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Sample records for charged particle energy

  1. Coaxial charged particle energy analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael A. (Inventor); Bryson, III, Charles E. (Inventor); Wu, Warren (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A non-dispersive electrostatic energy analyzer for electrons and other charged particles having a generally coaxial structure of a sequentially arranged sections of an electrostatic lens to focus the beam through an iris and preferably including an ellipsoidally shaped input grid for collimating a wide acceptance beam from a charged-particle source, an electrostatic high-pass filter including a planar exit grid, and an electrostatic low-pass filter. The low-pass filter is configured to reflect low-energy particles back towards a charged particle detector located within the low-pass filter. Each section comprises multiple tubular or conical electrodes arranged about the central axis. The voltages on the lens are scanned to place a selected energy band of the accepted beam at a selected energy at the iris. Voltages on the high-pass and low-pass filters remain substantially fixed during the scan.

  2. Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument Assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    This image shows the low-energy charged particle instrument before it was installed on one of NASA Voyager spacecraft in 1977. The instrument includes a stepper motor that turns the platform on which the sensors are mounted.

  3. EXTRACTOR FOR HIGH ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Lambertson, G.R.

    1964-04-01

    A particle-extracting apparatus for use with a beam of high-energy charged particles such as travel in an evacuated chamber along a circular equilibrium axis is described. A magnetized target is impacted relatively against the beam whereby the beam particles are deflected from the beam by the magnetic induction in the target. To this end the target may be moved into the beam or the beam may coast into the target and achieve high angular particle deflection and slow extraction. A deflecting septum magnet may additionally be used for deflection at even sharper angles. (AEC)

  4. Location of Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    This graphic shows the NASA Voyager 1 spacecraft and the location of its low-energy charged particle instrument. A labeled close-up of the low-energy charged particle instrument appears as the inset image.

  5. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Jason, Andrew J.; Blind, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  6. Electrostatic energy analyzers for high energy charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. M.; Ilyina, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    The electrostatic energy analyzers for high energy charged particle beams emitted from extended large-size objects as well as from remote point sources are proposed. Results of the analytical trajectory solutions in ideal cylindrical field provide focusing characteristics for both configurations. The instruments possess of simple compact design, based on an ideal cylindrical field with entrance window arranged in the end-boundary between electrodes and can be used for measurements in space technologies, plasma and nuclear physics.

  7. High Energy Charged Particles in Space at One Astronomical Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Gabriel, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    Single event effects and many other spacecraft anomalies are caused by positively charged high energy particles impinging on the vehicle and its component parts. Reviewed here are the current knowledge of the interplanetary particle environment in the energy ranges that are most important for these effects. State-of-the-art engineering models are briefly described along with comments on the future work required.

  8. High Energy Charged Particles in Space at One Astronomical Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Gabriel, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    Single event effects and many other spacecraft anomalies are caused by positively charged high energy particles impinging on the vehicle and its component parts. Reviewed here are the current knowledge of the interplanetary particle environment in the energy ranges that are most important for these effects. State-of-the-art engineering models are briefly described along with comments on the future work required.

  9. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  10. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  11. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/μm to 975 KeV/gmm with particle energy (on the cells) between 94 - 603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/μm. The inactivation cross-section (αi) and the action-section for mutant induction (αm) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 μm2 and 0.09 to 5.56 × 10-3 μm2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/μm. The mutagenicity (αm/αi) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 × 10-5 with the maximum value at 150 keV/μm. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  12. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  13. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  14. Charged-particle multiplicity at LHC energies

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The talk presents the measurement of the pseudorapidity density and the multiplicity distribution with ALICE at the achieved LHC energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV.An overview about multiplicity measurements prior to LHC is given and the related theoretical concepts are briefly discussed.The analysis procedure is presented and the systematic uncertainties are detailed. The applied acceptance corrections and the treatment of diffraction are discussed.The results are compared with model predictions. The validity of KNO scaling in restricted phase space regions is revisited. 

  15. Charged-Particle Acceleration and Energy Loss Measurements on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Ram, A. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Soures, J. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Roberts, S.; Sorce, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Phillips, T. W.

    2000-10-01

    Measurements have been made of charged fusion products produced in D ^3He-filled targets irradiated on OMEGA. Comparing the energy shifts of four particle types has probed two distinct physical processes: electrostatic acceleration in the low-density corona and energy loss in the high-density target. When the burn occurred during the laser pulse, particle energy shifts were dominated by acceleration effects. Using a simple mode, the time history of the target's electrostatic potential was found and shown to decay to zero soon after laser irradiation was complete. When the burn occurred after the pulse, particle energy shifts were dominated by energy losses in the target, allowing charged-particle stopping-power predictions to be tested. The results provide the first verification of the general form of stopping power theories over a wide velocity range. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of ICF under Coop. Agreem. No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  16. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  17. Use of incomplete energy recovery for the energy compression of large energy spread charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Benson, Stephen V.

    2007-01-23

    A method of energy recovery for RF-base linear charged particle accelerators that allows energy recovery without large relative momentum spread of the particle beam involving first accelerating a waveform particle beam having a crest and a centroid with an injection energy E.sub.o with the centroid of the particle beam at a phase offset f.sub.o from the crest of the accelerating waveform to an energy E.sub.full and then recovering the beam energy centroid a phase f.sub.o+Df relative to the crest of the waveform particle beam such that (E.sub.full-E.sub.o)(1+cos(f.sub.o+Df))>dE/2 wherein dE=the full energy spread, dE/2=the full energy half spread and Df=the wave form phase distance.

  18. Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hei, T K; Chen, D J; Brenner, D J; Hall, E J

    1988-07-01

    The mutagenic potential of charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) was assessed using the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus (HGPRT) in primary human fibroblasts. Exponentially growing cultures of early passaged fibroblasts were grown as monolayers on thin mylar sheets and were irradiated with accelerated protons, deuterons or helium-3 ions. The mutation rates were compared with those generated by 137Cs gamma-rays. LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, using the track segment mode, ranged from 10 to 150 keV/micron. After irradiation, cells were trypsinized, subcultured and assayed for both cytotoxicity and 6-thioguanine resistance. For gamma-rays, and for the charged particles of lower LET, the dose-response curves for cell survival were characterized by a marked initial shoulder, but approximated to an exponential function of dose for higher LETs. Mutation frequencies, likewise, showed a direct correlation to LET over the dose range examined. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for mutagenesis, based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, ranged from 1.30 for 10 keV/micron protons to 9.40 for 150 keV/micron helium-3 ions. Results of the present studies indicate that high-LET radiations, apart from being efficient inducers of cell lethality, are even more efficient in mutation induction as compared to low-LET ionizing radiation. These data are consistent with results previously obtained with both rodent and human fibroblast cell lines.

  19. Charged particle detectors with active detector surface for partial energy deposition of the charged particles and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Gerts, David W; Bean, Robert S; Metcalf, Richard R

    2013-02-19

    A radiation detector is disclosed. The radiation detector comprises an active detector surface configured to generate charge carriers in response to charged particles associated with incident radiation. The active detector surface is further configured with a sufficient thickness for a partial energy deposition of the charged particles to occur and permit the charged particles to pass through the active detector surface. The radiation detector further comprises a plurality of voltage leads coupled to the active detector surface. The plurality of voltage leads is configured to couple to a voltage source to generate a voltage drop across the active detector surface and to separate the charge carriers into a plurality of electrons and holes for detection. The active detector surface may comprise one or more graphene layers. Timing data between active detector surfaces may be used to determine energy of the incident radiation. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed herein.

  20. Instrument to measure energy and charge of low energy interplanetary particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tums, E.; Gloeckler, G.; Cain, J.; Sciambi, R.; Fan, C. Y.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment to measure the charge composition and energy spectra of ultra low energy charged particles in interplanetary space has been developed and launched on the IMP 8 (Explorer 50) satellite on Oct. 26, 1973. The instrument consists of two separate sensors sharing common electronics. One of these sensors uses a thin window gas proportional counter to measure the rate of energy loss and a totally depleted silicon surface barrier detector to measure total energy of incoming particles. The energy range for two dimensional analysis extends from 300 KeV to 2.5 MeV for protons and 60 KeV/nucleon to 25 MeV/nucleon for iron with excellent resolution of individual chemical elements. The other sensor combines electrostatic deflection with total energy measurements in silicon surface barrier detectors to give the ionic charge and kinetic energy of the particle.

  1. Charge, energy, and LET spectra measurements of charged particles in P0006 experiment of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Oda, K.; Henke, R. P.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Frigo, L. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Derrickson, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements are under way of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite using stacks of plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) placed in different locations of the satellite. In the initial work, the charge, energy, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles were measured with CR-39 double layer PNTDs located on the west end of the satellite. Primary and secondary stopping heavy ions as well as relativistic galactic cosmic rays (mostly iron particles) were measured separately. The results will be compared with similar measurements in other locations on LDEF with different orientation and shielding conditions. The remarkably detailed study of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite will lead to a better understanding of the radiation environment of the Space Station Freedom. It will enable more accurate prediction of single event upsets (SEUs) in microelectronics and, especially, more accurate assessment of the risk, contributed by the different components of the radiation field to the health and safety of crew members.

  2. Energy losses of positive and negative charged particles in electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diachenko, M. M.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2017-02-01

    A heavy charged particle propagation through electron gas has been studied using combination of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and the Green’s functions method. The energy loss of a charged particle has been found in the case of large transferred momentum taking into account the interference term in the expression for the rate. The dependence of the energy loss of a charged particles in electron gas with nonzero temperature on the sign of the charge has been obtained.

  3. Energy loss of a heavy particle near 3D charged rotating hairy black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Jalil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider a charged rotating black hole in three dimensions with a scalar charge and discuss the energy loss of a heavy particle moving near the black-hole horizon. We also study quasi-normal modes and find the dispersion relations. We find that the effect of scalar charge and electric charge increases the energy loss.

  4. High-Energy Charged Particles in the Innermost Jovian Magnetosphere

    PubMed

    Fischer; Pehlke; Wibberenz; Lanzerotti; Mihalov

    1996-05-10

    The energetic particles investigation carried by the Galileo probe measured the energy and angular distributions of the high-energy particles from near the orbit of Io to probe entry into the jovian atmosphere. Jupiter's inner radiation region had extremely large fluxes of energetic electrons and protons; intensities peaked at approximately2.2RJ (where RJ is the radius of Jupiter). Absorption of the measured particles was found near the outer edge of the bright dust ring. The instrument measured intense fluxes of high-energy helium ions (approximately62 megaelectron volts per nucleon) that peaked at approximately1.5RJ inside the bright dust ring. The abundances of all particle species decreased sharply at approximately1.35RJ; this decrease defines the innermost edge of the equatorial jovian radiation.

  5. Influence of gravitation on the self-energy of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zel'nikov, A.; Frolov, V.

    1982-02-01

    The influence of the gravitational field of a charged black hole on the self-energy of an electric and scalar charge at rest in this field is investigated. An exact expression is obtained for the energy of the charged particle, and the transition to the limit of a homogeneous gravitational field is investigated.

  6. On the Energy and Momentum of an Accelerated Charged Particle and the Sources of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksen, Erik; Gron, Oyvind

    2007-01-01

    We give a systematic development of the theory of the radiation field of an accelerated charged particle with reference to an inertial reference frame in flat spacetime. Special emphasis is given to the role of the Schott energy and momentum in the energy-momentum balance of the charge and its field. It is shown that the energy of the radiation…

  7. On the Energy and Momentum of an Accelerated Charged Particle and the Sources of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksen, Erik; Gron, Oyvind

    2007-01-01

    We give a systematic development of the theory of the radiation field of an accelerated charged particle with reference to an inertial reference frame in flat spacetime. Special emphasis is given to the role of the Schott energy and momentum in the energy-momentum balance of the charge and its field. It is shown that the energy of the radiation…

  8. Energy deposition rates by charged particles. [in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torkar, K. M.; Urban, A.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Smith, L. G.; Dumbs, A.; Grandal, B.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV-MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched within the Energy Budget Campaign from Northern Scandinavia is given, together with corresponding satellite data. In some cases strong temporal variations of the downgoing integral fluxes were observed. The fluxes provide the background for the calculated ion production rates and altitude profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance and cosmic noise absorption. The derived ion production rates by eneretic particles are compared to other night-time ionisation sources.

  9. Energy deposition rates by charged particles. [in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torkar, K. M.; Urban, A.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Smith, L. G.; Dumbs, A.; Grandal, B.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV-MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched within the Energy Budget Campaign from Northern Scandinavia is given, together with corresponding satellite data. In some cases strong temporal variations of the downgoing integral fluxes were observed. The fluxes provide the background for the calculated ion production rates and altitude profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance and cosmic noise absorption. The derived ion production rates by eneretic particles are compared to other night-time ionisation sources.

  10. Array of micro-machined mass energy micro-filters for charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalder, Roland E. (Inventor); Van Zandt, Thomas R. (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An energy filter for charged particles includes a stack of micro-machined wafers including plural apertures passing through the stack of wafers, focusing electrodes bounding charged particle paths through the apertures, an entrance orifice to each of the plural apertures and an exit orifice from each of the plural apertures and apparatus for biasing the focusing electrodes with an electrostatic potential corresponding to an energy pass band of the filter.

  11. A scaled experiment to study energy dissipation process during longitudinal compression of charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Y.; Nakajima, M.; Hasegawa, J.; Kikuchi, T.; Horioka, K.

    2016-03-01

    Beam behavior during longitudinal bunch compression of charged particles was investigated using a compact simulator device based on electron beams. Beam current waveforms and bunch compression ratios were measured as a function of the initial beam current. We found that the current waveform became blunt and the compression ratio degraded at higher beam currents. These results indicate that space-charge fields dissipate the kinetic energy of beam particles.

  12. An APL program for the distribution of energy deposition by charged particles passing through thin absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    An APL program which numerically evaluates the probability density function (PDF) for the energy deposited in a thin absorber by a charged particle is proposed, with application to the construction, pointing, and control of spacecraft. With this program, the PDF of the restricted energy loss distribution of Watts (1973) is derived, and Vavilov's (1957) distribution is obtained by proper parameter selection. The method is demonstrated with the example of the effect of charged particle induced radiation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) pointing accuracy. A Monte Carlo study simulates the photon noise caused by charged particles passing through the photomultiplier tube window, and the stochastic variation of energy loss is introduced into the simulation by generating random energy losses from a power law distribution. The program eliminates annoying loop procedures, and model parameter sensitivity can be studied using the graphical output.

  13. Energy losses of charged particles in a finite layer of substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechin, V. A.

    1985-04-01

    The energy lost by a charged particle as it crosses a plane-parallel plate with dielectric permittivity in a vacuum is calculated theoretically, applying the intermediate transition to the Heaviside transformation and considering various combinations of particle Lorentz factor and plate thickness. The problems encountered in comparing the theoretical predictions with experimental data are examined, and the application of the model of energy loss in very thin layers of Ermilova et al. (1974) is found to explain the observed anomalies.

  14. Optimization of accelerated charged particle beam for ADS energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Paraipan, M.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.

    2017-01-01

    A comparative analysis and optimization of energy efficiency for proton and ion beams in ADS systems is performed via simulation using a GEANT4 code with account for energy consumption for different accelerator types. It is demonstrated that for light nuclei, beginning from 7Li, with energies above 1 GeV/nucleon, ion beams are considerably (several times) more efficient than the 1-3 GeV proton beam. The possibility of achieving energy deposition equivalent to 1 GeV protons in a quasi-infinite uranium target with higher efficiency (and twice as small accelerator size) in the case of acceleration of light ions is substantiated.

  15. A 2-D Implicit, Energy and Charge Conserving Particle In Cell Method

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Allen L.; Knoll, Dana A.; Cieren, Emmanuel B.; Feltman, Nicolas; Leibs, Christopher A.; McCarthy, Colleen; Murthy, Karthik S.; Wang, Yijie

    2012-09-10

    Recently, a fully implicit electrostatic 1D charge- and energy-conserving particle-in-cell algorithm was proposed and implemented by Chen et al ([2],[3]). Central to the algorithm is an advanced particle pusher. Particles are moved using an energy conserving scheme and are forced to stop at cell faces to conserve charge. Moreover, a time estimator is used to control errors in momentum. Here we implement and extend this advanced particle pusher to include 2D and electromagnetic fields. Derivations of all modifications made are presented in full. Special consideration is taken to ensure easy coupling into the implicit moment based method proposed by Taitano et al [19]. Focus is then given to optimizing the presented particle pusher on emerging architectures. Two multicore implementations, and one GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) implementation are discussed and analyzed.

  16. The effect of induced charges on low-energy particle trajectories near conducting and semiconducting plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the induced charge was found on particles less than 1 eV as they passed through simulated parallel, grounded channels that are comparable in dimension to those that are presently in space plasma instruments which measure the flux of low-energy ions. Applications were made to both conducting and semiconducting channels that ranged in length from 0.1 to 50 mm and in aspect ratio from 1 to 100. The effect of the induced charge on particle trajectories from simple straight lines. Several configurations of channel aspect ratio and detector locations are considered. The effect is important only at very low energies with small dimensions.

