-and-space features, where line-edge roughness (LER) complemented with RIE lag becomes a major issue. Effect of flow rates and carbon-to-fluorine atomic ratio of fluorohydrocarbon gases was utilized to achieve acceptable process window allowing lower radio frequency powers therefore obtaining acceptable LER and RIE lag in the high-resolution features etched into BPSG.

  11. Laser-induced back-side etching with liquid and the solid hydrocarbon absorber films of different thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, M.; Lorenz, P.; Yunxiang, P.; Bayer, L.; Han, B.; Zimmer, K.

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced backside wet and dry etching (LIBWE and LIBDE) are methods for high-quality surface patterning of transparent dielectrics that making use of an additional absorber material attached to the rear side that is ablated in a confined configuration. Due to the manifold of the involved processes, the mechanism of the etching process and the parameter influence on the material removal process are multifaceted and not fully understood yet. In the present paper, we investigate the influence of the confinement to the backside etching process by studying the impact of the thickness of the attached liquid or solid absorber within a range of 12-125 and 0.2-11.7 μm, respectively. It was found that for the liquid and solid absorbers, the etching rate increases with the thickness of the absorber layer and saturates exceeding a certain value, which depends on the used laser fluence. Moreover, the incubation of etching depends on the absorber thickness. The comparison of the etching results of a similar thickness of the liquid and the solid absorber layers shows that the phase of the absorber (liquid or solid) does not influence the back-side etching process. Time-resolved shadowgraph images of the process indicate that with higher absorber layer thickness, the interaction time and strength of the laser-induced processes at the sample surface increase. The results suggest that confinement of the rear side attached absorber ablation influences the impact of the laser-induced secondary processes to the strength of the material modifications and, therefore, the etching rate.

  12. Wet KOH etching of freestanding AlN single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickermann, M.; Schmidt, S.; Epelbaum, B. M.; Heimann, P.; Nagata, S.; Winnacker, A.

    2007-03-01

    We investigated defect-selective wet chemical etching of freestanding aluminum nitride (AlN) single crystals and polished cuts in a molten NaOH-KOH eutectic at temperatures ranging from 240 to 400 °C. Due to the strong anisotropy of the AlN wurtzite structure, different AlN faces get etched at very different etching rates. On as-grown rhombohedral and prismatic facets, defect-related etching features could not be traced, as etching these facets was found to mainly emphasize features present already on the un-etched surface. On nitrogen polar basal planes, hexagonal pyramids/hillocks exceeding 100 μm in diameter may form within seconds of etching at 240 °C. They sometimes are arranged in lines and clusters, thus we attribute them to defects on the surface, presumably originating in the bulk material. On aluminum polar basal planes, the etch pit density which saturates after approx. 2-3 min of total etching time at 350 °C equals the density of a certain type of dislocations (presumably screw dislocations) threading the surface. Smaller etch pits form around annealed indentations, in the vicinity of some bigger etch pits after repeated etching, and sometimes also isolated on the surface area. Although alternate explanations exist, we attribute these etch pits to threading mixed and edge dislocations. This paper features etching parameters optimized for different planes and models on the formation of etching features especially on the polar faces. Finally, the issue of reliability and reproducibility of defect detection and evaluation by wet chemical etching is addressed.

  13. High index contrast polysiloxane waveguides fabricated by dry etching

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, S. J.; Zhang, M. Y.; Choi, D.-Y.; Luther-Davies, B.; Charters, R.

    2009-05-15

    The authors demonstrate the production of low loss enhanced index contrast waveguides by reactive ion etching of IPG trade mark sign polysiloxane thin films. The use of a silica mask and CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} etch gas led to large etch selectivity between the silica and IPG trade mark sign of >20 and etch rates of >100 nm/min. This work indicates that compact optical circuits could be successfully fabricated for telecommunication applications using polysiloxane films.

  14. Development of UV-assisted ozone steam etching and investigation of its usability for SU-8 removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shinya; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    2014-03-01

    We have developed ultraviolet (UV)-assisted ozone steam etching as a novel SU-8 removal technology. This technology is expected to remove SU-8 at a higher etch rate compared to a conventional wafer cleaning process based on ozone water immersion. An etching apparatus prototyped in this study achieves an etch rate greater than 100 nm min-1 by intermittently rotating an SU-8-coated substrate on a spinner for spinning out the etching products under UV irradiation. Its complete removability is also verified by analyzing the surfaces of etched samples via scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In a micromolding process, the non-swelling removability is successfully demonstrated by removing a SU-8 sacrificial mold and leaving electroplated metal mushroom microstructures without destruction. Such a structure cannot be released by conventional resist strippers, because it is lifted up due to resist swelling. We believe this etching technology becomes a viable option to remove chemically-stable polymers such as SU-8 in microelectromechanical systems.

  15. Fabricating nanostructures through a combination of nano-oxidation and wet etching on silicon wafers with different surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Ching

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the surface conditions of silicon wafers with native oxide layers (NOL) or hydrogen passivated layers (HPL) and how they influence the processes of nano-oxidation and wet etching. We also explore the combination of nano-oxidation and wet etching processes to produce nanostructures. Experimental results reveal that the surface conditions of silicon wafers have a considerable impact on the results of nano-oxidation when combined with wet etching. The height and width of oxides on NOL samples exceeded the dimensions of oxides on HPL samples, and this difference became increasingly evident with an increase in applied bias voltage. The height of oxidized nanolines on the HPL sample increased after wet etching; however, the width of the lines increased only marginally. After wet etching, the height and width of oxides on the NOL were more than two times greater than those on the HPL. Increasing the applied bias voltage during nano-oxidation on NOL samples increased both the height and width of the oxides. After wet etching however, the increase in bias voltage appeared to have little effect on the height of oxidized nanolines, but the width of oxidized lines increased. This study also discovered that the use of higher applied bias voltages on NOL samples followed by wet etching results in nanostructures with a section profile closely resembling a curved surface. The use of this technique enabled researchers to create molds in the shape of a silicon nanolens array and an elegantly shaped nanoscale complex structures mold.

  16. Comparison of Self-Etch Primers with Conventional Acid Etching System on Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Zope, Amit; Zope-Khalekar, Yogita; Chitko, Shrikant S.; Kerudi, Veerendra V.; Patil, Harshal Ashok; Jaltare, Pratik; Dolas, Siddhesh G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The self-etching primer system consists of etchant and primer dispersed in a single unit. The etching and priming are merged as a single step leading to fewer stages in bonding procedure and reduction in the number of steps that also reduces the chance of introduction of error, resulting in saving time for the clinician. It also results in smaller extent of enamel decalcification. Aim To compare the Shear Bond Strength (SBS) of orthodontic bracket bonded with Self-Etch Primers (SEP) and conventional acid etching system and to study the surface appearance of teeth after debonding; etching with conventional acid etch and self-etch priming, using stereomicroscope. Materials and Methods Five Groups (n=20) were created randomly from a total of 100 extracted premolars. In a control Group A, etching of enamel was done with 37% phosphoric acid and bonding of stainless steel brackets with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, California). Enamel conditioning in left over four Groups was done with self-etching primers and adhesives as follows: Group B-Transbond Plus (3M Unitek), Group C Xeno V+ (Dentsply), Group D-G-Bond (GC), Group E-One-Coat (Coltene). The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was also evaluated. Additionally, the surface roughness using profilometer were observed. Results Mean SBS of Group A was 18.26±7.5MPa, Group B was 10.93±4.02MPa, Group C was 6.88±2.91MPa while of Group D was 7.78±4.13MPa and Group E was 10.39±5.22MPa respectively. In conventional group ARI scores shows that over half of the adhesive was remaining on the surface of tooth (score 1 to 3). In self-etching primer groups ARI scores show that there was no or minor amount of adhesive remaining on the surface of tooth (score 4 and 5). SEP produces a lesser surface roughness on the enamel than conventional etching. However, statistical analysis shows significant correlation (p<0.001) of bond strength with surface roughness of enamel. Conclusion All groups might show clinically

  17. A in Situ Study of Plasma Etching Surface Chemistry Using Reflection Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchesi, Robert Peter

    Plasma etching is an important process in semiconductor manufacturing. The present work describes a means by which plasma etching surface chemistry may be studied in situ. The systems of interest were the sulfur hexafluoride plasma etching of silicon and tungsten in a diode reactor. A reflection infrared spectrometer was designed and constructed to be able to scan the frequency region from about 550cm ^{-1} to 1300cm ^{-1}, and a plasma etch reactor was modified to allow access to the infrared beam. Reflection infrared spectroscopy (RIS) allows the measurement of light absorbed by molecules adsorbed on a reflective surface selectively from light absorbed by molecules in the gas phase. RIS applied to heavily doped silicon substrates had limited success. While sulfur fluorine species were detected on the surface during plasma etching, no silicon fluorine species were ever detected. The sulfur fluorine species (referred to as SF_{rm x}) were not seen under any circumstances in the absence of an SF_6 plasma. Severe baseline drift of the infrared spectrometer during plasma etching was the main reason for the limited success. However, the results were significant in that they demonstrated the presence of sulfur fluorine species during the plasma etching of silicon in an SF_6 plasma. The baseline drift problems experienced with silicon were not found when tungsten was studied. The same SF _{rm x} feature detected on silicon was also found on tungsten during etching in an SF_6 plasma, but was never seen in the absence of the plasma. A detailed experimental and theoretical study was performed to show that the surface absorption feature seen was actually due to SF _{rm x} adsorbed on the surface. A hysteresis behavior was observed in the SF_ {rm x} concentration as the plasma power was ramped up and subsequently decreased. Finally, it could not be concluded if SF_{rm x} participated in the etch reaction by fluorinating the tungsten surface, but the presence of SF_ {rm x} on

  18. CR-39 track etching and blow-up method

    DOEpatents

    Hankins, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    This invention is a method of etching tracks in CR-39 foil to obtain uniformly sized tracks. The invention comprises a step of electrochemically etching the foil at a low frequency and a "blow-up" step of electrochemically etching the foil at a high frequency.

  19. New phase formation in titanium aluminide during chemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Takasaki, Akito; Ojima, Kozo; Taneda, Youji . Dept. of Mathematics and Physics)

    1994-05-01

    A chemical etching technique is widely used for metallographic observation. Because this technique is based on a local corrosion phenomenon on a sample, the etching mechanism, particularly for two-phase alloys, can be understood by electrochemical consideration. This paper describes formation of a new phase in a Ti-45Al (at.%) titanium aluminide during chemical etching, and the experimental results are discussed electrochemically.

  20. Dopant Selective Reactive Ion Etching of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for selectively etching a substrate is provided. In one embodiment, an epilayer is grown on top of the substrate. A resistive element may be defined and etched into the epilayer. On the other side of the substrate, the substrate is selectively etched up to the resistive element, leaving a suspended resistive element.

  1. Note: Mechanical etching of atomic force microscope tip and microsphere attachment for thermal radiation scattering enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Brissinger, D.; Parent, G. Lacroix, D.

    2013-12-15

    This Note describes a mechanical etching technique which can be used to prepare silicon tips used in atomic force microscopy apparatus. For such devices, dedicated tips with specific shapes are now commonly used to probe surfaces. Yet, the control of the tip morphology where characteristic scales are lower than 1 μm remains a real challenge. Here, we detail a controlled etching process of AFM probes apex allowing micrometer-sized sphere attachment. The technique used and influent parameters are discussed and SEM images of the achieved tips are given. Deceptive problems and drawbacks that might occur during the process are also covered.

  2. Reactive Ion Etched Unstable and Stable Semiconductor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biellak, Stephen Alexander

    1995-01-01

    High power, diffraction-limited semiconductor laser diodes are desirable for numerous applications such as efficient solid state laser pumping, nonlinear frequency conversion, and free-space communication. In the past several years, wide-stripe diode lasers and laser arrays with powers of up to several watts have become commercially available, but the beam quality of these devices is generally poor due to filamentation, a nonlinear material effect that aberrates the output beam profile. An attractive alternative to these simple Fabry-Perot lasers is offered by unstable resonators, which have inherently large gain volumes and a cavity geometry that inhibits filamentation. Prototype unstable resonators with dry-etched cavity mirrors have recently been demonstrated to achieve near diffraction -limited operation at moderately high output powers. However, the lateral mode properties of unstable resonators have heretofore not been examined in detail, nor has a reliable, high-throughput mirror etch process been developed for these devices. In this work, we have developed a GaAs RIE etching technique using common process equipment that yields mirrors with RMS surface roughness of 3 to 5 nm. We have fabricated unstable resonators and have measured lateral M ^2 beam quality values as low as 1.25 at 300 mW single facet output power in high magnification devices. The impact of cavity geometry and processing techniques on device performance was studied, and the optimal parameters for high-brightness applications were determined. Nearly concentric stable-resonator diode lasers were also fabricated for the first time using this etching technique. These stable-resonators were observed to operate in lateral modes determined primarily by the physical resonator structure up to several times threshold, after which nonlinear effects dominated the cavity modes. Based on these measurements, a description of stable device behavior in terms of gain saturation was developed. Finally, a

  3. Ag-mediated charge transport during metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Nadine; Fuhrmann, Bodo; Leipner, Hartmut S; Werner, Peter

    2013-05-22

    The charge transport mechanism during metal-assisted chemical etching of Si nanowires with contiguous metal films has been investigated. The experiments give a better insight how the charges and reaction products can penetrate to the etching front. The formation of a layer of porous Si between the metal film and the bulk Si is a prerequisite for the etching process. The electronic holes (positive charges) necessary for the etching of porous Si are generated at the surface of the metal in contact with the oxidative agent. Because of the insulating character of the thin walls of the porous Si, the transport of the electronic holes through this layer is not possible. Instead, it is found that the transport of electronic holes proceeds primarily by means of the Ag/Ag(+) redox pair circulating in the electrolyte and diffusing through the etched pores in the Si. The charge transport occurs without the ionic contribution at the positions where the metal is in direct contact with the Si. Here, an electropolishing process takes place, leading to an extensive removal of the Si and sinking in of the film into the Si substrate.

  4. Aluminum oxide mask fabrication by focused ion beam implantation combined with wet etching.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengjun; Iltanen, Kari; Chekurov, Nikolai; Grigoras, Kestutis; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2013-05-03

    A novel aluminum oxide (Al2O3) hard mask fabrication process with nanoscale resolution is introduced. The Al2O3 mask can be used for various purposes, but in this work it was utilized for silicon patterning using cryogenic deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The patterning of Al2O3 is a two-step process utilizing focused ion beam (FIB) irradiation combined with wet chemical etching. Gallium (Ga(+)) FIB maskless patterning confers wet etch selectivity between the irradiated region and the non-irradiated one on the Al2O3 layer, and mask patterns can easily be revealed by wet etching. This method is a modification of Ga(+) FIB mask patterning for the silicon etch stop, which eliminates the detrimental lattice damage and doping of the silicon substrate in critical devices. The shallow surface gallium FIB irradiated Al2O3 mask protects the underlying silicon from Ga(+) ions. The performance of the masking capacity was tested by drawing pairs consisting of a line and an empty space with varying width. The best result was seven such pairs for 1 μm. The smallest half pitch was 59 nm. This method is capable of arbitrary pattern generation. The fabrication of a freestanding single-ended tuning fork resonator utilizing the introduced masking method is demonstrated.

  5. Effect of Alkaline pH on Polishing and Etching of Single and Polycrystalline Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, R. Prasanna; Prasad, Y. Nagendra; Kwon, Tae-Young; Kang, Young-Jae; Park, Jin-Goo

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the polishing and etching behavior of single and polycrystalline silicon were studied. Prior to chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process, the surfaces were treated with dilute hydrofluoric acid (DHF) to remove native oxides. The surface analysis shows that the poly contains trace amount of oxygen even after DHF treatment. The static and dynamic etch rates, and removal rates were measured as a function of slurry pH. The single silicon showed a higher static etch rate than the poly. After static etch rate measurements, poly showed higher surface roughness and more hydrophilic which indicates that the surface of poly is different from single crystal silicon. The friction force between pad and substrate and pad temperature was also measured as a function of pH during polishing in order to get more understanding of polishing process. At all the pH values being investigated, poly showed lower dynamic and removal rates, higher friction force and higher temperature. This indicates that the removal of poly in CMP is predominantly by mechanical actions. Also, these results, suggest a mechanism in which the oxygen present in the poly grain boundaries strongly influences the etching and removal mechanism.

  6. Chemically Etched Open Tubular and Monolithic Emitters for Nanoelectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Luo, Quanzhou; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-15

    We have developed a new procedure for fabricating fused silica emitters for electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in which the end of a bare fused silica capillary is immersed into aqueous hydrofluoric acid, and water is pumped through the capillary to prevent etching of the interior. Surface tension causes the etchant to climb the capillary exterior, and the etch rate in the resulting meniscus decreases as a function of distance from the bulk solution. Etching continues until the silica touching the hydrofluoric acid reservoir is completely removed, essentially stopping the etch process. The resulting emitters have no internal taper, making them much less prone to clogging compared to e.g. pulled emitters. The high aspect ratios and extremely thin walls at the orifice facilitate very low flow rate operation; stable ESI-MS signals were obtained for model analytes from 5-μm-diameter emitters at a flow rate of 5 nL/min with a high degree of inter-emitter reproducibility. In extensive evaluation, the etched emitters were found to enable approximately four times as many LC-MS analyses of proteomic samples before failing compared with conventional pulled emitters. The fabrication procedure was also employed to taper the ends of polymer monolith-containing silica capillaries for use as ESI emitters. In contrast to previous work, the monolithic material protrudes beyond the fused silica capillaries, improving the monolith-assisted electrospray process.

