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Sample records for charged colloidal rods

  1. Phase diagrams of charged colloidal rods: Can a uniaxial charge distribution break chiral symmetry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drwenski, Tara; Dussi, Simone; Hermes, Michiel; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2016-03-01

    We construct phase diagrams for charged rodlike colloids within the second-virial approximation as a function of rod concentration, salt concentration, and colloidal charge. Besides the expected isotropic-nematic transition, we also find parameter regimes with a coexistence between a nematic and a second, more highly aligned nematic phase including an isotropic-nematic-nematic triple point and a nematic-nematic critical point, which can all be explained in terms of the twisting effect. We compute the Frank elastic constants to see if the twist elastic constant can become negative, which would indicate the possibility of a cholesteric phase spontaneously forming. Although the twisting effect reduces the twist elastic constant, we find that it always remains positive. In addition, we find that for finite aspect-ratio rods the twist elastic constant is also always positive, such that there is no evidence of chiral symmetry breaking due to a uniaxial charge distribution.

  2. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size.

  3. Switching plastic crystals of colloidal rods with electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing; Besseling, Thijs H.; Hermes, Michiel; Demirörs, Ahmet F.; Imhof, Arnout; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2014-01-01

    When a crystal melts into a liquid both long-ranged positional and orientational order are lost, and long-time translational and rotational self-diffusion appear. Sometimes, these properties do not change at once, but in stages, allowing states of matter such as liquid crystals or plastic crystals with unique combinations of properties. Plastic crystals/glasses are characterized by long-ranged positional order/frozen-in-disorder but short-ranged orientational order, which is dynamic. Here we show by quantitative three-dimensional studies that charged rod-like colloidal particles form three-dimensional plastic crystals and glasses if their repulsions extend significantly beyond their length. These plastic phases can be reversibly switched to full crystals by an electric field. These new phases provide insight into the role of rotations in phase behaviour and could be useful for photonic applications. PMID:24446033

  4. Electric Field Driven Self-Assembly of Colloidal Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Jaime; Chaudhary, Kundan; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve; Lewis, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    The ability to assemble anisotropic colloidal building blocks into ordered configurations is of both scientific and technological importance. We are studying how electric field-induced interactions guide the self-assembly of these blocks into well aligned microstructures. Specifically, we present observations of the assembly of colloidal silica rods (L/D ˜ 4) within planar electrode cells as a function of different electric field parameters. Results from video microscopy and image analysis demonstrate that aligned microstructures form due to the competition between equilibrium interactions of induced dipoles and non-equilibrium processes (i.e., electro-osmosis). Under the appropriate electric field conditions (˜ kHZ AC fields), aligned colloidal rod fluids form over large areas on the electrode surface. The superposition of a DC electric field to this aligned colloidal rod fluid initiates their condensation into a vertically oriented crystalline phase. Ongoing work is now focused on exploring how temporal changes to electric fields influence colloidal rod dynamics and, hence, the assembly kinetics of aligned colloidal monolayers.

  5. Small bright charged colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Liu, Heng; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2014-01-28

    Using electrochemical charge injection, the fluorescence lifetimes of negatively charged core/shell CdTe/CdSe QDs are measured as a function of core size and shell thickness. It is found that the ensemble negative trion lifetimes reach a maximum (∼4.5 ns) for an intermediate shell thickness. This leads to the smallest particles (∼4.5 nm) with the brightest trion to date. Single dot measurements show that the negative charge suppresses blinking and that the trion can be as bright as the exciton at room temperature. In contrast, the biexciton lifetimes remain short and exhibit only a monotonous increase with shell thickness, showing no correlation with the negative trion decays. The suppression of the Auger process in small negatively charged CdTe/CdSe quantum dots is unprecedented and a significant departure from prior results with ultrathick CdSe/CdS core/shell or dot-in-rod structures. The proposed reason for the optimum shell thickness is that the electron-hole overlap is restricted to the CdTe core while the electron is tuned to have zero kinetic energy in the core for that optimum shell thickness. The different trend of the biexciton lifetime is not explained but tentatively attributed to shorter-lived positive trions at smaller sizes. These results improve our understanding of multiexciton recombination in colloidal quantum dots and may lead to the design of bright charged QDs for more efficient light-emitting devices.

  6. Smectic filaments in colloidal suspensions of rods.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Daan; Schilling, Tanja

    2002-10-01

    In supersaturated isotropic mixtures of hard rods, smectic filaments have recently been observed. We propose a model for formation and growth of these filaments similar to the Hoffman-Lauritzen model for polymer crystallization. Filament thickness is determined by a compromise between maximizing the amount of smectic phase formed and minimizing the nucleation barrier for adding new segments to the growing filament. We compare our analytical results to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Transport in charged colloids driven by thermoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Würger, Alois

    2008-09-01

    We study the thermal diffusion coefficient D{T} of a charged colloid in a temperature gradient, and find that it is to a large extent determined by the thermoelectric response of the electrolyte solution. The thermally induced salinity gradient leads in general to a strong increase with temperature. The difference of the heat of transport of coions and counterions gives rise to a thermoelectric field that drives the colloid to the cold or to the warm, depending on the sign of its charge. Our results provide an explanation for recent experimental findings on thermophoresis in colloidal suspensions. PMID:18851262

  8. Ionic colloidal crystals of oppositely charged particles.

    PubMed

    Leunissen, Mirjam E; Christova, Christina G; Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Royall, C Patrick; Campbell, Andrew I; Imhof, Arnout; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2005-09-01

    Colloidal suspensions are widely used to study processes such as melting, freezing and glass transitions. This is because they display the same phase behaviour as atoms or molecules, with the nano- to micrometre size of the colloidal particles making it possible to observe them directly in real space. Another attractive feature is that different types of colloidal interactions, such as long-range repulsive, short-range attractive, hard-sphere-like and dipolar, can be realized and give rise to equilibrium phases. However, spherically symmetric, long-range attractions (that is, ionic interactions) have so far always resulted in irreversible colloidal aggregation. Here we show that the electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged particles can be tuned such that large ionic colloidal crystals form readily, with our theory and simulations confirming the stability of these structures. We find that in contrast to atomic systems, the stoichiometry of our colloidal crystals is not dictated by charge neutrality; this allows us to obtain a remarkable diversity of new binary structures. An external electric field melts the crystals, confirming that the constituent particles are indeed oppositely charged. Colloidal model systems can thus be used to study the phase behaviour of ionic species. We also expect that our approach to controlling opposite-charge interactions will facilitate the production of binary crystals of micrometre-sized particles, which could find use as advanced materials for photonic applications.

  9. Density functional theory of charged colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Derek Y.

    2001-06-01

    The phase behavior of charged colloidal systems has been studied recently by the density functional theory formalism (DFT) [R. van Roij, M. Dijkstra, and J. P. Hansen, Phys. Rev. E 59, 2010 (1999)]. A key feature of this approach is the appearance of a density and temperature-dependent effective Hamiltonian between the charged colloids. Under certain approximations, the effective Hamiltonian is made up only of a sum of position-independent one-body or volume terms and two-body colloid-separation dependent terms. In the limit of low colloidal densities, the DFT results do not reduce to the familiar Debye-Hückel limiting law nor do the results agree with previous work based on an identical approach but were developed using traditional statistical-mechanical methods [B. Beresford-Smith, D. Y. C. Chan, and D. J. Mitchell J. Colloid Interface Sci. 105, 216 (1985)]. This paper provides a reconciliation of these differences and comments on the significance of the one-body volume terms in the effective Hamiltonian of a system of charged colloids in determining thermodynamics and phase behavior.

  10. Determination of the rod-wire transition length in colloidal indium phosphide quantum rods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fudong; Buhro, William E

    2007-11-21

    Colloidal InP quantum rods (QRs) having controlled diameters and lengths are grown by the solution-liquid-solid method, from Bi nanoparticles in the presence of hexadecylamine and other conventional quantum dot surfactants. These quantum rods show band-edge photoluminescence after HF photochemical etching. Photoluminescence efficiency is further enhanced after the Bi tips are selectively removed from the QRs by oleic acid etching. The QRs are anisotropically 3D confined, the nature of which is compared to the corresponding isotropic 3D confinement in quantum dots and 2D confinement in quantum wires. The 3D-2D rod-wire transition length is experimentally determined to be 25 nm, which is about 2 times the bulk InP exciton Bohr radius (of approximately 11 nm).

  11. Statistical thermodynamics of charge-stabilized colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Valderrama, A.

    2008-06-01

    This thesis is a theoretical study of equilibrium statistical thermodynamic properties of colloidal systems in which electrostatic interactions play a dominant role, namely, charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. Such systems are fluids consisting of a mixture of a large number of mesoscopic particles and microscopic ions which interact via the Coulomb force, suspended in a molecular fluid. Quantum statistical mechanics is essential to fully understand the properties and stability of such systems. A less fundamental but for many purposes, sufficient description, is provided by classical statistical mechanics. In such approximation the system is considered as composed of a great number of charged classical particles with additional hard-core repulsions. The kinetic energy or momentum integrals become independent Gaussians, and hence their contribution to the free energy can be trivially evaluated. The contribution of the potential energy to the free energy on the other hand, depends upon the configuration of all the particles and becomes highly non-trivial due to the long-range character of the Coulomb force and the extremely different length scales involved in the problem. Using the microscopic model described above, we focus on the calculation of equilibrium thermodynamic properties (response functions), correlations (structure factors), and mechanical properties (forces and stresses), which can be measured in experiments and computed by Monte Carlo simulations. This thesis is divided into three parts. In part I, comprising chapters 2 and 3, we focus on finite-thickness effects in colloidal platelets and rigid planar membranes. In chapter 2 we study electrolyte-mediated interactions between two of such colloidal objects. Several aspects of these interactions are considered including the nature (attractive or repulsive) of the force between the objects, the osmotic properties for different types of surfaces and image charge effects. In part II, which includes

  12. Pair Potential of Charged Colloidal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Addas, K.; Ward, A.; Flynn, N. T.; Velasco, E.; Hagan, M. F.; Dogic, Z.; Fraden, S.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the construction of colloidal stars: 1μm polystyrene beads grafted with a dense brush of 1μm long and 10 nm wide charged semiflexible filamentous viruses. The pair interaction potentials of colloidal stars are measured using an experimental implementation of umbrella sampling, a technique originally developed in computer simulations in order to probe rare events. The influence of ionic strength and grafting density on the interaction is measured. Good agreements are found between the measured interactions and theoretical predictions based upon the osmotic pressure of counterions.

  13. Phase behavior of mixtures of colloidal rods and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Marie Elizabeth

    In this thesis we study entropy driven order in mixtures of rods and spheres. Systems of rod-like particles, as pure systems, exhibit rich liquid crystalline phase behavior. We chose to work with aqueous suspensions of either TMV or fd virus particles, both rod-like lyotropic systems. We complicate the phase behavior by adding a second component, colloidal spheres (PEG/PEO, BSA, polystyrene latex, or Dextran). Our first paper explores the phase behavior of TMV mixed with BSA or PEO, mapping out a phase diagram based on optical microscopy observations. We found our qualitative observations of TMV mixtures to be consistent with theoretical models of the depletion force. The second paper extends our study of phase behavior to mixtures of fd virus and polystyrene latex spheres. We qualitatively observe bulk demixing for very small diameter added spheres and for very large diameter added spheres. In addition, we observed microphase separation morphologies, such as lamellar and columnar structures, which formed for fd mixed with polystyrene latex spheres 0.1 microns in diameter. All of these microphase samples were viewed with differential interference microscopy (a few samples were further investigated using electron microscopy). Both our data and theoretical calculations illustrated that 0.1 micron diameter spheres have a stabilizing effect on the smectic phase. Our final work focused on fd virus mixed with Dextran. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the effect of added polymer on the isotropic-cholesteric co-existence region. I-Ch samples were prepared and fd and Dextran concentrations were measured using a spectrophotometer. Several conditions were explored, including two different molecular weights of Dextran and a range of ionic strengths. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the I-Ch coexistence region widens with added Dextran with the polymer preferentially partioned into the isotropic phase.

  14. Electric-field Induced Microdynamics of Charged Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyongok

    2014-12-01

    Electric-field induced phase/state transitions are observed in AC electric fields with small amplitudes and low frequencies in suspensions of charged fibrous viruses (fd), which are model systems for highly charged rod-like colloids. Texture- and particle-dynamics in these field-induced states, and on crossing transition lines, are explored by image time-correlation and dynamic light scattering, respectively. At relatively low frequencies, starting from a system within the isotropic-nematic coexistence region, a transition from a nematic to a chiral nematic is observed, as well as a dynamical state where nematic domains melt and reform. These transitions are preliminary due to field-induced dissociation/association of condensed ions. At higher frequencies a uniform state is formed that is stabilized by hydrodynamic interactions through field-induced electro-osmotic flow where the rods align along the field direction. There is a point in the field-amplitude versus frequency plane where various transition lines meet. This point can be identified as a “non-equilibrium critical point”, in the sense that a length scale and a time scale diverge on approach of that point. The microscopic dynamics exhibits discontinuities on crossing transition lines that were identified independently by means of image and signal correlation spectroscopy.

  15. Effect of surface charge on colloidal charge reversal.

    PubMed

    Martín-Molina, A; Rodríguez-Beas, C; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R; Quesada-Pérez, M

    2009-05-14

    The objective of this research work is to understand the effect of the surface charge density on the charge reversal phenomenon. To this end, we use experimental results and computer simulations. In particular, we measure the electrophoretic mobility of latex particles (macroions) in the presence of a multivalent electrolyte. We have focused on the electrolyte concentration range at which a reversal in the electrophoretic mobility is expected to happen. In particular, the role of the surface charge on the charge reversal process is looked into from several latexes with the same functional group but different surface charge densities. Although the mechanism responsible for the colloidal charge reversal is still a controversial issue, it is proved that ionic correlations are behind the appearance of such phenomenon (especially near the macroion surface). This conclusion can be inferred from a great variety of theoretical models. According to them, one of the factors that determine the charge reversal is the surface charge density of the macroions. However, this feature has been rarely analyzed in experiments. Our results appear therefore as a demanded survey to test the validity of the theoretical predictions. Moreover, we have also performed Monte Carlo simulations that take the ion size into account. The correlation found between experiments and simulations is fairly good. The combination of these techniques provides new insight into the colloidal charge reversal phenomena showing the effect of surface charge. PMID:19385634

  16. Sedimentation of a charged colloidal sphere in a charged cavity.

    PubMed

    Keh, Huan J; Cheng, Tsung F

    2011-12-01

    An analytical study is presented for the quasisteady sedimentation of a charged spherical particle located at the center of a charged spherical cavity. The overlap of the electric double layers is allowed, and the polarization (relaxation) effect in the double layers is considered. The electrokinetic equations that govern the ionic concentration distributions, electric potential profile, and fluid flow field in the electrolyte solution are linearized assuming that the system is only slightly distorted from equilibrium. Using a perturbation method, these linearized equations are solved for a symmetric electrolyte with the surface charge densities of the particle and cavity as the small perturbation parameters. An analytical expression for the settling velocity of the charged sphere is obtained from a balance among the gravitational, electrostatic, and hydrodynamic forces acting on it. Our results indicate that the presence of the particle charge reduces the magnitude of the sedimentation velocity of the particle in an uncharged cavity and the presence of the fixed charge at the cavity surface increases the magnitude of the sedimentation velocity of an uncharged particle in a charged cavity. For the case of a charged sphere settling in a charged cavity with equivalent surface charge densities, the net effect of the fixed charges will increase the sedimentation velocity of the particle. For the case of a charged sphere settling in a charged cavity with their surface charge densities in opposite signs, the net effect of the fixed charges in general reduces/increases the sedimentation velocity of the particle if the surface charge density of the particle has a greater/smaller magnitude than that of the cavity. The effect of the surface charge at the cavity wall on the sedimentation of a colloidal particle is found to increase with a decrease in the particle-to-cavity size ratio and can be significant in appropriate situations.

  17. Sedimentation of a charged colloidal sphere in a charged cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keh, Huan J.; Cheng, Tsung F.

    2011-12-01

    An analytical study is presented for the quasisteady sedimentation of a charged spherical particle located at the center of a charged spherical cavity. The overlap of the electric double layers is allowed, and the polarization (relaxation) effect in the double layers is considered. The electrokinetic equations that govern the ionic concentration distributions, electric potential profile, and fluid flow field in the electrolyte solution are linearized assuming that the system is only slightly distorted from equilibrium. Using a perturbation method, these linearized equations are solved for a symmetric electrolyte with the surface charge densities of the particle and cavity as the small perturbation parameters. An analytical expression for the settling velocity of the charged sphere is obtained from a balance among the gravitational, electrostatic, and hydrodynamic forces acting on it. Our results indicate that the presence of the particle charge reduces the magnitude of the sedimentation velocity of the particle in an uncharged cavity and the presence of the fixed charge at the cavity surface increases the magnitude of the sedimentation velocity of an uncharged particle in a charged cavity. For the case of a charged sphere settling in a charged cavity with equivalent surface charge densities, the net effect of the fixed charges will increase the sedimentation velocity of the particle. For the case of a charged sphere settling in a charged cavity with their surface charge densities in opposite signs, the net effect of the fixed charges in general reduces/increases the sedimentation velocity of the particle if the surface charge density of the particle has a greater/smaller magnitude than that of the cavity. The effect of the surface charge at the cavity wall on the sedimentation of a colloidal particle is found to increase with a decrease in the particle-to-cavity size ratio and can be significant in appropriate situations.

  18. Thermoelectricity and thermodiffusion in charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Huang, B T; Roger, M; Bonetti, M; Salez, T J; Wiertel-Gasquet, C; Dubois, E; Cabreira Gomes, R; Demouchy, G; Mériguet, G; Peyre, V; Kouyaté, M; Filomeno, C L; Depeyrot, J; Tourinho, F A; Perzynski, R; Nakamae, S

    2015-08-01

    The Seebeck and Soret coefficients of ionically stabilized suspension of maghemite nanoparticles in dimethyl sulfoxide are experimentally studied as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction. In the presence of a temperature gradient, the charged colloidal nanoparticles experience both thermal drift due to their interactions with the solvent and electric forces proportional to the internal thermoelectric field. The resulting thermodiffusion of nanoparticles is observed through forced Rayleigh scattering measurements, while the thermoelectric field is accessed through voltage measurements in a thermocell. Both techniques provide independent estimates of nanoparticle's entropy of transfer as high as 82 meV K(-1). Such a property may be used to improve the thermoelectric coefficients in liquid thermocells.

  19. Colloid Titration--A Rapid Method for the Determination of Charged Colloid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Keihei; Kina, Ken'yu

    1985-01-01

    "Colloid titration" is a volumetric method for determining charged polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions. The principle of colloid titration, reagents used in the procedure, methods of endpoint detection, preparation of reagent solutions, general procedure used, results obtained, and pH profile of colloid titration are considered. (JN)

  20. Screening of charged spheroidal colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Carlos; Téllez, Gabriel

    2010-10-01

    We study the effective screened electrostatic potential created by a spheroidal colloidal particle immersed in an electrolyte, within the mean field approximation, using Poisson-Boltzmann equation in its linear and nonlinear forms, and also beyond the mean field by means of Monte Carlo computer simulation. The anisotropic shape of the particle has a strong effect on the screened potential, even at large distances (compared to the Debye length) from it. To quantify this anisotropy effect, we focus our study on the dependence of the potential on the position of the observation point with respect with the orientation of the spheroidal particle. For several different boundary conditions (constant potential, or constant surface charge) we find that, at large distance, the potential is higher in the direction of the large axis of the spheroidal particle.

  1. Thermoelectricity and thermodiffusion in charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Huang, B T; Roger, M; Bonetti, M; Salez, T J; Wiertel-Gasquet, C; Dubois, E; Cabreira Gomes, R; Demouchy, G; Mériguet, G; Peyre, V; Kouyaté, M; Filomeno, C L; Depeyrot, J; Tourinho, F A; Perzynski, R; Nakamae, S

    2015-08-01

    The Seebeck and Soret coefficients of ionically stabilized suspension of maghemite nanoparticles in dimethyl sulfoxide are experimentally studied as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction. In the presence of a temperature gradient, the charged colloidal nanoparticles experience both thermal drift due to their interactions with the solvent and electric forces proportional to the internal thermoelectric field. The resulting thermodiffusion of nanoparticles is observed through forced Rayleigh scattering measurements, while the thermoelectric field is accessed through voltage measurements in a thermocell. Both techniques provide independent estimates of nanoparticle's entropy of transfer as high as 82 meV K(-1). Such a property may be used to improve the thermoelectric coefficients in liquid thermocells. PMID:26254665

  2. Interactions and collective behavior of attractive colloidal rods and microspheres grafted with filamentous bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei

    Interactions and collective behavior are investigated for two systems of attractive colloidal rods and colloidal stars. Attractive colloidal rods are constructed by grafting the temperature-sensitive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) to the surface of the semi-flexible filamentous fd virus. The phase diagram of fd-PNIPAM system becomes independent of ionic strength at high salt concentration and low temperature, i.e., the rods are sterically stabilized by the polymer. However, the network of rods undergoes a sol-gel transition as the temperature is raised. The viscoelastic moduli of fd and fd-PNIPAM suspensions are compared as a function of temperature, and the effect of ionic strength on the gelling behavior of fd-PNIPAM solution is measured. For all fluidlike and solidlike samples, the frequency-dependant linear viscoelastic moduli can be scaled onto universal master curves. Colloidal stars are constructed by grafting to 1 mum polystyrene beads a dense brush of 1 mum long and 10 nm wide semi-flexible filamentous viruses. The pair interaction potentials of colloidal stars are measured using an experimental implementation of umbrella sampling, a technique originally developed in computer simulations in order to probe rare events. The influence of ionic strength and grafting density on the interaction is measured. Good agreements are found between the measured interactions and theoretical predictions based upon the osmotic pressure of counterions.

  3. Heating-induced freezing and melting transitions in charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Toyotama, Akiko; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2011-03-01

    We examine influence of temperature on the phase behavior of dilute aqueous dispersions of charged colloidal silica and polystyrene particles. They undergo either freezing or melting transitions with increasing temperature. Freezing occurs in the case of low-charge, low-salt colloids, and melting is observed in the case of high-charge, high-salt colloids. All of these phase transitions are thermoreversible. These intriguing behaviors can be qualitatively explained in terms of the decrease in the permittivity of water at elevated temperatures.

  4. Thermoreversible Gels Composed of Colloidal Silica Rods with Short-Range Attractions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ryan P; Hong, Kunlun; Wagner, Norman J

    2016-08-23

    Dynamic arrest transitions of colloidal suspensions containing nonspherical particles are of interest for the design and processing of various particle technologies. To better understand the effects of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on gel and glass formation, we present a colloidal model system of octadecyl-coated silica rods, termed as adhesive hard rods (AHR), which enables control of rod aspect ratio and temperature-dependent interactions. The aspect ratios of silica rods were controlled by varying the initial TEOS concentration following the work of Kuijk et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 2346-2349) and temperature-dependent attractions were introduced by coating the calcined silica rods with an octadecyl-brush and suspending in tetradecane. The rod length and aspect ratio were found to increase with TEOS concentration as expected, while other properties such as the rod diameter, coating coverage, density, and surface roughness were nearly independent of the aspect ratio. Ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering measurements revealed temperature-dependent attractions between octadecyl-coated silica rods in tetradecane, as characterized by a low-q upturn in the scattered intensity upon thermal quenching. Lastly, the rheology of a concentrated AHR suspension in tetradecane demonstrated thermoreversible gelation behavior, displaying a nearly 5 orders of magnitude change in the dynamic moduli as the temperature was cycled between 15 and 40 °C. The adhesive hard rod model system serves as a tunable platform to explore the combined influence of particle shape anisotropy and attraction strength on the dynamic arrest transitions in colloidal suspensions with thermoreversible, short-range attractions. PMID:27466883

  5. Dynamic electrophoresis of charged colloids in an oscillating electric field.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chunyu; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2014-06-01

    The dynamics of charged colloids in an electrolyte solution is studied using direct numerical simulations via the smoothed profile method. We calculated the complex electrophoretic mobility μ(ω) of the charged colloids under an oscillating electric field of frequency ω. We show the existence of three dynamically distinct regimes, determined by the momentum diffusion and ionic diffusion time scales. The present results agree well with approximate theories based on the cell model in dilute suspensions; however, systematic deviations between the simulation results and theoretical predictions are observed as the volume fraction of colloids is increased, similar to the case of constant electric fields.

  6. Determination of colloidal particle surface charge from dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Marko; Nuansri, Rittirong; Mazza, Jacob; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Electrophoresis (EP) is used to determine colloidal particle surface charge. However, when the Debye length is comparable to or larger than the particle size, electrophoresis cannot be reliably used to determine the surface charge due to counter ion retardation flow. Alexander et al. developed a theory relating colloidal osmotic pressure and particle surface charge. We use dielectrophoresis (DEP) to obtain a potential landscape based on the number density distribution of the particles in a non-uniform AC electric field. We determine the osmotic pressure from the DEP force and density profiles using Einstein's osmotic equilibrium equation. Surface charge obtained by DEP (thermodynamics) will be compared to that obtained by EP (electrokinetics).

  7. Condensation and dissolution of nematic droplets in dispersions of colloidal rods with thermo–sensitive depletants

    PubMed Central

    Modlińska, Anna; Alsayed, Ahmed M.; Gibaud, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nematic droplets are droplets composed of elongated molecules that tend to point in the same direction but do not have any positional order. Such droplets are well known to adopt a spindle shape called tactoid. How such droplets condensate or melt and how the orientational symmetry is broken remains however unclear. Here we use a colloidal system composed of filamentous viruses as model rod–like colloids and pnipam microgel particles to induce thermo–sensitive depletion attraction between the rods. Microscopy experiments coupled to particle tracking reveal that the condensation of a nematic droplet is preceded by the formation of a new phase, an isotropic droplet. As the viruses constitute an excellent experimental realization of hard rods, it follows that the phenomenology we describe should be relevant to diverse micro- and nano-sized rods that interact through excluded volume interactions. This transition between isotropic and nematic droplets provides a new and reversible pathway to break the symmetry and order colloidal rods within a droplet with an external stimulus, and could constitute a benchmark experiment for a variety of technologies relying on reconfigurable control of rods. PMID:26656207

  8. Charge-extraction strategies for colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xinzheng; Masala, Silvia; Sargent, Edward H

    2014-03-01

    The solar-power conversion efficiencies of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have advanced from sub-1% reported in 2005 to a record value of 8.5% in 2013. Much focus has deservedly been placed on densifying, passivating and crosslinking the colloidal quantum dot solid. Here we review progress in improving charge extraction, achieved by engineering the composition and structure of the electrode materials that contact the colloidal quantum dot film. New classes of structured electrodes have been developed and integrated to form bulk heterojunction devices that enhance photocharge extraction. Control over band offsets, doping and interfacial trap state densities have been essential for achieving improved electrical communication with colloidal quantum dot solids. Quantum junction devices that not only tune the optical absorption spectrum, but also provide inherently matched bands across the interface between p- and n-materials, have proven that charge separation can occur efficiently across an all-quantum-tuned rectifying junction.

  9. Thermal Analog of Gimbal Lock in a Colloidal Ferromagnetic Janus Rod.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongxiang; Balin, Andrew Kaan; Dullens, Roel P A; Yeomans, Julia M; Aarts, Dirk G A L

    2015-12-11

    We report an entropy-driven orientational hopping transition in a magnetically confined colloidal Janus rod. In a magnetic field, the sedimented rod randomly hops between horizontal and vertical states: the latter state comes at a substantial gravitational cost at no reduction of magnetic potential energy. The probability distribution over the angles of the rod shows that the presence of an external magnetic field leads to the emergence of a metastable vertical state separated from the ground state by an effective barrier. This barrier does not come from the potential energy but rather from the vast gain in phase space available to the rod as it approaches the vertical state. The loss of rotational degree of freedom that gives rise to this effect is a statistical mechanical analogue of the phenomenon of gimbal lock from classical mechanics. PMID:26705660

  10. Solidification of a Charged Colloidal Dispersion Investigated Using Microfluidic Pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Ziane, Nadia; Salmon, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-07-28

    We investigate the dynamics of solidification of a charged colloidal dispersion using an original microfluidic technique referred to as micropervaporation. This technique exploits pervaporation within a microfluidic channel to extract the solvent of a dilute colloidal dispersion. Pervaporation concentrates the colloids in a controlled way up to the tip of the channel until a wet solid made of closely packed colloids grows and invades the microfluidic channel. For the charged dispersion under study, we however evidence a liquid to solid transition (LST) preceding the formation of the solid, owing to the presence of long-range electrostatic interactions. This LST is associated with the nucleation and growth of domains confined in the channel. These domains are then compacted anisotropically up to forming a wet solid of closely packed colloids. This solid then invades the whole channel as in directional drying with a growth rate which depends on the microfluidic geometry. In the final steps of the solidification, we observed the occurrence of cracks and shear bands, the delamination of the wet solid from the channel walls, and its invasion by a receding air front. Interestingly, this air front follows specific patterns within the solid which reveal different microscopic colloidal organizations.

  11. Transport of spherical colloids in layered phases of binary mixtures with rod-like particles.

    PubMed

    Piedrahita, Mauricio; Cuetos, Alejandro; Martínez-Haya, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    The transport properties of colloids in anisotropic media constitute a general problem of fundamental interest in experimental sciences, with a broad range of technological applications. This work investigates the transport of soft spherical colloids in binary mixtures with rod-like particles by means of Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics simulations. Layered phases are considered, that range from smectic phases to lamellar phases, depending on the molar fraction of the spherical particles. The investigation serves to characterize the distinct features of transport within layers versus those of transport across neighboring layers, both of which are neatly differentiated. The insertion of particles into layers and the diffusion across them occur at a smaller rate than the intralayer diffusion modulated by the formation of transitory cages in its initial stages. Collective events, in which two or more colloids diffuse across layers in a concerted way, are described as a non-negligible process in these fluids.

  12. Phase behavior of a suspension of colloidal hard rods and nonadsorbing polymer.

    PubMed

    Savenko, S V; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2006-06-21

    We study the phase behavior of a mixture of colloidal hard rods with a length-to-diameter ratio of L/sigma(c)=5 and nonadsorbing ideal polymer. We map our binary mixture onto an effective one-component system by integrating out the degrees of freedom of the polymer coils. We derive a formal expression for the exact effective Hamiltonian of the colloidal rods, i.e., it includes all effective many-body interactions and it is related to the exact free volume available for the polymer. We determine numerically on a grid the free volume available for the ideal polymer coils "on the fly" for each colloidal rod configuration during our Monte Carlo simulations. This allows us to go beyond first-order perturbation theory, which employs the pure hard-rod system as reference state. We perform free energy calculations for the isotropic, nematic, smectic, and crystal phase using thermodynamic integration and common tangent constructions are used at fixed polymer fugacities to map out the phase diagram. The phase behavior is determined for size ratios q=sigma(p)/sigma(c)=0.15, 0.5, and 1, where sigma(p) is the diameter of the polymer coils. The phase diagrams based on the full effective Hamiltonian are compared with those obtained from first-order perturbation theory, from simulations using the effective pair potential approximation to the effective Hamiltonian, and with those based on an empiric effective depletion potential for the rods. We find that the many-body character of the effective interactions stabilizes the nematic and smectic phases for large q, while the effective pair potential description overestimates the attractive interactions and favors, hence, a broad isotropic-crystal coexistence. PMID:16821948

  13. Active colloids propelled by induced-charge electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ming; Luijten, Erik

    Populations of motile organisms exhibit a variety of collective behaviors, ranging from bacterial colony formation to the flocking of birds. Current understanding of these active motions, which are typically far from equilibrium and based on the collective behavior of self-propelled entities, is far from complete. One approach is to reproduce these observations in systems of synthetic active colloids. However, one of the standard self-propulsion mechanisms, induced-charge electrophoresis (ICEP) of a dielectric Janus colloid remains not fully understood by itself, especially the strong dependence of the resultant particle motion on the frequency of the external field. Resolution of this outstanding problem requires detailed study of the time-resolved dielectric response of the colloid and the dynamics of the electric double layer. Through molecular dynamics simulations coupled with an efficient dielectric solver, we elucidate the underlying mechanism of the frequency dependence of ICEP and the polarization of a metallodielectric Janus colloid.

  14. Charge-Controlled Colloids on Liquid-Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Daniel A.; Reck, Bernd; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2014-03-01

    The tendency of colloidal particles to stabilize interfaces has been exploited for many years to generate Pickering emulsions with a variety of industrial applications. However, the exact stabilization mechanism and its dependence on the surface properties of the colloidal particles are not yet fully understood. We provide new interfacial studies on the nonequilibrium dynamics of a colloidal system with tunable surface charge density. We push individual sub-micron colloidal particles towards an oil-water interface and track their motion in three-dimensions using holographic microscopy to examine the influence of zeta potential on the dynamics of the system. This project was funded by the BASF Advanced Research Initiative, BASF SE, Germany.

  15. On shape and charges in colloidal dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trizac, Emmanuel

    Coulomb interactions are paramount in determining structural and dynamical properties for a wealth of anisotropic soft matter systems (clays, mineral crystallites, exfoliated nanosheets, patchy colloids, cement etc). The interplay between screening effects and anisotropy leads to distinctive yet often overlooked features, that will be discussed. In turn, the competition between the resulting effective potential and hard core constraints will be addressed. This competition can lead to non trivial structures, or impose strong dynamical slowing down. A distinction will be operated between weak and strong Coulomb coupling regimes.

  16. Spontaneous formation of stringlike clusters and smectic sheets for colloidal rods confined in thin wedgelike gaps.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideatsu; Maeda, Yoshiko

    2013-08-20

    Monodispersed colloidal rods of β-FeOOH with sizes ranging from 270 to 580 nm in length and 50 to 80 nm in width were synthesized. Narrow wedgelike gaps (0 to 700 nm in height) were formed around the inner bottom edge of the suspension glass cells. Optical microscopic observations revealed the formation of stringlike clusters of the rods and smectic sheets (by spontaneous side-by-side clustering of the strings) in the isotropic phase of the rod suspensions confined in narrow gaps; the electrolyte (HCl) concentrations of the suspensions are 5-40 mM, at which inter-rod interactions are attractive. The strings exhibit different colors that were used to investigate the structures of the strings with the help of interference color theory for thin films. The results are as follows. (1) The rods, lying flat on the gap bottom, are connected side-by-side and stacked upward to form stringlike clusters with different thicknesses depending on the gap height. (2) The stacking numbers (N(sr)) of the rods are estimated to be 1-5. With N(sr) increasing from 2 to 5, the volume fractions (ϕ) of the rods in the strings increased typically from 0.25-0.3 to 0.35-0.42 to reach limiting values (close to the ϕ values of the rods in the bulk smectic phase). (3) Unexpected low-ϕ strings are found in regions with an intermediate height in the gaps. These behaviors of ϕ may be caused by thermal fluctuations of the strings.

  17. Spontaneous formation of stringlike clusters and smectic sheets for colloidal rods confined in thin wedgelike gaps.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideatsu; Maeda, Yoshiko

    2013-08-20

    Monodispersed colloidal rods of β-FeOOH with sizes ranging from 270 to 580 nm in length and 50 to 80 nm in width were synthesized. Narrow wedgelike gaps (0 to 700 nm in height) were formed around the inner bottom edge of the suspension glass cells. Optical microscopic observations revealed the formation of stringlike clusters of the rods and smectic sheets (by spontaneous side-by-side clustering of the strings) in the isotropic phase of the rod suspensions confined in narrow gaps; the electrolyte (HCl) concentrations of the suspensions are 5-40 mM, at which inter-rod interactions are attractive. The strings exhibit different colors that were used to investigate the structures of the strings with the help of interference color theory for thin films. The results are as follows. (1) The rods, lying flat on the gap bottom, are connected side-by-side and stacked upward to form stringlike clusters with different thicknesses depending on the gap height. (2) The stacking numbers (N(sr)) of the rods are estimated to be 1-5. With N(sr) increasing from 2 to 5, the volume fractions (ϕ) of the rods in the strings increased typically from 0.25-0.3 to 0.35-0.42 to reach limiting values (close to the ϕ values of the rods in the bulk smectic phase). (3) Unexpected low-ϕ strings are found in regions with an intermediate height in the gaps. These behaviors of ϕ may be caused by thermal fluctuations of the strings. PMID:23876087

  18. Charge renormalization in nominally apolar colloidal dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Daniel J.; Hollingsworth, Andrew D.; Grier, David G.

    2016-04-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of the pair interactions between dielectric spheres dispersed in a fluid medium with a low dielectric constant. Despite the absence of charge control agents or added organic salts, these measurements reveal strong and long-ranged repulsions consistent with substantial charges on the particles whose interactions are screened by trace concentrations of mobile ions in solution. The dependence of the estimated charge on the particles' radii is consistent with charge renormalization theory and, thus, offers insights into the charging mechanism in this interesting class of model systems. The measurement technique, based on optical-tweezer manipulation and artifact-free particle tracking, makes use of optimal statistical methods to reduce measurement errors to the femtonewton frontier while covering an extremely wide range of interaction energies.

  19. Controlling colloid charge in nonpolar liquids with surfactants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gregory N; Eastoe, Julian

    2013-01-14

    The formation of ions in nonpolar solvents (with relative permittivity ε(r) of approximately 2) is more difficult than in polar liquids; however, these charged species play an important role in many applications, such as electrophoretic displays. The low relative permittivities of these solvents mean that charges have to be separated by large distances to be stable (approximately 28 nm or 40 times that in water). The inverse micelles formed by surfactants in these solvents provide an environment to stabilize ions and charges. Common surfactants used are sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT or AOT), polyisobutylene succinimide, sorbitan oleate, and zirconyl 2-ethyl hexanoate. The behavior of charged inverse micelles has been studied on both the bulk and on the microscopic scale and can be used to determine the motion of the micelles, their structure, and the nature of the electrostatic double layer. Colloidal particles are only weakly charged in the absence of surfactant, but in the presence of surfactants, many types, including polymers, metal oxides, carbon blacks, and pigments, have been observed to become positively or negatively charged. Several mechanisms have been proposed as the origin of surface charge, including acid-base reactions between the colloid and the inverse micelle, preferential adsorption of charged inverse micelles, or dissolution of surface species. While most studies vary only the concentration of surfactant, systematic variation of the particle surface chemistry or the surfactant structure have provided insight into the origin of charging in nonpolar liquids. By carefully varying system parameters and working to understand the interactions between surfactants and colloidal surfaces, further advances will be made leading to better understanding of the origin of charge and to the development of more effective surfactants. PMID:23187453

  20. Directing Colloidal Assembly and a Metal-Insulator Transition Using a Quench-Disordered Porous Rod Template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadrich, Ryan B.; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2014-11-01

    Replica and effective-medium theory methods are employed to elucidate how to massively reconfigure a colloidal assembly to achieve globally homogeneous, strongly clustered, and percolated equilibrium states of high electrical conductivity at low physical volume fractions. A key idea is to employ a quench-disordered, large-mesh rigid-rod network as a templating internal field. By exploiting bulk phase separation frustration and the tunable competing processes of colloid adsorption on the low-dimensional network and fluctuation-driven colloid clustering in the pore spaces, two distinct spatial organizations of greatly enhanced particle contacts can be achieved. As a result, a continuous, but very abrupt, transition from an insulating to metallic-like state can be realized via a small change of either the colloid-template or colloid-colloid attraction strength. The approach is generalizable to more complicated template or colloidal architectures.

  1. Interaction modes between asymmetrically and oppositely charged rods.

    PubMed

    Antila, Hanne S; Van Tassel, Paul R; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of oppositely and asymmetrically charged rods in salt-a simple model of (bio)macromolecular assembly-is observed via simulation to exhibit two free energy minima, separated by a repulsive barrier. In contrast to similar minima in the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, the governing mechanism includes electrostatic attraction at large separation, osmotic repulsion at close range, and depletion attraction near contact. A model accounting for ion condensation and excluded volume is shown to be superior to a mean-field treatment in predicting the effect of charge asymmetry on the free-energy profile.

  2. Interaction modes between asymmetrically and oppositely charged rods.

    PubMed

    Antila, Hanne S; Van Tassel, Paul R; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of oppositely and asymmetrically charged rods in salt-a simple model of (bio)macromolecular assembly-is observed via simulation to exhibit two free energy minima, separated by a repulsive barrier. In contrast to similar minima in the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, the governing mechanism includes electrostatic attraction at large separation, osmotic repulsion at close range, and depletion attraction near contact. A model accounting for ion condensation and excluded volume is shown to be superior to a mean-field treatment in predicting the effect of charge asymmetry on the free-energy profile. PMID:26986372

  3. Numerical study of cluster formation in binary charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Okuzono, Tohru; Odai, Kana; Masuda, Tatsuhiro; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-07-01

    Cluster formation of oppositely charged colloidal particles is studied numerically. A simple Brownian dynamics method with a screened-Coulomb (Yukawa) potential is employed for numerical simulations. An equilibrium phase which consists of clusters and unassociated particles is obtained. It is shown that the equilibrium association number of clusters and their shapes are determined by charge numbers and charge ratio of the binary particles. The phase diagram of cluster formation for various charge numbers and their ratios is obtained. A simple relation between the association number and the charge ratio is found. It is demonstrated that in the case of high charge ratio the cluster takes a multilayer structure which is highly symmetric. It is also pointed out that the cluster-particle interaction changes dynamically in the cluster formation process, which is involved in the selection of final cluster structure. PMID:27575181

  4. Numerical study of cluster formation in binary charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuzono, Tohru; Odai, Kana; Masuda, Tatsuhiro; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-07-01

    Cluster formation of oppositely charged colloidal particles is studied numerically. A simple Brownian dynamics method with a screened-Coulomb (Yukawa) potential is employed for numerical simulations. An equilibrium phase which consists of clusters and unassociated particles is obtained. It is shown that the equilibrium association number of clusters and their shapes are determined by charge numbers and charge ratio of the binary particles. The phase diagram of cluster formation for various charge numbers and their ratios is obtained. A simple relation between the association number and the charge ratio is found. It is demonstrated that in the case of high charge ratio the cluster takes a multilayer structure which is highly symmetric. It is also pointed out that the cluster-particle interaction changes dynamically in the cluster formation process, which is involved in the selection of final cluster structure.

  5. [Characteristics of DNA adsorption and desorption in variable and constant charge soil colloids].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dai-Zhang; Wang, Shen-Yang; Jiang, Xin; Heng, Li-Sha; Tan, Jin-Fang; Liu, Shi-Liang; Cao, Yong-Xian

    2009-09-15

    The characteristics of adsorption and desorption of DNA by Red soil colloid, Latosol colloid, Chao colloid and Cinnamon colloid at different pH values were studied using a batch method. It showed that there was an increase of solution pH after adsorption of DNA by the four soil colloids in both NaCl and KCl electrolyte systems. The increasing ranges of pH values were in order of Red soil colloid > Latosol colloid > Chao colloid > Cinnamon colloid, and NaCl electrolyte system > KCl electrolyte system. The amounts of DNA adsorption on soil colloids decreased with the increase of pH value. The maximum amounts of DNA adsorption in different colloids were about 13.1-14.8 microg x mg(-1) when pH values were 2-4. The decreasing ranges of the amounts of DNA adsorption were about 5.5 microg x mg(-1) in NaCl electrolyte system and 2.1 Mg x mg(-1) in KCl electrolyte system in Red soil colloid and Latosol colloid after the rising of equilibrium solution pH from 4.2 to 8.6, whereas the remarked decreasing ranges of the adsorption amounts of DNA were about 8.3-12.2 microg x mg(-1) on Chao colloid and Cinnamon colloid in two electrolyte systems. The decreasing ranges of DNA adsorption were in order of the constant charge (Chao soil and Cinnamon) colloids > the variable charge (Red soil and Latosol) colloids. The differences of desorption on the variable and the constant charge colloids are very significant while the DNA adsorbed was desorbed with NaOAc solution and NaH2 PO4 solution. The desorption percent desorption of DNA as NaH2PO4 desorbent was 23.5%-40.2% larger on the variable charge colloids than 8.8%-21.6% on the constant charge of colloids at the three different solution pH values of 3, 5 and 7, while that as NaOAc desorbent was 72.3%-85.9% larger on the constant charge colloids than 10%-24.5% on the variable charge colloids. These results implied that the ligand exchange played a more important role in DNA adsorption on the variable charge colloids, and electrostatic

  6. Charge-induced Rayleigh instabilities in small gold rods.

    PubMed

    Novo, Carolina; Mulvaney, Paul

    2007-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the addition of electrons to gold nanorods with aspect ratios ranging from 2 to 4 leads to an initial blue-shift in the absorption spectrum due to the increasing surface plasmon frequency of the electron gas. However, at longer times, there are changes in particle morphology induced by the surface charge. In the case of smaller injected electron densities, the surface plasmon band red-shifts as the end caps of the rods undergo increased faceting and develop {111} faces. In the case of higher electron densities, the rods undergo fragmentation into clouds of smaller spheres. These secondary processes and fragmentation are postulated to be a direct result of crossing the Rayleigh threshold.

  7. Colloidal Brazil-nut effect in sediments of binary charged suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esztermann, A.; Löwen, H.

    2004-10-01

    Equilibrium sedimentation density profiles of charged binary colloidal suspensions are calculated by computer simulations and density-functional theory. For deionized samples, we predict a colloidal "Brazil nut" effect: heavy colloidal particles sediment on top of the lighter ones provided that their mass per charge is smaller than that of the lighter ones. This effect is verifiable in settling experiments.

  8. Self-diffusion and sedimentation of tracer spheres in (semi)dilute dispersions of rigid colloidal rods

    PubMed

    Kluijtmans; Koenderink; Philipse

    2000-01-01

    Long-time self-diffusion and sedimentation of fluorescent tracer spheres in electrostatically stabilized dispersions of rigid colloidal host rods have been measured in situ with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and gravitational and ultracentrifugal sedimentation. The dynamics of silica tracer spheres of 39 and 370 nm radius was monitored in dispersions of host rods with aspect ratios 9.6 and 25.7 at various rod volume fractions. The translational and rotational diffusion coefficient of the host rods was obtained independently with dynamic light scattering and birefringence decay measurements. Our results indicate that sedimentation and long-time self-diffusion are determined by the same friction factor. Furthermore we find that, as long as the host rods are relatively mobile, tracer sphere sedimentation and long-time self-diffusion are governed by the macroscopic solution viscosity, regardless of the tracer and host rod size. However, when the host rods are immobilized, due to rod entanglements at higher volume fractions, tracer sphere dynamics depends strongly on the tracer size relative to the pore size of the host rod network. The large tracers are completely trapped in the network whereas the small tracer spheres remain mobile. Current models for tracer sphere motion in rod assemblies do not satisfactorily explain the complete dynamic regime covered by our experimental model system because the effect of host rod mobility is not properly taken into account.

  9. Effect of charge asymmetry and charge screening on structure of superlattices formed by oppositely charged colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavaskar, Ganeshprasad; Sharma, Siddharth; Punnathanam, Sudeep N.

    2012-04-01

    Colloidal suspensions made up of oppositely charged particles have been shown to self-assemble into substitutionally ordered superlattices. For a given colloidal suspension, the structure of the superlattice formed from self-assembly depends on its composition, charges on the particles, and charge screening. In this study we have computed the pressure-composition phase diagrams of colloidal suspensions made up of binary mixtures of equal sized and oppositely charged particles interacting via hard core Yukawa potential for varying values of charge screening and charge asymmetry. The systems are studied under conditions where the thermal energy is equal or greater in magnitude to the contact energy of the particles and the Debye screening length is smaller than the size of the particles. Our studies show that charge asymmetry has a significant effect on the ability of colloidal suspensions to form substitutionally ordered superlattices. Slight deviations of the charges from the stoichiometric ratio are found to drastically reduce the thermodynamic stability of substitutionally ordered superlattices. These studies also show that for equal-sized particles, there is an optimum amount of charge screening that favors the formation of substitutionally ordered superlattices.

  10. Charged colloids and polyelectrolytes: from statics to electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, H.; Esztermann, A.; Wysocki, A.; Allahyarov, E.; Messina, R.; Jusufi, A.; Hoffmann, N.; Gottwald, D.; Kahl, G.; Konieczny, M.; Likos, C. N.

    2005-01-01

    A review is given on recent studies of charged colloidal suspensions and polyelectrolytes both in static and non-equilibrium situations. As far as static equilibrium situations are concerned, we discuss three different problems: 1) Sedimentation density profiles in charged suspensions are shown to exhibit a stretched non-bariometric wing at large heights and binary suspensions under gravity can exhibit an analog of the brazil-nut effect known from granular matter, i.e. the heavier particles settle on top of the lighter ones. 2) Soft polyelectrolyte systems like polyelectrolyte stars and microgels show an ultra-soft effective interaction and this results into an unusual equilibrium phase diagram including reentrant melting transitions and stable open crystalline lattices. 3) The freezing transition in bilayers of confined charged suspensions is discussed and a reentrant behaviour is obtained. As far as nonequilibrium problems are concerned, we discuss an interface instability in oppositely driven colloidal mixtures and discuss possible approaches to simulate electrokinetic effects in charged suspensions.

  11. Charged micelle depletion attraction and interfacial colloidal phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Iracki, Tara D; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J; Eichmann, Shannon L; Bevan, Michael A

    2010-12-21

    Ensemble total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) is used to directly measure the evolution of colloid-surface depletion attraction with increasing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration near the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Measured potentials are well described by a modified Asakura-Oosawa (AO) depletion potential in addition to electrostatic and van der Waals contributions. The modified AO potential includes effects of electrostatic interactions between micelles and surfaces via effective depletant dimensions in an excluded volume term and partitioning in an osmotic pressure term. Directly measured colloid-surface depletion potentials are used in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to capture video microscopy (VM) measurements of micelle-mediated quasi-two-dimensional phase behavior including fluid, crystal, and gel microstructures. Our findings provide information to develop more rigorous and analytically simple models of depletion attraction in charged micellar systems. PMID:21077612

  12. Charge-controlled magnetism in colloidal doped semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamelin, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Electrical control over the magnetic states of doped semiconductor nanostructures could enable new spin-based information processing technologies, but the relatively weak interactions between dopants and charge carriers have so far suggested that such gated magnetism will be limited to cryogenic temperatures. This talk will describe the observation of a large, reversible, room-temperature magnetic response to charge injection in free-standing colloidal ZnO nanocrystals doped with Mn(II) ions. Injected electrons are found to delocalize throughout the entire nanocrystal, and to activate new ferromagnetic Mn(II)-Mn(II) exchange interactions that are strong enough to overcome antiferromagnetic coupling between nearest-neighbor Mn(II) ions, making the full magnetic moments of all dopants observable upon charging. Removal of the electron causes the system to revert to its original form, allowing reversible charge-controlled manipulation of room-temperature nanocrystal magnetism. The physical properties of these charged, doped nanocrystals are directly analogous to those of bound magnetic poltroons (BMPs) postulated to underlie high-temperature ferromagnetic ordering in the bulk forms of this and related diluted magnetic oxides. This discovery of charge-controlled magnetism in free-standing colloidal nanocrystals that is large, reversible, and stable at room temperature presents new opportunities for fundamental studies and raises interesting possibilities for the development of spin-based information processing technologies from solution-processable semiconductor nanostructures. Related references: Ochsenbein, S. T.; Feng, Y.; Whitaker, K. M.; Badaeva, E.; Liu, W. K.; Li, X.; Gamelin, D. R., Nature Nanotechnology, 4, 681 (2009); Liu, W. K.; Whitaker, K. M.; Kittilstved, K. R.; Gamelin, D. R., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 128, 3910 (2006).

  13. Effect of Size Polydispersity on Melting of Charged Colloidal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong

    2003-09-01

    We introduce simple prescriptions of the Yukawa potential to describe the effect of size polydispersity and macroion shielding effect in charged colloidal systems. The solid-liquid phase boundaries were presented with the Lindemann criterion based on molecular dynamics simulations. Compared with the Robbins-Kremer-Grest simulation results, a deviation of melting line is observed at small lambda, which means large macroion screening length. This deviation of phase boundary is qualitatively consistent with the simulation result of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation with full many-body interactions. It is found that this deviation of the solid-liquid phase behaviour is sensitive to the screening parameter.

  14. Effective interaction in asymmetric charged binary mixtures: the non-monotonic behaviour with the colloidal charge.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Fernández, M; Callejas-Fernández, J; Moncho-Jordá, A

    2012-11-01

    In this work we study the effective force between charged spherical colloids induced by the presence of smaller charged spheres using Monte Carlo simulations. The analysis is performed for two size ratios, q = R(s)/R(b), two screened direct repulsions, κ, and two small particle packing fractions, Ø(s). We specially focus on the effect of the charge of the big colloids (Z(b)), and observe that the repulsion between big particles shows a non-monotonic behaviour: for sufficiently small charge, we find an anomalous regime where the total repulsion weakens by increasing the big colloid charge. For larger charges, the system recovers the usual behaviour and the big-big interaction becomes more repulsive increasing Z(b). This effect is linked to the existence of strong attractive depletion interactions caused by the small-big electrostatic repulsion. We have also calculated the effective force using the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the HNC closure. In general, this theory agrees with the simulation results, and is able to capture this non-monotonic behaviour. PMID:23179012

  15. Effective interaction in asymmetric charged binary mixtures: the non-monotonic behaviour with the colloidal charge.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Fernández, M; Callejas-Fernández, J; Moncho-Jordá, A

    2012-11-01

    In this work we study the effective force between charged spherical colloids induced by the presence of smaller charged spheres using Monte Carlo simulations. The analysis is performed for two size ratios, q = R(s)/R(b), two screened direct repulsions, κ, and two small particle packing fractions, Ø(s). We specially focus on the effect of the charge of the big colloids (Z(b)), and observe that the repulsion between big particles shows a non-monotonic behaviour: for sufficiently small charge, we find an anomalous regime where the total repulsion weakens by increasing the big colloid charge. For larger charges, the system recovers the usual behaviour and the big-big interaction becomes more repulsive increasing Z(b). This effect is linked to the existence of strong attractive depletion interactions caused by the small-big electrostatic repulsion. We have also calculated the effective force using the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the HNC closure. In general, this theory agrees with the simulation results, and is able to capture this non-monotonic behaviour.