  17. Low Energy Charged Particle Measurement by Japanese Lunar Orbiter SELENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Asamura, K.; Mukai, T.

    2004-12-01

    SELENE (SELenological and Engineering satellite) is a Japanese lunar orbiter that will be launched in 2006. The main purpose of this satellite is to study the origin and evolution of the moon by means of global mapping of element abundances, mineralogical composition, and surface geographical mapping from 100km altitude. PACE (Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment) is one of the scientific instruments onboard the SELENE satellite. PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). ESA-S1 and S2 measure three-dimensional distribution function of low energy electrons below 17keV. ESA basically employs a method of a top hat electrostatic analyzer with angular scanning deflectors at the entrance and toroidal electrodes inside. IMA and IEA measure the three-dimensional distribution function of low energy ions below 28keV/q. IMA has an ability to discriminate the ion mass with high mass resolution. IMA consists of an energy analyzer that is basically the same as ESA and an LEF (Linear Electric Field) TOF (Time Of Flight) ion mass analyzer. IEA consists of only an energy analyzer that is the same as the energy analyzer of IMA. Each sensor has hemi-spherical field of view (FOV). With two pairs of sensors ESA-S1 & IMA, and ESA-S2 & IEA, which are installed on the +Z and -Z surface of the spacecraft, three-dimensional distribution function of low energy electrons and ions are observed. The scientific objectives of PACE are 1) to measure the ions sputtered from the lunar surface and the lunar atmosphere, 2) to measure the magnetic anomaly on the lunar surface using two ESAs and a magnetometer onboard SELENE simultaneously as an electron reflectometer, 3) to resolve the moon - solar wind interaction, 4) to resolve the moon - Earth's magnetosphere interaction, and 5) to observe the Earth's magnetotail. Sputtered ions from the lunar surface will be measured for the first time. Recently, ground

  18. Low Energy Charged Particle Measurement by Japanese Lunar Orbiter SELENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu.; Yokota, S.; Asamura, K.; Tanaka, T.; Mukai, T.

    SELenological and ENgineering Explorer (SELENE) is a Japanese lunar orbiter that will be launched in 2007. The main purpose of this satellite is to study the origin and evolution of the Moon by means of global mapping of element abundances, mineralogical composition, and surface geographical mapping from 100 km altitude. Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment (PACE) is one of the scientific instruments onboard the SELENE satellite. The scientific objectives of PACE are (1) to measure the ions sputtered from the lunar surface and the lunar atmosphere, (2) to measure the magnetic anomaly on the lunar surface using two electron spectrum analyzers (ESAs) and a magnetometer onboard SELENE simultaneously as an electron reflectometer, (3) to resolve the Moon-solar wind interaction, (4) to resolve the Moon-Earth's magnetosphere interaction, and (5) to observe the Earth's magnetotail. PACE consists of four sensors: ESA-S1, ESA-S2, ion mass analyzer (IMA), and ion energy analyzer (IEA). ESA-S1 and S2 measure the three-dimensional distribution function of low energy electrons below 15 keV, while IMA and IEA measure the three-dimensional distribution function of low energy ions below 28 keV/q.

  19. Can charged colloidal particles increase the thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency?

    PubMed

    Salez, Thomas J; Huang, Bo Tao; Rietjens, Maud; Bonetti, Marco; Wiertel-Gasquet, Cécile; Roger, Michel; Filomeno, Cleber Lopes; Dubois, Emmanuelle; Perzynski, Régine; Nakamae, Sawako

    2017-04-05

    Currently, liquid thermocells are receiving increasing attention as an inexpensive alternative to conventional solid-state thermoelectrics for low-grade waste heat recovery applications. Here we present a novel path to increase the Seebeck coefficient of liquid thermoelectric materials using charged colloidal suspensions; namely, ionically stabilized magnetic nanoparticles (ferrofluids) dispersed in aqueous potassium ferro-/ferri-cyanide electrolytes. The dependency of thermoelectric potential on experimental parameters such as nanoparticle concentration and types of solute ions (lithium citrate and tetrabutylammonium citrate) is examined to reveal the relative contributions from the thermogalvanic potential of redox couples and the entropy of transfer of nanoparticles and ions. The results show that under specific ionic conditions, the inclusion of magnetic nanoparticles can lead to an enhancement of the ferrofluid's initial Seebeck coefficient by 15% (at a nanoparticle volume fraction of ∼1%). Based on these observations, some practical directions are given on which ionic and colloidal parameters to adjust for improving the Seebeck coefficients of liquid thermoelectric materials.

  20. Charged Particle Transport in High-Energy-Density Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Transport coefficients for dense plasmas have been numerically computed using an effective Boltzmann approach. We have developed a simplified effective potential approach that yields accurate fits for all of the relevant cross sections and collision integrals. Our results have been validated with molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusion, interdiffusion, viscosity, thermal conductivity and stopping power. Molecular dynamics has also been used to examine the underlying assumptions of the Boltzmann approach through a categorization of behaviors of the velocity autocorrelation function in the Yukawa phase diagram. Using a velocity-dependent screening model, we examine the role of dynamical screening in transport as well. Implications of these results for Coulomb logarithm approaches are discussed. This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Polarization correction in the theory of energy losses by charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, D. N. Matveev, V. I.

    2015-05-15

    A method for finding the polarization (Barkas) correction in the theory of energy losses by charged particles in collisions with multielectron atoms is proposed. The Barkas correction is presented in a simple analytical form. We make comparisons with experimental data and show that applying the Barkas correction improves the agreement between theory and experiment.

  2. Gridless retarding potential analyzer for use in very-low-energy charged particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyn, T. W.; Sharp, W. E.; Hays, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of the hyperbolic retarding potential analyzer in the electrostatic mode is developed in detail and verified in the laboratory. A monoenergetic electron beam is used for the laboratory investigation. The analyzer (acronym HARP) has advantages over other conventional electrostatic analyzers; among them are less contact potential influence and high throughput because of the symmetry shape of the analyzer. The most useful application of the HARP is in detecting low-energy charged particles. A sample of low-energy particle data obtained in the earth's ionosphere is given.

  3. Gridless retarding potential analyzer for use in very-low-energy charged particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyn, T. W.; Sharp, W. E.; Hays, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of the hyperbolic retarding potential analyzer in the electrostatic mode is developed in detail and verified in the laboratory. A monoenergetic electron beam is used for the laboratory investigation. The analyzer (acronym HARP) has advantages over other conventional electrostatic analyzers; among them are less contact potential influence and high throughput because of the symmetry shape of the analyzer. The most useful application of the HARP is in detecting low-energy charged particles. A sample of low-energy particle data obtained in the earth's ionosphere is given.

  4. Solar Energetic Particle Drifts and the Energy Dependence of 1 AU Charge States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla, S.; Marsh, M. S.; Battarbee, M.

    2017-01-01

    The event-averaged charge state of heavy ion solar energetic particles (SEPs), measured at 1 au from the Sun, typically increases with the ions’ kinetic energy. The origin of this behavior has been ascribed to processes taking place within the acceleration region. In this paper we study the propagation through interplanetary space of SEP Fe ions, injected near the Sun with a variety of charge states that are uniformly distributed in energy, by means of a 3D test particle model. In our simulations, due to gradient and curvature drifts associated with the Parker spiral magnetic field, ions of different charge propagate with very different efficiencies to an observer that is not magnetically well connected to the source region. As a result we find that, for many observer locations, the 1 au event-averaged charge state < Q> , as obtained from our model, displays an increase with particle energy E, in qualitative agreement with spacecraft observations. We conclude that drift-associated propagation is a possible explanation for the observed distribution of < Q> versus E in SEP events, and that the distribution measured in interplanetary space cannot be taken to represent that at injection.

  5. Energy flow and charged particle spectra in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Ahmed, T.; Andreev, V.; Aid, S.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bärwolff, H.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Biddulph, P.; Binder, E.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Bosetti, P. C.; Boudry, V.; Bourdarios, C.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braun, U.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Chyla, J.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Colombo, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dann, A. W. E.; Dau, W. D.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; Devel, M.; de Roeck, A.; di Nezza, P.; Dingus, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Drescher, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebbinghaus, R.; Eberle, M.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellis, N. N.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Fensome, I. F.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Flauger, W.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuhrmann, P.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Gennis, M.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Godfrey, L.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Greif, H.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Harjes, J.; Haydar, R.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Huot, N.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kazarian, S.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krasny, M. W.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Langkau, R.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Leuschner, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Lewin, D.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lüers, D.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, A.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Monnier, E.; Moreau, F.; Moreels, J.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Murray, S. A.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Orenstein, S.; Ould-Saada, F.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Peters, S.; Phillips, H. T.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pilgram, W.; Pitzl, D.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Rauschnabel, K.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rudowicz, M.; Ruffer, M.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitz, W.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schulz, M.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Scobel, W.; Seehausen, U.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Tichomirov, I.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Urban, L.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallée, C.; van Esch, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Vick, R.; Villet, G.; Vogel, E.; Wacker, K.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Wegener, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wolff, Th.; Womersley, L. A.; Wright, A. E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.

    1994-09-01

    Global properties of the hadronic final state in deep inelastic scattering events at HERA are investigated. The data are corrected for detector effects and are compared directly with QCD phenomenology. Energy flows in both the laboratory frame and the hadronic centre of mass system and energy-energy correlations in the laboratory frame are presented. Comparing various QCD models, the colour dipole model provides the only satisfactory description of the data. In the hadronic centre of mass system the momentum components of charged particles longitudinal and transverse to the virtual boson direction are measured and compared with lower energy lepton-nucleon scattering data as well as with e + e - dat from LEP.

  6. Charging and transmission of low energy particles through Amorphous Solid Water films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-02-01

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has drawn significant attention in recent years due to its importance in biological and atmospheric processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging and transmission effects while striking Amorphous Solid Water (ASW) films, 240-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal substrate, utilizing contact potential difference (CPD) measurements. Charging by both species has shown a plate capacitor-like behaviour. L-defects energetically located just below the conduction band of ice, are likely to stabilize them. The incoming electrons kinetic energy dictates the maximal CPD by retardation of any further electrons from adding up to the already accumulated charges. Electron transmission measurements (0.5-1.5 microamps) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only following a relatively slow change that has developed within the ASW structure. Upon film stabilization, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of up to three hours. UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with a study of charged water nano-clusters.

  7. Particle charge spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An airflow through a tube is used to guide a charged particle through the tube. A detector may be used to detect charge passing through the tube on the particle. The movement of the particle through the tube may be used to both detect its charge and size.

  8. Concept and design of charged particle optics using energy Fourier plane collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guojun; Wei, Tao; Zhang, Zhuo; He, Xiaozhong; Zhang, Xiaoding; Li, Yiding; Shi, Jinshui

    2014-09-01

    Charged particle radiography has become a promising new approach in the field of transmission radiography because of the invention of the magnetic imaging lens. The using of the imaging lens makes it possible for thick objects to get significantly improved transmission radiography. Currently, the conventional charged particle radiography only uses the information of the flux attenuation and the angular scattering of the transmitted particles to determine the properties of the sample. However, the energy loss of the incident particles introduced by ionizations throughout the object limits the spatial resolution of the image because of the chromatic blur. In this paper a new concept of imaging lens that uses the information of the energy loss is proposed. With a specially designed imaging lens, the information of the energy loss could result in apparent contrast in the final image. This design procedure of the energy loss imaging lens is presented, and a preliminary design is verified by numerical simulations. Experimental demonstration is also expected on a cyclotron at the Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP.

  9. Energy-Charge-conserving, Implicit, Electrostatic Particle-in-Cell Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guangye; Chacon, Luis; Barnes, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel fully implicit formulation for a one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation approach. Unlike earlier implicit electrostatic PIC approaches (which are based on a linearized Vlasov-Poisson formulation), ours is based on a nonlinearly converged Vlasov-Ampere (VA) model. By iterating particles and fields to a tight nonlinear convergence tolerance, the approach features superior stability and accuracy properties, avoiding most of the accuracy pitfalls in earlier implicit PIC implementations. In particular, the formulation is stable against temporal (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) and spatial (aliasing) instabilities. It is charge- and energy-conserving to numerical round-off for arbitrary implicit time steps (unlike the earlier ''energy-conserving'' explicit PIC formulation, which only conserves energy in the limit of arbitrarily small time steps). While momentum is not exactly conserved, errors are kept small by an adaptive particle sub-stepping orbit integrator, which is instrumental to prevent particle tunneling (a deleterious effect for long-term accuracy). The VA model is orbit-averaged along particle orbits to enforce an energy conservation theorem with particle sub-stepping. As a result, very large time steps, constrained only by the dynamical time scale of interest, are possible without accuracy loss. Algorithmically, the approach features a Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov solver. A main development in this study is the nonlinear elimination of the new-time particle variables (positions and velocities). Such nonlinear elimination, which we term particle enslavement, results in a nonlinear formulation with memory requirements comparable to those of a fluid computation, and affords us substantial freedom in regards to the particle orbit integrator. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the advertised properties of the scheme. In particular, long-time ion acoustic wave simulations show that numerical

  10. An energy- and charge-conserving, implicit, electrostatic particle-in-cell algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.; Barnes, D. C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses a novel fully implicit formulation for a one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation approach. Unlike earlier implicit electrostatic PIC approaches (which are based on a linearized Vlasov-Poisson formulation), ours is based on a nonlinearly converged Vlasov-Ampére (VA) model. By iterating particles and fields to a tight nonlinear convergence tolerance, the approach features superior stability and accuracy properties, avoiding most of the accuracy pitfalls in earlier implicit PIC implementations. In particular, the formulation is stable against temporal (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) and spatial (aliasing) instabilities. It is charge- and energy-conserving to numerical round-off for arbitrary implicit time steps (unlike the earlier "energy-conserving" explicit PIC formulation, which only conserves energy in the limit of arbitrarily small time steps). While momentum is not exactly conserved, errors are kept small by an adaptive particle sub-stepping orbit integrator, which is instrumental to prevent particle tunneling (a deleterious effect for long-term accuracy). The VA model is orbit-averaged along particle orbits to enforce an energy conservation theorem with particle sub-stepping. As a result, very large time steps, constrained only by the dynamical time scale of interest, are possible without accuracy loss. Algorithmically, the approach features a Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov solver. A main development in this study is the nonlinear elimination of the new-time particle variables (positions and velocities). Such nonlinear elimination, which we term particle enslavement, results in a nonlinear formulation with memory requirements comparable to those of a fluid computation, and affords us substantial freedom in regards to the particle orbit integrator. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the advertised properties of the scheme. In particular, long-time ion acoustic wave simulations show that numerical

  11. Transverse energy distribution, charged particle multiplicities and spectra in /sup 16/O-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sunier, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The HELIOS (High Energy Lepton and Ion Spectrometer) experiment, installed at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron, proposes to examine in details the physical properties of a state of high energy created in nuclei by ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. It is generally believed that, at high densities or temperatures, a phase transition to a plasma of quark and gluons will occur. The dynamic of the expansion of such a plasma and its subsequent condensation into a hadron gas should markedly affect the composition and momentum distribution of the emerging particles and photons. The HELIOS experimental setup therefore combines 4..pi.. calorimetric coverage with measurements of inclusive particle spectra, two particle correlations, low and high mass lepton pairs and photons. The emphasis is placed on transverse energy flow (E/sub T/) measurements with good energy resolution, and the ability to trigger the acquisition of data in a variety of E/sub T/ ranges, thereby selecting the impact parameter or the violence of the collisions. This short note presents HELIOS results, for the most part still preliminary, on /sup 16/O-nucleus collisions at the incident energies of 60 and 200 GeV per nucleon. The E/sub T/ distributions from Al, Ag and W targets are discussed and compared to the associated charged particle multiplicities from W. Charged particle and (converted) photon spectra measured with the external magnetic spectrometer are compared for /sup 16/O + W and p + W collisions at 200 GeV per nucleon. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  12. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.; FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-18

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  13. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.; FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  14. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-18

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  15. Charged-particle emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yijun; Caucci, Luca; Barrett, Harrison H

    2017-06-01

    Conventional charged-particle imaging techniques - such as autoradiography - provide only two-dimensional (2D) black ex vivo images of thin tissue slices. In order to get volumetric information, images of multiple thin slices are stacked. This process is time consuming and prone to distortions, as registration of 2D images is required. We propose a direct three-dimensional (3D) autoradiography technique, which we call charged-particle emission tomography (CPET). This 3D imaging technique enables imaging of thick tissue sections, thus increasing laboratory throughput and eliminating distortions due to registration. CPET also has the potential to enable in vivo charged-particle imaging with a window chamber or an endoscope. Our approach to charged-particle emission tomography uses particle-processing detectors (PPDs) to estimate attributes of each detected particle. The attributes we estimate include location, direction of propagation, and/or the energy deposited in the detector. Estimated attributes are then fed into a reconstruction algorithm to reconstruct the 3D distribution of charged-particle-emitting radionuclides. Several setups to realize PPDs are designed. Reconstruction algorithms for CPET are developed. Reconstruction results from simulated data showed that a PPD enables CPET if the PPD measures more attributes than just the position from each detected particle. Experiments showed that a two-foil charged-particle detector is able to measure the position and direction of incident alpha particles. We proposed a new volumetric imaging technique for charged-particle-emitting radionuclides, which we have called charged-particle emission tomography (CPET). We also proposed a new class of charged-particle detectors, which we have called particle-processing detectors (PPDs). When a PPD is used to measure the direction and/or energy attributes along with the position attributes, CPET is feasible. © 2017 The Authors. Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals

  16. Electron-ion energy partition when a charged particle slows in a plasma: results.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lowell S; Preston, Dean L; Singleton, Robert L

    2012-07-01

    This paper concerns plasmas in which the electrons and ions may have different temperatures. This is a case that must be examined because nuclear fusion processes, such as those that appear in ICF capsules, have ions whose temperature runs away from the electron temperature. A fast charged particle traversing a plasma--such as the α particle created in deuterium-tritium fusion--loses its energy to both the electrons and the ions in the plasma. In this paper, we present and discuss the results for the energy partition, the fractions E(e)/E(0) and E(I)/E(0) of the initial energy E(0) of this projectile particle that are deposited into the electrons and ions when it has slowed to its minimum energy distribution. The calculations, performed in the following paper [Brown, Preston, and Singleton Jr., Phys. Rev. E 86, 016407 (2012)], use a well-defined Fokker-Planck equation for the phase-space distribution of the charged projectiles in a weakly to moderately coupled plasma. The Fokker-Planck equation holds to first subleading order in the dimensionless plasma coupling constant, which translates to computing to order n ln n (leading) and n (subleading) in the plasma density n. We present an examination of the energy partition for the general case, in which the temperatures of the ions and electrons in the background plasma are not equal. The energy partitions for a background plasma in thermal equilibrium have been previously computed, but the order n terms have not been calculated, only estimated. Our Fokker-Planck formulation provides an unambiguous, precise definition of the energy fractions.