  7. Effects of electrons on the shape of nanopores prepared by focused electron beam induced etching.

    PubMed

    Liebes, Yael; Hadad, Binyamin; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2011-07-15

    The fabrication of nanometric pores with controlled size is important for applications such as single molecule detection. We have recently suggested the use of focused electron beam induced etching (FEBIE) for the preparation of such nanopores in silicon nitride membranes. The use of a scanning probe microscope as the electron beam source makes this technique comparably accessible, opening the way to widespread fabrication of nanopores. Since the shape of the nanopores is critically important for their performance, in this work we focus on its analysis and study the dependence of the nanopore shape on the electron beam acceleration voltage. We show that the nanopore adopts a funnel-like shape, with a central pore penetrating the entire membrane, surrounded by an extended shallow-etched region at the top of the membrane. While the internal nanopore size was found to depend on the electron acceleration voltage, the nanopore edges extended beyond the primary electron beam spot size due to long-range effects, such as radiolysis and diffusion. Moreover, the size of the peripheral-etched region was found to be less dependent on the acceleration voltage. We also found that chemical etching is the rate-limiting step of the process and is only slightly dependent on the acceleration voltage. Furthermore, due to the chemical etch process the chemical composition of the nanopore rims was found to maintain the bulk membrane composition.

  8. Effects of electrons on the shape of nanopores prepared by focused electron beam induced etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebes, Yael; Hadad, Binyamin; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2011-07-01

    The fabrication of nanometric pores with controlled size is important for applications such as single molecule detection. We have recently suggested the use of focused electron beam induced etching (FEBIE) for the preparation of such nanopores in silicon nitride membranes. The use of a scanning probe microscope as the electron beam source makes this technique comparably accessible, opening the way to widespread fabrication of nanopores. Since the shape of the nanopores is critically important for their performance, in this work we focus on its analysis and study the dependence of the nanopore shape on the electron beam acceleration voltage. We show that the nanopore adopts a funnel-like shape, with a central pore penetrating the entire membrane, surrounded by an extended shallow-etched region at the top of the membrane. While the internal nanopore size was found to depend on the electron acceleration voltage, the nanopore edges extended beyond the primary electron beam spot size due to long-range effects, such as radiolysis and diffusion. Moreover, the size of the peripheral-etched region was found to be less dependent on the acceleration voltage. We also found that chemical etching is the rate-limiting step of the process and is only slightly dependent on the acceleration voltage. Furthermore, due to the chemical etch process the chemical composition of the nanopore rims was found to maintain the bulk membrane composition.

  9. Gold-thickness-dependent Schottky barrier height for charge transfer in metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zewen; Cui, Guanglei; Shi, Yi; Liu, Yousong; Ji, Guangbin

    2013-04-26

    Large-area, vertically aligned silicon nanowires with a uniform diameter along the height direction were fabricated by combining in situ-formed anodic aluminum oxide template and metal-assisted chemical etching. The etching rate of the Si catalyzed using a thick Au mesh is much faster than that catalyzed using a thin one, which is suggested to be induced by the charge transport process. The thick Au mesh in contact with the Si produces a low Au/Si Schottky barrier height, facilitating the injection of electronic holes from the Au to the Si, thus resulting in a high etching rate.

  10. Photoelectrochemical etching of silicon carbide (SiC) and its characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D. M.; Harris, G. L.; Wongchotigul, K.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is an attractive semiconductor material for high speed, high density, and high temperature device applications due to its wide bandgap (2.2-3.2 eV), high thermal conductivity, and high breakdown electric field (4 x 10(exp 6) V/cm). An instrumental process in the fabrication of semiconductor devices is the ability to etch in a highly controlled and selective manner for direct patterning techniques. A novel technique in etching using electrochemistry is described. This procedure involves the ultraviolet (UV) lamp-assisted photoelectrochemical etching of n-type 3C- and 6H-SiC to enhance the processing capability of device structures in SiC. While under UV illumination, the samples are anodically biased in an HF based aqueous solution since SiC has photoconductive properties. In order for this method to be effective, the UV light must be able to enhance the production of holes in the SiC during the etching process thus providing larger currents with light from the photocurrents generated than those currents with no light. Otherwise dark methods would be used as in the case of p-type 3C-SiC. Experiments have shown that the I/V characteristics of the SiC-electrolyte interface reveal a minimum etch voltage of 3 V and 4 V for n- and p-type 3C-SiC, respectively. Hence it is possible for etch-stops to occur. Etch rates calculated have been as high as 0.67 micrometer/min for p-type, 1.4 micrometer/min for n-type, and 1.1 micrometer/min for pn layer. On n-type 3C- SiC, an oxide formation is present where after etching a yellowish layer corresponds to a low Si/C ratio and a white layer corresponds to a high Si/C ratio. P-type 3C-SiC shows a grayish layer. Additionally, n-type 6H-SiC shows a brown layer with a minimum etch voltage of 3 V.

  11. RIE-based Pattern Transfer Using Nanoparticle Arrays as Etch Masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, Chip; Majetich, Sara A.; Bain, James A.

    2009-03-01

    Nanomasking is used to transfer the pattern of a self-assembled array of nanoparticles into an underlying thin film, for potential use as bit-patterned media. We have used this process to investigate the limits of pattern transfer, as a function of gap size in the pattern. Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) is our chosen process, since the gaseous reaction products and high chemical selectivity are ideal features for etching very small gaps. Interstitial surfactant is removed with an O2 plasma, allowing the etchants to penetrate between the particles. Their pattern is transferred into an intermediate SiO2 mask using a CH4-based RIE. This patterned SiO2 layer is finally used as a mask for the MeOH-based RIE which patterns the magnetic film. We present cross-sectional TEM characterization of the etch profiles, as well as magnetic characterization of the film before and after patterning.

  12. High T(sub c) Superconducting Bolometer on Chemically Etched 7 Micrometer Thick Sapphire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, B.; Brasunas, J. C.; Pique, A.; Fettig, R.; Mott, B.; Babu, S.; Cushman, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    A transition-edge IR detector, using a YBa2Cu3O(7-x) (YBCO) thin film deposited on a chemically etched, 7 micrometer thick sapphire substrate has been built. To our knowledge it is the first such high T(sub c) superconducting (HTS) bolometer on chemically thinned sapphire. The peak optical detectivity obtained is l.2 x 10(exp 10) cmHz(sup 1/2)/W near 4Hz. Result shows that it is possible to obtain high detectivity with thin films on etched sapphire with no processing after the deposition of the YBCO film. We discuss the etching process and its potential for micro-machining sapphire and fabricating 2-dimensional detector arrays with suspended sapphire membranes. A 30 micrometer thick layer of gold black provided IR absorption. Comparison is made with the current state of the art on silicon substrates.

  13. Fabrication of sub-15 nm aluminum wires by controlled etching

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan-Wall, T.; Hughes, H. J.; Hartman, N.; Marković, N.; McQueen, T. M.

    2014-04-28

    We describe a method for the fabrication of uniform aluminum nanowires with diameters below 15 nm. Electron beam lithography is used to define narrow wires, which are then etched using a sodium bicarbonate solution, while their resistance is simultaneously measured in-situ. The etching process can be stopped when the desired resistance is reached, and can be restarted at a later time. The resulting nanowires show a superconducting transition as a function of temperature and magnetic field that is consistent with their smaller diameter. The width of the transition is similar to that of the lithographically defined wires, indicating that the etching process is uniform and that the wires are undamaged. This technique allows for precise control over the normal state resistance and can be used to create a variety of aluminum nanodevices.

  14. Wet-etching of precipitation-based thin film microstructures for micro-solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, Jennifer L. M.; Muecke, Ulrich P.; Nalam, Prathima C.; Gauckler, Ludwig J.

    In micro-solid oxide fuel cells (μ-SOFCs) ceramic thin films are integrated as free-standing membranes on micromachinable substrates such as silicon or Foturan ® glass ceramic wafers. The processing of μ-SOFCs involves unavoidable dry- or wet-chemical etching for opening the substrate below the free-standing fuel cell membranes. In the first part of this paper current dry- and wet-chemical etchants for structuring of ceria-based electrolyte materials are reviewed, and compared to the etch-rates of common μ-SOFCs substrates. Wet-chemical etchants such as hydrofluoric acid are of high interest in μ-SOFC processing since they allow for homogeneous etching of ceria-based electrolyte thin films contrary to common dry-etching methods. In addition, HF acid is the only choice for substrate etching of μ-SOFC based on Foturan ® glass ceramic wafers. Etching of Ce 0.8Gd 0.2O 1.9- x spray pyrolysis electrolyte thin films with 10% HF:H 2O is investigated. The etch-resistance and microstructures of these films show a strong dependency on post deposition annealing, i.e. degree of crystallinity, and damage for low acid exposure times. Their ability to act as a potential etch-resistance for μ-SOFC membranes is broadly discussed. Guidance for thermal annealing and etching of Ce 0.8Gd 0.2O 1.9- x thin films for the fabrication of Foturan ®-based μ-SOFCs is given.

  15. Is total-etch dead? Evidence suggests otherwise.

    PubMed

    Alex, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Both the total-etch and self-etching systems of today have the potential to provide durable adhesive interface, and despite the proclamations of some, total-etch is alive and well. Indeed, evidence indicates that a viable and growing market remains for total-etch adhesive systems. This paper will discuss the origins, evolution, and idiosyncrasies of the total-etch technique as well as its place in dentistry today. New innovations, the use of antimicrobials to inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and sensitivity issues will also be discussed.

  16. Biomachining: metal etching via microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Tena, Estíbaliz; Barona, Astrid; Gallastegui, Gorka; Rodríguez, Adrián; López de Lacalle, L Norberto; Elías, Ana

    2017-05-01

    The use of microorganisms to remove metal from a workpiece is known as biological machining or biomachining, and it has gained in both importance and scientific relevance over the past decade. Conversely to mechanical methods, the use of readily available microorganisms is low-energy consuming, and no thermal damage is caused during biomachining. The performance of this sustainable process is assessed by the material removal rate, and certain parameters have to be controlled for manufacturing the machined part with the desired surface finish. Although the variety of microorganisms is scarce, cell concentration or density plays an important role in the process. There is a need to control the temperature to maintain microorganism activity at its optimum, and a suitable shaking rate provides an efficient contact between the workpiece and the biological medium. The system's tolerance to the sharp changes in pH is quite limited, and in many cases, an acid medium has to be maintained for effective performance. This process is highly dependent on the type of metal being removed. Consequently, the operating parameters need to be determined on a case-by-case basis. The biomachining time is another variable with a direct impact on the removal rate. This biological technique can be used for machining simple and complex shapes, such as series of linear, circular, and square micropatterns on different metal surfaces. The optimal biomachining process should be fast enough to ensure high production, a smooth and homogenous surface finish and, in sum, a high-quality piece. As a result of the high global demand for micro-components, biomachining provides an effective and sustainable alternative. However, its industrial-scale implementation is still pending.

  17. Diagnostic for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Etch Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's requirements for the rapid development and validation of future generation electronic devices as well as associated materials and processes, enabling technologies ion the processing of semiconductor materials arising from understanding etch chemistries are being developed through a research collaboration between Stanford University and NASA-Ames Research Center, Although a great deal of laboratory-scale research has been performed on many of materials processing plasmas, little is known about the gas-phase and surface chemical reactions that are critical in many etch and deposition processes, and how these reactions are influenced by the variation in operating conditions. In addition, many plasma-based processes suffer from stability and reliability problems leading to a compromise in performance and a potentially increased cost for the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Such a lack of understanding has hindered the development of process models that can aid in the scaling and improvement of plasma etch and deposition systems. The research described involves the study of plasmas used in semiconductor processes. An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source in place of the standard upper electrode assembly of the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) radio-frequency (RF) Reference Cell is used to investigate the discharge characteristics and chemistries. This ICP source generates plasmas with higher electron densities (approximately 10(exp 12)/cu cm) and lower operating pressures (approximately 7 mTorr) than obtainable with the original parallel-plate version of the GEC Cell. This expanded operating regime is more relevant to new generations of industrial plasma systems being used by the microelectronics industry. The motivation for this study is to develop an understanding of the physical phenomena involved in plasma processing and to measure much needed fundamental parameters, such as gas-phase and surface reaction rates. species

  18. Removal and deposition efficiencies of the long-lived 222Rn daughters during etching of germanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuzel, G.; Wójcik, M.; Majorovits, B.; Lampert, M. O.; Wendling, P.

    2012-06-01

    Removal and deposition efficiencies of the long-lived 222Rn daughters during etching from and onto surfaces of standard and high purity germanium were investigated. The standard etching procedure of Canberra-France used during production of high purity n-type germanium diodes was applied to germanium discs, which have been exposed earlier to a strong radon source for deposition of its progenies. An uncontaminated sample was etched in a solution containing 210Pb, 210Bi and 210Po. All isotopes were measured before and after etching with appropriate detectors. In contrast to copper and stainless steel, they were removed from germanium very efficiently. However, the reverse process was also observed. Considerable amounts of radioactive lead, bismuth and polonium isotopes present initially in the artificially polluted etchant were transferred to the clean high purity surface during processing of the sample.

  19. Precise in situ etch depth control of multilayered III−V semiconductor samples with reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) equipment

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschmidt, Ann-Kathrin; Barzen, Lars; Strassner, Johannes; Doering, Christoph; Bock, Wolfgang; Wahl, Michael; Kopnarski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) equipment is applied to monitor dry-etch processes (here specifically reactive ion etching (RIE)) of monocrystalline multilayered III–V semiconductors in situ. The related accuracy of etch depth control is better than 16 nm. Comparison with results of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) reveals a deviation of only about 4 nm in optimal cases. To illustrate the applicability of the reported method in every day settings for the first time the highly etch depth sensitive lithographic process to form a film lens on the waveguide ridge of a broad area laser (BAL) is presented. This example elucidates the benefits of the method in semiconductor device fabrication and also suggests how to fulfill design requirements for the sample in order to make RAS control possible. PMID:28144528

  20. Feedback control of polysilicon etching: Controller design issues

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, S.; Kushner, M.J.

    1998-12-31

    Feedback control can considerably improve the performance of rf plasma processing reactors. It has been recently demonstrated that plasma simulations can be useful in developing feedback control strategies and controllers. In this paper, the authors extend that work to address issues related to the improvement of controller design, experimental validation, and advanced control strategies for polysilicon etching in inductively coupled plasmas (ICP). The computational tool used in this study, the Virtual Plasma Equipment Model (VPEM), is based on a detailed 2-dimensional hybrid plasma equipment simulation. To validate the control aspects of the VPEM, they simulated a magnetic bucket ICP reactor currently being used for real time feedback control experiments at the University of Wisconsin. Results for the use of capacitively coupled power to control etch rate in real time will be discussed for both PID and PID-feed forward controllers. It has been demonstrated that controllers designed using response surface based techniques can control actuator drifts, compensate for external disturbances and nullify the effect of long term drifts in reactor characteristics. For these controllers to be generally useful, they must be able to handle variances such as sensor noise and process drift. They will discuss and demonstrate design improvements which make the controllers more robust, insensitive to noise and adaptive.

  1. Dry-etch resistance of fluorine functionalized polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Meiten; Ishikawa, Takuji; Araki, Takayuki; Aoyama, Hirokazu; Yamashita, Tsuneo; Yamazaki, Tamio; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Toriumi, Minoru; Itani, Toshiro

    2002-07-01

    The reactive ion etch (RIE) properties of fluorine funtionalized polymers in which fluorine atoms were incorporated in the main chain were examined. There was a tendency that the etching rates of these polymers were higher as lower the fluorine contents. The existing four models such as the Ohnishi model, the Kunz model, the Ohfuji model and the Kishimura model were applied to explain the correlation between the etching rates and the polymer compositions or structures, but the errors were too large to explain the relationship. A new model has developed to explain the effect of the fluorine incorporation to the dry etch resistance. The model assumed that there would be a correlation between the number of main chain fluorine atoms and the dry etch resistance, and the main chain fluorine incorporation would increase the dry etch resistance. The model could explain the dry etch resistance of the main chain fluorine incorporated polymers with adequate accuracy.

  2. Study of LiOH etching of polyethyleneterephtalate irradiated with 11.4 MeV/amu Pb ions by neutron depth profiling and alpha particle transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacík, J.; Červená, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Fink, D.; Strauss, P.

    1998-12-01

    Polyethyleneterephtalate (PETP) foils, 23 μm thick, irradiated with 11.4 MeV/amu Pb ions to the fluence of about 1 × 107 cm-2 were etched in 5M LiOH solution at the temperature of 40°C for 30-570 min and the etching process kinetics was examined by combined alpha particle transmission (APT) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) techniques. The etching process was visualized from very initial stages up to the breakthrough and the appearance of first openings after about 300 min of etching. Several parameters characterizing the etching process were determined and the pore internal profile was determined by comparing the measured APT spectra with those simulated by Monte-Carlo method.