  16. Non-additivity of pair interactions in charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Samuel D; Bartlett, Paul

    2016-07-21

    It is general wisdom that the pair potential of charged colloids in a liquid may be closely approximated by a Yukawa interaction, as predicted by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We experimentally determine the effective forces in a binary mixture of like-charged particles, of species 1 and 2, with blinking optical tweezers. The measured forces are consistent with a Yukawa pair potential but the (12) cross-interaction is not equal to the geometric mean of the (11) and (22) like-interactions, as expected from DLVO. The deviation is a function of the electrostatic screening length and the size ratio, with the cross-interaction measured being consistently weaker than DLVO predictions. The corresponding non-additivity parameter is negative and grows in magnitude with increased size asymmetry. PMID:27448904

  17. The structure of binary mixtures of charged colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Alcaraz, J. M.; D'Aguanno, B.; Klein, R.

    1991-11-01

    Structural properties of mixtures of charged colloidal particles are studied by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation together with the Rogers-Young closure relation. The partial radial distribution functions g ij( r) are found to agree very well with results obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. From g ij( r) partial structure factors S ij( k) are determined. They are used to obtain results for the experimentally accessible structure factor SM( k) and for the Bhatia-Thornton structure factors SNN( k), SCC( k) and SCC( k). The latter describe concentration ordering, charge ordering and their coupling. A systematic study of these quantities is presented as a function of relative composition of the two components. It is found that various features of SM( k), such as position and height of the main peak and its value at k = 0, change non-monotonously as a function of composition.

  18. Non-additivity of pair interactions in charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Samuel D.; Bartlett, Paul

    2016-07-01

    It is general wisdom that the pair potential of charged colloids in a liquid may be closely approximated by a Yukawa interaction, as predicted by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We experimentally determine the effective forces in a binary mixture of like-charged particles, of species 1 and 2, with blinking optical tweezers. The measured forces are consistent with a Yukawa pair potential but the (12) cross-interaction is not equal to the geometric mean of the (11) and (22) like-interactions, as expected from DLVO. The deviation is a function of the electrostatic screening length and the size ratio, with the cross-interaction measured being consistently weaker than DLVO predictions. The corresponding non-additivity parameter is negative and grows in magnitude with increased size asymmetry.

  19. Re-entrant melting and freezing in a model system of charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royall, C. Patrick; Leunissen, Mirjam E.; Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2006-06-01

    We studied the phase behavior of charged and sterically stabilized colloids using confocal microscopy in a low polarity solvent (dielectric constant 5.4). Upon increasing the colloid volume fraction we found a transition from a fluid to a body centered cubic crystal at 0.04150.0005, followed by reentrant melting at 0.11650.0015. A second crystal of different symmetry, random hexagonal close packed, was formed at a volume fraction around 0.5, similar to that of hard spheres. We attribute the intriguing phase behavior to the particle interactions that depend strongly on volume fraction, mainly due to the changes in the colloid charge. In this low polarity system the colloids acquire charge through ion adsorption. The low ionic strength leads to fewer ions per colloid at elevated volume fractions and consequently a density-dependent colloid charge.

  20. One-component plasma of point charges and of charged rods

    SciTech Connect

    Hatlo, Marius M.; Karatrantos, Argyrios; Lue, Leo

    2009-12-15

    An approximate theory is developed to describe the properties of mobile particles with extended charge distributions in the presence of a neutralizing fixed background charge. Long-wavelength fluctuations of the electric potential are handled within a variational perturbation approximation, and the short-wavelength fluctuations are handled within a cumulant (fugacity) expansion. The distinct treatment of these two contributions to the free energy enables the theory to provide quantitative predictions for the properties of these systems from the weak- to the strong-coupling regimes. With this theory, we study three different variations in the classical one-component plasma model: a plasma of point charges, a plasma of particles consisting of 8 linearly bonded point charges (8-mer), and a plasma of line charges. The theory was found to agree well with the available computer simulation data for the electrostatic interaction energy of these systems for all values of the plasma coupling parameter examined (GAMMA=0 to 400). In addition, we find that both the 8-mer rod and the line charge systems form a strongly ordered nematic phase, which is entirely driven by electrostatic interactions. The nematic phase only exists within a finite range of lengths of the charged particles. If the particles are too short or too long, the nematic phase does not appear. Finally, we find that the nematic phase is stable over a broader range of conditions for the line charge system than for the 8-mer rod system; consequently, the phase behavior of the one-component plasma is sensitive to the manner in which the charge is distributed on the particles.

  1. Glass transition of repulsive charged rods (fd-viruses).

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyongok

    2014-05-14

    It has recently been shown that suspensions of long and thin charged fibrous viruses (fd) form a glass at low ionic strengths. The corresponding thick electric double layers give rise to long-ranged repulsive electrostatic interactions, which lead to caging and structural arrest at concentrations far above the isotropic-nematic coexistence region. Structural arrest and freezing of the orientational texture are found to occur at the same concentration. In addition, various types of orientational textures are equilibrated below the glass transition concentration, ranging from a chiral-nematic texture with a large pitch (of about 100 μm), an X-pattern, and a tightly packed domain texture, consisting of helical domains with a relatively small pitch (of about 10 μm) and twisted boundaries. The dynamics of both particles as well as the texture are discussed, below and above the glass transition. Dynamic light scattering correlation functions exhibit two dynamical modes, where the slow mode is attributed to the elasticity of helical domains. On approach of the glass-transition concentration, the slow mode increases in amplitude, while as the amplitudes of the fast and slow mode become equal at the glass transition. Finally, interesting features of the "transient" behaviors of charged fd-rod glass are shown as the initial caging due to structural arrest, the propagation of flow originating from stress release, and the transition to the final metastable glass state. In addition to the intensity correlation function, power spectra are presented as a function of the waiting time, at the zero-frequency limit that may access to the thermal anomalities in a charged system.

  2. Mobile colloid generation induced by a cementitious plume: mineral surface-charge controls on mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I; Roberts, Kimberly A; Seaman, John C

    2012-03-01

    Cementitious materials are increasingly used as engineered barriers and waste forms for radiological waste disposal. Yet their potential effect on mobile colloid generation is not well-known, especially as it may influence colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. Whereas previous papers have studied the introduction of cement colloids into sediments, this study examined the influence of cement leachate chemistry on the mobilization of colloids from a subsurface sediment collected from the Savannah River Site, USA. A sharp mobile colloid plume formed with the introduction of a cement leachate simulant. Colloid concentrations decreased to background concentrations even though the aqueous chemical conditions (pH and ionic strength) remained unchanged. Mobile colloids were mainly goethite and to a lesser extent kaolinite. The released colloids had negative surface charges and the mean particle sizes ranged primarily from 200 to 470 nm. Inherent mineralogical electrostatic forces appeared to be the controlling colloid removal mechanism in this system. In the background pH of ~6.0, goethite had a positive surface charge, whereas quartz (the dominant mineral in the immobile sediment) and kaolinite had negative surface charges. Goethite acted as a cementing agent, holding kaolinite and itself onto the quartz surfaces due to the electrostatic attraction. Once the pH of the system was elevated, as in the cementitious high pH plume front, the goethite reversed to a negative charge, along with quartz and kaolinite, then goethite and kaolinite colloids were mobilized and a sharp spike in turbidity was observed. Simulating conditions away from the cementitious source, essentially no colloids were mobilized at 1:1000 dilution of the cement leachate or when the leachate pH was ≤ 8. Extreme alkaline pH environments of cementitious leachate may change mineral surface charges, temporarily promoting the formation of mobile colloids.

  3. Electrostatic correlations in colloidal suspensions: Density profiles and effective charges beyond the Poisson-Boltzmann theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Alexandre P.; Diehl, Alexandre; Levin, Yan

    2009-03-01

    A theory is proposed which allows us to calculate the distribution of the multivalent counterions around a colloidal particle using the cell model. The results are compared with the Monte Carlo simulations and are found to be very accurate in the two asymptotic regimes, close to the colloidal particle and far from it. The theory allows to accurately calculate the osmotic pressure and the effective charge of colloidal particles with multivalent counterions.

  4. Spatial inhomogeneities in ionic liquids, charged proteins, and charge stabilized colloids from collective variables theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsahan, O.; Ciach, A.

    2012-09-01

    Effects of size and charge asymmetry between oppositely charged ions or particles on spatial inhomogeneities are studied for a large range of charge and size ratios. We perform a stability analysis of the primitive model of ionic systems with respect to periodic ordering using the collective variables-based theory. We extend previous studies [Ciach , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.75.051505 75, 051505 (2007)] in several ways. First, we employ a nonlocal approximation for the reference hard-sphere fluid which leads to the Percus-Yevick pair direct correlation functions for the uniform case. Second, we use the Weeks-Chandler-Anderson regularization scheme for the Coulomb potential inside the hard core. We determine the relevant order parameter connected with the periodic ordering and analyze the character of the dominant fluctuations along the λ lines. We show that the above-mentioned modifications produce large quantitative and partly qualitative changes in the phase diagrams obtained previously. We discuss possible scenarios of the periodic ordering for the whole range of size and charge ratios of the two ionic species, covering electrolytes, ionic liquids, charged globular proteins or nanoparticles in aqueous solutions, and charge-stabilized colloids.

  5. Reentrant Solid-Liquid Transition in Ionic Colloidal Dispersions by Varying Particle Charge Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Junpei; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Koga, Tadanori; Ise, Norio; Hashimoto, Takeji

    1998-06-01

    The influence of the particle surface charge density on the solid-liquid phase transition in electrostatically stabilized colloidal silica and polymer latex dispersions is examined. Both systems show a reentrant transition with increasing charge density. This is not explainable in terms of the Yukawa potential and the charge-renormalization model.

  6. Electrolyte distribution around two like-charged rods: Their effective attractive interaction and angular dependent charge reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Ángeles, Felipe; Odriozola, Gerardo; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2006-04-01

    A simple model for two like-charged parallel rods immersed in an electrolyte solution is considered. We derived the three point extension (TPE) of the hypernetted chain/mean spherical approximation (TPE-HNC/MSA) and Poisson-Boltzmann (TPE-PB) integral equations. We numerically solve these equations and compare them to our results of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The effective interaction force, FT, the charge distribution profiles, ρel(x,y), and the angular dependent integrated charge function, P(θ ), are calculated for this system. The analysis of FT is carried out in terms of the electrostatic and entropic (depletion) contributions, FE and FC. We studied several cases of monovalent and divalent electrolytes, for which the ionic size and concentration are varied. We find good qualitative agreement between TPE-HNC/MSA and MC in all the cases studied. The rod-rod force is found to be attractive when immersed in large size, monovalent or divalent electrolytes. In general, the TPE-PB has poor agreement with the MC. For large monovalent and divalent electrolytes, we find angular dependent charge reversal charge inversion and polarizability. We discuss the intimate relationship between this angular dependent charge reversal and rod-rod attraction.

  7. Colloidal deposition and aggregation in the presence of charged collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Behnam; Rajendran, Arvind; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Colloids; complex fluid laboratory Team

    2014-11-01

    The transport of colloidal particles in porous media is of great importance in sub-surface environments. These colloidal particles facilitate transport of contaminants, low-soluble compounds and metals in groundwater. Here, we have studied transport dynamics of colloids inside porous medium using a combination of column experiments and batch studies. Polystyrene latex beads (100 nm), as colloidal agents, and soda lime glass beads, as porous medium, are employed in this work. On the one hand, batch experiments are undertaken to better understand concurrent aggregation and deposition of particles. On the other hand, column experiments are performed to understand the flow induced deposition of colloidal particles in the interstitial voids. Effect of collector surface preparation, pH, colloidal suspension concentration and collector beads mass is studied. Chemical release and shear field are revealed as two significant factors lying behind the coagulation of colloidal particles. These findings help us to better distinguish mechanisms responsible for the transport of colloids inside porous medium. We are collaborators. Behnam Sadri is master of science student while two other professor are supervising his research work.

  8. The Orbit of Water Droplets around Charged Rod

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferstl, Andrew; Burns, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The motion of charges around a centrally charged object is often compared to gravitational orbits (such as satellites around planets). Recently, a video taken by astronaut Don Pettit onboard the International Space Station shows water droplets orbiting a charged knitting needle. Here we attempt to model this motion and estimate the charges on the…

  9. The Orbit of Water Droplets Around Charged Rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferstl, Andrew; Burns, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    The motion of charges around a centrally charged object is often compared to gravitational orbits (such as satellites around planets). Recently, a video taken by astronaut Don Pettit onboard the International Space Station shows water droplets orbiting a charged knitting needle. Here we attempt to model this motion and estimate the charges on the objects involved in this system.

  10. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-06-22

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons-Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi-Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states.

  11. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-06-22

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons-Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi-Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states. PMID:27115342

  12. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons-Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi-Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states.

  13. Phase diagram of aggregation of oppositely charged colloids in salty water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Shklovskii, B I

    2004-02-01

    Aggregation of two oppositely charged colloids in salty water is studied. We focus on the role of Coulomb interaction in strongly asymmetric systems in which the charge and size of one colloid is much larger than the other one. In the solution, each large colloid (macroion) attracts a certain number of oppositely charged small colloids (Z-ion) to form a complex. If the concentration ratio of the two colloids is such that complexes are not strongly charged, they condense in a macroscopic aggregate. As a result, the phase diagram in a plane of concentrations of two colloids consists of an aggregation domain sandwiched between two domains of stable solutions of complexes. The aggregation domain has a central part of total aggregation and two wings corresponding to partial aggregation. A quantitative theory of the phase diagram in the presence of monovalent salt is developed. It is shown that as the Debye-Hückel screening radius r(s) decreases, the aggregation domain grows, but the relative size of the partial aggregation domains becomes much smaller. As an important application of the theory, we consider solutions of long double-helix DNA with strongly charged positive spheres (artificial chromatin). We also consider implications of our theory for in vitro experiments with the natural chromatin. Finally, the effect of different shapes of macroions on the phase diagram is discussed.

  14. Electrostatic Deformation of Liquid Surfaces by a Charged Rod and a Van De Graaff Generator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slisko, Josip; García-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Authors of physics textbooks frequently use the deflection of a thin, vertically falling water jet by a charged balloon, comb, or rod as a visually appealing and conceptually relevant example of electrostatic attraction. Nevertheless, no attempts are made to explore whether these charged bodies could cause visible deformation of a horizontal water…

  15. Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged colloids: Stability and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christdoss Pushpam, Sam David; Basavaraj, Madivala G.; Mani, Ethayaraja

    2015-11-01

    A binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids can be used to stabilize water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsions. A Monte Carlo simulation study to address the effect of charge ratio of colloids on the stability of Pickering emulsions is presented. The colloidal particles at the interface are modeled as aligned dipolar hard spheres, with attractive interaction between unlike-charged and repulsive interaction between like-charged particles. The optimum composition (fraction of positively charged particles) required for the stabilization corresponds to a minimum in the interaction energy per particle. In addition, for each charge ratio, there is a range of compositions where emulsions can be stabilized. The structural arrangement of particles or the pattern formation at the emulsion interface is strongly influenced by the charge ratio. We find well-mixed isotropic, square, and hexagonal arrangements of particles on the emulsion surface for different compositions at a given charge ratio. The distribution of coordination numbers is calculated to characterize structural features. The simulation study is useful for the rational design of Pickering emulsifications wherein oppositely charged colloids are used, and for the control of pattern formation that can be useful for the synthesis of colloidosomes and porous shells derived thereof.

  16. Coupling between bulk- and surface chemistry in suspensions of charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinen, M.; Palberg, T.; Löwen, H.

    2014-03-01

    The ionic composition and pair correlations in fluid phases of realistically salt-free charged colloidal sphere suspensions are calculated in the primitive model. We obtain the number densities of all ionic species in suspension, including low-molecular weight microions, and colloidal macroions with acidic surface groups, from a self-consistent solution of a coupled physicochemical set of nonlinear algebraic equations and non-mean-field liquid integral equations. Here, we study suspensions of colloidal spheres with sulfonate or silanol surface groups, suspended in demineralized water that is saturated with carbon dioxide under standard atmosphere. The only input required for our theoretical scheme are the acidic dissociation constants pKa, and effective sphere diameters of all involved ions. Our method allows for an ab initio calculation of colloidal bare and effective charges, at high numerical efficiency.

  17. Spatial configurations of charged rod-like particles in external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisina, I.; Lisin, E.; Vaulina, O.

    2016-03-01

    Formation of different spatial configurations for system of charged rod-like particles is considered theoretically and numerically, including formation of layered structures in the external electric field. Analytical model for a determination of the angle between the axis of a rod and the symmetry axis of electric trap is presented. New algorithm is proposed here for a dynamical simulation of many interacting non-spherical particles. Conditions for a correct replacement of the interaction between uniformly charged rods by the interaction of "bipoles" (i.e., by two similar point charges) are obtained. Study was performed in a wide range of parameters that are similar to conditions of laboratory experiments in a dusty plasma.

  18. Phase Behavior of Charged Colloids and the Effect of External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynninen, A.-P.

    2005-12-01

    Colloids are particles with a size in the nano- to micrometer range that are dispersed in a solvent, and that due to collisions from the solvent molecules, undergo Brownian motion. In most cases, the surface of the colloid acquires a net charge due to dissociation of chemical groups at the surface. In this thesis, we present results of computer simulations on the phase behavior of charged colloidal suspensions using various levels of description: Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, DLVO theory with effective many-body interactions, and the primitive model. We make two attempts to amend the DLVO theory to include many-body interactions: (i) density-dependent truncation and (ii) three-body interactions. In the case of three-body interactions, we find at low salt concentration a very broad coexistence between a fluid and a dense face-centered-cubic (fcc) phase, while at intermediate salt concentration a broad body-centered-cubic (bcc)-fcc coexistence regime appears. However, in our primitive model calculations, we did not find any broad coexistence regions or any other manifestations of three-body interactions. Thus, the effective Hamiltonian of charged colloids seems to be better described by the standard pairwise DLVO potential, than by a Hamiltonian including a density-dependent truncation or three-body interactions. We study the gas-liquid critical point of asymmetric electrolyte mixtures consisting of large multivalent macroions and small monovalent co- and counterions. The system can be seen as a binary mixture of colloids with their counterions and salt at strong electrostatic coupling. We calculate the critical point locus that connects the salt-free state consisting of macroions and counterions with the pure salt state. We calculate the ground-state phase diagram of a mixture of large and small (size ratio 0.31) oppositely charged colloids. The phase diagram displays novel structures, but also colloidal analogs of simple-salt structures and of

  19. Surface treatment of silica nanoparticles for stable and charge-controlled colloidal silica

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Won-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Tae-il; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Paek, Seung-Min; Oh, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made to control the surface charge of colloidal silica nanoparticles with 20 nm and 100 nm diameters. Untreated silica nanoparticles were determined to be highly negatively charged and have stable hydrodynamic sizes in a wide pH range. To change the surface to a positively charged form, various coating agents, such as amine containing molecules, multivalent metal cation, or amino acids, were used to treat the colloidal silica nanoparticles. Molecules with chelating amine sites were determined to have high affinity with the silica surface to make agglomerations or gel-like networks. Amino acid coatings resulted in relatively stable silica colloids with a modified surface charge. Three amino acid moiety coatings (L-serine, L-histidine, and L-arginine) exhibited surface charge modifying efficacy of L-histidine > L-arginine > L-serine and hydrodynamic size preservation efficacy of L-serine > L-arginine > L-histidine. The time dependent change in L-arginine coated colloidal silica was investigated by measuring the pattern of the backscattered light in a Turbiscan™. The results indicated that both the 20 nm and 100 nm L-arginine coated silica samples were fairly stable in terms of colloidal homogeneity, showing only slight coalescence and sedimentation. PMID:25565824

  20. Simulation of electric double layers around charged colloids in aqueous solution of variable permittivity.

    PubMed

    Fahrenberger, Florian; Xu, Zhenli; Holm, Christian

    2014-08-14

    The ion distribution around charged colloids in solution has been investigated intensely during the last decade. However, few theoretical approaches have included the influence of variation in the dielectric permittivity within the system, let alone in the surrounding solvent. In this article, we introduce two relatively new methods that can solve the Poisson equation for systems with varying permittivity. The harmonic interpolation method approximately solves the Green's function in terms of a spherical harmonics series, and thus provides analytical ion-ion potentials for the Hamiltonian of charged systems. The Maxwell equations molecular dynamics algorithm features a local approach to electrostatics, allowing for arbitrary local changes of the dielectric constant. We show that the results of both methods are in very good agreement. We also found that the renormalized charge of the colloid, and with it the effective far field interaction, significantly changes if the dielectric properties within the vicinity of the colloid are changed. PMID:25134594

  1. A Detailed Study on the Low-Energy Structures of Charged Colloidal Clusters.

    PubMed

    Cruz, S M A; Marques, J M C

    2016-04-01

    The target of this investigation is the systematic characterization of the low-energy structures of charged colloidal clusters that may be important to understand the self-assembling process of biomolecules. The aggregation of charged colloidal particles is governed by the attractive short-ranged Morse potential and the Yukawa repulsive tail to describe the long-range charge effect. A global optimization strategy, based on our own evolutionary algorithm, was adopted to discover the low-energy structures of colloidal clusters composed of up to 20 particles. A detailed analysis of the low-energy structures involving charged particles shows that the appearance of the Bernal spiral as the most stable motif occurs, first, at N = 6, but it is favored for larger clusters (N ≥ 13); for 6 ≤ N ≤ 12, there is a competition between the spiral (which is favored for higher charges) and more spherical-like structures. Finally, we study binary clusters composed by two sets of differently charged colloidal particles. Although a great diversity of low-energy structures is observed (especially for aggregates with one of the components in excess), the global minimum is disputed by three structural motifs depending on the composition of the cluster and, in some cases, on the range of the Morse potential. PMID:26986933

  2. Beyond Millikan: The Dynamics of Charging Events on Individual Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beunis, Filip; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    By measuring the stable charge on oil drops in air, Millikan demonstrated the discrete nature of electric charge. We extend his approach to the charge on solid-liquid interfaces, and focus on the dynamics of the discrete fluctuations. Our measurements are accurate and fast enough to observe changes of one elementary charge. Experiments over thousands of seconds yield information about the fast dynamics of electrochemical reactions, relevant for physicochemical and biological systems. As an example, we study (dis)charging processes on colloidal particles in a nonpolar liquid.

  3. Beyond Millikan: the dynamics of charging events on individual colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Beunis, Filip; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    By measuring the stable charge on oil drops in air, Millikan demonstrated the discrete nature of electric charge. We extend his approach to the charge on solid-liquid interfaces, and focus on the dynamics of the discrete fluctuations. Our measurements are accurate and fast enough to observe changes of one elementary charge. Experiments over thousands of seconds yield information about the fast dynamics of electrochemical reactions, relevant for physicochemical and biological systems. As an example, we study (dis)charging processes on colloidal particles in a nonpolar liquid.

  4. Thermoreversible crystallization of charged colloids due to adsorption/desorption of ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Murakado, Ai; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Nagano, Ryota; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    We report that charged colloids exhibit thermoreversible crystallization via the adsorption of ionic surfactants onto particle surfaces. Due to the temperature dependence of the adsorption quantity, the colloids crystallized upon cooling and melted upon heating. To clarify the influences of surfactant adsorption on the crystallization, polystyrene (PS) particles dispersed in ethylene glycol (EG)/water mixtures were employed, enabling continuous tuning of the adsorption quantity by changing the EG concentration. The thermoreversible crystallization/melting behavior was found to be mainly attributable to changes in the ionic strength of the medium resulting from variation in the concentration of the non-adsorbed ionic surfactant molecules with temperature. We expect that the present findings will be useful for fine control of colloidal crystallization and the further study of colloidal crystallization in low permittivity media.

  5. A common neighbor analysis of crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charged spherical colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia Bañuelos, Efraín; Contreras Aburto, Claudio; Maldonado Arce, Amir

    2016-03-01

    The topological analysis tool known as the common neighbor analysis (CNA) is used for the first time in this work to analyze crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. For this purpose, Brownian dynamics computer simulations are implemented to investigate the crystallization kinetics of homogeneously melted colloidal crystals that are composed of hard-core-screened-Coulomb interacting particles. The results are in agreement with recent static structure factor measurements that could indicate the presence of icosahedral units in the metastable melt, and with the fact that weakly screened charged colloids crystallize into body-centered-cubic (bcc) ordering. A two-step crystallization pathway is found, in which the population of bcc-subunit CNA-pairs satisfactorily obeys a Verhulst model. Moreover, the CNA helped to unveil that the excess entropy obeys a quasi-universal functional form, relating the behavior of colloidal, molecular, and metallic liquid systems. The work contributes to the scientific understanding of the crystallization pathway of charged colloids, and to the development of new ways to assess the degree of crystalline order, starting from the excess entropy.

  6. Evaporation of sessile drops containing colloidal rods: coffee-ring and order-disorder transition.

    PubMed

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2015-03-01

    Liquid drops containing insoluble solutes when dried on solid substrates leave distinct ring-like deposits at the periphery or along the three-phase contact line-a phenomena popularly known as the coffee-ring or the coffee stain effect. The formation of such rings as well as their suppression is shown to have applications in particle separation and disease diagnostics. We present an experimental study of the evaporation of sessile drops containing silica rods to elucidate the structural arrangement of particles in the ring, an effect of the addition of surfactant and salt. To this end, the evaporation of aqueous sessile drops containing model rod-like silica particles of aspect ratio ranging from ∼4 to 15 on a glass slide is studied. We first show that when the conditions such as (1) solvent evaporation, (2) nonzero contact angle, (3) contact line pinning, (4) no surface tension gradient driven flow, and (5) repulsive particle-particle/particle-substrate interactions, that are necessary for the formation of the coffee-ring are met, the suspension drops containing silica rods upon evaporation leave a ring-like deposit. A closer examination of the ring deposits reveals that several layers of silica rods close to the edge of the drop are ordered such that the major axis of the rods are oriented parallel to the contact line. After the first few layers of ordered arrangement of particles, a random arrangement of particles in the drop interior is observed indicating an order-disorder transition in the ring. We monitor the evolution of the ring width and particle velocity during evaporation to elucidate the mechanism of the order-disorder transition. Moreover, when the evaporation rate is lowered, the ordering of silica rods is observed to extend over large areas. We demonstrate that the nature of the deposit can be tuned by the addition of a small quantity of surfactant or salt. PMID:25521279

  7. Evaporation of sessile drops containing colloidal rods: coffee-ring and order-disorder transition.

    PubMed

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2015-03-01

    Liquid drops containing insoluble solutes when dried on solid substrates leave distinct ring-like deposits at the periphery or along the three-phase contact line-a phenomena popularly known as the coffee-ring or the coffee stain effect. The formation of such rings as well as their suppression is shown to have applications in particle separation and disease diagnostics. We present an experimental study of the evaporation of sessile drops containing silica rods to elucidate the structural arrangement of particles in the ring, an effect of the addition of surfactant and salt. To this end, the evaporation of aqueous sessile drops containing model rod-like silica particles of aspect ratio ranging from ∼4 to 15 on a glass slide is studied. We first show that when the conditions such as (1) solvent evaporation, (2) nonzero contact angle, (3) contact line pinning, (4) no surface tension gradient driven flow, and (5) repulsive particle-particle/particle-substrate interactions, that are necessary for the formation of the coffee-ring are met, the suspension drops containing silica rods upon evaporation leave a ring-like deposit. A closer examination of the ring deposits reveals that several layers of silica rods close to the edge of the drop are ordered such that the major axis of the rods are oriented parallel to the contact line. After the first few layers of ordered arrangement of particles, a random arrangement of particles in the drop interior is observed indicating an order-disorder transition in the ring. We monitor the evolution of the ring width and particle velocity during evaporation to elucidate the mechanism of the order-disorder transition. Moreover, when the evaporation rate is lowered, the ordering of silica rods is observed to extend over large areas. We demonstrate that the nature of the deposit can be tuned by the addition of a small quantity of surfactant or salt.

  8. Anion-Dependent Aggregate Formation and Charge Behavior of Colloidal Fullerenes (n-C60)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate and transport of colloidal fullerenes (n-C60) in the environment is likely to be guided by electrokinetic and aggregation behavior. In natural water bodies inorganic ions exert significant effects in determining the size and charge of n-C60 nanoparticles. Although the ef...

  9. Effect of three-body interactions on the phase behavior of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Hynninen, A-P; Dijkstra, M; van Roij, R

    2004-06-01

    We study numerically the effect of attractive triplet interactions on the phase behavior of suspensions of highly charged colloidal particles at low salinity. In our computer simulations, we employ the pair and triplet potentials that were obtained from a numerical Poisson-Boltzmann study [Phys. Rev. E 66, 011402 (2002)

  10. Brownian-dynamics simulation studies of a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension under shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, J. ); Sood, A.K.; Krishnamurthy, H.R. Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research, Indian Institute of Science campus, Bangalore 560012 )

    1994-11-01

    We have carried out Brownian-dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension under oscillatory shear flow with both Couette and Poiseuille velocity profiles. We show that in the steady-shear'' limit, for both of the velocity profiles, the enhancement of the self-diffusion coefficient in directions transverse to the flow shows a crossover from a [dot [gamma

  11. Dumping topological charges on neighbors: ice manifolds for colloids and vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. It has been found experimentally and numerically that both colloids and vortices exhibit ice or quasi-ice manifolds. However, the frustration of colloids and vortices differs essentially from spin ice at the vertex level. We show that the effective vertex energetics of the colloidal/vortex systems is made identical to that of spin ice materials by the contribution of an emergent field associated to the topological charge of the vertex. The similarity extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, where the effect of geometric hard constraints can be subsumed into the spatial modulation of the emergent field, which mediates an entropic interaction between topological charges. There, as in spin ice materials, genuine ice manifolds enter a Coulomb phase, whereas quasi-ice manifolds posses a well defined screening length, provided by a plasma of embedded topological charges. We also show that such similarities break down in lattices of mixed coordination because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices. This opens interesting perspective for extensions beyond physics, to social and economical networks.

  12. Isotropic-cholesteric phase transition of filamentous virus suspensions as a function of rod length and charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Kirstin R.; Fraden, Seth

    2004-12-01

    The viruses studied are genetically engineered, charged, semiflexible filamentous bacteriophages that are structurally identical to M13 virus, but differ either in contour length or surface charge. While varying contour length (L) we assume the persistence length (P) remains constant, and thus we alter the rod flexibility (L/P) . Surface charge is altered both by changing solution pH and by comparing two viruses, fd and M13, which differ only by the substitution of one charged for one neutral amino acid per virus coat protein. We measure both the isotropic and cholesteric coexistence concentrations as well as the nematic order parameter after unwinding the cholesteric phase in a magnetic field as a function of rod surface charge, rod length, solution ionic strength, and solution pH . The isotropic-cholesteric transition experimental results agree semiquantitatively with theoretical predictions for semiflexible, charged rods at high ionic strength, but disagree at low ionic strength.

  13. Surface charges and optical characteristic of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Chen, Changxin; Li, Jiang-Tao; Yang, Yun; Lin, Zhi-Ming

    2011-07-01

    Colloidal cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with an average diameter of 4.4 nm have been fabricated by anisotropic wet chemical etching of microsized cubic SiC powder. Fourier transform infrared spectra show that these cubic SiC nanocrystals contain carboxylic acid, SiH, CH, and CHx groups. UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy clearly indicate that water and ethanol colloidal suspensions of the as-fabricated colloidal samples exhibit strong and above band gap blue and blue-green emissions. The cubic SiC nanocrystals show different surface charges in water and ethanol solutions due to the interaction of water molecules with polar Si-terminated surfaces of cubic SiC nanocrystals. The results explain the distinctive optical characteristics of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals in water and ethanol, and reveal that quantum confinement and surface charges play a great role in determining the optical characteristics of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals.

  14. Surface charges and optical characteristic of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with an average diameter of 4.4 nm have been fabricated by anisotropic wet chemical etching of microsized cubic SiC powder. Fourier transform infrared spectra show that these cubic SiC nanocrystals contain carboxylic acid, SiH, CH, and CHx groups. UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy clearly indicate that water and ethanol colloidal suspensions of the as-fabricated colloidal samples exhibit strong and above band gap blue and blue-green emissions. The cubic SiC nanocrystals show different surface charges in water and ethanol solutions due to the interaction of water molecules with polar Si-terminated surfaces of cubic SiC nanocrystals. The results explain the distinctive optical characteristics of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals in water and ethanol, and reveal that quantum confinement and surface charges play a great role in determining the optical characteristics of colloidal cubic SiC nanocrystals. PMID:21762496

  15. Liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase separation and flocculation for a charged colloidal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Lai, S K; Wu, K L

    2002-10-01

    We model the intercolloidal interaction by a hard-sphere Yukawa repulsion to which is added the long-range van der Waals attraction. In comparison with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek repulsion, the Yukawa repulsion explicitly incorporates the spatial correlations between colloids and small ions. As a result, the repulsive part can be expressed analytically and has a coupling strength depending on the colloidal volume fraction. By use of this two-body potential of mean force and in conjunction with a second-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, we construct the colloidal Helmholtz free energy and use it to calculate the thermodynamic quantities, pressure and chemical potential, needed in the determination of the liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase diagrams. We examine, in an aqueous charged colloidal dispersion, the effects of the Hamaker constant and particle size on the conformation of a stable liquid-liquid phase transition calculated with respect to the liquid-solid coexistence phases. We find that there exists a threshold Hamaker constant or particle size whose value demarcates the stable liquid-liquid coexistence phases from their metastable counterparts. Applying the same technique and using the energetic criterion, we extend our calculations to study the flocculation phenomenon in aqueous charged colloids. Here, we pay due attention to determining the loci of a stability curve stipulated for a given temperature T0, and obtain the parametric phase diagram of the Hamaker constant vs the coupling strength or, at given surface potential, the particle size. By imposing T0 to be the critical temperature T(c), i.e., setting k(B)T0 (=k(B)T(c)) equal to a reasonable potential barrier, we arrive at the stability curve that marks the irreversible/reversible phase transition. The interesting result is that there occurs a minimum size for the colloidal particles below (above) which the colloidal dispersion is driven to an irreversible (reversible) phase

  16. Recrystallization and zone melting of charged colloids by thermally induced crystallization.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Mariko; Toyotama, Akiko; Suzuki, Misaki; Sugao, Yukihiro; Okuzono, Tohru; Uchida, Fumio; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2013-08-01

    We examined the application of recrystallization and zone-melting crystallization methods, which have been used widely to fabricate large, high-purity crystals of atomic and molecular systems, to charged colloidal crystals. Our samples were aqueous dispersions of colloidal silica (with particle diameters of d = 108 or 121 nm and particle volume fractions of ϕ = 0.035-0.05) containing the weak base pyridine. The samples crystallized upon heating because of increases in the particle charge numbers, and they melted reversibly on cooling. During the recrystallization experiments, the polycrystalline colloids were partially melted in a Peltier cooling device and then were crystallized by stopping the cooling and allowing the system to return to ambient temperature. The zone-melting crystallization was carried out by melting a narrow zone (millimeter-sized in width) of the polycrystalline colloid samples and then moving the sample slowly over a cooling device to recrystallize the molten region. Using both methods, we fabricated a few centimeter-sized crystals, starting from millimeter-sized original polycrystals when the crystallization rates were sufficiently slow (33 μm/s). Furthermore, the optical quality of the colloidal crystals, such as the half-band widths of the diffraction peaks, was significantly improved. These methods were also useful for refining. Small amounts of impurity particles (fluorescent polystyrene particles, d = 333 nm, ϕ = 5 × 10(-5)), added to the colloidal crystals, were excluded from the crystals when the crystallization rates were sufficiently slow (∼0.1 μm/s). We expect that the present findings will be useful for fabricating large, high-purity colloidal crystals.

  17. Modified Mason number for charged paramagnetic colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Du, Di; Hilou, Elaa; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of magnetorheological fluids have typically been described by the Mason number, a governing parameter defined as the ratio between viscous and magnetic forces in the fluid. For most experimental suspensions of magnetic particles, surface forces, such as steric and electrostatic interactions, can significantly influence the dynamics. Here we propose a theory of a modified Mason number that accounts for surface forces and show that this modified Mason number is a function of interparticle distance. We demonstrate that this modified Mason number is accurate in describing the dynamics of a rotating pair of paramagnetic colloids of identical or mismatched sizes in either high or low salt solutions. The modified Mason number is confirmed to be pseudoconstant for particle pairs and particle chains undergoing a stable-metastable transition during rotation. The interparticle distance term can be calculated using theory or can be measured experimentally. This modified Mason number is more applicable to magnetorheological systems where surface forces are not negligible. PMID:27415316

  18. Modified Mason number for charged paramagnetic colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Di; Hilou, Elaa; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of magnetorheological fluids have typically been described by the Mason number, a governing parameter defined as the ratio between viscous and magnetic forces in the fluid. For most experimental suspensions of magnetic particles, surface forces, such as steric and electrostatic interactions, can significantly influence the dynamics. Here we propose a theory of a modified Mason number that accounts for surface forces and show that this modified Mason number is a function of interparticle distance. We demonstrate that this modified Mason number is accurate in describing the dynamics of a rotating pair of paramagnetic colloids of identical or mismatched sizes in either high or low salt solutions. The modified Mason number is confirmed to be pseudoconstant for particle pairs and particle chains undergoing a stable-metastable transition during rotation. The interparticle distance term can be calculated using theory or can be measured experimentally. This modified Mason number is more applicable to magnetorheological systems where surface forces are not negligible.

  19. Photoinduced charge transfer between fullerenes and TiO{sub 2} semiconductor colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, P.V.; Bedja, I.; Hotchandani, S.

    1994-10-01

    A photocatalytic method has been presented to carry out one-electron reduction of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} in 50/50 (v/v) benzene/ethanol. The fullerene reduction was carried out in colloidal TiO{sub 2} suspension using UV excitation. The charge transfer between the excited TiO{sub 2} semiconductor colloid and fullerene molecule occurs with a quantum efficiency of 13% for C{sub 70} and 24% for C{sub 60}. Laser flash photolysis measurements have been carried out to elucidate the mechanism of photocatalytic reduction.

  20. Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on the stability of dispersions of weakly charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Herman, David; Walz, John Y

    2015-05-01

    The stability behavior of dispersions of weakly charged silica colloids was studied in the presence of highly charged metal oxide nanoparticles. Experiments were performed using 5 nm zirconia as well as 10 nm alumina nanoparticles (both positively charged), which were added to 0.1 vol % suspensions of 1.0 μm silica microparticles at the silica IEP. Both types of nanoparticles provided effective stabilization of the silica; i.e., the silica suspensions were stabilized for longer than the observation period (greater than 12 h). Stability was observed at zirconia concentrations as low as 10(-4) vol % and at an alumina concentration of 10(-2) vol %. The nanoparticles adsorbed onto the microparticle surfaces (confirmed via SEM imaging), which increased the zeta-potential of the silica. Force profile measurements performed with colloidal probe atomic force microscopy showed that the adsorption was effectively irreversible.

  1. Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on the stability of dispersions of weakly charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Herman, David; Walz, John Y

    2015-05-01

    The stability behavior of dispersions of weakly charged silica colloids was studied in the presence of highly charged metal oxide nanoparticles. Experiments were performed using 5 nm zirconia as well as 10 nm alumina nanoparticles (both positively charged), which were added to 0.1 vol % suspensions of 1.0 μm silica microparticles at the silica IEP. Both types of nanoparticles provided effective stabilization of the silica; i.e., the silica suspensions were stabilized for longer than the observation period (greater than 12 h). Stability was observed at zirconia concentrations as low as 10(-4) vol % and at an alumina concentration of 10(-2) vol %. The nanoparticles adsorbed onto the microparticle surfaces (confirmed via SEM imaging), which increased the zeta-potential of the silica. Force profile measurements performed with colloidal probe atomic force microscopy showed that the adsorption was effectively irreversible. PMID:25860256

  2. Thermodiffusion in positively charged magnetic colloids: influence of the particle diameter.

    PubMed

    Sehnem, A L; Aquino, R; Campos, A F C; Tourinho, F A; Depeyrot, J; Figueiredo Neto, A M

    2014-03-01

    The Soret coefficient (ST) of positively charged magnetic colloids was measured as a function of the nanoparticles' diameter. The Z-scan technique and the generalization of the thermal lens model proved to be a reliable technique to measure ST. We show that ST is negative and increases with the particle's diameter, being best described by a functional dependence of the type ST∝d0. Potentiometric and conductometric experiments show that the particle's surface charge decreases as the temperature increases, changing the electrostatic interaction between the nanoparticles. The temperature gradient imposed in the ferrofluid by the Gaussian laser beam leads to the formation of the particle's concentration gradient. The origin of this phenomenon is discussed in terms of the decrease of the particle's surface charge in the hottest region of the sample and the thermoelectric field due to the inhomogeneous distribution of hydrogenous ions present in the colloidal suspension. PMID:24730843

  3. Charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Xing, Xiaochen; Li, Ye; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2014-05-01

    The physical behavior of solid colloids trapped at a fluid-fluid interface remains in itself an open fundamental issue. Here, we show that the gradients of surface tension can induce particles to jet towards the oil/water interface with velocities as high as ~ 60 mm/s when particle suspensions come in contact with the interface. We hypothesize that rubbing between the particles and oil lead to the spontaneous accumulation of negative charges on the hemisphere of those interfacial particles that contact the oil phase by means of triboelectrification. The charging process is highly dependent on the sliding distances, and gives rise to long-ranged repulsions that protect interfacial particles from coagulating at the interface by the presence of electrolyte. These triboelectric charges, however, are compensated within several hours, which affect the stability of interfacial particles. Importantly, by charging different kinds of colloidal particles using various spreading solvents and dispersion methods, we have demonstrated that charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces impacts a broad range of dynamical behavior.

  4. Charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Xing, XiaoChen; Li, Ye; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2014-01-01

    The physical behavior of solid colloids trapped at a fluid-fluid interface remains in itself an open fundamental issue. Here, we show that the gradients of surface tension can induce particles to jet towards the oil/water interface with velocities as high as ≈ 60 mm/s when particle suspensions come in contact with the interface. We hypothesize that rubbing between the particles and oil lead to the spontaneous accumulation of negative charges on the hemisphere of those interfacial particles that contact the oil phase by means of triboelectrification. The charging process is highly dependent on the sliding distances, and gives rise to long-ranged repulsions that protect interfacial particles from coagulating at the interface by the presence of electrolyte. These triboelectric charges, however, are compensated within several hours, which affect the stability of interfacial particles. Importantly, by charging different kinds of colloidal particles using various spreading solvents and dispersion methods, we have demonstrated that charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces impacts a broad range of dynamical behavior. PMID:24786477

  5. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    PubMed Central

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals. PMID:26984298

  6. Spontaneous Formation of Eutectic Crystal Structures in Binary and Ternary Charged Colloids due to Depletion Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyotama, Akiko; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    Crystallization of colloids has extensively been studied for past few decades as models to study phase transition in general. Recently, complex crystal structures in multi-component colloids, including alloy and eutectic structures, have attracted considerable attention. However, the fabrication of 2D area-filling colloidal eutectics has not been reported till date. Here, we report formation of eutectic structures in binary and ternary aqueous colloids due to depletion attraction. We used charged particles + linear polyelectrolyte systems, in which the interparticle interaction could be represented as a sum of the electrostatic, depletion, and van der Waals forces. The interaction was tunable at a lengthscale accessible to direct observation by optical microscopy. The eutectic structures were formed because of interplay of crystallization of constituent components and accompanying fractionation. An observed binary phase diagram, defined by a mixing ratio and inverse area fraction of the particles, was analogous to that for atomic and molecular eutectic systems. This new method also allows the adjustment of both the number and wavelengths of Bragg diffraction peaks. Furthermore, these eutectic structures could be immobilized in polymer gel to produce self-standing materials. The present findings will be useful in the design of the optical properties of colloidal crystals.

  7. Phase transitions in nanoconfined binary mixtures of highly oriented colloidal rods.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, Daniel; Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; Velasco, Enrique

    2010-09-28

    We analyse a binary mixture of colloidal parallel hard cylindrical particles with identical diameters but dissimilar lengths L(1) and L(2), with s = L(2)/L(1) = 3, confined by two parallel hard walls in a planar slit-pore geometry, using a fundamental-measure density functional theory. This model presents nematic (N) and two types of smectic (S) phases, with first- and second-order N-S bulk transitions and S-S demixing, and surface behaviour at a single hard wall which includes complete wetting by the S phase mediated (or not) by an infinite number of surface-induced layering (SIL) transitions. In the present paper the effects of confinement on this model colloidal fluid mixture are studied. Confinement brings about profound changes in the phase diagram, resulting from competition between the three relevant length scales: pore width h, smectic period d and length ratio s. Four main effects are identified: (i) second-order bulk N-S transitions are suppressed; (ii) demixing transitions are weakly affected, with small shifts in the mu(1)-mu(2) (chemical potentials) plane; (iii) confinement-induced layering (CIL) transitions occurring in the two confined one-component fluids in some cases merge with the demixing transition; (iv) surface-induced layering (SIL) transitions occurring at a single surface as coexistence conditions are approached are also shifted in the confined fluid. The trends with pore size are analysed by means of complete mu(1)-mu(2) and p-x[combining macron] (pressure-mean pore composition) phase diagrams for particular values of pore size. This work, which is the first one to address the behaviour of liquid-crystalline mixtures under confinement, could be relevant as a first step to understand the self-assembling properties of mixtures of metallic nanoparticles under external fields in restricted geometry.

  8. Polyelectrolyte (PE) induced interactions between Charged and zwitterionic Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryamitsyn, Victor; Ganesan, Venkat

    2014-03-01

    A numerical self-consistent field (SCF) theory approach was developed for studying mixture of polyelectrolytes with charged and uncharged nanoparticles. Such an approach was used to analyze within the mean-field limit the polyelectrolyte-mediated effective interactions between the particles. The system considered allows for the local PE and particle charges to be defined by the local concentration of ionizable on groups on the particles and polyelectrolytes, ambient conditions like pH and the local electrostatic potential. Calculation of the free energy of a system of one, two and three particles in the polyelectrolyte solution allowdd us to calculate the particle insertion free energy, two and three body particle-particle interactions as a function of the properties of solution, polymer-particle interactions and the particle size. For the situation involving acidic PE and a base type positively charged particles, the PE mediated particle-particle interaction is purely repulsive for the larger particle-particle distances at low polymer concentrations. At short-particle particle distances and/or higher polyelectrolyte concentrations the particle-particle interaction becomes a depletion-type attraction. For Zwitterionic positively chaged paticles particles we have found a a range

  9. Electricity and colloidal stability: how charge distribution in the tissue can affects wound healing.

    PubMed

    Farber, Paulo Luiz; Hochman, Bernardo; Furtado, Fabianne; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2014-02-01

    The role of endogenous electric fields in wound healing is still not fully understood. Electric fields are of fundamental importance in various biological processes, ranging from embryonic development to disease progression, as described by many investigators in the last century. This hypothesis brings together some relevant literature on the importance of electric fields in physiology and pathology, the theory of biologically closed electric circuits, skin battery (a phenomenon that occurs after skin injury and seems to be involved in tissue repair), the relationship between electric charge and interstitial exclusion, and how skin tissues can be regarded as colloidal systems. The importance of electric charges, as established in the early works on the subject and the relevance of zeta potential and colloid stability are also analyzed, and together bring a new light for the physics involved in the wound repair of all the body tissues.

  10. Charged colloid-polymer mixtures: a study on electrostatic depletion attraction.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Fernández, M; Moncho-Jordá, A; Callejas-Fernández, J

    2011-02-01

    In this work, light scattering methods have been used to study the effect of adding charged polymer chains on the structural and dynamic properties of a charged colloidal system. The experimental measurements of the static structure factor S(cc)(q) show that as the polymer concentration increases, the main peak moves to higher q-values, which is interpreted in terms of the electrostatically enhanced depletion attraction induced by the polymer. Moreover, we found that the shift of the peak depends on the interplay between two relevant length scales, the polymer radius of gyration, R(g), and the Debye length, κ(-1). To reach these conclusions, the polymer reference interaction site model has been employed to explain the experimental results and to study how the effective depletion attraction depends on the polymer concentration, R(g) and κ(-1). Additionally, the measurements of the dynamic structure factor f(q, τ) indicate that the colloidal diffusion increases with the polymer concentration. Both static and dynamic analysis point out that the repulsion between colloids becomes weaker as the charged polymer is added. PMID:21303158

  11. Temporary Charge Carrier Separation Dominates the Photoluminescence Decay Dynamics of Colloidal CdSe Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Rabouw, Freddy T; van der Bok, Johanna C; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Mahler, Benoît; Nasilowski, Michel; Pedetti, Silvia; Dubertret, Benoît; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël

    2016-03-01

    Luminescent colloidal CdSe nanoplatelets with atomically defined thicknesses have recently been developed, and their potential for various applications has been shown. To understand their special properties, experiments have until now focused on the relatively short time scales of at most a few nanoseconds. Here, we measure the photoluminescence decay dynamics of colloidal nanoplatelets on time scales up to tens of microseconds. The excited state dynamics are found to be dominated by the slow (∼μs) dynamics of temporary exciton storage in a charge-separated state, previously overlooked. We study the processes of charge carrier separation and exciton recovery in pure CdSe nanoplatelets as well as in core-crown and core-shell CdSe/CdS nanoplatelets with high ensemble quantum yields of 50%, and discuss the implications. Our work highlights the importance of reversible charge carrier trapping and experiments over a wide range of time scales for the understanding of colloidal nanoemitters in general and nanoplatelets in particular. PMID:26863992

  12. Charged colloid-polymer mixtures: a study on electrostatic depletion attraction.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Fernández, M; Moncho-Jordá, A; Callejas-Fernández, J

    2011-02-01

    In this work, light scattering methods have been used to study the effect of adding charged polymer chains on the structural and dynamic properties of a charged colloidal system. The experimental measurements of the static structure factor S(cc)(q) show that as the polymer concentration increases, the main peak moves to higher q-values, which is interpreted in terms of the electrostatically enhanced depletion attraction induced by the polymer. Moreover, we found that the shift of the peak depends on the interplay between two relevant length scales, the polymer radius of gyration, R(g), and the Debye length, κ(-1). To reach these conclusions, the polymer reference interaction site model has been employed to explain the experimental results and to study how the effective depletion attraction depends on the polymer concentration, R(g) and κ(-1). Additionally, the measurements of the dynamic structure factor f(q, τ) indicate that the colloidal diffusion increases with the polymer concentration. Both static and dynamic analysis point out that the repulsion between colloids becomes weaker as the charged polymer is added.

  13. Transport of colloidal silica in unsaturated sand: Effect of charging properties of sand and silica particles.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Motoyoshi

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the transport of colloidal silica in various degrees of a water-saturated Toyoura sand column, because silica particles are widely used as catalyst carriers and abrasive agents, and their toxicity is reported recently. Since water-silica, water-sand, and air-water interfaces have pH-dependent negative charges, the magnitude of surface charge was controlled by changing the solution pH. The results show that, at high pH conditions (pH 7.4), the deposition of colloidal silica to the sand surface is interrupted and the silica concentration at the column outlet immediately reaches the input concentration in saturated conditions. In addition, the relative concentration of silica at the column outlet only slightly decreases to 0.9 with decreasing degrees of water saturation to 38%, because silica particles are trapped in straining regions in the soil pore and air-water interface. On the other hand, at pH 5 conditions (low pH), where sand and colloid have less charge, reduced repulsive forces result in colloidal silica attaching onto the sand in saturated conditions. The deposition amount of silica particles remarkably increases with decreasing degrees of water saturation to 37%, which is explained by more particles being retained in the sand column associated with the air-water interface. In conclusion, at higher pH, the mobility of silica particles is high, and the air-water interface is inactive for the deposition of silica. On the other hand, at low pH, the deposition amount increases with decreasing water saturation, and the particle transport is inhibited. PMID:27045635

  14. Structure of colloidal complexes obtained from neutral/poly- electrolyte copolymers and oppositely charged surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berret, J.-F.; Cristobal, G.; Hervé, P.; Oberdisse, J.; Grillo, I.

    2002-11-01

    We report on the phase behavior and scattering properties of colloidal complexes made from block copolymers and surfactants. The copolymer is poly(sodium acrylate)-b-poly(acrylamide), hereafter abbreviated as PANa-PAM, with molecular weight 5000 g/mol for the first block and 30000 g/mol for the second. In aqueous solutions and neutral pH, poly(sodium acrylate) is a weak polyelectrolyte, whereas poly(acrylamide) is neutral and in good-solvent conditions. The surfactant is dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and is of opposite charge with respect to the polyelectrolyte block. Combining dynamical light scattering and small-angle neutron scattering, we show that in aqueous solutions PANa-PAM diblocks and DTAB associate into colloidal complexes. For surfactant-to-polymer charge ratios Z lower than a threshold (Z_C sim 0.3), the complexes are single surfactant micelles decorated by few copolymers. Above the threshold, the colloidal complexes reveal an original core-shell microstructure. We have found that the core of typical radius 100 200 Å is constituted from densely packed surfactant micelles connected by the polyelectrolyte blocks. The outer part of the colloidal complex is a corona and is made from the neutral poly(acrylamide) chains. Typical hydrodynamic sizes for the whole aggregate are around 1000 Å. The aggregation numbers expressed in terms of numbers of micelles and copolymers per complex are determined and found to be comprised between 100 400, depending on the charge ratio Z and on the total concentration. We have also shown that the sizes of the complexes depend on the exact procedure of the sample preparation. We propose that the driving mechanism for the complex formation is similar to that involved in the phase separation of homopolyelectrolyte/surfactant systems. With copolymers, the presence of the neutral blocks prevents the macroscopic phase separation from occurring.