  17. Electromagnetic Weibel Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-10-20

    In plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions, collective instabilities may develop if there is sufficient coupling between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom. Our previous numerical and theoretical studies of intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson and H. Qin, PRSTAB, 6, 084401 (2003); Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138 (2002)] demonstrated that a fast, electrostatic, Harris-like instability develops, and saturates nonlinearly, for sufficiently large temperature anisotropy (T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b} >> 1). The total distribution function after saturation, however, is still far from equipartitioned. In this paper the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to investigate detailed properties of the transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instability for a long charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical pipe of radius r{sub w}. The kinetic stability analysis is carried out for azimuthally symmetric perturbations about a two-temperature thermal equilibrium distribution in the smooth-focusing approximation. The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure and instability thresholds are determined. The stability analysis shows that, although there is free energy available to drive the electromagnetic Weibel instability, the finite transverse geometry of the charged particle beam introduces a large threshold value for the temperature anisotropy ((T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b}){sup Weibel} >> (T{sub {perpendicular}b}/T{sub {parallel}b}){sup Harris}) below which the instability is absent. Hence, unlike the case of an electrically neutral plasma, the Weibel instability is not expected to play as significant a role in the process of energy isotropization of intense unneutralized charged particle beams as the electrostatic Harris-type instability.

  18. Charged Particle Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    Improved version of Faraday cup increases accuracy of measurements of flux density of charged particles incident along axis through collection aperture. Geometry of cone-and-sensing cup combination assures most particles are trapped.

  19. Adsorption free energy of variable-charge nanoparticles to a charged surface in relation to the change of the average chemical state of the particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liping; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H; Hiemstra, Tjisse

    2006-01-03

    Variable-charge nanoparticles such as proteins and humics can adsorb strongly to charged macroscopic surfaces such as silica and iron oxide minerals. To model the adsorption of variable-charge particles to charged surfaces, one has to be able to calculate the adsorption free energy involved. It has been shown that the change in the free energy of variable-charge particles is related to the change in their average chemical state upon adsorption, which is commonly described using surface complexation models. In this work, expressions for the free-energy change in variable-charge particles due to changes in chemical binding are derived for three ion-binding models (i.e., the Langmuir, Langmuir-Freundlich, and NICA models) and for changes due to nonspecific binding for the Donnan model. The expressions for the adsorption free energy of the variable-charge particles to a charged surface are derived on the basis of the equality of the (electro)chemical potential of the particles in the bulk solution and adsorption phase. The expressions derived are general in the sense that they account for the competition between charge-determining ions that bind chemically to the particles, and they also apply in case of the formation of chemical bonds between particle ligands and surface sites. The derived expressions can be applied in the future to model the adsorption of variable-charge nanoparticles to charged surfaces. The results obtained for the NICA-Donnan model make it possible to apply this advanced surface complexation model to describe the adsorption of humics to minerals.

  20. Numerical studies of the Weibel Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-11-01

    In intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy free energy is available to drive a transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instability. The finite transverse geometry of the confined beam makes a detailed theoretical investigation difficult. In this paper the newly developed bEASt (beam eigenmode and spectra) code which solves the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations is used to investigate the detailed properties of the Weibel instability for a long charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical pipe of radius r_w. The stability analysis is carried out for azimuthally symmetric perturbations about a two-temperature thermal equilibrium distribution in the smooth-focusing approximation. To study the nonlinear stage of the instability, the Darwin model is being developed and incorporated into the Beam Equilibrium Stability and Transport(BEST) code.

  1. Irradiation of Neurons with High-Energy Charged Particles: An In Silico Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Murat; Parihar, Vipan K.; Limoli, Charles L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a stochastic computational model of microscopic energy deposition events is used to study for the first time damage to irradiated neuronal cells of the mouse hippocampus. An extensive library of radiation tracks for different particle types is created to score energy deposition in small voxels and volume segments describing a neuron’s morphology that later are sampled for given particle fluence or dose. Methods included the construction of in silico mouse hippocampal granule cells from neuromorpho.org with spine and filopodia segments stochastically distributed along the dendritic branches. The model is tested with high-energy 56Fe, 12C, and 1H particles and electrons. Results indicate that the tree-like structure of the neuronal morphology and the microscopic dose deposition of distinct particles may lead to different outcomes when cellular injury is assessed, leading to differences in structural damage for the same absorbed dose. The significance of the microscopic dose in neuron components is to introduce specific local and global modes of cellular injury that likely contribute to spine, filopodia, and dendrite pruning, impacting cognition and possibly the collapse of the neuron. Results show that the heterogeneity of heavy particle tracks at low doses, compared to the more uniform dose distribution of electrons, juxtaposed with neuron morphology make it necessary to model the spatial dose painting for specific neuronal components. Going forward, this work can directly support the development of biophysical models of the modifications of spine and dendritic morphology observed after low dose charged particle irradiation by providing accurate descriptions of the underlying physical insults to complex neuron structures at the nano-meter scale. PMID:26252394

  2. A low-energy charged particle distribution imager with a compact sensor for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Berg, K.; Cameron, T.; Enno, G. A.; Marcellus, C. G.; King, E. P.; Wevers, I.; King, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Low-energy plasmas having temperatures of order 1 eV or less are found commonly in the ionospheres and space environments of Earth and other planets. Measuring the density, temperature, drift velocities, phase-space anisotropies, and other properties of these plasmas presents numerous challenges. Examples are distortions of particle trajectories due to spacecraft wakes, spacecraft charging, and particle gyromotion in magnetized plasmas. Furthermore, these plasmas are known to organize into structures as small as tens of meters across, traversed by spacecraft in tens of milliseconds or less. The Suprathermal Plasma Imager (SPI) was developed to address these challenges. The SPI is optimized for measurements of particles with ~1 eV energies, and of the suprathermal extension of those populations up to several hundred eV. The SPI is sensitive to particle flux intensities of order 6×105 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 eV-1 and greater. It produces 3024-pixel images corresponding to two-dimensional (angle/energy) cuts through plasma velocity distribution functions, with an image frame rate of up to 100 s-1. The SPI has a cylindrical sensor head measuring 37.5 mm in diameter and 14 cm long, with a mass of 350 g. The relatively small size and mass of the sensor allow it to be deployed easily on a boom, outside of the spacecraft's electrical sheath and in a region where wake perturbations are reduced. The SPI sensor head contains no electronic circuitry, but instead creates a visible image of the particle distribution with a system of dc-biased grids, microchannel plates, and a phosphor screen. The phosphor image is transferred via an imaging fiber-optic cable to an instrument box in the main spacecraft body, where it is sampled with a charge-coupled device and support electronics. Inside the sensor, angle/energy images of incident particle distributions are formed by a pair of concentric hemispherical grids. The incident energies Ei accessible to the analyzer lie in the range 0<=Ei

  3. Low-Energy Charged Particles in Saturn's Magnetosphere: Results from Voyager 1.

    PubMed

    Krimigis, S M; Armstrong, T P; Axford, W I; Bostrom, C O; Gloeckler, G; Keath, E P; Lanzerotti, L J; Carbary, J F; Hamilton, D C; Roelof, E C

    1981-04-10

    The low-energy charged particle instrument on Voyager 1 measured low-energy electrons and ions (energies >/= 26 and >/= 40 kiloelectron volts, respectively) in Saturn's magnetosphere. The first-order ion anisotropies on the dayside are generally in the corotation direction with the amplitude decreasing with decreasing distance to the planet. The ion pitch-angle distributions generally peak at 90 degrees , whereas the electron distributions tend to have field-aligned bidirectional maxima outside the L shell of Rhea. A large decrease in particle fluxes is seen near the L shell of Titan, while selective particle absorption (least affecting the lowest energy ions) is observed at the L shells of Rhea, Dione, and Tethys. The phase space density of ions with values of the first invariant in the range approximately 300 to 1000 million electron volts per gauss is consistent with a source in the outer magnetosphere. The ion population at higher energies (>/= 200 kiloelectron volts per nucleon) consists primarily of protons, molecular hydrogen, and helium. Spectra of all ion species exhibit an energy cutoff at energies >/= 2 million electron volts. The proton-to-helium ratio at equal energy per nucleon is larger (up to approximately 5 x 10(3)) than seen in other magnetospheres and is consistent with a local (nonsolar wind) proton source. In contrast to the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Earth, there are no lobe regions essentially devoid of particles in Saturn's nighttime magnetosphere. Electron pitch-angle distributions are generally bidirectional andfield-aligned, indicating closed field lines at high latitudes. Ions in this region are generally moving toward Saturn, while in the magnetosheath they exhibit strong antisunward streaming which is inconsistent with purely convective flows. Fluxes of magnetospheric ions downstream from the bow shock are present over distances >/= 200 Saturn radii from the planet. Novel features identified in the Saturnian magnetosphere include a

  4. Energy losses and transition radiation produced by the interaction of charged particles with a graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mišković, Zoran L.; Segui, Silvina; Gervasoni, Juana L.; Arista, Néstor R.

    2016-09-01

    We present a fully relativistic formulation of the energy loss of a charged particle traversing a conductive monoatomic layer and apply it to the case of graphene in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). We use two models of conductivity appropriate for different frequency regimes: (a) THz (terahertz) frequency range and (b) optical range. In each range we distinguish two types of contributions to the electron energy loss: the energy deposited in graphene in the form of electronic excitations (Ohm losses), and the energy that is emitted in the form of radiation. We find strong relativistic effects in the electron energy loss spectra, which are manifested, e.g., in the increased heights of the principal π and σ +π peaks that may be observed in TEM in the optical range. While the radiative energy losses are suppressed in the optical range in comparison to the Ohmic losses, we find that these two contributions are comparable in magnitude in the THz range, where the response of doped graphene is dominated by the Dirac plasmon polariton (DPP). In particular, relative contributions of the Ohmic and radiative energy losses are strongly affected by the damping of DPP. In the case of a clean graphene with low damping, the angular distribution of the radiated spectra at the sub-THz frequencies exhibit strong and possibly observable skewing towards graphene.

  5. Z1/3/ contribution to the energy loss of heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, S. H., Jr.; Sung, C. C.

    1979-01-01

    The Z1(3) contribution of distant collisions to the average energy loss of heavy charged particles is obtained by extending Bethe's quantum-mechanical calculation to the next highest order in Z1. The second-order Born approximation for the inelastic-collision cross section is simplified by using two major approximations. The infinite summation over terms arising from the coupling to intermediate states of the target atom is approximated with the aid of a parameter and the closure relation. This parameter is proportional to the average excitation energy of the intermediate states as described in the literature. The atomic form factors are simplified through a dipole expansion. Results are obtained in terms of an average excitation energy of the medium. Exemplary results for stopping in Al are presented for estimated values of the average excitation energy of the intermediate states. These results approach the classical and experimental values as the velocity of the penetrating particle increases, agreeing within 20% at beta = 0.3.

  6. Z1/3/ contribution to the energy loss of heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, S. H., Jr.; Sung, C. C.

    1979-01-01

    The Z1(3) contribution of distant collisions to the average energy loss of heavy charged particles is obtained by extending Bethe's quantum-mechanical calculation to the next highest order in Z1. The second-order Born approximation for the inelastic-collision cross section is simplified by using two major approximations. The infinite summation over terms arising from the coupling to intermediate states of the target atom is approximated with the aid of a parameter and the closure relation. This parameter is proportional to the average excitation energy of the intermediate states as described in the literature. The atomic form factors are simplified through a dipole expansion. Results are obtained in terms of an average excitation energy of the medium. Exemplary results for stopping in Al are presented for estimated values of the average excitation energy of the intermediate states. These results approach the classical and experimental values as the velocity of the penetrating particle increases, agreeing within 20% at beta = 0.3.

  7. Cellular and molecular analysis of mutagenesis induced by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L. X.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannias, D.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) and gamma rays was scored using human-hamster hybrid AL cells. The LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility ranged from 10 keV/microm protons to 150 keV/microm 4He ions. The induced mutant fractions at both the S1 and HGPRT loci were dependent on the dose and LET. In addition, for each dose examined, the mutant yield at the S1 locus was 30-60 fold higher than at the corresponding HGPRT locus. To determine whether the mutation spectrum was comparably dependent on dose and LET, independent S1- and HGPRT- mutants induced by 150 keV/microm 4He ions and gamma rays were isolated, and their DNA was analyzed by both Southern blotting and multiplex PCR methods. While the majority of radiation-induced mutants showed deletions of varying sizes, the relative percentage of large deletions was found to be related to both the dose and LET of the radiation examined. Using a mutation system that can detect multilocus changes, results of the present study show that radiation-induced chromosomal loss can be in the millions of base pairs.

  8. Cellular and molecular analysis of mutagenesis induced by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L X; Waldren, C A; Vannias, D; Hei, T K

    1996-03-01

    Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) and gamma rays was scored using human-hamster hybrid AL cells. The LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility ranged from 10 keV/microm protons to 150 keV/microm 4He ions. The induced mutant fractions at both the S1 and HGPRT loci were dependent on the dose and LET. In addition, for each dose examined, the mutant yield at the S1 locus was 30-60 fold higher than at the corresponding HGPRT locus. To determine whether the mutation spectrum was comparably dependent on dose and LET, independent S1- and HGPRT- mutants induced by 150 keV/microm 4He ions and gamma rays were isolated, and their DNA was analyzed by both Southern blotting and multiplex PCR methods. While the majority of radiation-induced mutants showed deletions of varying sizes, the relative percentage of large deletions was found to be related to both the dose and LET of the radiation examined. Using a mutation system that can detect multilocus changes, results of the present study show that radiation-induced chromosomal loss can be in the millions of base pairs.

  9. Cellular and molecular analysis of mutagenesis induced by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L. X.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannias, D.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) and gamma rays was scored using human-hamster hybrid AL cells. The LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility ranged from 10 keV/microm protons to 150 keV/microm 4He ions. The induced mutant fractions at both the S1 and HGPRT loci were dependent on the dose and LET. In addition, for each dose examined, the mutant yield at the S1 locus was 30-60 fold higher than at the corresponding HGPRT locus. To determine whether the mutation spectrum was comparably dependent on dose and LET, independent S1- and HGPRT- mutants induced by 150 keV/microm 4He ions and gamma rays were isolated, and their DNA was analyzed by both Southern blotting and multiplex PCR methods. While the majority of radiation-induced mutants showed deletions of varying sizes, the relative percentage of large deletions was found to be related to both the dose and LET of the radiation examined. Using a mutation system that can detect multilocus changes, results of the present study show that radiation-induced chromosomal loss can be in the millions of base pairs.

  10. Streams of Charged Particles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-28

    This graphic shows the different streams of charged particles inside the bubble around our sun and outside, in the unexplored territory of interstellar space. The heliosheath, where NASA two Voyager spacecraft are now traveling, is shown in red.

  11. Splitting of a high-energy positively-charged particle beam with a bent crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandiera, L.; Kirillin, I. V.; Bagli, E.; Berra, A.; De Salvador, D.; Guidi, V.; Lietti, D.; Mazzolari, A.; Prest, M.; Shul'ga, N. F.; Sytov, A.; Vallazza, E.

    2017-07-01

    The possibility of high-energy positively-charged particle beam splitting by means of a short bent axially oriented silicon crystal was recently reported in an experiment carried out at CERN SPS H8 extracted line with a 400 GeV/c proton beam. Here, we investigate more deeply such a possibility focusing our attention on the efficiency of beam splitting and its modulation for different crystal-to-beam orientations. New experimental results confirm the possibility of modulating the 400 GeV/c proton beam intensity in different planar channels by adjusting the orientation of the crystal. Furthermore, an analysis of the beam splitting efficiency vs. the curvature of the crystal was carried out through simulation, highlighting that there exists a bending radius for which the efficiency is maximal.