  3. Low temperature dry etching of chromium towards control at sub-5 nm dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staaks, Daniel; Yang, XiaoMin; Lee, Kim Y.; Dhuey, Scott D.; Sassolini, Simone; Rangelow, Ivo W.; Olynick, Deirdre L.

    2016-10-01

    Patterned chromium and its compounds are crucial materials for nanoscale patterning and chromium based devices. Here we investigate how temperature can be used to control chromium etching using chlorine/oxygen gas mixtures. Oxygen/chlorine ratios between 0% and 100% and temperatures between -100 °C and +40 °C are studied. Spectroscopic ellipsometry is used to precisely measure rates, chlorination, and the thickness dependence of n and k. Working in the extremes of oxygen content (very high or very low) and lower temperatures, we find rates can be controlled to nanometers per minute. Activation energies are measured and show that etch mechanisms are both temperature and oxygen level dependent. Furthermore, we find that etching temperature can manipulate the surface chemistry. One surprising consequence is that at low oxygen levels, Etching rates increase with decreasing temperature. Preliminary feature-profile studies show the extremes of temperature and oxygen provide advantages over commonly used room temperature processing conditions. One example is with higher ion energies at -100 °C, where etching products deposit.

  4. Enzymatic degradation of adhesive-dentin interfaces produced by mild self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    De Munck, Jan; Mine, Atsushi; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Poitevin, André; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2010-10-01

    Endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) released by adhesive procedures may degrade collagen in the hybrid layer and so compromise the bonding effectiveness of etch-and-rinse adhesives. In this study, endogenous enzymatic degradation was evaluated for several simplified self-etch adhesives. In addition, primers were modified by adding two MMP inhibitors: chlorhexidine, a commonly used disinfectant, but also a non-specific MMP inhibitor; and SB-3CT, a specific inhibitor of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Gelatin zymography of fresh human dentin powder was used to identify the enzymes released by the adhesives. Micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) testing was used to assess the mechanical properties of resin-dentin interfaces over time. In none of the experimental groups treated with the mild self-etch adhesives was MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 identified. Also, no difference in the μTBS was measured for the inhibitor-modified and the control inhibitor-free adhesives after 6 months of water storage. It is concluded that in contrast to etch-and-rinse adhesives, the involvement of endogenous MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the bond-degradation process is minimal for mild self-etch adhesives.

  5. Etching of polymers, proteins and bacterial spores by atmospheric pressure DBD plasma in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzminova, A.; Kretková, T.; Kylián, O.; Hanuš, J.; Khalakhan, I.; Prukner, V.; Doležalová, E.; Šimek, M.; Biederman, H.

    2017-04-01

    Many studies proved that non-equilibrium discharges generated at atmospheric pressure are highly effective for the bio-decontamination of surfaces of various materials. One of the key processes that leads to a desired result is plasma etching and thus the evaluation of etching rates of organic materials is of high importance. However, the comparison of reported results is rather difficult if impossible as different authors use diverse sources of atmospheric plasma that are operated at significantly different operational parameters. Therefore, we report here on the systematic study of the etching of nine different common polymers that mimic the different structures of more complicated biological systems, bovine serum albumin (BSA) selected as the model protein and spores of Bacillus subtilis taken as a representative of highly resistant micro-organisms. The treatment of these materials was performed by means of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) sustained in open air at constant conditions. All tested polymers, BSA and spores, were readily etched by DBD plasma. However, the measured etching rates were found to be dependent on the chemical structure of treated materials, namely on the presence of oxygen in the structure of polymers.

  6. Wavelength Dependence of UV Effect on Etch Rate and Noise in CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Micah; Traynor, Nathan; McLean, James; Padalino, Stephen; Sangster, Craig; McCluskey, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    The use of CR-39 plastic as a SSNTD is an effective technique for recovering data in high-energy particle experiments including inertial confinement fusion. To reveal particle tracks after irradiation, CR-39 is chemically etched at elevated temperatures with NaOH, producing signal pits at the nuclear track sites that are measurable by an optical microscope. CR-39 pieces also exhibit etch-induced noise, either surface roughness or pit-like features not caused by nuclear particles, which negatively affects the ability of observers to distinguish actual pits. When CR-39 is exposed to high intensity UV light after nuclear irradiation and before etching, an increase in etch rates and pit diameters is observed. UV exposure can also increase noise, which in the extreme can distort the shapes of particle pits. Analyzing the effects of different wavelengths in the UV spectrum we have determined that light of the wavelength 255 nm increases etch rates and pit diameters while causing less background noise than longer UV wavelengths. Preliminary research indicates that heating CR-39 to elevated temperatures (~80 °C) during UV exposure also improves the signal-to-noise ratio for this process. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  7. Enhancement of Particle Track Etch Rate in CR-39 by UV Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Micah; Ume, Rubab; McLean, James; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean

    2015-11-01

    The use of CR-39 plastic as a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector is effective for obtaining data in high-energy particle experiments including inertial confinement fusion. To reveal particle tracks after irradiation, CR-39 is chemically etched at elevated temperatures with NaOH, producing signal pits at the nuclear track sites that are measurable by an optical microscope. CR-39 pieces sometimes also exhibit etch-induced noise, either surface features not caused by nuclear particles. When CR-39 is exposed to high intensity UV light after nuclear irradiation with 5.4 MeV alpha particles and before etching, an increase in etch rates and pit diameters is observed, though UV exposure can also increase noise. We have determined that light from a low pressure mercury vapor lamp (predominantly wavelength 253.7 nm) increases etch rates and pit diameters while causing minimal background noise. Heating CR-39 to elevated temperatures (~80 °C) during UV exposure also improves the signal-to-noise ratio for this process. Surprisingly, initial data from CR-39 irradiated with 3.4 MeV protons and exposed to UV show reduced pit diameters. This material is based in part upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Effects of Gas and Surface Temperatures during Cryogenic Etching of silicon with SF6/O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinck, Stefan; Neyts, Erik; Tillocher, Thomas; Dussart, Remi; Bogaerts, Annemie; Plasmant Team; Gremi Team

    2016-09-01

    Cryogenic deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of silicon and SiO2 used for creating vias is investigated. The wafer is cooled to about -100 °C and a SF6/O2 mixture is applied. During cryogenic DRIE, a SiFxOy passivation layer is formed which prevents isotropic etching and the diffusion of F atoms into the Si or SiO2 material. When the wafer is brought back to room temperature, this passivation layer desorbs naturally, leaving a clean trench with no scalloping. The primary issue with cryogenic DRIE is the high sensitivity to oxygen content and substrate or gas temperature. Both effects are investigated here. We believe that understanding the temperature dependent surface behavior of the O and F atoms to etch silicon is a primary step in obtaining full insight in the mechanisms of the SiFxOy passivation layer formation and automatic desorption. For this purpose, we apply a self-consistent model that covers both the bulk plasma characteristics as well as the surface processes during etching. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are also performed to obtain insight in the surface reaction mechanisms. For validation of the modeling results, the etch rates are also experimentally obtained with reflectometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) pictures.

  9. Evaluation of Cu Ion Concentration Effects on Cu Etching Rate in Chemical-Mechanical Polishing Slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Hideaki; Sugiura, Osamu; Matsumura, Yoshiyuki; Kinoshita, Masaharu

    2007-04-01

    The effects of Cu ion concentration of the different solutions on Cu etching rate were investigated. From the dipping experiment of Cu substrates in different solutions of malic acid, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), benzotriazole (BTA), and Cu ions, it was revealed that Cu etching rate is increased if the concentration of Cu(II) ions added in the solution is high. This is considered to be caused by the effect of Cu(II) ions on H2O2 molecules. In the solution of pH 7, the Cu etching rate increased markedly between 1.7× 10-4 and 3.4× 10-4 M Cu(II) ion concentrations. The maximum increase in the etching rate was from 990 to 2200 nm/min at a H2O2 concentration of 2 wt %. In the solution of pH 3, a marked change in the etching rate was not observed. Our results show that the concentration of Cu ions on the polishing pad in chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process is very important.

  10. Formation of Mach angle profiles during wet etching of silica and silicon nitride materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulinyan, M.; Bernard, M.; Bartali, R.; Pucker, G.

    2015-12-01

    In integrated circuit technology peeling of masking photoresist films is a major drawback during the long-timed wet etching of materials. It causes an undesired film underetching, which is often accompanied by a formation of complex etch profiles. Here we report on a detailed study of wedge-shaped profile formation in a series of silicon oxide, silicon oxynitride and silicon nitride materials during wet etching in a buffered hydrofluoric acid (BHF) solution. The shape of etched profiles reflects the time-dependent adhesion properties of the photoresist to a particular material and can be perfectly circular, purely linear or a combination of both, separated by a knee feature. Starting from a formal analogy between the sonic boom propagation and the wet underetching process, we model the wedge formation mechanism analytically. This model predicts the final form of the profile as a function of time and fits the experimental data perfectly. We discuss how this knowledge can be extended to the design and the realization of optical components such as highly efficient etch-less vertical tapers for passive silicon photonics.

  11. Systematic study on pulse parameters in fabricating porous silicon-layered structures by pulse electrochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Yin, W. J.; Ma, L. L.; Obbard, E.; Ding, X. M.; Hou, X. Y.

    2007-08-01

    Pulse electrochemical etching was used to improve the quality of porous silicon (PS) layers. Although alternative PS layers of different porosities have been realized by this etching technique, there is no systematic study on the influence of different etching pulse parameters on PS during the etching process. We test various combinations of pulse parameters, including duty cycle and duration, in fabricating PS-layered structures. The optical thickness and actual thickness of the PS structures fabricated are investigated by means of reflectance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that reducing the duty cycle and pulse duration of the pulse can promote the formation of PS layers with a large optical thickness and high refractive index. Meanwhile, the uniformity of PS is also improved. The duty cycle of 1:10-1:20 and pulse duration of 0.1-0.2 ms can result in the best uniformity and smoothness for the highly doped p-Si wafers. We believe that our work could set the foundation for further improvement of pulse electrochemical etching.

  12. Polygonal pits on silicon surfaces that are created by laser-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mitsunori; Kimura, Saori

    2017-02-01

    Laser-assisted chemical etching was conducted for creating periodic textures on silicon surfaces. Silicon plates with the (111) surface orientation were immersed in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide, and a pulsed laser beam (532 nm wavelength, 5 ns duration, 10 pulse/s) was irradiated on their surface to promote anisotropic etching. The laser beam was patterned by using a glass capillary plate that contained a hexagonal array of micropores (10 μ m diameter, 12 m period). The focused beam projected the hexagonal image on the silicon surface, creating bright spots of 4 μ m period. During the laser irradiation process of 3 min, both laser-induced ablation and chemical etching took place at these bright spots. After stop of laser irradiation, the chemical etching progressed further, and consequently, a periodic array of triangular or hexagonal pits emerged on the silicon surface. The direction of the triangular pits changed by rotation of the silicon plate. When a silicon plate with the (100) surface orientation was used, diamond or rectangular pits were created on its surface. The mechanism of this polygonal texturing was explained by using the normal and intersecting vectors of the (100), (110), and (111) planes that exhibited different etching rates.

  13. Anisotropic etching of amorphous perfluoropolymer films in oxygen-based inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takao; Akagi, Takanori; Ichiki, Takanori

    2009-01-01

    An amorphous perfluoropolymer, "Cytop™" (Asahi Glass Co., Ltd.), is a preferable material for the fabrication of micro total analysis system devices because of its superior optical transparency over a wide wavelength range and low refractive index of 1.34, which is almost the same as that of water, as well as excellent chemical stability. To establish the precise microfabrication technology for this unique resin, the dry etching of the amorphous perfluoropolymer in Ar/O2 low-pressure inductively coupled plasma has been studied. A relatively high etch rate of approximately 6.3 μm/min at maximum and highly anisotropic etched features was attained. Plasma measurements by a single Langmuir probe technique and actinometry revealed that etching is dominated by ion-assisted surface desorption above a 10% O2 mixing ratio, whereas the supply of active oxygen species is the rate-limiting process below 10%. Moreover, angled x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of an etched trench pattern revealed that a high anisotropy is attributed to the formation of a carbon-rich sidewall protection layer.

  14. Thermal desorption mass spectrometric and x-ray photoelectron studies of etched surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rye, R. R.; Kelber, J. A.

    1987-12-01

    The etching of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with Na solutions is known to lead to a loss of F, a loss which is correlated with enhanced adhesion. Subsequent heating partially restores surface F with a concurrent loss of adhesion strength. We have combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and gas phase mass spectroscopy for in situ measurements of the processes that occur as the fluorocarbon is heated. An array of volatile products, which vary with the specific treatment, desorb from etched PTFE. Among these are: N 2 and low molecular weight fluorocarbons, the amounts of which monotonically decrease with increasing exposure to the etching solution (and probably result from the bulk); species such as CO and CO 2, which in part result from surface impurities; and water and acetone which result from the rinse steps following the etching process. XPS measurements show that etching produces a major loss of surface F and a gain of surface O. The latter probably results from the subsequent rinse steps. Heating produces a substantial recovery in surface F with only a small decrease in the surface O, and the gain in surface F is shown to occur at a higher temperature than the desorption of any species from the surface. Thus, desorption of products from the surface is decoupled, in terms of both the distribution of products and their relative temperatures, from the surface changes as monitored by XPS. This decoupling suggests that the increase in surface F results from diffusion of low molecular weight fluorocarbons from the bulk or a transition region, or from a rearrangement of the sponge-like surface region produced in the etching process.

  15. Edge-Controlled Growth and Etching of Two-Dimensional GaSe Monolayers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xufan; Dong, Jichen; Idrobo, Juan C.; ...

    2016-12-07

    Understanding the atomistic mechanisms governing the growth of two-dimensional (2D) materials is of great importance in guiding the synthesis of wafer-sized, single-crystalline, high-quality 2D crystals and heterostructures. Etching, in many cases regarded as the reverse process of material growth, has been used to study the growth kinetics of graphene. In this paper, we explore a growth–etching–regrowth process of monolayer GaSe crystals, including single-crystalline triangles and irregularly shaped domains formed by merged triangles. We show that the etching begins at a slow rate, creating triangular, truncated triangular, or hexagonally shaped holes that eventually evolve to exclusively triangles that are rotated 60°more » with respect to the crystalline orientation of the monolayer triangular crystals. The regrowth occurs much faster than etching, reversibly filling the etched holes and then enlarging the size of the monolayer crystals. A theoretical model developed based on kinetic Wulff construction (KWC) theory and density functional theory (DFT) calculations accurately describe the observed morphology evolution of the monolayer GaSe crystals and etched holes during the growth and etching processes, showing that they are governed by the probability of atom attachment/detachment to/from different types of edges with different formation energies of nucleus/dents mediated by chemical potential difference Δμ between Ga and Se. Finally, our growth–etching–regrowth study provides not only guidance to understand the growth mechanisms of 2D binary crystals but also a potential method for the synthesis of large, shape-controllable, high-quality single-crystalline 2D crystals and their lateral heterostructures.« less

  16. Edge-Controlled Growth and Etching of Two-Dimensional GaSe Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xufan; Dong, Jichen; Idrobo, Juan C.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; Ding, Feng; Xiao, Kai

    2016-12-07

    Understanding the atomistic mechanisms governing the growth of two-dimensional (2D) materials is of great importance in guiding the synthesis of wafer-sized, single-crystalline, high-quality 2D crystals and heterostructures. Etching, in many cases regarded as the reverse process of material growth, has been used to study the growth kinetics of graphene. In this paper, we explore a growth–etching–regrowth process of monolayer GaSe crystals, including single-crystalline triangles and irregularly shaped domains formed by merged triangles. We show that the etching begins at a slow rate, creating triangular, truncated triangular, or hexagonally shaped holes that eventually evolve to exclusively triangles that are rotated 60° with respect to the crystalline orientation of the monolayer triangular crystals. The regrowth occurs much faster than etching, reversibly filling the etched holes and then enlarging the size of the monolayer crystals. A theoretical model developed based on kinetic Wulff construction (KWC) theory and density functional theory (DFT) calculations accurately describe the observed morphology evolution of the monolayer GaSe crystals and etched holes during the growth and etching processes, showing that they are governed by the probability of atom attachment/detachment to/from different types of edges with different formation energies of nucleus/dents mediated by chemical potential difference Δμ between Ga and Se. Finally, our growth–etching–regrowth study provides not only guidance to understand the growth mechanisms of 2D binary crystals but also a potential method for the synthesis of large, shape-controllable, high-quality single-crystalline 2D crystals and their lateral heterostructures.