  15. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kats, C. M.

    2008-10-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are searching for colloidal materials with specific physical properties to better understand our surrounding world.Until recently research in colloid science was mainly focused on spherical (isotropic) particles. Monodisperse spherical colloids serve as a model system as they exhibit similar phase behaviour as molecular and atomic systems. Nevertheless, in many cases the spherical shape is not sufficient to reach the desired research goals. Recently the more complex synthesis methods of anisotropic model colloids has strongly developed. This thesis should be regarded as a contribution to this research area. Anisotropic colloids can be used as a building block for complex structures and are expected not only to lead to the construction of full photonic band gap materials. They will also serve as new, more realistic, models systems for their molecular analogues. Therefore the term ‘molecular colloids” is sometimes used to qualify these anisotropic colloidal particles. In the introduction of this thesis, we give an overview of the main synthesis techniques for anisotropic colloids. Chapter 2 describes the method of etching silicon wafers to construct monodisperse silicon rods. They subsequently were oxidized and labeled (coated) with a fluorescent silica layer. The first explorative phase behaviour of these silica rods was studied. The particles showed a nematic ordering in charge stabilized suspensions. Chapter 3 describes the synthesis of colloidal gold rods and the (mesoporous) silica coating of gold rods. Chapter 4 describes the physical and optical properties of these particles when thermal energy is added. This is compared to the case where the particles are irradiated with

  16. Asymmetrical phase separation and gelation in binary mixtures of oppositely charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Zong, Yiwu; Yuan, Guangcui; Han, Charles C

    2016-07-01

    Two types of colloidal particles, which are nearly the same in chemical composition but carry opposite surface charges, are mixed in water. Depending on the relative proportion of the oppositely charged particles, the process of aggregation leads to the formation of discrete clusters of various sizes in dilute dispersions, and to the development of particle gel networks in more concentrated systems. Due to the significant difference in the absolute values of surface charges (negative particle: -48 mV, positive particle: +24 mV), the phase separation and the gelation behaviors are asymmetric with respect to the mixing ratio. Mixtures with excess negative particles are more stable, while mixtures with excess positive particles are easily affected by phase separation. The hetero-aggregation triggered by the addition of microscopically large macro-ions is similar to what is often observed in a mono-component charged colloidal system, i.e., phase separation occurs through addition of small electrolyte ions. Within the concentration region investigated here, it is clear that the gel line is buried inside the phase separation region. Gelation occurs only when the number and size of the clusters are large and big enough to connect up into a space-spanning network. Our results indicate that, in this binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids, although the interaction between unlike species is attractive and that between like species is repulsive, the onset of gelation is in fact governed by the equilibrium phase separation, as in the case of purely attractive systems with short-range isotropic interaction. PMID:27394122

  17. Asymmetrical phase separation and gelation in binary mixtures of oppositely charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Yiwu; Yuan, Guangcui; Han, Charles C.

    2016-07-01

    Two types of colloidal particles, which are nearly the same in chemical composition but carry opposite surface charges, are mixed in water. Depending on the relative proportion of the oppositely charged particles, the process of aggregation leads to the formation of discrete clusters of various sizes in dilute dispersions, and to the development of particle gel networks in more concentrated systems. Due to the significant difference in the absolute values of surface charges (negative particle: -48 mV, positive particle: +24 mV), the phase separation and the gelation behaviors are asymmetric with respect to the mixing ratio. Mixtures with excess negative particles are more stable, while mixtures with excess positive particles are easily affected by phase separation. The hetero-aggregation triggered by the addition of microscopically large macro-ions is similar to what is often observed in a mono-component charged colloidal system, i.e., phase separation occurs through addition of small electrolyte ions. Within the concentration region investigated here, it is clear that the gel line is buried inside the phase separation region. Gelation occurs only when the number and size of the clusters are large and big enough to connect up into a space-spanning network. Our results indicate that, in this binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids, although the interaction between unlike species is attractive and that between like species is repulsive, the onset of gelation is in fact governed by the equilibrium phase separation, as in the case of purely attractive systems with short-range isotropic interaction.

  18. Weakly nonlinear electrophoresis of a highly charged colloidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Zeyde, Roman; Yavneh, Irad; Yariv, Ehud

    2013-05-01

    At large zeta potentials, surface conduction becomes appreciable in thin-double-layer electrokinetic transport. In the linear weak-field regime, where this effect is quantified by the Dukhin number, it is manifested in non-Smoluchowski electrophoretic mobilities. In this paper we go beyond linear response, employing the recently derived macroscale model of Schnitzer and Yariv ["Macroscale description of electrokinetic flows at large zeta potentials: Nonlinear surface conduction," Phys. Rev. E 86, 021503 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.021503] as the infrastructure for a weakly nonlinear analysis of spherical-particle electrophoresis. A straightforward perturbation in the field strength is frustrated by the failure to satisfy the far-field conditions, representing a non-uniformity of the weak-field approximation at large distances away from the particle, where salt advection becomes comparable to diffusion. This is remedied using inner-outer asymptotic expansions in the spirit of Acrivos and Taylor ["Heat and mass transfer from single spheres in Stokes flow," Phys. Fluids 5, 387 (1962), 10.1063/1.1706630], with the inner region representing the particle neighborhood and the outer region corresponding to distances scaling inversely with the field magnitude. This singular scheme furnishes an asymptotic correction to the electrophoretic velocity, proportional to the applied field cubed, which embodies a host of nonlinear mechanisms unfamiliar from linear electrokinetic theories. These include the effect of induced zeta-potential inhomogeneity, animated by concentration polarization, on electro-osmosis and diffuso-osmosis; bulk advection of salt; nonuniform bulk conductivity; Coulomb body forces acting on bulk volumetric charge; and the nonzero electrostatic force exerted upon the otherwise screened particle-layer system. A numerical solution of the macroscale model validates our weakly nonlinear analysis.

  19. Particle Segregation at Contact Lines of Evaporating Colloidal Drops: Influence of the Substrate Wettability and Particle Charge-Mass Ratio.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Marín, Diego; Moraila-Martínez, Carmen L; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A

    2015-06-23

    Segregation of particles during capillary/convective self-assembly is interesting for self-stratification in colloidal deposits. In evaporating drops containing colloidal particles, the wettability properties of substrate and the sedimentation of particles can affect their accumulation at contact lines. In this work we studied the size segregation and discrimination of charged particles with different densities. We performed in-plane particle counting at evaporating triple lines by using fluorescence confocal microscopy. We studied separately substrates with very different wettability properties and particles with different charge-mass ratios at low ionic strength. We used binary colloidal suspensions to compare simultaneously the deposition of two different particles. The particle deposition rate strongly depends on the receding contact angle of the substrate. We further observed a singular behavior of charged polystyrene particles in binary mixtures under "salt-free" conditions explained by the "colloidal Brazil nut" effect.

  20. Particle Segregation at Contact Lines of Evaporating Colloidal Drops: Influence of the Substrate Wettability and Particle Charge-Mass Ratio.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Marín, Diego; Moraila-Martínez, Carmen L; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A

    2015-06-23

    Segregation of particles during capillary/convective self-assembly is interesting for self-stratification in colloidal deposits. In evaporating drops containing colloidal particles, the wettability properties of substrate and the sedimentation of particles can affect their accumulation at contact lines. In this work we studied the size segregation and discrimination of charged particles with different densities. We performed in-plane particle counting at evaporating triple lines by using fluorescence confocal microscopy. We studied separately substrates with very different wettability properties and particles with different charge-mass ratios at low ionic strength. We used binary colloidal suspensions to compare simultaneously the deposition of two different particles. The particle deposition rate strongly depends on the receding contact angle of the substrate. We further observed a singular behavior of charged polystyrene particles in binary mixtures under "salt-free" conditions explained by the "colloidal Brazil nut" effect. PMID:26000909

  1. Charge effects and nanoparticle pattern formation in electrohydrodynamic NanoDrip printing of colloids.

    PubMed

    Richner, Patrizia; Kress, Stephan J P; Norris, David J; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-03-21

    Advancing open atmosphere printing technologies to produce features in the nanoscale range has important and broad applications ranging from electronics to photonics, plasmonics and biology. Recently an electrohydrodynamic printing regime has been demonstrated in a rapid dripping mode (termed NanoDrip), where the ejected colloidal droplets from nozzles of diameters of O (1 μm) can controllably reach sizes an order of magnitude smaller than the nozzle and can generate planar and out-of-plane structures of similar sizes. Despite the demonstrated capabilities, our fundamental understanding of important aspects of the physics of NanoDrip printing needs further improvement. Here we address the topics of charge content and transport in NanoDrip printing. We employ quantum dot and gold nanoparticle dispersions in combination with a specially designed, auxiliary, asymmetric electric field, targeting the understanding of charge locality (particles vs. solvent) and particle distribution in the deposits as indicated by the dried nanoparticle patterns (footprints) on the substrate. We show that droplets of alternating charge can be spatially separated when applying an ac field to the nozzle. The nanoparticles within a droplet are distributed asymmetrically under the influence of the auxiliary lateral electric field, indicating that they are the main carriers. We also show that the ligand length of the nanoparticles in the colloid affects their mobility after deposition (in the sessile droplet state). PMID:26928324

  2. In-plane particle counting at contact lines of evaporating colloidal drops: effect of the particle electric charge.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Marín, Diego; Moraila-Martínez, Carmen L; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A

    2015-02-01

    Complete understanding of colloidal assembly is still a goal to be reached. In convective assembly deposition, the concentration gradients developed in evaporating drops or reservoirs are usually significant. However, collective diffusion of charge-stabilized particles has been barely explored. The balance between convective and diffusive flows may dictate the particle dynamics inside evaporating colloidal drops. In this work we performed in situ counting of fluorescent particles in the vicinity of the triple line of evaporating sessile drops by using confocal laser scanning microscopy. We used particles of different sizes, with different charge response over the pH scale and we focused on charged and nearly uncharged particles. Two substrates with different receding contact angles were used. Binary colloidal mixtures were used to illustrate simultaneously the accumulation of particles with two different charge states at the triple line. The deposition rate close to the triple line was different depending on the electric state of the particle, regardless of the substrate used.

  3. Secondary minimum coagulation in charged colloidal suspensions from statistical mechanics methods.

    PubMed

    Cortada, María; Anta, Juan A; Molina-Bolívar, J A

    2007-02-01

    A statistical mechanics approach is applied to predict the critical parameters of coagulation in the secondary minimum for charged colloidal suspensions. This method is based on the solution of the reference hypernetted chain (RHNC) integral equation, and it is intended to estimate only the locus of the critical point instead of the full computation of the "gas-liquid" coexistence. We have used an extrapolation procedure due to the lack of solution of the integral equation in the vicinity of the critical point. Knowing that the osmotic isothermal compressibility of the colloidal system should ideally diverge in the critical point, we work out the critical salt concentration for which the inverse of the compressibility should be zero. This extrapolation procedure is more rapid than that previously proposed by Morales and co-workers [Morales, V.; Anta, J. A.; Lago, S. Langmuir 2003, 19, 475], and it is shown to give equivalent results. We also present experimental results about secondary minimum coagulation for polystyrene latexes and use our method to reproduce the experimental trends. The comparison between theory and experiment is quite good for all colloidal diameters studied.

  4. Interactions between colloidal particles in the presence of an ultrahighly charged amphiphilic polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Yu, Danfeng; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hui; Cui, Yingxian; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jinben

    2014-12-01

    A novel amphiphilic polyelectrolyte denoted as PAGC8 and a traditional amphiphilic polyelectrolyte denoted as PASC8 were prepared. PAGC8 consisted of gemini-type surfactant segment based on 1,3-bis (N,N-dimethyl-N-octylammonium)-2-propyl acrylate dibromide, while PASC8 incorporated acryloyloxyethyl-N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecylammonium bromide as single chain surfactant units within its repeat unit structure. Turbidity, stability, and zeta potential measurements were performed in the presence of PAGC8 and PASC8, respectively, to evaluate their effectiveness in inducing solid/liquid separations. It was found that the maximum transmittance was observed before the zeta potential values reached the isoelectric point, implying that not only charge neutralization but also charge-patch mechanism contributed to the separation process. Colloid probe atomic force microscopy technique was introduced to directly determine the interactions between surfaces in the presence of ultrahighly charged amphiphilic polyelectrolyte. On the basis of the AFM results, we have successfully interpreted the influence of the charge density of the polyelectrolytes on the phase stability. Electrostatic interaction played the dominant role in the flocculation processes, although both electrostatic interaction and hydrophobic effect provided contributions to the colloidal dispersions. The attractions upon surfaces approach in the case of PAGC8 were significantly larger than that of PASC8 due to the higher charge density. The strong peeling events upon retraction in the presence of PAGC8 implied that the hydrophobic effect was stronger than that of PASC8, which displayed the loose pulling events. A strong attraction was identified at shorter separation distances for both systems. However, these interactions cannot be successfully described by the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory of colloid stability due to the participation of charge-patch and strong hydrophobic effect. To account for the

  5. Ionic density distributions near the charged colloids: Spherical electric double layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Soon-Chul

    2013-11-21

    We have studied the structure of the spherical electric double layers on charged colloids by a density functional perturbation theory, which is based both on the modified fundamental-measure theory for the hard spheres and on the one-particle direct correlation functional (DCF) for the electronic residual contribution. The contribution of one-particle DCF has been approximated as the functional integration of the second-order correlation function of the ionic fluids in a bulk phase. The calculated result is in very good agreement with the computer simulations for the ionic density distributions and the zeta potentials over a wide range of macroion sizes and electrolyte concentrations, and compares with the results of Yu et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 7223 (2004)] and modified Poisson-Boltzmann approximation [L. B. Bhuiyan and C. W. Outhwaite, Condens. Matter Phys. 8, 287 (2005)]. The present theory is able to provide interesting insights about the charge inversion phenomena occurring at the interface.

  6. Where the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann cell model fails: Spurious phase separation in charged colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamashiro, M. N.; Schiessel, H.

    2003-07-01

    The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) spherical Wigner-Seitz cell model—introduced to theoretically describe suspensions of spherical charged colloidal particles—is investigated at the nonlinear and linearized levels. The linearization of the mean-field PB functional yields linearized Debye-Hückel-type equations agreeing asymptotically with the nonlinear PB results in the weak-coupling (high-temperature) limit. Both the canonical (fixed number of microions) as well as the semigrand-canonical (in contact with an infinite salt reservoir) cases are considered and discussed in a unified linearized framework. In disagreement with the exact nonlinear PB solution inside a Wigner-Seitz cell, the linearized theory predicts the occurrence of a thermodynamical instability with an associated phase separation of the homogeneous suspension into dilute (gas) and dense (liquid) phases, being thus a spurious result of the linearization. We show that these artifacts, although thermodynamically consistent with quadratic expansions of the nonlinear functional and osmotic pressure, may be traced back to the nonfulfillment of the underlying assumptions of the linearization. This raises questions about the reliability of the prediction of gas/liquid-like phase separation in deionized aqueous suspensions of charged colloids mediated by monovalent counterions obtained by linearized theories.

  7. Net charge transport during sodium-dependent calcium extrusion in isolated salamander rod outer segments

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The light-sensitive current and the current associated with the extrusion of internal Ca2+ in exchange for external Na+ have been recorded from detached rod outer segments from the salamander retina by the use of the whole-cell voltage clamp technique. No significant current-carrying mechanisms are present in the outer segment membrane apart from the light-sensitive conductance and the Na:Ca,K exchange, and exchange currents can therefore be recorded directly without the use of subtraction procedures or pharmacological blockers. The charge moved by the exchange was studied by loading outer segments with a known amount of calcium and then recording the exchange current on return to a Na(+)-containing solution. Calcium is not sequestered to any significant extent in a slowly exchanging internal store, as the charge recovered is unaffected if admission of the Na(+)-containing solution is delayed for 40 s. The number of charges flowing into the cell in exchange for each Ca2+ ion extruded was found not to deviate significantly from one over a wide range of ionic conditions and membrane potentials. These results show that the stoichiometry of the exchange is fixed over a wide range of conditions, and that the size of the inward exchange current is therefore directly proportional to the rate of Ca2+ efflux through the carrier. PMID:1722238

  8. Multistep photochemical charge separation in rod-like molecules based on aromatic insides and diimides

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S.R.; Svec, W.A.; Gosztola, D.; Wasielewski, M.R. |

    1996-07-17

    A series of intramolecular triads with linear, rod-like structures has been developed that undergo very efficient two-step electron transfer following direct excitation of a chromophore possessing a charge transfer (CT) excited state. The CT state of 4-aminonaphthalene-1,8-imide (ANI), produced by direct excitation of the chromophore, has about 70% of a negative charge transferred from the amine to the imide. Attachment of aniline (AN) and p-methoxyaniline (MeOAn) donors to ANI by means of a piperazine bridge results in linear dyads. An-ANI and MeOAn-ANI, that undergo rapid electron transfer in about 10{sup -11} s to give a >99% yield of the ion pairs, An{sup +}-ANI{sup -} and MeOAn{sup +}-ANI{sup -}, in which the charges are separated by 7.7 A. Further attachment of a 1,8:4,5-naphthalene-dimide (NI) electron acceptor to the imide group of ANI using a 2,5-dimethyphenyl spacer results in triads An-ANI-NI and MeOAn-ANI-NI. Excitation of the CT state of ANI within these triads results in the same high yield charge separation step observed in the corresponding dyads followed by a subnanosecond charge shift reaction to yield the giant dipole states An{sup +}-ANI-NI{sup -} and MeOAn{sup +}-ANI-NI{sup -} in 72% and 92% yield, respectively, in toluene. The lifetime of MeOAn{sup +}-ANI-NI{sup -} is 310 ns. These triad molecules make explicit use of a CT excited state to initiate a multistep electron transfer process. 67 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Charge effects and nanoparticle pattern formation in electrohydrodynamic NanoDrip printing of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richner, Patrizia; Kress, Stephan J. P.; Norris, David J.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-03-01

    Advancing open atmosphere printing technologies to produce features in the nanoscale range has important and broad applications ranging from electronics to photonics, plasmonics and biology. Recently an electrohydrodynamic printing regime has been demonstrated in a rapid dripping mode (termed NanoDrip), where the ejected colloidal droplets from nozzles of diameters of O (1 μm) can controllably reach sizes an order of magnitude smaller than the nozzle and can generate planar and out-of-plane structures of similar sizes. Despite the demonstrated capabilities, our fundamental understanding of important aspects of the physics of NanoDrip printing needs further improvement. Here we address the topics of charge content and transport in NanoDrip printing. We employ quantum dot and gold nanoparticle dispersions in combination with a specially designed, auxiliary, asymmetric electric field, targeting the understanding of charge locality (particles vs. solvent) and particle distribution in the deposits as indicated by the dried nanoparticle patterns (footprints) on the substrate. We show that droplets of alternating charge can be spatially separated when applying an ac field to the nozzle. The nanoparticles within a droplet are distributed asymmetrically under the influence of the auxiliary lateral electric field, indicating that they are the main carriers. We also show that the ligand length of the nanoparticles in the colloid affects their mobility after deposition (in the sessile droplet state).Advancing open atmosphere printing technologies to produce features in the nanoscale range has important and broad applications ranging from electronics to photonics, plasmonics and biology. Recently an electrohydrodynamic printing regime has been demonstrated in a rapid dripping mode (termed NanoDrip), where the ejected colloidal droplets from nozzles of diameters of O (1 μm) can controllably reach sizes an order of magnitude smaller than the nozzle and can generate planar and

  10. Nematic ordering of rigid rod polyelectrolytes induced by electrostatic interactions: Effect of discrete charge distribution along the chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dian; Venev, Sergey V.; Palyulin, Vladimir V.; Potemkin, Igor I.

    2011-02-01

    Similar to the Debye-Hückel plasma, charged groups in solutions of rigid rod polyelectrolytes attract each other. We derive expression for the correlation free energy of electrostatic attraction of the rods within the random phase approximation. In this theory, we explicitly take into account positions of charged groups on the chains and examine both charge and polymer concentration fluctuations. The correlation free energies and the osmotic pressures are calculated for isotropic and completely ordered nematic phase. The results of the discrete model are compared with results of a continuous model. The discrete model gives rise to a stronger attraction between the charged groups both in the isotropic and nematic phases and to a stronger orienting action of the electrostatic forces.

  11. Theoretical predictions of structures in dispersions containing charged colloidal particles and non-adsorbing polymers.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fei; Turesson, Martin; Woodward, Clifford E; van Gruijthuijsen, Kitty; Stradner, Anna; Forsman, Jan

    2016-04-28

    We develop a theoretical model to describe structural effects on a specific system of charged colloidal polystyrene particles, upon the addition of non-adsorbing PEG polymers. This system has previously been investigated experimentally, by scattering methods, so we are able to quantitatively compare predicted structure factors with corresponding experimental data. Our aim is to construct a model that is coarse-grained enough to be computationally manageable, yet detailed enough to capture the important physics. To this end, we utilize classical polymer density functional theory, wherein all possible polymer configurations are accounted for, subject to a mean-field Boltzmann weight. We make efforts to counteract drawbacks with this mean-field approach, resulting in structural predictions that agree very well with computationally more demanding simulations. Electrostatic interactions are handled at the fully non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann level, and we demonstrate that a linearization leads to less accurate predictions. The particle charge is an experimentally unknown parameter. We define the surface charge such that the experimental and theoretical gel point at equal polymer concentration coincide. Assuming a fixed surface charge for a certain salt concentration, we find very good agreements between measured and predicted structure factors across a wide range of polymer concentrations. We also present predictions for other structural quantities, such as radial distribution functions, and cluster size distributions. Finally, we demonstrate that our model predicts the occurrence of equilibrium clusters at high polymer concentrations, but low particle volume fractions and salt levels. PMID:27056112

  12. Phase Behavior of 2D Charged Hydrophobic Colloids in Flat and Curved Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Colm; Guerra, Rodrigo; Chaikin, Paul

    Charged hydrophobic colloids, when dispersed in oil with a relatively high dielectric constant, can become highly charged. In the presence of an interface with a conducting aqueous phase, particles bind strongly to the interface via image-charge attraction. At sufficiently high density, these charged interfacial particles self-organize into a 2D repulsive (Wigner) crystalline solid phase, while at lower densities, the particles form a 2D fluid. By observing samples prepared at different densities, we can probe various points in the phase diagram of this soft 2D material, and compare our results with applicable theory and simulations. In this talk, we present two sets of experiments we have performed on this system: first, we show how we can use gravity as an external force to create a controlled density gradient, and thereby directly measure the equation of state and other quantities of interest. Second, we discuss how, by observing particles which are bound to the surface of spherical droplets, we can explore how the presence of finite background curvature affects the phase behavior of the system.

  13. Two-stage crystallization of charged colloids under low supersaturation conditions.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Kai; Arnold, Axel

    2015-03-21

    We report simulations on the homogeneous liquid-fcc nucleation of charged colloids for both low and high contact energy values. As a precursor for crystal formation, we observe increased local order at the position where the crystal will form, but no correlations with the local density. Thus, the nucleation is driven by order fluctuations rather than density fluctuations. Our results also show that the transition involves two stages in both cases, first a transition of liquid → bcc, followed by a bcc → hcp/fcc transition. Both transitions have to overcome free energy barriers, so that a spherical bcc-like cluster is formed first, in which the final fcc structure is nucleated mainly at the surface of the crystallite. This means that the second stage bcc-fcc phase transition is a heterogeneous nucleation in the partially grown solid phase, even though we start from a homogeneous bulk liquid. The height of the bcc → hcp/fcc free energy barrier strongly depends on the contact energies of the colloids. For low contact energy this barrier is low, so that the bcc → hcp/fcc transition occurs spontaneously. For the higher contact energy, the second barrier is too high to be crossed spontaneously by the colloidal system. However, it was possible to ratchet the system over the second barrier and to transform the bcc nuclei into the stable hcp/fcc phase. The transitions are dominated by the first liquid-bcc transition and can be described by classical nucleation theory using an effective surface tension.

  14. Soil colloidal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent understanding that organic and inorganic contaminants are often transported via colloidal particles has increased interest in colloid science. The primary importance of colloids in soil science stems from their surface reactivity and charge characteristics. Characterizations of size, shape,...

  15. Influence of iron solubility and charged surface-active compounds on lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters containing association colloids.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Johnson, David R; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-05-15

    The impact of iron compounds with different solubilities on lipid oxidation was studied in the presence and absence of association colloids. Iron (III) sulfate only accelerated lipid oxidation in the presence of association colloids while iron (III) oleate accelerated oxidation in the presence and absence of association colloids. Further, iron (III) oxide retarded lipid oxidation both with and without association colloids. The impact of charged association colloids on lipid oxidation in ethyl oleate was also investigated. Association colloids consisting of the anionic surface-active compound dodecyl sulphosuccinate sodium salt (AOT), cationic surface-active compound hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic surface-active compound 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) retarded, promoted, and had no effect on lipid oxidation rates, respectively. These results indicate that the polarity of metal compounds and the charge of association colloids play a big role in lipid oxidation.

  16. Influence of iron solubility and charged surface-active compounds on lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters containing association colloids.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Johnson, David R; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-05-15

    The impact of iron compounds with different solubilities on lipid oxidation was studied in the presence and absence of association colloids. Iron (III) sulfate only accelerated lipid oxidation in the presence of association colloids while iron (III) oleate accelerated oxidation in the presence and absence of association colloids. Further, iron (III) oxide retarded lipid oxidation both with and without association colloids. The impact of charged association colloids on lipid oxidation in ethyl oleate was also investigated. Association colloids consisting of the anionic surface-active compound dodecyl sulphosuccinate sodium salt (AOT), cationic surface-active compound hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic surface-active compound 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) retarded, promoted, and had no effect on lipid oxidation rates, respectively. These results indicate that the polarity of metal compounds and the charge of association colloids play a big role in lipid oxidation. PMID:26776045

  17. Long-time self-diffusion of charged spherical colloidal particles in parallel planar layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Aburto, Claudio; Báez, César A.; Méndez-Alcaraz, José M.; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2014-06-01

    The long-time self-diffusion coefficient, DL, of charged spherical colloidal particles in parallel planar layers is studied by means of Brownian dynamics computer simulations and mode-coupling theory. All particles (regardless which layer they are located on) interact with each other via the screened Coulomb potential and there is no particle transfer between layers. As a result of the geometrical constraint on particle positions, the simulation results show that DL is strongly controlled by the separation between layers. On the basis of the so-called contraction of the description formalism [C. Contreras-Aburto, J. M. Méndez-Alcaraz, and R. Castañeda-Priego, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 174111 (2010)], the effective potential between particles in a layer (the so-called observed layer) is obtained from integrating out the degrees of freedom of particles in the remaining layers. We have shown in a previous work that the effective potential performs well in describing the static structure of the observed layer (loc. cit.). In this work, we find that the DL values determined from the simulations of the observed layer, where the particles interact via the effective potential, do not agree with the exact values of DL. Our findings confirm that even when an effective potential can perform well in describing the static properties, there is no guarantee that it will correctly describe the dynamic properties of colloidal systems.

  18. Renormalization in charged colloids: non-monotonic behaviour with the surface charge.

    PubMed

    Haro-Pérez, C; Quesada-Pérez, M; Callejas-Fernández, J; Schurtenberger, P; Hidalgo-Álvarez, R

    2006-07-19

    The static structure factor S(q) is measured for a set of deionized latex dispersions with different numbers of ionizable surface groups per particle and similar diameters. For a given volume fraction, the height of the main peak of S(q), which is a direct measure of the spatial ordering of latex particles, does not increase monotonically with the number of ionizable groups. This behaviour cannot be described using the classical renormalization scheme based on the cell model. We analyse our experimental data using a renormalization model based on the jellium approximation, which predicts the weakening of the spatial order for moderate and large particle charges.

  19. Cluster formation in binary charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions confined to a two-dimensional plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat; Mukherjee, Manjori; Mishra, Pankaj

    2016-09-01

    Hypernetted chain (HNC) integral equation theory has been used to study the structural features of binary charged stabilized colloidal suspensions confined to a two-dimensional plane. The particles interact via purely repulsive Yukawa intermolecular potential, the inverse screening length scaled by the average distance between strongly interacting components of the mixture (dimensionless screening parameter) being 1, 3 and 5. Results of HNC theory for one-component systems are found to be in very good agreement with that of simulation, in the parameter range of our study. Binary Yukawa systems with dimensionless screening parameters 1 and 3 are found to exhibit diffuse clusters of the weakly interacting particles, marked by the emergence of a cluster peak in the corresponding partial structure factor curves. No cluster peak is found in the system with the screening parameter 5. For the entire range of mixture parameters, the strongly interacting particles remain homogeneously distributed.

  20. Wrinkled-graphene wrapped silicon nanoparticles synthesized through charged colloidal assembly for enhanced battery performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Lu, Chunxiang; Ma, Canliang; Zhang, Baoping

    2014-10-01

    Elastic composite of wrinkled graphene sheets and Si nanoparticles has been prepared through engineering charged Si nanoparticles capping with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane and graphene oxide in colloidal state. In the composite, the Si nanoparticles are uniformly wrapped by the graphene sheets. When used as an anode for lithium-ion batteries, the as-obtained material exhibits high Coulombic efficiency, good cycling stability of 1044 mAh g-1 at a current density of 200 mA g-1 after 100 cycles, and superior rate capability. Such excellent electrochemical performance should be attributed to the wrinkled graphene sheets, which not only buffer volume expansion of Si nanoparticles during the cycling but also act as electrical conducting pathway.

  1. Kinetics study of crystallization with the disorder-bcc-fcc phase transition of charged colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Du, Xuan; Liu, Lixia

    2011-06-21

    Structure transformation (disorder-bcc-fcc) in charged colloidal dispersions, as a manifestation of the Ostwald's step rule, was confirmed by means of reflection spectrum (RS) measurements in our previous study. By taking advantage of a reflection spectrum containing plenty of information about the crystallization behaviors, time-dependent changes of parameters associated with the crystal structure and composition during the disorder-bcc-fcc transition are reported by treating the data from RS in this article. In addition, Avrami's model is adopted to analyze the transition process and investigate the transition rate. On the basis of the above investigations, associated kinetic features of crystallization with the disorder-bcc-fcc transition are described.

  2. Reentrant phase transition in charged colloidal suspensions: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, B. V. R.; Arora, Akhilesh K.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    1993-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of aqueous charged colloidal suspensions interacting via an effective pair potential are carried out with a view to elucidate the mechanism of the reentrant phase transition reported in these systems. The computed pair-correlation functions show that a weakly interacting homogeneous suspension phase separates into dense and rare phases and thereafter reenters into a homogeneous state with crystalline or liquidlike order when the concentration of the ionic impurities is decreased. The cluster-size distribution indeed shows the existence of dense-phase droplets for the intermediate range of impurity-ion concentrations where the phase separation occurs. Some of the recent experimental results are discussed in the light of the present simulation results.

  3. Long-range repulsive charged colloids in and out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, M. N.

    2013-04-01

    The research described in this thesis focusses on the behaviour of charged colloidal particles with long-range repulsive interactions. The experimental model system we used consisted of sterically stabilised charged poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) colloids suspended in cyclohexyl bromide (CHB). In this low-polar solvent very low ionic concentrations can be achieved, resulting in a large Debye screening length (on the order of the particle diameter), i.e. long-range interactions. The pair interaction in these systems is often modelled by the hard-core repulsive Yukawa (or screened Coulomb) potential, which we used for our computer simulations. In Monte Carlo simulations we investigated the effect of size polydispersity on the crystal-fluid transition. We observed a shift to higher volume fraction of the crystal-fluid transition upon increasing the polydispersity. At high polydispersities parts of the higher charged systems that were initially crystalline became amorphous. The amorphous parts had a higher polydispersity than the crystalline parts, indicating the presence of a terminal polydispersity beyond which the homogeneous crystal phase was no longer stable. We investigated the slow dynamics close to the glass transition as a function of the range of the potential, also in simulations. We determined the long-time structural relaxation time and long-time self-diffusion coefficient, which could be well fitted by a power law predicted by mode-coupling theory (MCT) and by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) equation. In experiments we used confocal microscopy to study the system quantitatively in 3D on a single-particle level. We performed micro-electrophoresis measurements to determine the surface potential and charge of the PMMA particles at a volume fraction around 0.02. The surface potential was roughly independent of the diameter of the particle and was found to be lower for unlocked particles (steric stabiliser adsorbed to surface) than for locked particles

  4. One-step solvothermal synthesis of highly water-soluble, negatively charged superparamagnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jining; Ran, Xinze; Shi, Chunmeng; Cheng, Humin; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping

    2013-07-01

    Highly charged hydrophilic superparamagnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters with an average diameter of 195 nm have been successfully synthesized using a modified one-step solvothermal method. Anionic polyelectrolyte poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt containing both sulfonate and carboxylate groups was used as the stabilizer. The clusters synthesized under different experimental conditions were characterized with transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering; it was found that the size distribution and water dispersity were significantly affected by the concentration of the polyelectrolyte stabilizer and iron sources in the reaction mixtures. A possible mechanism involving novel gel-like large molecular networks that confined the nucleation and aggregation process was proposed and discussed. The colloidal nanocrystal clusters remained negatively charged in the experimental pH ranges from 2 to 11, and also showed high colloidal stability in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and ethanol. These highly colloidal stable superparamagnetic Fe3O4 clusters could find potential applications in bioseparation, targeted drug delivery, and photonics.Highly charged hydrophilic superparamagnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters with an average diameter of 195 nm have been successfully synthesized using a modified one-step solvothermal method. Anionic polyelectrolyte poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt containing both sulfonate and carboxylate groups was used as the stabilizer. The clusters synthesized under different experimental conditions were characterized with transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering; it was found that the size distribution and water dispersity were significantly affected by the concentration of the polyelectrolyte stabilizer and iron sources in the reaction mixtures. A possible mechanism involving novel gel-like large molecular networks that confined the nucleation and

  5. Single-mode lasing from colloidal water-soluble CdSe/CdS quantum dot-in-rods.

    PubMed

    Di Stasio, Francesco; Grim, Joel Q; Lesnyak, Vladimir; Rastogi, Prachi; Manna, Liberato; Moreels, Iwan; Krahne, Roman

    2015-03-18

    Core-shell CdSe/CdS nanocrystals are a very promising material for light emitting applications. Their solution-phase synthesis is based on surface-stabilizing ligands that make them soluble in organic solvents, like toluene or chloroform. However, solubility of these materials in water provides many advantages, such as additional process routes and easier handling. So far, solubilization of CdSe/CdS nanocrystals in water that avoids detrimental effects on the luminescent properties poses a major challenge. This work demonstrates how core-shell CdSe/CdS quantum dot-in-rods can be transferred into water using a ligand exchange method employing mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Key to maintaining the light-emitting properties is an enlarged CdS rod diameter, which prevents potential surface defects formed during the ligand exchange from affecting the photophysics of the dot-in-rods. Films made from water-soluble dot-in-rods show amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) with a similar threshold (130 μJ/cm(2)) as the pristine material (115 μJ/cm(2)). To demonstrate feasibility for lasing applications, self-assembled microlasers are fabricated via the "coffee-ring effect" that display single-mode operation and a very low threshold of ∼10 μJ/cm(2). The performance of these microlasers is enhanced by the small size of MPA ligands, enabling a high packing density of the dot-in-rods.

  6. Single-mode lasing from colloidal water-soluble CdSe/CdS quantum dot-in-rods.

    PubMed

    Di Stasio, Francesco; Grim, Joel Q; Lesnyak, Vladimir; Rastogi, Prachi; Manna, Liberato; Moreels, Iwan; Krahne, Roman

    2015-03-18

    Core-shell CdSe/CdS nanocrystals are a very promising material for light emitting applications. Their solution-phase synthesis is based on surface-stabilizing ligands that make them soluble in organic solvents, like toluene or chloroform. However, solubility of these materials in water provides many advantages, such as additional process routes and easier handling. So far, solubilization of CdSe/CdS nanocrystals in water that avoids detrimental effects on the luminescent properties poses a major challenge. This work demonstrates how core-shell CdSe/CdS quantum dot-in-rods can be transferred into water using a ligand exchange method employing mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Key to maintaining the light-emitting properties is an enlarged CdS rod diameter, which prevents potential surface defects formed during the ligand exchange from affecting the photophysics of the dot-in-rods. Films made from water-soluble dot-in-rods show amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) with a similar threshold (130 μJ/cm(2)) as the pristine material (115 μJ/cm(2)). To demonstrate feasibility for lasing applications, self-assembled microlasers are fabricated via the "coffee-ring effect" that display single-mode operation and a very low threshold of ∼10 μJ/cm(2). The performance of these microlasers is enhanced by the small size of MPA ligands, enabling a high packing density of the dot-in-rods. PMID:25335769

  7. Adhesion, stretching, and electrical charge assessment of dermatan sulfate molecules by colloidal probes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Caballero, Leonardo; Pavez, Jorge; Melo, Francisco

    2012-06-26

    Electrical and mechanical properties of dermatan sulfate (DS) molecules are studied in an aqueous environment as a function of pH. DS molecules linked at various points distributed on the surface of mica previously silanizated along with a suitable functionalized microsphere, attached to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM), provided suitable surfaces for testing interactions through the colloidal probe methodology. The repulsive force between the surfaces indicated that the charge of DS increases with pH as a result of the gradual deprotonation of acidic groups. Pulling experiments revealed increasing adhesion of DS to the monolayer as a function of pH, presumably due both to the electrical nature of the interaction between these molecules and the progressive increase of the charge of DS with pH. Serrations exhibited by the force in pulling experiments indicate that more than a single DS molecule is stretched at the same time. In addition, pulling force remained significant even at extensions that went beyond the average contour length of a single DS molecule, which suggests the existence of a significant link between DS molecules.

  8. Structure and short-time dynamics in concentrated suspensions of charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Westermeier, Fabian; Fischer, Birgit; Roseker, Wojciech; Grübel, Gerhard; ägele, Gerhard; Heinen, Marco

    2012-09-21

    We report a comprehensive joint experimental-theoretical study of the equilibrium pair-structure and short-time diffusion in aqueous suspensions of highly charged poly-acrylate (PA) spheres in the colloidal fluid phase. Low-polydispersity PA sphere systems with two different hard-core radii, R(0) = 542 and 1117 Å, are explored over a wide range of concentrations and salinities using static and dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle x-ray scattering, and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). The measured static and dynamic scattering functions are analyzed using state-of-the-art theoretical methods. For all samples, the measured static structure factor, S(Q), is in good agreement with results by an analytical integral equation method for particles interacting by a repulsive screened Coulomb plus hard-core pair potential. In our DLS and XPCS measurements, we have determined the short-time diffusion function D(Q) = D(0) H(Q)∕S(Q), comprising the free diffusion coefficient D(0) and the hydrodynamic function H(Q). The latter is calculated analytically using a self-part corrected version of the δγ-scheme by Beenakker and Mazur which accounts approximately for many-body hydrodynamic interactions (HIs). Except for low-salinity systems at the highest investigated volume fraction φ ≈ 0.32, the theoretical predictions for H(Q) are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In particular, the increase in the collective diffusion coefficient D(c) = D(Q → 0), and the decrease of the self-diffusion coefficient, D(s) = D(Q → ∞), with increasing φ is well described. In accord with the theoretical prediction, the peak value, H(Q(m)), of H(Q) relates to the nearest neighbor cage size ∼2π∕Q(m), for which concentration scaling relations are discussed. The peak values H(Q(m)) are globally bound from below by the corresponding neutral hard-spheres peak values, and from above by the limiting peak values for low-salinity charge-stabilized systems

  9. One-step solvothermal synthesis of highly water-soluble, negatively charged superparamagnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jining; Ran, Xinze; Shi, Chunmeng; Cheng, Humin; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping

    2013-08-01

    Highly charged hydrophilic superparamagnetic Fe3O4 colloidal nanocrystal clusters with an average diameter of 195 nm have been successfully synthesized using a modified one-step solvothermal method. Anionic polyelectrolyte poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt containing both sulfonate and carboxylate groups was used as the stabilizer. The clusters synthesized under different experimental conditions were characterized with transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering; it was found that the size distribution and water dispersity were significantly affected by the concentration of the polyelectrolyte stabilizer and iron sources in the reaction mixtures. A possible mechanism involving novel gel-like large molecular networks that confined the nucleation and aggregation process was proposed and discussed. The colloidal nanocrystal clusters remained negatively charged in the experimental pH ranges from 2 to 11, and also showed high colloidal stability in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and ethanol. These highly colloidal stable superparamagnetic Fe3O4 clusters could find potential applications in bioseparation, targeted drug delivery, and photonics. PMID:23803791

  10. Structure and effective interactions in parallel monolayers of charged spherical colloids.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Aburto, C; Méndez-Alcaraz, J M; Castañeda-Priego, R

    2010-05-01

    We study the microstructure and the effective interactions of model suspensions consisting of Yukawa-like colloidal particles homogeneously distributed in equally spaced parallel planar monolayers. All the particles interact with each other, but particle transfer between monolayers is not allowed. The spacing between the layers defines the effective system dimensionality. When the layer spacing is comparable to the particle size, the system shows quasi-three-dimensional behavior, whereas for large distances the layers behave as effective two-dimensional systems. We find that effective attractions between like-charged particles can be triggered by adjusting the interlayer spacing, showing that the distance between adjacent layers is an excellent control parameter for the effective interparticle interactions. Our study is based on Brownian dynamics simulations and the integral equations theory of liquids. The effective potentials are accounted for by exploiting the invariance of the Ornstein-Zernike matrix equation under contractions of the description, and on assuming that the difference between bare and effective bridge functions can be neglected. We find that the hypernetted chain approximation does not account properly for the effective interactions in layered systems. PMID:20459160

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic effects on a charged colloidal sphere with arbitrary double-layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tzu H; Keh, Huan J

    2010-10-01

    An analytical study is presented for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects on a translating and rotating colloidal sphere in an arbitrary electrolyte solution prescribed with a general flow field and a uniform magnetic field at a steady state. The electric double layer surrounding the charged particle may have an arbitrary thickness relative to the particle radius. Through the use of a simple perturbation method, the Stokes equations modified with an electric force term, including the Lorentz force contribution, are dealt by using a generalized reciprocal theorem. Using the equilibrium double-layer potential distribution from solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain closed-form formulas for the translational and angular velocities of the spherical particle induced by the MHD effects to the leading order. It is found that the MHD effects on the particle movement associated with the translation and rotation of the particle and the ambient fluid are monotonically increasing functions of κa, where κ is the Debye screening parameter and a is the particle radius. Any pure rotational Stokes flow of the electrolyte solution in the presence of the magnetic field exerts no MHD effect on the particle directly in the case of a very thick double layer (κa→0). The MHD effect caused by the pure straining flow of the electrolyte solution can drive the particle to rotate, but it makes no contribution to the translation of the particle.

  12. Determination of the positions and orientations of concentrated rod-like colloids from 3D microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Besseling, T H; Hermes, M; Kuijk, A; de Nijs, B; Deng, T-S; Dijkstra, M; Imhof, A; van Blaaderen, A

    2015-05-20

    Confocal microscopy in combination with real-space particle tracking has proven to be a powerful tool in scientific fields such as soft matter physics, materials science and cell biology. However, 3D tracking of anisotropic particles in concentrated phases remains not as optimized compared to algorithms for spherical particles. To address this problem, we developed a new particle-fitting algorithm that can extract the positions and orientations of fluorescent rod-like particles from three dimensional confocal microscopy data stacks. The algorithm is tailored to work even when the fluorescent signals of the particles overlap considerably and a threshold method and subsequent clusters analysis alone do not suffice. We demonstrate that our algorithm correctly identifies all five coordinates of uniaxial particles in both a concentrated disordered phase and a liquid-crystalline smectic-B phase. Apart from confocal microscopy images, we also demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to identify nanorods in 3D electron tomography reconstructions. Lastly, we determined the accuracy of the algorithm using both simulated and experimental confocal microscopy data-stacks of diffusing silica rods in a dilute suspension. This novel particle-fitting algorithm allows for the study of structure and dynamics in both dilute and dense liquid-crystalline phases (such as nematic, smectic and crystalline phases) as well as the study of the glass transition of rod-like particles in three dimensions on the single particle level. PMID:25922931

  13. Anion-Dependent Aggregate Formation and Charge Behavior of Colloidal Fullerenes (n-C60)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, B.; Weaver, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    The fate and transport of colloidal fullerenes (n-C60) in the environment are likely to be guided by their electrokinetic and aggregation behavior. In natural water bodies inorganic ions exert significant effects in determining the size and charge of dispersed n-C60. Although the effects of cations on the behavior of n-C60 have been studied extensively; studies on the effect of anions are relatively few and thus were the focus of our investigation. The effects of anions (e.g., Cl- , SO42-) on average aggregate size (DH) and zeta potential (ZP) of n-C60 were found to be absent in presence of monovalent cations (e.g., Na+) over the tested range of pH (3-to-12) and ionic strength (0-to-20 mM). Similar observations were noted in the presence of multivalent cations (e.g., Mg2+) near acidic and neutral pH conditions. However, under alkaline conditions (pH~10) a strong anion-dependent reversal of surface charge was noted. The ZP of n-C60 changed from -65 mV, when dispersed in DI water, to +4 mV and +40 mV in the presence of SO42- and Cl-, respectively in a 10mM salt concentration (i.e., MgCl2 and MgSO4). The corresponding DH of the dispersed n-C60 changed simultaneously from 115 nm, in DI water, to 1450 nm and 225 nm for the MgSO4 and MgCl2 electrolytes. These findings provide a better understanding of interfacial interaction characteristics of n-C60 NPs, and may lead to remediation strategies for n-C60 NPs in the environment.

  14. [Effect of low molecular weight organic acids on Pb2+ adsorption and desorption by constant charge soil colloids].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yati; Wang, Xudong; Zhang, Yiping; Qu, Aihua

    2003-11-01

    The isothermal curves of Pb2+ adsorption-desorption by soil colloids followed Freundlich and Langmuir equation. The adsorption constant Ka showed the trend of old manured loessal soil > yellow loessal soil > dark cultivated loessal soil > yellow cinamon soil, which was consistent with surface charge density sigma 0, an indicator of the strength of Pb2+ adsorption by each soil colloid. Low molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) made Pb2+ adsorbed amount decreased and adsorption affinity increased, and the effect of citric acid was larger than that of oxalic acid. The constant Kd of residual Pb2+ adsorption after desorption showed the trend of old manured loessal soil > yellow cinamon soil > dark cultivated loessal soil > yellow loessal soil, which reflected the adsorption strength of residual Pb2+ after desorption, and was related to the contents of organic matter and free ferric oxide. The isothermal curves of Pb2+ desorption from soil colloids were obvious higher than those of Pb2+ adsorption. In NaNO3 and oxalic acid background solution, the isothermal curves of Pb2+ adsorption were far away from those of Pb2+ desorption, showing that the hysteretic degree between adsorption and desorption was very large. The isothermal curves of Pb2+ desorption from soil colloids were closed to those of Pb2+ adsorption in citric acid background solution, which showed that the Pb adsorption and desorption was reversible.

  15. Hexadecapolar Colloids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-11

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and forbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms’ displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. We describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Becausemore » of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and report the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.« less

  16. Hexadecapolar colloids

    PubMed Central

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously. PMID:26864184

  17. Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids: comparative analysis by colloid titration and potentiometric titration with continuous pK-distribution function model.

    PubMed

    Bratskaya, S; Golikov, A; Lutsenko, T; Nesterova, O; Dudarchik, V

    2008-09-01

    Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids of a different origin (inshore soils, peat, marine sediments, and soil (lysimetric) waters) were evaluated by means of two alternative methods - colloid titration and potentiometric titration. In order to elucidate possible limitations of the colloid titration as an express method of analysis of low content of humic substances we monitored changes in acid-base properties and charge densities of humic substances with soil depth, fractionation, and origin. We have shown that both factors - strength of acidic groups and molecular weight distribution in humic and fulvic acids - can affect the reliability of colloid titration. Due to deviations from 1:1 stoichiometry in interactions of humic substances with polymeric cationic titrant, the colloid titration can underestimate total acidity (charge density) of humic substances with domination of weak acidic functional groups (pK>6) and high content of the fractions with molecular weight below 1kDa.

  18. Charge Stabilized Crystalline Colloidal Arrays As Templates For Fabrication of Non-Close-Packed Inverted Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Justin J.; Ben-Moshe, Matti; Tikhonov, Alexander; Qu, Dan; Lamont, Daniel N.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a straightforward method to form non close-packed highly ordered fcc direct and inverse opal silica photonic crystals. We utilize an electrostatically self assembled crystalline colloidal array (CCA) template formed by monodisperse, highly charged polystyrene particles. We then polymerize a hydrogel around the CCA (PCCA) and condense the silica to form a highly ordered silica impregnated (siPCCA) photonic crystal. Heating at 450 °C removes the organic polymer leaving a silica inverse opal structure. By altering the colloidal particle concentration we independently control the particle spacing and the wall thickness of the inverse opal photonic crystals. This allows us to control the optical dielectric constant modulation in order to optimize the diffraction; the dielectric constant modulation is controlled independently of the photonic crystal periodicity. These fcc photonic crystals are better ordered than typical close-packed photonic crystals because their self assembly utilizes soft electrostatic repulsive potentials. We show that colloidal particle size and charge polydispersity has modest impact on ordering, in contrast to that for close-packed crystals. PMID:20163800

  19. Efficient Light-driven Long Distance Charge Separation and H2 Generation in Semiconductor Quantum Rods and Nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Tianquan

    Quantum confined semiconductor nanocrystals (0D quantum dots, 1D quantum rods and 2D quantum platlets) have been intensively investigated as light harvesting and charge separation materials for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications. The efficiency of these semiconductor nanocrystal-based devices depends on many fundamental processes, including light harvesting, carrier relaxation, exciton localization and transport, charge separation and charge recombination. The competition between these processes determines the overall solar energy conversion (solar to electricity or fuel) efficiency. Semiconductor nano-heterostructures, combining two or more material components, offer unique opportunities to control their charge separation properties by tailoring their compositions, dimensions and spatial arrangement. Further integration of catalysts (heterogeneous or homogeneous) to these materials form multifunctional nano-heterostructures. Using 0D, 1D and 2D CdSe/CdS/Pt heterostructures as model systems, we directly probe the above-mentioned fundamental exciton and carrier processes by transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. We are examining how to control these fundamental processes through the design of heterostructures to achieve long-lived charge separation and efficient H2 generation. In this talk, we will discuss a new model for exciton dissociation by charge transfer in quantum dots (i.e. Auger assisted electron transfer), mechanism of 1D and 2D exciton transport and dissociation in nanorods, and key factors limiting H2 generation efficiency in CdSe/CdS/Pt nanorod heterostructures.

  20. Elimination of deep surface traps in charged colloidal PbS and CdSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznyy, Oleksandr; Thon, Susanna; Ip, Alex; Sargent, Edward

    2013-03-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer a promising path towards high efficiency, scalable, solution and room processed photovoltaics and electronics. Their promise is curtailed today by difficulty of doping, inefficient transport, nonradiative recombination, and blinking, all generally attributed to electronic trap formation. Using first-principles simulations on off-stoichiometric colloidal quantum dots, we show that preparing a CQD free of traps is possible. However, self-compensating defects can form deep electronic trap states in response to charging or doping even in the most idealized CQDs. Surface traps arise from atomic dimers whose energy levels reside within the bandgap. The same states can also form upon photoexcitation, providing an atomistic mechanism for blinking. We show that avoiding the trap formation upon doping is possible by incorporation of select cations on the surface which shift the dimer energy levels above the quantum-confined bandedge.

  1. Photophysical and photochemical aspects of coupled semiconductors. Charge-transfer processes in colloidal CdS-TiO sub 2 and CdS-AgI systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gopidas, K.R.; Bohorquez, M.; Kamat, P.V. )

    1990-08-09

    The mechanistic and kinetic details of the charge injection from excited CdS into a large bandgap semiconductor such as AgI and TiO{sub 2} have been investigated by coupling the two semiconductor systems in the colloidal form. The interaction between the two colloids led to the quenching of CdS emission. The rate constants for the charge injection from excited CdS into the conduction band of AgI and TiO{sub 2} colloids were determined to be 2.2 {times} 10{sup 7} and >5 {times} 10{sup 10} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Transmission electron microscopic analysis indicated the possibility of several CdS colloidal particles interacting with a single particle of TiO{sub 2} and participating in the charge injection process. Primary photochemical events in the CdS-TiO{sub 2} system were investigated by picosecond laser flash photolysis. The charge injected into the TiO{sub 2} colloid and trapped at the Ti{sup 4+} site was characterized from its broad absorption in the region of 500-760 nm. The extended lifetime of these trapped charge carriers indicated an improved charge separation in the coupled semiconductor system.