  12. Single-crystal CVD diamond detector for low-energy charged particles with energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Yuki Sato; Hiroyuki Murakami; Takehiro Shimaoka; Masakatsu Tsubota; Junichi, H. Kaneko

    2015-07-01

    The performance of a diamond detector made of a single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition was studied for charged particles, having energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV. Energy peaks of these low-energy ions were clearly observed. However, we observed that the pulse height for individual incident ion decreases with increasing atomic number of the ions. We estimated the charge collection efficiency of the generated charge carriers by charged particle incident. The charge collection above ∼95% is achieved for helium (He{sup +}) with the energy above 1.5 MeV. On the other hand, the charge collection efficiency for heavy-ions shows wrong values compared with that of He{sup +}, ∼70% for silicon (Si{sup +}) and 35 to 40% for gold (Au{sup 3+}), at the same incident energy range, respectively. (authors)

  13. Direct electron-pair production by high energy heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Dong, B. L.

    1989-01-01

    Direct electron pain production via virtual photons by moving charged particles is a unique electro-magnetic process having a substantial dependence on energy. Most electro-magnetic processes, including transition radiation, cease to be sensitive to the incident energy above 10 TeV/AMU. Thus, it is expected, that upon establishment of cross section and detection efficiency of this process, it may provide a new energy measuring technique above 10 TeV/AMU. Three accelerator exposures of emulsion chambers designed for measurements of direct electron-pains were performed. The objectives of the investigation were to provide the fundamental cross-section data in emulsion stacks to find the best-fit theoretical model, and to provide a calibration of measurements of direct electron-pairs in emulsion chamber configurations. This paper reports the design of the emulsion chambers, accelerator experiments, microscope measurements, and related considerations for future improvements of the measurements, and for possible applications to high energy cosmic ray experiments. Also discussed are the results from scanning 56m of emulsion tracks at 1200x magnification so that scanning efficiency is optimized. Measurements of the delta-ray range spectrum were also performed for much shorter track lengths, but with sufficiently large statistics in the number of measured delta-rays.

  14. The knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum from the simultaneous EAS charged particles and muon density spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijay, Biplab; Banik, Prabir; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-09-01

    In this work we examine with the help of Monte Carlo simulation whether a consistent primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays emerges from both the experimentally observed total charged particles and muon size spectra of cosmic ray extensive air showers considering primary composition may or may not change beyond the knee of the energy spectrum. It is found that EAS-TOP observations consistently infer a knee in the primary energy spectrum provided the primary is pure unchanging iron whereas no consistent primary spectrum emerges from simultaneous use of the KASCADE observed total charged particle and muon spectra. However, it is also found that when primary composition changes across the knee the estimation of spectral index of total charged particle spectrum is quite tricky, depends on the choice of selection of points near the knee in the size spectrum.

  15. Energy exchange between a laser beam and charged particles using inverse transition radiation and method for its use

    DOEpatents

    Kimura, Wayne D.; Romea, Richard D.; Steinhauer, Loren C.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for exchanging energy between relativistic charged particles and laser radiation using inverse diffraction radiation or inverse transition radiation. The beam of laser light is directed onto a particle beam by means of two optical elements which have apertures or foils through which the particle beam passes. The two apertures or foils are spaced by a predetermined distance of separation and the angle of interaction between the laser beam and the particle beam is set at a specific angle. The separation and angle are a function of the wavelength of the laser light and the relativistic energy of the particle beam. In a diffraction embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the diffraction effect due to the apertures in the optical elements. In a transition embodiment, the interaction between the laser and particle beams is determined by the transition effect due to pieces of foil placed in the particle beam path.

  16. Apolipoprotein E expression and behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nelson, Gregory A.; Vazquez, Marcelo; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Slater, James M.; Pearlstein, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a lipid binding protein that plays an important role in tissue repair following brain injury. In the present studies, we have investigated whether apoE affects the behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation. METHODS: Sixteen male apoE knockout (KO) mice and sixteen genetically matched wild-type (WT) C57BL mice were used in this experiment. Half of the KO and half of the WT animals were irradiated with 600 MeV/amu iron particles (2 Gy whole body). The effect of irradiation on motor coordination and stamina (Rotarod test), exploratory behavior (open field test), and spatial working and reference memory (Morris water maze) was assessed. ROTAROD TEST: Performance was adversely affected by radiation exposure in both KO and WT groups at 30 d after irradiation. By 60 d after radiation, the radiation effect was lost in WT, but still apparent in irradiated KO mice. OPEN FIELD TEST: Radiation reduced open field exploratory activity 14, 28, 56, 84, and 168 d after irradiation of KO mice, but had no effect on WT mice. MORRIS WATER MAZE: Radiation adversely affected spatial working memory in the KO mice, but had no discernible effect in the WT mice as assessed 180 d after irradiation. In contrast, irradiated WT mice showed marked impairment of spatial reference memory in comparison to non-irradiated mice, while no effect of radiation was observed in KO mice. CONCLUSIONS: These studies show that apoE expression influences the behavioral toxicity of HZE particle radiation and suggest that apoE plays a role in the repair/recovery from radiation injury of the CNS. ApoE deficiency may exacerbate the previously reported effects of HZE particle radiation in accelerating the brain aging process.

  17. Apolipoprotein E expression and behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nelson, Gregory A.; Vazquez, Marcelo; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Slater, James M.; Pearlstein, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a lipid binding protein that plays an important role in tissue repair following brain injury. In the present studies, we have investigated whether apoE affects the behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation. METHODS: Sixteen male apoE knockout (KO) mice and sixteen genetically matched wild-type (WT) C57BL mice were used in this experiment. Half of the KO and half of the WT animals were irradiated with 600 MeV/amu iron particles (2 Gy whole body). The effect of irradiation on motor coordination and stamina (Rotarod test), exploratory behavior (open field test), and spatial working and reference memory (Morris water maze) was assessed. ROTAROD TEST: Performance was adversely affected by radiation exposure in both KO and WT groups at 30 d after irradiation. By 60 d after radiation, the radiation effect was lost in WT, but still apparent in irradiated KO mice. OPEN FIELD TEST: Radiation reduced open field exploratory activity 14, 28, 56, 84, and 168 d after irradiation of KO mice, but had no effect on WT mice. MORRIS WATER MAZE: Radiation adversely affected spatial working memory in the KO mice, but had no discernible effect in the WT mice as assessed 180 d after irradiation. In contrast, irradiated WT mice showed marked impairment of spatial reference memory in comparison to non-irradiated mice, while no effect of radiation was observed in KO mice. CONCLUSIONS: These studies show that apoE expression influences the behavioral toxicity of HZE particle radiation and suggest that apoE plays a role in the repair/recovery from radiation injury of the CNS. ApoE deficiency may exacerbate the previously reported effects of HZE particle radiation in accelerating the brain aging process.

  18. High throughput on-chip analysis of high-energy charged particle tracks using lensfree imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Wei; Shabbir, Faizan; Gong, Chao; Gulec, Cagatay; Pigeon, Jeremy; Shaw, Jessica; Greenbaum, Alon; Tochitsky, Sergei; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-04-13

    We demonstrate a high-throughput charged particle analysis platform, which is based on lensfree on-chip microscopy for rapid ion track analysis using allyl diglycol carbonate, i.e., CR-39 plastic polymer as the sensing medium. By adopting a wide-area opto-electronic image sensor together with a source-shifting based pixel super-resolution technique, a large CR-39 sample volume (i.e., 4 cm × 4 cm × 0.1 cm) can be imaged in less than 1 min using a compact lensfree on-chip microscope, which detects partially coherent in-line holograms of the ion tracks recorded within the CR-39 detector. After the image capture, using highly parallelized reconstruction and ion track analysis algorithms running on graphics processing units, we reconstruct and analyze the entire volume of a CR-39 detector within ∼1.5 min. This significant reduction in the entire imaging and ion track analysis time not only increases our throughput but also allows us to perform time-resolved analysis of the etching process to monitor and optimize the growth of ion tracks during etching. This computational lensfree imaging platform can provide a much higher throughput and more cost-effective alternative to traditional lens-based scanning optical microscopes for ion track analysis using CR-39 and other passive high energy particle detectors.

  19. High throughput on-chip analysis of high-energy charged particle tracks using lensfree imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Shabbir, Faizan; Gong, Chao; Gulec, Cagatay; Pigeon, Jeremy; Shaw, Jessica; Greenbaum, Alon; Tochitsky, Sergei; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a high-throughput charged particle analysis platform, which is based on lensfree on-chip microscopy for rapid ion track analysis using allyl diglycol carbonate, i.e., CR-39 plastic polymer as the sensing medium. By adopting a wide-area opto-electronic image sensor together with a source-shifting based pixel super-resolution technique, a large CR-39 sample volume (i.e., 4 cm × 4 cm × 0.1 cm) can be imaged in less than 1 min using a compact lensfree on-chip microscope, which detects partially coherent in-line holograms of the ion tracks recorded within the CR-39 detector. After the image capture, using highly parallelized reconstruction and ion track analysis algorithms running on graphics processing units, we reconstruct and analyze the entire volume of a CR-39 detector within ˜1.5 min. This significant reduction in the entire imaging and ion track analysis time not only increases our throughput but also allows us to perform time-resolved analysis of the etching process to monitor and optimize the growth of ion tracks during etching. This computational lensfree imaging platform can provide a much higher throughput and more cost-effective alternative to traditional lens-based scanning optical microscopes for ion track analysis using CR-39 and other passive high energy particle detectors.

  20. Eikonal approximation in the theory of energy loss by fast charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, V. I. Makarov, D. N.; Gusarevich, E. S.

    2011-05-15

    Energy losses in fast charged particles as a result of collisions with atoms are considered in the eikonal approximation. It is shown that the nonperturbative contribution to effective stopping in the range of intermediate impact parameters (comparable with the characteristic sizes of the electron shells of the target atoms) may turn out to be significant as compared to shell corrections to the Bethe-Bloch formula calculated in perturbation theory. The simplifying assumptions are formulated under which the Bethe-Bloch formula can be derived in the eikonal approximation. It is shown that the allowance for nonperturbative effects may lead to considerable (up to 50%) corrections to the Bethe-Bloch formula. The applicability range for the Bethe-Bloch formula is analyzed. It is concluded that calculation of the energy loss in the eikonal approximation (in the range of impact parameters for which the Bethe-Bloch formula is normally used) is much more advantageous than analysis based on the Bethe-Bloch formula and its modifications because not only the Bloch correction is included in the former calculations, the range of intermediate impact parameters is also taken into account nonperturbatively; in addition, direct generalization to the cases of collisions of complex projectiles and targets is possible in this case.

  1. Detection of Charged Particles with Charge Injection Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, K.A.; Apker, B.; Hammond, S.; Punaro, J.; Marshall, F.J.; Laine, J.; Forties, R.

    2007-07-02

    A method for using charge injection devices (CIDs) for detection of high-energy charged particles from inertial-confinement fusion reactions is described. Because of the relatively small depletion region of the CID camera (depletion depth of ~7 um), aluminum foils are placed in front of the device to reduce the energy of the charged particles and maximize the energy deposited in the CID. Simultaneous measurements of ^2H(d,p)^3H protons with a CID and a surface barrier detector indicate that the CID is an efficient detector of charged fusion products. Tests using high energy alpha particles emitted from a radium-226 source are also reported.

  2. Scalar self-energy for a charged particle in global monopole spacetime with a spherical boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Saharian, A. A.

    2012-07-01

    We analyze combined effects of the geometry produced by a global monopole and a concentric spherical boundary on the self-energy of a point-like scalar charged test particle at rest. We assume that the boundary is outside the monopole’s core with a general spherically symmetric inner structure. An important quantity to this analysis is the three-dimensional Green function associated with this system. For both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions obeyed by the scalar field on the sphere, the Green function presents a structure that contains contributions due to the background geometry of the spacetime and the boundary. Consequently, the corresponding induced scalar self-energy also presents a similar structure. For points near the sphere, the boundary-induced part dominates and the self-force is repulsive/attractive with respect to the boundary for Dirichlet/Neumann boundary condition. In the region outside the sphere at large distances from it, the boundary-free part in the self-energy dominates and the corresponding self-force can be either attractive or repulsive with dependence of the curvature coupling parameter for scalar field. In particular, for the minimal coupling we show the presence of a stable equilibrium point for the Dirichlet boundary condition. In the region inside the sphere, the nature of the self-force depends on the specific model for the monopole’s core. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, we shall consider two distinct models, namely the flower-pot and the ballpoint-pen ones.

  3. High-speed MCP anodes for high time resolution low-energy charged particle spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Yokota, Shoichiro; Asamura, Kazushi; Krieger, Amanda

    2017-02-01

    The time resolution of low-energy charged particle measurements is becoming higher and higher. In order to realize high time resolution measurements, a 1-D circular delay line anode has been developed as a high-speed microchannel plate (MCP) anode. The maximum count rate of the 1-D circular delay line anode is around 1 × 107/s/360°, which is much higher than the widely used resistive anode, whose maximum count rate is around 1 × 106/s/360°. In order to achieve much higher speeds, an MCP anode with application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) has been developed. We have decided to adopt an anode configuration in which a discrete anode is formed on a ceramic substrate, and a bare ASIC chip is installed on the back of the ceramic. It has been found that the anode can detect at a high count rate of 2 × 108/s/360°. Developments in both delay line and discrete anodes, as well as readout electronics, will be reviewed.

  4. Charge composition and energy spectral of cosmic ray primary particles for energies higher than 1 TeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernov, S. N.; Ivanenko, I. P.; Grigorov, N. L.; Basina, Y. V.; Vakulov, P. V.; Vasilyev, Y. Y.; Golinskaya, R. M.; Grigoryeva, L. B.; Zhuravlev, D. A.; Zatsepin, V. I.

    1985-01-01

    Onboard the Cosmos-I543 satellite an experiment was performed to investigate the charge composition and primary cosmic ray energy spectrum for energies higher than I TeV. Preliminary experimental data are reported.

  5. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-01-26

    The measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron ( K0s or Λ/Λ- ) and a charged particle, emitted in pPb collisions, are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 35 nb-1, were collected at a nucleon–nucleon center-of-mass energy (√sNN ) of 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. Our results are compared to semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at √sNN , covering similar charged-particle multiplicities in the events. The observed azimuthal correlations at large relative pseudorapidity are used to extract the second-order (v2) andmore » third-order (v3) anisotropy harmonics of K0s and Λ/Λ- particles. These quantities are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in the event and the transverse momentum of the particles. For high-multiplicity pPb events, a clear particle species dependence of v2 and v3 is observed. For pT<2 GeV, the v2 and v3 values of K0s particles are larger than those of particles at the same pT. This splitting effect between two particle species is found to be stronger in pPb than in PbPb collisions in the same multiplicity range. When divided by the number of constituent quarks and compared at the same transverse kinetic energy per quark, both v2 and v3 for K0s particles are observed to be consistent with those for Λ/Λ- particles at the 10% level in pPb collisions. This consistency extends over a wide range of particle transverse kinetic energy and event multiplicities.« less

  6. Electrodynamics of massless charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Kurt

    2015-02-15

    We derive the classical dynamics of massless charged particles in a rigorous way from first principles. Since due to ultraviolet divergences this dynamics does not follow from an action principle, we rely on (a) Maxwell’s equations, (b) Lorentz- and reparameterization-invariance, and (c) local conservation of energy and momentum. Despite the presence of pronounced singularities of the electromagnetic field along Dirac-like strings, we give a constructive proof of the existence of a unique distribution-valued energy-momentum tensor. Its conservation requires the particles to obey standard Lorentz equations and they experience, hence, no radiation reaction. Correspondingly, the dynamics of interacting classical massless charged particles can be consistently defined, although they do not emit bremsstrahlung end experience no self-interaction.

  7. Energy deposition rates by charged particles measured during the energy budget campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, A.; Torkar, K. M.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Grandal, B.; Smith, L. G.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV to MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched from Northern Scandinavia are reported together with corresponding satellite data. The downgoing integral fluxes indicate the temporal fluctuations during each flight. Height profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance are given.

  8. Energy deposition rates by charged particles measured during the energy budget campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, A.; Torkar, K. M.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Grandal, B.; Smith, L. G.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV to MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched from Northern Scandinavia are reported together with corresponding satellite data. The downgoing integral fluxes indicate the temporal fluctuations during each flight. Height profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance are given.