  17. Profile Evolution Simulation in Etching Systems Using Level Set Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    1998-01-01

    Semiconductor device profiles are determined by the characteristics of both etching and deposition processes. In particular, a highly anisotropic etch is required to achieve vertical sidewalls. However, etching is comprised of both anisotropic and isotropic components, due to ion and neutral fluxes, respectively. In Ar/Cl2 plasmas, for example, neutral chlorine reacts with the Si surfaces to form silicon chlorides. These compounds are then removed by the impinging ion fluxes. Hence the directionality of the ions (and thus the ion angular distribution function, or IAD), as well as the relative fluxes of neutrals and ions determines the amount of undercutting. One method of modeling device profile evolution is to simulate the moving solid-gas interface between the semiconductor and the plasma as a string of nodes. The velocity of each node is calculated and then the nodes are advanced accordingly. Although this technique appears to be relatively straightforward, extensive looping schemes are required at the profile corners. An alternate method is to use level set theory, which involves embedding the location of the interface in a field variable. The normal speed is calculated at each mesh point, and the field variable is updated. The profile comers are more accurately modeled as the need for looping algorithms is eliminated. The model we have developed is a 2-D Level Set Profile Evolution Simulation (LSPES). The LSPES calculates etch rates of a substrate in low pressure plasmas due to the incident ion and neutral fluxes. For a Si substrate in an Ar/C12 gas mixture, for example, the predictions of the LSPES are identical to those from a string evolution model for high neutral fluxes and two different ion angular distributions.(2) In the figure shown, the relative neutral to ion flux in the bulk plasma is 100 to 1. For a moderately isotropic ion angular distribution function as shown in the cases in the left hand column, both the LSPES (top row) and rude's string

  18. Digital Electrochemical Etching of Compound Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-26

    Cd is stripped by oxidation to Cd2+. Underpotentials are chosen so that only the top atomic layer of an element is removed. Potentials sufficient to...the compound. The two potentials of the square wave correspond to underpotential stripping potentials for Cd and Te respectively. Directions for the...for the etching of CdTe. For CdTe, Te is stripped by reduction to Tel while Cd is stripped by oxidation to Cd2 . Underpotentials are chosen o that only

  19. Etching of moldavities under natural conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knobloch, V.; Knoblochova, Z.; Urbanec, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The hypothesis that a part of the lechatellierites which originated by etching from a basic moldavite mass became broken off after deposition of moldavite in the sedimentation layer is advanced. Those found close to the original moldavite were measured for statistical averaging of length. The average length of lechatelierite fibers per cubic mm of moldavite mass volume was determined by measurement under a microscope in toluene. The data were used to calculate the depth of the moldavite layer that had to be etched to produce the corresponding amount of lechatelierite fragments. The calculations from five "fields" of moldavite surface, where layers of fixed lechatelierite fragments were preserved, produced values of 2.0, 3.1, 3.5, 3.9 and 4.5. Due to inadvertent loss of some fragments the determined values are somewhat lower than those found in references. The difference may be explained by the fact that the depth of the layer is only that caused by etching after moldavite deposition.

  20. GaN nanowire arrays by a patterned metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. C.; Yuan, G. D.; Wu, R. W.; Lu, H. X.; Liu, Z. Q.; Wei, T. B.; Wang, J. X.; Li, J. M.; Zhang, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    We developed an one-step and two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method to produce self-organized GaN nanowire arrays. In one-step approach, GaN nanowire arrays are synthesized uniformly on GaN thin film surface. However, in a two-step etching processes, GaN nanowires are formed only in metal uncovered regions, and GaN regions with metal-covering show nano-porous sidewalls. We propose that nanowires and porous nanostructures are tuned by sufficient and limited etch rate, respectively. PL spectra shows a red-shift of band edge emission in GaN nanostructures. The formation mechanism of nanowires was illustrated by two separated electrochemical reactions occur simultaneously. The function of metals and UV light was illustrated by the scheme of potential relationship between energy bands in Si, GaN and standard hydrogen electrode potential of solution and metals.

  1. Miniature tapered photonic crystal fiber interferometer with enhanced sensitivity by acid microdroplets etching.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Sun-jie; Chen, Ye; Kou, Jun-long; Xu, Fei; Lu, Yan-qing

    2011-08-01

    We fabricate a miniature tapered photonic crystal fiber (PCF) interferometer with enhanced sensitivity by acid microdroplets etching. This method is very simple and cost effective, avoiding elongating the PCF, moving and refixing the device during etching, and measuring. The refractive index sensing properties with different PCF diameters are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The tapering velocity can be controlled by the microdroplet size and position. The sensitivity greatly increases (five times, 750 nm/RIU) and the size decreases after slightly tapering the PCF. The device keeps low temperature dependence before and after tapering. More uniformly and thinly tapered PCFs can be realized with higher sensitivity (∼100 times) by optimizing the etching process.

  2. Etching of carbon nanowalls during synthesis in the plasma of direct current discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironovich, K. V.; Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Krivchenko, V. A.

    2015-02-01

    Anisotropic etching of carbon nanowalls by hydrogen during synthesis in plasma discharge of direct current is considered. This effect brings about generation of defects in the bottom part of the side surface of the nanowalls during their vertical growth. Based on the theoretical model of the discharge, it is shown that a decrease in the intensity of such etching is accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of such hydrocarbon radicals as C, CH, CH2, C2H, C3, and C3H, which indicates their possible role in the so-called process of healing of vacancies in the structure of nanowalls. In addition, it has been shown that an increase in synthesis temperature also can contribute to a decrease in the etching intensity.

  3. Etching of InP by H3PO4, H2O2 Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouton, A.; Sundararaman, C. S.; Lafontaine, H.; Poulin, S.; Currie, J. F.

    1990-10-01

    This paper deals with the chemical etching of (100) InP using a phosphoric acid and hydrogen peroxide mixture. It is shown that the etching rate is strongly dependent on the relative concentration of the two species; it is maximal for an equivolumic solution, and depending on the dilution it ranges from 70 to 20 Å/min. The activation energy of a non-diluted solution is approximately 14 kcal/mol. The post-etch surface state of the sample analysed by SEM and XPS, shows a very smooth surface for all concentrations, and the formation of a InPO4\\cdotxH2O layer. This solution can be used as a very precise etchant in devices processes.

  4. Freestanding HfO2 grating fabricated by fast atom beam etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongjin; Wu, Tong; Kanamori, Yoshiaki; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2011-04-01

    We report here the fabrication of freestanding HfO2 grating by combining fast atom beam etching (FAB) of HfO2 film with dry etching of silicon substrate. HfO2 film is deposited onto silicon substrate by electron beam evaporator. The grating patterns are then defined by electron beam lithography and transferred to HfO2 film by FAB etching. The silicon substrate beneath the HfO2 grating region is removed to make the HfO2 grating suspend in space. Period- and polarization-dependent optical responses of fabricated HfO2 gratings are experimentally characterized in the reflectance measurements. The simple process is feasible for fabricating freestanding HfO2 grating that is a potential candidate for single layer dielectric reflector. PACS: 73.40.Ty; 42.70.Qs; 81.65.Cf.

  5. Emission Properties of Porous Silicon Electron Emitters Formed by Pulsed Anodic Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W. B.; Zhao, W.; Fan, J. L.; Wu, S. L.; Zhang, J. T.

    2017-02-01

    Porous silicon (PS) layers were formed by pulsed anodic etching and subsequently processed by electrochemical oxidization (ECO) and high-pressure water vapor annealing (HWA), and their morphologies and oxidation degrees were analyzed. The electron emitters based on these PS layers were fabricated, and their emission properties were investigated. The experimental results show that a PS layer formed by pulsed anodic etching has a better pore-diameter homogeneity in the longitudinal direction, and it can obtain good oxidation quality more easily by the combined treatment of ECO and HWA. The as-formed PS electron emitters have better emission properties in comparison with those based on PS layers prepared by constant-current anodic etching.

  6. Low-loss slot waveguides with silicon (111) surfaces realized using anisotropic wet etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Kapil; Khokhar, Ali; Boden, Stuart; Arimoto, Hideo; Oo, Swe; Chong, Harold; Reed, Graham; Saito, Shinichi

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate low-loss slot waveguides on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. Waveguides oriented along the (11-2) direction on the Si (110) plane were first fabricated by a standard e-beam lithography and dry etching process. A TMAH based anisotropic wet etching technique was then used to remove any residual side wall roughness. Using this fabrication technique propagation loss as low as 3.7dB/cm was realized in silicon slot waveguide for wavelengths near 1550nm. We also realized low propagation loss of 1dB/cm for silicon strip waveguides.

  7. The regeneration and recycle of chromium etching solutions using concentrator cell membrane technology.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Abdul J; Ganguli, Bijita; Grimes, Susan M

    2006-02-01

    The regeneration of chromium (VI) and the recovery of etched copper from chromium etching solutions by electrodialysis is improved by the addition of a concentrator cell in the catholyte chamber. The concentrator media used are ion-exchange resins or activated carbon cloth. The maximum percentages for the regeneration of chromium and recovery of copper in these systems is however less than 80% and 90% respectively because of the competition between the processes of oxidation of Cr(III) and electrodeposition of copper. A novel combination of electrolysis with electrodialysis and concentrator cell technology is developed that achieves 92% chromium regeneration and 90% copper recovery.

  8. Cl Insertion on Si(100)-(2×1): Etching Under Conditions of Supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Abhishek; Butera, R. E.; Weaver, J. H.

    2007-03-01

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy to show that Cl2 dosing of Cl-saturated Si(100)-(2×1) surfaces at elevated temperature leads to uptake beyond “saturation” and allows access to a new etching pathway. This process involves Cl insertion in Si-Si dimer bonds or backbonds, diffusion of the inserted Cl, and ultimately desorption of SiCl2. Investigations into the etch kinetics reveal that insertion occurs via a novel form of Cl2 dissociative chemisorption that is mediated by dangling bond sites. Upon dissociation, one Cl atom adsorbs at the dangling bond while the other can insert.

  9. Luminescence of GaN nanocolumns obtained by photon-assisted anodic etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiginyanu, I. M.; Ursaki, V. V.; Zalamai, V. V.; Langa, S.; Hubbard, S.; Pavlidis, D.; Föll, H.

    2003-08-01

    GaN nanocolumns with transverse dimensions of about 50 nm were obtained by illumination-assisted anodic etching of epilayers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on sapphire substrates. The photoluminescence spectroscopy characterization shows that the as-grown bulk GaN layers suffer from compressive biaxial strain of 0.5 GPa. The majority of nanocolumns are fully relaxed from strain, and the room-temperature luminescence is free excitonic. The high quality of the columnar nanostructures evidenced by the enhanced intensity of the exciton luminescence and by the decrease of the yellow luminescence is explained by the peculiarities of the anodic etching processing.

  10. Advanced antireflective nanostructures etched down from nanosilver colloid-transformed island mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seong-Je; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hye; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Lee, Eung-Sug; Choi, Jun-Hyuk

    2012-11-01

    Advanced fabrication methods for antireflective nanostructures are presented via the formation of thermally grown nanosilver islands from continuously deposited colloidal multilayers, followed by a multi-step reactive ion etch (RIE) with optimized gas mixture rate. This process allows the formation of a random array of nanostructures of diameter 150 nm or less and height greater than 200 nm. The reflectance falls to around 0.7% in the visible region, with reasonably enhanced broadband stability and reduced incidence angle dependence. The tunability of antireflection was investigated with respect to several parameters associated with the nanosilver etch mask fabrication and RIE conditions.

  11. Fabrication of submicron structures in nanoparticle/polymer composite by holographic lithography and reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A. Ping; He, Sailing; Kim, Kyoung Tae; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Burzynski, Ryszard; Samoc, Marek; Prasad, Paras N.

    2008-11-01

    We report on the fabrication of nanoparticle/polymer submicron structures by combining holographic lithography and reactive ion etching. Silica nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in a (SU8) polymer matrix at a high concentration, and in situ polymerization (cross-linking) is used to form a nanoparticle/polymer composite. Another photosensitive SU8 layer cast upon the nanoparticle/SU8 composite layer is structured through holographic lithography, whose pattern is finally transferred to the nanoparticle/SU8 layer by the reactive ion etching process. Honeycomb structures in a submicron scale are experimentally realized in the nanoparticle/SU8 composite.

  12. Etching and Polymerization in Fluorocarbon-Hydrogen Plasmas: Mathematical Modeling and Experimental Investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Stephanie Watts

    reduced with hydrogen addition until the polymer point was reached. While it would appear that the polymer is preventing etching, it is also possible that not enough total fluorine (including that in CF _{rm x}) is available under these process conditions. Etching of oxide was strongly controlled by DC bias, but neutral chemistry also influenced the etch rate.

  13. Morphological evaluation of new total etching and self etching adhesive system interfaces with dentin

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Mithra N; Hegde, Priyadarshini; Chandra, C Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the resin-dentin interface, quality of the hybrid layer of total-etching and self-etching adhesive systems under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in 40 extracted human molars. In Group I XP bond (Dentsply), in Group II Adper Single Bond II (3M ESPE), in Group III Adper Easy One (3M ESPE), and in Group IV Xeno V (Dentsply) were applied. Teeth were restored with resin composite, subjected to thermocycling, and sectioned in Buccolingual plane. The samples were demineralized using 6N HCl, for 30 sec, and deproteinized with 2.5% NaOCl for 10 min, gold sputtered, and viewed using a scanning electron microscope. Results: Among the total-etch systems used, the XP Bond showed a clear, thick hybrid layer, with long resin tags and few voids. Among the self-etch adhesive systems, the Xeno V did not show a clearly recognizable hybrid layer, but there were no voids and continuous adaptation was seen with the dentin. Conclusion: The adaptation of self-etch adhesives to the resin-dentin interface was good without voids or separation of phases; showing a thin, continuous hybrid layer. PMID:22557814

  14. Synthesis of anatase titanium dioxide nanocaps via hydrofluoric acid etching towards enhanced photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Kun; Wang, Dan; Yang, Ping; Cheng, Xin

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocaps prepared by HF-assisted chemical etching method exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with commercial P25 because of HF served as an etching agent to remove doped impurities. - Highlights: • Anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocaps were synthesized by HF etching process. • The optimal conditions of experiment are 700 °C calcination and 0.2 mL HF solution. • The photocatalytic properties was studied upon UV and Visible irradiation. • The unique TiO{sub 2} nanocaps structure shows excellent photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Anatase titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanocaps were created via a four-step process including the preparation of SiO{sub 2} spheres, the deposition of a TiO{sub 2} layer to fabricate SiO{sub 2}@TiO{sub 2} composite spheres, the calcination for obtaining the crystal structure of anatase phase, and hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching to dissolve SiO{sub 2} cores. The SiO{sub 2}@TiO{sub 2} spheres calcined at 700 °C revealed fine photocatalytic activity. Interestingly, most of samples transformed into TiO{sub 2} nanocaps via HF etching, and TiO{sub 2} nanocaps prepared using optimal conditions exhibited quick degradation (k is 0.052 min{sup −1}) compared with commercial P25 (k is 0.030 min{sup −1}) and the TiO{sub 2} nanostructures etched by a NaOH solution. The excellent photocatalytic performance is attributed to its unique hollow hemispherical nanocaps structure, which is in favor of making full use of incident light. The photocatalysis phenomenon in visible light was also observed after depositing Au nanoparticles on anantase TiO{sub 2} nanocaps.

  15. HAREM: high aspect ratio etching and metallization for microsystems fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarajlic, Edin; Yamahata, Christophe; Cordero, Mauricio; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2008-07-01

    We report a simple bulk micromachining method for the fabrication of high aspect ratio monocrystalline silicon MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) in a standard silicon wafer. We call this two-mask microfabrication process high aspect ratio etching and metallization or HAREM: it combines double-side etching and metallization to create suspended micromechanical structures with electrically 'insulating walls' on their backside. The insulating walls ensure a proper electrical insulation between the different actuation and sensing elements situated on either fixed or movable parts of the device. To demonstrate the high potential of this simple microfabrication method, we have designed and characterized electrostatically actuated microtweezers that integrate a differential capacitive sensor. The prototype showed an electrical insulation better than 1 GΩ between the different elements of the device. Furthermore, using a lock-in amplifier circuit, we could measure the position of the moving probe with few nanometers resolution for a displacement range of about 3 µm. This work was presented in part at the 21st IEEE MEMS Conference (Tucson, AZ, USA, 13-17 January, 2008) (doi:10.1109/MEMSYS.2008.4443656).

  16. Oxidation threshold in silicon etching at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Tillocher, T.; Dussart, R.; Mellhaoui, X.; Lefaucheux, P.; Maaza, N. Mekkakia; Ranson, P.; Boufnichel, M.; Overzet, L.J.

    2006-07-15

    In silicon etching in SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2} plasmas, an oxidation threshold appears when the oxygen content is large enough. A SiO{sub x}F{sub y} passivation layer is formed under such conditions. This threshold is reached at lower oxygen proportions if the substrate is cooled down to cryogenic temperatures. In this article, we present a mass spectrometry study of this oxidation threshold in different experimental conditions (temperature, source rf power, self-bias) on bare silicon wafers. The presence of the threshold is clearly evident in the signals of many ions, for example, SiF{sub 3}{sup +}, F{sup +}, and SOF{sub 2}{sup +}. This helps us to determine the main reactions which can occur in the SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2} plasma in our experimental conditions. This threshold appears for higher oxygen proportions when either the source power or the chuck self-bias is increased. The ion bombardment transfers energy to the surface and makes the film desorb. A model, describing the oxygen coverage as a function of the parameters mentioned above, is proposed to interpret these results. Data presented in this article give another point of view of the cryogenic etching process. They contribute to explain how anisotropic profiles can be achieved at low temperature. Surfaces subjected to ion bombardment (the bottom of the structures) are below the oxidation threshold while the structures sidewalls, not subjected to ion bombardment, are in passivating regime.