  2. Kinetics of ergodic-to-nonergodic transitions in charged colloidal suspensions: Aging and gelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hajime; Jabbari-Farouji, Sara; Meunier, Jacques; Bonn, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    There are two types of isotropic disordered nonergodic states in colloidal suspensions: colloidal glasses and gels. In a recent paper [H. Tanaka, J. Meunier, and D. Bonn, Phys. Rev. E 69, 031404 (2004)], we discussed the static aspect of the differences and the similarities between the two. In this paper, we focus on the dynamic aspect. The kinetics of the liquid-glass transition is called “aging,” while that of the sol-gel transition is called “gelation.” The former is primarily governed by repulsive interactions between particles, while the latter is dominated by attractive interactions. Slowing down of the dynamics during aging reflects the increasing cooperativity required for the escape of a particle from the cage formed by the surrounding particles, while that during gelation reflects the increase in the size of particle clusters towards the percolation transition. Despite these clear differences in the origin of the slowing down of the kinetics between the two, it is not straightforward experimentally to distinguish them in a clear manner. For an understanding of the universal nature of ergodic-to-nonergodic transitions, it is of fundamental importance to elucidate the differences and the similarities in the kinetics between aging and gelation. We consider this problem, taking Laponite suspension as an explicit example. In particular, we focus on the two types of nonergodic states: (i) an attractive gel formed by van der Waals attractions for high ionic strengths and (ii) a repulsive Wigner glass stabilized by long-range Coulomb repulsions for low ionic strengths. We demonstrate that the aging of colloidal Wigner glass crucially differs not only from gelation, but also from the aging of structural and spin glasses. The aging of the colloidal Wigner glass is characterized by the unique cage-forming regime that does not exist in the aging of spin and structural glasses.

  3. Electric response of a magnetic colloid to periodic external excitation for different nanoparticles concentrations: Determination of the particles' effective charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalioto, F.; Barbero, G.; Sehnem, A. L.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    The effective electric charge of a nanoparticle in an ionic magnetic colloidal system (an ionic ferrofluid) is determined by using the impedance spectroscopy technique. The electric response of the samples to a harmonic external electric field excitation is described by means of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck model. The model proposed for the theoretical interpretation of the impedance spectroscopy data considers that the magnetic particles are electrically charged with H+ and have in their vicinity Cl- counterions, resulting in an effective charge Qeff. In the presence of an harmonic, in time, external field (frequency bigger than 10 4 Hz ) particles are assumed to be at rest, due to inertial reason. In this framework, the response of the cell is due to the H+ and Cl- present in the solution. From the spectra of the real and imaginary components of the electric impedance of the cell, by means of a best fit procedure to our model, we derive the effective electric charge of the magnetic particles and the bulk density of ions. From an independent measurement of the ζ-potential of the suspension, it is possible to calculate the hydrodynamic radius of the particle, in good agreement with that independently measured.

  4. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d3 (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles.

  5. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d(3) (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles. PMID:27394119

  6. Generalized Onsager theory for strongly anisometric patchy colloids.

    PubMed

    Wensink, H H; Trizac, E

    2014-01-14

    The implications of soft "patchy" interactions on the orientational disorder-order transition of strongly elongated colloidal rods and flat disks is studied within a simple Onsager-van der Waals density functional theory. The theory provides a generic framework for studying the liquid crystal phase behaviour of highly anisometric cylindrical colloids which carry a distinct geometrical pattern of repulsive or attractive soft interactions localized on the particle surface. In this paper, we apply our theory to the case of charged rods and disks for which the local electrostatic interactions can be described by a screened-Coulomb potential. We consider infinitely thin rod like cylinders with a uniform line charge and infinitely thin discotic cylinders with several distinctly different surface charge patterns. Irrespective of the backbone shape the isotropic-nematic phase diagrams of charged colloids feature a generic destabilization of nematic order at low ionic strength, a dramatic narrowing of the biphasic density region, and a reentrant phenomenon upon reducing the electrostatic screening. The low screening regime is characterized by a complete suppression of nematic order in favor of positionally ordered liquid crystal phases. PMID:24437905

  7. Generalized Onsager theory for strongly anisometric patchy colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensink, H. H.; Trizac, E.

    2014-01-01

    The implications of soft "patchy" interactions on the orientational disorder-order transition of strongly elongated colloidal rods and flat disks is studied within a simple Onsager-van der Waals density functional theory. The theory provides a generic framework for studying the liquid crystal phase behaviour of highly anisometric cylindrical colloids which carry a distinct geometrical pattern of repulsive or attractive soft interactions localized on the particle surface. In this paper, we apply our theory to the case of charged rods and disks for which the local electrostatic interactions can be described by a screened-Coulomb potential. We consider infinitely thin rod like cylinders with a uniform line charge and infinitely thin discotic cylinders with several distinctly different surface charge patterns. Irrespective of the backbone shape the isotropic-nematic phase diagrams of charged colloids feature a generic destabilization of nematic order at low ionic strength, a dramatic narrowing of the biphasic density region, and a reentrant phenomenon upon reducing the electrostatic screening. The low screening regime is characterized by a complete suppression of nematic order in favor of positionally ordered liquid crystal phases.

  8. Influence of an Additive-Free Particle Spreading Method on Interactions between Charged Colloidal Particles at an Oil/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yi, Zonglin; Xing, Xiaochen; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2016-05-17

    The assembly and manipulation of charged colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces represent active areas of fundamental and applied research. Previously, we have shown that colloidal particles can spontaneously generate unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface when spreading solvent is used to disperse them at an oil/water interface. These residual charges in turn affect the long-ranged electrostatic repulsive forces and packing of particles at the interface. To further uncover the influence arising from the spreading solvents on interfacial particle interactions, in the present study we utilize pure buoyancy to drive the particles onto an oil/water interface and compare the differences between such a spontaneously adsorbed particle monolayer to the spread monolayer based on solvent spreading techniques. Our results show that the solvent-free method could also lead particles to spread well at the interface, but it does not result in violent sliding of particles along the interface. More importantly, this additive-free spreading method can avoid the formation of unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface. These findings agree well with our previous hypothesis; namely, those unstable residual charges are triboelectric charges that arise from the violently rubbing of particles on oil at the interface. Therefore, if the spreading solvents could be avoided, then we would be able to get rid of the formation of residual charges at interfaces. This finding will provide insight for precisely controlling the interactions among colloidal particles trapped at fluid/fluid interfaces.

  9. Influence of an Additive-Free Particle Spreading Method on Interactions between Charged Colloidal Particles at an Oil/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yi, Zonglin; Xing, Xiaochen; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2016-05-17

    The assembly and manipulation of charged colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces represent active areas of fundamental and applied research. Previously, we have shown that colloidal particles can spontaneously generate unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface when spreading solvent is used to disperse them at an oil/water interface. These residual charges in turn affect the long-ranged electrostatic repulsive forces and packing of particles at the interface. To further uncover the influence arising from the spreading solvents on interfacial particle interactions, in the present study we utilize pure buoyancy to drive the particles onto an oil/water interface and compare the differences between such a spontaneously adsorbed particle monolayer to the spread monolayer based on solvent spreading techniques. Our results show that the solvent-free method could also lead particles to spread well at the interface, but it does not result in violent sliding of particles along the interface. More importantly, this additive-free spreading method can avoid the formation of unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface. These findings agree well with our previous hypothesis; namely, those unstable residual charges are triboelectric charges that arise from the violently rubbing of particles on oil at the interface. Therefore, if the spreading solvents could be avoided, then we would be able to get rid of the formation of residual charges at interfaces. This finding will provide insight for precisely controlling the interactions among colloidal particles trapped at fluid/fluid interfaces. PMID:27108987

  10. Control of the surface charge density of colloidal silica by sodium hydroxide in salt-freeand low-salt dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Junpei; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Ise, Norio; Yamaguchi, Takuji

    1997-03-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements and conductometric titrations were performed on dilute salt-free aqueous dispersion of a colloidal silica (diameter: 0.11+/-0.01×10-6nm) whose charge number can be varied with the quantity of coexisting sodium hydroxide. In the absence of sodium hydroxide, the silica particle had an effective (net) surface charge density σe of 8×10-8nC cm-2. Titrations by hydrochloric acid were performed in the presence of sodium hydroxide. When the NaOH concentration was sufficiently high, the titration curve could be divided into three regions with regard to slope values. These regions could be ascribed to titrations of excess sodium hydroxide, ionizable surface groups having Na ions as counterions, and excess hydrochloric acid. The analytical surface charge density σa, estimated from the titration curves, increased with increasing [NaOH]. It was found that the concentrations of Na and OH ions in excess were negligible when the [NaOH] was smaller than 2.5×10-4nM and the volume fraction of the silica, φ, was larger than 2.6×10-3. The value of σa at this threshold was 1.8×10-5nC cm-2. Under these conditions we could control the σa value by varying [NaOH]. The present system provides larger possibilities in studying the influence of charge density on the physico-chemical properties of ionic colloidal systems. Viscosity measurements were performed for salt-free and low-salt dispersions at [NaOH]'s where its excess concentration was found to be negligible. The σa dependence of the viscosity was in good agreement with previous results obtained from ionic latices having various σa's. A relationship between the effective charge density at an infinite dilution, σe\\|φ=0, and σa was examined for latex systems. An empirical relation, ln σe\\|φ=0=0.49 ln σa-1.0, was obtained by using σe\\|φ=0 values determined by the conductivity for latices with various σa's from 0.21×10-6 to 5.6×10-6nC cm-2. By assuming that this relation holds

  11. A differential dielectric spectroscopy setup to measure the electric dipole moment and net charge of colloidal quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kortschot, R. J.; Bakelaar, I. A.; Erné, B. H.; Kuipers, B. W. M.

    2014-03-15

    A sensitive dielectric spectroscopy setup is built to measure the response of nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid to an alternating electric field over a frequency range from 10{sup −2} to 10{sup 7} Hz. The measured complex permittivity spectrum records both the rotational dynamics due to a permanent electric dipole moment and the translational dynamics due to net charges. The setup consists of a half-transparent capacitor connected in a bridge circuit, which is balanced on pure solvent only, using a software-controlled compensating voltage. In this way, the measured signal is dominated by the contributions of the nanoparticles rather than by the solvent. We demonstrate the performance of the setup with measurements on a dispersion of colloidal CdSe quantum dots in the apolar liquid decalin.

  12. High reduction of interfacial charge recombination in colloidal quantum dot solar cells by metal oxide surface passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jin; Kuga, Yuki; Mora-Seró, Iván; Toyoda, Taro; Ogomi, Yuhei; Hayase, Shuzi; Bisquert, Juan; Shen, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on colloidal QDs and metal oxide nanowires (NWs) possess unique and outstanding advantages in enhancing light harvesting and charge collection in comparison to planar architectures. However, the high surface area of the NW structure often brings about a large amount of recombination (especially interfacial recombination) and limits the open-circuit voltage in BHJ solar cells. This problem is solved here by passivating the surface of the metal oxide component in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar cells (CQDSCs). By coating thin TiO2 layers onto ZnO-NW surfaces, the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency have been improved by over 40% in PbS CQDSCs. Characterization by transient photovoltage decay and impedance spectroscopy indicated that the interfacial recombination was significantly reduced by the surface passivation strategy. An efficiency as high as 6.13% was achieved through the passivation approach and optimization for the length of the ZnO-NW arrays (device active area: 16 mm2). All solar cells were tested in air, and exhibited excellent air storage stability (without any performance decline over more than 130 days). This work highlights the significance of metal oxide passivation in achieving high performance BHJ solar cells. The charge recombination mechanism uncovered in this work could shed light on the further improvement of PbS CQDSCs and/or other types of solar cells.Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on colloidal QDs and metal oxide nanowires (NWs) possess unique and outstanding advantages in enhancing light harvesting and charge collection in comparison to planar architectures. However, the high surface area of the NW structure often brings about a large amount of recombination (especially interfacial recombination) and limits the open-circuit voltage in BHJ solar cells. This problem is solved here by passivating the surface of the metal oxide component in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar

  13. Melting and freezing lines for a mixture of charged colloidal spheres with spindle-type phase diagram.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Nina J; Palberg, Thomas

    2010-09-14

    We have measured the phase behavior of a binary mixture of like-charged colloidal spheres with a size ratio of Γ=0.9 and a charge ratio of Λ=0.96 as a function of particle number density n and composition p. Under exhaustively deionized conditions, the aqueous suspension forms solid solutions of body centered cubic structure for all compositions. The freezing and melting lines as a function of composition show opposite behavior and open a wide, spindle shaped coexistence region. Lacking more sophisticated treatments, we model the interaction in our mixtures as an effective one-component pair energy accounting for number weighted effective charge and screening constant. Using this description, we find that within experimental error the location of the experimental melting points meets the range of melting points predicted for monodisperse, one-component Yukawa systems made in several theoretical approaches. We further discuss that a detailed understanding of the exact phase diagram shape including the composition dependent width of the coexistence region will need an extended theoretical treatment.

  14. Avoidance model for soft particles. II. Positional ordering of charged rods.

    PubMed

    Kramer, E M; Herzfeld, J

    2000-06-01

    The phase diagram of parallel, charged spherocylinders is computed. The topology of the diagram is found to be similar to the uncharged one, but there are several qualitative changes. Regions of phase coexistence are significantly narrower and positional ordering is stabilized by the electrostatic repulsions. The nematic phase occupies a very narrow zone. We suggest that soft repulsions between surfactant micelles may be responsible for the absence of a nematic phase in most surfactant systems. We also present comparisons with the observed nematic-smectic phase transition for fd and tobacco mosaic virus particles. PMID:11088380

  15. Adsorption of DNA on colloidal Ag nanoparticles: effects of nanoparticle surface charge, base content and length of DNA.

    PubMed

    Abbasian, Sara; Moshaii, Ahmad; Nikkhah, Maryam; Farkhari, Nahid

    2014-04-01

    The adsorption of single and double stranded DNA on colloidal silver nanoparticles has been studied to investigate the effects of surface charge of the nanoparticles, the composition of the oligonucleotide and its length on the adsorption characteristics. The results explain that the nanoparticle surface charge is a key parameter determining the propensity of oligonucleotides to adsorb on nanoparticles. The adsorption also depends on the length and composition of oligonucleotide. The protective effects of both single and double stranded DNA against salt-induced aggregation dramatically increase as the DNA length increases. In contrast to other available reports, we observed that long oligonucleotides (single-stranded and double stranded) can well be adsorbed on the nanoparticles as the short ones leading to almost complete protection of nanoparticles against salt induced aggregation and hence are not suitable for the sensing applications. Finally, the light scattering from the Ag nanoparticles has been simulated and the results compared with the experiments. Our understanding should improve development of colorimetric assays for DNA detection based on aggregation of unmodified metallic nanoparticles.

  16. Delocalized and localized charged excitons in single CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods revealed by polarized photoluminescence blinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Toshiyuki; Sato, Ryota; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-07-01

    CdSe/CdS heterostructured nanocrystals with quasi-type-II band alignments provide an interesting platform for studying the photoluminescence (PL) blinking associated with their unique morphologies. By using simultaneous measurements of the PL intensity, lifetime, and polarization anisotropy, we reveal the role of the electron delocalization during the blinking of single CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods. We found that a significant change in the PL polarization anisotropy distinguishes between two kinds of charged excitons with different electron delocalizations. We report our observation of unique polarized PL blinking governed by the band alignments and the Coulomb interactions between the charges inside and outside the dot-in-rod.

  17. Aggregation and stability of anisotropic charged clay colloids in aqueous medium in the presence of salt.

    PubMed

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2016-01-01

    Na-montmorillonite nanoclay is a colloid of layered mineral silicate. When dispersed in water, this mineral swells on absorption of water and exfoliates into platelets with electric double layers on their surfaces. Even at low particle concentration, the aqueous dispersion can exhibit a spontaneous ergodicity breaking phase transition from a free flowing liquid to nonequilibrium, kinetically arrested and disordered states such as gels and glasses. In an earlier publication [Applied Clay Science, 2015, 114, 8592], we showed that the stability of clay gels can be enhanced by adding a salt later to the clay dispersion prepared in deionized water, rather than by adding the clay mineral to a previously mixed salt solution. Here, we directly track the collapsing interface of sedimenting clay gels using an optical method and show that adding salt after dispersing the clay mineral does indeed result in more stable gels even in very dilute dispersions. These weak gels are seen to exhibit a transient collapse after a finite delay time, a phenomenon observed previously in depletion gels. The velocity of the collapse oscillates with the age of the sample. However, the average velocity of collapse increases with sample age up to a peak value before decreasing at higher ages. With increasing salt concentration, the delay time for transient collapse decreases, while the peak value of the collapsing velocity increases. Using ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy, rheometry and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, we confirm that morphological changes of the gel network assembly, facilitated by thermal fluctuations, lead to the observed collapse phenomenon. Since clay minerals are used extensively in polymer nanocomposites, as rheological modifiers, stabilizers and gas absorbents, we believe that the results reported in this work are extremely useful for several practical applications and also for understanding geophysical phenomena such as the formation and stability of quicksand

  18. Aggregation and stability of anisotropic charged clay colloids in aqueous medium in the presence of salt.

    PubMed

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2016-01-01

    Na-montmorillonite nanoclay is a colloid of layered mineral silicate. When dispersed in water, this mineral swells on absorption of water and exfoliates into platelets with electric double layers on their surfaces. Even at low particle concentration, the aqueous dispersion can exhibit a spontaneous ergodicity breaking phase transition from a free flowing liquid to nonequilibrium, kinetically arrested and disordered states such as gels and glasses. In an earlier publication [Applied Clay Science, 2015, 114, 8592], we showed that the stability of clay gels can be enhanced by adding a salt later to the clay dispersion prepared in deionized water, rather than by adding the clay mineral to a previously mixed salt solution. Here, we directly track the collapsing interface of sedimenting clay gels using an optical method and show that adding salt after dispersing the clay mineral does indeed result in more stable gels even in very dilute dispersions. These weak gels are seen to exhibit a transient collapse after a finite delay time, a phenomenon observed previously in depletion gels. The velocity of the collapse oscillates with the age of the sample. However, the average velocity of collapse increases with sample age up to a peak value before decreasing at higher ages. With increasing salt concentration, the delay time for transient collapse decreases, while the peak value of the collapsing velocity increases. Using ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy, rheometry and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, we confirm that morphological changes of the gel network assembly, facilitated by thermal fluctuations, lead to the observed collapse phenomenon. Since clay minerals are used extensively in polymer nanocomposites, as rheological modifiers, stabilizers and gas absorbents, we believe that the results reported in this work are extremely useful for several practical applications and also for understanding geophysical phenomena such as the formation and stability of quicksand

  19. Rodding Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rods can be made of stainless steel or titanium. Regular rods do not expand. They have many ... v regular), the rod materials (stainless steel v titanium) and the age for a first rodding surgery. ...

  20. Dynamic arrest in charged colloidal systems exhibiting large-scale structural heterogeneities.

    PubMed

    Haro-Pérez, C; Rojas-Ochoa, L F; Castañeda-Priego, R; Quesada-Pérez, M; Callejas-Fernández, J; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R; Trappe, V

    2009-01-01

    Suspensions of charged liposomes are found to exhibit typical features of strongly repulsive fluid systems at short length scales, while exhibiting structural heterogeneities at larger length scales that are characteristic of attractive systems. We model the static structure factor of these systems using effective pair interaction potentials composed of a long-range attraction and a shorter range repulsion. Our modeling of the static structure yields conditions for dynamically arrested states at larger volume fractions, which we find to agree with the experimentally observed dynamics. PMID:19257245

  1. Environmentally benign synthesis of positively charged, ultra-low sized colloidal gold in universal solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajeet; De, Arnab; Saxena, Amit; Mozumdar, Subho

    2014-06-01

    A simple, single-step, one pot method was developed for the synthesis of monodispersed, ultralow sized, water-dispersible, stable, positively charged gold nanoparticles using the branched polyethlyneimine (PEI) in an aqueous media. Sizes of the gold nanoparticles have been tuned by adjusting the concentration of PEI and the gold salt. Formation of gold nanoparticles has been evidenced using various characterization techniques such as quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) and spectroscopy and UV-visible spectrophotometer.

  2. Dynamic arrest in charged colloidal systems exhibiting large-scale structural heterogeneities.

    PubMed

    Haro-Pérez, C; Rojas-Ochoa, L F; Castañeda-Priego, R; Quesada-Pérez, M; Callejas-Fernández, J; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R; Trappe, V

    2009-01-01

    Suspensions of charged liposomes are found to exhibit typical features of strongly repulsive fluid systems at short length scales, while exhibiting structural heterogeneities at larger length scales that are characteristic of attractive systems. We model the static structure factor of these systems using effective pair interaction potentials composed of a long-range attraction and a shorter range repulsion. Our modeling of the static structure yields conditions for dynamically arrested states at larger volume fractions, which we find to agree with the experimentally observed dynamics.

  3. Dynamic Arrest in Charged Colloidal Systems Exhibiting Large-Scale Structural Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Haro-Perez, C.; Callejas-Fernandez, J.; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R.; Rojas-Ochoa, L. F.; Castaneda-Priego, R.; Quesada-Perez, M.; Trappe, V.

    2009-01-09

    Suspensions of charged liposomes are found to exhibit typical features of strongly repulsive fluid systems at short length scales, while exhibiting structural heterogeneities at larger length scales that are characteristic of attractive systems. We model the static structure factor of these systems using effective pair interaction potentials composed of a long-range attraction and a shorter range repulsion. Our modeling of the static structure yields conditions for dynamically arrested states at larger volume fractions, which we find to agree with the experimentally observed dynamics.

  4. Salt effect on microscopic structure and stability of colloidal complex obtained from neutral/polyelectrolyte block copolymer and oppositely charged surfactant.

    PubMed

    Annaka, Masahiko

    2012-11-01

    The salt effect on complex formation of poly(acrylamide)-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PAM-b-PAA) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) at different NaBr concentrations, C(NaBr), was investigated by laser light scattering (LLS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). LLS and SANS clearly indicates that the aqueous solution of PAM-b-PAA and DTAB associate into colloidal complexes. For low surfactant-to-polymer charge ratio Z lower than the critical value Z(C), the colloidal complexes are single DTAB micelles dressed by a few PAM-b-PAA. Above Z(C), the colloidal complexes form a core-shell microstructure. The complex formation in the PAM-b-PAA/DTAB is enhanced by addition of salt: Z(C) decreases with increasing C(NaBr). This is considered to similar to the cmc behavior for the pure surfactant system. The core of the complex consists of densely packed surfactant micelles (DTA(+)), and PAA block chains bind to these micelles, displace their counteranions (Br-) and bridge them. The corona of the complex is constituted from the PAM. Since the interaction between polyelectrolyte and oppositely charged surfactant is primarily electrostatic in nature, the core radius and the intermicellar distance of the DTA(+) micelles inside the core depend on C(NaBr). The addition of salt screens the electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged PAA block and DTAB, which weakens the interaction. With increasing C(NaBr), therefore, the core of the colloidal complex is considered to swell, which leads to the increases in the core radius R(C) and the intermicellar distance of the DTA(+) micelles inside the core. The aggregation number expressed in terms of DTA(+) micelles per complex is also evaluated using the analogy with the homopolyelectrolyte/surfactant system.

  5. Electrophoresis of a charged colloidal particle in porous media: boundary effect of a solid plane.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Peter; Huang, Cheng-Hsuan; Lee, Eric

    2011-11-15

    Electrokinetic treatments such as the electrophoretic technique have been applied successfully to various soil remediation and contaminant removal situations. To understand further the fundamental features involved, the electrophoretic motion of a charged particle in porous media is investigated theoretically in this study, focusing on the boundary effect of a nearby solid plane toward which the particle moves perpendicularly. The porous medium is modeled as a Brinkman fluid with a characteristic screening length (λ(-1)) that can be obtained directly from the experimental data. General electrokinetic equations are used to describe the system and are solved with a pseudospectral method based on Chebyshev polynomials. We found that the particle motion is deterred by the boundary effect in general. The closer the particle is to the boundary, the more severe this effect is. Up to a 90% reduction in particle mobility is observed in some situations. This indicates that a drastic overestimation (10-fold!) of the overall transport rate of particles may occur for large-scale in situ operations in porous media, such as soil remediation utilizing large planar electrodes, should a portable analytical formula valid for bulk systems only be used. Correction factors for various situations in porous media are presented as convenient charts with which to aid engineers and researchers in the field of environmental engineering, for instance, as a realistic estimation of the actual transport rate obtainable. In addition, the results of present study can be applied to biomedical engineering and drug delivery as well because polymer gels and skin barriers both have a porous essence. PMID:21967511

  6. Out-of-equilibrium processes in suspensions of oppositely charged colloids: liquid-to-crystal nucleation and gel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We study the kinetics of the liquid-to-crystal transformation and of gel formation in colloidal suspensions of oppositely charged particles. We analyse, by means of both computer simulations and experiments, the evolution of a fluid quenched to a state point of the phase diagram where the most stable state is either a homogeneous crystalline solid or a solid phase in contact with a dilute gas. On the one hand, at high temperatures and high packing fractions, close to an ordered-solid/disordered-solid coexistence line, we find that the fluid-to-crystal pathway does not follow the minimum free energy route. On the other hand, a quench to a state point far from the ordered-crystal/disordered-crystal coexistence border is followed by a fluid-to-solid transition through the minimum free energy pathway. At low temperatures and packing fractions we observe that the system undergoes a gas-liquid spinodal decomposition that, at some point, arrests giving rise to a gel-like structure. Both our simulations and experiments suggest that increasing the interaction range favors crystallization over vitrification in gel-like structures. [4pt] In collaboration with Chantal Valeriani, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands and SUPA, School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, JCMB King's Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, UK; Teun Vissers, Andrea Fortini, Mirjam E. Leunissen, and Alfons van Blaaderen, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University; Daan Frenke, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW, Cambridge, UK; and Marjolein Dijkstra, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University.

  7. Plasmon-induced charge separation at two-dimensional gold semishell arrays on SiO{sub 2}@TiO{sub 2} colloidal crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ling; Nishi, Hiroyasu; Tatsuma, Tetsu

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectrodes based on plasmonic Au semishell (or halfshell) arrays are developed. A colloidal crystal consisting of SiO{sub 2}@TiO{sub 2} core-shell particles is prepared on a TiO{sub 2}-coated transparent electrode. A Au semishell (or halfshell) array is deposited by sputtering or evaporation on the colloidal crystal. An electrode with the semishell (or halfshell) array exhibits negative photopotential shifts and anodic photocurrents under visible light at 500-800 nm wavelengths in an aqueous electrolyte containing an electron donor. In particular, hydroquinone and ethanol are good electron donors. The photocurrents can be explained in terms of plasmon-induced charge separation at the Au-TiO{sub 2} interface.

  8. Directed self-assembly of colloidal model systems on charge-selective surfaces in external electric fields: theory and numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Falk, Guido

    2013-02-14

    Membrane electrophoretic deposition has a long-established reputation in delivering high quality nanoparticle compact and coating solutions in the field of high performance nanoparticle architectures made from aqueous nanoparticle suspensions. Although for a long time, it has been common practice in nanoparticle science and particle-based nanotechnology to use membrane electrophoretic shaping of nanoparticles, little is known about long-range electrohydrodynamic manipulation of the engineered assembly of colloidal particles at the nanoscale. Here, we analyze the interfacial field-induced flow of a strong electrolyte and its implications for the directed self-assembly of colloidal nanoparticles on nonuniform charge-selective ion-exchange membrane surfaces as well as on conducting microelectrodes imposed to electrophoretic deposition boundary conditions. Numerical calculations of the vortex streamlines are derived for the case of extreme diffusion limitation, concentration polarization near the limiting current, and induced electric forces acting upon the residual space charge. The system is modeled by coupled mass balances, Ohmic law, Navier-Stokes, and Nernst-Planck equations. Particularly, numerical calculations under bulk electroconvection conditions show that the latter provides an efficient intrinsic interfacial mechanism capable of accounting for the experimentally observed local electrophoretic deposition behavior of nanoparticles at ideal permselective membranes with nonplanar periodic charge discontinuity and metal microelectrodes. PMID:22913482

  9. Rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sable, D.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a rod guide assembly for a sucker rod longitudinally reciprocably movable in a well flow conductor comprising: a pair of longitudinally spaced upper and lower stops rigidly secured to a sucker rod; and a guide body movably mounted on the rod between the stops. The stops being spaced from each other a distance slightly greater than the length of the guide body, the upper stop engaging the guide body to move the guide body downwardly with the rod after an initial short downward movement of the rod after initiation of each downward movement of the rod and the lower stop engaging the guide body to move the second guide body upwardly with the rod after initial short upward movement of the rod after initiation of each upward movement of the rod during the longitudinal reciprocatory movement of the rod in a well flow conductor.

  10. Enhanced emission of charged-exciton polaritons from colloidal quantum dots on a SiN/SiO2 slab waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xingsheng; Li, Xingyun

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the photoluminescence (PL) spectra and the time-resolved PL decay process from colloidal quantum dots on SiN/SiO2 wet etched via BOE (HF:NH4F:H2O). The spectrum displays multi-peak shapes that vary with irradiation time. The evolution of the spectral peaks with irradiation time and collection angle demonstrates that the strong coupling of the charged-exciton emission to the leaky modes of the SiN/SiO2 slab waveguide predominantly produces short-wavelength spectral peaks, resulting in multi-peak spectra. We conclude that BOE etching enhances the charged-exciton emission efficiency and its contribution to the total emission compared with the unetched case. BOE etching smoothes the electron confinement potential, thus decreasing the Auger recombination rate. Therefore, the charged-exciton emission efficiency is high, and the charged-exciton-polariton emission can be further enhanced through strong coupling to the leaky mode of the slab waveguide. PMID:25988709

  11. The role of charged particles in the positive corona-generated photon count in a rod to plane air gap

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, X. M.; Wang, Y. J.; MacAlpine, J. M. K.; Chen, L.; Wang, L. M.; Guan, Z. C.; Wan, S. W.; Liu, L.

    2013-08-26

    The relationship between the calculated charged-particle densities in positive corona, the rate of streamer production, and the photon count from the corona were investigated and found to be closely related. Both the densities of electrons and positive ions peaked at 11.8 kV, near the corona inception voltage; they then fell rapidly before slowly rising again. This behavior was exactly matched by the measured photon count. The calculation of the charged-particle density in a positive corona was achieved by means of a fluid model.

  12. Time-resolved optical study on the charge carrier dynamics in a TiO{sub 2}/AgI sandwich colloid

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzmaurice, D.; Frei, H.; Rabani, J. |

    1995-06-01

    Preparation of a sandwich colloid involving TiO{sub 2} and AgI (hexagonal) particles in alkaline aqueous solution is described. Time-resolved optical absorption experiments are reported that involve pulsed laser excitation at 355 nm (TiO{sub 2} bandgap) and at 410 nm (AgI bandgap). Charge carrier dynamics was probed directly by transient absorption measurements in the near-infrared and by reaction with methyl viologen (MV{sup 2+}). Reduction of MV{sup 2+} was observed to occur over a period of 100-200 {mu}s. MV{sup +} so produced reduced AgI to silver. By contrast, MV{sup 2+} reduction upon bandgap excitation of neat alkaline TiO{sub 2} colloid was complete within 1 {mu}s. These observations signal a prolonged electron-hole separation in the case of the AgI/TiO{sub 2} sol and indicate the formation of sandwich particles. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  13. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    fluid-fluid interface [2]. Together with Remco Tuinier, Henk has recently completed a book in this area which is to appear later this year. A major theme in Henk's research is that of phase transitions in lyotropic liquid crystals. Henk, together with Daan Frenkel and Alain Stroobants, realized in the 1980s that a smectic phase in dispersions of rod-like particles can be stable without the presence of attractive interactions, similar to nematic ordering as predicted earlier by Onsager [3]. Together with Gert-Jan Vroege he wrote a seminal review in this area [4]. Henk once said that 'one can only truly develop one colloidal model system in one's career' and in his case this must be that of gibbsite platelets. Initially Henk's group pursued another polymorph of aluminium hydroxide, boehmite, which forms rod-like particles [5], which already displayed nematic liquid crystal phases. The real breakthrough came when the same precursors treated the produced gibbsite platelets slightly differently. These reliably form a discotic nematic phase [6] and, despite the polydispersity in their diameter, a columnar phase [7]. A theme encompassing a wide range of soft matter systems is that of colloidal dynamics and phase transition kinetics. Many colloidal systems have a tendency to get stuck in metastable states, such as gels or glasses. This is a nuisance if one wishes to study phase transitions, but it is of great practical significance. Such issues feature in many of Henk's publications, and with Valerie Anderson he wrote a highly cited review in this area [8]. Henk Lekkerkerker has also invested significant effort into the promotion of synchrotron radiation studies of colloidal suspensions. He was one of the great supporters of the Dutch-Belgian beamline 'DUBBLE' project at the ESRF [9]. He attended one of the very first experiments in Grenoble in 1999, which led to a Nature publication [7]. He was strongly involved in many other experiments which followed and also has been a

  14. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    fluid-fluid interface [2]. Together with Remco Tuinier, Henk has recently completed a book in this area which is to appear later this year. A major theme in Henk's research is that of phase transitions in lyotropic liquid crystals. Henk, together with Daan Frenkel and Alain Stroobants, realized in the 1980s that a smectic phase in dispersions of rod-like particles can be stable without the presence of attractive interactions, similar to nematic ordering as predicted earlier by Onsager [3]. Together with Gert-Jan Vroege he wrote a seminal review in this area [4]. Henk once said that 'one can only truly develop one colloidal model system in one's career' and in his case this must be that of gibbsite platelets. Initially Henk's group pursued another polymorph of aluminium hydroxide, boehmite, which forms rod-like particles [5], which already displayed nematic liquid crystal phases. The real breakthrough came when the same precursors treated the produced gibbsite platelets slightly differently. These reliably form a discotic nematic phase [6] and, despite the polydispersity in their diameter, a columnar phase [7]. A theme encompassing a wide range of soft matter systems is that of colloidal dynamics and phase transition kinetics. Many colloidal systems have a tendency to get stuck in metastable states, such as gels or glasses. This is a nuisance if one wishes to study phase transitions, but it is of great practical significance. Such issues feature in many of Henk's publications, and with Valerie Anderson he wrote a highly cited review in this area [8]. Henk Lekkerkerker has also invested significant effort into the promotion of synchrotron radiation studies of colloidal suspensions. He was one of the great supporters of the Dutch-Belgian beamline 'DUBBLE' project at the ESRF [9]. He attended one of the very first experiments in Grenoble in 1999, which led to a Nature publication [7]. He was strongly involved in many other experiments which followed and also has been a

  15. Cationic Silicon Nanocrystals with Colloidal Stability, pH‐Independent Positive Surface Charge and Size Tunable Photoluminescence in the Near‐Infrared to Red Spectral Range

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kenneth K.; Liao, Kristine; Casillas, Gilberto; Li, Yiying

    2016-01-01

    In this report, the synthesis of a novel class of cationic quaternary ammonium‐surface‐functionalized silicon nanocrystals (ncSi) using a novel and highly versatile terminal alkyl halide‐surface‐functionalized ncSi synthon is described. The distinctive features of these cationic ncSi include colloidal stability, pH‐independent positive surface charge, and size‐tunable photoluminescence (PL) in the biologically relevant near‐infrared‐to‐red spectral region. These cationic ncSi are characterized via a combination of high‐resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy‐dispersive X‐ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared, X‐ray photoelectron, and photoluminescence spectroscopies, and zeta potential measurements. PMID:27812459

  16. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  17. Effect of surface charge on the colloidal stability and in vitro uptake of carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Vanessa; Herrera, Adriana P.; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Torres-Lugo, Madeline

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle physicochemical properties such as surface charge are considered to play an important role in cellular uptake and particle–cell interactions. In order to systematically evaluate the role of surface charge on the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles, we prepared carboxymethyl-substituted dextrans with different degrees of substitution, ranging from 38 to 5 groups per chain, and reacted them using carbodiimide chemistry with amine–silane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with narrow size distributions in the range of 33–45 nm. Surface charge of carboxymethyl-substituted dextran-coated nano-particles ranged from −50 to 5 mV as determined by zeta potential measurements, and was dependent on the number of carboxymethyl groups incorporated in the dextran chains. Nanoparticles were incubated with CaCo-2 human colon cancer cells. Nanoparticle–cell interactions were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and uptake was quantified by elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Mechanisms of internalization were inferred using pharmacological inhibitors for fluid-phase, clathrin-mediated, and caveola-mediated endocytosis. Results showed increased uptake for nanoparticles with greater negative charge. Internalization patterns suggest that uptake of the most negatively charged particles occurs via non-specific interactions. PMID:24470787

  18. Does colloid shape affect detachment of colloids by a moving air-water interface?

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L; Davis, Howard P

    2013-05-14

    Air-water interfaces interact strongly with colloidal particles by capillary forces. The magnitude of the interaction force depends on, among other things, the particle shape. Here, we investigate the effects of particle shape on colloid detachment by a moving air-water interface. We used hydrophilic polystyrene colloids with four different shapes (spheres, barrels, rods, and oblong disks), but otherwise identical surface properties. The nonspherical shapes were created by stretching spherical microspheres on a film of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The colloids were then deposited onto the inner surface of a glass channel. An air bubble was introduced into the channel and passed through, thereby generating a receding followed by an advancing air-water interface. The detachment of colloids by the air-water interfaces was visualized with a confocal microscope, quantified by image analysis, and analyzed statistically to determine significant differences. For all colloid shapes, the advancing air-water interface caused pronounced colloid detachment (>63%), whereas the receding interface was ineffective in colloid detachment (<1.5%). Among the different colloid shapes, the barrels were most readily removed (94%) by the advancing interface, followed by the spheres and oblong disks (80%) and the rods (63%). Colloid detachment was significantly affected by colloid shape. The presence of an edge, as it occurs in a barrel-shaped colloid, promoted colloid detachment because the air-water interface is being pinned at the edge of the colloid. This suggests that the magnitude of colloid mobilization and transport in porous media is underestimated for edged particles and overestimated for rodlike particles when a sphere is used as a model colloid.

  19. An insight into the mechanism of charge-transfer of hybrid polymer:ternary/quaternary chalcopyrite colloidal nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Parul; Singh, Son

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this work, we have demonstrated the structural and optoelectronic properties of the surface of ternary/quaternary (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe) chalcopyrite nanocrystallites passivated by tri-n-octylphosphine-oxide (TOPO) and tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) and compared their charge transfer characteristics in the respective polymer: chalcopyrite nanocomposites by dispersing them in poly(3-hexylthiophene) polymer. It has been found that CZTSe nanocrystallites due to their high crystallinity and well-ordered 3-dimensional network in its pristine form exhibit a higher steric- and photo-stability, resistance against coagulation and homogeneity compared to the CISe and CIGSe counterparts. Moreover, CZTSe nanocrystallites display efficient photoluminescence quenching as evident from the high value of the Stern–Volmer quenching constant (K SV) and eventually higher charge transfer efficiency in their respective polymer P3HT:CZTSe composites. We modelled the dependency of the charge transfer from the donor and the charge separation mechanism across the donor–acceptor interface from the extent of crystallinity of the chalcopyrite semiconductors (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe). Quaternary CZTSe chalcopyrites with their high crystallinity and controlled morphology in conjunction with regioregular P3HT polymer is an attractive candidate for hybrid solar cells applications. PMID:25161859

  20. An insight into the mechanism of charge-transfer of hybrid polymer:ternary/quaternary chalcopyrite colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Parul; Singh, Son; Sharma, Shailesh Narain

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have demonstrated the structural and optoelectronic properties of the surface of ternary/quaternary (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe) chalcopyrite nanocrystallites passivated by tri-n-octylphosphine-oxide (TOPO) and tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) and compared their charge transfer characteristics in the respective polymer: chalcopyrite nanocomposites by dispersing them in poly(3-hexylthiophene) polymer. It has been found that CZTSe nanocrystallites due to their high crystallinity and well-ordered 3-dimensional network in its pristine form exhibit a higher steric- and photo-stability, resistance against coagulation and homogeneity compared to the CISe and CIGSe counterparts. Moreover, CZTSe nanocrystallites display efficient photoluminescence quenching as evident from the high value of the Stern-Volmer quenching constant (K SV) and eventually higher charge transfer efficiency in their respective polymer P3HT:CZTSe composites. We modelled the dependency of the charge transfer from the donor and the charge separation mechanism across the donor-acceptor interface from the extent of crystallinity of the chalcopyrite semiconductors (CISe/CIGSe/CZTSe). Quaternary CZTSe chalcopyrites with their high crystallinity and controlled morphology in conjunction with regioregular P3HT polymer is an attractive candidate for hybrid solar cells applications. PMID:25161859

  1. Trapping and chaining self-assembly of colloidal polystyrene particles over a floating electrode by using combined induced-charge electroosmosis and attractive dipole-dipole interactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiyu; Shao, Jinyou; Jia, Yankai; Tao, Ye; Ding, Yucheng; Jiang, Hongyuan; Ren, Yukun

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel low-frequency strategy to trap 10 μm colloidal polystyrene (PS) particles of small buoyancy velocity on the surface of a floating electrode, on the basis of combined induced-charge electroosmotic (ICEO) flow and dipole-dipole chaining phenomenon. For field frequencies of 5-50 Hz, much lower than the reciprocal RC time scale, double-layer polarization makes electric field lines pass around the 'insulating' surface of the ideally polarizable floating electrode. Once the long-range ICEO convective micro-vortexes transport particles quickly from the bulk fluid to the electrode surface, neighbouring particles aligned along the local horizontal electric field attract one another by attractive dipolar interactions, and form arrays of particle chains that are almost parallel with the applied electric field. Most importantly, this low-frequency trapping method takes advantage of the dielectrophoretic (DEP) particle-particle interaction to enhance the downward buoyancy force of this dipolar chaining assembly structure, in order to overcome the upward ICEO fluidic drag and realize stable particle trapping around the flow stagnation region. For the sake of comparison, the field frequency is further raised far above the DC limit. At the intermediate frequencies of 200 Hz-2 kHz, this trapping method fails to work, since the normal electric field component emanates from the conducting electrode surface. Besides, at high field frequencies (>3 kHz), particles can be once again effectively trapped at the electrode center, though with a compact (3 kHz) or disordered (10 kHz) 2D packing state on the electrode surface and mainly governed by the short-range negative DEP force field, resulting in requiring a much longer trapping time. To gain a better interpretation of the various particle behaviours observed in experiments, we develop a theoretical framework that takes into account both Maxwell-Wagner interfacial charge relaxation at the particle

  2. Trapping and chaining self-assembly of colloidal polystyrene particles over a floating electrode by using combined induced-charge electroosmosis and attractive dipole-dipole interactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiyu; Shao, Jinyou; Jia, Yankai; Tao, Ye; Ding, Yucheng; Jiang, Hongyuan; Ren, Yukun

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel low-frequency strategy to trap 10 μm colloidal polystyrene (PS) particles of small buoyancy velocity on the surface of a floating electrode, on the basis of combined induced-charge electroosmotic (ICEO) flow and dipole-dipole chaining phenomenon. For field frequencies of 5-50 Hz, much lower than the reciprocal RC time scale, double-layer polarization makes electric field lines pass around the 'insulating' surface of the ideally polarizable floating electrode. Once the long-range ICEO convective micro-vortexes transport particles quickly from the bulk fluid to the electrode surface, neighbouring particles aligned along the local horizontal electric field attract one another by attractive dipolar interactions, and form arrays of particle chains that are almost parallel with the applied electric field. Most importantly, this low-frequency trapping method takes advantage of the dielectrophoretic (DEP) particle-particle interaction to enhance the downward buoyancy force of this dipolar chaining assembly structure, in order to overcome the upward ICEO fluidic drag and realize stable particle trapping around the flow stagnation region. For the sake of comparison, the field frequency is further raised far above the DC limit. At the intermediate frequencies of 200 Hz-2 kHz, this trapping method fails to work, since the normal electric field component emanates from the conducting electrode surface. Besides, at high field frequencies (>3 kHz), particles can be once again effectively trapped at the electrode center, though with a compact (3 kHz) or disordered (10 kHz) 2D packing state on the electrode surface and mainly governed by the short-range negative DEP force field, resulting in requiring a much longer trapping time. To gain a better interpretation of the various particle behaviours observed in experiments, we develop a theoretical framework that takes into account both Maxwell-Wagner interfacial charge relaxation at the particle

  3. Effects of different crystal faces on the surface charge of colloidal goethite (α-FeOOH) particles: an experimental and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaboriaud, Fabien; Ehrhardt, Jean-Jacques

    2003-03-01

    The surface charge of colloidal particles is usually determined by potentiometric titration. These acid-base titrations make it possible to measure the pH of point-of-zero charge (pzc) for oxide minerals. This macroscopic property is the most important parameter used in surface complexation modeling to reproduce experimental data. The pzc values of goethite reported in the literature vary between 7.0 and 9.5. Carbonate adsorption and/or surface morphology are thought to account for this wide range. We demonstrate a procedure for the removal of the carbonate ions that initially adsorb on goethite and strongly affect the titration curves and pzc determination. We also investigated the crystal-face-specific reactivity of two morphologically different goethites. The z-profiles obtained from atomic force microscopy (AFM) images showed that the goethite with the smallest specific surface area ( S = 49 m 2/g, denoted G49) exhibits 70% of the (001) face, whereas this value is only 30% for the goethite with largest specific surface area ( S = 95 m 2/g, denoted G95). This morphologic difference results in slightly different pzc values: 9.0 for G49 goethite and 9.1 for G95 geothite. These experimental pzc values have been correlated with multisite complexation calculations using both the full-site and the 1-pK approaches. We used the full-site approach to consider all of the configurations of hydrogen bond interactions with surface site. The resulting mean charges gave estimated pzc values of 8.9 and 9.2 for the (001) and (101) faces, respectively. Considering these theoretical pzc values for individual faces and the face distributions obtained from AFM analysis, the calculated pzc values are in full agreement with the experimental pzc values. However, this morphologic difference is more expressed in surface charge values than in the pzc values. Indeed, the surface charge of G49 goethite is much higher than that of G95 goethite, and the 1-pK calculations make it possible to

  4. Self-Assembly of Charged Amphiphilic Diblock Copolymers with Insoluble Blocks of Decreasing Hydrophobicity: From Kinetically Frozen Colloids to Macrosurfactants

    SciTech Connect

    M Jacquin; P Muller; H Cottet; O Theodoly

    2011-12-31

    We have investigated the self-assembly properties in aqueous solution of amphiphilic diblock copolymers with insoluble blocks of different hydrophobicity and demonstrated that the condition to obtain dynamic micelles is to design samples with insoluble blocks of low enough hydrophobicity. We focus here on results with new water-soluble amphiphilic diblock copolymers poly(diethyleneglycol ethylether acrylate)-b-poly(acrylic acid), or PDEGA-b-PAA. The physical characteristics of PDEGA-b-PAA micelles at high ionization have been determined by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). We show that PDEGA-b-PAA samples form micelles at thermodynamic equilibrium. The critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) decrease strongly with ionic strength and temperature due to a solvent quality decrease for, respectively, the corona and the core. This behavior of reversible aggregation is remarkable as compared to the behavior of kinetically frozen aggregation that has been widely observed with samples of similar architecture and different hydrophobic blocks, for example, poly(styrene)-b-poly(acrylic acid), PS-b-PAA, and poly(butyl acrylate)-b-poly(acrylic acid), PBA-b-PAA. We have measured the interfacial tension between water and the homopolymers PDEGA and PBA at, respectively, 3 and 20 mN/m at room temperature, which permits one to estimate the energy cost to extract a unimer from a micelle. The results are consistent with a micelle association that is fast for PDEGA-b-PAA and kinetically frozen PBA-b-PAA. Hence, PDEGA-b-PAA samples form a new system of synthetic charged macrosurfactant with unique properties of fast dynamic association, tunable charge, and water solubility even at temperatures and NaCl concentrations as high as 65 C and 1 M.

  5. Polarity inversion of ζ-potential in concentrated colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla-Granados, Héctor M; Jiménez-Ángeles, Felipe; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2011-10-27

    A concentrated colloidal dispersion is studied by applying an integral equations theory to the colloidal primitive model fluid. Important effects, attributed to large size and charge and to the finite concentration of colloidal particles, are found. We observe a polarity inversion of ζ-potential for concentrated colloidal dispersions, while it is not present for a single colloidal particle at infinite dilution. An excellent qualitative agreement between our theoretical predictions and our computer simulations is observed.

  6. Re-shaping colloidal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the geometry and yield of anisotropic colloidal particles remains a challenge for hierarchical self-assembly. I will discuss a synthetic strategy for fabricating colloidal clusters by creating order in randomly aggregated polymer spheres using surface tension and geometrical constraints. The technique can be extended to a variety of charge-stabilized polymer spheres and offers control over the cluster size distribution. VENI grant from The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  7. Colloid update.

    PubMed

    Argalious, Maged Y

    2012-01-01

    This update aims to provide an evidence based review of natural and synthetic colloids with a special emphasis on the various generations of the synthetic colloid hydroxyethyl starch. The effect of 1(st), 2(nd) and 3(rd) generation hetastarches on bleeding, coagulopathy, acute kidney injury and mortality will be discussed. The results of randomised controlled trials addressing morbidity and mortality outcomes of colloid versus crystalloid resuscitation in critically ill patients will be described. In addition, the rationale and evidence behind early goal directed fluid therapy (EGDFT) including a practical approach to assessment of dynamic measures of fluid responsiveness will be presented.

  8. Colloidal polypyrrole

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized aromatic heterocyclic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a vinyl pyridine-containing polymer and dopant anions and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are disclosed.

  9. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  10. Colloid Mobilization and Transport during Capillary Fringe Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead filled column. Confocal images showed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively-charged and hydrophilic positively-charged colloids did.

  11. Semiconductor Quantum Rods as Single Molecule FluorescentBiological Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Boussert, Benjamine; Koski, Kristie; Gerion, Daniele; Manna, Liberato; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-05-29

    In recent years, semiconductor quantum dots have beenapplied with great advantage in a wide range of biological imagingapplications. The continuing developments in the synthesis of nanoscalematerials and specifically in the area of colloidal semiconductornanocrystals have created an opportunity to generate a next generation ofbiological labels with complementary or in some cases enhanced propertiescompared to colloidal quantum dots. In this paper, we report thedevelopment of rod shaped semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum rods) asnew fluorescent biological labels. We have engineered biocompatiblequantum rods by surface silanization and have applied them fornon-specific cell tracking as well as specific cellular targeting. Theproperties of quantum rods as demonstrated here are enhanced sensitivityand greater resistance for degradation as compared to quantum dots.Quantum rods have many potential applications as biological labels insituations where their properties offer advantages over quantumdots.

  12. Colloid mobilization and transport during capillary fringe fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead-filled column. We studied four specific conditions: (1) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase, (2) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially wet porous medium, (3) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially dry porous medium, and (4) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase with the presence of a static air bubble. Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. Our results demonstrate that capillary fringe fluctuations are an effective means for colloid mobilization.

  13. Colloidal polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized amino-substituted aromatic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a random copolymer containing amino-benzene type moieties as side chain constituents, and dopant anions, and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are provided.

  14. Characteristics of colloids generated during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Mertz, C.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.; Chaiko, D.

    1993-10-01

    Aqueous colloidal suspensions were generated by reacting nuclear waste glasses with groundwater at 90{degrees}C at different ratios of the glass surface area to solution volume (S/V). The colloids have been characterized in terms of size, charge, identity, and stability with respect to salt concentration, pH, and time, by examination using dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and transmission electron microscopy. The colloids are predominately produced by precipitation from solution, possibly with contribution from reacted layers that have spallated from the glass. These colloids are silicon-rich minerals. The colloidal suspensions agglomerate when the salinity of the solutions increase. The following implications for modeling the colloidal transport of contaminants have been derived from this study: (1) The sources of the colloids are not only solubility-limited real colloids and the pseudo colloids formed by adsorption of radionuclides onto a groundwater colloid, but also from the spalled surface layers of reacted waste glasses. (2) In a repository, the local environment is likely to be glass-reaction dominated and the salt concentration is likely to be high, leading to rapid colloid agglomeration and settling; thus, colloid transport may be insignificant. (3) If large volumes of groundwater contact the glass reaction site, the precipitated colloids may become resuspended, and colloid transport may become important. (4) Under most conditions, the colloids are negatively charged and will deposit readily on positively charged surfaces. Negatively charged surfaces will, in general, facilitate colloid stability and transport.

  15. Tuning Colloid-Interface Interactions by Salt Partitioning.

    PubMed

    Everts, J C; Samin, S; van Roij, R

    2016-08-26

    We show that the interaction of an oil-dispersed colloidal particle with an oil-water interface is highly tunable from attractive to repulsive, either by varying the sign of the colloidal charge via charge regulation or by varying the difference in hydrophilicity between the dissolved cations and anions. In addition, we investigate the yet unexplored interplay between the self-regulated colloidal surface charge distribution with the planar double layer across the oil-water interface and the spherical one around the colloid. Our findings explain recent experiments and have direct relevance for tunable Pickering emulsions. PMID:27610887

  16. Tuning Colloid-Interface Interactions by Salt Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everts, J. C.; Samin, S.; van Roij, R.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the interaction of an oil-dispersed colloidal particle with an oil-water interface is highly tunable from attractive to repulsive, either by varying the sign of the colloidal charge via charge regulation or by varying the difference in hydrophilicity between the dissolved cations and anions. In addition, we investigate the yet unexplored interplay between the self-regulated colloidal surface charge distribution with the planar double layer across the oil-water interface and the spherical one around the colloid. Our findings explain recent experiments and have direct relevance for tunable Pickering emulsions.