  9. A Closed Parameterization of DNA–Damage by Charged Particles, as a Function of Energy — A Geometrical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To present a closed formalism calculating charged particle radiation damage induced in DNA. The formalism is valid for all types of charged particles and due to its closed nature is suited to provide fast conversion of dose to DNA-damage. Methods The induction of double strand breaks in DNA–strings residing in irradiated cells is quantified using a single particle model. This leads to a proposal to use the cumulative Cauchy distribution to express the mix of high and low LET type damage probability generated by a single particle. A microscopic phenomenological Monte Carlo code is used to fit the parameters of the model as a function of kinetic energy related to the damage to a DNA molecule embedded in a cell. The model is applied for four particles: electrons, protons, alpha–particles, and carbon ions. A geometric interpretation of this observation using the impact ionization mean free path as a quantifier, allows extension of the model to very low energies. Results The mathematical expression describes the model adequately using a chi–square test (). This applies to all particle types with an almost perfect fit for protons, while the other particles seem to result in some discrepancies at very low energies. The implementation calculating a strict version of the RBE based on complex damage alone is corroborated by experimental data from the measured RBE. The geometric interpretation generates a unique dimensionless parameter for each type of charged particle. In addition, it predicts a distribution of DNA damage which is different from the current models. PMID:25340636

  10. Fractionally Charged Zero-Energy Single-Particle Excitations in a Driven Fermi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalets, Michael

    2016-07-01

    A voltage pulse of a Lorentzian shape carrying half of the flux quantum excites out of a zero-temperature Fermi sea an electron in a mixed state, which looks like a quasiparticle with an effectively fractional charge e /2 . A prominent feature of such an excitation is a narrow peak in the energy distribution function lying exactly at the Fermi energy μ . Another spectacular feature is that the distribution function has symmetric tails around μ , which results in a zero-energy excitation. This sounds improbable since at zero temperature all available states below μ are fully occupied. The resolution lies in the fact that such a voltage pulse also excites electron-hole pairs, which free some space below μ and thus allow a zero-energy quasiparticle to exist. I discuss also how to address separately electron-hole pairs and a fractionally charged zero-energy excitation in an experiment.

  11. Review of the Microdosimetric Studies for High-Energy Charged Particle Beams Using a Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Shuichi; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Sasaki, Shinichi

    Lineal energy (y) distributions were measured for various types of charged particles such as protons and iron, with kinetic energies of up to 500 MeV/u, via the use of a wall-less tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Radial dependencies of y distributions were also experimentally evaluated to investigate the track structures of protons, carbon, and iron beams. This paper reviews a series of measured data using the aforementioned TEPC as well as assesses the systematic verification of a microdosimetric calculation model of a y distribution incorporated into the particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS) and associated track structure models.

  12. The Ionic Charge of Solar Energetic Particles with Energies of 0.3-70 MeV per Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetliker, M.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Mason, G. M.; Mazur, J. E.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.

    1997-03-01

    With the three particle sensors Low Energy Ion Composition Analyzer (LICA), Heavy Ion Large Area Proportional Counter Telescope (HILT), and Mass Spectrometer Telescope (MAST) on board the polar-orbiting Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) satellite, the ionic charge of solar energetic particles (SEP) was measured over a wide energy range from 0.3 to 70 MeV per nucleon. For each sensor, the evaluation was performed separately. The results obtained with LICA (0.3-10 MeV per nucleon) and MAST (15-70 MeV per nucleon) were published earlier by Mason et al. and Leske et al., respectively. In this work we present the results of the HILT sensor (7-50 MeV per nucleon) and discuss the combined results of the three instruments. With HILT, the mean ionic charge of SEP was measured for carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, argon, calcium, and iron in the energy range 7-50 MeV per nucleon during two consecutive large SEP events in 1992 October-November. The mean ionic charge was inferred from the rigidity-dependent geomagnetic flux cutoff. The coronal temperatures deduced from the mean ionic charges are well in accordance with the value of ~2 × 106 K except for neon and magnesium, as previously reported. The data measured with the three sensors, LICA, HILT, and MAST, agree well and are in accordance with data previously measured at energies below 3 MeV per nucleon (Luhn et al.), except for iron, where we observed a significant energy dependence of the mean charge over the energy range 0.3-70 MeV per nucleon.

  13. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  14. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  15. Moment-Preserving Computational Approach for High Energy Charged Particle Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-16

    61 Figure 35: Comparison with Lockwood data for 500-keV (left) and 1000-keV (right) electrons normally on tantalum slab...with 60 degrees off-normal incidence on tantalum slab. ...................................................... 63 Figure 39: Charge deposition... tantalum semi-infinite slabs. .............................. 57 Table 12: Total energy deposition comparison for 500-keV and 1000-keV electrons with

  16. CHARGE-EXCHANGE LIMITS ON LOW-ENERGY {alpha}-PARTICLE FLUXES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Woods, T. N.

    2012-06-20

    This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary {alpha} particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He II bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. We study 10 events in total, including the {gamma}-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic particles. The absence of charge-exchange line wings may point to a need for more complete theoretical work. Some of the events do have broadband signatures, which could correspond to continua from other origins, but these do not have the spectral signatures expected from the Orrall-Zirker mechanism.

  17. Mixtures of latex particles and the surfactant of opposite charge used as interface stabilizers--influence of particle contact angle, zeta potential, flocculation and shear energy.

    PubMed

    Deleurence, Rémi; Parneix, Caroline; Monteux, Cécile

    2014-09-28

    We investigate the stabilization of air-water interfaces by mixtures of negatively charged latex particles (sulfate polystyrene) and cationic surfactants (alkyl trimethylammonium bromides). First we report results concerning the binding of surfactant molecules to the latex particles. As the surfactant concentration increases, the charge of the particles reverses, from negative to positive, because CnTAB first binds electrostatically to the latex particles and then through hydrophobic interaction with the monolayer already adsorbed on the particles as well as directly with the hydrophobic surface of the latex. Over a large range of surfactant concentrations around the charge inversion, a strong flocculation is observed and 100 μm large aggregates form in the suspension. Unlike previous studies published on mixtures of inorganic particles with oppositely charged surfactants, we show that we can vary the sign of the zeta potential of the particles without changing the contact angle of the particles over a large range of surfactant concentrations. Indeed, the latex particles that we study are more hydrophobic than inorganic particles, hence adding moderate concentrations of the surfactant results in a weak variation of the contact angle while the charge of the particles can be reversed. This enables decoupling of the effect of zeta potential and contact angle on the interfacial properties of the mixtures. Our study shows that the contact angle and the charge of the particles are not sufficient parameters to control the foam properties, and the key-parameters are the flocculation state and the shear energy applied to produce the foam. Indeed, flocculated samples, whatever the sign of the zeta potential, enable production of a stable armour at the interface. The large aggregates do not adsorb spontaneously at the interface because of their large size, however when a large shear energy is used to produce the foam very stable foam is obtained, where particles are trapped

  18. Magnetic guidance of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbers, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Many experiments and devices in physics use static magnetic fields to guide charged particles from a source onto a detector, and we ask the innocent question: What is the distribution of particle intensity over the detector surface? One should think that the solution to this seemingly simple problem is well known. We show that, even for uniform guide fields, this is not the case, and we present analytical point spread functions (PSF) for magnetic transport that deviate strongly from previous results. The "magnetic" PSF shows unexpected singularities, which were recently also observed experimentally, and which make detector response very sensitive to minute changes of position, field amplitude, or particle energy. In the field of low-energy particle physics, these singularities may become a source of error in modern high precision experiments, or may be used for instrument tests.

  19. Coulomb effects in high-energy e+e- electroproduction by a heavy charged particles in an atomic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krachkov, P. A.; Milstein, A. I.

    2017-08-01

    The cross section of high-energy e+e- pair production by a heavy charged particle in the atomic field is investigated in detail. We take into account the interaction with the atomic field of e+e- pair and a heavy particle as well. The calculation is performed exactly in the parameters of the atomic field. It is shown that, in contrast to the commonly accepted point of view, the cross section differential with respect to the final momentum of a heavy particle is strongly affected by the interaction of a heavy particle with the atomic field. However, the cross section integrated over the final momentum of a heavy particle is independent of this interaction.

  20. Integrated development facility for the calibration of low-energy charged particle flight instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, A. P.; Reynolds, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The design of a low-energy ion facility for development and calibration of thermal ion instrumentation is examined. A directly heated cathode provides the electrons used to produce ions by impact ionization and an applied magnetic field increases the path length followed by the electrons. The electrostatic and variable geometry magnetic mirror configuration in the ion source is studied. The procedures for the charge neutralization of the beam and the configuration and function of the 1.4-m drift tube are analyzed. A microcomputer is utilized to control and monitor the beam energy and composition, and the mass- and angle-dependent response of the instrument under testing. The facility produces a high-quality ion beam with an adjustable range of energies up to 150 eV; the angular divergence and uniformity of the beam is obtained from two independent retarding potential analyzers. The procedures for calibrating the instrument being developed are described.

  1. Interplanetary charged particle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art knowledge of the solar wind, solar particle events, and galactic cosmic rays is reviewed for the development of space vehicle design criteria based on these interplanetary environments. These criteria are described quantitatively in terms of intensity, flux and fluence, and their dependences on time, position and energy, and the associated probabilities and related parameters, for electrons, protons and other ions.

  2. Two Instruments for Measuring Distributions of Low-Energy Charged Particles in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bader, Michel; Fryer, Thomas B.; Witteborn, Fred C.

    1961-01-01

    Current estimates indicate that the bulk of interplanetary gas consists of protons with energies between 0 and 20 kev and concentrations of 1 to 105 particles/cu cm. Methods and instrumentation for measuring the energy and density distribution of such a gas are considered from the standpoint of suitability for space vehicle payloads. It is concluded that electrostatic analysis of the energy distribution can provide sufficient information in initial experiments. Both magnetic and electrostatic analyzers should eventually be used. Several instruments designed and constructed at the Ames Research Center for space plasma measurements, and the methods of calibration and data reduction are described. In particular, the instrument designed for operation on solar cell power has the following characteristics: weight, 1.1 pounds; size, 2 by 3 by 4 inches; and power consumption, 145 mw. The instrument is designed to yield information on the concentration, energy distribution, and the anisotropy of ion trajectories in the 0.2 to 20 kev range.

  3. Energy dependence of the transverse momentum distributions of charged particles in pp collisions measured by ALICE.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B; Adam, J; Adamová, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agnello, M; Agocs, A G; Agostinelli, A; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, N; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahmed, I; Ahn, S A; Ahn, S U; Aimo, I; Aiola, S; Ajaz, M; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alexandre, D; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Alves Garcia Prado, C; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Äystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldisseri, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Bán, J; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Batzing, P C; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Bedda, C; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Bencedi, G; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Bergognon, A A E; Bertens, R A; Berzano, D; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhom, J; Bianchi, L; Bianchi, N; Bianchin, C; Bielčík, J; Bielčíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bjelogrlic, S; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Bock, F; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bornschein, J; Botje, M; Botta, E; Böttger, S; Braidot, E; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Broker, T A; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Brun, R; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Buncic, P; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Caliva, A; Calvo Villar, E; Camerini, P; Canoa Roman, V; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carminati, F; Casanova Díaz, A; Castillo Castellanos, J; Casula, E A R; Catanescu, V; Cavicchioli, C; Ceballos Sanchez, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Chojnacki, M; Choudhury, S; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, S U; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Colamaria, F; Colella, D; Collu, A; Colocci, M; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M E; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortese, P; Cortés Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Crochet, P; Cruz Albino, R; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; Dang, R; Danu, A; Das, K; Das, D; Das, I; Dash, A; Dash, S; De, S; Delagrange, H; Deloff, A; Dénes, E; Deppman, A; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gruttola, D; De Marco, N; De Pasquale, S; de Rooij, R; Diaz Corchero, M A; Dietel, T; Divià, R; Di Bari, D; Di Giglio, C; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Djuvsland, Ø; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Dönigus, B; Dordic, O; Dubey, A K; Dubla, A; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, A K; D Erasmo, G; Elia, D; Emschermann, D; Engel, H; Erazmus, B; Erdal, H A; Eschweiler, D; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Esumi, S; Evans, D; Evdokimov, S; Eyyubova, G; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fehlker, D; Feldkamp, L; Felea, D; Feliciello, A; Feofilov, G; Fernández Téllez, A; Ferreiro, E G; Ferretti, A; Festanti, A; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floratos, E; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Francescon, A; Frankenfeld, U; Fuchs, U; Furget, C; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhøje, J J; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A; Gallio, M; Gangadharan, D R; Ganoti, P; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Gargiulo, C; Garishvili, I; Gerhard, J; Germain, M; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Ghidini, B; Ghosh, P; Gianotti, P; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glässel, P; Goerlich, L; Gomez, R; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Gotovac, S; Graczykowski, L K; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoras, A; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, A; Grigoryan, S; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J-Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerzoni, B; Guilbaud, M; Gulbrandsen, K; Gulkanyan, H; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Khan, K H; Haake, R; Haaland, Ø; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harris, J W; Harton, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, S; Hayrapetyan, A; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hippolyte, B; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hřivnáčová, I; Huang, M; Humanic, T J; Hutter, D; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Incani, E; Innocenti, G M; Ionita, C; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivanov, V; Ivanov, M; Ivanytskyi, O; Jachołkowski, A; Jahnke, C; Jang, H J; Janik, M A; Jayarathna, P H S Y; Jena, S; Jimenez Bustamante, R T; Jones, P G; Jung, H; Jusko, A; Kalcher, S; Kaliňák, P; Kalliokoski, T; Kalweit, A; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Kar, S; Karasu Uysal, A; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kazantsev, A; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Ketzer, B; Khan, S A; Khan, M M; Khan, P; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kileng, B; Kim, S; Kim, D W; Kim, D J; Kim, B; Kim, T; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kim, J S; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Kiss, G; Klay, J L; Klein, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Knospe, A G; Köhler, M K; Kollegger, T; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskikh, A; Kovalenko, V; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G; Kral, J; Králik, I; Kramer, F; Kravčáková, A; Krelina, M; Kretz, M; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Krus, M; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucera, V; Kucheriaev, Y; Kugathasan, T; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kulakov, I; Kumar, J; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A B; Kurepin, A; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, S; Kushpil, V; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Lagana Fernandes, C; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; La Pointe, S L; La Rocca, P; Lea, R; Lechman, M; Lee, S C; Lee, G R; Legrand, I; Lehnert, J; Lemmon, R C; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; León Monzón, I; Lévai, P; Li, S; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Ljunggren, H M; Lodato, D F; Loenne, P I; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Lohner, D; Loizides, C; Loo, K K; Lopez, X; López Torres, E; Løvhøiden, G; Lu, X-G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luo, J; Luparello, G; Luzzi, C; Jacobs, P M; Ma, R; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malinina, L; Mal'Kevich, D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Markert, C; Marquard, M; Martashvili, I; Martin, N A; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez García, G; Martin Blanco, J; Martynov, Y; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastroserio, A; Matyja, A; Mazer, J; Mazumder, R; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mercado Pérez, J; Meres, M; Miake, Y; Mikhaylov, K; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miśkowiec, D; Mitu, C; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Montaño Zetina, L; Monteno, M; Montes, E; Moon, T; Morando, M; Moreira De Godoy, D A; Moretto, S; Morreale, A; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Müller, H; Munhoz, M G; Murray, S; Musa, L; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nedosekin, A; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Nielsen, B S; Nikolaev, S; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Nilsen, B S; Nilsson, M S; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Nyanin, A; Nyatha, A; Nystrand, J; Oeschler, H; Oh, S K; Oh, S; Olah, L; Oleniacz, J; Oliveira Da Silva, A C; Onderwaater, J; Oppedisano, C; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Oskarsson, A; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pachr, M; Pagano, P; Paić, G; Painke, F; Pajares, C; Pal, S K; Palaha, A; Palmeri, A; Papikyan, V; Pappalardo, G S; Park, W J; Passfeld, A; Patalakha, D I; Paticchio, V; Paul, B; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Pereira Da Costa, H; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E; Peresunko, D; Pérez Lara, C E; Perrino, D; Peryt, W; Pesci, A; Pestov, Y; Petráček, V; Petran, M; Petris, M; Petrov, P; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Piano, S; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Pitz, N; Piyarathna, D B; Planinic, M; Płoskoń, M; Pluta, J; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Polichtchouk, B; Poljak, N; Pop, A; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Pospíšil, V; Potukuchi, B; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puddu, G; Punin, V; Putschke, J; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Rademakers, A; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rathee, D; Rauch, W; Rauf, A W; Razazi, V; Read, K F; Real, J S; Redlich, K; Reed, R J; Rehman, A; Reichelt, P; Reicher, M; Reidt, F; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J-P; Reygers, K; Riccati, L; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Rivetti, A; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M; Rodriguez Manso, A; Røed, K; Rogochaya, E; Rohni, S; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Rosnet, P; Rossegger, S; Rossi, A; Roy, P; Roy, C; Rubio Montero, A J; Rui, R; Russo, R; Ryabinkin, E; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Šafařík, K; Sahoo, R; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Sakaguchi, H; Sakai, S; Sakata, D; Salgado, C A; Salzwedel, J; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sanchez Castro, X; Šándor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Santagati, G; Santoro, R; Sarkar, D; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schulc, M; Schuster, T; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, R; Scott, P A; Segato, G; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seo, J; Serci, S; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Shabetai, A; Shabratova, G; Shahoyan, R; Sharma, S; Sharma, N; Shigaki, K; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siddhanta, S; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Simatovic, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singha, S; Singhal, V; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Skjerdal, K; Smakal, R; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R J M; Søgaard, C; Soltz, R; Song, M; Song, J; Soos, C; Soramel, F; Spacek, M; Sputowska, I; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Steinpreis, M; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stiller, J H; Stocco, D; Stolpovskiy, M; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Subieta Vásquez, M A; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Suleymanov, M; Sultanov, R; Šumbera, M; Susa, T; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarka, I; Szczepankiewicz, A; Szymański, M; Takahashi, J; Tangaro, M A; Tapia Takaki, J D; Tarantola Peloni, A; Tarazona Martinez, A; Tauro, A; Tejeda Muñoz, G; Telesca, A; Terrevoli, C; Ter Minasyan, A; Thäder, J; Thomas, D; Tieulent, R; Timmins, A R; Toia, A; Torii, H; Trubnikov, V; Trzaska, W H; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Ulery, J; Ullaland, K; Ulrich, J; Uras, A; Urciuoli, G M; Usai, G L; Vajzer, M; Vala, M; Valencia Palomo, L; Vande Vyvre, P; Vannucci, L; Van Hoorne, J W; van Leeuwen, M; Vargas, A; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vechernin, V; Veldhoen, M; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Vergara, S; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Viinikainen, J; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Vinogradov, Y; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Völkl, M A; Voloshin, S; Voloshin, K; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vorobyev, I; Vranic, D; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, B; Wagner, V; Wagner, J; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, M; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Weber, M; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, G; Wilkinson, J; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Winn, M; Xiang, C; Yaldo, C G; Yamaguchi, Y; Yang, H; Yang, P; Yang, S; Yano, S; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yoo, I-K; Yushmanov, I; Zaccolo, V; Zach, C; Zampolli, C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zgura, I S; Zhalov, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, Y; Zhang, H; Zhang, X; Zhou, D; Zhou, Y; Zhou, F; Zhu, X; Zhu, J; Zhu, J; Zhu, H; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, M B; Zimmermann, A; Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M; Zyzak, M

    Differential cross sections of charged particles in inelastic pp collisions as a function of pT have been measured at [Formula: see text] at the LHC. The pT spectra are compared to NLO-pQCD calculations. Though the differential cross section for an individual [Formula: see text] cannot be described by NLO-pQCD, the relative increase of cross section with [Formula: see text] is in agreement with NLO-pQCD. Based on these measurements and observations, procedures are discussed to construct pp reference spectra at [Formula: see text] up to pT=50 GeV/c as required for the calculation of the nuclear modification factor in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions.