  17. Selective Etching via Soft Lithography of Conductive Multilayered Gold Films with Analysis of Electrolyte Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Ralph W.; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment is designed to expose undergraduate students to the process of selective etching by using soft lithography and the resulting electrical properties of multilayered films fabricated via self-assembly of gold nanoparticles. Students fabricate a conductive film of gold on glass, apply a patterned resist using a polydimethylsiloxane…

  18. [Restoration of composite on etched stainless steel crowns. (1)].

    PubMed

    Goto, G; Zang, Y; Hosoya, Y

    1990-01-01

    Object of investigation The retention of composite resin to etched stainless steel crowns was tested as a possible method for restoring primary anterior teeth. Method employed 1) SEM observation Stainless steel crowns (Sankin Manufacture Co.) were etched with an aqua resia to create surface roughness and undercut to retain the composite resin to the crowns. Etching times were 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 20 minutes, then washed in a 70% alcohol solution using an ultrasonic washer and dried. A total of 96 etched samples and non etched control samples were observed through the scanning electron microscope (Hitachi 520). 2) Shear bond strength test Stainless steel crowns were etched in an aqua resia from 1 to 20 minutes, then washed and dried. Composite resin (Photo Clearfil A, Kuraray Co.) with the bonding agent was placed on the crowns and the shear bond strength was tested in 56 samples using an Autograph (DCS-500, Shimazu). Results 1) SEM observation showed that the etching surface of stainless steel crowns created surface roughness and undercut. The most desirable surface was obtained in the 3 to 5 minute etching time specimens. 2) The highest bond strength was obtained in a 3 minute etching specimen. It was 42.12 MPa, although 29.26 MPa in mean value. Conclusion Etching with an aqua resia increased the adherence of composite resin to the surface of stainless steel crowns.

  19. High precision AlGaAsSb ridge-waveguide etching by in situ reflectance monitored ICP-RIE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, N. T.; Breivik, Magnus; Patra, S. K.; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove

    2014-05-01

    GaSb-based semiconductor diode lasers are promising candidates for light sources working in the mid-infrared wavelength region of 2-5 μm. Using edge emitting lasers with ridge-waveguide structure, light emission with good beam quality can be achieved. Fabrication of the ridge waveguide requires precise etch stop control for optimal laser performance. Simulation results are presented that show the effect of increased confinement in the waveguide when the etch depth is well-defined. In situ reflectance monitoring with a 675 nm-wavelength laser was used to determine the etch stop with high accuracy. Based on the simulations of laser reflectance from a proposed sample, the etching process can be controlled to provide an endpoint depth precision within +/- 10 nm.

  20. Selectivity on Etching: Creation of High-Energy Facets on Copper Nanocrystals for CO2 Electrochemical Reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenni; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Zhaorui; Jin, Mingshang; Yin, Yadong

    2016-04-26

    Creating high-energy facets on the surface of catalyst nanocrystals represents a promising method for enhancing their catalytic activity. Herein we show that crystal etching as the reverse process of crystal growth can directly endow nanocrystal surfaces with high-energy facets. The key is to avoid significant modification of the surface energies of the nanocrystal facets by capping effects from solvents, ions, and ligands. Using Cu nanocubes as the starting material, we have successfully demonstrated the creation of high-energy facets in metal nanocrystals by controlled chemical etching. The etched Cu nanocrystals with enriched high-energy {110} facets showed significantly enhanced activity toward CO2 reduction. We believe the etching-based strategy could be extended to the synthesis of nanocrystals of many other catalysts with more active high-energy facets.

  1. Metal adsorbent for alkaline etching aqua solutions of Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Masao; Ueki, Yuji; Seko, Noriaki; Takeda, Toshihide; Kawano, Shin-ichi

    2012-08-01

    High performance adsorbent is expected to be synthesized for the removal of Ni and Cu ions from strong alkaline solution used in the surface etching process of Si wafer. Fibrous adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induce emulsion graft polymerization onto polyethylene nonwoven fabric and subsequent amination. The reaction condition was optimized using 30 L reaction vessel and nonwoven fabric, 0.3 m width and 18 m long. The resulting fibrous adsorbent was evaluated by 48 wt% NaOH and KOH contaminated with Ni and Cu ions, respectively. The concentration levels of Ni and Cu ions was reduced to less than 1 μg/kg (ppb) at the flow rate of 10 h-1 in space velocity. The life of adsorbent was 30 times higher than that of the commercialized resin. This novel adsorbent was commercialized as METOLATE® since the ability of adsorption is remarkably higher than that of commercial resin used practically in Si wafer processing.

  2. Si nanopatterning by reactive ion etching through an on-chip self-assembled porous anodic alumina mask

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We report on Si nanopatterning through an on-chip self-assembled porous anodic alumina (PAA) masking layer using reactive ion etching based on fluorine chemistry. Three different gases/gas mixtures were investigated: pure SF6, SF6/O2, and SF6/CHF3. For the first time, a systematic investigation of the etch rate and process anisotropy was performed. It was found that in all cases, the etch rate through the PAA mask was 2 to 3 times lower than that on non-masked areas. With SF6, the etching process is, as expected, isotropic. By the addition of O2, the etch rate does not significantly change, while anisotropy is slightly improved. The lowest etch rate and the best anisotropy were obtained with the SF6/CHF3 gas mixture. The pattern of the hexagonally arranged pores of the alumina film is, in this case, perfectly transferred to the Si surface. This is possible both on large areas and on restricted pre-defined areas on the Si wafer. PACS 78.67.Rb, 81.07.-b, 61.46.-w PMID:23402551

  3. Unveiling the shape-diversified silicon nanowires made by HF/HNO3 isotropic etching with the assistance of silver.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yun; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-01-21

    Hydrofluoric (HF)/nitric (HNO3)/acetic (CH3COOH) acid, normally referred to as the HNA method, is a widely utilized technique for performing isotropic etching on silicon (Si) in industrial Si-based processing and device construction. Here, we reported a novel etching strategy based on a HF/HNO3 process with the assistance of silver (Ag) nano-seeds, offering good controllability in preparing diversified Si nanostructure arrays with particularly smooth top surfaces. The involved mechanism was visualized by systematically investigating both the time and temperature dependencies on the etching kinetics with various ratios of HF to HNO3. Moreover, by testing different Ag(+)-ion containing oxidants on Si etching, we have re-examined the state-of-the-art metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) using HF/AgNO3 etchants. In contrast with previous reports, we found that the interplay of hole injections from Ag(+) and NO3(-) ions to the valence band of Si collectively contributes to the unidirectional dissolution of Si. Finally, we explored the engineering of the Ag nano-seeds to regularize the orientation of the etched nanowires formed on non-Si (100) wafers, which further provides a reliable pathway for constructing the desired morphologies of one-dimensional Si nanostructures regardless of wafer orientation.

  4. Chemical etching and EDAX analysis of beryllium-free nickel-chromium ceramo-metal alloy.

    PubMed

    Atta, O M; Mosleh, I E; Shehata, M T

    1995-10-01

    A chemical etching technique is described for producing etch patterns in beryllium-free nickel chromium ceramo-metal alloy. Disc-shaped samples were chemically etched, evaluated with SEM and analysed by the EDAX technique. Scanning electron micrographs revealed, profound retentive cavities. The EDAX analysis provided a comprehensive interpretation of the etch mechanism. The obtained results show that the developed chemical etching has the potential to produce a highly retentive etched surface with less problematic and less technique sensitive than electrolytic etching.

  5. Experimental procurement of the complete 3D etch rate distribution of Si in anisotropic etchants based on vertically micromachined wagon wheel samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosálvez, M. A.; Pal, Prem; Ferrando, N.; Hida, H.; Sato, K.

    2011-12-01

    This is part I of a series of two papers dedicated to the presentation of a novel, large throughput, experimental procedure to determine the three-dimensional distribution of the etch rate of silicon in a wide range of anisotropic etchants, including a total of 30 different etching conditions in KOH, KOH+IPA, TMAH and TMAH+Triton solutions at various concentrations and temperatures. The method is based on the use of previously reported, vertically micromachined wagon wheels (WWs) (Wind and Hines 2000 Surf. Sci. 460 21-38 Nguyen and Elwenspoek 2007 J. Electrochem. Soc. 154 D684-91), focusing on speeding up the etch rate extraction process for each WW by combining macrophotography and image processing procedures. The proposed procedure positions the WWs as a realistic alternative to the traditional hemispherical specimen. The obtained, extensive etch rate database is used to perform wet etching simulations of advanced systems, showing good agreement with the experimental counterparts. In part II of this series (Gosálvez et al J. Micromech. Microeng. 21 125008), we provide a theoretical analysis of the etched spoke shapes, a detailed comparison to the etch rates from previous studies and a self-consistency study of the measured etch rates against maximum theoretical values derived from the spoke shape analysis.

  6. Double hexagonal graphene ring synthesized using a growth-etching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinyang; Xu, Yangyang; Cai, Hongbing; Zuo, Chuandong; Huang, Zhigao; Lin, Limei; Guo, Xiaomin; Chen, Zhendong; Lai, Fachun

    2016-07-01

    Precisely controlling the layer number, stacking order, edge configuration, shape and structure of graphene is extremely challenging but highly desirable in scientific research. In this report, a new concept named the growth-etching method has been explored to synthesize a graphene ring using the chemical vapor deposition process. The graphene ring is a hexagonal structure, which contains a hexagonal exterior edge and a hexagonal hole in the centre region. The most important concept introduced here is that the oxide nanoparticle derived from annealing is found to play a dual role. Firstly, it acts as a nucleation site to grow the hexagonal graphene domain and then it works as a defect for etching to form a hole. The evolution process of the graphene ring with the etching time was carefully studied. In addition, a double hexagonal graphene ring was successfully synthesized for the first time by repeating the growth-etching process, which not only confirms the validity and repeatability of the method developed here but may also be further extended to grow unique graphene nanostructures with three, four, or even tens of graphene rings. Finally, a schematic model was drawn to illustrate how the double hexagonal graphene ring is generated and propagated. The results shown here may provide valuable guidance for the design and growth of unique nanostructures of graphene and other two-dimensional materials.

  7. Self-aligned mask renewal for anisotropically etched circular micro- and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, Peter; Holzapfel, Sebastian; Windhab, Erich J.; Jäckel, Heinz

    2011-11-01

    The top-down fabrication of high aspect ratio circular micro- and nanostructures in silicon nitride is presented. A new method is introduced to increase the aspect ratio of anisotropically etched holes by a factor of more than two with respect to the results obtained from an established dry-etching process. The method is based on the renewal of an etching mask after a first etching step has been completed. Mask renewal is done by line-of-sight deposition of a masking layer on the surface of the sample, which is mounted at an angle with respect to the deposition direction. No additional alignment step is required. The proof of principle is performed for silicon nitride etching through a mask of titanium, but the method has great potential to be applicable to a wide variety of substrate-mask combinations and to find entrance into various engineering fields. Two specific applications are highlighted. Firstly, a thick silicon nitride hardmask is used for the fabrication of deeply etched photonic crystal holes in indium phosphide (InP). For holes of 280 nm diameter, a record aspect ratio of 20 and an overall selectivity of 28.5 between a positive-tone resist layer and InP are reported. Secondly, the use of perforated silicon nitride membranes for droplet formation for applications in food engineering or pharmaceutics is addressed. Preliminary results show a potential for the self-aligned mask renewal method to exceed state-of-the-art membrane quality in terms of pore size, aspect ratio and membrane stability.

  8. KOH post-etching-induced rough silicon nanowire array for H2 gas sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuxiang; Wang, Yongyao; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2016-11-01

    The limited surface area and compacted configuration of silicon nanowires (SiNWs), which are made by one-step metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) go against target gas diffusion and adsorbtion for gas sensing application. To harvest suitable gas sensitivity and fast response-recovery characteristics, an aligned, rough SiNW array with loose configuration and high surface area was fabricated by a two-step etching process. The MACE technique was first employed to fabricate a smooth SiNW array, and then a KOH post-etching method was developed to roughen the NW surface further. The influence of the KOH post-etching time on the array density and surface roughness of the SiNWs was investigated, and the H2-sensing properties of the sensor based on the as-fabricated rough SiNW array were evaluated systematically at room temperature. It was revealed that the post-etching of KOH roughens the NW surface effectively, and also decreases the wire diameter and array density considerably. The resulting configuration of the SiNW array with high active surface and loose geometry is favorable for gas sensing. Consequently, the rough SiNW array-based sensor exhibited a linear response to H2 with a wide range of concentrations (50-10 000 ppm) at room temperature. Good stability and selectivity, satisfying response-recovery characteristics were also achieved. However, over-etching of SiNWs by KOH solution results in a considerable decrease in surface roughness and then in the H2-sensing response of the NWs.

  9. Effect of Re-Etching of Oxalate-Occluded Dentin on Microleakage of Composite Resin Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Saffarpour, Aida; Ghavam, Maryam; Saffarpour, Anna; Sadighi, Kimiya; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of re-etching of desensitized dentin for five and 10 seconds on marginal microleakage of composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities (4×2×2mm) were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 64 third molars and randomly divided into four groups of 16. In the control group, Single Bond (SB) adhesive was applied after etching. In BB+SB group, after application of BisBlock (BB) desensitizer agent (which needs etching), SB adhesive was used. In BB+5E+SB group, re-etching of dentin was done for five seconds after application of desensitizer, and then the adhesive was applied. The process in BB+10E+SB was the same as BB+5E+SB group except for re-etching time, which was 10 seconds. The cavities were restored with composite resin. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water and 10,000 thermal cycles, all samples were subjected to dye penetration test. The teeth were sectioned buccolingually in the middle of restorations. A blind examiner observed the sections under a stereomicroscope. Results: At the occlusal margins, no significant difference in microleakage was observed among the groups (P>0.05). Application of BB in combination with SB had no effect in comparison to the control group (P>0.05); while there were significant differences in microleakage scores between BB+10E+SB and control (P=0.002), BB+10E+SB and BB+SB (P<0.001) and BB+5E+SB and BB+SB groups (P=0.009). Conclusions: Dentin re-etching after application of BB desensitizer increased the gingival microleakage of class V composite restorations. Application of BB desensitizer combined with SB adhesive enhanced marginal seal. PMID:28127325

  10. Degradation in the Fatigue Strength of Dentin by Cutting, Etching and Adhesive Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H.-H.; Majd, H.; Orrego, S.; Majd, B.; Romberg, E.; Mutluay, M.M.; Arola, D.

    2014-01-01

    The processes involved in placing resin composite restorations may degrade the fatigue strength of dentin and increase the likelihood of fractures in restored teeth. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative changes in strength and fatigue behavior of dentin caused by bur preparation, etching and resin bonding procedures using a 3-step system. Methods Specimens of dentin were prepared from the crowns of unrestored 3rd molars and subjected to either quasi-static or cyclic flexural loading to failure. Four treated groups were prepared including dentin beams subjected to a burr treatment only with a conventional straight-sided bur, or etching treatment only. An additional treated group received both bur and etching treatments, and the last was treated by bur treatment and etching, followed by application of a commercial resin adhesive. The control group consisted of “as sectioned” dentin specimens. Results Under quasi-static loading to failure there was no significant difference between the strength of the control group and treated groups. Dentin beams receiving only etching or bur cutting treatments exhibited fatigue strengths that were significantly lower (p≤0.0001) than the control; there was no significant difference in the fatigue resistance of these two groups. Similarly, the dentin receiving bur and etching treatments exhibited significantly lower (p≤0.0001) fatigue strength than that of the control, regardless of whether an adhesive was applied. Significance The individual steps involved in the placement of bonded resin composite restorations significantly decrease the fatigue strength of dentin, and application of a bonding agent does not increase the fatigue strength of dentin. PMID:24985539

  11. Ion beam sputter etching and deposition of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.; Miller, T. B.; Crandall, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoropolymer etching and deposition techniques including thermal evaporation, RF sputtering, plasma polymerization, and ion beam sputtering are reviewed. Etching and deposition mechanism and material characteristics are discussed. Ion beam sputter etch rates for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were determined as a function of ion energy, current density and ion beam power density. Peel strengths were measured for epoxy bonds to various ion beam sputtered fluoropolymers. Coefficients of static and dynamic friction were measured for fluoropolymers deposited from ion bombarded PTFE.

  12. Etched-multilayer phase shifting masks for EUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.

    2005-04-05

    A method is disclosed for the implementation of phase shifting masks for EUV lithography. The method involves directly etching material away from the multilayer coating of the mask, to cause a refractive phase shift in the mask. By etching into the multilayer (for example, by reactive ion etching), rather than depositing extra material on the top of the multilayer, there will be minimal absorption loss associated with the phase shift.