  17. Biaxial ferromagnetic liquid crystal colloids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingkun; Ackerman, Paul J; Lubensky, Tom C; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2016-09-20

    The design and practical realization of composite materials that combine fluidity and different forms of ordering at the mesoscopic scale are among the grand fundamental science challenges. These composites also hold a great potential for technological applications, ranging from information displays to metamaterials. Here we introduce a fluid with coexisting polar and biaxial ordering of organic molecular and magnetic colloidal building blocks exhibiting the lowest symmetry orientational order. Guided by interactions at different length scales, rod-like organic molecules of this fluid spontaneously orient along a direction dubbed "director," whereas magnetic colloidal nanoplates order with their dipole moments parallel to each other but pointing at an angle to the director, yielding macroscopic magnetization at no external fields. Facile magnetic switching of such fluids is consistent with predictions of a model based on competing actions of elastic and magnetic torques, enabling previously inaccessible control of light. PMID:27601668

  18. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Messina and H Löwen Mode expansion for the density profiles of crystal-fluid interfaces: hard spheres as a test caseM Oettel Scaling of layer spacing of charged particles under slit-pore confinement: an effect of concentration or of effective particle diameter?Yan Zeng and Regine von Klitzing Hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal particles in a planar poreB Bonilla-Capilla, A Ramírez-Saito, M A Ojeda-López and J L Arauz-Lara Ageing in a system of polydisperse goethite boardlike particles showing rich phase behaviourA B G M Leferink op Reinink, E van den Pol, D V Byelov, A V Petukhov and G J Vroege Temperature as an external field for colloid-polymer mixtures: 'quenching' by heating and 'melting' by coolingShelley L Taylor, Robert Evans and C Patrick Royall Spinning motion of a deformable self-propelled particle in two dimensionsMitsusuke Tarama and Takao Ohta Emergent states in dense systems of active rods: from swarming to turbulenceH H Wensink and H Löwen

  19. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole–dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single

  20. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  1. Colloid transport in saturated porous media: Elimination of attachment efficiency in a new colloid transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landkamer, Lee L.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2013-05-01

    A colloid transport model is introduced that is conceptually simple yet captures the essential features of colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media when colloid retention is dominated by the secondary minimum because an electrostatic barrier inhibits substantial deposition in the primary minimum. This model is based on conventional colloid filtration theory (CFT) but eliminates the empirical concept of attachment efficiency. The colloid deposition rate is computed directly from CFT by assuming all predicted interceptions of colloids by collectors result in at least temporary deposition in the secondary minimum. Also, a new paradigm for colloid re-entrainment based on colloid population heterogeneity is introduced. To accomplish this, the initial colloid population is divided into two fractions. One fraction, by virtue of physiochemical characteristics (e.g., size and charge), will always be re-entrained after capture in a secondary minimum. The remaining fraction of colloids, again as a result of physiochemical characteristics, will be retained "irreversibly" when captured by a secondary minimum. Assuming the dispersion coefficient can be estimated from tracer behavior, this model has only two fitting parameters: (1) the fraction of the initial colloid population that will be retained "irreversibly" upon interception by a secondary minimum, and (2) the rate at which reversibly retained colloids leave the secondary minimum. These two parameters were correlated to the depth of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) secondary energy minimum and pore-water velocity, two physical forces that influence colloid transport. Given this correlation, the model serves as a heuristic tool for exploring the influence of physical parameters such as surface potential and fluid velocity on colloid transport.

  2. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  3. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  4. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets. PMID:27131565

  5. FUEL ROD ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1959-09-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods aod a tubular casing through which a coolant flows in heat-change contact with the ruel rods are described. The casting is of trefoil section and carries the fuel rods, each of which has two fin engaging the serrated fins of the other two fuel rods, whereby the fuel rods are held in the casing and are interlocked against relative longitudinal movement.

  6. Structural transitions in condensed colloidal virus phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Nathan; Barr, Steve; Udit, Andrew; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Nguyen, Thanh; Finn, M. G.; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    Analogous to monatomic systems colloidal phase behavior is entirely determined by the interaction potential between particles. This potential can be tuned using solutes such as multivalent salts and polymers with varying affinity for the colloids to create a hierarchy of attractions. Bacteriophage viruses are a naturally occurring type of colloidal particle with characteristics difficult to achieve by laboratory synthesis. They are monodisperse, nanometers in size, and have heterogeneous surface charge distributions. We use the MS2 and Qbeta bacteriophages (diameters 27-28nm) to understand the interplay between different attraction mechanisms on nanometer-sized colloids. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) is used to characterize the inter-particle interaction between colloidal viruses using several polymer species and different salt types.

  7. Manipulating semiconductor colloidal stability through doping.

    PubMed

    Fleharty, Mark E; van Swol, Frank; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2014-10-10

    The interface between a doped semiconductor material and electrolyte solution is of considerable fundamental interest, and is relevant to systems of practical importance. Both adjacent domains contain mobile charges, which respond to potential variations. This is exploited to design electronic and optoelectronic sensors, and other enabling semiconductor colloidal materials. We show that the charge mobility in both phases leads to a new type of interaction between semiconductor colloids suspended in aqueous electrolyte solutions. This interaction is due to the electrostatic response of the semiconductor interior to disturbances in the external field upon the approach of two particles. The electrostatic repulsion between two charged colloids is reduced from the one governed by the charged groups present at the particles surfaces. This type of interaction is unique to semiconductor particles and may have a substantial effect on the suspension dynamics and stability.

  8. Linked topological colloids in a nematic host.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Angel; Hermosillo, Leonardo; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-04-14

    Geometric shape and topology of constituent particles can alter many colloidal properties such as Brownian motion, self-assembly, and phase behavior. Thus far, only single-component building blocks of colloids with connected surfaces have been studied, although topological colloids, with constituent particles shaped as freestanding knots and handlebodies of different genus, have been recently introduced. Here we develop a topological class of colloids shaped as multicomponent links. Using two-photon photopolymerization, we fabricate colloidal microparticle analogs of the classic examples of links studied in the field of topology, the Hopf and Solomon links, which we disperse in nematic fluids that possess orientational ordering of anisotropic rod-like molecules. The surfaces of these particles are treated to impose tangential or perpendicular boundary conditions for the alignment of liquid crystal molecules, so that they generate a host of topologically nontrivial field and defect structures in the dispersing nematic medium, resulting in an elastic coupling between the linked constituents. The interplay between the topologies of surfaces of linked colloids and the molecular alignment field of the nematic host reveals that linking of particle rings with perpendicular boundary conditions is commonly accompanied by linking of closed singular defect loops, laying the foundations for fabricating complex composite materials with interlinking-based structural organization.

  9. Linked topological colloids in a nematic host

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Angel; Hermosillo, Leonardo; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2015-01-01

    Geometric shape and topology of constituent particles can alter many colloidal properties such as Brownian motion, self-assembly, and phase behavior. Thus far, only single-component building blocks of colloids with connected surfaces have been studied, although topological colloids, with constituent particles shaped as freestanding knots and handlebodies of different genus, have been recently introduced. Here we develop a topological class of colloids shaped as multicomponent links. Using two-photon photopolymerization, we fabricate colloidal microparticle analogs of the classic examples of links studied in the field of topology, the Hopf and Solomon links, which we disperse in nematic fluids that possess orientational ordering of anisotropic rod-like molecules. The surfaces of these particles are treated to impose tangential or perpendicular boundary conditions for the alignment of liquid crystal molecules, so that they generate a host of topologically nontrivial field and defect structures in the dispersing nematic medium, resulting in an elastic coupling between the linked constituents. The interplay between the topologies of surfaces of linked colloids and the molecular alignment field of the nematic host reveals that linking of particle rings with perpendicular boundary conditions is commonly accompanied by linking of closed singular defect loops, laying the foundations for fabricating complex composite materials with interlinking-based structural organization. PMID:25825765

  10. Control rod drive hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Ose, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

  11. Control rod drive

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  12. Effective Forces Between Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tehver, Riina; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1999-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions have proven to be excellent model systems for the study of condensed matter and its phase behavior. Many of the properties of colloidal suspensions can be investigated with a systematic variation of the characteristics of the systems and, in addition, the energy, length and time scales associated with them allow for experimental probing of otherwise inaccessible regimes. The latter property also makes colloidal systems vulnerable to external influences such as gravity. Experiments performed in micro-ravity by Chaikin and Russell have been invaluable in extracting the true behavior of the systems without an external field. Weitz and Pusey intend to use mixtures of colloidal particles with additives such as polymers to induce aggregation and form weak, tenuous, highly disordered fractal structures that would be stable in the absence of gravitational forces. When dispersed in a polarizable medium, colloidal particles can ionize, emitting counterions into the solution. The standard interaction potential in these charged colloidal suspensions was first obtained by Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek. The DLVO potential is obtained in the mean-field linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approximation and thus has limited applicability. For more precise calculations, we have used ab initio density functional theory. In our model, colloidal particles are charged hard spheres, the counterions are described by a continuum density field and the solvent is treated as a homogeneous medium with a specified dielectric constant. We calculate the effective forces between charged colloidal particles by integrating over the solvent and counterion degrees of freedom, taking into account the direct interactions between the particles as well as particle-counterion, counterion-counterion Coulomb, counterion entropic and correlation contributions. We obtain the effective interaction potential between charged colloidal particles in different configurations. We evaluate two

  13. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  14. 1987 Sucker rod tables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This reference identifies manufacturers qualified to produce API sucker rods and related equipment, lists chemical and mechanical properties of the various types of rods and provides dimensional characteristics. In addition, similar information is given for non-API products such as fiberglass and hollow rods.

  15. Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russel, W. B.; Saville, D. A.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1992-03-01

    The book covers the physical side of colloid science from the individual forces acting between submicron particles suspended in a liquid through the resulting equilibrium and dynamic properties. The relevant forces include Brownian motion, electrostatic repulsion, dispersion attraction, both attraction and repulsion due to soluble polymer, and viscous forces due to relative motion between the particles and the liquid. The balance among Brownian motion and the interparticle forces decides the questions of stability and phase behavior. Imposition of external fields produces complex effects, i.e. electrokinetic phenomena (electric field), sedimentation (gravitational field), diffusion (concentration/chemical potential gradient), and non-Newtonian rheology (shear field). The treatment aims to impart a sound, quantitative understanding based on fundamental theory and experiments with well-characterized model systems. This broad grasp of the fundamentals lends insight and helps to develop the intuitive sense needed to isolate essential features of technological problems and design critical experiments. Some exposure to fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and electricity and magnetism is assumed, but each subject is reintroduced in a self-contained manner.

  16. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  17. Sucker rod construction

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Goodman, J.L.; Tickle, J.D.; Liskey, A.K.

    1987-03-31

    A sucker rod construction is described comprising: a connector member being formed to define a rod receptacle having a closed axially inner end and an open axially outer end, the rod receptacle having axially spaced, tapered annular surfaces, a cylindrical fiberglass rod having an end having an outer surface being received within the rod receptacle through the outer end and cooperating therewith to define an annular chamber between the outer surface of the end of the rod and the tapered annular surfaces, and a bonding means positioned in the annular chamber for bonding to the outer surface of the end of the rod to confront the tapered annular surfaces, each annular surface having an angle of taper with respect to the outer surface of the fiberglass rod, and each angle of taper being progressively and uniformly less toward the open end by an amount between one and one-half degrees and two degrees, inclusive, and a collet connected to the connector member adjacent the open axially outer end of the rod receptacle and having an axial bore therethrough retaining the end of the rod in coaxial position within the rod receptacle.

  18. Effect of atropine on oral clearance of a radiolabeled sulfur colloid

    SciTech Connect

    LaForce, F.M.; Thompson, B.; Trow, R.

    1984-11-01

    Physical clearance is an important oral defense mechanism against gram-negative rods. The authors describe a simple technique that uses commercially available technetium-99m sulfur colloid to measure oral clearance. Technetium-99m sulfur colloid was sprayed into the mouth, and clearance was measured as the percent decrease in radiolabel counts over 2 hours using a radioisotope camera. Results using this technique compared favorably with clearance data using Tc-99m radiolabeled Escherichia coli. Atropine significantly decreased oral clearance rates of the colloid. Decreased clearance may be an important risk factor in the development of gram-negative rod colonization in hospitalized patients. 15 references, 3 figures.

  19. Wear resistant rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, K.W.

    1991-12-03

    This paper describes a sucker rod guide. It comprises: a series of sucker rods connected end to end forming a sucker rod string, the sucker rod string extending down into a tubing string of a producing oil well from a pump jack located on the surface of the ground above the tubing string to a pump located at a bottom end of the tubing string, the pump forces produced fluid collected at the bottom end of the tubing string up to the ground's surface, the produced fluid occupies a space between the rod string and the tubing string through which the fluid is channeled from the bottom end of the tubing string to the ground's surface, the pump jack raises and lowers the rod string in the fluid being pumped up the tubing string while the fluid bathes the rod string within the tubing string, wherein the improvement comprises the following structure in combination with the above.

  20. Sucker rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.J.; Starks, J.A.

    1989-08-22

    This patent describes a sucker rod guide for mounting on a sucker rod and spacing the sucker rod from the tubing in an oil well. The guide comprising a generally cylindrically-shaped, extruded, ultra-high density polyethylene body having a substantially smooth outside surface; a longitudinal bore provided centrally of the body. The bore having a smaller diameter than the diameter of the sucker rod; a plurality of grooves provided in circumferential relationship in the bore; and a tapered slot extending longitudinally through the body from the outside surface to the bore. The tapered slot further comprising a slot mouth located at the outside surface and a slot throat spaced from the slot mouth. The slot throat lying adjacent to the sucker rod bore and wherein the slot throat is wider than the slot mouth for mounting the sucker rod guide on the sucker rod.

  1. Low turbulence rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, E.L.

    1992-05-26

    This patent describes an improved sucker rod guide for fixedly engaging around a sucker rod at a selected location along the length of the rod. It comprises a substantially cylindrical polymeric body having a longitudinal axis, a terminal end substantially continually tapered to the rod, a radially-inward surface and a radially outward surface, the radially inward surface of the body adjacent to and in tripping engagement with the rod when the rod guide is fixedly engaged around the rod; and a plurality of substantially continuous, longitudinal vanes carried by the body, a vane having a selected length and width, and longitudinally disposed along the radially outward surface of the guide body, extending radially away from the guide body and having a radially outside wear surface.

  2. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  3. Optimal Navigation of Self-Propelled Colloids in Microstructured Mazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuguang; Bevan, Michael

    Controlling navigation of self-propelled microscopic `robots' subject to random Brownian motion in complex microstructured environments (e.g., porous media, tumor vasculature) is important to many emerging applications (e.g., enhanced oil recovery, drug delivery). In this work, we design an optimal feedback policy to navigate an active self-propelled colloidal rod in complex mazes with various obstacle types. Actuation of the rods is modelled based on a light-controlled osmotic flow mechanism, which produces different propulsion velocities along the rod's long axis. Actuator-parameterized Langevin equations, with soft rod-obstacle repulsive interactions, are developed to describe the system dynamics. A Markov decision process (MDP) framework is used for optimal policy calculations with design goals of colloidal rods reaching target end points in minimum time. Simulations show that optimal MDP-based policies are able to control rod trajectories to reach target regions order-of-magnitudes faster than uncontrolled rods, which diverges as maze complexity increases. An efficient multi-graph based implementation for MDP is also presented, which scales linearly with the maze dimension.

  4. Depletion induced clustering in mixtures of colloidal spheres and fd-virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guu, D.; Dhont, J. K. G.; Vliegenthart, G. A.; Lettinga, M. P.

    2012-11-01

    We determined the phase boundary of an ideal rod-sphere mixture consisting of fd-virus, which is an established model system for mono-disperse colloidal rods, and density matched mono-disperse polystyrene beads employing diffuse wave spectroscopy. The low volume fraction of fd needed to induce a phase separation at relatively low ionic strength exemplifies the fact that slender rods are very effective depletion agents. Confocal microscopy showed that stable clusters are formed during phase separation. Relaxation after shear deformation of these clusters showed that the phase separation is gas-liquid-like and that the interfacial tension involved is very low as in colloid-polymer mixtures.

  5. Colloid Bound Transport of Contaminats In The Unsaturated Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, T.; Christ, A.

    Colloids can play a major role in the relocation of contaminants in the unsaturated zone. The amount of colloid driven transport is defined by soil chemistry, soil water chemistry and water flow velocity as well as colloid composition and formation. In a current research project we investigate the filtration and mobilization of colloids in unsaturated column studies. We use different soil types, chosen by a wide range of mean grain size and heterogeneity. Particle tracers are polystyrene solids with a de- fined negative surface charge and defined size from 50 nm to 10 µm. In addition, we use natural colloids extracted from a wide range of contaminated and uncontaminated land. Experimental conditions are exactly controlled throughout all the time. We alter mainly flow velocity ionic strength in order to study the filtration behaviour of the soils. In addition, Pyrene and Lead are are used as model contaminants. First results show the colloids are not retarded in many coarse structured soil types. Preferential colloid flow shows a major impact in breakthrough behaviour. Colloid bound lead is relocated significant through the unsaturated zone, whereas non colloid bound lead species are strongly retarded. In the presentation we will show results of contami- nant processes and present new results on the filtration behaviour of colloids in the unsaturated zone depending on flow velocity, soil type and colloid size.

  6. Colloids: current recommendations.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel L

    2008-05-01

    Colloids are increasingly becoming considered indispensable in the management of critically ill patients. Typical indications for colloid administration include patients with tissue edema, hypovolemia, and low oncotic pressure. Current guidelines for the use of colloids in veterinary patients balance the purported benefits of colloid fluid administration with the potential risks, such as volume overload and coagulation disturbances. This article focuses primarily on hydroxyethyl starches, because they are the most commonly used colloid in veterinary practice, and because recent advances in colloid therapy have been achieved with this colloid. Newer colloids have been modified to limit effects on the coagulation system, and they may be used to modulate the inflammatory response, which could prove to be particularly useful in the management of critically ill patients. A better understanding of how different fluids influence the host response may enable us to explore new applications of fluid replacement therapy beyond simply replenishing volume deficits.

  7. Using Microfluidics to Measure the Equation of State for a 2D Colloidal Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balchunas, Andrew; Cabanas, Rafael; Fraden, Seth; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-03-01

    In the presence of non-adsorbing polymer, monodisperse filamentous viruses assembles into colloidal membranes which are 2D liquid-like one-rod-length-thick monolayers of aligned rods. Colloidal membranes are of particular interest because their properties are accounted for by the same theoretical models that are used to describe biophysics of conventional lipid bilayers. However, bulk membrane formation only occurs over a very limited range of depletant concentrations and ionic strengths. In order to explore the properties of the colloidal membranes under a much wider range of molecular parameters, we have develop a microfluidics technique that allows for in-site exchange of the enveloping polymer suspension thus allowing us to access the region of phase space where membranes are metastable. Using our technique we determine how the colloidal membrane area depends on applied osmotic pressure allowing us to determine its equation of state. We also characterize the dynamics of the constituent rods by using single molecules tracking techniques.

  8. Non-blinking single-photon generation with anisotropic colloidal nanocrystals: towards room-temperature, efficient, colloidal quantum sources.

    PubMed

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Leménager, Godefroy; Martiradonna, Luigi; Carbone, Luigi; Vezzoli, Stefano; Desfonds, Pascal; Cozzoli, Pantaleo Davide; Hermier, Jean-Pierre; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Cingolani, Roberto; De Vittorio, Massimo; Bramati, Alberto

    2013-04-11

    Blinking and single-photon emission can be tailored in CdSe/CdS core/shell colloidal dot-in-rods. By increasing the shell thickness it is possible to obtain almost non-blinking nanocrystals, while the shell length can be used to control single-photon emission probability.

  9. Synchronized oscillations of dimers in biphasic charged fd-virus suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, K.; Piao, S. H.; Choi, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    Micron-sized colloidal spheres that are dispersed in an isotropic-nematic biphasic host suspension of charged rods (fd-virus particles) are shown to spontaneously form dimers, which exhibit a synchronized oscillatory motion. Dimer formation is not observed in the monophase of isotropic and nematic suspensions. The synchronized oscillations of dimers are connected to the inhomogeneous state of the host suspension of charged rods (fd viruses) where nematic domains are in coexistence with isotropic regions. The synchronization of oscillations occurs in bulk states, in the absence of an external field. With a low field strength of an applied electric field, the synchronization is rather reduced, but it recovers again when the field is turned off. In this Rapid Communication, we report this observation as an example of the strange attractor, occurring in the mixture of PS (polystyrene) dimers in an isotropic-nematic coexistence biphasic fd-virus network. Furthermore, we highlight that the synchronization of PS-dimer oscillations is the result of a global bifurcation diagram, driven by a delicate balance between the short-attractive "twisted" interaction of PS dimers and long-ranged electrostatic repulsive interactions of charged fd rods. The interest is then in the local enhancement of "twist-nematic" elasticity in reorientation of the dimer oscillations. An analysis of image-time correlations is provided with the data movies and Fourier transforms of averaged orientations for the synchronized oscillations of dimers in the biphasic I -N coexistence concentration of charged fd-virus suspensions.

  10. Surface pressure isotherm for a monolayer of charged colloidal particles at a water/nonpolar-fluid interface: experiment and theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Plamen V; Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A

    2014-03-18

    Monolayers from electrically charged micrometer-sized silica particles, spread on the air/water interface, are investigated. Because of the electrostatic repulsion, the distances between the particles are considerably greater than their diameters, i.e., we are dealing with nondensely packed interfacial layers. The electrostatic repulsion between the particles occurs through the air phase. Surface pressure vs area isotherms were measured by Langmuir trough, and the monolayers' morphology was monitored by microscope. The mean area per particle is determined by Delaunay triangulation and Voronoi diagrams. In terms of mean area, the surface pressure for monolayers from polydisperse and monodisperse particles obeys the same law. The experiments show that Π ∝ L(-3) at large L, where Π is the surface pressure and L is the mean interparticle distance. A theoretical cell model is developed, which predicts not only the aforementioned asymptotic law but also the whole Π(L) dependence. The model presumes a periodic distribution of the surface charge density, which induces a corresponding electric field in the air phase. Then, the Maxwell pressure tensor of the electric field in the air phase is calculated and integrated according to the Bakker's formula to determine the surface pressure. Thus, all collective effects from the electrostatic interparticle interactions are taken into account as well as the effects from the particle finite size. By evaporation of water, the particle monolayers are deposited on a solid substrate placed on the bottom of the trough. The electrostatic interparticle repulsion is strong enough to withstand the attractive lateral capillary immersion forces that are operative during the drying of the monolayer on the substrate. The obtained experimental results and the developed theoretical model can be useful for prediction and control of the properties of nondensely packed interfacial monolayers from charged particles that find applications for

  11. Photoinduced ultrafast charge separation in colloidal 2-dimensional CdSe/CdS-Au hybrid nanoplatelets and corresponding application in photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Himani; Kumar, Yogesh; Dana, Jayanta; Satpati, Biswarup; Ghosh, Hirendra N; Deka, Sasanka

    2016-08-25

    Multicomponent hybrid nanocrystals (HNC) consisting of a semiconductor and metallic domains are an important class of nanostructured materials demonstrating useful applications and interesting basic knowledge. In this scenario, Au nanoparticle (NP) islands of ∼2 nm have been grown on unique two dimensional (2D) CdSe/CdS core@shell hexagonal nanoheteroplatelets of 20 nm diameter to form unprecedented 2D CdSe/CdS-Au HNCs and detailed optical characterization has been carried out to determine the dimensionality based electron transfer dynamics on the ultrafast scale. Steady state optical absorption studies show that upon growing Au NPs onto the 2D nanoplates, a new band appears in the red region of the spectra (500-800 nm), which suggests a strong interaction between the exciton of the core-shell and the plasmon of the metal NPs. Fluorescence studies showed the quenching of emission of the semiconductor domains upon the growth of the metallic domains. Detailed optical and TRPL studies suggested efficient charge transfer from the 2D CdSe/CdS to the Au domains, irrespective of excitation wavelength. Femtosecond transient absorption studies suggest that the electron transfer from the 2D hybrid nanocrystals to the metal domain is on an ultrafast time scale (∼800 fs). No evidence is observed for charge transfer from the 2 nm Au domains to the semiconductor seeds. The broad absorption in the visible region of the hybrid nanocrystals and the ultrafast charge transfer facilitates very efficient photo-catalytic reactions under direct sun light, as a case study. PMID:27533050

  12. What Is a Colloid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the properties of colloids, listing those commonly encountered (such as whipped cream, mayonnaise, and fog). Also presents several experiments using colloids and discusses "Silly Putty," a colloid with viscoelastic properties whose counterintuitive properties result from its mixture of polymers. (DH)

  13. Graded morphology in bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on colloidal semiconductor nanostructures: Directed charge-separation and facile carrier transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Uttiya; Pal, Amlan J.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce density gradient of p- and n-type compound semiconductor nanostructures in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. The graded BHJs (GBHJs) were formed with the p-type copper-zinc-tin-sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4) nanoparticles and n-type Bi2S3 nanorods, both of which were based on nontoxic and earth-abundant elements and were grown at a moderate reaction temperature (180 °C). The concentration gradient of the nanostructures in the GBHJs provided a preferred directionality of nano-depletion regions for directed charge separation and also a controlled vertical segregation for ever-increasing carrier-transport pathways during the charge-extraction process. A comparison of solar cell characteristics having a bilayer, a BHJ, and a GBHJ structure is being presented. The performance of the thickness-optimized devices for highest efficiency shows that the GBHJ offered an improved short-circuit current as compared to the bilayer and the BHJ structures and a higher fill-factor as compared to the BHJ device. The overall energy conversion efficiency (η) of GBHJ exceeded that of the other two heterojunctions. The advantages of GBHJ structures in yielding an improved η have been explained through an increased exciton dissociation process along with a lower carrier recombination as compared to the bilayer and the BHJ structures, respectively. Series and shunt resistances, which were derived from current-voltage characteristics and impedance spectroscopy, supported such analyses.

  14. Charge dynamics at heterojunctions for PbS/ZnO colloidal quantum dot solar cells probed with time-resolved surface photovoltage spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, B. F.; Leontiadou, M. A.; Clark, P. C. J.; Williamson, A. I.; Silly, M. G.; Sirotti, F.; Fairclough, S. M.; Tsang, S. C. E.; Neo, D. C. J.; Assender, H. E.; Watt, A. A. R.; Flavell, W. R.

    2016-02-01

    Time-resolved laser-pump X-ray-photoemission-probe spectroscopy of a ZnO ( 10 1 ¯ 0 ) substrate with and without PbS quantum dots (QDs) chemically linked to the surface is performed, using laser photon energies resonant with and below the band gap energy of the substrate (λ = 372 and 640 nm, hν = 3.33 and 1.94 eV). Charge injection from the photoexcited QDs to ZnO is demonstrated through the change in the surface photovoltage of the ZnO substrate observed when the heterojunction is illuminated with 1.94 eV radiation. The measured carrier dynamics are limited by the persistent photoconductivity of ZnO, giving dark carrier lifetimes of the order of 200 μs in a depletion layer at the interface. The chemical specificity of soft X-rays is used to separately measure the charge dynamics in the quantum dots and the substrate, yielding evidence that the depletion region at the interface extends into the PbS QD layer.

  15. Electrokinetic properties of polymer colloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micale, F. J.; Fuenmayor, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The surface of polymer colloids, especially polystyrene latexes, were modified for the purpose of controlling the electrokinetic properties of the resulting colloids. Achievement required a knowledge of electrical double layer charging mechanism, as a function of the electrolyte conditions, at the polymer/water interface. The experimental approach is to control the recipe formulation in the emulsion polymerization process so as to systematically vary the strong acid group concentration on the surface of the polymer particles. The electrophoretic mobility of these model particles will then be measured as a function of surface group concentration and as a function of electrolyte concentration and type. An effort was also made to evaluate the electrophoretic mobility of polystyrene latexes made in space and to compare the results with latexes made on the ground.

  16. Transport of Intrinsic Plutonium Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, D.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Tarimala, S.; Keller, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    column at a flow rate of ~ 6 mL/hr. Despite that the Pu intrinsic colloids are positively charged while the alluvium grain surfaces are negatively charged under the current experimental conditions, about 30% of the Pu colloids population transported through the column and broke through earlier than trillium. Our previous experiments in the same column have shown a highly unretarded transport of the negatively charged pseudo Pu colloids (Pu sorbed onto smectite colloids) and complete retardation of the dissolved Pu. The enhanced transport of Pu colloids was explained by the effective pore volume concept. Combining the results of these two experiments, it is concluded that the intrinsic Pu colloids transported in the column by adsorbing onto the background clay colloids due to electrostatic repulsion.

  17. Pull rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1988-04-21

    A pull rod assembly comprising a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring, said piston device being mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  18. Pull rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, Olisse C.

    1990-01-01

    A pull rod assembly comprising a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring, said piston device being mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  19. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  20. Pull rod assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a pull rod assembly. It comprises: a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring. The piston device is mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  1. Statistical Physics of Colloidal Dispersions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canessa, E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis is concerned with the equilibrium statistical mechanics of colloidal dispersions which represent useful model systems for the study of condensed matter physics; namely, charge stabilized colloidal dispersions and polymer stabilized colloidal dispersions. A one-component macroparticle approach is adopted in order to treat the macroscopic and microscopic properties of these systems in a simple and comprehensive manner. The thesis opens with the description of the nature of the colloidal state before reviewing some basic definitions and theory in Chapter II. In Chapter III a variational theory of phase equilibria based on the Gibbs-Bogolyobov inequality is applied to sterically stabilized colloidal dispersions. Hard spheres are chosen as the reference system for the disordered phases while an Einstein model is used for the ordered phases. The new choice of pair potential, taken for mathematical convenience, is a superposition of two Yukawa functions. By matching a double Yukawa potential to the van der Waals attractive potential at different temperatures and introducing a purely temperature dependent coefficient to the repulsive part, a rich variety of observed phase separation phenomena is qualitatively described. The behaviour of the potential is found to be consistent with a small decrease of the polymer layer thickness with increasing temperature. Using the same concept of a collapse transition the non-monotonic second virial coefficient is also explained and quantified. It is shown that a reduction of the effective macroparticle diameter with increasing temperature can only be partially examined from the point of view of a (binary-) polymer solution theory. This chapter concludes with the description of the observed, reversible, depletion flocculation behaviour. This is accomplished by using the variational formalism and by invoking the double Yukawa potential to allow

  2. Electrohydrodynamically patterned colloidal crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Ryan C. (Inventor); Poon, Hak F. (Inventor); Xiao, Yi (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for assembling patterned crystalline arrays of colloidal particles using ultraviolet illumination of an optically-sensitive semiconducting anode while using the anode to apply an electronic field to the colloidal particles. The ultraviolet illumination increases current density, and consequently, the flow of the colloidal particles. As a result, colloidal particles can be caused to migrate from non-illuminated areas of the anode to illuminated areas of the anode. Selective illumination of the anode can also be used to permanently affix colloidal crystals to illuminated areas of the anode while not affixing them to non-illuminated areas of the anode.

  3. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    PubMed Central

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  4. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Viswanathan; P. Reimus

    2003-09-05

    Colloid retardation is influenced by the attachment and detachment of colloids from immobile surfaces. This analysis demonstrates the development of parameters necessary to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids and, hence, retardation in both fractured tuff and porous alluvium. Field and experimental data specific to fractured tuff are used for the analysis of colloid retardation in fractured tuff. Experimental data specific to colloid transport in alluvial material from Yucca Mountain as well as bacteriophage field studies in alluvial material, which are thought to be good analogs for colloid transport, are used to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids in the alluvial material. There are no alternative scientific approaches or technical methods for calculating these retardation factors.

  5. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  6. Microfluidic colloid filtration.

    PubMed

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J C; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today's water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a "cake layer"--often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  7. Bacterial Flagella as a Model Rigid Rod of Tunable Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Walter; Yardimci, Sevim; Gibaud, Thomas; Snow, Henry; Urbach, Jeff; Dogic, Zvonimir

    In this research, we study the physical properties of suspensions of bacterial flagella from Salmonella typhimurium prepared in a variety of rigid polymorphic shapes. Flagella act as a rigid colloidal particle that can exhibit non-trivial geometry including helices of varying dimensions, straight rods, or a combination of the two in the same filament. By controlling the conditions in which flagella are prepared, the polymorphic shape assumed by the filament can be controlled. Utilizing different polymorphic shapes, we combine results from optical microscopy observations of single filaments with bulk rheological measurements to help understand the role that constituent colloidal geometry plays in complex bulk behavior.

  8. Effective interaction of charged platelets in aqueous solution: Investigations of colloid laponite suspensions by static light scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Rosenfeldt, S.; Ballauff, M.; Harnau, L.

    2005-11-01

    We study dilute aqueous solutions of charged disklike mineral particles (laponite) by a combination of static light scattering (SLS) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Laponite solutions are known to form gels above a certain critical concentration that must be described as nonequilibrium states. Here we focus on the investigation by SLS and SAXS at concentrations below gelation (c<0.016 g/L) and at low concentrations of added salt (0.001M and 0.005M). Thus, we have obtained the scattering function of single Laponite platelets as well as the structure factor describing their interaction at finite concentration. A detailed analysis of the combined sets of data proves that the solutions are in a well-defined equilibrium state. Moreover, this analysis demonstrates the internal consistency and accuracy of the scattering functions obtained at finite concentrations. We find that laponite particles interact through an effective pair potential that is attractive on short range but repulsive on longer range. This finding demonstrates that Laponite solutions exhibit only a limited stability at the concentration of added salt used herein. Raising the ionic strength to 0.005M already leads to slow flocculation as is evidenced from the enhanced scattering intensity at smallest scattering angles. All data strongly suggest that the gelation occurring at higher concentration is related to aggregation.

  9. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  10. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  11. Liquid-vapor phase diagram and surface properties in oppositely charged colloids represented by a mixture of attractive and repulsive Yukawa potentials.

    PubMed

    Chapela, Gustavo A; del Río, Fernando; Alejandre, José

    2013-02-01

    The liquid-vapor phase diagrams of equal size diameter σ binary mixtures of screened potentials have been reported for several ranges of interaction using Monte Carlo simulation methods [J. B. Caballero, A. M. Puertas, A. Ferńandez-Barbero, F. J. de las Nieves, J. M. Romero-Enrique, and L. F. Rull, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 054909 (2006); A. Fortini, A.-P. Hynninen, and M. Dijkstra, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 094502 (2006)]. Both works report controversial results about the stability of the phase diagram with the inverse Debye screening length κ. Caballero found stability for values of κσ up to 20 while Fortini reported stability for κσ up to 20 while Fortini reported stability for κσ ≤ 4. In this work a spinodal decomposition process where the liquid and vapor phases coexist through an interface in a slab geometry is used to obtain the phase equilibrium and surface properties using a discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations for mixtures of equal size particles carrying opposite charge and interacting with a mixture of attractive and repulsive Yukawa potentials at different values of κσ. An crude estimation of the triple point temperatures is also reported. The isothermal-isobaric method was also used to determine the phase stability using one phase simulations. We found that liquid-vapor coexistence is stable for values of κσ > 20 and that the critical temperatures have a maximum value at around κσ = 10, in agreement with Caballero et al. calculations. There also exists a controversy about the liquid-vapor envelope stability of the pure component attractive Yukawa model which is also discussed in the text. In addition, details about the equivalence between continuous and discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations are given, in the Appendix, for Yukawa and Lennard-Jones potentials.

  12. Liquid-vapor phase diagram and surface properties in oppositely charged colloids represented by a mixture of attractive and repulsive Yukawa potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapela, Gustavo A.; del Río, Fernando; Alejandre, José

    2013-02-01

    The liquid-vapor phase diagrams of equal size diameter σ binary mixtures of screened potentials have been reported for several ranges of interaction using Monte Carlo simulation methods [J. B. Caballero, A. M. Puertas, A. Ferńandez-Barbero, F. J. de las Nieves, J. M. Romero-Enrique, and L. F. Rull, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 054909 (2006), 10.1063/1.2159481; A. Fortini, A.-P. Hynninen, and M. Dijkstra, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 094502 (2006), 10.1063/1.2335453]. Both works report controversial results about the stability of the phase diagram with the inverse Debye screening length κ. Caballero found stability for values of κσ up to 20 while Fortini reported stability for κσ up to 20 while Fortini reported stability for κσ ⩽ 4. In this work a spinodal decomposition process where the liquid and vapor phases coexist through an interface in a slab geometry is used to obtain the phase equilibrium and surface properties using a discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations for mixtures of equal size particles carrying opposite charge and interacting with a mixture of attractive and repulsive Yukawa potentials at different values of κσ. An crude estimation of the triple point temperatures is also reported. The isothermal-isobaric method was also used to determine the phase stability using one phase simulations. We found that liquid-vapor coexistence is stable for values of κσ > 20 and that the critical temperatures have a maximum value at around κσ = 10, in agreement with Caballero et al. calculations. There also exists a controversy about the liquid-vapor envelope stability of the pure component attractive Yukawa model which is also discussed in the text. In addition, details about the equivalence between continuous and discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations are given, in the Appendix, for Yukawa and Lennard-Jones potentials.

  13. Rod sequence advisor

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.M. ); Lu, Yi ); Furia, R.V.; Thompson, R.J. ); Lin, Ching-lu )

    1992-01-01

    During startup and power shaping maneuvers of boiling water reactors (BWR's), control rods are sequentially withdrawn from the reactor core. The withdrawal sequences determine the overall reactor power and the local core power density and are based on the knowledge of station engineers. It is important that the control rods are withdrawn in such a manner that the local power level does not become excessive while the desired reactor power is generated. Rules that constrain the relative positions of control rod groups have been developed to do this. While these rules are relatively simple, applying them to all possible movements of the 17 control rod groups in a typical BWR is complex and time consuming. SMARTRODS, is a rule based pilot expert system, was developed in LISP for the determination of the rod sequences.

  14. Rod Photoreceptors Detect Rapid Flicker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, J. D.; MacLeod, Donald I. A.

    1977-01-01

    Rod-isolation techniques show that light-adapted human rods detect flicker frequencies as high as 28 hertz, and that the function relating rod critical flicker frequency to stimulus intensity contains two distinct branches. (MLH)

  15. Transport of barrel and spherical shaped colloids in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Knappenberger, Thorsten; Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Model colloids are usually spherical, but natural colloids have irregular geometries. Transport experiments of spherical colloids may not reflect the transport characteristics of natural colloids in porous media. We investigated saturated and unsaturated transport of colloids with spherical and angular shapes under steady-state, flow conditions. A pulse of negatively-charged colloids was introduced into a silica sand column at three different effective water saturations (Se = 0.31, 0.45, and 1.0). Colloids were introduced under high ionic strength of [106]mM to cause attachment to the secondary energy minimum and later released by changing the pore water to low ionic strength. After the experiment, sand was sampled from different depths (0, -4, and -11 cm) for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and colloid extraction. Water saturation affected colloid transport with more retention under low than under high saturation. Colloids were retained and released from a secondary energy minimum with more angular-shaped colloids being retained and released. Colloids extracted from the sand revealed highest colloid deposition in the top layer and decreasing deposition with depth. Pore straining and grain-grain wedging dominated colloid retention.

  16. Transport of barrel and spherical shaped colloids in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Knappenberger, Thorsten; Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Model colloids are usually spherical, but natural colloids have irregular geometries. Transport experiments of spherical colloids may not reflect the transport characteristics of natural colloids in porous media. We investigated saturated and unsaturated transport of colloids with spherical and angular shapes under steady-state, flow conditions. A pulse of negatively-charged colloids was introduced into a silica sand column at three different effective water saturations (Se = 0.31, 0.45, and 1.0). Colloids were introduced under high ionic strength of [106]mM to cause attachment to the secondary energy minimum and later released by changing the pore water to low ionic strength. After the experiment, sand was sampled from different depths (0, -4, and -11 cm) for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and colloid extraction. Water saturation affected colloid transport with more retention under low than under high saturation. Colloids were retained and released from a secondary energy minimum with more angular-shaped colloids being retained and released. Colloids extracted from the sand revealed highest colloid deposition in the top layer and decreasing deposition with depth. Pore straining and grain-grain wedging dominated colloid retention. PMID:26275396

  17. Particulate mobility in vertical deposition of attractive monolayer colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kwan Wee; Koh, Yaw Koon; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Wong, Chee Cheong

    2010-05-18

    In the colloidal self-assembly of charged particles on surfaces with opposite polarity, disorder often dominates. In this report, we show that ionic strength, volume fraction, and solvent evaporation temperature can be optimized in the vertical deposition method to yield hexagonal close-packed monolayer arrays with positively charged colloids on negatively charged bare glass. We further extend our study to form well-defined binary two-dimensional superlattices with oppositely charged monolayers grown layer-by-layer. Our results suggest that the lack of particulate mobility in oppositely charged systems is the main cause of disorder, and maximum mobility is attained when all three growth parameters are finely adjusted to increase the time scale for the particles to stabilize and order during crystal growth in these attractive systems. A clear understanding and control of the collective behavior of highly mobile colloids could lead to the creation of greater diversity of nanoarchitectures.

  18. Analysis of colloid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-12-31

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  20. Control rod driveline and grapple

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A control rod driveline and grapple is disclosed for placement between a control rod drive and a nuclear reactor control rod containing poison for parasitic neutron absorption required for reactor shutdown. The control rod is provided with an enlarged cylindrical handle which terminates in an upwardly extending rod to provide a grapple point for the driveline. The grapple mechanism includes a tension rod which receives the upwardly extending handle and is provided with a lower annular flange. A plurality of preferably six grapple segments surround and grip the control rod handle. Each grapple rod segment grips the flange on the tension rod at an interior upper annular indentation, bears against the enlarged cylindrical handle at an intermediate annulus and captures the upwardly flaring frustum shaped handle at a lower and complementary female segment. The tension rods and grapple segments are surrounded by and encased within a cylinder. The cylinder terminates immediately and outward extending annulus at the lower portion of the grapple segments. Excursion of the tension rod relative to the encasing cylinder causes rod release at the handle by permitting the grapple segments to pivot outwardly and about the annulus on the tension rod so as to open the lower defined frustum shaped annulus and drop the rod. Relative movement between the tension rod and cylinder can occur either due to electromagnetic release of the tension rod within defined limits of travel or differential thermal expansion as between the tension rod and cylinder as where the reactor exceeds design thermal limits.

  1. Statics and dynamics of colloidal particles on optical tray arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    We examine the statics and dynamics of charged colloids interacting with periodic optical trap arrays. In particular we study the regime where more than one colloid is confined in each trap, creating effective dimer, trimer, and higher order states called colloidal molecular crystals. The n-mer states have all effective orientational degree of freedom which can be controlled with an external driving field. In general, the external field causes a polarization effect where the orientation of the n-mers aligns with the external field, similar to liquid crystal systems. Additionally, under a rotating external drive the n-mers can rotate with the drive. In some cases a series of structural transitions in the colloidal crystal states occur in the rotating field due to a competition between the ordering of the colloidal molecular crystals and the polarization effect which orients the n-mers in the direction of the drive. We also show that for some parameters, the n-mers continuously rotate with the drive without witching, that depinning transitions can occur where the colloids jump from well to well, and that there are a number of distinct dynamical transitions between the phases. Finally, we illustrate colloidal orderings at fillings of more than four colloids per trap, indicating that it is possible to create higher order colloidal crystal cluster phases.

  2. Why rods and cones?

    PubMed

    Lamb, T D

    2016-02-01

    Under twenty-first-century metropolitan conditions, almost all of our vision is mediated by cones and the photopic system, yet cones make up barely 5% of our retinal photoreceptors. This paper looks at reasons why we additionally possess rods and a scotopic system, and asks why rods comprise 95% of our retinal photoreceptors. It considers the ability of rods to reliably signal the arrival of individual photons of light, as well as the ability of the retina to process these single-photon signals, and it discusses the advantages that accrue. Drawbacks in the arrangement, including the very slow dark adaptation of scotopic vision, are also considered. Finally, the timing of the evolution of cone and rod photoreceptors, the retina, and the camera-style eye is summarised.

  3. Flexible sucker rod unit

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.F.

    1987-02-03

    This patent describes a deep well having: a. an education tube with an inside diameter extending from the surface of the earth to far below the surface, b. a reciprocating pump housing attached to the bottom of the education tube, c. pump jack means at the surface for reciprocating the pump, d. a light sucker rod connected to the pump jack means and extending into the education tube, and e. a series of heavy sinker bars having a large cross sectional area in the education tube connecting the light sucker rod to the pump; f. an improved integral metal flexible rod unit interconnecting the sinker bars comprising in combination with the above: g. a coupling on each end of the integral metal flexible rod unit connecting the flexible rod unit to the contiguous sinker bar, h. a segment which is flexible as compared to the sinker bars connecting one of the couplings to i. an integral metal bearing adjacent to the other of the couplings, the bearing having j. a cylindrical surface with k. a diameter i. only slightly smaller than the inside diameter of the education tube thereby forming a sliding fit therewith, and ii. greater than the diameter of any other portion of the flexible rod unit and the sinker bar, and l. grooves in the cylindrical surface for the passage of fluid between in the education tube around the bearing.

  4. Measuring the equation of state for a 2D colloidal membrane: A microfluidic approach to buffer exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balchunas, Andrew; Cabanas, Rafael; Fraden, Seth; Dogic, Zvonimir

    Previous work has shown that monodisperse rod-like colloidal particles, such as a filamentous bacteriophage, self assemble into a 2D monolayer smectic in the presence of a non-adsorbing depleting polymer. These structures have the same functional form of bending rigidity and lateral compressibility as conventional lipid bi-layers, so we name the monolayer smectic a colloidal membrane. We have developed a microfluidic device such that the osmotic pressure acting on a colloidal membrane may be controlled via a full in situ buffer exchange. Rod density within individual colloidal membranes was measured as a function of osmotic pressure and a first order phase transition, from 2D fluid to 2D solid, was observed. kon and koff rates of rod to membrane binding were measured by lowering the osmotic pressure until membrane evaporation occurred.

  5. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  6. Polished rod liner puller assmbly

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, B.V.

    1990-01-02

    This patent describes a polished rod liner puller assembly operable with a well casing head assembly to remove a polished rod liner member of a polished rod liner assembly from a well. It comprises: a work table assembly operable to be placed around the well casing head assembly and enclose the polished rod liner assembly; a base plate assembly mounted on the work table assembly; a piston and cylinder jack assembly mounted on the base plate assembly and extended upwardly therefrom; and a winged rod clamp assembly connectable to the piston and cylinder jack assembly and to a polished rod member of the polished rod liner assembly and operable on actuation of the piston and cylinder jack assembly to axially move the polished rod member and the polished rod liner member to remove the polished rod liner member from the well.

  7. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  8. Does water content or flow rate control colloid transport in unsaturated porous media?

    PubMed

    Knappenberger, Thorsten; Flury, Markus; Mattson, Earl D; Harsh, James B

    2014-04-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (θ - θr)/(θs - θr)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  9. Method for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trau, Mathias (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method apparatus is provided for electrophoretically depositing particles onto an electrode, and electrohydrodynamically assembling the particles into crystalline structures. Specifically, the present method and apparatus creates a current flowing through a solution to cause identically charged electrophoretically deposited colloidal particles to attract each other over very large distances (<5 particle diameters) on the surface of electrodes to form two-dimensional colloidal crystals. The attractive force can be created with both DC and AC fields and can modulated by adjusting either the field strength or frequency of the current. Modulating this lateral attraction between the particles causes the reversible formation of two-dimensional fluid and crystalline colloidal states on the electrode surface. Further manipulation allows for the formation of two or three-dimensional colloidal crystals, as well as more complex designed structures. Once the required structures are formed, these three-dimension colloidal crystals can be permanently frozen or glued by controlled coagulation induced by to the applied field to form a stable crystalline structure.

  10. Apparatus for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trau, Mathias (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method apparatus is provided for electrophoretically depositing particles onto an electrode, and electrohydrodynamically assembling the particles into crystalline structures. Specifically, the present method and apparatus creates a current flowing through a solution to cause identically charged electrophoretically deposited colloidal particles to attract each other over very large distances (<5 particle diameters) on the surface of electrodes to form two-dimensional colloidal crystals. The attractive force can be created with both DC and AC fields and can modulated by adjusting either the field strength or frequency of the current. Modulating this lateral attraction between the particles causes the reversible formation of two-dimensional fluid and crystalline colloidal states on the electrode surface. Further manipulation allows for the formation of two or three-dimensional colloidal crystals, as well as more complex designed structures. Once the required structures are formed, these three-dimension colloidal crystals can be permanently frozen or glued by controlled coagulation induced by to the applied field to form a stable crystalline structure.

  11. Reentrant phase transition in charged colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Akhilesh K.; Tata, B. V. R.; Sood, A. K.; Kesavamoorthy, R.

    1988-06-01

    We report the observation of a novel phase transition in dilute aqueous suspensions of polystyrene particles as a function of ionic impurity concentration C. The suspension phase separates into dense and rare phases only for a restricted range of C which depends on particle concentration n. The dense phase has liquidlike or crystalline order depending on n and C. Free energies of the homogeneous and the phase-separated states are calculated with an effective interparticle potential. The calculated phase diagram is in qualitative agreement with the present experimental results.

  12. Nonlinearity and noise at the rod - rod bipolar cell synapse

    PubMed Central

    Trexler, E. Brady; Casti, Alexander R.R.; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    In the retina, rod bipolar (RBP) cells synapse with many rods, and suppression of rod outer segment and synaptic noise is necessary for their detection of rod single photon responses (SPRs). Depending on the rods’ signal to noise ratio (SNR), the suppression mechanism will likely eliminate some SPRs as well, resulting in decreased quantum efficiency. We examined this synapse in rabbit, where 100 rods converge onto each RBP. Suction electrode recordings showed that rabbit rod SPRs were difficult to distinguish from noise (independent SNR estimates were 2.3 and 2.8). Nonlinear transmission from rods to RBPs improved response detection (SNR = 8.7), but a large portion of the rod SPRs were discarded. For the dimmest flashes, the loss approached 90%. Despite the high rejection ratio, noise of two distinct types were apparent in the RBP traces: low amplitude rumblings and discrete events that resembled the SPR. The SPR-like event frequency suggests they result from thermal isomerizations of rhodopsin, which occured at the rate 0.033 s−1rod−1. The presence of low amplitude noise is explained by a sigmoidal input-output relationship at the rod - RBP synapse and the input of noisy rods. The rabbit rod SNR and RBP quantum efficiency are the lowest yet reported, suggesting that the quantum efficiency of the rod - RBP synapse may depend on the SNR in rods. These results point to the possibility that fewer photoisomerizations are discarded for species such as primate, which has a higher rod SNR. PMID:21047445

  13. From crystal chemistry to colloid stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, B.; Burrows, N.; Penn, R. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aqueous suspensions of ferrihydrite nanoparticles form a colloid with properties that can be understood using classical theories but which additionally exhibit the distinctive phenomenon of nanocluster formation. While use of in situ light and x-ray scattering methods permit the quantitative determination of colloid stability, interparticle interactions, and cluster or aggregate geometry, there are currently few approaches to predict the colloidal behavior of mineral nanoparticles. A longstanding goal of aqueous geochemistry is the rationalization and prediction of the chemical properties of hydrated mineral interfaces from knowledge of interface structure at the molecular scale. Because interfacial acid-base reactions typically lead to the formation of a net electrostatic charge at the surfaces of oxide, hydroxide, and oxyhydroxide mineral surfaces, quantitative descriptions of this behavior have the potential to permit the prediction of long-range interactions between mineral particles. We will evaluate the feasibility of this effort by constructing a model for surface charge formation for ferrihydrite that combines recent insights into the crystal structure of this phase and proposed methods for estimating the pKa of acidic surface groups. We will test the ability of this model to predict the colloidal stability of ferrihydrite suspensions as a function of solution chemistry.

  14. Understanding flame rods

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, J.A. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The flame rod is probably the least understood method of flame detection. Although it is not recommended for oilfired equipment, it is very common on atmospheric, or {open_quotes}in-shot,{close_quotes} gas burners. It is also possible, although not common, to have an application with a constant gas pilot, monitored by a flame rod, and maintaining an oil main flame. Regardless of the application, chances are that flame rods will be encountered during the course of servicing. The technician today must be versatile and able to work on many different types of equipment. One must understand the basic principles of flame rods, and how to correct potential problems. The purpose of a flame detection system is two-fold: (1) to prove there is no flame when there shouldn`t be one, and (2) to prove there is a flame when there should be one. Flame failure response time is very important. This is the amount of time it takes to realize there is a loss of flame, two to four seconds is typical today. Prior to flame rods, either bi-metal or thermocouple type flame detectors were common. The response time for these detectors was up to three minutes, seldom less than one minute.

  15. Detachment of colloids from a solid surface by a moving air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Flury, Markus; Zhou, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Colloid attachment to liquid-gas interfaces is an important process used in industrial applications to separate suspended colloids from the fluid phase. Moving gas bubbles can also be used to remove colloidal dust from surfaces. Similarly, moving liquid-gas interfaces lead to colloid mobilization in the natural subsurface environment, such as in soils and sediments. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of moving air-water interfaces on the detachment of colloids deposited on an air-dried glass surface, as a function of colloidal properties and interface velocity. We selected four types of polystyrene colloids (positive and negative surface charge, hydrophilic and hydrophobic). The colloids were deposited on clean microscope glass slides using a flow-through deposition chamber. Air-water interfaces were passed over the colloid-deposited glass slides, and we varied the number of passages and the interface velocity. The amounts of colloids deposited on the glass slides were visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy and quantified by image analysis. Our results showed that colloids attached under unfavorable conditions were removed in significantly greater amounts than those attached under favorable conditions. Hydrophobic colloids were detached more than hydrophilic colloids. The effect of the air-water interface on colloid removal was most pronounced for the first two passages of the air-water interface. Subsequent passages of air-water interfaces over the colloid-deposited glass slides did not cause significant additional colloid removal. Increasing interface velocity led to decreased colloid removal. The force balances, calculated from theory, supported the experimental findings, and highlight the dominance of detachment forces (surface tension forces) over the attachment forces (DLVO forces).