  4. Quasi-energy spectrum and dynamical localizations of two charged particles in a one-dimensional lattice system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Suqing, Duan; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2006-04-01

    The quasi-energy spectrum of two charged particles in a one-dimensional lattice system driven by an external field are theoretically studied with the help of numerical calculations. It is found that the quasi-energy spectrum splits into two regions. In the gourd-shaped region the Floquet states mainly contain the Wannier states |l,m> (l≠m), which describe the two particles occupy the different sites. The (avoid) crossing points in this region are corresponding to the dynamical localizations of the two particles which initially occupy on different sites when the distance between the initial sites is large. These conditions of dynamical localization are the same as that in single particle system. In the other region (electron electron or electron hole pair region), the Floquet states mainly contain the Wannier states |l,l>, which describe the two particles simultaneously occupy the lth site. The (avoid) crossing points in this region are corresponding to the dynamical localizations of the two particles happening which initially occupy on same site.

  5. Health risks of space exploration: targeted and nontargeted oxidative injury by high-charge and high-energy particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Gonon, Géraldine; Buonanno, Manuela; Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; de Toledo, Sonia M; Pain, Debkumar; Azzam, Edouard I

    2014-03-20

    During deep space travel, astronauts are often exposed to high atomic number (Z) and high-energy (E) (high charge and high energy [HZE]) particles. On interaction with cells, these particles cause severe oxidative injury and result in unique biological responses. When cell populations are exposed to low fluences of HZE particles, a significant fraction of the cells are not traversed by a primary radiation track, and yet, oxidative stress induced in the targeted cells may spread to nearby bystander cells. The long-term effects are more complex because the oxidative effects persist in progeny of the targeted and affected bystander cells, which promote genomic instability and may increase the risk of age-related cancer and degenerative diseases. Greater understanding of the spatial and temporal features of reactive oxygen species bursts along the tracks of HZE particles, and the availability of facilities that can simulate exposure to space radiations have supported the characterization of oxidative stress from targeted and nontargeted effects. The significance of secondary radiations generated from the interaction of the primary HZE particles with biological material and the mitigating effects of antioxidants on various cellular injuries are central to understanding nontargeted effects and alleviating tissue injury. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the cellular responses to HZE particles, particularly under reduced gravity and situations of exposure to additional radiations, such as protons, should be useful in reducing the uncertainty associated with current models for predicting long-term health risks of space radiation. These studies are also relevant to hadron therapy of cancer.

  6. Thick-lens velocity-map imaging spectrometer with high resolution for high-energy charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, N. G.; Paul, D.; Gura, A.; Laurent, G.; De, S.; Li, H.; Wang, Z.; Ahn, B.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, T. K.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Cocke, C. L.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Kim, D.; Kling, M. F.

    2014-05-01

    A novel design for a velocity-map imaging (VMI) spectrometer with high resolution over a wide energy range surpassing a standard VMI design is reported. The main difference to a standard three-electrode VMI is the spatial extension of the applied field using 11 electrodes forming a thick-lens. This permits measurements of charged particles with higher energies while achieving excellent resolving power over a wide range of energies. Using SIMION simulations, the thick-lens VMI is compared to a standard design for up to 360 eV electrons. The simulations also show that the new spectrometer design is suited for charged-particle detection with up to 1 keV using a repeller-electrode voltage of -30 kV. The experimental performance is tested by laser-induced ionization of rare gases producing electrons up to about 70 eV. The thick-lens VMI is useful for a wide variety of studies on atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in intense laser fields and high-photon-energy fields from high-harmonic-generation or free-electron lasers.

  7. Direct Observations of the Charge States of Low Energy Solar Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fan, C. Y.; Hovestadt, D.

    1973-01-01

    The charge states of carbon and oxygen of solar origin were measured directly in interplanetary space. At 100 keV per nucleon the C(+5)/C(+6) and O(+7)/O(+8) ratios are 1.8 and 1.6 respectively. It was found that the abundance ratios of low energy heavy nuclei to He is significantly larger than corresponding photospheric values: the enhancement of O/He is 35 and both Si/He and Fe/He are overabundant by a factor of 100. To explain these observations a mechanism is proposed which first preferentially accelerates heavy ions and is followed by either storage of these ions in the coronal regions or strong adiabatic deceleration.

  8. Direct observations of the charge states of low energy solar particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fan, C. Y.; Hovestadt, D.

    1974-01-01

    The charge states of carbon and oxygen of solar origin have been measured directly in interplanetary space. At 100 keV per nucleon the C(+5)/C(+6) and O(+7)/O(+8) ratios are 1.8 and 1.6, respectively. Abundance ratios of low energy heavy nuclei to He are found which are significantly larger than the corresponding photospheric values. The enhancement of O/He is 35, and both Si/He and Fe/He are overabundant by a factor of 100. To explain these observations a mechanism is proposed which first preferentially accelerates heavy ions and is followed by either storage of these ions in the coronal regions or strong adiabatic deceleration.

  9. Effect of albedo particles on charge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, N.H.; Ahn, H.S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J.H.; Jeon, J.A.; Kim, C.H.; Kim, K.C.; Lee, M.H.; Lutz, L.; Malinin, A.; Nam, S.; Park, I.H.; Park, J.H.; Seo, E.S.; Walpole, P.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Yoo, J.H.; Yoon, Y.S.; Zinn, S.Y.

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) investigation is designed to make direct measurements of high energy cosmic-ray particles at the top of the atmosphere. The Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) provides charge measurements of all primary particles from protons to iron nuclei. As the SCD is mounted above the calorimeter, albedo particles backscattered from the calorimeter are one of the major background sources for charge measurements. The SCD with double layers of the silicon sensors in the calorimeter module was tested with high-energy electron and hadron beams at CERN in October 2006. The efficiency of the charge reconstruction is studied using the beam test data and GEANT based Monte Carlo simulation data. Effects of albedo particles on charge measurements will be discussed in this paper.

  10. Magnetometer Application for GAMMA-400 Telescope Switching into the Mode with Increased Low Energy Charged Particles Intensity Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khyzhniak, E. V.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Chasovikov, E. N.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Topchiev, N. P.

    GAMMA-400 is an international project of a high apogee orbital astrophysical observatory for studying the characteristics of high-energy gamma-emission, electrons/positrons and light nuclei fluxes. The energy range for γ-rays and electrons/positrons registration in the main aperture is from ∼0.1 GeV to ∼3.0 TeV. Also, this aperture allows high energy light nuclei fluxes characteristics investigation. Moreover, special aperture configuration allows registering of gamma-quanta, electrons (positrons) and light nuclei from the lateral directions too. The spacecraft GAMMA-400 orbit will be located in the Earth's magnetosphere and will pass front shock wave from magnetosphere interaction with the solar wind, turbulent-transition region, magnetopause and so on. During the satellite's movement through various Earth's magnetosphere regions its anticoincidence detectors will register high intensity fluxes of low energy charged particles captured by the magnetic field. The working area sections of GAMMA-400 detector systems used as anticoincidence shield are about 1 m2 each. The high intensity low energy charged particles flux influence on anticoincidence detectors should be taken into account during particle identification. This article presents a comparison between Earth's magnetosphere theoretical model according to SPENVIIS package and real data measured by detectors onboard THEMIS series satellites. The differences between these two datasets indicate that the calculated data are not sufficient to make short time predictions of variations of magnetic induction in the outer magnetosphere. A special trigger marker flag will be produced by GAMMA-400 counting and triggers signals formation system accordingly to the data of two onboard magnetometers. This flag's presence leads to special algorithms execution start, putting the plastic detectors into a dedicated working mode taking into account possible high count rates of external detector layers.

  11. Timing capabilities of garnet crystals for detection of high energy charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchini, M. T.; Gundacker, S.; Lecoq, P.; Benaglia, A.; Nikl, M.; Kamada, K.; Yoshikawa, A.; Auffray, E.

    2017-04-01

    Particle detectors at future collider experiments will operate at high collision rates and thus will have to face high pile up and a harsh radiation environment. Precision timing capabilities can help in the reconstruction of physics events by mitigating pile up effects. In this context, radiation tolerant, scintillating crystals coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) can provide a flexible and compact option for the implementation of a precision timing layer inside large particle detectors. In this paper, we compare the timing performance of aluminum garnet crystals (YAG: Ce, LuAG: Ce, GAGG: Ce) and the improvements of their time resolution by means of codoping with Mg2+ ions. The crystals were read out using SiPMs from Hamamatsu glued to the rear end of the scintillator and their timing performance was evaluated by measuring the coincidence time resolution (CTR) of 150 GeV charged pions traversing a pair of crystals. The influence of crystal properties, such as density, light yield and decay kinetics on the timing performance is discussed. The best single detector time resolutions are in the range of 23-30 ps (sigma) and only achieved by codoping the garnet crystals with divalent ions, such as Mg2+. The much faster scintillation decay in the co-doped samples as compared to non co-doped garnets explains the higher timing performance. Samples of LSO: Ce, Ca and LYSO:Ce crystals have also been used as reference time device and showed a time resolution at the level of 17 ps, in agreement with previous results.

  12. Charge-collection efficiency of single-crystal CVD diamond detector for low-energy charged particles with energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuki; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Shimaoka, Takehiro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Kaneko, Junichi H.

    2016-10-01

    The performance of a diamond detector created from a single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition was studied for application in detecting charged particles having energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV. Energy peaks of different low-energy ions were clearly observed. However, we observed that the pulse height for individual incident ions decreases with increasing atomic number of the ions. We estimated the charge collection efficiency of the generated charge carriers by the incident charged particles. The charge collection efficiencies are 97.0 ± 0.7% for 2 MeV helium-ions (He+). On the other hand, compared with that of He+, silicon-ions (Si+) and gold-ions (Au3+) show low charge collection efficiency: 70.6 ± 2.2% and 29.5 ± 4.2% for 2 MeV-Si+ and 2 MeV-Au3+, respectively. We also found that the charge collection efficiency decreases as the generated charge density inside the diamond crystal increases.

  13. Centrality and energy dependence of charged-particle multiplicities in heavy ion collisions in the context of elementary reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Carroll, A.; Gushue, S.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Remsberg, L. P.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Betts, R. R.; Garcia, E.; Halliwell, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Kucewicz, W.; McLeod, D.

    2006-08-15

    The PHOBOS experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured the total multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of collision centrality in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})= 19.6, 130, and 200 GeV. An approximate independence of / on the number of participating nucleons is observed, reminiscent of 'wounded nucleon' scaling (N{sub ch}{proportional_to}N{sub part}) observed in proton-nucleus collisions. Unlike p+A, the constant of proportionality does not seem to be set by the pp/pp data at the same energy. Rather, there seems to be a surprising correspondence with the total multiplicity measured in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations, as well as the rapidity shape measured over a large range. The energy dependence of the integrated multiplicity per participant pair shows that e{sup +}e{sup -} and A+A data agree over a large range of center-of-mass energies ({radical}(s)>20 GeV), and pp/pp data can be brought to agree approximately with the e{sup +}e{sup -} data by correcting for the typical energy taken away by leading particles. This is suggestive of a mechanism for soft particle production that depends mainly on the amount of available energy. It is conjectured that the dominant distinction between A+A and p+p collisions is the multiple collisions per participant, which appears to be sufficient to substantially reduce the energy taken away by leading particles.

  14. Verification of charge sign for high-energy particles measured by magnetic tracking system of PAMELA spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, A. D.; Alekseev, V. V.; Bogomolov, Yu V.; Dunaeva, O. A.; Malakhov, V. V.; Mayorov, A. G.; Rodenko, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of experimental data of primary positrons and antiprotons fluxes obtained by PAMELA spectrometer, recently confirmed by AMS-02 spectrometer, for some reasons is of big interest for scientific community, especially for energies higher than 100 GV, where appearance of signal coming from dark matter particles is possible. In this work we present a method for verification of charge sign for high-energy antiprotons, measured by magnetic tracking system of PAMELA spectrometer, which can be immitated by protons due to scattering or finite instrumental resolution at high energies (so-called “spillover”). We base our approach on developing2 a set of distinctive features represented by differently computed rigidities and training AdaBoost classifier, which shows good classification accuracy on Monte-Carlo simulation data of 98% for rigidity up to 600 GV.

  15. Results of measurement of the response of a delta-doped Charge Coupled Device (CCD) to low energy neutral and charged particles and vacuum ultra-violet photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond; Nikzad, Shouleh; Davis, Michael; Slater, David; Jones, Todd

    We have measured the response of a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed delta-doped Charge Coupled Device (CCD) to beams of neutral and charge particle beams over an energy range from 0.8 to 20 keV/e. The species investigated include H0, H+, He+, N+, N2+, and Ar+, using the particle calibration facility at the Southwest Research Institute R (SwRI R ). The response of the CCD was also measured over the wavelength range from 584 to 3324 ˚ A at SwRI R . Details will be given in the paper. Both the particle and VUV measurements are extensions of those previously performed by JPL. Our interest in the delta-doped CCD is its possibility as a detector in plasma or UV flight instruments, replacing the microchannel plate (MCP) detector conventionally used for such instruments. The CCD does not require high voltage to operate, as does the MCP, permitting design of simpler, lower mass and power instruments. Such instruments would allow lower mass spacecraft for exploration of planetary body atmospheres.

  16. Modeling of low-energy charged particles passage through GAMMA-400 gamma-telescope thermal insulation and two- layer plastic scintillation detectors used as anticoincidence shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasovikov, E. N.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Kheymits, M. D.; Yurkin, Yu T.

    2016-02-01

    The results of low-energy charged particles passage through GAMMA-400 gamma- telescope thermal insulation and two-layer plastic scintillation detectors used as anticoincidence shield are presented. An existing GEANT4 GAMMA-400 model is used. Effects of thermal insulation on charged particle passage are investigated. These results will be used to testing the effect of low-energy charged particles flux on GAMMA-400 gamma-quanta registration capabilities. Sufficiently large energy deposition in two-layer plastic anticoincidence scintillation detectors might interfere with high-energy particle registration and identification. However, GAMMA-400 detection capabilities are not affected by this, as the energy deposition in the lower layer of S3 is less than 1.5 MeV in all simulated cases. This value is less than threshold for high energy particles identification start (2.5 MeV). It makes impossible to incorrectly identify a low-energy charged particle energy deposition as backsplash from a high-energy gamma-quantum.

  17. System Size, Energy, and Centrality Dependence of Pseudorapidity Distributions of Charged Particles in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Chai, Z.; Holzman, B.; Nouicer, R.; Pak, R.; Sedykh, I.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Szostak, A.; Wyngaardt, S.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.