  13. Capillary flow in sacrificially etched nanochannels

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, Mark N.; Hawkins, Aaron R.; Murray, Dallin; Maynes, Daniel; Lee, Milton L.; Woolley, Adam T.; Tolley, H. Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Planar nanochannels are fabricated using sacrificial etching technology with sacrificial cores consisting of aluminum, chromium, and germanium, with heights ranging from 18 to 98 nm. Transient filling via capillary action is compared against the Washburn equation [E. W. Washburn, Phys. Rev. 17, 273 (1921)], showing experimental filling speeds significantly lower than classical continuum theory predicts. Departure from theory is expressed in terms of a varying dynamic contact angle, reaching values as high as 83° in channels with heights of 18 nm. The dynamic contact angle varies significantly from the macroscopic contact angle and increases with decreasing channel dimensions. PMID:21772934

  14. Capillary flow in sacrificially etched nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Hamblin, Mark N; Hawkins, Aaron R; Murray, Dallin; Maynes, Daniel; Lee, Milton L; Woolley, Adam T; Tolley, H Dennis

    2011-06-01

    Planar nanochannels are fabricated using sacrificial etching technology with sacrificial cores consisting of aluminum, chromium, and germanium, with heights ranging from 18 to 98 nm. Transient filling via capillary action is compared against the Washburn equation [E. W. Washburn, Phys. Rev. 17, 273 (1921)], showing experimental filling speeds significantly lower than classical continuum theory predicts. Departure from theory is expressed in terms of a varying dynamic contact angle, reaching values as high as 83° in channels with heights of 18 nm. The dynamic contact angle varies significantly from the macroscopic contact angle and increases with decreasing channel dimensions.

  15. In Vitro Evaluation of Microleakage Around Orthodontic Brackets Using Laser Etching and Acid Etching Methods

    PubMed Central

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Yassaei, Sogra; Karandish, Maryam; Farzaneh, Sedigeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: path of microleakage between the enamel and adhesive potentially allows microbial ingress that may consequently cause enamel decalcification. The aim of this study was to compare microleakage of brackets bonded either by laser or acid etching techniques. Materials and Method: The specimens were 33 extracted premolars that were divided into three groups as the acid etching group (group 1), laser etching with Er:YAG at 100 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 2), and laser etching with Er:YAG at 140 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 3). After photo polymerization, the teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then the specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 2% methylen blue for 24hs, sectioned, and examined under a stereomicroscope. They were scored for marginal microleakage that occurred between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces from the occlusal and gingival margins. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal- Wallis test. Results: For the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive surfaces, significant differences were not observed between the three groups. Conclusion: According to this study, the Er:YAG laser with 1.5 and 2.1 watt settings may be used as an adjunctive for preparing the surface for orthodontic bracket bonding. PMID:25628661

  16. Anisotropic etching of Al by a directed Cl2 flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efremow, N. N.; Geis, M. W.; Mountain, R. W.; Lincoln, G. A.; Randall, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    A new Al etching technique is described that uses an ion beam from a Kaufman ion source and a directed Cl2 flux. The ion beam is used primarily to remove the native oxide and to allow the Cl2 to spontaneously react with the Al film forming volatile Al2Cl6. By controlling both the flux equivalent pressure of Cl2 and the ion beam current, this etching technique makes possible the anisotropic etching of Al with etch rates from 100 nm/min to nearly 10 microns/min with a high degree of selectivity.

  17. Resonantly enhanced selective photochemical etching of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichas, E.; Kayambaki, M.; Iliopoulos, E.; Pelekanos, N. T.; Savvidis, P. G.

    2009-04-01

    Wavelength dependent photochemical etching of GaN films reveals a strong resonant enhancement of the photocurrent at the GaN gap, in close agreement with the excitonic absorption profile of GaN. The corresponding etching rate of GaN strongly correlates with the measured photocurrent. No photocurrent, nor etching is observed for AlGaN films under same excitation conditions. The method could pave the way to the development of truly selective etching of GaN on AlGaN for the fabrication of nitride based optoelectronic devices.

  18. Lateral electrochemical etching of III-nitride materials for microfabrication

    DOEpatents

    Han, Jung

    2017-02-28

    Conductivity-selective lateral etching of III-nitride materials is described. Methods and structures for making vertical cavity surface emitting lasers with distributed Bragg reflectors via electrochemical etching are described. Layer-selective, lateral electrochemical etching of multi-layer stacks is employed to form semiconductor/air DBR structures adjacent active multiple quantum well regions of the lasers. The electrochemical etching techniques are suitable for high-volume production of lasers and other III-nitride devices, such as lasers, HEMT transistors, power transistors, MEMs structures, and LEDs.

  19. Fe-catalyzed etching of exfoliated graphite through carbon hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guangjun; Calizo, Irene; Hacker, Christina A.; Richter, Curt A.; Hight Walker, Angela R.

    2016-01-01

    We present an investigation on Fe-catalyzed etching of graphite by dewetting Fe thin films on graphite in forming gas. Raman mapping of the etched graphite shows thickness variation in the etched channels and reveals that the edges are predominately terminated in zigzag configuration. X-ray diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopy measurements identify that the catalytic particles are Fe with the presence of iron carbide and iron oxides. The existence of iron carbide indicates that, in additional to carbon hydrogenation, carbon dissolution into Fe is also involved during etching. Furthermore, the catalytic particles can be re-activated upon a second annealing in forming gas. PMID:27840449

  20. AlGaN-Cladding-Free m-Plane InGaN/GaN Laser Diodes with p-Type AlGaN Etch Stop Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Robert M.; Haeger, Daniel A.; Hsu, Po Shan; Hardy, Matthew T.; Kelchner, Kathryn M.; Fujito, Kenji; Feezell, Daniel F.; Mishra, Umesh K.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji

    2011-09-01

    We present a new method of improving the accuracy and reproducibility of dry etching processes for ridge waveguide InGaN/GaN laser diodes (LDs). A GaN:Al0.09Ga0.91N etch rate selectivity of 11:1 was demonstrated for an m-plane LD with a 40 nm p-Al0.09Ga0.91N etch stop layer (ESL) surrounded by Al-free cladding layers, establishing the effectiveness of AlGaN-based ESLs for controlling etch depth in ridge waveguide InGaN/GaN LDs. These results demonstrate the potential for integrating AlGaN ESLs into commercial device designs where accurate control of the etch depth of the ridge waveguide is necessary for stable, kink-free operation at high output powers.

  1. Synthesis of dawsonite: a method to treat the etching waste streams of the aluminium anodising industry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ayuso, E; Nugteren, H W

    2005-05-01

    Synthesis of dawsonite was studied as a way to deal with the etching waste streams of the aluminium anodising industry in order to reduce the emissions to the environment and also to recover useful and marketable mineral resource materials. The process of synthesis was carried out using two different waste streams arising from the etching section of an anodising process when a cascade rinsing system is employed, the spent etching bath solution (132 g/l of Al and 151 g/l of Na), and the first stage effluent from the cascade rinsing system (67 g/l of Al and 71 g/l of Na). The synthesis of dawsonite was studied as a function of NaHCO3/Al molar ratio (1-10), crystallization temperature (30-150 degrees C), and reaction time (2-48 h) using supersaturated NaHCO3 solutions. A NaHCO3/Al molar ratio of 3 was optimal to obtain dawsonite as a single phase, and a reaction time of 24 h and high crystallization temperature (150 degrees C) to improve its crystallinity. The mineral characterisation was performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential thermal analysis (DTA), all of which indicated characteristics typical of the desired compound. Almost 100% of the aluminium initially present in the etching waste streams was recovered in the form of dawsonite when the appropriate conditions for its synthesis were used.

  2. Prediction of silicon oxynitride plasma etching using a generalized regression neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungwhan; Lee, Byung Teak

    2005-08-01

    A prediction model of silicon oxynitride (SiON) etching was constructed using a neural network. Model prediction performance was improved by means of genetic algorithm. The etching was conducted in a C2F6 inductively coupled plasma. A 24 full factorial experiment was employed to systematically characterize parameter effects on SiON etching. The process parameters include radio frequency source power, bias power, pressure, and C2F6 flow rate. To test the appropriateness of the trained model, additional 16 experiments were conducted. For comparison, four types of statistical regression models were built. Compared to the best regression model, the optimized neural network model demonstrated an improvement of about 52%. The optimized model was used to infer etch mechanisms as a function of parameters. The pressure effect was noticeably large only as relatively large ion bombardment was maintained in the process chamber. Ion-bombardment-activated polymer deposition played the most significant role in interpreting the complex effect of bias power or C2F6 flow rate. Moreover, [CF2] was expected to be the predominant precursor to polymer deposition.

  3. Etching of Silicon in HBr Plasmas for High Aspect Ratio Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Meyyappan, M.; Mathad, G. S.; Ranade, R.

    2002-01-01

    Etching in semiconductor processing typically involves using halides because of the relatively fast rates. Bromine containing plasmas can generate high aspect ratio trenches, desirable for DRAM and MEMS applications, with relatively straight sidewalk We present scanning electron microscope images for silicon-etched trenches in a HBr plasma. Using a feature profile simulation, we show that the removal yield parameter, or number of neutrals removed per incident ion due to all processes (sputtering, spontaneous desorption, etc.), dictates the profile shape. We find that the profile becomes pinched off when the removal yield is a constant, with a maximum aspect ratio (AR) of about 5 to 1 (depth to height). When the removal yield decreases with increasing ion angle, the etch rate increases at the comers and the trench bottom broadens. The profiles have ARs of over 9:1 for yields that vary with ion angle. To match the experimentally observed etched time of 250 s for an AR of 9:1 with a trench width of 0.135 microns, we find that the neutral flux must be 3.336 x 10(exp 17)sq cm/s.

  4. Micro structuration of gaas surface by wet etching: towards a specific surface behavior.

    PubMed

    Bienaime, Alex; Elie-Caille, Celine; Leblois, Therese

    2012-08-01

    Resonant microelectromechanical systems are promising devices for real time and highly sensitive measurements. The sensitivity of such sensors to additional mass loadings which can be increased thanks to the miniaturisation of devices is of prime importance for biological applications. The miniaturisation of structures passes through a photolithographic process and wet chemical etching. So, this paper presents new results on the anisotropic chemical etching of the gallium arsenide (GaAs) crystal used for this application, in several solutions. This paper focuses on the micro/nanostructuration of the sensing surface to increase the sensor sensitivity. Indeed, this active surface will be biofunctionalized to operate in biological liquid media in view of biomolecules detection. Several experimental conditions of etching bath composition, concentration and temperature were examined to obtain a large variety of geometrical surfaces topographies and roughness. According to the orientation dependence of the chemical etching process, the experiments were also performed on various GaAs crystal plates. The bath 1 H3PO4:9 H2O2:1 H2O appeared to be particularly adapted to the fabrication of the GaAs microstructured membrane: indeed, the bath is highly stable, anisotropic, and, as a function of temperature, it allows the production of a large variety of GaAs surface topographies.

  5. Acid-etched microtexture for enhancement of bone growth into porous-coated implants.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Harvey, E J; Tanzer, M; Krygier, J J; Bobyn, J D

    2003-11-01

    We designed an in vivo study to determine if the superimposition of a microtexture on the surface of sintered titanium beads affected the extent of bone ingrowth. Cylindrical titanium intramedullary implants were coated with titanium beads to form a porous finish using commercial sintering techniques. A control group of implants was left in the as-sintered condition. The test group was etched in a boiling acidic solution to create an irregular surface over the entire porous coating. Six experimental dogs underwent simultaneous bilateral femoral intramedullary implantation of a control implant and an acid etched implant. At 12 weeks, the implants were harvested in situ and the femora processed for undecalcified, histological examination. Eight transverse serial sections for each implant were analysed by backscattered electron microscopy and the extent of bone ingrowth was quantified by computer-aided image analysis. The extent of bone ingrowth into the control implants was 15.8% while the extent of bone ingrowth into the etched implants was 25.3%, a difference of 60% that was statistically significant. These results are consistent with other research that documents the positive effect of microtextured surfaces on bone formation at an implant surface. The acid etching process developed for this study represents a simple method for enhancing the potential of commonly available porous coatings for biological fixation.

  6. Photoelectrochemical etching of epitaxial InGaN thin films: Self-limited kinetics and nanostructuring

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Xiaoyin; Fischer, Arthur J.; Coltrin, Michael E.; Lu, Ping; Koleske, Daniel D.; Wang, George T.; Polsky, Ronen; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    2014-10-22

    We report here the characteristics of photoelectrochemical (PEC) etching of epitaxial InGaN semiconductor thin films using narrowband lasers with linewidth less than ~1 nm. In the initial stages of PEC etching, when the thin film is flat, characteristic voltammogram shapes are observed. At low photo-excitation rates, voltammograms are S-shaped, indicating the onset of a voltage-independent rate-limiting process associated with electron-hole-pair creation and/or annihilation. At high photo-excitation rates, voltammograms are superlinear in shape, indicating, for the voltage ranges studied here, a voltage-dependent rate-limiting process associated with surface electrochemical oxidation. As PEC etching proceeds, the thin film becomes rough at the nanoscale, and ultimately evolves into an ensemble of nanoparticles. As a result, this change in InGaN film volume and morphology leads to a characteristic dependence of PEC etch rate on time: an incubation time, followed by a rise, then a peak, then a slow decay.

  7. Etching of Bacillus atrophaeus by oxygen atoms, molecules and argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, J.; Flötgen, C.; Kussel, G.; Raball, V.; von Keudell, A.

    2008-10-01

    The etching of spores of Bacillus atrophaeus by oxygen atoms, molecules and argon ions is investigated in a particle beam experiment. Thereby, the conditions occurring in an argon oxygen plasma are mimicked and fundamental inactivation mechanisms are revealed. It is shown that only the combined impact of argon ions and of O atoms or O2 molecules causes significant etching of the spores. This is explained by the process of chemical sputtering, where an ion induced defect at the surface of the spore reacts with either the incident bi-radical O2 or with an incident O atom. This leads to the formation of CO, CO2 and H2O and thus to erosion. This process is compared to the plasma etching of hydrocarbon thin films as an atomistic model system for the spore coat. It is shown that the etch rate in an inductively coupled argon oxygen plasma is only maximal if both, the electron density and thus the ion flux towards the surface and the O atom flux are optimized simultaneously.

  8. Photoelectrochemical etching of epitaxial InGaN thin films: Self-limited kinetics and nanostructuring

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Xiaoyin; Fischer, Arthur J.; Coltrin, Michael E.; ...

    2014-10-22

    We report here the characteristics of photoelectrochemical (PEC) etching of epitaxial InGaN semiconductor thin films using narrowband lasers with linewidth less than ~1 nm. In the initial stages of PEC etching, when the thin film is flat, characteristic voltammogram shapes are observed. At low photo-excitation rates, voltammograms are S-shaped, indicating the onset of a voltage-independent rate-limiting process associated with electron-hole-pair creation and/or annihilation. At high photo-excitation rates, voltammograms are superlinear in shape, indicating, for the voltage ranges studied here, a voltage-dependent rate-limiting process associated with surface electrochemical oxidation. As PEC etching proceeds, the thin film becomes rough at the nanoscale,more » and ultimately evolves into an ensemble of nanoparticles. As a result, this change in InGaN film volume and morphology leads to a characteristic dependence of PEC etch rate on time: an incubation time, followed by a rise, then a peak, then a slow decay.« less

  9. Oxidation and etching behaviors of the InAs surface in various acidic and basic chemical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jihoon; Lee, Seunghyo; Lim, Sangwoo

    2017-04-01

    Indium arsenide (InAs) is the candidate of choice as a new channel material for application in future technologies beyond the Si-based electronic devices because it has a much higher electron mobility than silicon. In this study, the oxidation and etching behaviors of InAs (100) in various acidic and basic solutions, such as HF, HCl, H2SO4, NaOH, KOH, and NH4OH, were investigated. In addition, the effect of pH on the oxidation and etching reactions taking place on the InAs surface was studied using solutions with a pH ranging from 1 to 13. It was observed that the oxidation of the InAs surface was hindered in acidic solutions, which was attributed to the dissolution of the oxidized surface layer. In particular, the treatment of the InAs surface using a strongly acidic solution with a pH of less than 3 produced an oxide-free surface due to the predominant etching of the InAs surface. The addition of H2O2 to the acidic solutions greatly increased the etching rate of the InAs surface, which suggests that the oxidation process is the rate-limiting step in the sequence of reactions that occur during the etching of the InAs surface in acidic solutions. The etching of InAs was suppressed in neutral solutions, which resulted in the formation of a relatively thicker oxide layer on the surface, and mild etching of the InAs surface took place in basic solutions. However, in basic solutions, the addition of H2O2 did not significantly contribute to the increase of the oxidation state of the InAs surface; thus, its effect on the etching rate of InAs was smaller than in acidic solutions.

  10. Direct evidence of reactive ion etching induced damages in Ge2Sb2Te5 based on different halogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juntao; Xia, Yangyang; Liu, Bo; Feng, Gaoming; Song, Zhitang; Gao, Dan; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Weiwei; Chan, Yipeng; Feng, Songlin

    2016-08-01

    Chalcogenide glasses based on Ge-Te-Sb are processed using reactive ion etching (RIE) in the fabrication of phase change memory (PCM). These materials are known to be halogenated easily and apt to be damaged when exposed to halogen gas based plasmas which can cause severe halogenation-induced degradation. In this paper, we investigate the RIE induced damage of popular phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) in different halogen based plasmas (CF4, Cl2 and HBr) highly diluted by argon. After blanket etching, results of scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy directly showed that the surface of Cl2 etched samples were roughest with a Ge deficient damaged layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to investigate the chemical shift of constituent elements. Selected scans over the valence band peaks of Te 3d revealed that electrons were transferred from chalcogenide to halogen and the highest halogenation was observed on the GST etched by CF4. The GST films masked with patterned TiN were also etched. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and surface scan directly showed the line profile and the damaged layer. Almost vertical and smooth sidewall without damaged layer makes HBr a promising gas for GST etch in the fabrication of high-density memory devices.