  16. Physical factors affecting the transport and fate of colloids in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Yates, Scott R.; Bettahar, Mehdi; Simunek, Jirka

    2002-12-01

    Saturated soil column experiments were conducted to explore the influence of colloid size and soil grain size distribution characteristics on the transport and fate of colloid particles in saturated porous media. Stable monodispersed colloids and porous media that are negatively charged were employed in these studies. Effluent colloid concentration curves and the final spatial distribution of retained colloids by the porous media were found to be highly dependent on the colloid size and soil grain size distribution. Relative peak effluent concentrations decreased and surface mass removal by the soil increased when the colloid size increased and the soil median grain size decreased. These observations were attributed to increased straining of the colloids; i.e., blocked pores act as dead ends for the colloids. When the colloid size is small relative to the soil pore sizes, straining becomes a less significant mechanism of colloid removal and attachment becomes more important. Mathematical modeling of the colloid transport experiments using traditional colloid attachment theory was conducted to highlight differences in colloid attachment and straining behavior and to identify parameter ranges that are applicable for attachment models. Simulated colloid effluent curves using fitted first-order attachment and detachment parameters were able to describe much of the effluent concentration data. The model was, however, less adequate at describing systems which exhibited a gradual approach to the peak effluent concentration and the spatial distribution of colloids when significant mass was retained in the soil. Current colloid filtration theory did not adequately predict the fitted first-order attachment coefficients, presumably due to straining in these systems.

  17. Ultrafast exciton dynamics and light-driven H2 evolution in colloidal semiconductor nanorods and Pt-tipped nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaifeng; Zhu, Haiming; Lian, Tianquan

    2015-03-17

    Colloidal quantum confined one-dimensional (1D) semiconductor nanorods (NRs) and related semiconductor-metal heterostructures are promising new materials for efficient solar-to-fuel conversion because of their unique physical and chemical properties. NRs can simultaneously exhibit quantum confinement effects in the radial direction and bulk like carrier transport in the axial direction. The former implies that concepts well-established in zero-dimensional quantum dots, such as size-tunable energetics and wave function engineering through band alignment in heterostructures, can also be applied to NRs; while the latter endows NRs with fast carrier transport to achieve long distance charge separation. Selective growth of catalytic metallic nanoparticles, such as Pt, at the tips of NRs provides convenient routes to multicomponent heterostructures with photocatalytic capabilities and controllable charge separation distances. The design and optimization of such materials for efficient solar-to-fuel conversion require the understanding of exciton and charge carrier dynamics. In this Account, we summarize our recent studies of ultrafast charge separation and recombination kinetics and their effects on steady-state photocatalytic efficiencies of colloidal CdS and CdSe/CdS NRs and related NR-Pt heterostructures. After a brief introduction of their electronic structure, we discuss exciton dynamics of CdS NRs. By transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence decay, it is shown that although the conduction band electrons are long-lived, photogenerated holes in CdS NRs are trapped on an ultrafast time scale (∼0.7 ps), which forms localized excitons due to strong Coulomb interaction in 1D NRs. In quasi-type II CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod NRs, a large valence band offset drives the ultrafast localization of holes to the CdSe core, and the competition between this process and ultrafast hole trapping on a CdS rod leads to three types of exciton species with distinct spatial

  18. Electric double layer of anisotropic dielectric colloids under electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, M.; Wu, H.; Luijten, E.

    2016-07-01

    Anisotropic colloidal particles constitute an important class of building blocks for self-assembly directed by electrical fields. The aggregation of these building blocks is driven by induced dipole moments, which arise from an interplay between dielectric effects and the electric double layer. For particles that are anisotropic in shape, charge distribution, and dielectric properties, calculation of the electric double layer requires coupling of the ionic dynamics to a Poisson solver. We apply recently proposed methods to solve this problem for experimentally employed colloids in static and time-dependent electric fields. This allows us to predict the effects of field strength and frequency on the colloidal properties.

  19. Photophysics and photochemistry of quantized ZnO colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, P.V.; Patrick, B.

    1992-08-06

    The photophysical and photochemical behavior of quantized ZnO colloids in ethanol has been investigated by time-resolved transient absorption and emission measurements. Trapping of electrons at the ZnO surface resulted in broad absorption in the red region. The green emission of ZnO colloids was readily quenched by hole scavengers such as SCN{sup -} and I{sup -}. The photoinduced charge transfer to these hole scavengers was studied by laser flash photolysis. The yield of oxidized product increased considerably when ZnO colloids were coupled with ZnSe. 36 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Observation and characterization of colloids derived from leached cement hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Sugiyama, D.; Swanton, S. W.; Myatt, B. J.

    2003-03-01

    The possibility of colloid generation from cement hydrates in a cementitious repository environment has been investigated through leaching experiments. Pulverized samples of High Flyash and Silica fume-content Cement (HFSC) and 1:9 ordinary portland cement/blast furnace slag (1:9 OPC/BFS) hydrate were leached in low-salinity groundwater at three solid-to-liquid (S/L) mass ratios (1:5, 1:50 and 1:100), and two temperatures (20 and 60 °C) for durations of nearly 2 and 8 months. Detailed characterization of colloid populations has been undertaken by TEM coupled with X-ray analysis. In addition, the surface charge and stability behavior of colloids have been investigated. The colloid concentrations in HFSC hydrate leachates generated at 20 and 60 °C show similar trends with S/L ratio. The colloid concentrations of leachates with the lower S/L ratio (1:50 and 1:100) are in the range of 10 11-10 12 particles per liter. The majority of these particles are composed predominantly of Si, Ca, and Al; the mean particle size is less than 100 nm. The lowest colloid concentrations are found in the leachates with the highest S/L ratios, and the colloid populations tend to be dominated by larger particles. HFSC-derived colloid stability is due to a high negative zeta potential at alkaline pH values, combined with a calcium concentration that is below the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) for the colloids. A preliminary interpretation of HFSC-derived colloid stability based on classical DLVO theory provides a semi-quantitative explanation of the dependence of colloid populations on the S/L ratio in the leaching experiments.

  1. COMPOSITE CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Rock, H.R.

    1963-12-24

    A composite control rod for use in controlling a nuclear reactor is described. The control rod is of sandwich construction in which finned dowel pins are utilized to hold together sheets of the neutron absorbing material and nonabsorbing structural material thereby eliminating the need for being dependent on the absorbing material for structural support. The dowel pins perform the function of absorbing the forces due to differential thermal expansion, seating further with the fins into the sheets of material and crushing before damage is done either to the absorbing or non-absorbing material. (AEC)

  2. Entropic forces stabilize diverse emergent structures in colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Gibaud, Thomas; Dogic, Zvonimir; Lubensky, T. C.

    The depletion interaction mediated by non-adsorbing polymers promotes condensation and assembly of repulsive colloidal particles into diverse higher-order structures and materials. One example, with particularly rich emergent behaviors, is the formation of two-dimensional colloidal membranes from a suspension of filamentous $\\it{fd}$ viruses, which act as rods with effective repulsive interactions, and dextran, which acts as a condensing, depletion-inducing agent. Colloidal membranes exhibit chiral twist even when the constituent virus mixture lacks macroscopic chirality, change from a circular shape to a striking starfish shape upon changing the chirality of constituent rods, and partially coalesce via domain walls through which the viruses twist by $180^\\circ$. We formulate an entropically-motivated theory that can quantitatively explain these experimental structures and measurements, both previously published and newly performed, over a wide range of experimental conditions. Our results elucidate how entropy alone, manifested through the viruses as Frank elastic energy and through the depletants as an effective surface tension, drives the formation and behavior of these diverse structures. Our generalizable principles propose the existence of analogous effects in molecular membranes and can be exploited in the design of reconfigurable colloidal structures.

  3. Entropic forces stabilize diverse emergent structures in colloidal membranes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Louis; Gibaud, Thomas; Dogic, Zvonimir; Lubensky, T C

    2016-01-14

    The depletion interaction mediated by non-adsorbing polymers promotes condensation and assembly of repulsive colloidal particles into diverse higher-order structures and materials. One example, with particularly rich emergent behaviors, is the formation of two-dimensional colloidal membranes from a suspension of filamentous fd viruses, which act as rods with effective repulsive interactions, and dextran, which acts as a condensing, depletion-inducing agent. Colloidal membranes exhibit chiral twist even when the constituent virus mixture lacks macroscopic chirality, change from a circular shape to a striking starfish shape upon changing the chirality of constituent rods, and partially coalesce via domain walls through which the viruses twist by 180°. We formulate an entropically-motivated theory that can quantitatively explain these experimental structures and measurements, both previously published and newly performed, over a wide range of experimental conditions. Our results elucidate how entropy alone, manifested through the viruses as Frank elastic energy and through the depletants as an effective surface tension, drives the formation and behavior of these diverse structures. Our generalizable principles propose the existence of analogous effects in molecular membranes and can be exploited in the design of reconfigurable colloidal structures. PMID:26472139

  4. Dispersion stability and electrokinetic properties of intrinsic plutonium colloids: implications for subsurface transport.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I; Zhou, Dongxu; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Tarimala, Sowmitri; Ware, S Doug; Keller, Arturo A

    2013-06-01

    Subsurface transport of plutonium (Pu) may be facilitated by the formation of intrinsic Pu colloids. While this colloid-facilitated transport is largely governed by the electrokinetic properties and dispersion stability (resistance to aggregation) of the colloids, reported experimental data is scarce. Here, we quantify the dependence of ζ-potential of intrinsic Pu(IV) colloids on pH and their aggregation rate on ionic strength. Results indicate an isoelectric point of pH 8.6 and a critical coagulation concentration of 0.1 M of 1:1 electrolyte at pH 11.4. The ζ-potential/pH dependence of the Pu(IV) colloids is similar to that of goethite and hematite colloids. Colloid interaction energy calculations using these values reveal an effective Hamaker constant of the intrinsic Pu(IV) colloids in water of 1.85 × 10(-19) J, corresponding to a relative permittivity of 6.21 and refractive index of 2.33, in agreement with first principles calculations. This relatively high Hamaker constant combined with the positive charge of Pu(IV) colloids under typical groundwater aquifer conditions led to two contradicting hypotheses: (a) the Pu(IV) colloids will exhibit significant aggregation and deposition, leading to a negligible subsurface transport or (b) the Pu(IV) colloids will associate with the relatively stable native groundwater colloids, leading to a considerable subsurface transport. Packed column transport experiments supported the second hypothesis.

  5. Welded oil well pump rod

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.F.

    1986-06-10

    A friction welded multiple component oil well sucker rod is described which consists of an elongated cylindrical rod section and apposed coupling end portions welded to opposite ends of the rod section, the coupling end portions being of a nominal maximum diameter at least 1.5 times greater than the rod section and including means for connecting the sucker rod to an adjacent rod in end to end relationship. The couplings end portions each include an axial tapered portion between the connecting means and an end face adapted to be butted to the rod section, the coupling end portions being butted against the opposed end portions of the rod section during a friction welding operation to form a radially outward projecting bulge of displaced material on the rod section and the coupling end portions, respectively. A greater cross-sectional area is formed at the transition of the rod section to the coupling end portion to reduce the unit tensile stress on the sucker rod in the vicinity of the weld, wherein the displaced material is machined to form a tapered surface between the rod section and the axial tapered portion of the coupling end portion, the tapered surface having an angle of taper with respect to the longitudinal axis of the sucker rod less than the angle of taper of the coupling end portion.

  6. Waveguides in colloidal nanosuspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Peña, Luis A.; Salazar-Romero, Yadira; Terborg, Roland A.; Hernández-Cordero, Juan; Torres, Juan P.; Volke-Sepúlveda, K.

    2014-09-01

    We present and discuss a set of experiments based on the application of the nonlinear properties of colloidal nanosuspensions to induce waveguides with a high-power CW laser beam (wavelength 532nm) and its use for controlling an additional probe beam. The probe is a CW laser of a different wavelength (632nm), whose power is well below the critical value to induce nonlinear effects in the colloidal medium. We also discuss a technique for the characterization of the induced waveguides.

  7. Class D sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Woodings, R. T.

    1984-10-23

    It has been found that API Class D sucker rods can be made inexpensively from low-alloy, low-cost steel by following a suitable induction-normalizing process and using a suitable steel to which there has been added 0.07 to 0.15 percent of vanadium.

  8. A brief perspective on the diverging theories of lymphatic targeting with colloids

    PubMed Central

    Siram, Karthik; Marslin, Gregory; Raghavan, Chellan Vijaya; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Rahman, Habibur; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    For targeted delivery of colloids to the lymphatic system, the colloids should efficiently reach and remain in the lymphatics for a considerable period of time. As per the current knowledge, diffusion and phagocytosis are the two mechanisms through which colloids reach the lymphatic system. Several parameters including particle size and charge have been shown to affect the direct uptake of colloids by the lymphatic system. Although many researchers attached ligands on the surface of colloids to promote phagocytosis-mediated lymphatic delivery, another school of thought suggests avoidance of phagocytosis by use of carriers like polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated colloids to impart stealth attributes and evade phagocytosis. In this perspective, we weigh up the paradoxical theories and approaches available in the literature to draw conclusions on the conditions favorable for achieving efficient lymphatic targeting of colloids. PMID:27366065

  9. A brief perspective on the diverging theories of lymphatic targeting with colloids.

    PubMed

    Siram, Karthik; Marslin, Gregory; Raghavan, Chellan Vijaya; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Rahman, Habibur; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    For targeted delivery of colloids to the lymphatic system, the colloids should efficiently reach and remain in the lymphatics for a considerable period of time. As per the current knowledge, diffusion and phagocytosis are the two mechanisms through which colloids reach the lymphatic system. Several parameters including particle size and charge have been shown to affect the direct uptake of colloids by the lymphatic system. Although many researchers attached ligands on the surface of colloids to promote phagocytosis-mediated lymphatic delivery, another school of thought suggests avoidance of phagocytosis by use of carriers like polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated colloids to impart stealth attributes and evade phagocytosis. In this perspective, we weigh up the paradoxical theories and approaches available in the literature to draw conclusions on the conditions favorable for achieving efficient lymphatic targeting of colloids. PMID:27366065

  10. Holographically Defined Nanoparticle Placement in 3D Colloidal Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Yoonho; Yu, Dongguk; George, Matthew C.; Braun, Paul V.

    2010-06-30

    We demonstrate an optical interference-based photochemical method for the high-resolution localization of nanoparticles inside colloidal crystals or other porous structures. The method specifically relies on photoinduced inversion of the colloidal crystal surface charge to drive the localized deposition of charged gold nanoparticles. 4-Bromomethyl-3-nitrobenzoic acid (BNBA) was used as a photocleavable linker, and dansylamide was attached to BNBA to increase the absorption at 351 nm. Two-beam interference lithography was used for high-resolution optical patterning of the colloidal crystals; the resulting pattern was then decorated with functional nanoparticles. The periodicity of the pattern was 400 nm, and the width of the gold nanoparticle decorated region was ~200 nm. Our strategy of using photoswitching in a refractive-index-matched porous medium followed by the attachment of nanoparticles to the photoswitched region should be applicable to wide classes of charged nanoparticles.

  11. Directing colloidal assembly and a metal-insulator transition using quenched-disordered polymeric networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Anh; Jadrich, Ryan; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Replica integral equation and effective medium theory methods are employed to elucidate how to massively reconfigure a colloidal assembly and realize equilibrium states of high electrical conductivity at low physical volume fractions. This is achieved by employing variable mesh size networks of rigid rod or semiflexible polymers as a templating internal field. By exploiting bulk phase separation frustration and the tunable competing processes of colloid adsorption on the low dimensional network and fluctuation-driven colloid clustering in the pore spaces, distinct spatial organizations of greatly enhanced particle contacts can be achieved. As a result, a continuous, but very abrupt, transition from an insulating to metallic-like state can be realized via a small change of either the colloid-template or colloid-colloid attraction strength. Polymer conformational fluctuations are found to significantly modify the physical adsorption process and hence the ability of colloids to organize along the filamentary network strands. Qualitatively new physical behavior can emerge as the pore size approaches the colloid diameter, reflecting strong frustrating constraints of the template on colloidal assembly.

  12. Colloidal nanocrystals for quality lighting and displays: milestones and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Talha; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis of nanocrystals have enabled high-quality high-efficiency light-emitting diodes, displays with significantly broader color gamut, and optically-pumped lasers spanning the whole visible regime. Here we review these colloidal platforms covering the milestone studies together with recent developments. In the review, we focus on the devices made of colloidal quantum dots (nanocrystals), colloidal quantum rods (nanorods), and colloidal quantum wells (nanoplatelets) as well as those of solution processed perovskites and phosphor nanocrystals. The review starts with an introduction to colloidal nanocrystal photonics emphasizing the importance of colloidal materials for light-emitting devices. Subsequently,we continue with the summary of important reports on light-emitting diodes, in which colloids are used as the color converters and then as the emissive layers in electroluminescent devices. Also,we review the developments in color enrichment and electroluminescent displays. Next, we present a summary of important reports on the lasing of colloidal semiconductors. Finally, we summarize and conclude the review presenting a future outlook.

  13. Transport and Straining of Colloid-Sized Materials in Saturated Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamindu, D. K.; Kawamoto, K.; Saito, H.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2007-12-01

    The fact that colloids facilitate transport of contaminants such as heavy metals, pesticides, radionuclides etc. through porous media has gained widespread acceptance in the last few decades. Colloid attachment and straining have been identified as key mechanisms on colloid retention/filtration in porous media. Much research attention was focused on colloid straining during recent years since the attachment-based classical filtration theory could not accurately predict colloid deposition, especially under unfavorable attachment conditions. Recent studies further revealed that transport and filtration of colloids largely depend on initial colloid concentration and flow rate. Despite growing attention, however, the knowledge of colloid filtration, especially for natural soil colloids, is still limited. This study investigated attachment and straining of colloid-sized glass beads with the diameter of 1-10μm and soil colloids with the diameter of less than 1 μm extracted from a volcanic ash soil in saturated sand (Toyoura sand) by means of a series of column experiments at different colloid concentrations and flow rates (Darcian flux 0.16-1.0cm/min). The height and internal diameter of the sand column were 10cm and 4.91cm, respectively. Bromide was also added to colloidal solution as a conservative tracer. In each column experiment, 3 pore volumes of artificial rainwater was initially applied downward at a steady flow rate, then shifted to 10 pore volumes of colloidal solution, followed by another 5 pore volumes of artificial rainwater. By measuring the colloid concentration of effluents, colloid breakthrough and breakdown curves were observed. Glass bead colloids exhibited essentially no breakthrough on both high and low flow rates, suggesting all colloids deposited in the soil column. Since colloid attachment is unlikely due to mutual repulsion of negatively charged colloids and sand grains, we presume all colloids were physically strained in porous media

  14. Random Packings Of Rod-Sphere Mixtures Simulated By Mechanical Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrylyuk, Andriy V.; Wouterse, Alan; Philipse, Albert P.

    2009-06-01

    We study the random close packing of a binary mixture of spheres and rod-like particles (spherocylinders) by the mechanical contraction computer simulation. We investigate the universality in packing of near-spheres by monitoring the position and the value of the maximum in the mixture packing density as a function of the mixture composition and the rod aspect ratio. We find that independently of the mixture composition the particles pack more efficiently/densely as the rod aspect ratio is perturbed slightly from zero and the maximum density is always reached at one unique rod aspect ratio of about 0.45. The dependence of the value of the maximum packing fraction on the mixture composition (the relative rod volume fraction) is linear, exhibiting some ideality in packing of near-spheres. This counter-intuitive finding suggests that even for high rod concentrations in a rod-sphere mixture the packing is governed by local contacts between the neighboring particles, which is usually observed for dilute colloidal suspensions and granular gases, where there is no correlation between the particles. The plausible explanation for this intriguing behavior is that the correlations between the particles are completely lost in the range of distances of several particle diameters, which can be originated from the decoupling of the orientational and translational degrees of freedom of the nearly spherical rods. This gives rise to the universality and locality of random close packing of the rod-sphere mixtures.

  15. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  16. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  17. Clustering and self-assembly in colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, F.

    2012-01-01

    A colloidal dispersion consists of small particles called colloids, typically tens of nanometers to a few micrometers in size, suspended in a solvent. Due to collisions with the much smaller particles in the solvent, colloids perform Brownian motion: randomly directed movements that cause the particles to diffuse through the system. In principle, this motion allow the system of particles to explore all configurations available to them, sampling all of phase space according to the Boltzmann distribution. Analogous to molecular and atomic systems, colloidal systems can form disordered gas and liquid phases, as well as more ordered phases such as crystals, liquid crystals, or finite-sized aggregates. Since the particles form these phases based purely on their interactions and the Brownian motion that results from thermal fluctuations in their solvent, the process of forming these ordered structures is called self-assembly. In this thesis, we study the self-assembly of a variety of colloidal systems. We attempt to determine what structures can be expected to form, investigate the order and stability of these phases, and examine the nucleation of self-assembled crystals. To do this, we make use of computers to simulate the behavior of colloidal particles in suspension. Depending on the system under consideration, we perform either Monte Carlo simulations or event-driven molecular dynamics. In particular, we study the self-assembly of particles of several shapes in external electric or magnetic fields, the phase behavior of hard colloidal cubes, and the phase diagrams of charged colloidal spheres with a constant surface potential. Furthermore, we investigate the nucleation of binary hard sphere mixtures, the self-assembly of colloidal particles in evaporating emulsion droplets, and the formation of colloidal micelles. Where possible, we compare our results with experimental findings in similar systems.

  18. A universal approach to fabricate ordered colloidal crystals arrays based on electrostatic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun; Zhang, Junhu; Zhu, Difu; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Xuemin; Wang, Tieqiang; Yang, Bai

    2010-12-01

    We present a novel and simple method to fabricate two-dimensional (2D) poly(styrene sulfate) (PSS, negatively charged) colloidal crystals on a positively charged substrate. Our strategy contains two separate steps: one is the three-dimensional (3D) assembly of PSS particles in ethanol, and the other is electrostatic adsorption in water. First, 3D assembly in ethanol phase eliminates electrostatic attractions between colloids and the substrate. As a result, high-quality colloidal crystals are easily generated, for electrostatic attractions are unfavorable for the movement of colloidal particles during convective self-assembly. Subsequently, top layers of colloidal spheres are washed away in the water phase, whereas well-packed PSS colloids that are in contact with the substrate are tightly linked due to electrostatic interactions, resulting in the formation of ordered arrays of 2D colloidal spheres. Cycling these processes leads to the layer-by-layer assembly of 3D colloidal crystals with controllable layers. In addition, this strategy can be extended to the fabrication of patterned 2D colloidal crystals on patterned polyelectrolyte surfaces, not only on planar substrates but also on nonplanar substrates. This straightforward method may open up new possibilities for practical use of colloidal crystals of excellent quality, various patterns, and controllable fashions.

  19. Colloid-probe AFM studies of the interaction forces of proteins adsorbed on colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurvinder; Bremmell, Kristen E; Griesser, Hans J; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-04-28

    In recent years, colloid-probe AFM has been used to measure the direct interaction forces between colloidal particles of different size or surface functionality in aqueous media, as one can study different forces in symmerical systems (i.e., sphere-sphere geometry). The present study investigates the interaction between protein coatings on colloid probes and hydrophilic surfaces decorated with hexagonally close packed single particle layers that are either uncoated or coated with proteins. Controlled solvent evaporation from aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles (coated with or without lysozyme and albumin) produces single layers of close-packed colloidal crystals over large areas on a solid support. The measurements have been carried out in an aqueous medium at different salt concentrations and pH values. The results show changes in the interaction forces as the surface charge of the unmodified or modified particles, and ionic strength or pH of the solution is altered. At high ionic strength or pH, electrostatic interactions are screened, and a strong repulsive force at short separation below 5 nm dominates, suggesting structural changes in the absorbed protein layer on the particles. We also study the force of adhesion, which decreases with an increment in the salt concentration, and the interaction between two different proteins indicating a repulsive interaction on approach and adhesion on retraction. PMID:25758979

  20. SAFETY SYSTEM FOR CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Paget, J.A.

    1963-05-14

    A structure for monitoring the structural continuity of a control rod foi a neutron reactor is presented. A electric conductor readily breakable under mechanical stress is fastened along the length of the control rod at a plurality of positions and forms a closed circuit with remote electrical components responsive to an open circuit. A portion of the conductor between the control rod and said components is helically wound to allow free and normally unrestricted movement of the segment of conductor secured to the control rod relative to the remote components. Any break in the circuit is indicative of control rod breakage. (AEC)

  1. Locked-wrap fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Samuel; Chertock, Alan J.; Punches, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for spacing fast reactor fuel rods using a wire wrapper improved by orienting the wire-wrapped fuel rods in a unique manner which introduces desirable performance characteristics not attainable by previous wire-wrapped designs. Use of this method in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor results in: (a) improved mechanical performance, (b) improved rod-to-rod contact, (c) reduced steel volume, and (d) improved thermal-hydraulic performance. The method produces a "locked wrap" design which tends to lock the rods together at each of the wire cluster locations.

  2. Sucker rod centralizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, O.; Newski, A.

    1989-10-03

    This patent describes a device for centralizing at least one sucker rod within a production pipe downhole in a well and for reducing frictional forces between the pipe and at least one sucker rod. It comprises an elongate, substantially cylindrical body member having a longitudinal axis, a plurality of slots within the member and a rotatable member mounted within each slot, each of the plurality of slots has its major dimension along a first axis parallel to the longitudinal axis of the body member and is oriented with respect to the other seats so as to form a helicoidal array for maximizing the total surface contact area between the rotatable members and the pipe and for decreasing the forces acting on each rotatable member.

  3. Sucker rod guide

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.C.

    1988-10-25

    This patent describes an improved guide for use in a string of sucker rods for reciprocation in a tubing string in a borehole, the sucker rods having threaded male ends, the guide comprising: an elongated upright cylindrical member of external diameter less than the internal diameter of tubing in which it is to be used, the member having sucker rod receiving female threaded openings at the upper and lower ends, the threaded openings being coaxial of the member cylindrical axis whereby the member may be positioned in a string of sucker rods, and including a plurality of spaced-apart parallel sided slots within the member, each slot being of semi-circular configuration and of depth greater than the radius and less than the diameter of the cylindrical member, the sidewalls of each slot being parallel to and equally spaced from a plane of the member cylindrical axis; the member having an axle bore therein for each of the slots, the axle bores being parallel and spaced apart from each other, a plane of the axis of each bore being perpendicular the member cylindrical axis and the axis of each bore being displaced away from the member cylindrical axis; an axle received in each axle bore; and a wheel received on each axle the diameter of each wheel being approximately the diameter of the cylindrical member, the periphery of each wheel extending beyond the member cylindrical wall whereby the wheels are positioned to engage and roll on the internal cylindrical surface of tubing, the planes of adjacent slots in the member being rotationally displaced from each other, a portion of each wheel extending beyond the cylindrical surface of the member, the opposed portion of each wheel being within the confines of the member cylindrical surface whereby each wheel can contact a tubing wall at only one point on its cylindrical surface.

  4. APPARATUS FOR SHEATHING RODS

    DOEpatents

    Ford, W.K.; Wyatt, M.; Plail, S.

    1961-08-01

    An arrangement is described for sealing a solid body of nuclear fuel, such as a uranium metal rod, into a closelyfitting thin metallic sheath with an internal atmosphere of inert gas. The sheathing process consists of subjecting the sheath, loaded with the nuclear fuel body, to the sequential operations of evacuation, gas-filling, drawing (to entrap inert gas and secure close contact between sheath and body), and sealing. (AEC)

  5. Straining of colloidal particles in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shangping; Gao, Bin; Saiers, James E.

    2006-12-01

    Straining may influence the mobility of colloid-sized particles within groundwater aquifers as well as within granular filters that are used in wastewater treatment. We conducted column transport experiments using latex microspheres as the colloids and quartz sand as the porous medium to investigate the response of colloid straining to changes in colloid diameter (dp) and sand grain diameter (dg). For these experiments the negatively charged microspheres were suspended in deionized water, and the quartz sand was thoroughly cleaned to minimize physicochemical deposition (attachment), which permitted the determination of straining in an unambiguous way. The measurements of strained (immobile phase) and effluent (aqueous phase) colloid concentrations could be described with a transport model that accounted for an exponential decline in straining rates with increasing concentrations of strained colloids. Best fit values of the model coefficient that quantified clean bed straining rates (ko) were negligibly small for dp/dg < 0.008 and, above this threshold, varied linearly with dp/dg. Our findings suggest that accurate inferences on the mobility of colloid-sized particles will require consideration of the effects of straining when dp/dg exceeds 0.008.

  6. Bead-Based Microfluidic Sediment Analogues: Fabrication and Colloid Transport.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yang; Huang, Jingwei; Xiao, Feng; Yin, Xiaolong; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Neeves, Keith B; Wu, Ning

    2016-09-13

    Mobile colloids can act as carriers for low-solubility contaminants in the environment. However, the dominant mechanism for this colloid-facilitated transport of chemicals is unclear. Therefore, we developed a bead-based microfluidic platform of sediment analogues and measured both single and population transport of model colloids. The porous medium is assembled through a bead-by-bead injection method. This approach has the versatility to build both electrostatically homogeneous and heterogeneous media at the pore scale. A T-junction at the exit also allowed for encapsulation and enumeration of colloids effluent at single particle resolution to give population dynamics. Tortuosity calculated from pore-scale trajectory analysis and its comparison with lattice Boltzmann simulations revealed that transport of colloids was influenced by the size exclusion effect. The porous media packed by positively and negatively charged beads into two layers showed distinctive colloidal particle retention and significant remobilization and re-adsorption of particles during water flushing. We demonstrated the potential of our method to fabricate porous media with surface heterogeneities at the pore scale. With both single and population dynamics measurement, our platform has the potential to connect pore-scale and macroscale colloid transport on a lab scale and to quantify the impact of grain surface heterogeneities that are natural in the subsurface environment. PMID:27548505

  7. Sucker rod coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Klyne, A.A.

    1986-11-11

    An anti-friction sucker rod coupling is described for connecting a pair of sucker rods and centralizing them in a tubing string, comprising: an elongate, rigid, substantially cylindrical body member, each end of the body member forming means for threadably connecting the body member with a sucker rod. The body member further forms a transversely extending, substantially diametric, generally vertical slot extending therethrough. The body member further forms a pin bore, such pin bore extending transversely through the body member so as to intersect the slot substantially perpendicularly; a wheel member positioned within the slot to rotate in a generally vertical plane. The wheel member has a portion thereof extending beyond the periphery of the body member to engage the inner surface of the tubing string and centralize the coupling; and a pin mounted in the pin bore and supporting member thereon, whereby the wheel member is rotatable within the slot; the wheel member having sufficient clearance between its side surfaces and the wall surfaces of the slot, when the wheel member is centered in the slot on the pin, whereby the wheel member may shift along the pin to assist in ejecting sand and oil from the slot.

  8. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small button'' in the latch mechanism had broken off of the lock plunger'' and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  9. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small ``button`` in the latch mechanism had broken off of the ``lock plunger`` and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  10. Rod locking device

    SciTech Connect

    Troxell, J.N. Jr.

    1986-07-22

    A ram locking apparatus used on a blowout preventer is described having a housing, a ram, ram actuating means having a closing side and a retracted side and a tail rod having its inner end connected to the ram actuating means and its outer end engaged by the apparatus to lock the ram. The apparatus consists of: a lock housing having a closed end and a hollow interior connected to the exterior of the preventer housing in which the tail rod is positioned, a body positioned within the lock housing, a primary piston, a lost motion connection between the primary piston and the body, a lock piston associated with the primary piston and movable axially with respect to the primary piston, a tapered split locking ring interconnected to the lock piston, wedging means with the split locking ring, and means for supplying fluid under pressure into the lock housing for movement of the pistons, the initial pressure on the primary pistons causing movement of the body to engage the ram tail rod and subsequently moving the lock piston relative to the wedging means and to thereby wedge the split locking ring against the interior of the lock housing to lock the body therein against movement in the lock housing.

  11. Synchronized oscillations of dimers in biphasic charged fd-virus suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kang, K; Piao, S H; Choi, H J

    2016-08-01

    Micron-sized colloidal spheres that are dispersed in an isotropic-nematic biphasic host suspension of charged rods (fd-virus particles) are shown to spontaneously form dimers, which exhibit a synchronized oscillatory motion. Dimer formation is not observed in the monophase of isotropic and nematic suspensions. The synchronized oscillations of dimers are connected to the inhomogeneous state of the host suspension of charged rods (fd viruses) where nematic domains are in coexistence with isotropic regions. The synchronization of oscillations occurs in bulk states, in the absence of an external field. With a low field strength of an applied electric field, the synchronization is rather reduced, but it recovers again when the field is turned off. In this Rapid Communication, we report this observation as an example of the strange attractor, occurring in the mixture of PS (polystyrene) dimers in an isotropic-nematic coexistence biphasic fd-virus network. Furthermore, we highlight that the synchronization of PS-dimer oscillations is the result of a global bifurcation diagram, driven by a delicate balance between the short-attractive "twisted" interaction of PS dimers and long-ranged electrostatic repulsive interactions of charged fd rods. The interest is then in the local enhancement of "twist-nematic" elasticity in reorientation of the dimer oscillations. An analysis of image-time correlations is provided with the data movies and Fourier transforms of averaged orientations for the synchronized oscillations of dimers in the biphasic I-N coexistence concentration of charged fd-virus suspensions. PMID:27627230

  12. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    third conference in a series that began in 2004 [2] and was continued in 2008 [3]. The CODEF meeting series is held in conjunction with the German Dutch Transregional Collaborative Research Centre SFB TR6 with the title Physics of Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields. Papers from scientists working within this network as well as those from further invited contributors are summarized in this issue. They are organized according to the type of field applied, namely: shear flow electric field laser-optical and magnetic field confinement other fields and active particles To summarize the highlights of this special issue as regards shear fields, the response of depletion-induced colloidal clusters to shear is explored in [4]. Soft particles deform under shear and their structural and dynamical behaviour is studied both by experiment [5] and theory [6]. Transient dynamics after switching on shear is described by a joint venture of theory, simulation and experiment in [7]. Colloids provide the fascinating possibility to drag single particles through the suspension, which gives access to microrheology (as opposed to macrorheology, where macroscopic boundaries are moved). Several theoretical aspects of microrheology are discussed in this issue [8-10]. Moreover, a microscopic theory for shear viscosity is presented [11]. Various aspects of colloids in electric fields are also included in this issue. Electrokinetic phenomena for charged suspensions couple flow and electric phenomena in an intricate way and are intensely discussed both by experiment and simulation in contributions [12-14]. Dielectric phenomena are also influenced by electric fields [15]. Electric fields can induce effective dipolar forces between colloids leading to string formation [16]. Finally, binary mixtures in an electric driving field exhibit laning [17]. Simulation [18] and theoretical [19] studies of this nonequilibrium phenomenon are also discussed in this issue. Laser-optical fields can be used to

  13. Stress distributions in flowing aggregated colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Silbert, L.E.; Farr, R.S.; Melrose, J.R.; Ball, R.C.

    1999-09-01

    Simulations of the flow of concentrated aggregated colloidal systems, at the particulate level, are used to investigate the distribution of stresses in the shear-thinning regime. It is found that the distribution of shear stress carried by interparticle bonds decays approximately exponentially at large stresses, but with a double-exponential distribution for values of positive stress. The microstructural mechanisms associated with large stresses are manifested in clusters which dominate the positive contribution to the stress in the system. Towards the end of shear thinning the highest forces occur along bonds defining rods of particles aligned approximately along the flow-compression direction. We propose that the rheology of such systems is determined by a rupture{endash}reformation process of these clusters of stress concentration during the flow. The aggregation forces play the role of enhancing such stress concentration by stabilizing clusters against buckling. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Scattering from correlations in colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions typically exhibit spatial correlations over distances of order 10-10/sup 4/ A, corresponding either to the size of individual particles (e.g., polymer chains, surfactant micelles) or to the range of interaction between particles (e.g., charged polymer lattices at low ionic strength). Apart from having fundamental intrinsic interest, such systems are also extremely useful as model systems with which to study, for example, non-Newtonian hydrodynamics, since temporal correlations are generally much longer lived (10/sup -8/-10/sup -3/ sec) than those found in simple atomic or small molecular systems (10/sup -13/-10/sup -10/ sec). Colloids have long been the subject of macroscopic phenomenological research (on rheological properties, for example), but it is only recently that microscopic light, x-ray and neutron scattering techniques have been applied to their study, in large part because of theoretical difficulties in understanding the scattering from dense liquid-like systems of interacting particles. For spherical colloids, such theoretical problems have now been largely overcome, and for anisotropic colloids experimental techniques are being developed which circumvent the intractable theoretical areas. This paper will first review some static light and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) results on colloidal suspensions, both at equilibrium and in steady-state non-equilibrium situations, and will then discuss some dynamic measurements on polymer solutions and melts made using the neutron spin-echo (NSE) technique. Emphasis is placed on experiments which have a possible counterpart in synchrotron radiation studies. In particular, NSE extends the results of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) to larger momentum transfers and shorter time-scales than are available with visible light, and the extension of PCS to short wavelength on a synchrotron source would be of similar fundamental interest.

  15. Structural properties of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Alcaraz, J. M.; Chávez-Páez, M.; D'Aguanno, B.; Klein, R.

    1995-02-01

    Structural properties of three- and two-dimensional colloids composed by hard spheres and/or by Yukawa particles, which can have different diameters and charges, are studied by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation, together with Percus-Yevick, hypernetted chain and Rogers-Young approximations. From the partial radial distribution functions gij( r) the partial structure factors Sij( k) are determined, and with them the compressibility structure factor Sx( k), the measured structure factor SM( k) and the Bhatia-Thornton structure factors SNN( k), SNQ( k) and SQQ( k). As an effect of diameter and/or charge polydispersity on the structure of binary mixtures, the position and height of the main peak of SM( k), and its value at k = 0, change non-monotonously with the composition. In the case of binary mixtures of hard and Yukawa spheres the structure is given by two different scales. A liquid-solid phase transition induced by a change in the dimensionality was found for monodisperse systems.

  16. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  17. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  18. Cone rod dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Christian P

    2007-01-01

    Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs) (prevalence 1/40,000) are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP), also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs) resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7). Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far). The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs), CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs), and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs). It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is always advised. Currently

  19. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Peter T. K.

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  20. Reactor control rod timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.T.

    1982-02-09

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (Above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  1. Paramagnetic particle assemblies as colloidal models for atomic and molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dichuan

    2011-12-01

    Colloidal particles are ideal models for studying the behavior of atomic and molecular systems. They resemble their atomic and molecular analogues in that their dynamics are driven by thermal energy and their equilibrium properties are controlled by inter-particle interactions. Based on this analogy, it is reasonable to construct colloidal chains, where each particle represents a repeat unit, as models for polymers. The advantages of this system over molecular systems are its controllable rigidity, contour length and diameter, as well as the convenience to capture its instantaneous shape and position via video microscopy, which are not trivial to realize in molecular systems. By utilizing the dipolar properties of magnetic colloids, a number of groups have assembled semiflexible and rigid colloidal chains by cross-linking magnetic beads under a magnetic field using polymer linkers. Recently, efforts in constructing colloidal chains led even to anisotropic magnetic colloidal chains that mimic the detailed atomic arrangements of polymers. These properties make colloidal chains possible candidates for the classic bead-spring or bead-rod model systems for semiflexible and rigid polymers. In my thesis, I present a method for generating linear colloidal chain structures by linking surface functionalized paramagnetic particles using DNA. First, I investigate the force interactions between individual magnetic particles under different conditions to optimize the resulting chain stability. A systematic study the bending and rotational diffusion dynamics of the chains and their relationship with the DNA linking chemistry is presented. I then demonstrate their use as a ideal model system to study polymer dynamics In addition, a technique to measure short-range repulsive surface forces between these colloids with high precision was developed. Building on these repulsive force studies, a colloidal system to study 2-D phase transitions was created. This thesis provides insights

  2. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1988-01-01

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  3. Development of Filler Structure in Colloidal Silica-Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Meth, Jeffrey S; Zane, Stephen G; Chi, Changzai; Londono, J David; Wood, Barbara A; Cotts, Patricia; Keating, Mimi; Guise, William; Weigand, Steven

    2012-02-07

    The realization of the full potential for polymeric nanocomposites to manifest their entitled property improvements relies, for some properties, on the ability to achieve maximum particle-matrix interfacial area. Well-dispersed nanocomposites incorporating colloidal silica as the filler can be realized in both polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) matrices by exploiting the charge stabilized nature of silica in nonaqueous solvents which act as Bronsted bases. We demonstrate that dispersions of colloidal silica in dimethylformamide are charge stabilized, regardless of organosilyl surface functionalization. When formulated with polymer solutions, the charge stabilized structure is maintained during drying until the charged double layer collapses. Although particles are free to diffuse and cluster after this neutralization, increased matrix viscosity retards the kinetics. We demonstrate how high molecular weight polymers assist in immobilizing the structure of the silica to produce well-dispersed composites. The glass transition temperatures of these composites do not vary, even at loadings up to 50 vol %.

  4. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  5. Sucker rod assembly and method

    SciTech Connect

    Pagan, A.J.

    1986-07-01

    An improved sucker rod assembly is described comprising, in combination: a. a sucker rod; and b. a pair of fittings secured to opposite ends of the rod, each fitting including: i. a rigid elongated casing having interior surfaces defining an open front end and cavity extending rearwardly from the open front end in which cavity one end of the sucker rod is disposed, the side portions of the interior surfaces being contoured to define, with the side portions of the sucker rod end a single, annular elongated tapered wedge-shaped space; and ii. anchoring means filling the space and bonding to the side portions of the rod end to lock the rod end in place, the anchoring means having a narrower diameter at the front end thereof than at about the rear end thereof and being generally frusto-conical, the anchoring means comprising a plurality of separate rigid inserts, the interior surfaces of which collectively define a central elongated passageway in which the rod end is received, the interior surfaces of the inserts being tightly bonded to the side portions of the rod, and the inserts being bonded to each other along the contact lines therebetween to form a unitary structure.

  6. Hybrid Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticle Colloidal Gels are Injectable Fillers for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhen; Jamal, Syed; Detamore, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Injectable bone fillers have emerged as an alternative to the invasive surgery often required to treat bone defects. Current bone fillers may benefit from improvements in dynamic properties such as shear thinning during injection and recovery of material stiffness after placement. Negatively charged inorganic hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled with positively charged organic poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs to create a cohesive colloidal gel. This material is held together by electrostatic forces that may be disrupted by shear to facilitate extrusion, molding, or injection. Scanning electron micrographs of the dried colloidal gels showed a well-organized, three-dimensional porous structure. Rheology tests revealed that certain colloidal gels could recover after being sheared. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells were also highly viable when seeded on the colloidal gels. HAp/PLGA NP colloidal gels offer an attractive scheme for injectable filling and regeneration of bone tissue. PMID:23815275

  7. COLLOIDS. Colloidal matter: Packing, geometry, and entropy.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-08-28

    Colloidal particles with well-controlled shapes and interactions are an ideal experimental system for exploring how matter organizes itself. Like atoms and molecules, these particles form bulk phases such as liquids and crystals. But they are more than just crude analogs of atoms; they are a form of matter in their own right, with complex and interesting collective behavior not seen at the atomic scale. Their behavior is affected by geometrical or topological constraints, such as curved surfaces or the shapes of the particles. Because the interactions between the particles are often short-ranged, we can understand the effects of these constraints using geometrical concepts such as packing. The geometrical viewpoint gives us a window into how entropy affects not only the structure of matter, but also the dynamics of how it forms. PMID:26315444

  8. Colloidal electroconvection in a thin horizontal cell. I. Microscopic cooperative patterns at low voltage.

    PubMed

    Han, Yilong; Grier, David G

    2005-04-22

    Applying an electric field to an aqueous colloidal dispersion establishes a complex interplay of forces among the highly mobile simple ions, the more highly charged but less mobile colloidal spheres, and the surrounding water. This interplay can induce a wide variety of visually striking dynamical instabilities even when the applied field is constant. This paper reports on the highly organized patterns that emerge when electrohydrodynamic forces compete with gravity in thin layers of charge-stabilized colloidal spheres subjected to low voltages between parallel-plate electrodes. Depending on the conditions, these spheres can form levitating clusters with morphologies ranging from tumbling clouds to toroidal vortex rings and to writhing labyrinths.

  9. Interaction of latex colloids with mineral surfaces and Grimsel granodiorite.

    PubMed

    Filby, A; Plaschke, M; Geckeis, H; Fanghänel, Th

    2008-12-12

    Bentonite clay is considered as possible backfill material for nuclear waste repositories in crystalline rock. The same material may also be a source of clay colloids, which may act as carriers for actinide ions possibly released from the repository. Depending on the geochemical parameters, these colloids may be retained by interaction with mineral surfaces of the host rock. In the present study interaction of carboxylated fluorescent latex colloids, used as a model for bentonite colloids, with natural Grimsel granodiorite and some of its component minerals is studied by fluorescence microscopy and SEM/EDX. The experiments are carried out by varying the pH from 2-10. Strong adsorption is observed at pH values close to or below the points of zero charge (pHpzc) of the mineral surfaces. The influence of Eu(III), used as a chemical homologue for trivalent actinide ions, on colloid adsorption is investigated. Depending on mineral phase and pH, a significant increase of colloid adsorption is observed in the presence of Eu(III).

  10. Showing particles their place: deterministic colloid immobilization by gold nanomeshes.

    PubMed

    Stelling, Christian; Mark, Andreas; Papastavrou, Georg; Retsch, Markus

    2016-08-14

    The defined immobilization of colloidal particles on a non-close packed lattice on solid substrates is a challenging task in the field of directed colloidal self-assembly. In this contribution the controlled self-assembly of polystyrene beads into chemically modified nanomeshes with a high particle surface coverage is demonstrated. For this, solely electrostatic interaction forces were exploited by the use of topographically shallow gold nanomeshes. Employing orthogonal functionalization, an electrostatic contrast between the glass surface and the gold nanomesh was introduced on a sub-micron scale. This surface charge contrast promotes a highly site-selective trapping of the negatively charged polystyrene particles from the liquid phase. AFM force spectroscopy with a polystyrene colloidal probe was used to rationalize this electrostatic focusing effect. It provides quantitative access to the occurring interaction forces between the particle and substrate surface and clarifies the role of the pH during the immobilization process. Furthermore, the structure of the non-close packed colloidal monolayers can be finely tuned by varying the ionic strength and geometric parameters between colloidal particles and nanomesh. Therefore one is able to specifically and selectively adsorb one or several particles into one individual nanohole. PMID:27416921

  11. Colloidal electrodynamics, electrohydrodynamics and thermodynamics in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yilong

    We use digital video microscopy and liquid structure theory to measure pair potentials of charged stabilized colloidal spheres in an equilibrium monolayer. Anomalous attraction is founded between like-charged spheres in different degree of confinement, different composition of spheres or substrates, at high ionic strength, or for larger spheres. Error analysis is developed to rule out artifacts. We show that one wall is enough to induce the attraction and gold substrate can enhance such effect. The recently derived configuration temperature is generalized to a hierarchy of hyperconfigurational temperatures. We show their relation to the hypervirial theorem. These temperature definitions are successfully tested experimentally for the first time via colloidal systems. The results confirmed our anomalous attractions measured in the previous chapter. As a set of constrains, hyperconfigurational temperatures are used to determine free parameters in an unknown potential. Other applications and thermodynamic considerations are discussed. The complicate electrohydrodynamic interplay of microions' fluxes and macroions in an electric field can induce many instabilities. A zoo of self-organized colloidal patterns are discovered in electrolysis of a horizontal layer of aqueous colloid. At low voltage, spheres cooperatively form various quasi-stationary microscopic clusters. At higher bias, spheres passively trace the electroconvection which is more nonlinear than its thermal analogy, the Raleigh-Benard convection. Explaining these patterns provides new challenge in pattern formation, electrokinetic of colloid and electrochemistry.

  12. Experimental and computational studies of rod-deployment mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalbe, L.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Stofleth, J.H.; Greene, R.W.

    1996-08-01

    We describe experimental measurements and hydrocode simulations of two tests in which long (L/D=12), steel rods were accelerated laterally with charges of Detasheet-C high explosive (HE). In each test configuration, 84 rods were initially aligned parallel to one another in an array of four concentric rings. The first test had a central core of HE that dispersed the rods isotropically. The second test had a narrow, 180 degree strip of HE on one side of the assembly that focused the rods directionally. Using radiographic data taken at several milliseconds after HE initiation, we measured the dynamic distributions of the rods, and their translational velocities and tumble rates. To compare with the data, we also modeled the experiments with our smooth particle hydrocode SPHINX. Within the context of our numerical model, the hydrocode results agree satisfactorily with the test data. We include in our discussion many of the inferences and insights that our results provide to the phenomenology and performance of multimode, rod-deployment mechanisms.

  13. Rod Climbing of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Wang, Xiaorong

    We wish to report an unexpected effect observed for particle suspensions sucked to pass through a vertical pipe. Above a critical concentration, the suspension on the outside of the pipe may climb along the outside wall of the pipe and then display a surprising rod-climbing effect. Our study shows that the phenomenon is influenced mainly by the suspension composition, the pipe dimension and the suction speed. The effects of the pipe materials of different kinds are negligible. Increasing the suction force and the concentration increases the climbing height. Increasing the pipe diameter and wall thickness reduces the climbing effect. This behavior may be relevant to that the suspensions of the type described are all displaying markedly shear-thickening.

  14. Sucker rod pump

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, J.R.

    1992-04-14

    This patent describes a subsurface well pump, it comprises: a working barrel; a plunger which reciprocates along the vertical axis within the working barrel between an upper and lower position; a rod connected to the plunger and extending to a means for providing reciprocating force; a well string extending from the top of the working barrel to the surface; an outlet check valve which permits flow to exit the working barrel into the well string and does not permit flow to exit the well string into the working barrel; and an inlet check valve which permits flow into the working barrel from outside of the subsurface pump, the inlet check valve being above the top position of the plunger, the inlet check valve having a cross sectional flow area about equal to or greater than the horizontal cross sectional area of the working barrel, and the inlet check valve being a hinged flapper valve.

  15. Spectroscopic properties of colloidal indium phosphide quantum wires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Wang, Fudong; Yu, Heng; Li, Jingbo; Hang, Qingling; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Janes, David B.; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    Colloidal InP quantum wires are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, and passivated with the traditional quantum dots surfactants 1-hexadecylamine and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide. The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to other experimental results for InP quantum dots and wires, and to the predictions of theory. The photoluminescence behavior of the wires is also investigated. Efforts to enhance photoluminescence efficiencies through photochemical etching in the presence of HF result only in photochemical thinning or photo-oxidation, without a significant influence on quantum-wire photoluminescence. However, photo-oxidation produces residual dot and rod domains within the wires, which are luminescent. The results establish that the quantum-wire band gaps are weakly influenced by the nature of the surface passivation, and that colloidal quantum wires have intrinsically low photoluminescence efficiencies.

  16. Equilibrium Shape of Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Ray M; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-10-27

    Assembling colloidal particles into highly ordered configurations, such as photonic crystals, has significant potential for enabling a broad range of new technologies. Facilitating the nucleation of colloidal crystals and developing successful crystal growth strategies require a fundamental understanding of the equilibrium structure and morphology of small colloidal assemblies. Here, we report the results of a novel computational approach to determine the equilibrium shape of assemblies of colloidal particles that interact via an experimentally validated pair potential. While the well-known Wulff construction can accurately capture the equilibrium shape of large colloidal assemblies, containing O(10(4)) or more particles, determining the equilibrium shape of small colloidal assemblies of O(10) particles requires a generalized Wulff construction technique which we have developed for a proper description of equilibrium structure and morphology of small crystals. We identify and characterize fully several "magic" clusters which are significantly more stable than other similarly sized clusters.

  17. A theory for depletion-induced colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Lubensky, Tom C.

    2014-03-01

    Depletion-induced formation of colloidal membranes has been recently observed in suspensions of hard rods [E. Barry and Z. Dogic, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 10348 (2010); T. Gibaud et al., Nature 481, 348 (2012)]. These membranes exhibit a variety of rich behaviors that must ultimately be driven by entropy alone. We propose an entropic model that can capture certain features of these membranes, including their curved edge shape and the presence of twist even with achiral rods. We calculate phenomenological parameters, such as the Frank twist constant and the Helfrich bending modulus, from physical quantities. Finally, we describe novel behaviors predicted by our model. We acknowledge support by NSF grant DMR-1104707.

  18. Colloidal Suspensions in Shear Flow : a Real Space Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derks, D.

    2006-09-01

    decomposition pattern is observed. As the structure coarsens, the domains become highly stretched along the flow direction, and the domain width along the vorticity axis reaches a stationary size, corresponding to a steady state. In the final stage of phase separation the denser colloidal liquid phase settles on the bottom of the cell, while the gas phase floats on top. The interface between these phases is the topic of Chapter 5. We investigate the thermal fluctuations of the colloidal gas-liquid interface subjected to a shear flow parallel to the interface. Strikingly, we find that the shear strongly suppresses capillary waves, making the interface smoother. Finally, we consider the demixing process in systems of attractive rods (Chapter 6). A mixture of rod-like viruses (fd) and polymer (dextran) is quenched from a flow-induced fully nematic state into the region where the nematic and the isotropic phase coexist (at zero shear). Dependent on the concentration of rods we observe either demixing by nucleation-and-growth (high concentration) or spinodal decomposition (low concentration). At intermediate concentrations we see the transition between both types of demixing processes, where we locate the spinodal point.