    2009-04-10

    We present the first measurements of the pseudorapidity distribution of primary charged particles in Cu+Cu collisions as a function of collision centrality and energy, {radical}(s{sub NN})=22.4, 62.4, and 200 GeV, over a wide range of pseudorapidity, using the PHOBOS detector. A comparison of Cu+Cu and Au+Au results shows that the total number of produced charged particles and the rough shape (height and width) of the pseudorapidity distributions are determined by the number of nucleon participants. More detailed studies reveal that a more precise matching of the shape of the Cu+Cu and Au+Au pseudorapidity distributions over the full range of pseudorapidity occurs for the same N{sub part}/2A rather than the same N{sub part}. In other words, it is the collision geometry rather than just the number of nucleon participants that drives the detailed shape of the pseudorapidity distribution and its centrality dependence at RHIC energies.

  18. Sequential charged-particle and neutron activation of Flibe in the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J.F.; Tobin, M.T.; Vujic, J.L.; Sanz, J.

    1996-06-14

    Most radionuclide generation/depletion codes consider only neutron reactions and assume that charged particles, which may be generated in these reactions, deposit their energy locally without undergoing further nuclear interactions. Neglect of sequential charged-particle (x,n) reactions can lead to large underestimation in the inventories of radionuclides. PCROSS code was adopted for use with the ACAB activation code to enable calculation of the effects of (x,n) reactions upon radionuclide inventories and inventory-related indices. Activation calculations were made for Flibe (2LiF + BeF{sub 2}) coolant in the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design. For pure Flibe coolant, it was found that (x,n) reactions dominate the residual contact dose rate at times of interest for maintenance and decommissioning. For impure Flibe, however, radionuclides produced directly in neutron reaction dominate the contact dose rate and (x,n) reactions do not make a significant contribution. Results demonstrate potential importance of (x,n) reactions and that the relative importance of (x,n) reactions varies strongly with the composition of the material considered. Future activation calculations should consider (x,n) reactions until a method for pre-determining their importance is established.

  19. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-04-01

    Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  20. Acceleration technologies for charged particles: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Particle accelerators have many important uses in scientific experiments, in industry and in medicine. This paper reviews the variety of technologies which are used to accelerate charged particles to high energies. It aims to show how the capabilities and limitations of these technologies are related to underlying physical principles. The paper emphasises the way in which different technologies are used together to convey energy from the electrical supply to the accelerated particles.

  1. Health Risks of Space Exploration: Targeted and Nontargeted Oxidative Injury by High-Charge and High-Energy Particles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Gonon, Géraldine; Buonanno, Manuela; Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Pain, Debkumar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: During deep space travel, astronauts are often exposed to high atomic number (Z) and high-energy (E) (high charge and high energy [HZE]) particles. On interaction with cells, these particles cause severe oxidative injury and result in unique biological responses. When cell populations are exposed to low fluences of HZE particles, a significant fraction of the cells are not traversed by a primary radiation track, and yet, oxidative stress induced in the targeted cells may spread to nearby bystander cells. The long-term effects are more complex because the oxidative effects persist in progeny of the targeted and affected bystander cells, which promote genomic instability and may increase the risk of age-related cancer and degenerative diseases. Recent Advances: Greater understanding of the spatial and temporal features of reactive oxygen species bursts along the tracks of HZE particles, and the availability of facilities that can simulate exposure to space radiations have supported the characterization of oxidative stress from targeted and nontargeted effects. Critical Issues: The significance of secondary radiations generated from the interaction of the primary HZE particles with biological material and the mitigating effects of antioxidants on various cellular injuries are central to understanding nontargeted effects and alleviating tissue injury. Future Directions: Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the cellular responses to HZE particles, particularly under reduced gravity and situations of exposure to additional radiations, such as protons, should be useful in reducing the uncertainty associated with current models for predicting long-term health risks of space radiation. These studies are also relevant to hadron therapy of cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1501–1523. PMID:24111926

  2. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  3. Testing model energy spectra of charged particles produced in hadron interactions on the basis of atmospheric muons

    SciTech Connect

    Dedenko, L. G.; Roganova, T. M.; Fedorova, G. F.

    2015-10-15

    An original method for calculating the spectrum of atmospheric muons with the aid of the CORSIKA 7.4 code package and numerical integration is proposed. The first step consists in calculating the energy distribution of muons for various fixed energies of primary-cosmic-ray particles and within several chosen hadron-interaction models included in the CORSIKA 7.4 code package. After that, the spectrum of atmospheric muons is calculated via integrating the resulting distribution densities with the chosen spectrum of primary-cosmic-ray particles. The atmospheric-muon fluxes that were calculated on the basis of the SIBYLL 2.1, QGSJET01, and QGSJET II-04 models exceed the predictions of the wellknown Gaisser approximation of this spectrum by a factor of 1.5 to 1.8 in the range of muon energies between about 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} GeV.Under the assumption that, in the region of extremely highmuon energies, a dominant contribution to the muon flux comes from one to two generations of charged π{sup ±} and K{sup ±} mesons, the production rate calculated for these mesons is overestimated by a factor of 1.3 to 1.5. This conclusion is confirmed by the results of the LHCf and TOTEM experiments.

  4. Bent silicon strip crystals for high-energy charged particle beam collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germogli, G.; Mazzolari, A.; Guidi, V.; Romagnoni, M.

    2017-07-01

    For applications in high energy particles accelerators, such as the crystal-assisted beam collimation, several strip crystals exploiting anticlastic curvature were produced in the last decade at the Sensor and Semiconductor Laboratory (SSL) of Ferrara by means of revisited techniques for silicon micromachining, such as photolitography and wet etching. Those techniques were recently enhanced by introducing a further treatment called Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF), which allowed to fabricate crystals with ultraflat surface and miscut very close to zero. The technology of the mechanical devices used to hold and bend crystals has been also improved by employing a titanium alloy to realize the holders. Characterization method were also improved: the usage of a high resolution X-rays diffractometer was introduced to directly measure crystal bending and torsion. Accuracy of the diffractometer was furtherly enhanced with an autocollimator, which found an important application in miscut characterization. A new infrared light interferometer was used to map the thickness of the starting swafers with sub-micrometric precision, as well as to measure the length along the beam of the strips. Crystals were characterized at the H8 external lines of CERN-SPS with various hundreds-GeV ion beams, which gave results in agreement with the precharacterization performed at SSL. One strip was selected among the crystals to be installed in the LHC beam pipe during the Long Shutdown 1 in 2014. These crystals were very recently tested in a crystal-assisted collimation experiment with a 6.5 TeV proton beam, resulting in the first observation of channeling at this record energy, being also the first observation of channeling of the beam circulating in the LHC.

  5. Method to select gamma rays with energy above 50 GeV against a charge-particle background in the GAMMA-400 space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Galper, A. M.; Kadilin, V.; Arkhangelskaya, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Zverev, V. G.; Kaplin, V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Runtso, M. F.; Suchkov, S. I.; Topchiev, N. P.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Bakaldin, A.; Dalkarov, O.

    2016-02-01

    Studying high-energy (>50GeV) cosmic gamma radiation raises a problem of selection of neutral gamma rays from a background of charged particles. The problem is embarrassed by the backsplash effect. The backsplash consists, in the main, of low-energy (1 MeV) secondary photons moving backwards and is produced by any high-energy gamma quantum. A charged-particle rejection method using the anticoincidence and time-of-flight systems is proposed. Charged-particle events are distinguished from those being triggered by high-energy gamma-rays producing backsplash. The method is based on the time separation of signals. It allows us to keep the gamma-ray detection efficiency high up to high energies.

  6. Fog dispersion. [charged particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, L. S.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of using the charged particle technique to disperse warm fog at airports is investigated and compared with other techniques. The charged particle technique shows potential for warm fog dispersal, but experimental verification of several significant parameters, such as particle mobility and charge density, is needed. Seeding and helicopter downwash techniques are also effective for warm fog disperals, but presently are not believed to be viable techniques for routine airport operations. Thermal systems are currently used at a few overseas airports; however, they are expensive and pose potential environmental problems.

  7. Charge, energy and LET spectra of high LET primary and secondary particles in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors of the P0006 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csige, I.; Frigo, L. A.; Benton, E. V.; Oda, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the charge, energy and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of about 800 high LET (LET(sub infinity) H2O greater than 50 keV/micron) particles in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors in the P0006 experiment of LDEF. Primary particles with residual range at the reference surface greater than about 2 microns and secondary particles produced in the detector material with total range greater than about 4 microns were measured. We have used a multi-etch technique and an internal calibration to identify and measure the energy of the particles at the reference surface. The LET spectrum was obtained from the charge and energy distribution of the particles.

  8. Charged particle therapy: the physics of interaction.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Antony J

    2009-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long and distinguished history with more than 50,000 patients having been treated, mainly with high-energy proton therapy. Particularly, for proton therapy, there is an increasing interest in exploiting the physical characteristics of charged particles for further improving the potential of radiation therapy. In this article, we review the most important interactions of charged particles with matter and describe the basic physical principles that underlie why particle beams behave the way they do and why such a behavior could bring many benefits in radiation therapy.

  9. Energetic Charged Particles Above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Diver, Declan; Pinçon, Jean-Louis; Phelps, Alan D. R.; Bourdon, Anne; Helling, Christiane; Blanc, Elisabeth; Honary, Farideh; Harrison, R. Giles; Sauvaud, Jean-André; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Lester, Mark; Rycroft, Michael; Kosch, Mike; Horne, Richard B.; Soula, Serge; Gaffet, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The French government has committed to launch the satellite TARANIS to study transient coupling processes between the Earth's atmosphere and near-Earth space. The prime objective of TARANIS is to detect energetic charged particles and hard radiation emanating from thunderclouds. The British Nobel prize winner C.T.R. Wilson predicted lightning discharges from the top of thunderclouds into space almost a century ago. However, new experiments have only recently confirmed energetic discharge processes which transfer energy from the top of thunderclouds into the upper atmosphere and near-Earth space; they are now denoted as transient luminous events, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and relativistic electron beams. This meeting report builds on the current state of scientific knowledge on the physics of plasmas in the laboratory and naturally occurring plasmas in the Earth's atmosphere to propose areas of future research. The report specifically reflects presentations delivered by the members of a novel Franco-British collaboration during a meeting at the French Embassy in London held in November 2011. The scientific subjects of the report tackle ionization processes leading to electrical discharge processes, observations of transient luminous events, electromagnetic emissions, energetic charged particles and their impact on the Earth's atmosphere. The importance of future research in this area for science and society, and towards spacecraft protection, is emphasized.

  10. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Schultz, Larry Joe; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Sossong, Michael James; Blanpied, Gary

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  11. Photoelectric Charging of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sickafoose, A.; Colwell, J.; Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.; Walch, B.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed on the photoelectric charging of dust particles which are either isolated or adjacent to a surface that is also a photoemitter. We find that zinc dust charges to a positive potential of a few volts when isolated in vacuum and that it charges to a negative potential of a few volts when passed by a photoemitting surface. The illumination is an arc lamp emitting wavelengths longer than 200 nm and the emitting surface is a zirconium foil.

  12. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  13. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  14. Charged particle periodicity in the Saturnian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the first definitive evidence for charged particle modulations near the magnetic rotation period at Saturn. This periodicity is apparent in the ratios (and spectra) of low energy charged particles in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Most of the data presented were taken during the Voyager 2 outbound portion of the Saturn encounter. During this time the spacecraft was at high latitudes (approximately 30 deg) in the southern hemisphere of the Saturnian magnetosphere. The probe's trajectory was approximately along the dawn meridian at an essentially constant local time. The observation that the charged particle modulation is consistent with the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) period provides a basic input for the resolution of a puzzle which has existed ever since the discovery of the SKR modulation. The charged particle periodicity identified suggests that a basic asymmetry must exist in the Saturnian magnetosphere.

  15. A multi-dimensional, energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.

    2015-12-01

    For decades, the Vlasov-Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic plasma simulations in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes, to avoid radiative noise issues and gain computational efficiency. However, the Darwin model results in an elliptic set of field equations that renders conventional explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. Here, we explore a fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov-Darwin model in multiple dimensions, which overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. The finite-difference scheme for Darwin field equations and particle equations of motion is space-time-centered, employing particle sub-cycling and orbit-averaging. The algorithm conserves total energy, local charge, canonical-momentum in the ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy considerations, not stability, and can be orders of magnitude larger than required in a standard explicit electromagnetic PIC simulation. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 2D-3V.

  16. A multi-dimensional, energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov–Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.

    2015-08-11

    For decades, the Vlasov–Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic plasma simulations in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes, to avoid radiative noise issues and gain computational efficiency. However, the Darwin model results in an elliptic set of field equations that renders conventional explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. We explore a fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov–Darwin model in multiple dimensions, which overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. The finite-difference scheme for Darwin field equations and particle equations of motion is space–time-centered, employing particle sub-cycling and orbit-averaging. This algorithm conserves total energy, local charge, canonical-momentum in the ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy considerations, not stability, and can be orders of magnitude larger than required in a standard explicit electromagnetic PIC simulation. Finally, we demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 2D–3V.

  17. A multi-dimensional, energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic Vlasov–Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.

    2015-08-11

    For decades, the Vlasov–Darwin model has been recognized to be attractive for particle-in-cell (PIC) kinetic plasma simulations in non-radiative electromagnetic regimes, to avoid radiative noise issues and gain computational efficiency. However, the Darwin model results in an elliptic set of field equations that renders conventional explicit time integration unconditionally unstable. We explore a fully implicit PIC algorithm for the Vlasov–Darwin model in multiple dimensions, which overcomes many difficulties of traditional semi-implicit Darwin PIC algorithms. The finite-difference scheme for Darwin field equations and particle equations of motion is space–time-centered, employing particle sub-cycling and orbit-averaging. This algorithm conserves total energy, local charge,more » canonical-momentum in the ignorable direction, and preserves the Coulomb gauge exactly. An asymptotically well-posed fluid preconditioner allows efficient use of large cell sizes, which are determined by accuracy considerations, not stability, and can be orders of magnitude larger than required in a standard explicit electromagnetic PIC simulation. Finally, we demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency properties of the algorithm with various numerical experiments in 2D–3V.« less

  18. CCD-Based Imaging of Low-Energy Charged Particle Distribution Functions on ePOP and Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Canadian Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) and the European Space Agency's three Swarm satellites are being readied for launch in September and November 2013, respectively. Each will carry instruments that incorporate a novel CCD-based charged-particle detector to provide 64-pixel-diameter images of 2-D, low-energy charged particle distributions. The ePOP Suprathermal Electron Imager (SEI) will produce distribution functions in pitch angle and energy up to 200 eV at rates of up to 100 per second, with the goal of characterizing photo and suprathermal electrons that can drive ion outflow. The SEI can also image ion distributions up to 20 eV. ePOP will be launched on a Space-X Falcon 9 rocket into a polar elliptical orbit with an apogee of 1500 km. The Swarm satellites will be launched on a Russian Rokot vehicle into circular polar orbits, two at an initial altitude of 450 km, the third at 530 km. Swarm will measure magnetic and electric fields, the latter indirectly through ion drift detected by two Thermal Ion Imagers (TII) in each instrument, with the aid of Langmuir probe measurements of spacecraft potential and electron density and temperature. Electric fields measurements will be produced at a cadence of 2 per second to produce a picture of ionospheric electrodynamics at scales from 4 km to global. Due to special emphasis on measurement precision, Swarm will be able to resolve variations in Poynting flux as small as 1 microWatt per square meter. We gratefully acknowledge the ePOP SEI technical development team at the University of Calgary, and funding from the Canadian Space Agency. The Swarm Electric Field Instruments were built by a COM DEV Canada in collaboration with the University of Calgary and the Swedish Institute for Space Physics in Uppsala, with funding from ESA and CSA.

  19. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  20. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D.; de Freitas, U.; Bezerra de Mello, E. R.

    2011-03-01

    We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green's function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopole's core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ballpoint-pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole.

  1. Contribution of High Charge and Energy (HZE) Ions During Solar-Particle Event of September 29, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Atwell, William; Badavi, Francis F.; Miller, Jack

    1999-01-01

    The solar-particle event (SPE) of September 29, 1989, produced an iron-rich spectrum with energies approaching 1 A GeV with an approximate spectral slope parameter of 2.5. These high charge and energy (HZE) ions challenge conventional methods of shield design and assessment of astronaut risks. In the past, shield design and risk assessment have relied on proton shielding codes and biological response models derived from X-ray and neutron exposure data. Because the HZE spectra decline rapidly with energy and HZE attenuation in materials is limited by their penetration power, details of the mass distributions about the sensitive tissues (shielding materials and the astronaut's body) are important determining factors of the exposure levels and distributions of linear energy transfer. Local tissue environments during the SPE of September 29, 1989, with its f= components are examined to analyze the importance of these ions to human SPE exposure. Typical space suit and lightly shielded structures leave significant contributions from HZE components to certain critical body tissues and have important implications on the models for risk assessment. A heavily shielded equipment room of a space vehicle or habitat requires knowledge of the breakup of these ions into lighter components, including neutrons, for shield design specifications.