  11. Characterization of graphite etched with potassium hydroxide and its application in fast-rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-08-01

    Surface-modified graphite for application as an anode material in lithium ion batteries was obtained by etching with KOH under mild conditions without high-temperature annealing. The surface of the etched graphite is covered with many nano-sized pores that act as entrances for lithium ions during the charging process. As compared with pristine graphite and other references such as pitch-coated or etched graphite samples with annealing, our non-annealed etched graphite exhibits excellent electrochemical properties, particularly at fast charging rates of over 2.5 C. While avoidance of the trade-off between increase of irreversible capacity and good rate capability has previously been a main concern in highly porous carbonaceous materials, we show that the slightly larger surface area created by the etching does not induce a significant increase of irreversible capacity. This study shows that it is important to limit the size of pores to the nanometer scale for excellent battery performance, which is possible by etching under relatively mild conditions.

  12. Mechanism for low-etching resistance and surface roughness of ArF photoresist during plasma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jinnai, Butsurin; Koyama, Koji; Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Momose, Hikaru; Samukawa, Seiji

    2009-03-01

    ArF excimer laser lithography was introduced to fabricate nanometer-scale devices and uses chemically amplified photoresist polymers including photoacid generators (PAGs). Because plasma-etching processes cause serious problems related to the use of ArF photoresists, such as line-edge roughness and low etching selectivity, we have to understand the interaction between plasma and ArF photoresist polymers. Investigating the effects of surface temperature and the irradiation species from plasma, we have found that ion irradiation by itself did not drastically increase the roughness or etching rate of ArF photoresist films unless it was combined with ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet (UV/VUV) photon irradiation. The structures of ArF photoresist polymers were largely unchanged by ion irradiation alone but were destroyed by combinations of ion and UV/VUV-photon irradiation. Our results suggested that PAG-mediated deprotection induced by UV/VUV-photon irradiation was amplified at surface temperatures above 100 deg. C. The etching rate and surface roughness of plasma-etched ArF photoresists are affected by the irradiation species and surface temperature during plasma etching. UV/VUV-photon irradiation plays a particularly important role in the interaction between plasma and ArF photoresist polymers.

  13. Ultrastructure of the surface of dental enamel with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) with and without acid etching.

    PubMed

    Bozal, Carola B; Kaplan, Andrea; Ortolani, Andrea; Cortese, Silvina G; Biondi, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to analyze the ultrastructure and mineral composition of the surface of the enamel on a molar with MIH, with and without acid etching. A permanent tooth without clinical MIH lesions (control) and a tooth with clinical diagnosis of mild and moderate MIH, with indication for extraction, were processed with and without acid etching (H3PO4 37%, 20") for observation with scanning electron microscope (SEM) ZEISS (Supra 40) and mineral composition analysis with an EDS detector (Oxford Instruments). The control enamel showed normal prismatic surface and etching pattern. The clinically healthy enamel on the tooth with MIH revealed partial loss of prismatic pattern. The mild lesion was porous with occasional cracks. The moderate lesion was more porous, with larger cracks and many scales. The mineral composition of the affected surfaces had lower Ca and P content and higher O and C. On the tooth with MIH, even on normal looking enamel, the demineralization does not correspond to an etching pattern, and exhibits exposure of crystals with rods with rounded ends and less demineralization in the inter-prismatic spaces. Acid etching increased the presence of cracks and deep pores in the adamantine structure of the enamel with lesion. In moderate lesions, the mineral composition had higher content of Ca, P and Cl. Enamel with MIH, even on clinically intact adamantine surfaces, shows severe alterations in the ultrastructure and changes in ionic composition, which affect the acid etching pattern and may interfere with adhesion.

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Tensile – Bond Strength of An Orthodontic Adhesive with and without Fluoride Application, After Acid Etching -An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yugandhar, G; Ramana, I Venkata; Srinivas, K; Yadav, S. Sarjeev Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background Fixed appliances hinder the effective control of plaque accumulation and white spot lesions may develop under the ill fitting bands or adjacent to the stainless steel brackets during orthodontic treatment particularly the etching process. Aims and Objectives Comparative study of tensile bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive with and without fluoride application after acid etching to know the effect of fluoride on bond strength. Materials and Methods This study is carried out on 90 non carious human premolar teeth, and divided in 6 groups with each group of 15 specimens. In those Groups I and IV were control group acid etch treatment, Group II and V is 1.23% APF gel (acid etch plus APF gel treatment,) and group III and VI is 8% SnF2 (acid etch plus SnF2 treatment). Samples of Group I, II and III bond strength were tested after 24 h and groups IV, V and VI after one month on microtechtensometer machine. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation was carried out for the 2 specimens for the control group after acid etch and 4 specimens after acid etch with fluoride application for fluoride groups. Results Control and SnF2 treated groups was found to be nearly similar to the control group whereas APF treated group showed less focal holes than the other 2 groups. Conclusion Fluoride application after acid etching without having an adverse effect on bond strength but we can prevent the white spot lesions and caries. PMID:26023648

  15. Smooth wet etching by ultraviolet-assisted photoetching and its application to the fabrication of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, H.; DiSanto, D. W.; Soerensen, G.; Bolognesi, C. R.; Tang, H.; Webb, J. B.

    2000-12-01

    We characterize a KOH-based ultraviolet (UV) photoassisted wet etching technique using K2S2O8 as the oxidizing agent. The solution provides a well-controlled etch rate and produces smooth high-quality etched surfaces with a minimal degradation in surface roughness as measured by atomic force microscopy. The evolution of the solution pH upon exposure to UV radiation is identified as key to obtaining smooth etched surfaces and a controlled etch rate: Unless steps are taken to maintain the pH above 12.0, the etch rate displays a sharp drop that coincides with a gross roughening of the etched surface. The applicability of the present technique is demonstrated by the fabrication of high-quality mesa-isolated AlGaN/GaN hetrostructure field-effect transistors. In addition, the etch presented here features a high selectivity to C-doped layers which should prove useful in the fabrication of AlGaN/GaN hetrostructure bipolar transistors. The method is well adapted to device processing applications because it does not require connection to the sample to an external electrochemical cell.

  16. Characterizing fluorocarbon assisted atomic layer etching of Si using cyclic Ar/C4F8 and Ar/CHF3 plasma.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Dominik; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian; Bruce, Robert L; Joseph, Eric A; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S

    2017-02-07

    With the increasing interest in establishing directional etching methods capable of atomic scale resolution for fabricating highly scaled electronic devices, the need for development and characterization of atomic layer etching processes, or generally etch processes with atomic layer precision, is growing. In this work, a flux-controlled cyclic plasma process is used for etching of SiO2 and Si at the Angstrom-level. This is based on steady-state Ar plasma, with periodic, precise injection of a fluorocarbon (FC) precursor (C4F8 and CHF3) and synchronized, plasma-based Ar(+) ion bombardment [D. Metzler et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 32, 020603 (2014) and D. Metzler et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 34, 01B101 (2016)]. For low energy Ar(+) ion bombardment conditions, physical sputter rates are minimized, whereas material can be etched when FC reactants are present at the surface. This cyclic approach offers a large parameter space for process optimization. Etch depth per cycle, removal rates, and self-limitation of removal, along with material dependence of these aspects, were examined as a function of FC surface coverage, ion energy, and etch step length using in situ real time ellipsometry. The deposited FC thickness per cycle is found to have a strong impact on etch depth per cycle of SiO2 and Si but is limited with regard to control over material etching selectivity. Ion energy over the 20-30 eV range strongly impacts material selectivity. The choice of precursor can have a significant impact on the surface chemistry and chemically enhanced etching. CHF3 has a lower FC deposition yield for both SiO2 and Si and also exhibits a strong substrate dependence of FC deposition yield, in contrast to C4F8. The thickness of deposited FC layers using CHF3 is found to be greater for Si than for SiO2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study surface chemistry. When thicker FC films of 11 Å are employed, strong changes of FC film chemistry during a cycle are seen

  17. Characterizing fluorocarbon assisted atomic layer etching of Si using cyclic Ar/C4F8 and Ar/CHF3 plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Dominik; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian; Bruce, Robert L.; Joseph, Eric A.; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.

    2017-02-01

    With the increasing interest in establishing directional etching methods capable of atomic scale resolution for fabricating highly scaled electronic devices, the need for development and characterization of atomic layer etching processes, or generally etch processes with atomic layer precision, is growing. In this work, a flux-controlled cyclic plasma process is used for etching of SiO2 and Si at the Angstrom-level. This is based on steady-state Ar plasma, with periodic, precise injection of a fluorocarbon (FC) precursor (C4F8 and CHF3) and synchronized, plasma-based Ar+ ion bombardment [D. Metzler et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 32, 020603 (2014) and D. Metzler et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 34, 01B101 (2016)]. For low energy Ar+ ion bombardment conditions, physical sputter rates are minimized, whereas material can be etched when FC reactants are present at the surface. This cyclic approach offers a large parameter space for process optimization. Etch depth per cycle, removal rates, and self-limitation of removal, along with material dependence of these aspects, were examined as a function of FC surface coverage, ion energy, and etch step length using in situ real time ellipsometry. The deposited FC thickness per cycle is found to have a strong impact on etch depth per cycle of SiO2 and Si but is limited with regard to control over material etching selectivity. Ion energy over the 20-30 eV range strongly impacts material selectivity. The choice of precursor can have a significant impact on the surface chemistry and chemically enhanced etching. CHF3 has a lower FC deposition yield for both SiO2 and Si and also exhibits a strong substrate dependence of FC deposition yield, in contrast to C4F8. The thickness of deposited FC layers using CHF3 is found to be greater for Si than for SiO2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study surface chemistry. When thicker FC films of 11 Å are employed, strong changes of FC film chemistry during a cycle are seen

  18. Characterizing Fluorocarbon Assisted Atomic Layer Etching of Si Using Cyclic Ar/C4F8 and Ar/CHF3 Plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Metzler, Dominik; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian; ...

    2016-09-08

    With the increasing interest in establishing directional etching methods capable of atomic scale resolution for fabricating highly scaled electronic devices, the need for development and characterization of atomic layer etching (ALE) processes, or generally etch processes with atomic layer precision, is growing. In this work, a flux-controlled cyclic plasma process is used for etching of SiO2 and Si at the Angstrom-level. This is based on steady-state Ar plasma, with periodic, precise injection of a fluorocarbon (FC) precursor (C4F8 and CHF3), and synchronized, plasma-based Ar+ ion bombardment [D. Metzler et al., J Vac Sci Technol A 32, 020603 (2014), and D.more » Metzler et al., J Vac Sci Technol A 34, 01B101 (2016)]. For low energy Ar+ ion bombardment conditions, physical sputter rates are minimized, whereas material can be etched when FC reactants are present at the surface. This cyclic approach offers a large parameter space for process optimization. Etch depth per cycle, removal rates, and self-limitation of removal, along with material dependence of these aspects, were examined as a function of FC surface coverage, ion energy, and etch step length using in situ real time ellipsometry. The deposited FC thickness per cycle is found to have a strong impact on etch depth per cycle of SiO2 and Si, but is limited with regard to control over material etching selectivity. Ion energy over the 20 to 30 eV range strongly impacts material selectivity. The choice of precursor can have a significant impact on the surface chemistry and chemically enhanced etching. CHF3 has a lower FC deposition yield for both SiO2 and Si, and also exhibits a strong substrate dependence of FC deposition yield, in contrast to C4F8. The thickness of deposited FC layers using CHF3 is found to be greater for Si than for SiO2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study surface chemistry. When thicker FC films of 11 Å are employed, strong changes of FC film chemistry during a cycle are

  19. Vapor-Liquid-Solid Etch of Semiconductor Surface Channels by Running Gold Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    Nikoobakht, Babak; Herzing, Andrew; Muramoto, Shin; Tersoff, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    We show that Au nanoparticles spontaneously move across the (001) surface of InP, InAs, and GaP when heated in the presence of water vapor. As they move, the particles etch crystallographically aligned grooves into the surface. We show that this process is a negative analog of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of semiconductor nanowires: semiconductor dissolves into the catalyst, and reacts with water vapor at the catalyst surface to create volatile oxides, depleting the dissolved cations and anions and so sustaining the dissolution process. This VLS etching process provides a new tool for directed assembly of structures with sub-lithographic dimensions, as small as a few nanometers in diameter. Au particles above 100 nm in size do not exhibit this process but remain stationary, with oxide accumulating around the particles. PMID:26599639

  20. EDITORIAL: The Fifth International Workshop on Physical Chemistry of Wet Etching of Semiconductors (PCWES 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Helmut

    2007-04-01

    The biannual Workshop on Physical Chemistry of Wet Etching of Semiconductors (PCWES) was held in Saarbrücken, Germany in June 2006 for the fifth time in its history. The event was initiated in 1998 by Miko Elwenspoek from Twente University. It is a dedicated workshop with a typical attendance of about 30 scientists with multidisciplinary backgrounds from all parts of the world working in the field. Starting off in Holten in The Netherlands in 1998, subsequent workshops have been held at Toulouse, France in 2000, Nara, Japan in 2002, and Montreal, Canada in 2004. The initial focus was upon anisotropic etching of silicon in alkaline solutions, including surface topology, modelling aspects and applications. This process has found a wide range of applications in microsystems technology (MST), i.e. in the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Most prominently, it provides the technological basis for bulk micromachining. More recently, other semiconductors such as germanium, III-V compounds and, particularly, wide-bandgap materials have started to enter the field. Furthermore, electrochemical aspects have gained in importance and the formation of porous silicon has also become a considerable part of the programme. From the very beginning up to the present time there was and is a strong focus on illumination of the underlying mechanism of crystallographic anisotropy, as well as on the understanding of electrochemical and dopant-induced etch stop phenomena. The fifth workshop, presented in Saarbrücken, included a total of twenty four contributions, six of which were as posters. Five of these are included in this partial special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering as full length papers after having undergone the standard review process. The selection of contributions starts with the first invited paper given by M Gosalvez et al, resulting from a collaboration between Nagoya University, Japan and Helsinki University of Technology

  1. Restoration interface microleakage using one total-etch and three self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Deliperi, S; Bardwell, D N; Wegley, C

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a total-etch and three self-etch adhesives in reducing microleakage after three months water storage and thermocycling. Thirty freshly extracted caries-free human premolars and molars were used. Class V standardized preparations were performed on the facial and lingual surfaces, with the gingival margin placed 1 mm below the CEJ. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups; Group I: Xeno III one-step self-etch adhesive (Dentsply/Caulk), Group II: Prime & Bond NT total-etch adhesive (Dentsply/Caulk), Group III: i-Bond one-step self-etch adhesive (Heraeus Kulzer) and Group IV: Clearfil SE Bond two-step self-etch adhesive (Kuraray Medical). The teeth were restored using 2 mm increments of shade A2 resin composite (Esthet-X, Dentsply/Caulk). Each layer was cured using the Spectrum 800 curing light (Dentsply/Caulk) for 20 seconds at 600mW/cm2. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 90 days. Samples were thermocycled 500x between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C with a dwell time of 30 seconds, then placed in a 0.5% methylene blue dye solution for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. Samples were sectioned longitudinally and evaluated for microleakage at the occlusal and gingival margins under a stereomicroscope at 20x magnification. Dye penetration was scored: 0 = no penetration; 1 = partial dye penetration along the occlusal or gingival wall; 2 = dye penetration along the occlusal or gingival wall; 3 = dye penetration to and along the axial wall. A Mann-Whitney test was used to demonstrate significantly more dye penetration in Group III than in the other groups at both the occlusal and gingival scores (p < 0.0001). When comparing the occlusal and gingival scores for each group, the Wilcoxon Rank test showed no significant difference in dye penetration for Xeno III (p > 0.05), Prime & Bond NT (p = 0.059) and I Bond (p = 0.083), and Clearfil SE Bond yielded more dye penetration at the occlusal than at the gingival wall (p = 0.001).

  2. Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Weyher, J.L.; Lazar, S.; Macht, L.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Molnar,R.J.; Muller, S.; Nowak, G.; Grzegory, I.

    2006-08-10

    Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN in molten eutectic of KOH + NaOH (E etch) and in hot sulfuric and phosphoric acids (HH etch) is discussed in detail. Three size grades of pits are formed by the preferential E etching at the outcrops of threading dislocations on the Ga-polar surface of GaN. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as the calibration tool it is shown that the largest pits are formed on screw, intermediate on mixed and the smallest on edge dislocations. This sequence of size does not follow the sequence of the Burgers values (and thus the magnitude of the elastic energy) of corresponding dislocations. This discrepancy is explained taking into account the effect of decoration of dislocations, the degree of which is expected to be different depending on the lattice deformation around the dislocations, i.e. on the edge component of the Burgers vector. It is argued that the large scatter of optimal etching temperatures required for revealing all three types of dislocations in HVPE-grown samples from different sources also depends upon the energetic status of dislocations. The role of kinetics for reliability of etching in both etches is discussed and the way of optimization of the etching parameters is shown.