  19. Regenerative hyperpolarization in rods.

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, F S

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of the rods in Necturus maculosus were studied at the cell body and the outer segments in dark and light under current and voltage clamp with a pair of intracellular electrodes separated by about 1 mum. 2. The membrane resistance in the dark was voltage- and time-dependent both for the cell body and the outer segment. Slight depolarizations in the cell body reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 10 M omega with a time constant of about 1 sec. Polarization in either direction, at the outer segment, when greater than about 20 mV, reduced the slope resistance from 60 to 30 M omega. The dark potential in the cell body was typically -30 to -35 m V; at the outer segment it was typically only -10 to -15 mV. 3. The light-elicited voltage response in both the cell body and the outer segment was largest with the membrane near the dark potential level. In both regions, the response was reduced when the membrane was polarized in either direction. 4. Under voltage-clamp conditions, a reversal potential for the light response near + 10 mV was measured at the outer segment. At the cell body no reversal potential for the light response was measured; there the clamping current required during the light response was almost of the same magnitude at all potential levels. 5. When the membrane at the cell body was hyperpolarized in the dark under voltage clamp, a transient outward current, typically about one-half the magnitude of the initial inward clamping current was required to maintain the membrane at the clamped potential level. This outward current transient was associated with a decrease in membrane resistance with similar time course. The transient outward current reversed and became inward when the membrane was clamped to potentials more negative than -80 mV. Thus, the transient outward current appears to involve a transient activation initiated by hyperpolarization. I is regenerative in that it is initiated by hyperpolarization and tends to

  20. Eulerian formulation of elastic rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynen, Alexandre; Detournay, Emmanuel; Denoël, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    In numerous biological, medical and engineering applications, elastic rods are constrained to deform inside or around tube-like surfaces. To solve efficiently this class of problems, the equations governing the deflection of elastic rods are reformulated within the Eulerian framework of this generic tubular constraint defined as a perfectly stiff normal ringed surface. This reformulation hinges on describing the rod-deformed configuration by means of its relative position with respect to a reference curve, defined as the axis or spine curve of the constraint, and on restating the rod local equilibrium in terms of the curvilinear coordinate parametrizing this curve. Associated with a segmentation strategy, which partitions the global problem into a sequence of rod segments either in continuous contact with the constraint or free of contact (except for their extremities), this re-parametrization not only trivializes the detection of new contacts but also transforms these free boundary problems into classic two-points boundary-value problems and suppresses the isoperimetric constraints resulting from the imposition of the rod position at the extremities of each rod segment.

  1. Transport of synthetic colloids through single saturated fractures: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, P.W.

    1995-07-01

    Colloids having the same surface charge sign as the bulk of the geologic media in a groundwater system may be able to travel through the system faster than soluble species because they will follow fluid streamlines more closely and they should have less tendency to diffuse into pores or dead spaces in the media than soluble species. Synthetic colloids with uniform, controlled properties may be ideal for serving as {open_quotes}worst-case{close_quotes} tracers that provide lower-bound estimates of contaminant travel times in hydrologic systems. This report discusses a review of the literature pertaining to colloid transport in single saturated natural fractures. After a brief background discussion to put the literature review in perspective, the phenomenon of colloid transport in saturated fractures is divided into three major topics, each of which is reviewed in detail: (1) saturated fluid flow through fractures; (2) colloid transport by convection, diffusion, and force fields; and (3) colloid interactions with surfaces. It is suggested that these phenomena be accounted for in colloid transport models by using (1) lubrication theory to describe water flow through fractures, (2) particle tracking methods to describe colloid transport in fractures, and (3) a kinetic boundary layer approximation to describe colloid interactions with fracture walls. These methods offer better computational efficiency and better experimental accessibility to model parameters than rigorously solving the complete governing equations.

  2. Decreased Salinity and Actinide Mobility: Colloid-Facilitated Transport or pH Change?

    PubMed

    Haliena, Brian; Zheng, Hangping; Melson, Nathan; Kaplan, Daniel I; Barnett, Mark O

    2016-01-19

    Colloids have been implicated in influencing the transport of actinides and other adsorbed contaminants in the subsurface, significantly increasing their mobility. Such colloid-facilitated transport can be induced by changes in groundwater chemistry that occur, for example, when high ionic strength contaminant plumes are displaced by infiltrating rainwater. We studied the transport and mobility of Th(IV), as an analogue for Pu(IV) and other tetravalent actinides [An(IV)], in saturated columns packed with a natural heterogeneous subsurface sandy sediment. As expected, decreases in ionic strength both promoted the mobilization of natural colloids and enhanced the transport of previously adsorbed Th(IV). However, colloid-facilitated transport played only a minor role in enhancing the transport of Th(IV). Instead, the enhanced transport of Th(IV) was primarily due to the pH-dependent desorption of Th(IV) caused by the change in ionic strength. In contrast, the adsorption of Th(IV) had a marked impact on the surface charge of the sandy sediment, significantly affecting the mobility of the colloids. In the absence of Th(IV), changes in ionic strength were ineffective at releasing colloids while in the presence of Th(IV), decreases in ionic strength liberated significant concentrations of colloids. Therefore, under the conditions of our experiments which mimicked acidic, high ionic strength groundwater contaminant plumes, Th(IV) had a much greater effect on colloid transport than colloids had on Th(IV) transport.

  3. Rod coupling for oil well sucker rods and the like

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.

    1986-07-29

    A coupling is described for joining solid reciprocating sucker rods to form a rod string in a well pump or the like comprising a unitary metal sleeve having an axial threaded bore and an irregular outer surface, and a homogeneous and non-fibrous coating on the sleeve over the outer surface providing an externally substantially cylindrical coupling, the coating comprising a flexible and abrasive resistant thermoplastic hydrourethane polymer formed on the irregular outer surface of the sleeve while in the molten state.

  4. Rod-like polyelectrolyte brushes with mono- and multivalent counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazli, H.; Golestanian, R.; Hansen, P. L.; Kolahchi, M. R.

    2006-02-01

    A model of rod-like polyelectrolyte brushes in the presence of monovalent and multivalent counterions but with no added salt is studied using Monte Carlo simulation. The average height of the brush, the histogram of rod conformations, and the counterion density profile are obtained for different values of the grafting density of the charge-neutral wall. For a domain of grafting densities, the brush height is found to be relatively insensitive to the density due to a competition between counterion condensation and inter-rod repulsion. In this regime, multivalent counterions collapse the brush in the form of linked clusters. Nematic order emerges at high grafting densities, resulting in an abrupt increase of the brush height.

  5. Detachment of deposited colloids by advancing and receding air-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2011-08-16

    Moving air-water interfaces can detach colloidal particles from stationary surfaces. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of advancing and receding air-water interfaces on colloid detachment as a function of interface velocity. We deposited fluorescent, negatively charged, carboxylate-modified polystyrene colloids (diameter of 1 μm) into a cylindrical glass channel. The colloids were hydrophilic with an advancing air-water contact angle of 60° and a receding contact angle of 40°. After colloid deposition, two air bubbles were sequentially introduced into the glass channel and passed through the channel at different velocities (0.5, 7.7, 72, 982, and 10,800 cm/h). The passage of the bubbles represented a sequence of receding and advancing air-water interfaces. Colloids remaining in the glass channel after each interface passage were visualized with confocal microscopy and quantified by image analysis. The advancing air-water interface was significantly more effective in detaching colloids from the glass surface than the receding interface. Most of the colloids were detached during the first passage of the advancing air-water interface, while the subsequent interface passages did not remove significant amounts of colloids. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborate our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface movement were stronger than during the receding movement. Theory indicates that, for hydrophilic colloids, the advancing interface movement generally exerts a stronger detachment force than the receding, except when the hysteresis of the colloid-air-water contact angle is small and that of the channel-air-water contact angle is large.

  6. Stokesian Dynamic Simulations of Colloid Assembly at a Fluid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dani, Archit; Maldarelli, Charles

    2015-11-01

    The collective dynamics and self-assembly of colloids floating at a gas/liquid or a liquid/liquid interface is a balance between deterministic lateral interaction forces, e.g. capillary attraction and dipolar electrostatic repulsion if the particles are charged, viscous resistance to colloid motion along the surface and thermal fluctuations. As the colloid size decreases, thermal (Brownian) forces become important and can affect the self assembly into ordered patterns and crystal structures that are the starting point for materials applications. Stokesian dynamics simulations are presented to describe the lateral organization of particles along the surface in Brownian dominated regimes that includes (using a pairwise approximation) capillary attraction and the hydrodynamic interaction between particles (incorporating the effect of the particle immersion depth) and thermal fluctuations. Clustering, fractal growth and particle ordering are observed at critically large values of the Peclet numbers, while smaller values yield states in which particles remain uncorrelated in space and more widely separated.

  7. Crystalloid and colloid therapy.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Langdon

    2014-08-01

    Fluid therapy is a cornerstone of emergency medicine, but equine practitioners should be aware of recent developments that have modified previous recommendations. First, new emphasis on the avoidance of hyperchloremia suggests that crystalloids with a lower chloride concentration may be more appropriate for use. Second, modifications to the understanding of the Starling equation suggest that the benefits of colloids may be more limited than previously thought. In addition, the negative effects of fluid overload on morbidity and mortality are becoming increasingly recognized. Although more specific research in horses is needed, these principles are likely to apply across all species.

  8. Rod coupling with mounted guide

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, M.L.

    1987-05-26

    This patent describes a well sucker rod string, in a well bore, the combination comprising: an axially elongated coupling section having threads at axially opposite ends thereof for coupling to and between successive sucker rods in the rod string, to transmit string loading. The section has first and second exposed surfaces adjacent an end of the section, and a third surface located between the first and second exposed surfaces; a rod guide consisting of molded plastic material extending about and bonded to the section third surface to project outwardly therefrom for engagement with the well bore during up and down stroking of the string; and one annular groove sunk in the section between the first and third surfaces, and another annular groove sunk in the section between the second and third surfaces. The depth of the one groove is less than about 15% of the radius of the section at the first surface.

  9. Colloid solutions: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Tomi T; Miyashita, Ryo; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2010-12-01

    Albumin, dextran, gelatin, and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions are colloids that efficiently expand the circulating blood volume. The administration of colloids restores the intravascular volume with minimal risk of tissue edema in comparison with crystalloid solutions alone. However, colloids are always given for surgical and critically ill patients. The type of the colloid, volumes applied, aggressiveness of fluid resuscitation, and the volume status at the initial phase of administration determine their clinical responses. The outcome after fluid resuscitation with various colloids in critically ill patients seems to be comparable according to systematic reviews. A randomized, adequately powered clinical trial comparing modern nonprotein colloid to albumin is still lacking. Rapidly degradable HES solutions have good hemodynamic effects, and the risk of adverse renal and coagulation effects, as well as allergic reactions, is minimal. The current investigation has also shown the beneficial effect of HES solution (especially HES 130/0.4) on inflammatory response, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and postoperative outcome. The indication of colloids with an assessment of the degree of hypovolemia and safety profiles should thus be taken into consideration before colloid administration.

  10. Adsorption-induced colloidal aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, B. M.; Petit, J.-M.; Beysens, D.

    1998-03-01

    Reversible colloidal aggregation in binary liquid mixtures has been studied for a number of years. As the phase separation temperature of the liquid mixture is approached the thickness of an adsorption layer around the colloidal particles increases. Beysens and coworkers have demonstrated experimentally that this adsorption layer is intimately connected with the aggregation of the colloidal particles, however, no definitive theory has been available which can explain all of the experimental observations. In this contribution we describe an extension of the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek theory of colloidal aggregation which takes into account the presence of the adsorption layer and which more realistically models the attractive dispersion interactions. This modified theory can quantitatively account for many of the observed experimental features such as the characteristics of the aggregated state, the general shape of the aggregation line, and the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient for a lutidine-water mixture containing a small volume fraction of silica colloidal particles.

  11. Sorption of radionuclides at tracer level on mineral colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Hadem, N.; Fourest, B.; Guillaumont, R.

    1995-12-01

    Transport of radionuclides by colloids through the geosphere is an important issue in exercises aimed to assess the safety of an underground radwaste repository sited in a water saturated zone. The first problems to deal with are the characterization of the colloids and their capabilities to sorb, at trace level and even at tracer level, radionuclides. This study investigates the relationships between the sorption of short lived {sup 137}Cs{sup +}, {sup 223}Ra{sup 2+}, {sup 227}Th and {sup 131}I{sup -} and the zeta potential, {zeta}-potential, of well identified colloids, as a function of pH (2 to 11), ionic strength, I (10{sup -3} to 1 M), and colloid concentration (up to 2000 ppm). {xi}-potential is the essential parameter to be considered since it reflects both the stability and the surface charge of the colloid. SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Th{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4} colloids have been chosen as `model colloids`. They are not really found in natural media, but are representative of particles with isoelectric points (i.e.p.) ranging between pH 2 to 9. In some cases the effect of the concentration of the elements has been studied as well, to check saturation effects (Cs and I from 10{sup -11} to 10{sup -2}M). Experimental data show that the distribution of radionuclides between the two phases considered depends mainly on zeta potential, but also on other identified factors.

  12. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  13. Colloidal gold and silica in mesothermal vein systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrington, R. J.; Wilkinson, J. J.

    1993-06-01

    Some of the textural features of mesothermal gold-quartz veins may be best explained by the initial precipitation of amorphous silica gel (colloid), which subsequently crystallizes to quartz. This can occur in brittle-ductile shear zones where a significant fluid-pressure drop occurs during stick-slip failure. Such a process rapidly supersaturates the hydrothermal fluid with respect to amorphous silica, which precipitates instead of quartz, owing to favorable kinetics. Depressurization also commonly leads to fluid unmixing and destabilization of soluble gold complexes. However, the presence of colloidal silica can stabilize gold colloid, allowing further transport of particulate gold in suspension in the hydrothermal fluid. Silica gel would be highly unstable under mesothermal conditions and would undergo rapid syneresis and crystallization to form quartz; solid impurities would tend to be expelled toward grain boundaries. This model can account for the primary anhedral aggregate textures typical of mesothermal quartz veins, the concentration of gold along grain boundaries and the formation of discrete gold nuggets, and the rare occurrence of low-order silica polymorphs and relict spheroidal structures. The transport of gold in colloidal form may be one reason for the frequently consistent bulk grade distribution in gold-quartz vein systems over many hundreds of metres (in some cases kilometres) of depth. In addition, the formation of charged colloidal particles may help to explain the attraction of gold grains to specific mineral surfaces.

  14. Software design of the ATLAS Muon Cathode Strip Chamber ROD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, R.; Huffer, M.; Claus, R.; Herbst, R.; Lankford, A.; Schernau, M.; Panetta, J.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Eschrich, I.; Deng, J.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS Cathode Strip Chamber system consists of two end-caps with 16 chambers each. The CSC Readout Drivers (RODs) are purpose-built boards encapsulating 13 DSPs and around 40 FPGAs. The principal responsibility of each ROD is for the extraction of data from two chambers at a maximum trigger rate of 75 KHz. In addition, each ROD is in charge of the setup, control and monitoring of the on-detector electronics. This paper introduces the design of the CSC ROD software. The main features of this design include an event flow schema that decentralizes the different dataflow streams, which can thus operate asynchronously at its own natural rate; an event building mechanism that associates data transferred by the asynchronous streams belonging to the same event; and a sparcification algorithm that discards uninteresting events and thus reduces the data occupancy volume. The time constraints imposed by the trigger rate have made paramount the use of optimization techniques such as the curiously recurrent template pattern and the programming of critical code in assembly language. The behaviour of the CSC RODs has been characterized in order to validate its performance.

  15. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul William; Boukhalfa, Hakim

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  16. RP cone-rod degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Heckenlively, J R

    1987-01-01

    A group of patients with progressive retinal degeneration and visual field loss, who meet the basic definition of RP were investigated to better define the relationship of the findings on the ERG with clinical characteristics such as visual field size, presence or absence of scotomata or pseudo-altitudinal defects on visual field, amount of night blindness; and presence or absence of macular or optic nerve changes. These studies suggest that cone-rod degeneration patients of the RP type go through the following stages; early, the ERG has a definite cone-rod pattern where the rod ERG is larger than the cone ERG while both are abnormal. As the disease advances, there is more of a reduction in the scotopic ERG such that both the rod and cone ERGs become nearly equal. As the disease further progresses the ERG becomes non-recordable on single-flash technique, but there is good residual rod function and the final rod threshold remains good until the visual field is reduced, typically less than 10 degrees with the IV-4 isopter. Finally with advanced disease the patient becomes night blind and generally becomes very difficult to distinguished from patients who have advanced rod-cone degeneration. While it may seem logical to find that visual field size correlates with various ERG parameters; this has not been as consistent a finding in patients with rod-cone degeneration in the author's experience. The analysis shows several new pieces of information about visual field changes in cone-rod degeneration; enlarged blind spots are seen earlier in cases which have recordable cone-rod patterns (group I), and pseudo-altitudinal changes are more likely to occur in autosomal recessive patients. Patients with macular lesions and central scotomata had larger amplitudes than patients with normal appearing maculae and no central scotomata. Patients with temporal optic atrophy had an earlier onset of symptoms and significant correlation with both photopic a- and b-waves and bright flash

  17. Adaptable and dynamic soft colloidal photonics (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Go, Dennis

    2015-10-01

    Existent photonic systems are highly integrated with the active component being completely isolated from the environment as a result of their complex format. There are almost no example for periodic photonic materials, which can interact with their environment by being sensitive to external stimuli while providing the corresponding photonic response. Due to this lack of interaction with the outside world, smart optical components, which are self-healing or adaptable, are almost impossible to achieve. I am going to present an aqueous colloidal system, consisting of core-shell particles with a solid core and a soft shell, bearing both negatively and positively charged groups. The described soft colloids exhibit like charges over a broad range of pH, where they repel each other resulting in a pefect and defect-free photonic crystal. In the absence of a net charge the colloids acquire the arrangement of an amorphous photonic glass. We showcase the applicability of our colloidal system for photonic applications by temporal programming of the photonic system and dynamic switching between ordered and amorphous particle arrangements. We can decrease the pH slowly allowing the particles to transit from negative through neutral to positive, and have them arrange accordingly from crystalline to amorphous and back to crystalline. Thus, we achieve a pre-programmable and autonomous dynamic modulation of the crystallinity of the colloidal arrays and their photonic response. References [1] Go, D., Kodger, T. E., Sprakel, J., and Kuehne, A. J.C. Soft matter. 2014, 10(40), 8060-8065.

  18. Crystalline Colloidal Arrays in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunkara, Hari B.; Penn, B. G.; Frazier, D. O.; Ramachandran, N.

    1997-01-01

    Crystalline Colloidal Arrays (CCA, also known as colloidal crystals), composed of aqueous or nonaqueous dispersions of self-assembled nanosized polymer colloidal spheres, are emerging toward the development of advanced optical devices for technological applications. The spontaneous self assembly of polymer spheres in a dielectric medium results from the electrostatic repulsive interaction between particles of uniform size and charge distribution. In a way similar to atomic crystals that diffract X-rays, CCA dispersions in thin quartz cells selectively and efficiently Bragg diffract the incident visible light. The reason for this diffraction is because the lattice (body or face centered cubic) spacing is on the order of the wavelength of visible light. Unlike the atomic crystals that diffract a fixed wavelength, colloidal crystals in principle, depending on the particle size, particle number and charge density, can diffract W, Vis or IR light. Therefore, the CCA dispersions can be used as laser filters. Besides, the diffraction intensity depends on the refractive index mismatch between polymer spheres and dielectric medium; therefore, it is possible to modulate incident light intensities by manipulating the index of either the spheres or the medium. Our interest in CCA is in the fabrication of all-optical devices such as optical switches, limiters, and spatial light modulators for optical signal processing. The two major requirements from a materials standpoint are the incorporation of suitable nonlinear optical materials (NLO) into polymer spheres which will allow us to alter the refractive index of the spheres by intense laser radiation, and preparation of solid CCA filters which can resist laser damage. The fabrication of solid composite filters not only has the advantage that the films are easier to handle, but also the arrays in solid films are more robust than in liquid media. In this paper, we report the photopolymerization process used to trap CCA in polymer

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ROD DRIVE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Oakes, L.C.; Walker, C.S.

    1959-12-15

    ABS>A suspension mechanism between a vertically movable nuclear reactor control rod and a rod extension, which also provides information for the operator or an automatic control signal, is described. A spring connects the rod extension to a drive shift. The extension of the spring indicates whether (1) the rod is at rest on the reactor, (2) the rod and extension are suspended, or (3) the extension alone is suspended, the spring controlling a 3-position electrical switch.

  20. Method of measuring a profile of the density of charged particles in a particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, L.G.; Jankowski, D.J.

    1975-10-01

    A profile of the relative density of charged particles in a beam is obtained by disposing a number of rods parallel to each other in a plane perpendicular to the beam and shadowing the beam. A second number of rods is disposed perpendicular to the first rods in a plane perpendicular to the beam and also shadowing the beam. Irradiation of the rods by the beam of charged particles creates radioactive isotopes in a quantity proportional to the number of charged particles incident upon the rods. Measurement of the radioactivity of each of the rods provides a measure of the quantity of radioactive material generated thereby and, together with the location of the rods, provides information sufficient to identify a profile of the density of charged particles in the beam.

  1. Effect of colloidal materials on cellulase production by Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, S.J.B.; Cooper, D.G.; Fuller, O.M.

    1985-04-01

    The addition of positively charged colloidal materials to the growth medium markedly increased the concentration of cellulase enzymes produced by Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30. Filter paper activities of up to 4 and 13 IU/ml have been achieved by the addition of colloidal materials, using 3% lactose and 3% cellulose, respectively, as a substrate. The particles exert their effect by binding soluble sugars and slowing their uptake by the organism.

  2. Transmission efficiency measurement at the FNAL 4-rod RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J. P.; Garcia, F. G.; Ostiguy, J. F.; Saini, A.; Zwaska, R.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents measurements of the beam transmission performed on the 4-rod RFQ currently under operation at Fermilab. The beam current has been measured at the RFQ exit as a function of the magnetic field strength in the two LEBT solenoids. This measurement is compared with scans performed on the FermiGrid with the beam dynamics code TRACK. A particular attention is given to the impact, on the RFQ beam transmission, of the space-charge neutralization in the LEBT.

  3. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. PMID:27600123

  4. Two-dimensional dipolar nematic colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Skarabot, M; Ravnik, M; Zumer, S; Tkalec, U; Poberaj, I; Babic, D; Osterman, N; Musevic, I

    2007-11-01

    We study the interactions and directed assembly of dipolar nematic colloidal particles in planar nematic cells using laser tweezers. The binding energies for two stable configurations of a colloidal pair with homeotropic surface alignment are determined. It is shown that the orientation of the dipolar colloidal particle can efficiently be controlled and changed by locally quenching the nematic liquid crystal from the laser-induced isotropic phase. The interaction of a single colloidal particle with a single colloidal chain is determined and the interactions between pairs of colloidal chains are studied. We demonstrate that dipolar colloidal chains self-assemble into the two-dimensional (2D) dipolar nematic colloidal crystals. An odd-even effect is observed with increasing number of colloidal chains forming the 2D colloidal crystal. PMID:18233658

  5. Rod guide/paraffin scraper

    SciTech Connect

    Mabry, J.F.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes improvement in a rod guide and paraffin scraper. It comprises: a body including longitudinal ribs spaced radially and extending out from the body; having two identical halves with the body surrounding a bore to accept a sucker rod, and each of the identical halves having a locking and tightening feature using a tongue and groove concept for interfitting the halves together over the sucker rod. This improvement comprises a rod guide and paraffin scraper with two identical halves comprising; a cylindrical central body including, at each end, three longitudinal ribs radially spaced to form a triad leaving three flow channels, at each end of the body, of essentially the same size and spacing as the ribs; and an angular wedge with opposingly ramped sides at the inside end of each of the ribs for scraping and directing material into the flow channels; and a set of triangular shaped tongues that interfit with a set of triangular shaped grooves for tightening the identical halves together and over the sucker rod; and a pair of cone-shaped male locks at one end of the identical half to mate with a pair of cone-shaped female locks at the opposite end of the other identical half.

  6. Direct visualization of the interfacial position of colloidal particles and their assemblies.

    PubMed

    Vogel, N; Ally, J; Bley, K; Kappl, M; Landfester, K; Weiss, C K

    2014-06-21

    A method for direct visualization of the position of nanoscale colloidal particles at air-water interfaces is presented. After assembling hard (polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate), silica) or soft core-shell gold-hydrogel composite (Au@PNiPAAm) colloids at the air-water interface, butylcyanoacrylate is introduced to the interface via the gas phase. Upon contact with water, an anionic polymerization reaction of the monomer is initiated and a film of poly(butylcyanoacrylate) (PBCA) is generated, entrapping the colloids at their equilibrium position at the interface. We apply this method to investigate the formation of complex, binary assembly structures directly at the interface, to visualize soft, nanoscale hydrogel colloids in the swollen state, and to visualize and quantify the equilibrium position of individual micro- and nanoscale colloids at the air-water interface depending of the amount of charge present on the particle surface. We find that the degree of deprotonation of the carboxyl group shifts the air-water contact angle, which is further confirmed by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. Remarkably, the contact angles determined for individual colloidal particles feature a significant distribution that greatly exceeds errors attributable to the size distribution of the colloids. This finding underlines the importance of accessing soft matter on an individual particle level.

  7. The renormalized Jellium model of colloidal suspensions with multivalent counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, Thiago E.; Levin, Yan

    2010-12-01

    An extension of the renormalized Jellium model which allows to study colloidal suspensions containing trivalent counterions is proposed. The theory is based on a modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation which incorporates the effects of counterion correlations near the colloidal surfaces using a new boundary condition. The renormalized charges, the counterion density profiles, and osmotic pressures can be easily calculated using the modified renormalized Jellium model. The results are compared with the ones obtained using the traditional Wigner-Seitz (WS) cell approximation also with a new boundary condition. We find that while the thermodynamic functions obtained within the renormalized Jellium model are in a good agreement with their WS counterpart, the effective charges predicted by the two theories can be significantly different.

  8. Gelled colloidal crystals as tunable optical filters for spectrophotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugao, Yukihiro; Onda, Sachiko; Toyotama, Akiko; Takiguchi, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Tsutomu; Hara, Shigeo; Nishikawa, Suguru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-08-01

    We examined the performance of charged colloidal crystals immobilized in a polymer gel as tunable optical filters. The colloidal crystals of charged silica particles (particle diameter = 121 nm; particle concentration = 3.5 vol %; and Bragg wavelength λB = 630–720 nm) were produced by unidirectional crystallization under a temperature gradient. Photocurable gelation reagents were dissolved in the sample beforehand; this enabled gel immobilization of the crystals under ultraviolet illumination. The crystals had dimensions of more than 25 mm2 in area and 1 mm in thickness, and spatial λB variations of less than 1%. Upon mechanical compression, λB values shifted linearly and reversibly over almost the entire visible spectrum. Using the gelled crystals as tunable optical filters, we measured the transmittance spectra of various samples and found them to be in close agreement with those determined using a spectrophotometer equipped with optical gratings.

  9. Gelled colloidal crystals as tunable optical filters for spectrophotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugao, Yukihiro; Onda, Sachiko; Toyotama, Akiko; Takiguchi, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Tsutomu; Hara, Shigeo; Nishikawa, Suguru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-08-01

    We examined the performance of charged colloidal crystals immobilized in a polymer gel as tunable optical filters. The colloidal crystals of charged silica particles (particle diameter = 121 nm; particle concentration = 3.5 vol %; and Bragg wavelength λB = 630-720 nm) were produced by unidirectional crystallization under a temperature gradient. Photocurable gelation reagents were dissolved in the sample beforehand; this enabled gel immobilization of the crystals under ultraviolet illumination. The crystals had dimensions of more than 25 mm2 in area and 1 mm in thickness, and spatial λB variations of less than 1%. Upon mechanical compression, λB values shifted linearly and reversibly over almost the entire visible spectrum. Using the gelled crystals as tunable optical filters, we measured the transmittance spectra of various samples and found them to be in close agreement with those determined using a spectrophotometer equipped with optical gratings.

  10. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.

    1990-11-13

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints. No Drawings

  11. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  12. Method of making colloid labeled with radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  13. Three-Dimensional Self Assembly of Semiconducting Colloidal Nanocrystals: From Fundamental Forces to Collective Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Abécassis, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Self-assembly of colloidal nanoparticles into higher order superstructures is becoming an important topic in current research in nanoscience. More and more research efforts are being dedicated to the controlled processing of nanoparticle dispersions to yield complex architectures from these simple building blocks. This is due to the fact that collective effects can emerge from an assembly of organized nanoparticles. Semiconducting colloidal nanocrystals such as quantum dots are promising materials for a wide range of applications in optoelectronic photovoltaics. The fundamental interactions that dictate the self-assembly of semiconducting colloidal nanocrystals in apolar solvents are reviewed with a focus on 3D structures and basic shapes (spheres, rods, and platelets). Emergent collective properties and the effect of the self-assembly on the optical properties of the particles are also discussed.

  14. COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH THE VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus

    2003-09-14

    Contaminants have leaked into the vadose zone at the USDOE Hanford reservation. It is important to understand the fate and transport of these contaminants to design remediation strategies and long-term waste management plans at the Hanford reservation. Colloids may play an important role in fate and transport of strongly sorbing contaminants, such as Cs or Pu. This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. The specific objectives addressed are: (1) Determine the structure, composition, and surface charge characteristics of colloidal particles formed under conditions similar to those occurring during leakage of waste typical of Hanford tank supernatants into soils and sediments surrounding the tanks. (2) Characterize the mutual interactions between colloids, contaminant, and soil matrix in batch experiments under various ionic strength and pH conditions. We will investigate the nature of the solid-liquid interactions and the kinetics of the reactions. (3) Evaluate mobility of colloids through soil under different degrees of water saturation and solution chemistry (ionic strength and pH). (4) Determine the potential of colloids to act as carriers to transport the contaminant through the vadose zone and verify the results through comparison with field samples collected under leaking tanks. (5) Improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for implementation into reactive chemical transport models. This project was in part supported by an NSF-IGERT grant to Washington State University. The IGERT grant provided funding for graduate student research and education, and two graduate students were involved in the EMSP project. The IGERT program also supported undergraduate internships. The project is part of a larger EMSP program to study fate and transport of contaminants under leaking Hanford waste tanks. The project has

  15. Colloidal membranes: The rich confluence of geometry and liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Cihan Nadir

    A simple and experimentally realizable model system of chiral symmetry breaking is liquid-crystalline monolayers of aligned, identical hard rods. In these materials, tuning the chirality at the molecular level affects the geometry at systems level, thereby inducing a myriad of morphological transitions. This thesis presents theoretical studies motivated by the rich phenomenology of these colloidal monolayers. High molecular chirality leads to assemblages of rods exhibiting macroscopic handedness. In the first part we consider one such geometry, twisted ribbons, which are minimal surfaces to a double helix. By employing a theoretical approach that combines liquid-crystalline order with the preferred shape, we focus on the phase transition from simple flat monolayers to these twisted structures. In these monolayers, regions of broken chiral symmetry nucleate at the interfaces, as in a chiral smectic A sample. The second part particularly focuses on the detailed structure and thermodynamic stability of two types of observed interfaces, the monolayer edge and domain walls in simple flat monolayers. Both the edge and "twist-walls" are quasi-one-dimensional bands of molecular twist deformations dictated by local chiral interactions and surface energy considerations. We develop a unified theory of these interfaces by utilizing the de Gennes framework accompanied by appropriate surface energy terms. The last part turns to colloidal "cookies", which form in mixtures of rods with opposite handedness. These elegant structures are essentially flat monolayers surrounded by an array of local, three dimensional cusp defects. We reveal the thermodynamic and structural characteristics of cookies. Furthermore, cookies provide us with a simple relation to determine the intrinsic curvature modulus of our model system, an important constant associated with topological properties of membranes. Our results may have impacts on a broader class of soft thin films.

  16. Stuck fuel rod capping sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Gorscak, Donald A.; Maringo, John J.; Nilsen, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    A stuck fuel rod capping sleeve to be used during derodding of spent fuel assemblies if a fuel rod becomes stuck in a partially withdrawn position and, thus, has to be severed. The capping sleeve has an inner sleeve made of a lower work hardening highly ductile material (e.g., Inconel 600) and an outer sleeve made of a moderately ductile material (e.g., 304 stainless steel). The inner sleeve may be made of an epoxy filler. The capping sleeve is placed on a fuel rod which is then severed by using a bolt cutter device. Upon cutting, the capping sleeve deforms in such a manner as to prevent the gross release of radioactive fuel material

  17. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  18. Emergent behavior in active colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöttl, Andreas; Stark, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Active colloids are microscopic particles, which self-propel through viscous fluids by converting energy extracted from their environment into directed motion. We first explain how artificial microswimmers move forward by generating near-surface flow fields via self-phoresis or the self-induced Marangoni effect. We then discuss generic features of the dynamics of single active colloids in bulk and in confinement, as well as in the presence of gravity, field gradients, and fluid flow. In the third section, we review the emergent collective behavior of active colloidal suspensions, focusing on their structural and dynamic properties. After summarizing experimental observations, we give an overview of the progress in modeling collectively moving active colloids. While active Brownian particles are heavily used to study collective dynamics on large scales, more advanced methods are necessary to explore the importance of hydrodynamic and phoretic particle interactions. Finally, the relevant physical approaches to quantify the emergent collective behavior are presented.

  19. Colloidal caterpillars for cargo transportation.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yuji; Takikawa, Yoshinori; Jampani, V S R; Hoshikawa, Hikaru; Seto, Takafumi; Bahr, Christian; Herminghaus, Stephan; Hidaka, Yoshiki; Orihara, Hiroshi

    2014-11-28

    Tunable transport of tiny objects in fluid systems is demanding in diverse fields of science such as drug delivery, active matter far from equilibrium, and lab-on-a-chip applications. Here, we report the directed motion of colloidal particles and self-assembled colloidal chains in a nematic liquid crystal matrix using electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) rolls. The asymmetric distortion of the molecular orientation around the particles results - for single particles - in a hopping motion from one EHC roll to the next and - for colloidal chains - in a caterpillar-like motion in the direction perpendicular to the roll axes. We demonstrate the use of colloidal chains as microtraction engines for the transport of various types of microcargo.

  20. Showing particles their place: deterministic colloid immobilization by gold nanomeshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelling, Christian; Mark, Andreas; Papastavrou, Georg; Retsch, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The defined immobilization of colloidal particles on a non-close packed lattice on solid substrates is a challenging task in the field of directed colloidal self-assembly. In this contribution the controlled self-assembly of polystyrene beads into chemically modified nanomeshes with a high particle surface coverage is demonstrated. For this, solely electrostatic interaction forces were exploited by the use of topographically shallow gold nanomeshes. Employing orthogonal functionalization, an electrostatic contrast between the glass surface and the gold nanomesh was introduced on a sub-micron scale. This surface charge contrast promotes a highly site-selective trapping of the negatively charged polystyrene particles from the liquid phase. AFM force spectroscopy with a polystyrene colloidal probe was used to rationalize this electrostatic focusing effect. It provides quantitative access to the occurring interaction forces between the particle and substrate surface and clarifies the role of the pH during the immobilization process. Furthermore, the structure of the non-close packed colloidal monolayers can be finely tuned by varying the ionic strength and geometric parameters between colloidal particles and nanomesh. Therefore one is able to specifically and selectively adsorb one or several particles into one individual nanohole.The defined immobilization of colloidal particles on a non-close packed lattice on solid substrates is a challenging task in the field of directed colloidal self-assembly. In this contribution the controlled self-assembly of polystyrene beads into chemically modified nanomeshes with a high particle surface coverage is demonstrated. For this, solely electrostatic interaction forces were exploited by the use of topographically shallow gold nanomeshes. Employing orthogonal functionalization, an electrostatic contrast between the glass surface and the gold nanomesh was introduced on a sub-micron scale. This surface charge contrast promotes a

  1. Synthesis of gold nano-wire and nano-dumbbell shaped colloids and AuC60 nano-clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landon, Preston B.; Jarvis, Brandon C.; Gilleland, Cody L.; Renfro, Tim; Gutierrez, Jose; Synowczynski, Jennifer; Hirsch, Samuel G.; Glosser, Robert

    2005-08-01

    A technique for the fabrication of colloidal gold nano-wire and nano-dumbbell shaped particles using carbon nanotubes and rod shaped viruses as templates is described. The gold (Au) encapsulation process was accomplished by the precipitation of gold chloride from aqueous solutions. When this process was conducted in the presence of hydroxylated C60, small pieces of phase-separated composites of AuC60 appeared to have formed. These nano-clusters may turn out to be large noble metal analogs of the alkali metal fullerides with the smallest geometrically possible Au aggregate consisting of 55 gold atoms. The existence of noble metal fullerene composites has been previously theorized. The alkali metal fullerides are examples of phase separated solids and have exhibited superconductivity with temperatures as high 33K. The mechanism required for the binding energy between C60 and gold has been observed to exist between C60 and many of the mirror metals (Al, Ag, Au, Cu, Ni). This binding energy is a charge transfer from the metal Fermi level into the C60 LUMO. If this bonding energy, is greater than the metals coagulation energy an Au/C60 size terminated mechanism during the formation of the gold aggregates by the adhesion of C60 to the surface is energetically favorable.

  2. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  3. Force vs. extension of colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Leroy; Pelcovits, Robert; Powers, Thomas; Zakhary, Mark; Dogic, Zvonimir

    In experiments, disk-shaped colloidal membranes composed of long rod-like viruses will take on a twisted ribbon shape under the application of a diametric stretching force. We use an effective model valid for membranes with small twist penetration to study this phase transition and calculate the force necessary to stretch the membrane to a given extension. The model predicts that for small deformations, the force is linear with spring constant depending on the effective edge bending stiffness of the membrane, while for large extensions, the force is found to saturate to a constant value. Surprisingly, the force is not a monotonic function of the extension. Finally, we use simple numerical calculations to find a power law that accurately describes the critical stretch at which the membrane starts to twist, which may be used to estimate the value of unknown parameters by comparison with experimental data. We are grateful for support from the Brandeis Center for Bioinspired Soft Materials, NSF MRSEC, DMR-1420382.

  4. Analysis of reciprocating compressor piston rod failures

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, H.A.; Drosjack, M.J.

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the analysis of five piston rod failures which occurred on reciprocating compressors. Calculations are shown for rod stress which includes nominal rod loading sources as well as additional loads due to unusual pressure losses in the compressor valves, flexure of the rods due to misalignment, and manufacturing errors. The additional loads were incorporated on the basis of field measurements. The stress values are used with Baquin's equation to produce fatigue life curves for the rods. Based on the calculations, recommendations for modified rods were made. The calculation procedures are described in a manner which will permit their application to other reciprocating compressors.

  5. Functional colloidal trimers by quenched electrostatic assembly.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Joseph J; Chaturvedi, Neetu; Velegol, Darrell

    2010-10-14

    It is shown how to assemble three particles into a single "colloidal trimer". The particles may consist of different materials and be different sizes, and they can be assembled in a particular sequence (i.e. 1-2-3 or 2-1-3 or 2-3-1). Several trimer assemblies are demonstrated, including polystyrene-silica-polystyrene, gold-polystyrene-silver, and gold-silicon-silver. The gold-silicon-silver assembly operates as a catalytic motor, moving rapidly by autoelectrophoresis when placed in a hydrogen peroxide solution. The assemblies are made by allowing oppositely-charged particles to aggregate in a diffusion-limited manner for a time, and then quenching the aggregation by the addition of a nanoparticle coating on one of the particles. We call this method "Quenched Electrostatic Assembly", and it serves as a general, scalable method for synthesizing multi-component colloidal trimers, including those requiring a certain sequential order, but not requiring particular orientations. In addition, when polymer nanoparticles are used to quench the aggregation, they can be fused above their glass transition temperature to produce assemblies that are mechanically stable. PMID:20830380

  6. Hierarchical Fast Multipole Simulation of Magnetic Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günal, Yüksel; Visscher, Pieter

    1997-03-01

    We have extended the well-known "fast multipole"footnote L. F. Greengard and V. Rokhlin, J. Comp. Phys. 73 p. 325, 1987. methods for molecular-dynamics simulation of large systems of point charges to continuum systems, such as magnetic films or colloids/march.html>particulate suspensions. (These methods reduce the computational labor from O(N^2) to O(N log N) or O(N), the number of particles). We apply the method to the particular case of a colloidal dispersion of magnetized cylindrical particles. Our method is fully hierarchical, both upward and downward from the particle size scale. The force on each particle is calculated by grouping distant particles into large clusters, nearer particles into smaller clusters, and dividing the nearest particles into segments. The fineness with which the particles are divided is controlled by an error tolerance parameter. The field of each cluster or segment is computed from a multipole expansion. Distant periodic images are also treated as multipoles - this is much faster than standard Fourier-transform or Ewald summation techniques.

  7. Organic nature of colloidal actinides transported in surface water environments.

    PubMed

    Santschi, Peter H; Roberts, Kimberly A; Guo, Laodong

    2002-09-01

    Elevated levels of (239,240)Pu and 241Am have been present in surficial soils of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), CO, since the 1960s, when soils were locally contaminated in the 1960s by leaking drums stored on the 903 Pad. Further dispersion of contaminated soil particles was by wind and water. From 1998 until 2001, we examined actinide ((239,240)Pu and 241Am) concentrations and phase speciation in the surface environment at RFETS through field studies and laboratory experiments. Measurements of total (239,240)Pu and 241Am concentrations in storm runoff and pond discharge samples, collected during spring and summer times in 1998-2000, demonstrate that most of the (239,240)Pu and 241Am transported from contaminated soils to streams occurred in the particulate (> or = 0.45 microm; 40-90%) and colloidal (approximately 2 nm or 3 kDa to 0.45 microm; 10-60%) phases. Controlled laboratory investigations of soil resuspension, which simulated storm and erosion events, confirmed that most of the Pu in the 0.45 microm filter-passing phase was in the colloidal phase (> or = 80%) and that remobilization of colloid-bound Pu during soil erosion events can be greatly enhanced by humic and fulvic acids present in these soils. Most importantly, isoelectric focusing experiments of radiolabeled colloidal matter extracted from RFETS soils revealed that colloidal Pu is in the four-valent state and is mostly associated with a negatively charged organic macromolecule with a pH(IEP) of 3.1 and a molecular weight of 10-15 kDa, rather than with the more abundant inorganic (iron oxide and clay) colloids. This finding has important ramifications for possible remediation, erosion controls, and land-management strategies. PMID:12322742

  8. Impact of dissolved organic matter on colloid transport in the vadose zone: deterministic approximation of transport deposition coefficients from polymeric coating characteristics.

    PubMed

    Morales, Verónica L; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Bin; Lion, Leonard W; Bisogni, James J; McDonough, Brendan A; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2011-02-01

    Although numerous studies have been conducted to discern colloid transport and stability processes, the mechanistic understanding of how dissolved organic matter (DOM) affects colloid fate in unsaturated soils (i.e., the vadose zone) remains unclear. This study aims to bridge the gap between the physicochemical responses of colloid complexes and porous media interfaces to solution chemistry, and the effect these changes have on colloid transport and fate. Measurements of adsorbed layer thickness, density, and charge of DOM-colloid complexes and transport experiments with tandem internal process visualization were conducted for key constituents of DOM, humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA), at acidic, neutral and basic pH and two CaCl(2) concentrations. Polymeric characteristics reveal that, of the two tested DOM constituents, only HA electrosterically stabilizes colloids. This stabilization is highly dependent on solution pH which controls DOM polymer adsorption affinity, and on the presence of Ca(+2) which promotes charge neutralization and inter-particle bridging. Transport experiments indicate that HA improved colloid transport significantly, while FA only marginally affected transport despite having a large effect on particle charge. A transport model with deposition and pore-exclusion parameters fit experimental breakthrough curves well. Trends in deposition coefficients are correlated to the changes in colloid surface potential for bare colloids, but must include adsorbed layer thickness and density for sterically stabilized colloids. Additionally, internal process observations with bright field microscopy reveal that, under optimal conditions for retention, experiments with FA or no DOM promoted colloid retention at solid-water interfaces, while experiments with HA enhanced colloid retention at air-water interfaces, presumably due to partitioning of HA at the air-water interface and/or increased hydrophobic characteristics of HA-colloid complexes.

  9. Fractionalization of interstitials in curved colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, William T. M.; Bowick, Mark J.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the effect of curvature and topological frustration in crystals yields insights into the fragility of the ordered state. For instance, a one-dimensional crystal of identical charged particles can accommodate an extra particle (interstitial) if all the particle positions are readjusted, yet in a planar hexagonal crystal interstitials remain trapped between lattice sites and diffuse by hopping. Using optical tweezers operated independently of three-dimensional imaging, we inserted interstitials in a lattice of similar colloidal particles sitting on flat or curved oil/glycerol interfaces, and imaged the ensuing dynamics. We find that, unlike in flat space, the curved crystals self-heal through a collective particle rearrangement that redistributes the increased density associated with the interstitial. This process can be interpreted in terms of the out-of-equilibrium interaction of topological defects with each other and with the underlying curvature. Our observations suggest the existence of particle fractionalization on curved surface crystals.

  10. Application of fiberglass sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.G. )

    1991-05-01

    Fiberglass sucker rods are assuming a place in artificial-lift technology. This paper briefly describes the manufacturing process and gives some design and operational hints for practical applications. It also describes some mathematical modeling modifications needed for fiberglass wave-equation design programs.

  11. On the Applicability of DLVO Theory to the Prediction of Clay Colloids Stability.

    PubMed

    Missana; Adell

    2000-10-01

    The stability behavior of Na-montmorillonite colloids has been studied by combining the analysis of their surface charge properties and time-resolved dynamic light scattering experiments. The chemical surface model for several types of clays, including montmorillonite, has to take into account the double surface charge contribution due to their permanent structural charge and to their pH-dependent charge, which is developed at the edge sites, therefore, these stability studies were carried out as a function of both ionic strength and pH. DLVO theory is largely applied for the prediction of the stability of many colloidal systems, including the natural ones. This work shows that the stability behavior of Na-montmorillonite colloids cannot be satisfactorily reproduced by DLVO theory, using the surface parameters experimentally obtained. Particularly, this theory is unable to explain their pH-dependent stability behavior caused by the small charge at the edge sites. Based on these results, a literature review of DLVO stability prediction of clay colloids was performed. It confirmed that this theory is not capable of taking into account the double contribution to the total surface charge and, at the same time, pointed out the main uncertainties related to the appropriate use of the input parameters for the calculation as, for example, the Hamaker constant or the surface potential. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. Photodoping of Colloidal Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Alicia W.

    This dissertation addresses various aspects of photodoping colloidal nanocrystals. Photodoped ZnO nanocrystals were found to be versatile tuneable reducers using both quantum confinement and band-gap engineering with Mg2+ doping to change the conduction band potential. Using photoluminescence of the visible trap and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy of Mg2+ and Mn2+ co-doped ZnO, Mg2+ was shown to change the potential of both the conduction and valence band in a ratio of 0.68:0.32. The hole scavenging reaction using ethanol as the hole scavenger was investigated using continuous-wave and time resolved photoluminescence of the visible trap state of ZnO. The reaction was found to occur between the valence band hole and with a rate of > 15 ps-1. Quenching of the ZnO visible trap luminescence upon photodoping was shown to be due to trap/electron Auger process while the concomitant enhancement of the UV band-gap emission was hypothesized to be due to a reduction in non-radiative processes due to extra electrons in the conduction-band. The trap/electron Auger process in ZnO nanocrystals was further characterized by a size-dependence and shown to scale with R2. Another previously unknown Auger size dependence was measured in CdSe/ZnS trions and shown to scale with R4.3.

  13. Consolidation of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Wei-Heng; Kim, Seong Il; Shih, Wan Y.; Aksay, I.A. ); Schilling, C.H. Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA )

    1990-08-01

    A key step in the processing of ceramics is the consolidation of powders into engineered shapes. Colloidal processing uses solvents (usually water) and dispersants to break up powder agglomerates in suspension and thereby reduce the pore size in a consolidated compact. However, agglomeration and particle rearrangement leading to pore enlargement can still occur during drying. Therefore, it is beneficial to consolidate the compact as densely as possible during the suspension stage. The consolidation techniques of pressure filtration and centrifugation were studied and the results are reported in this paper. In particular, the steady-state pressure- density relationship was studied, and information was obtained regarding the consolidation process, the microstructure, and the average density profile of consolidated cakes. Recently, we performed Monte Carlo simulations on a cluster-cluster aggregation model with restructuring, and found the exponential relationship between pressure and density is indeed the result of the breaking up of the fractal structural units. Furthermore, we calculated density profiles from the bottom to the top of the consolidated cakes by solving the local static force balance equation in the continuum particulate network. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Synthesis of positively charged calcium hydroxyapatite nano-crystals and their adsorption behavior of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Kazuhiko; Oda, Shohei; Fukusumi, Masao; Morisada, Yoshiaki

    2009-10-01

    Positively charged Hap nano-crystals were prepared by using beta-alanine and clarified the adsorption affinity of these surface amide functionalized Hap nano-crystals to proteins. Colloidal surface amide functionalized Hap nano-crystals were prepared by wet method in the presence of various amounts of beta-alanine by changing molar ratio of beta-alanine/Ca (beta/Ca ratio) in the solution. The rod-like nano-crystals were lengthened with addition of beta-alanine though their width did not vary; carboxyl groups of beta-alanine are strongly coordinated to Ca2+ ions exposed on ac and/or bc faces to inhibit particle growth to a- and/or b-axis directions and enhance the particle growth along to the c-axis. No difference can be recognized on the crystal structure among the synthesized Hap nano-crystals by XRD measurements. However, the large difference was recognized by TG-DTA and FTIR measurements. Those measurements revealed that beta-alanine is incorporated on the Hap nano-crystal surface up to the beta/Ca ratio of 1.0, though they are absent in the nano-crystals synthesized at beta/Ca ratio > or = 2.0. The zeta potential (zp) of beta-alanine-Hap nano-crystals prepared at beta/Ca = 0.4 and 1.0 of those incorporating beta-alanine exhibited positive charge at pH < or = 5.9. The saturated amounts of adsorbed BSA for the positively charged beta-alanine-Hap nano-crystals were increased 2.3-2.4-fold by their electrostatic attraction force between positively charged beta-alanine-Hap nano-crystals and negatively charged BSA molecules. We were able to control the adsorption affinity of Hap nano-crystal by changing their surface charge.

  15. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Alexander H.; Thon, Susanna M.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Zhitomirsky, David; Debnath, Ratan; Levina, Larissa; Rollny, Lisa R.; Carey, Graham H.; Fischer, Armin; Kemp, Kyle W.; Kramer, Illan J.; Ning, Zhijun; Labelle, André J.; Chou, Kang Wei; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, Edward H.

    2012-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electron-hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device.

  16. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids.

    PubMed

    Ip, Alexander H; Thon, Susanna M; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Zhitomirsky, David; Debnath, Ratan; Levina, Larissa; Rollny, Lisa R; Carey, Graham H; Fischer, Armin; Kemp, Kyle W; Kramer, Illan J; Ning, Zhijun; Labelle, André J; Chou, Kang Wei; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electron-hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device.

  17. Three-Rod Linear Ion Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, Gary R.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1993-01-01

    Three-parallel-rod electrode structures proposed for use in linear ion traps and possibly for electrostatic levitation of macroscopic particles. Provides wider viewing angle because they confine ions in regions outside rod-electrode structures.

  18. What operators say about fiberglass sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1984-11-01

    This article presents the results of an informal survey of oil producing companies and one design engineering firm in the Permian Basin about the use and performance of fiberglass sucker rods in sucker rod pumps.

  19. Simple method for the synthesis of inverse patchy colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oostrum, P. D. J.; Hejazifar, M.; Niedermayer, C.; Reimhult, E.

    2015-06-01

    Inverse patchy colloids (IPC's) have recently been introduced as a conceptually simple model to study the phase-behavior of heterogeneously charged units. This class of patchy particles is referred to as inverse to highlight that the patches repel each other in contrast to the attractive interactions of conventional patches. IPCs demonstrate a complex interplay between attractions and repulsions that depend on their patch size and charge, their relative orientations as well as on charge of the substrate below; the resulting wide array of different types of aggregates that can be formed motivates their fabrication and use as model system. We present a novel method that does not rely on clean-room facilities and that is easily scalable to modify the surface of colloidal particles to create two polar regions with the opposite charge with respect to that of the equatorial region. The patch size is characterized by electron microscopy and fluorescently labeled to facilitate using confocal microscopy to study their phase behavior. We show that the pH can be used to tune the charges of the IPCs thus offering a tool to steer the self assembly.

  20. Simple method for the synthesis of inverse patchy colloids.

    PubMed

    van Oostrum, P D J; Hejazifar, M; Niedermayer, C; Reimhult, E

    2015-06-17

    Inverse patchy colloids (IPC's) have recently been introduced as a conceptually simple model to study the phase-behavior of heterogeneously charged units. This class of patchy particles is referred to as inverse to highlight that the patches repel each other in contrast to the attractive interactions of conventional patches. IPCs demonstrate a complex interplay between attractions and repulsions that depend on their patch size and charge, their relative orientations as well as on charge of the substrate below; the resulting wide array of different types of aggregates that can be formed motivates their fabrication and use as model system. We present a novel method that does not rely on clean-room facilities and that is easily scalable to modify the surface of colloidal particles to create two polar regions with the opposite charge with respect to that of the equatorial region. The patch size is characterized by electron microscopy and fluorescently labeled to facilitate using confocal microscopy to study their phase behavior. We show that the pH can be used to tune the charges of the IPCs thus offering a tool to steer the self assembly.

  1. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  2. Fibrinogen monolayer characterization by colloid deposition.

    PubMed

    Nattich-Rak, Małgorzata; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Wasilewska, Monika; Sadowska, Marta

    2013-09-24

    Colloid particle deposition was applied to characterize bovine and human fibrinogen (Fb) monolayers on mica produced by controlled adsorption under diffusion transport at pH 3.5. The surface concentration of Fb was determined by AFM enumeration of single molecules adsorbed over the substrate surface. The electrokinetic properties of Fb monolayers for various ionic strength were studied using the in situ streaming potential measurements. It was shown that Fb adsorbs irreversibly on mica for a broad range of ionic strength of 4 × 10(-4) to 0.15 M, NaCl. The overcharging of initially negative mica surface occurred for fibrinogen surface concentrations higher than 1400 μm(-2). The orientation of fibrinogen molecules in the monolayers was evaluated by the colloid deposition method involving negatively charged polystyrene latex microspheres, 820 nm in diameter. An anomalous deposition of negative latex particles on substrates exhibiting a negative zeta potential was observed, which contradicts the mean-field DLVO predictions. Measurable deposition was observed even at low ionic strength where the minimum approach distance of latex particles to the interface exceeds 70 nm (for 6 × 10(-4) M NaCl). This confirms that, at this pH, fibrinogen molecules adsorb end-on on mica assuming extended conformations with the positive charge located mostly in the end part of the αA chains. This agrees with previous experimental and theoretical results discussed in the literature (Santore, M. M.; Wertz Ch. F. Protein spreading kinetics at liquid-solid interfaces via an adsorption probe method. Langmuir 2005, 21, 10172-10178 (experimental); Adamczyk, Z.; Barbasz, J.; Cieśla, M.; Mechanisms of fibrinogen adsorption at solid substrates. Langmuir, 2011, 25, 6868-6878 (theoretical)). This unusual latex deposition on Fb monolayers was quantitatively interpreted in terms of the model developed in ref 55 (Jin, X.; Wang, N. H. L.; Tarjus, G.; Talbot, J. Irreversible adsorption on nonuniform

  3. Who makes API sucker rods and couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    This guide identifies manufacturers qualified to produce API sucker rods and related equipment, lists chemical and mechanical properties of the various types of rods and provides dimensional characteristics. In addition, similar information is given for non-API rods such as fiberglass and aluminum.

  4. Inverted Control Rod Lock-In Device

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, W. G.; Bost, G. E.

    1962-12-01

    A mechanism which prevents control rods from dropping out of the reactor core in the event the vessel in which the reactor is mounted should capsize is described. The mechanism includes a pivoted toothed armature which engages the threaded control rod lead screw and prevents removal of the rod whenever the armature is not attracted by the provided electromagnetic means. (AEC)

  5. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  6. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  7. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  8. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  9. 21 CFR 876.4270 - Colostomy rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colostomy rod. 876.4270 Section 876.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4270 Colostomy rod. (a) Identification. A colostomy rod...

  10. On the Equivalence of Trapped Colloids, Pinned Vortices, and Spin Ice

    SciTech Connect

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-04-23

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. The frustration of the two models, one describing colloids and vortices, the other describing spin ice, differs essentially. However, their effective energetics is made identical by the contribution of an emergent field associated to a topological charge. This equivalence extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, yet breaks down in lattices of mixed coordination, because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices.

  11. Photocatalytic Applications of Colloidal Heterostructured Nanocrystals: What's Next?

    PubMed

    Razgoniaeva, Natalia; Moroz, Pavel; Lambright, Scott; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Recent progress in the colloidal synthesis of inorganic nanocrystals has led to the realization of complex, multidomain nanoparticle morphologies that give rise to advanced optoelectronic properties. Such nanocomposites are particularly appealing for photocatalytic applications where tunable absorption, extensive charge separation, and large surface-to-volume ratios are important. To date, heterostructured nanocrystals featuring a metal catalyst and a semiconductor "chromophore" component have shown compelling efficiencies in photoreduction reactions, including sacrificial hydrogen production. Time-resolved optical studies have attributed their success to a near-complete separation of photoinduced charges across dissimilar nanoparticle domains. The spectroscopy approach has also identified the key performance-limiting factors of nanocrystal catalysts that arise from inefficient extraction of photoinduced charges to catalytic sites. Along these lines, the main scope of present-day efforts targets the improvement of interstitial charge transfer pathways across the chromophore-catalyst assembly through the design of high-quality stoichiometric interfaces.

  12. PLGA-chitosan/PLGA-alginate Nanoparticle Blends as Biodegradable Colloidal Gels for Seeding Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Jamal, Syed; Detamore, Michael S.; Berkland, Cory

    2010-01-01

    The natural polymers chitosan and alginate represent an attractive material choice for biodegradable inplants. These were used as coating materials to make positively and negatively charged PLGA nanoparticles, respectively. After blending at total solids concentration >10% wt/vol, these oppositely charged nanoparticles yielded a cohesive colloidal gel. Electrostatic forces between oppositely charged nanoparticles produced a stable 3-D porous network that may be extruded or molded to the desired shape. This high concentration colloidal system demonstrated shear-thinning behavior due to the disruption of interparticle interactions. Once the external force was removed, the cohesive property of the colloidal gel was recovered. Scanning electron micrographs of dried colloidal networks revealed an organized, 3-D microporous structure. Rheological studies were employed to probe the differences in plasticity and shear sensitivity of colloidal gels. Viability tests of hUCMSCs seeded on the colloidal gels also demonstrated the negligible cytotoxicity of the materials. All the results indicated the potential application of the biodegradable colloidal gels as an injectable scaffold in tissue engineering and drug release. PMID:21254383

  13. Preparation of hydroxyapatite rod-like crystals by protein precursor method

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yingchao; Li Shipu . E-mail: zlhyc@yahoo.com.cn; Wang Xinyu; Jia Li; He Jianhua

    2007-06-05

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) rod-like crystals were successfully prepared by thermolysis of bovine serum albumin (BSA)/calcium-phosphate (CaP) colloidal precursors. The precursors were obtained by precipitation method from Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Ca(OH){sub 2}, in which BSA was added as regulation additive and ultrasound irradiation was utilized as assistant technology. The properties of the precursors, such as size distribution, morphology, thermodynamic changes, were determined by DLS, SPM and TGA-DTA. The characterization results from DLS, SPM, TG-DTA, XRD and SEM indicated that BSA interacted with CaP particles and formed about 7-130 nm BSA/CaP hybrid colloidal particles between 2 and 4 g/L of BSA concentration. With the increasing of sintering temperature, BSA disintegrated and burned out, and rod-like HAP crystals formed at about 600 deg. C. With the increasing of BSA concentration, the phase composition of products did not change and the HAP crystals became more uniform and smaller. The ratio of length to width ranged from 7.6 to 12 at 4 g/L BSA concentration. This method provides for a controllable bottom-up fabrication of HAP rod-like crystals.

  14. Injectable PLGA based Colloidal Gels for Zero-order Dexamethasone Release in Cranial Defects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Wang, Jinxi; Lu, Qinghua; Detamore, Michael S.; Berkland, Cory

    2010-01-01

    Bone fillers have emerged as an alternative to the invasive surgery often required to repair skeletal defects. Achieving controlled release from these materials is desired for accelerating healing. Here, oppositely-charged Poly (d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were used to create a cohesive colloidal gel as an injectable drug-loaded filler to promote healing in bone defects. The colloid self-assembled through electrostatic forces resulting in a stable 3-D network that may be extruded or molded to the desired shape. The colloidal gel demonstrated shear-thinning behavior due to the disruption of interparticle interactions as the applied shear force was increased. Once the external force was removed, the cohesive property of the colloidal gel was recovered. Similar reversibility and shear-thinning behavior were also observed in colloidal gels loaded with dexamethasone. Near zero-order dexamethasone release was observed over two months when the drug was encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles and simply blending the drug with the colloidal gel showed similar kinetics for one month. Surgical placement was facilitated by the pseudoplastic material properties and in vivo observations demonstrated that the PLGA colloidal gels stimulated osteoconductive bone formation in rat cranial bone defects. PMID:20303585

  15. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  16. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-a; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:26279317

  17. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  18. Phase behavior of mixtures of oppositely charged protein nanoparticles at asymmetric charge ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maarten Biesheuvel, P.; Lindhoud, Saskia; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; de Vries, Renko

    2006-04-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for the phase behavior of mixtures of oppositely charged globular protein molecules in aqueous solutions containing monovalent salt. These colloidal mixtures are interesting model systems, on the one hand for electrolyte solutions (“colloidal ionic liquids”), and on the other for mixtures of oppositely charged (bio)macromolecules, colloids, micelles, etc., with the range of the electrostatic interactions (Debye length) easily tunable from much smaller to much larger than the particle size, simply by adding different amounts of monovalent salt. In this paper we investigate the phase behavior of such mixtures in the case that equally sized colloids have a large difference in charge magnitude. This is possible at any mixing ratio because small ions compensate any colloidal charge asymmetry. Our experimental system is based on lysozyme, a positively charged “hard” globular protein molecule, and succinylated lysozyme, a chemical modification of lysozyme which is negatively charged. By changing the solution pH we can adjust the ratio of charge between the two molecules. To describe phase separation into a dilute phase and a dense “complex” phase, a thermodynamic model is set up in which we combine the Carnahan-Starling-van der Waals equation of state with a heterogeneous Poisson-Boltzmann cell model and include the possibility that protein molecules adjust their charge when they move from one phase to the other (charge regulation). The theory uses the nonelectrostatic attraction strength as the only adjustable parameter and reasonably well reproduces the data in that complexation is only possible at intermediate pH , not too asymmetric mixing ratios, and low enough ionic strength and temperature.

  19. Entropy favours open colloidal lattices.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoming; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Burgeoning experimental and simulation activity seeks to understand the existence of self-assembled colloidal structures that are not close-packed. Here we describe an analytical theory based on lattice dynamics and supported by experiments that reveals the fundamental role entropy can play in stabilizing open lattices. The entropy we consider is associated with the rotational and vibrational modes unique to colloids interacting through extended attractive patches. The theory makes predictions of the implied temperature, pressure and patch-size dependence of the phase diagram of open and close-packed structures. More generally, it provides guidance for the conditions at which targeted patchy colloidal assemblies in two and three dimensions are stable, thus overcoming the difficulty in exploring by experiment or simulation the full range of conceivable parameters.

  20. Guide for rotating sucker rods

    SciTech Connect

    Harrel, R.D.

    1986-11-04

    This patent describes an improved guide for use in a string of sucker rods rotated in a tubing string in a borehole, the sucker rods having threaded male ends, the guide comprising: an elongated upright solid cylindrical coupling body of external diameter less than the internal diameter of tubing in which it is to be used; a pair of spaced apart axle holders positioned in three recess; an axle received in each recess in the coupling body, the axis of each axle being parallel and spaced from the body longitudinal axis; a roller rotatably received on each axle, the periphery of each roller extending exteriorly of the external cylindrical surface of the coupling body; and means to retain each of the holders in the coupling body recess.

  1. Exploiting rod technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-01

    ROD development was proceeding apace until recent budgetary decisions caused funding support for ROD development to be drastically reduced. The funding which was originally provided by DARPA and the Balanced Technology Initiative (BTI) Office has been cut back to zero from $800K. To determine the aeroballistic coefficients of a candidate dart, ARDEC is currently supporting development out of its own 6.2 funds at about $100K. ARDEC has made slow progress toward achieving this end because of failures in the original dart during testing. It appears that the next dart design to be tested will diverge from the original concept visualized by DARPA and Science and Technology Associates (STA). STA, the design engineer, takes exception to these changes on the basis of inappropriate test conditions and insufficient testing. At this time, the full resolution of this issue will be difficult because of the current management structure, which separates the developer (ARDEC) from the designer (STA).

  2. The rod circuit in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Vaney, D I; Young, H M; Gynther, I C

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian retinae have a well-defined neuronal pathway that serves rod vision. In rabbit retina, the different populations of interneurons in the rod pathway can be selectively labeled, either separately or in combination. The rod bipolar cells show protein kinase C immunoreactivity; the rod (AII) amacrine cells can be distinguished in nuclear-yellow labeled retina; the rod reciprocal (S1 & S2) amacrine cells accumulate serotonin; and the dopaminergic amacrine cells show tyrosine-hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Furthermore, intracellular dye injection of the microscopically identified interneurons enables whole-population and single-cell studies to be combined in the same tissue. Using this approach, we have been able to analyze systematically the neuronal architecture of the rod circuit across the rabbit retina and compare its organization with that of the rod circuit in central cat retina. In rabbit retina, the rod interneurons are not organized in a uniform neuronal module that is simply scaled up from central to peripheral retina. Moreover, peripheral fields in superior and inferior retina that have equivalent densities of each neuronal type show markedly different rod bipolar to AII amacrine convergence ratios, with the result that many more rod photoreceptors converge on an AII amacrine cell in superior retina. In rabbit retina, much of the convergence in the rod circuit occurs in the outer retina whereas, in central cat retina, it is more evenly distributed between the inner and outer retina.

  3. Tests pinpoint sucker-rod failures

    SciTech Connect

    Elshawesh, F.; Elhoud, A.; Elagdel, E.

    1997-05-26

    A detailed metallurgical examination of a 7/8-inch and a 1-inch sucker rod revealed corrosion fatigue had caused their failure. The 7 to 8-inch rod had failed after a few months of service while the 1-inch rod failed after 1 year. Both rods had been used in a sweet-oil environment. Both rods failed by corrosion fatigue because of repeated loads during operations. Pitting because of the presence of chloride ions and carbon dioxide was initiated on the rod surface, which in turn acted as a crack origin from which the fatigue crack initiated and propagated during operations. The pitting was on the external surface. These pits were large and penetrated through the rod cross-section. Fatigue cracking is initiated at the bottom of the pit where high stress concentration is expected and propagated because the rods were subjected to the alternating stresses during operation. The extent of the fatigue crack varied in the two examined rods because of the difference in the rod heat treatment and microstructure. The paper discusses fatigue failure, the visual examination, macroscopic and microscopic examinations, rod properties, and future operations.

  4. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    DOEpatents

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  5. Photophysics of carbon-60 colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Andrew F.

    The goal of this dissertation is to study the photophysics of suspensions of colloidal C60 particles to determine if their nonlinear optical (NLO) response is superior in any way to benchmark NLO materials such as molecular solutions of C60 and carbon black suspensions (CBS). C60 in molecular form is known to exhibit strong reverse saturable absorption (RSA) and it is posited that colloidal particles composed of many C60 molecules would maintain some degree of RSA behavior upon association, although some quenching is to be expected. CBS is known to have an NLO response that is dominated by nonlinear scattering resulting from a phase change due to heating of the carbon black particles by absorbed energy. Colloidal C 60 particles that are many nanometers in diameter are similar to CBS, so it is posited that they would also have a nonlinear scattering mechanism contributing to their NLO response. Three samples of C60 colloids are characterized by several techniques, along with two carbon black suspensions and one molecular solution of C60. Transmission electron microscopy is used to determine morphology. Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to determine the absorption spectrum and the relaxation kinetics of the first excited singlet state. Nanosecond laser flash photolysis is used to determine the absorption spectrum and the relaxation kinetics of the first excited triplet state. Z-scan is used to determine triplet-triplet absorption cross-sections. An experiment is performed to determine the percentage of the input energy that is transmitted, scattered, or absorbed by each sample. Computer modeling is performed to compare the experimental results to theory. Results show that all materials that exhibit nonlinear scattering have a constant extinction coefficient in the nonlinear regime, implying a characteristic size for the scattering centers that is independent of input energy. Quenching processes in C60 colloids are found to be morphology dependent, with more

  6. Two studies of colloidal interactions: electric polarizability and protein crystallization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fraden, Seth; Hu, Yue

    2001-08-06

    (I)Electric polarizability. During this grant period, the focus was on five topics concerning electric field effects on colloids. The first topic focuses on electric interactions between charged colloids in the absence of external fields, and the remaining four deal with colloids in the presence of external fields. The topics are (1) calculation of the effect of confinement on the pair-potential between like-charged colloids, (2) experimental determination of the interparticle potential under the conditions of dielectric polarization, (3) measurement of the evolution of structure of ER fluids, (4) synthesis of novel colloids designed for ER studies, and (5) computer modeling of polarization of surface charge. (II) Protein crystallization. Studies of the phase behavior of mixtures of proteins and polymers were initiated. The motivation was to test recent theories that suggested that optimal conditions for protein crystallization could be obtained using such mixtures. Combined light scattering measurements of the virial coefficients and determination of the phase diagram of protein/polymer mixtures revealed that the theoretical picture needs to be substantially modified.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Supramolecular Colloids.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Neus; De Feijter, Isja; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-01-01

    Control over colloidal assembly is of utmost importance for the development of functional colloidal materials with tailored structural and mechanical properties for applications in photonics, drug delivery and coating technology. Here we present a new family of colloidal building blocks, coined supramolecular colloids, whose self-assembly is controlled through surface-functionalization with a benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derived supramolecular moiety. Such BTAs interact via directional, strong, yet reversible hydrogen-bonds with other identical BTAs. Herein, a protocol is presented that describes how to couple these BTAs to colloids and how to quantify the number of coupling sites, which determines the multivalency of the supramolecular colloids. Light scattering measurements show that the refractive index of the colloids is almost matched with that of the solvent, which strongly reduces the van der Waals forces between the colloids. Before photo-activation, the colloids remain well dispersed, as the BTAs are equipped with a photo-labile group that blocks the formation of hydrogen-bonds. Controlled deprotection with UV-light activates the short-range hydrogen-bonds between the BTAs, which triggers the colloidal self-assembly. The evolution from the dispersed state to the clustered state is monitored by confocal microscopy. These results are further quantified by image analysis with simple routines using ImageJ and Matlab. This merger of supramolecular chemistry and colloidal science offers a direct route towards light- and thermo-responsive colloidal assembly encoded in the surface-grafted monolayer. PMID:27168201

  8. Colloids and Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range

  9. Calcium spikes in toad rods.

    PubMed Central

    Fain, G L; Gerschenfeld, H M; Quandt, F N

    1980-01-01

    1. When the retina of the toad, Bufo marinus, was superfused with 6-12 mM-tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), intracellular recordings from rods showed large, depolarizing regenerative potentials. For brief exposures to TEA, these potentials occurred during the recovery phase of the light responses; whereas, during longer exposures, they were spontaneous in darkness but suppressed during illumination. Similar regenerative potentials were observed during perfusion with 3-10 mM-4-aminopyridine and 1-2 mM-BaCl2. 2. The amplitude of the regenerative potentials depended upon the extracellular Ca concentration ([Ca2+]o). Lowering [Ca2+]o decreased their amplitude and in zero [Ca2+]o they were reversibly abolished. Increasing [Ca2+]o by 1.5-2 times produced a small hyperpolarization of membrane potential and a large augmentation in regenerative response amplitude. However, larger increases in [Ca2+]o produced large membrane hyperpolarizations and reversibly suppressed the regenerative responses. 3. High concentrations of Sr2+ in TEA also enhanced regenerative activity but did not affect the rod resting membrane potential. The amplitude of regenerative potentials increased continuously with increasing [Sr2+]o, and in 28 mM-Sr2+ the rods generated 60-70 mV action potentials, even in the absence of extracellular Na+. 4. The regenerative potentials were blocked by 25 microM-Cd2+, 50-100 microM-Co2+, 5mM-Mg2+, and 100 microM-D-600. They were unaffected by 2 microM-TTX or 2-5 mM-Na aspartate. 5. In Ringer containing 12 mM-TEA, large anode break responses could be recorded from rods at the termination of inward current pulses. These anode break responses were also suppressed by Co2+ and unaffected by TTX or Na aspartate. 6. We conclude that the membrane of toad rods contains a conductance normally selective for Ca2+, which is activated by depolarization. In normal Ringer, the inward current through this conductance produces little effect, since it is balanced by a large outward

  10. Designing Whey Protein-Polysaccharide Particles for Colloidal Stability.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Ty; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh; Foegeding, E Allen

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between whey proteins and polysaccharides, in particular the formation of food-grade soluble complexes, are of interest because of potential functional and health benefits. A specific application that has not received much attention is the use of complexes for enhanced colloidal stability of protein sols, such as protein-containing beverages. In beverages, the primary goal is the formation of complexes that remain dispersed after thermal processing and extended storage. This review highlights recent progress in the area of forming whey protein-polysaccharide soluble complexes that would be appropriate for beverage applications. Research in this area indicates that soluble complexes can be formed and stabilized that are reasonably small in size and possess a large surface charge that would predict colloidal stability. Selection of specific proteins and polysaccharides can be tailored to desired conditions. The principal challenges involve overcoming restrictions on protein concentration and ensuring that protein remains bioavailable.

  11. Colloidal quantum dot solids for solution-processed solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mingjian; Liu, Mengxia; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-03-01

    Solution-processed photovoltaic technologies represent a promising way to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of solar energy harvesting. Among these, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot photovoltaics have the advantage of a spectrally tuneable infrared bandgap, which enables use in multi-junction cells, as well as the benefit of generating and harvesting multiple charge carrier pairs per absorbed photon. Here we review recent progress in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, focusing on three fronts. First, we examine strategies to manage the abundant surfaces of quantum dots, strategies that have led to progress in the removal of electronic trap states. Second, we consider new device architectures that have improved device performance to certified efficiencies of 10.6%. Third, we focus on progress in solution-phase chemical processing, such as spray-coating and centrifugal casting, which has led to the demonstration of manufacturing-ready process technologies.

  12. Magnetic assembly of colloidal superstructures with multipole symmetry.

    PubMed

    Erb, Randall M; Son, Hui S; Samanta, Bappaditya; Rotello, Vincent M; Yellen, Benjamin B

    2009-02-19

    The assembly of complex structures out of simple colloidal building blocks is of practical interest for building materials with unique optical properties (for example photonic crystals and DNA biosensors) and is of fundamental importance in improving our understanding of self-assembly processes occurring on molecular to macroscopic length scales. Here we demonstrate a self-assembly principle that is capable of organizing a diverse set of colloidal particles into highly reproducible, rotationally symmetric arrangements. The structures are assembled using the magnetostatic interaction between effectively diamagnetic and paramagnetic particles within a magnetized ferrofluid. The resulting multipolar geometries resemble electrostatic charge configurations such as axial quadrupoles ('Saturn rings'), axial octupoles ('flowers'), linear quadrupoles (poles) and mixed multipole arrangements ('two tone'), which represent just a few examples of the type of structure that can be built using this technique.

  13. Magnetic assembly of colloidal superstructures with multipole symmetry.

    PubMed

    Erb, Randall M; Son, Hui S; Samanta, Bappaditya; Rotello, Vincent M; Yellen, Benjamin B

    2009-02-19

    The assembly of complex structures out of simple colloidal building blocks is of practical interest for building materials with unique optical properties (for example photonic crystals and DNA biosensors) and is of fundamental importance in improving our understanding of self-assembly processes occurring on molecular to macroscopic length scales. Here we demonstrate a self-assembly principle that is capable of organizing a diverse set of colloidal particles into highly reproducible, rotationally symmetric arrangements. The structures are assembled using the magnetostatic interaction between effectively diamagnetic and paramagnetic particles within a magnetized ferrofluid. The resulting multipolar geometries resemble electrostatic charge configurations such as axial quadrupoles ('Saturn rings'), axial octupoles ('flowers'), linear quadrupoles (poles) and mixed multipole arrangements ('two tone'), which represent just a few examples of the type of structure that can be built using this technique. PMID:19225522

  14. Directed Assembly of Soft Colloids through Rapid Solvent Exchange.

    PubMed

    Nikoubashman, Arash; Lee, Victoria E; Sosa, Chris; Prud'homme, Robert K; Priestley, Rodney D; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2016-01-26

    We studied the directed assembly of soft nanoparticles through rapid micromixing of polymers in solution with a nonsolvent. Both experiments and computer simulations were performed to elucidate the underlying physics and to investigate the role of various process parameters. In particular, we discovered that no external stabilizing agents or charged end groups are required to keep the colloids separated from each other when water is used as the nonsolvent. Furthermore, the size of the nanoparticles can be reliably tuned through the mixing rate and the ratio between polymer solution and nonsolvent. Our results demonstrate that this mechanism is highly promising for the mass fabrication of uniformly sized colloidal particles, using a wide variety of polymeric feed materials.

  15. Temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient of ionic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehnem, A. L.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.; Aquino, R.; Campos, A. F. C.; Tourinho, F. A.; Depeyrot, J.

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient ST(T ) in electrostatically charged magnetic colloids is investigated. Two different ferrofluids, with different particles' mean dimensions, are studied. In both cases we obtain a thermophilic behavior of the Soret effect. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient is described assuming that the nanoparticles migrate along the ionic thermoelectric field created by the thermal gradient. A model based on the contributions from the thermoelectrophoresis and variation of the double-layer energy, without fitting parameters, is used to describe the experimental results of the colloid with the bigger particles. To do so, independent measurements of the ζ potential, mass diffusion coefficient, and Seebeck coefficient are performed. The agreement of the theory and the experimental results is rather good. In the case of the ferrofluid with smaller particles, it is not possible to get experimentally reliable values of the ζ potential and the model described is used to evaluate this parameter and its temperature dependence.

  16. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Vanessa; Bulović, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs) have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI). We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs) in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs - optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection - that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt). We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs. PMID:22110863

  17. Phase behavior and unusual dynamics of stimuli-responsive microgel colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, B. V. R.

    2013-02-01

    Monodisperse poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel particles in aqueous medium exhibit structural ordering similar to that observed in atomic systems. Colloidal crystals of these microgel particles exhibit series of phase transitions with increase in temperature due to reduction in the particle size and variation in the interparticle interactions. Unlike hard-sphere or charged colloidal particles, microgel particles are heterogeneous in particle density with dense solvent penetrable polymer core and brush-like polymer chains forming a shell. In this talk I will present static/dynamic light scattering, confocal microscopy and UV-Visible spectroscopy results on dense microgel suspensions exhibiting unusual dynamics across melting, tunabilty of Bragg diffraction, particle distribution and nature of interparticle interaction upon osmotic compression. From these results I conclude that PNIPAM microgel sphere are not only soft but also compressible and differ from other hard-sphere and charged colloidal systems in significant way in their structure, dynamics and phase behaviour.

  18. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for studying the groundwater colloids for the Yucca Mountain Project in conjunction with the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. Colloidal particle size distributions and total particle concentration in groundwater samples are quantified and characterized. Colloid materials from cavity waters collected near underground nuclear explosion sites by HRMP field sampling personnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were quantified. Selected colloid samples were further characterized by electron microscope to evaluate the colloid shapes, elemental compositions, and mineral phases. The authors have evaluated the colloid size and concentration in the natural groundwater sample that was collected from the ER-20-5 well and stored in a 50-gallon (about 200-liter) barrel for several months. This groundwater sample was studied because HRMP personnel have identified trace levels of radionuclides in the water sample. Colloid results show that even though the water sample had filtered through a series of Millipore filters, high-colloid concentrations were identified in all unfiltered and filtered samples. They had studied the samples that were diluted with distilled water and found that diluted samples contained more colloids than the undiluted ones. These results imply that colloids are probably not stable during the storage conditions. Furthermore, results demonstrate that undesired colloids have been introduced into the samples during the storage, filtration, and dilution processes. They have evaluated possible sources of colloid contamination associated with sample collection, filtrating, storage, and analyses of natural groundwaters. The effects of container types and sample storage time on colloid size distribution and total concentration were studied to evaluate colloid stability by using J13 groundwater. The data suggests that groundwater samples

  19. Colloidal Assembly via Shape Complementarity

    SciTech Connect

    Macfarlane, Robert John; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2010-07-15

    A simple method for selectively assembling colloidal particles with depletion forces is achieved using the concept of shape complementarity, reminiscent of Fischer's “lock and key” enzyme model. A spherical particle can fit inside a second particle with an indentation of similar size and shape, allowing access to a large variety of assembled structures.

  20. Sonochemical synthesis of iron colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.; Fang, M.; Hyeon, T.

    1996-11-27

    We present here a new method for the preparation of stable ferromagnetic colloids of iron using high-intensity ultrasound to sonochemically decompose volatile organometallic compounds. These colloids have narrow size distributions centered at a few nanometers and are found to be superparamagnetic. In conclusion, a simple synthetic method has been discovered to produce nanosized iron colloid using high-intensity ultrasound. Nanometer iron particles dispersed in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) matrix or stabilized by adsorption of oleic acid have been synthesized by sonochemical decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5}. Transmission electron micrographs show that the iron particles have a relatively narrow range in size from 3 to 8 nm for polyvinylpyrrolidone, while oleic acid gives an even more uniform distribution at 8 nm. magnetic measurements revealed that these nanometer iron particles are superparamagnetic with a saturation magnetization of 101 emu/g (Fe) at 290 K. This work is easily extended to colloids of other metals and to alloys of two or more metals, simply by using multiple volatile precursors. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-09-01

    Drying suspensions often leave behind complex patterns of particulates, as might be seen in the coffee stains on a table. Here, we consider the dynamics of periodic band or uniform solid film formation on a vertical plate suspended partially in a drying colloidal solution. Direct observations allow us to visualize the dynamics of band and film deposition, where both are made of multiple layers of close packed particles. We further see that there is a transition between banding and filming when the colloidal concentration is varied. A minimal theory of the liquid meniscus motion along the plate reveals the dynamics of the banding and its transition to the filming as a function of the ratio of deposition and evaporation rates. We also provide a complementary multiphase model of colloids dissolved in the liquid, which couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving meniscus to the fluid and particulate flows and the transition from a dilute suspension to a porous plug. This allows us to determine the concentration dependence of the bandwidth and the deposition rate. Together, our findings allow for the control of drying-induced patterning as a function of the colloidal concentration and evaporation rate.

  2. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  3. Physics of Colloids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, Dave; Weeks, Eric; Gasser, Urs; Dinsmore, Tony; Mawley, Suliana; Segre, Phil; Cipelletti, Lucia

    2000-01-01

    This talk will present recent results from ground-based research to support the "Physics of Colloids in Space" project which is scheduled to fly in the ISS approximately one year from now. In addition, results supporting future planned flights will be discussed.

  4. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  5. Colloid-Associated Phosphorus Transport in Heterogeneous Alluvial Gravel Aquifer Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafogler, M.; Pang, L.; McGill, E.; Baumann, T.; Close, M.

    2012-04-01

    Kaolinite the highest fractions of colloid associated phosphorous were observed, Goethite showed the lowest effect on phosphorous mobilization. By using CXTFIT parameters according to the velocity enhancement of the colloid-associated phosphorus transport were modeled. They showed that the velocity of colloids was 1.1 to 1.5 times higher than the conservative tracer. During the experiments the pH was around 7. Here, the surface charge of the sediments, Kaolinite, and E. coli are slightly negative while Goethite colloids are slightly positively charged. Therefore, the adsorption of phosphate to Goethite is high and the attachment efficiency of Goethite at the sediment is high. Together, this explains the observed low recovery rates of phosphate in the presence of colloids.

  6. Nonequilibrium interfaces in colloidal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bier, Markus; Arnold, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    The time-dependent structure, interfacial tension, and evaporation of an oversaturated colloid-rich (liquid) phase in contact with an undersaturated colloid-poor (vapor) phase of a colloidal dispersion is investigated theoretically during the early-stage relaxation, where the interface is relaxing towards a local equilibrium state while the bulk phases are still out of equilibrium. Since systems of this type exhibit a clear separation of colloidal and solvent relaxation time scales with typical times of interfacial tension measurements in between, they can be expected to be suitable for analogous experimental studies, too. The major finding is that, irrespective of how much the bulk phases differ from two-phase coexistence, the interfacial structure and the interfacial tension approach those at two-phase coexistence during the early-stage relaxation process. This is a surprising observation since it implies that the relaxation towards global equilibrium of the interface is not following but preceding that of the bulk phases. Scaling forms for the local chemical potential, the flux, and the dissipation rate exhibit qualitatively different leading order contributions depending on whether an equilibrium or a nonequilibrium system is considered. The degree of nonquilibrium between the bulk phases is found to not influence the qualitative relaxation behavior (i.e., the values of power-law exponents), but to determine the quantitative deviation of the observed quantities from their values at two-phase coexistence. Whereas the underlying dynamics differs between colloidal and molecular fluids, the behavior of quantities such as the interfacial tension approaching the equilibrium values during the early-stage relaxation process, during which nonequilibrium conditions of the bulk phases are not changed, can be expected to occur for both types of systems.

  7. Distorted colloidal arrays as designed template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ye; Zhou, Ziwei; Möhwald, Helmuth; Ai, Bin; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Ye, Shunsheng; Zhang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel type of colloidal template with broken symmetry was generated using commercial, inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE). With proper but simple treatment, the traditional symmetric non-close-packed colloidal template evolves into an elliptical profile with high uniformity. This unique feature can add flexibility to colloidal lithography and/or other lithography techniques using colloidal particles as building blocks to fabricate nano-/micro-structures with broken symmetry. Beyond that the novel colloidal template we developed possesses on-site tunability, i.e. the transformability from a symmetric into an asymmetric template. Sandwich-type particles with eccentric features were fabricated utilizing this tunable template. This distinguishing feature will provide the possibility to fabricate structures with unique asymmetric features using one set of colloidal template, providing flexibility and broad tunability to enable nano-/micro-structure fabrication with colloidal templates.

  8. Glass/Jamming Transition in Colloidal Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segre, Philip N.; Prasad, Vikram; Weitz, David A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have studied colloidal aggregation in a model colloid plus polymer system with short-range attractive interactions. By varying the colloid concentration and the strength of the attraction, we explored regions where the equilibrium phase is expected to consist of colloidal crystallites in coexistance with colloidal gas (i.e. monomers). This occurs for moderate values of the potential depth, U approximately equal to 2-5 kT. Crystallization was not always observed. Rather, over an extended sub-region two new metastable phases appear, one fluid-like and one solid-like. These were examined in detail with light scattering and microscopy techniques. Both phases consist of a near uniform distribution of small irregular shaped clusters of colloidal particles. The dynamical and structural characteristics of the ergodic-nonergodic transition between the two phases share much in common with the colloidal hard sphere glass transition.

  9. Photoluminenscence blinking dynamics of colloidal quantum dots in the presence of controlled external electron traps.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihua; Cotlet, Mircea

    2012-01-23

    The effect of the external charge trap on the photoluminescence blinking dynamics of individual colloidal quantum dots is investigated with a series of colloidal quantum dot-bridge-fullerene dimers with varying bridge lengths, where the fullerene moiety acts as a well-defined, well-positioned external charge trap. It is found that charge transfer followed by charge recombination is an important mechanism in determining the blinking behavior of quantum dots when the external trap is properly coupled with the excited state of the quantum dot, leading to a quasi-continuous distribution of 'on' states and an early fall-off from a power-law distribution for both 'on' and 'off' times associated with quantum dot photoluminescence blinking.

  10. Photoluminescence Blinking Dynamics of Colloidal Quantum Dots in the Presence of Controlled External Electron Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, M.; Xu, Z.

    2012-01-23

    The effect of the external charge trap on the photoluminescence blinking dynamics of individual colloidal quantum dots is investigated with a series of colloidal quantum dot-bridge-fullerene dimers with varying bridge lengths, where the fullerene moiety acts as a well-defined, well-positioned external charge trap. It is found that charge transfer followed by charge recombination is an important mechanism in determining the blinking behavior of quantum dots when the external trap is properly coupled with the excited state of the quantum dot, leading to a quasi-continuous distribution of 'on' states and an early fall-off from a power-law distribution for both 'on' and 'off' times associated with quantum dot photoluminescence blinking.

  11. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  12. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  13. Examination of cadmium safety rod thermal test specimens and failure mechanism evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Peacock, H.B.; Iyer, N.C.

    1992-01-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental cadmium safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. Companion reports describe the experiments and a structural evaluation (finite element analysis) of the safety rod. This report deals primarily with the examination of the test specimens, evaluation of possible failure mechanisms, and confirmatory separate effects experiments. It is concluded that the failures observed in the cadmium safety rod thermal tests which occurred at low temperature (T < 600{degrees}C) with slow thermal ramp rates (slow cladding strain rates) resulted from localized dissolution of the stainless steel cladding by the cadmium/aluminum solution and subsequent ductility exhaustion and rupture. The slow thermal ramp rate is believed to be the root cause for the failures; specifically, the slow ramp rate led to localized cladding shear deformation which ruptured the protective oxide film on the cladding inner surface and allowed dissolution to initiate. The test results and proposed failure mechanism support the conclusion that the rods would not fail below 500{degrees}C even at slow ramp rates. The safety rod thermal test specimen failures which occurred at high temperature (T > 800{degrees}C) with fast thermal ramp rates are concluded to be mechanical in nature without significant environmental degradation. Based on these tests, tasks were initiated to design and manufacture B{sub 4}C safety rods to replace the cadmium safety rods. The B{sub 4}C safety rods have been manufactured at this time and it is currently planned to charge them to the reactor in the near future. 60 refs.

  14. Automatic safety rod for reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-03-23

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  15. Spontaneous Patterning of Confined Granular Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanis, Jennifer; Harries, Daniel; Sackett, Dan L.; Losert, Wolfgang; Nossal, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Vertically vibrated rod-shaped granular materials confined to quasi-2D containers self-organize into distinct patterns. We find, consistent with theory and simulation, a density dependent isotropic-nematic transition. Along the walls, rods interact sterically to form a wetting layer. For high rod densities, complex patterns emerge as a result of competition between bulk and boundary alignment. A continuum elastic energy accounting for nematic distortion and local wall anchoring reproduces the structures seen experimentally.

  16. 78 FR 56217 - Steel Threaded Rod from India: Postponement of Preliminary Determination of Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... of Commerce DATES: Effective Date: September 12, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brooke...\\ See Steel Threaded Rod From India: Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigation, 78 FR 44532 (July... subsidies including grants for rental space, freight charges, airfare and advertising. The deadline...

  17. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  18. PREFACE: Colloidal and molecular electro-optics Colloidal and molecular electro-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palberg, Thomas; Löwen, Hartmut

    2010-12-01

    exciting trends and earn the interest of a good fraction of contemporary soft matter scientists. Note1 http://www.elopto2010.fb08.uni-mainz.de Note2 http://www.sfb-tr6.de References [1] Weinberger P 2008 John Kerr and his effects found in 1877 and 1878 Phil. Mag. Lett. 88 897-907 [2] Benoit H 1948 Calcul de l'écart quadratique moyen entre les extrémités de diverses chaînes moléculaires de type usuel J. Polym. Sci. 3 376-87 [3] Benoit H 1949 Sur un dispositif de mesure de l'effet Kerr par impulsions electriques isoles Comptes Rendus 228 1716-8 [4] Benoit H 1951 Contribution a l'etude de l'effet Kerr presente par les solutions diluees de macromolecules rigide Ann. Phys. 6 561-609 Colloidal and molecular electro-optics contents Electric dichroism transients of aqueous solutions of DNA J A Bertolotto, G M Corral, E M Farias de La Torre and G B Roston The role of effective charges in the electrophoresis of highly charged colloids Apratim Chatterji and Jürgen Horbach Nonlinear response of the electric birefringence of polyelectrolyte solutions J L Déjardin and J M Martinez Kerr constant of multi-subunit particles and semiflexible, wormlike chains J García de la Torre, F G Díaz Baños and H E Pérez Sánchez Self-assembling electroactive hydrogels for flexible display technology Scott L Jones, Kok Hou Wong, Pall Thordarson and François Ladouceur Electrooptical effects in colloid systems subjected to short pulses of strong electric field S A Klemeshev, M P Petrov, A A Trusov and A V Voitylov The effect of ionic strength on electrical properties of polyelectrolyte multilayers on colloidal particles V Milkova and Ts Radeva Charge transport and current in non-polar liquids Kristiaan Neyts, Filip Beunis, Filip Strubbe, Matthias Marescaux, Bart Verboven, Masoumeh Karvar and Alwin Verschueren Ionic concentration- and pH-dependent electrophoretic mobility as studied by single colloid electrophoresis I Semenov, P Papadopoulos, G Stober and F Kremer Effect of magnesium ions and

  19. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  20. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Pardini, John A.; Walker, David E.

    1987-01-01

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  1. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  2. Improved model for sucker rod pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, D.R.; Schmidt, Z.

    1981-01-01

    An improved model for predicting the behavior of sucker rod pumping installations is presented. This model incorporates the dynamics of the liquid columns as well as the sucker rod string through a system of partial differential equations. The system of equations is solved by a modified method of characteristics on a digital computer. The model predicts the polished rod and pump dynamometer cards and incorporates the effects of liquid inertia and viscosity. It is capable of simulating a wide variety of pumping conditions where liquid physical properties are important. The information predicted by the model is useful in the design and operation of sucker rod pumping installations. Refs.

  3. An improved model for sucker rod pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, D.R.; Schmidt, Z.

    1983-02-01

    An improved model for predicting the behavior of sucker rod pumping installations is presented. This model incorporates the dynamics of the liquid columns as well as the sucker rod string through a system of partial differential equations. This system of equations is solved by a modified method of characteristics on a digital computer. The model predicts the polished-rod and pump dynamometer cards and incorporates the effects of liquid inertia and viscosity. The model is capable of simulating a wide variety of pumping conditions for which liquid physical properties are important. The information predicted by the model is useful in the design and operation of sucker rod pumping installations.

  4. Monodisperse Clusters in Charged Attractive Colloids: Linear Renormalization of Repulsion.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Štěpán; Allen, Michael P

    2015-08-11

    Experiments done on polydisperse particles of cadmium selenide have recently shown that the particles form spherical isolated clusters with low polydispersity of cluster size. The computer simulation model of Xia et al. ( Nat. Nanotechnol. 2011 , 6 , 580 ) explaining this behavior used a short-range van der Waals attraction combined with a variable long-range screened electrostatic repulsion, depending linearly on the volume of the clusters. In this work, we term this dependence "linear renormalization" of the repulsive term, and we use advanced Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the kinetically slowed down phase separation in a similar but simpler model. We show that amorphous drops do not dissolve and crystallinity evolves very slowly under linear renormalization, and we confirm that low polydispersity of cluster size can also be achieved using this model. The results indicate that the linear renormalization generally leads to monodisperse clusters.

  5. Electrokinetic phenomena and dielectrophoresis in charged colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. P.; Karttunen, Mikko; Yu, K. W.; Dong, L.

    2003-03-01

    AC electrokinetic phenomena, i.e., electrorotation, dielectrophoresis and traveling wave dielectrophoresis, have gained an increasing amount of attention. This is due to their wide range of applications from cancer research to identifying and separating parasites, cell populations and viruses, and even to design of nanomotors. Despite the number of applications, there is need for a theory that treats the different aspects of electrokinetic phenomena on an equal footing starting from the general underlying physical principles. Here, we present a theoretical study of dielectrophoretic (DEP) crossover spectrum of two polarizable particles under the action of a nonuniform AC electric field. For two approaching particles, the mutual polarization interaction yields a change in their respective dipole moments, and hence, in the DEP crossover spectrum. We use the multiple image method to study the induced polarization effects and using spectral representation theory, an analytic expression for the DEP force is derived. Our results shows that the mutual polarization effects can change the crossover frequency at which the DEP force changes sign. The results are in agreement with recent experimental observations. Importantly, this approach goes beyond the standard theory and helps to clarify the important question of the underlying polarization mechanisms. The extension to dense systems and relation to electrorotation is discussed.

  6. Soft-materials: From colloids on templates to polymers in nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian

    We describe two major experimental studies on colloidal systems. We demonstrate that square two-dimensional grating templates can drive the growth of three-dimensional, face-centered-cubic (fcc) colloidal crystals by convective assembly. The square symmetry [i.e. (100) planes parallel to the substrate] of the underlying templates was transferred to the colloidal crystals and maintained throughout their growth of ˜50 layers. We characterized crystals grown on flat and on templated substrates using electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). SAXS measurements of the templated samples clearly revealed four-fold diffraction patterns that arise from fcc domains without stacking faults. In a different vein, we investigated how polymers behave in colloidal nematic liquid crystals. Semi-flexible polymers with persistence lengths varying from 0.05 to 16 mum were dissolved in a nematic liquid crystal of rod-like virus fd. The polymers were directly visualized with fluorescence optical microscopy and their fluctuations were quantitatively analyzed. A coil-to-rod transition of the semiflexible polymers was observed when the background phase evolved from isotropic to the nematic phase. We found that semiflexible filaments' long wavelength fluctuations were the result of the tight coupling to the background nematic field's fluctuation. The Odijk deflection length and the elastic constant of the background nematic phase were extracted from our experimental data. In addition to the experimental work described above, we have developed a wide range of particle synthesis capabilities in the laboratory. While all of these procedures were based on previous work, in many cases we developed techniques to improve yield and/or generate new kinds of colloidal particles. We used emulsion polymerization and sol-gel process to synthesize organic PMMA colloid particles and inorganic silica and Zinc Sulfide (ZnS) colloid particles. For the PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate

  7. Colloidal aspects of texture perception.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Ton; van Aken, George A; de Jongh, Harmen H J; Hamer, Rob J

    2009-08-30

    Recently, considerable attention has been given to the understanding of texture attributes that cannot directly be related to physical properties of food, such as creamy, crumbly and watery. The perception of these attributes is strongly related to the way the food is processed during food intake, mastication, swallowing of it and during the cleaning of the mouth after swallowing. Moreover, their perception is modulated by the interaction with other basic attributes, such as taste and aroma attributes (e.g. sourness and vanilla). To be able to link the composition and structure of food products to more complicated texture attributes, their initial physical/colloid chemical properties and the oral processing of these products must be well understood. Understanding of the processes in the mouth at colloidal length scales turned out to be essential to grasp the interplay between perception, oral physiology and food properties. In view of the huge differences in physical chemical properties between food products, it is practical to make a distinction between solid, semi-solid, and liquid food products. The latter ones are often liquid dispersions of emulsion droplets or particles in general. For liquid food products for instance flow behaviour and colloidal stability of dispersed particles play a main role in determining their textural properties. For most solid products stiffness and fracture behaviour in relation to water content are essential while for semi-solids a much larger range of mechanical properties will play a role. Examples of colloidal aspects of texture perception will be discussed for these three categories of products based on selected sensory attributes and/or relevant colloidal processes. For solid products some main factors determining crispness will be discussed. For crispiness of dry cellular solid products these are water content and the architecture of the product at mesoscopic length scales (20-1000 microm). In addition the distribution of

  8. Effect of colloidal particle size on adsorbed monodisperse and bidisperse monolayers.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Rachel T; Dan, Nily

    2011-07-19

    Coating hydrogel films or microspheres by an adsorbed colloidal shell is one synthesis method for forming colloidosomes. The colloidal shell allows control of the release rate of encapsulated materials, as well as selective transport. Previous studies found that the packing density of self-assembled, adsorbed colloidal monolayers is independent of the colloidal particle size. In this paper we develop an equilibrium model that correlates the packing density of charged colloidal particles in an adsorbed shell to the particle dimensions in monodisperse and bidisperse systems. In systems where the molar concentration in solution is fixed, the increase in adsorption energy with increasing particle size leads to a monotonic increase in the monolayer packing density with particle radius. However, in systems where the mass fraction of the particles in the adsorbing solutions is fixed, increasing particle size also reduces the molar concentration of particles in solution, thereby reducing the probability of adsorption. The result is a nonmonotonic dependence of the packing density in the adsorbed layer on the particle radius. In bidisperse monolayers composed of two particle sizes, the packing density in the layer increases significantly with size asymmetry. These results may be utilized to design the properties of colloidal shells and coatings to achieve specific properties such as transport rate and selectivity.

  9. Direct visualization of the interfacial position of colloidal particles and their assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Ally, J.; Bley, K.; Kappl, M.; Landfester, K.; Weiss, C. K.

    2014-05-01

    A method for direct visualization of the position of nanoscale colloidal particles at air-water interfaces is presented. After assembling hard (polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate), silica) or soft core-shell gold-hydrogel composite (Au@PNiPAAm) colloids at the air-water interface, butylcyanoacrylate is introduced to the interface via the gas phase. Upon contact with water, an anionic polymerization reaction of the monomer is initiated and a film of poly(butylcyanoacrylate) (PBCA) is generated, entrapping the colloids at their equilibrium position at the interface. We apply this method to investigate the formation of complex, binary assembly structures directly at the interface, to visualize soft, nanoscale hydrogel colloids in the swollen state, and to visualize and quantify the equilibrium position of individual micro- and nanoscale colloids at the air-water interface depending of the amount of charge present on the particle surface. We find that the degree of deprotonation of the carboxyl group shifts the air-water contact angle, which is further confirmed by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. Remarkably, the contact angles determined for individual colloidal particles feature a significant distribution that greatly exceeds errors attributable to the size distribution of the colloids. This finding underlines the importance of accessing soft matter on an individual particle level.A method for direct visualization of the position of nanoscale colloidal particles at air-water interfaces is presented. After assembling hard (polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate), silica) or soft core-shell gold-hydrogel composite (Au@PNiPAAm) colloids at the air-water interface, butylcyanoacrylate is introduced to the interface via the gas phase. Upon contact with water, an anionic polymerization reaction of the monomer is initiated and a film of poly(butylcyanoacrylate) (PBCA) is generated, entrapping the colloids at their equilibrium position at the interface. We apply

  10. Colloid dispersion on the pore scale.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas; Toops, Laura; Niessner, Reinhard

    2010-02-01

    Dispersion describes the spreading of a tracer or contaminant in an aquifer. Detailed knowledge of dispersion is the key to successful risk assessment in case of groundwater pollution or groundwater protection. The dispersion of colloids on the pore scale is controlled by flow velocity, ionic strength, colloid size, colloid concentration, and colloid-matrix interactions. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative data and to assess the scale dependency of colloid dispersion on the pore scale. The positions of carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (1 microm, 0.5 microm) were recorded during transport experiments in silicon micromodels with three pore topologies. The positions were combined into particle trajectories revealing the flow path of individual colloids. More than thousand trajectories were evaluated for each experiment to obtain the dispersivity of the colloids for flow distances between 10 and 1000 microm. All experiments were run at high Peclet numbers. The pore scale dispersivity was on the order of 8-30% of the flow distance with pure water, dependent on the heterogeneity of the pore topology. The dispersivity was positively correlated with the ionic strength and inversely correlated with the colloid size and the flow velocity. A coating of the micromodel surface with humic acid also increased dispersivity. The quantitative data set presented here supports the theoretical framework for colloid transport and allows to parametrize colloid transport on the pore scale.

  11. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems). PMID:26427370

  12. Colloid dispersion on the pore scale.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas; Toops, Laura; Niessner, Reinhard

    2010-02-01

    Dispersion describes the spreading of a tracer or contaminant in an aquifer. Detailed knowledge of dispersion is the key to successful risk assessment in case of groundwater pollution or groundwater protection. The dispersion of colloids on the pore scale is controlled by flow velocity, ionic strength, colloid size, colloid concentration, and colloid-matrix interactions. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative data and to assess the scale dependency of colloid dispersion on the pore scale. The positions of carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (1 microm, 0.5 microm) were recorded during transport experiments in silicon micromodels with three pore topologies. The positions were combined into particle trajectories revealing the flow path of individual colloids. More than thousand trajectories were evaluated for each experiment to obtain the dispersivity of the colloids for flow distances between 10 and 1000 microm. All experiments were run at high Peclet numbers. The pore scale dispersivity was on the order of 8-30% of the flow distance with pure water, dependent on the heterogeneity of the pore topology. The dispersivity was positively correlated with the ionic strength and inversely correlated with the colloid size and the flow velocity. A coating of the micromodel surface with humic acid also increased dispersivity. The quantitative data set presented here supports the theoretical framework for colloid transport and allows to parametrize colloid transport on the pore scale. PMID:20042215

  13. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems).

  14. Application of ESEM to environmental colloids.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, H E; Kale, R

    1993-08-01

    Environmental colloids are toxic or radioactive particles suspended in ground or surface water. These hazardous particles can facilitate and accelerate the transport of toxicants and enhance the threat to humans by exposure to pathogenic substances. The chemical and physical properties of hazardous colloids have not been well characterized nor are there standard colloid remediation technologies to prevent their deleterious effects. Colloid characterization requires measurement of their size distribution, zeta potential, chemical composition, adsorption capacity, and morphology. The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) by ElectroScan, Inc., analyzes particle sizes, composition, and morphology. It is also used in this study to identify the attachment of colloids onto packing or rock surfaces in our development of a colloid remediation process. The ESEM has confirmed the composition of groundwater colloids in our studies to be generally the same material as the surrounding rock. The morphology studies have generally shown that colloids are simply small pieces of the rock surface that has exfoliated into the surrounding water. However, in general, the source and chemical composition of groundwater colloids is site dependent. We have found that an ESEM works best as a valuable analysis tool within a suite of colloid characterization instruments.

  15. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the

  16. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways. PMID:26718442

  17. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways.

  18. Bimodal colloid gels of highly size-asymmetric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jooyoung; Lee, Seong Jae; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Seung Jong

    2015-07-01

    We report a type of colloidal gel, induced by a minute incremental addition of mutually attractive small particles (size ˜12 nm) to a suspension of highly charged large particles (size ˜500 nm). The gel's morphological behavior does not follow the typical power-law scaling for fractal clusters. Its unique scaling behavior has two distinct power-law indices, based on particle volume fraction. We show the unique scaling behavior arises when nonfractal networks of large particles are bridged by small-particle clusters, which occurs between a lower and upper critical boundary of small particle volume fraction.

  19. Field induced anisotropic cooperativity in a magnetic colloidal glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandersman, E.; Chushkin, Y.; Dubois, E.; Dupuis, V.; Robert, A.; Perzynski, R.

    The translational dynamics in a repulsive colloidal glass-former is probed by time-resolved X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy. In this dense dispersion of charge-stabilized and magnetic nanoparticles, the interaction potential can be tuned, from quasi-isotropic to anisotropic by applying an external magnetic field. Structural and dynamical anisotropies are reported on interparticle lengthscales associated with highly anisotropic cooperativity, almost two orders of magnitude larger in the field direction than in the perpendicular direction and in zero field.

  20. Phases transitions and interfaces in temperature-sensitive colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Schall, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Colloids are widely used because of their exceptional properties. Beside their own applications in food, petrol, cosmetics and drug industries, photonic, optical filters and chemical sensor, they are also known as powerful model systems to study molecular phase behavior. Here, we examine both aspects of colloids using temperature-sensitive colloidal systems to fully investigate colloidal phase behavior and colloidal assembly.