  3. Evaluation of bond strength of orthodontic brackets without enamel etching

    PubMed Central

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Motaghi, Shiva; Moghaddas, Mohmmadjavad

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare the shear bond strength of brackets with and without enamel etching. Material and Methods In this study, 60 sound premolars were randomly divided into four different groups: 1- TXE group: Enamel etching+Transbond XT adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 2- TXS group: Transbond plus self-etch adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 3- PQ1E group: Enamel etching+ PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 4- PQ1 group: PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. The shear bond strengths of brackets were evaluated using universal testing machine at cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was also measured. One-way ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc, Kruskal-wallis and Mann-Witney U test were used for data analysis. Results There was a significant difference between etched and unetched groups respect to SBS and ARI (p<0.05), however; no significant difference was observed between unetched group and self-etch adhesive group (p>> 0.05). The shear bond strength of PQ1 group was the least but in acceptable range and its ARI was less than other groups. Conclusions PQ1 adhesive can be used for bracket bonding without enamel etching with adequate bond strength and minimal ARI. Key words:Bracket, shear bond strength, filled-adhesive, self-etch adhesive. PMID:26535100

  4. Laser etching: A new technology to identify Florida grapefruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beam etches the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allowing for pathogen entry. The long term effects of laser labeling o...

  5. Sputtered gold mask for deep chemical etching of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisciotta, B. P.; Gross, C.; Olive, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    Sputtered mask resists chemical attack from acid and has adherence to withstand prolonged submergence in etch solution without lifting from silicon surface. Even under prolonged etch conditions with significant undercutting, gold mask maintained excellent adhesion to silicon surface and imperviousness to acid.

  6. Laser surface pretreatment of 100Cr6 bearing steel - Hardening effects and white etching zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buling, Anna; Sändker, Hendrik; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Krupp, Ulrich; Hamann-Steinmeier, Angela

    2016-08-01

    In order to achieve a surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 (1-1.5 wt.% Cr) a laser-based process was used. The obtained modification may result in an optimization of the adhesive properties of the surface with respect to an anticorrosion polymer coating on the basis of PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone), which is applied on the steel surface by a laser melting technique. This work deals with the influence of the laser-based pretreatment regarding the surface microstructure and the micro-hardness of the steel, which has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy and automated micro-hardness testing. The most suitable parameter set for the laser-based pretreatment leads to the formation of very hard white etching zones (WEZ) with a thickness of 23 μm, whereas this pretreatment also induces topographical changes. The occurrence of the white etching zones is attributed to near-surface re-austenitization and rapid quenching. Moreover, dark etching zones (DEZ) with a thickness of 32 μm are found at the laser path edges as well as underneath the white etching zones (WEZ). In these areas, the hardness is decreased due to the formation of oxides as a consequence of re-tempering.

  7. Etching high aspect ratio (110) silicon grooves in CsOH

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, S.; Hesketh, P.J.; Macrander, A.T.

    1995-02-01

    In a previous study the authors developed a fabrication process for a single-crystal silicon X-ray analyzer for use at the Advanced Photon Source, a 6 GeV synchrotron accelerator ring under construction at Argonne National Laboratories. The bent silicon crystal will be used as an analyzer to collect and focus a monochromatic beam of X-rays by Bragg reflection with an energy resolution better than 10 meV for the (hhh) planes (H>6) for diffraction near backscattering. The cross-sectional geometry produced by anisotropic etching high aspect ratio (height/width = 115) silicon grooves with CSOH was studied as a function of the solution concentration. At 50 weight percent (w/o) CSOH straight sidewalls are produced, but at 15 and 25 w/o re-entrant tapered profiles are produced. The etch rates are increased in the groove by 25--100% indicating diffusion effects. The etch rate of the surface was in agreement with previous studies of CSOH etching, but unable to predict the dimensional changes in the grooves.

  8. Thermodynamic assessment and experimental verification of reactive ion etching of magnetic metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeseung; Chen, Jack Kun-Chieh; Chang, Jane P.

    2014-07-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of etch chemistries for Co, Fe, and Ni using a combination of hydrogen, oxygen, and halogen gases suggested that a single etchant does not work at 300 K; however, a sequential exposure to multiple etchants results in sufficiently high partial pressure of the reaction products for the process to be considered viable. This sequential dose utilized the two reactions, a surface halogenation followed by the secondary etchant exposure. (MX{sub 2} (c) + 3Y →MY(g) + 2XY(g), where M = Co, Fe, Ni; X = F, Cl, Br; Y = O, H) The volatilization reaction induced by sequential plasma exposure changed the equilibrium point, increasing the partial pressure of the etch product. Amongst all combinations, Cl{sub 2} or Br{sub 2} plasmas followed by H{sub 2} plasma were the most effective. From both the gas phase diagnostics and surface composition analysis, H{sub 2} plasma alone could not etch metallic Co, Fe, and Ni films but alternating doses of Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} plasmas resulted in more effective removal of chlorinated metals and increased the overall etch rate.

  9. Challenges and mitigation strategies for resist trim etch in resist-mandrel based SAQP integration scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Nihar; Franke, Elliott; Liu, Eric; Raley, Angelique; Smith, Jeffrey; Farrell, Richard; Wang, Mingmei; Ito, Kiyohito; Das, Sanjana; Ko, Akiteru; Kumar, Kaushik; Ranjan, Alok; O'Meara, David; Nawa, Kenjiro; Scheer, Steven; DeVillers, Anton; Biolsi, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Patterning the desired narrow pitch at 10nm technology node and beyond, necessitates employment of either extreme ultra violet (EUV) lithography or multi-patterning solutions based on 193nm-immersion lithography. With enormous challenges being faced in getting EUV lithography ready for production, multi-patterning solutions that leverage the already installed base of 193nm-immersion-lithography are poised to become the industry norm for 10 and 7nm technology nodes. For patterning sub-40nm pitch line/space features, self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) with resist pattern as the first mandrel shows significant cost as well as design benefit, as compared to EUV lithography or other multi-patterning techniques. One of the most critical steps in this patterning scheme is the resist mandrel definition step which involves trimming / reformation of resist profile via plasma etch for achieving appropriate pitch after the final pattern. Being the first mandrel, the requirements for the Line Edge Roughness (LER) / Line Width Roughness (LWR); critical dimension uniformity (CDU); and profile in 3-dimensions for the resist trim / reformation etch is extremely aggressive. In this paper we highlight the unique challenges associated in developing resist trim / reformation plasma etch process for SAQP integration scheme and summarize our efforts in optimizing the trim etch chemistries, process steps and plasma etch parameters for meeting the mandrel definition targets. Finally, we have shown successful patterning of 30nm pitch patterns via the resist-mandrel SAQP scheme and its implementation for Si-fin formation at 7nm node.

  10. Feasibility of atomic layer etching of polymer material based on sequential O{sub 2} exposure and Ar low-pressure plasma-etching

    SciTech Connect

    Vogli, Evelina; Metzler, Dominik; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.

    2013-06-24

    We describe controlled, self-limited etching of a polystyrene polymer using a composite etching cycle consisting of sequential deposition of a thin reactive layer from precursors produced from a polymer-coated electrode within the etching chamber, modification using O{sub 2} exposure, and subsequent low-pressure Ar plasma etching, which removes the oxygen-modified deposited reactive layer along with Almost-Equal-To 0.1 nm unmodified polymer. Deposition prevents net etching of the unmodified polymer during the etching step and enables self-limited etch rates of 0.1 nm/cycle.

  11. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Dishman, J.L.

    1985-10-11

    Disclosed is a method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 1/ in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 2/, wherein Eg/sub 2/ > Eg/sub 1/, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method. The method comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg/sub 1/ but less than Eg/sub 2/, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  12. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Dishman, James L.

    1987-01-01

    A method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg.sub.1 in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg.sub.2, wherein Eg.sub.2 >Eg.sub.1, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method, comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg.sub.1 but less than Eg.sub.2, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  13. OPTIMIZING COLLAGEN TRANSPORT THROUGH TRACK-ETCHED NANOPORES

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Ericka M.; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2008-01-01

    Polymer transport through nanopores is a potentially powerful tool for separation and organization of molecules in biotechnology applications. Our goal is to produce aligned collagen fibrils by mimicking cell-mediated collagen assembly: driving collagen monomers in solution through the aligned nanopores in track-etched membranes followed by fibrillogenesis at the pore exit. We examined type I atelo-collagen monomer transport in neutral, cold solution through polycarbonate track-etched membranes comprising 80-nm-diameter, 6-μm-long pores at 2% areal fraction. Source concentrations of 1.0, 2.8 and 7.0 mg/ml and pressure differentials of 0, 10 and 20 inH2O were used. Membrane surfaces were hydrophilized via covalent poly(ethylene-glycol) binding to limit solute-membrane interaction. Collagen transport through the nanopores was a non-intuitive process due to the complex behavior of this associating molecule in semi-dilute solution. Nonetheless, a modified open pore model provided reasonable predictions of transport parameters. Transport rates were concentration- and pressure-dependent, with diffusivities across the membrane in semi-dilute solution two-fold those in dilute solution, possibly via cooperative diffusion or polymer entrainment. The most significant enhancement of collagen transport was accomplished by membrane hydrophilization. The highest concentration transported (5.99±2.58 mg/ml) with the highest monomer flux (2.60±0.49 ×103 molecules s-1 pore-1) was observed using 2.8 mg collagen/ml, 10 inH2O and hydrophilic membranes. PMID:21394216

  14. VisualTAPAS: an example of density functional theory assisted understanding and simulation of anisotropic etching (abstract only).

    PubMed

    Gosálvez, Miguel A

    2008-02-13

    VisualTAPAS is a self-contained, user-friendly, graphical user interface based simulator of wet etching and deep reactive ion etching with multi-masking capabilities, built upon an octree representation of the silicon substrate (www.fyslab.hut.fi/∼mag/VisualTAPAS/Home.html). The program allows the use of a wide range of kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and cellular automata time-evolution algorithms, including a fast octree search algorithm for the KMC simulations. 'VisualTAPAS' stands for 'visual three-dimensional anisotropic processing at all scales'. The use of the term 'visual' stresses the interactive visual capabilities of the program. Here, a brief history of the evolution of VisualTAPAS as a research tool will be presented: from the initial efforts, explaining the anisotropy of wet etching as a result of steric hindrance using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and KMC simulations, to the most recent implementation, focusing on the propagation of the etch front for engineering applications by making use of the analytical solution of the continuous cellular automaton (CCA) method; and in between, a recent example of DFT assisted understanding of the effects of metal impurities on the surface morphology of the etched surfaces will be presented. We try to bridge together three complementary simulation tools, namely, DFT, KMC and CCA methods. Our experience with the use of the three methods for the simulation of anisotropic etching shows that DFT is very useful and, many times, an unavoidable approach. Similarly, the KMC approach is the method of choice for understanding the large variety of etched surface morphologies while the CCA is an outstanding tool for the simulation of the process at an engineering level.

  15. Effect of silicon resistivity on its porosification using metal induced chemical etching: morphology and photoluminescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shailendra K.; Sahu, Gayatri; Kumar, Vivek; Sahoo, P. K.; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-03-01

    The structure and light-emitting properties of porous Si nanowires (Si NWs) fabricated by metal induced chemical etching (MIE) process on two different Si substrates of different resistivities have been investigated here. The surface morphological studies have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy. It is observed that porous Si containing well aligned Si NWs is formed from high resistivity (1-20 Ωcm) Si wafer, whereas interconnected pores or cheese-like structures are formed from low resistivity (0.2 Ωcm) Si wafers after MIE. An explanation for the different porosification processes has been proposed based on the initial doping level, where number of dopants seems to be playing an important role in the etching process. Visible photoluminescence (PL) has been observed from all the porous Si samples, that are attributed due to quantum confinement effect.

  16. Wet-Etch Figuring Optical Figuring by Controlled Application of Liquid Etchant

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    2001-02-13

    WET-ETCH FIGURING (WEF) is an automated method of precisely figuring optical materials by the controlled application of aqueous etchant solution. This technology uses surface-tension-gradient-driven flow to confine and stabilize a wetted zone of an etchant solution or other aqueous processing fluid on the surface of an object. This wetted zone can be translated on the surface in a computer-controlled fashion for precise spatial control of the surface reactions occurring (e.g. chemical etching). WEF is particularly suitable for figuring very thin optical materials because it applies no thermal or mechanical stress to the material. Also, because the process is stress-free the workpiece can be monitored during figuring using interferometric metrology, and the measurements obtained can be used to control the figuring process in real-time--something that cannot be done with traditional figuring methods.

  17. Effects of Etch-and-Rinse and Self-etch Adhesives on Dentin MMP-2 and MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, A.; Scaffa, P.; Carrilho, M.; Tjäderhane, L.; Di Lenarda, R.; Polimeni, A.; Tezvergil-Mutluay, A.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Breschi, L.

    2013-01-01

    Auto-degradation of collagen matrices occurs within hybrid layers created by contemporary dentin bonding systems, by the slow action of host-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). This study tested the null hypothesis that there are no differences in the activities of MMP-2 and -9 after treatment with different etch-and-rinse or self-etch adhesives. Tested adhesives were: Adper Scotchbond 1XT (3M ESPE), PQ1 (Ultradent), Peak LC (Ultradent), Optibond Solo Plus (Kerr), Prime&Bond NT (Dentsply) (all 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesives), and Adper Easy Bond (3M ESPE), Tri-S (Kuraray), and Xeno-V (Dentsply) (1-step self-etch adhesives). MMP-2 and -9 activities were quantified in adhesive-treated dentin powder by means of an activity assay and gelatin zymography. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities were found after treatment with all of the simplified etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives; however, the activation was adhesive-dependent. It is concluded that all two-step etch-and-rinse and the one-step self-etch adhesives tested can activate endogenous MMP-2 and MMP-9 in human dentin. These results support the role of endogenous MMPs in the degradation of hybrid layers created by these adhesives. PMID:23128110

  18. Bonding with self-etching primers--pumice or pre-etch? An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ian; Bradley, Gerard T; Bosio, Jose A; Hefti, Arthur F; Berzins, David W

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths (SBSs) of orthodontic brackets bonded with self-etching primer (SEP) using different enamel surface preparations. A two-by-two factorial study design was used. Sixty human premolars were harvested, cleaned, and randomly assigned to four groups (n = 15 per group). Teeth were bathed in saliva for 48 hours to form a pellicle. Treatments were assigned as follows: group 1 was pumiced for 10 seconds and pre-etched for 5 seconds with 37 per cent phosphoric acid before bonding with SEP (Transbond Plus). Group 2 was pumiced for 10 seconds before bonding. Group 3 was pre-etched for 5 seconds before bonding. Group 4 had no mechanical or chemical preparation before bonding. All teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C before debonding. The SBS values and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score were recorded. The SBS values (± 1 SD) for groups 1-4 were 22.9 ± 6.6, 16.1 ± 7.3, 36.2 ± 8.2, and 13.1 ± 10.1 MPa, respectively. Two-way analysis of variance and subsequent contrasts showed statistically significant differences among treatment groups. ARI scores indicated the majority of adhesive remained on the bracket for all four groups. Pre-etching the bonding surface for 5 seconds with 37 per cent phosphoric acid, instead of pumicing, when using SEPs to bond orthodontic brackets, resulted in greater SBSs.

  19. Feature Profiles on Plasma Etch of Organic Films by a Temporal Control of Radical Densities and Real-Time Monitoring of Substrate Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Hiroki; Ito, Masafumi; Ohta, Takayuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    The precise etching of organic films with a low dielectric constant (low-k) in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma etching reactor with a plasma generation of 100 MHz and an applied bias of 2 MHz employing a gas mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen was performed by real-time control of the densities of hydrogen (H) and nitrogen (N) radicals based on real-time measurement of the Si substrate temperature. H and N radical densities were monitored near the sidewall of the reactor by vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, and temperature was monitored by an optical fiber-type low-coherence interferometer. On the basis of the results of surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, etched profiles were effectively determined from the chemical component of protection layers on the sidewall of the etched pattern affected by the ratio of H/(H+N) and substrate temperature. As the etching feature evolves, the ratio of radical density should be controlled temporally to maintain vertical profiles according to the change in substrate temperature. As a result, we have successfully realized an organic film with a vertical feature. These results indicate the need for autonomous control of the etch process based on real-time information on the plasma process for the next-generation ultrafine etching.

  20. Particle swarm optimization-based continuous cellular automaton for the simulation of deep reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Gosálvez, Miguel A.; Pal, Prem; Sato, Kazuo; Xing, Yan

    2015-05-01

    We combine the particle swarm optimization (PSO) method and the continuous cellular automaton (CCA) in order to simulate deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), also known as the Bosch process. By considering a generic growth/etch process, the proposed PSO-CCA method provides a general, integrated procedure to optimize the parameter values of any given theoretical model conceived to describe the corresponding experiments, which are simulated by the CCA method. To stress the flexibility of the PSO-CCA method, two different theoretical models of the DRIE process are used, namely, the ballistic transport and reaction (BTR) model, and the reactant concentration (RC) model. DRIE experiments are designed and conducted to compare the simulation results with the experiments on different machines and process conditions. Previously reported experimental data are also considered to further test the flexibility of the proposed method. The agreement between the simulations and experiments strongly indicates that the PSO-CCA method can be used to adjust the theoretical parameters by using a limited amount of experimental data. The proposed method has the potential to be applied on the modeling and optimization of other growth/etch processes.