  2. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  3. Hybrid charged-particle guide for studying (n, charged particle) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; White, R.M.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1982-08-25

    Charged-particle transport systems consisting of magnetic quadrupole lenses have been employed in recent years in the study of (n, charged particle) reactions. We have completed a new transport system that is based both on magnetic lenses as well as electrostatic fields. The magnetic focusing of this charged-particle guide is provided by six magnetic quadrupole lenses arranged in a CDCCDC sequence (in the vertical plane). The electrostatic field is produced by a wire at high voltage which stretches the length of the guide and is physically at the center of the magnetic axis. The magnetic lenses are used for charged particles above 5 MeV; the electrostatic guide is used for lower energies. This hybrid system possesses the excellent focusing and background rejection properties of other magnetic systems. For low energy charged-particles, the electrostatic transport avoids the narrow band-passes in charged-particle energy which are a problem with purely magnetic transport systems. This system is installed at the LLNL Cyclograaff facility for the study of (n, charged particle) reactions at neutron energies up to 35 MeV.

  4. Low Energy Charged Particle Measurement by MAP-PACE Onboard KAGUYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi.; Yokota, Shoichiro; Asamura, Kazushi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Nishino, Masaki; Mukai, Toshifumi; Mukai, Kaguya Map-Pace Team

    MAP-PACE (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment) is one of the scientific instruments onboard the KAGUYA (SELENE) satellite. PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). ESA-S1 and S2 measure the distribution function of low energy electrons below 15keV, while IMA and IEA measure the distribution function of mass identified low energy ions below 28keV/q. Since KAGUYA is a three-axis stabilized spacecraft, a pair of electron sensors (ESA-S1 and S2) and a pair of ion sensors (IMA and IEA) are necessary for obtaining three-dimensional distribution function of electrons and ions. Low energy ion measurements on the lunar orbit have been realized more than 30 years after the Apollo period. In addition, nobody has ever measured the mass identified three-dimensional distribution function of low energy ions at 100km altitude. PACE discovered surprisingly active low energy ion environment around the Moon. Instead of being absorbed by the lunar surface, quite a large amount of solar wind ions are reflected back from the Moon. The reflected solar wind ions are accelerated above solar wind energy picked up by the electric field in the solar wind.

  5. Metastable states of plasma particles close to a charged surface

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2015-09-15

    The free energy of the plasma particles and the charged surface that form an electroneutral system is calculated on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It is shown that, owing to correlation of light plasma particles near the charged surface and close to heavy particles of high charge, there can be metastable states in plasma. The corresponding phase charts of metastable states of the separate components of plasma, and plasma as a whole, are constructed. These charts depend on temperature, the charge magnitude, the size of the particles, and the share of the charge of the light carriers out of the total charge of the plasma particles.

  6. An integrated development facility for the calibration of low-energy charged particle flight instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, A. P.; Reynolds, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A system was developed for the calibration and development of thermal ion instrumentation. The system provides an extended beam with usable current rates, approx. 1 pA/sq cm, at beam energies as low as 1 eV, with much higher values available with increasing energy. A tandem electrostatic and variable geometry magnetic mirror configuration within the ion source optimizes the use of the ionizing electrons. The system is integrated under microcomputer control to allow automatic control and monitoring of the beam energy and composition and the mass and angle-dependent response of the instrument under test. The system is pumped by a combination of carbon vane and cryogenic sorption roughing pumps and ion and liquid helium operating pumps.

  7. Study of dust particle charging in weakly ionized inert gases taking into account the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Dyatko, N. A.; Kostenko, A. S.

    2014-11-15

    The charging of dust particles in weakly ionized inert gases at atmospheric pressure has been investigated. The conditions under which the gas is ionized by an external source, a beam of fast electrons, are considered. The electron energy distribution function in argon, krypton, and xenon has been calculated for three rates of gas ionization by fast electrons: 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14}, and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −1}. A model of dust particle charging with allowance for the nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function in the region of strong plasma quasi-neutrality violation around the dust particle is described. The nonlocality is taken into account in an approximation where the distribution function is a function of only the total electron energy. Comparative calculations of the dust particle charge with and without allowance for the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function have been performed. Allowance for the nonlocality is shown to lead to a noticeable increase in the dust particle charge due to the influence of the group of hot electrons from the tail of the distribution function. It has been established that the screening constant virtually coincides with the smallest screening constant determined according to the asymptotic theory of screening with the electron transport and recombination coefficients in an unperturbed plasma.

  8. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Santosh P.; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D.; Govindarajan, J.

    2013-02-15

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a= 25 cm and major radius, R= 75 cm) using a 45 Degree-Sign parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and {Delta}E/E of high-energy channel has been found to be {approx}10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature T{sub i}(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically T{sub e}(0) {approx} 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

  9. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Santosh P; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D; Govindarajan, J

    2013-02-01

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a = 25 cm and major radius, R = 75 cm) using a 45° parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and ΔE∕E of high-energy channel has been found to be ∼10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature Ti(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically Te(0) ∼ 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

  10. Low-energy charged particle measurement by MAP-PACE onboard SELENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Yokota, Shoichiro; Asamura, Kazushi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Akiba, Ryota; Fujimoto, Masaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Hajime; Hirahara, Masafumi; Hoshino, Masahiro; Machida, Shinobu; Mukai, Toshifumi; Nagai, Tsugunobu; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Masato; Oyama, Koh-ichiro; Sagawa, Eiichi; Sasaki, Susumu; Seki, Kanako; Terasawa, Toshio

    2008-04-01

    MAP-PACE (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment-Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment) is one of the scientific instruments onboard the SELENE (SELenological and ENgineering Explorer) satellite. PACE consists of four sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). ESA-S1 and S2 measure the distribution function of low-energy electrons below 15 keV, while IMA and IEA measure the distribution function of low energy ions below 28 keV/q. Each sensor has a hemispherical field of view. Since SELENE is a three-axis stabilized spacecraft, a pair of electron sensors (ESA-S1 and S2) and a pair of ion sensors (IMA and IEA) are necessary for obtaining a three-dimensional distribution function of electrons and ions. The scientific objectives of PACE are (1) to measure the ions sputtered from the lunar surface and the lunar atmosphere, (2) to measure the magnetic anomaly on the lunar surface using two ESAs and a magnetometer onboard SELENE simultaneously as an electron reflectometer, (3) to resolve the Moon-solar wind interaction, (4) to resolve the Moon-Earth's magnetosphere interaction, and (5) to observe the Earth's magnetotail.

  11. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Allman, S.L.; Chunghsuan Chen; Chen, F.C.

    1993-02-02

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  12. Optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence efficiencies for high-energy heavy charged particle irradiation in Al2O3:C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yukihara, E. G.; Gaza, R.; McKeever, S. W. S.; Soares, C. G.

    2004-01-01

    The thermally and optically stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) response to high energy heavy-charged particles (HCPs) was investigated for two types of Al2O3:C luminescence dosimeters. The OSL signal was measured in both continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed mode. The efficiencies of the HCPs at producing TL or OSL, relative to gamma radiation, were obtained using four different HCPs beams (150 MeV/u 4He, 400 MeV/u 12C, 490 MeV/u 28Si, and 500 MeV/u 56Fe). The efficiencies were determined as a function of the HCP linear energy transfer (LET). It was observed that the efficiency depends on the type of detector, measurement technique, and the choice of signal. Additionally, it is shown that the shape of the CW-OSL decay curve from Al2O3:C depends on the type of radiation, and, in principle, this can be used to extract information concerning the LET of an unknown radiation field. The response of the dosimeters to low-LET radiation was also investigated for doses in the range from about 1-1000 Gy. These data were used to explain the different efficiency values obtained for the different materials and techniques, as well as the LET dependence of the CW-OSL decay curve shape. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence efficiencies for high-energy heavy charged particle irradiation in Al2O3:C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yukihara, E. G.; Gaza, R.; McKeever, S. W. S.; Soares, C. G.

    2004-01-01

    The thermally and optically stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) response to high energy heavy-charged particles (HCPs) was investigated for two types of Al2O3:C luminescence dosimeters. The OSL signal was measured in both continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed mode. The efficiencies of the HCPs at producing TL or OSL, relative to gamma radiation, were obtained using four different HCPs beams (150 MeV/u 4He, 400 MeV/u 12C, 490 MeV/u 28Si, and 500 MeV/u 56Fe). The efficiencies were determined as a function of the HCP linear energy transfer (LET). It was observed that the efficiency depends on the type of detector, measurement technique, and the choice of signal. Additionally, it is shown that the shape of the CW-OSL decay curve from Al2O3:C depends on the type of radiation, and, in principle, this can be used to extract information concerning the LET of an unknown radiation field. The response of the dosimeters to low-LET radiation was also investigated for doses in the range from about 1-1000 Gy. These data were used to explain the different efficiency values obtained for the different materials and techniques, as well as the LET dependence of the CW-OSL decay curve shape. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The ISPM experiment for spectral, composition and anistropy measurements of charged particles at low energie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Gold, R. E.; Anderson, K. A.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lin, R. P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Pick, M.; Roelof, E. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Simnett, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    The Heliosphere Instrument for Spectral, Composition, and Anisotropy at Low Energies (HI-SCALE) designed to measure interplanetary ions and electrons is described. Ions and electrons are detected by five separate solid-state detector telescopes oriented to give complete pitch angle coverage from the spinning spacecraft. Ion elemental abundances are determined by a telescope using a thin front detector element in a three-element telescope. Experiment operation is controlled by a microprocessor-based data system. Inflight calibration is provided by radioactive sources mounted on closable telescope covers. Ion and electron spectral information is determined using broad-energy-range rate channels, and a pulse-height analyzer for more detailed spectra. The instrument weighs 5.775 kg and uses 4.0 W power.

  15. Processing of radioactive waste by the use of low energy ({le} 100 MeV) charged particle accelerators. Optimization problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mushnikov, V.N.; Ozhigov, L.S.; Khizhnyak, N.A.

    1993-12-31

    The radiation processing of long-lived radiotoxic elements is based on transmutation reactions under the action of various particles and energies. Among the different particle sources the most promising is the proton accelerator. The present work studied the process of radiation deactivation in the stationary proton flux as functions of their flux density and energy. The Bateman-Robinson differential equations were solved.

  16. Charged Particle Monitor on the Astrosat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. R.; Patil, M. H.; Bhargava, Yash; Khanna, Rakesh; Hingar, M. K.; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Basak, Rupal; Sreekumar, S.; Samuel, Essy; Priya, P.; Vinod, P.; Bhattacharya, D.; Bhalerao, V.; Vadawale, S. V.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Pandiyan, R.; Subbarao, K.; Seetha, S.; Sarma, K. Suryanarayana

    2017-06-01

    Charged Particle Monitor (CPM) on-board the Astrosat satellite is an instrument designed to detect the flux of charged particles at the satellite location. A Cesium Iodide Thallium (CsI(Tl)) crystal is used with a Kapton window to detect protons with energies greater than 1 MeV. The ground calibration of CPM was done using gamma-rays from radioactive sources and protons from particle accelerators. Based on the ground calibration results, energy deposition above 1 MeV are accepted and particle counts are recorded. It is found that CPM counts are steady and the signal for the onset and exit of South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region are generated in a very reliable and stable manner.

  17. Charged particle multiplicity studies with PHOBOS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2008-01-01

    Summary and conclusion: (1) Multiplicity - PHOBOS have performed complete charged particle multiplicity measurements for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions, System size dependence, and 'Complete' pseudorapidity distributions; 'Universality' compared to elementary e+e- collisions; and (2) Midrapidity multiplicity - Factorization of centrality and energy dependencies; (3) Limiting fragmentation - extended longitudinal scaling - Seen for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, and d+Au, Also observed in flow observables; (4) Total charged particle multiplicity - N{sub ch}/N{sub part} constant with centrality, (5) Future - Finish up many analysis and reviews.

  18. Search milli-charged particles at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, W.G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  19. Design and development of a multi-architecture, fully implicit, charge and energy conserving particle-in-cell framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Joshua; Knoll, Dana; McPherson, Allen; Taitano, William; Chacon, Luis; Chen, Guangye; Pakin, Scott

    2013-10-01

    As computer architectures become increasingly heterogeneous the need for algorithms and applications that can utilize these new architectures grows more pressing. CoCoPIC is a fully implicit charge and energy conserving particle-in-cell framework developed as part of the Computational Co-Design for Multi-Scale Applications in the Natural Sciences (CoCoMANS) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. CoCoMANS is a multi-disciplinary computational co-design effort with the goal of developing new algorithms for emerging architectures using multi-scale applications. This poster will present the co-design process evolved within CoCoMANS, and details regarding the design and development of multi-architecture framework for a plasma application. This framework utilizes multiple abstraction layers in order to maximize code reuse between architectures, while providing low level abstractions to incorporate architecture specific operation optimizations such as vectorizations or hardware fused multiply-add. CoCoPIC's target problems include 1D3V slow shocks, and 2D3V magnetic island coalescence. Results of the multi-core development and optimization process will be presented.

  20. The joint NASA/Goddard-University of Maryland research program in charged particle and high energy photon detector technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Progress made in the following areas is discussed: low energy ion and electron experiments; instrument design for current experiments; magnetospheric measurement of particles; ion measurement in the earth plasma sheet; abundance measurement; X-ray data acquisition; high energy physics; extragalactic astronomy; compact object astrophysics; planetology; and high energy photon detector technology.

  1. Calculation of energy distributions of charged particles produced by neutrons from 0.14 to 65 MeV in tissue substitutes.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Nakane, Y; Yamaguchi, Y

    2007-01-01

    Energy distributions of secondary charged particles were calculated in tissue substitutes irradiated by neutrons from 0.14 to 65 MeV, using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System. The calculations were compared with experimental data measured by tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC). It is found that the calculated distributions of the lineal energy, y, generally agree well with the measured ones for neutrons from several 100 keV to 15 MeV. In the case of 40 and 65 MeV neutron irradiations, wall effects of TEPC should be considered and the fluence of alphas is underestimated by the calculations. Integrated dose contributions of the secondary charged particles are generally in good agreement with those of the measured ones.

  2. SU-E-T-334: Track Structure Simulations of Charged Particles at Low and Intermediate Energies: Cross Sections Needs for Light and Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dingfelder, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) track structure simulations follow the primary as well as all produced secondary particles in an event-by-event manner, from starting or ejection energy down to total stopping. They provide useful information on physics and chemistry of the biological response to radiation. They depend on reliable interaction cross sections and transport models of the considered radiation quality with biologically relevant materials. Most transport models focus on sufficiently fast and bare (i.e., fully ionized) ions and cross sections calculated within the (relativistic) first Born or Bethe approximations. These theories consider the projectile as a point particle and rely on proton cross sections and simple charge-scaling methods; they neglect the atomic nature of the ion and break down at low and intermediate ion energies. Heavier ions are used in particle therapy and slow to intermediate and low energies in the biologically interesting Bragg peak. Lighter and slower fragment ions, including alpha particles, protons, and neutrons are also produced in nuclear and break up reactions of charged particles. Secondary neutrons also produce recoil protons and ions, mainly in the intermediate energy range. Results/Conclusion: This work reviews existing models for track structure simulations and cross section calculations for light and heavy ions focusing on the low and intermediate energy range. It also presents new and updated aspects on cross section calculations and simulation techniques for ions and discusses the need for new models, calculations, and experimental data.

  3. Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Sachchida

    2010-05-01

    Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere Marykutty Michael1, Sachchida Nand Tripathi1,2,3, Pratima Arya1 1Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 2Oak Ridge Associated Universities 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Observations by two instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft, Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and CAssini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS), revealed the existence of heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile species with masses of several thousand atomic mass units at altitudes of 950 - 1400 km in the atmosphere of Titan (Waite et al., 2007; Crary et al., 2009). Though these particles were believed to be molecules, they are most likely aerosols formed by the clumping of smaller molecules (Waite et al., 2009). These particles were estimated to have a density of 10-3 kg m-3 and a size of up to 256 nm. The existence of very heavy ions has also been observed by the CAPS components with a mass by charge ratio of up to 10000 (Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Sittler et al., 2009). The goal of this paper is to find out whether the so called heavy ions (or charged particles) are generated by the charge transfer of ions and electrons to the particles. The charging of these particles has been studied by using the charge balance equations that include positive ions, negative ions, electrons, neutral and charged particles. Information on the most abundant ion clusters are obtained from Vuitton et al., (2009) and Wilson and Atreya, (2004). Mass by charge ratio thus calculated will be compared with those observed by Coates et al. (2007). References: Coates AJ, et al., Discovery of heavy negative ions in Titan's ionosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34:L22103, 2007. Coates AJ, et al., Heavy negative ions in titan's ionosphere: altitude and latitude dependence. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.05.009, 2009. Crary F.J., et al., Heavy ions, temperatures and winds in titan's ionosphere: Combined cassini caps and inms observations. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.006, 2009

  4. Charged spinning black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Guo Heng; Fu Chune

    2010-11-15

    It has recently been pointed out that the spinning Kerr black hole with maximal spin could act as a particle collider with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy. In this paper, we will extend the result to the charged spinning black hole, the Kerr-Newman black hole. The center-of-mass energy of collision for two uncharged particles falling freely from rest at infinity depends not only on the spin a but also on the charge Q of the black hole. We find that an unlimited center-of-mass energy can be approached with the conditions: (1) the collision takes place at the horizon of an extremal black hole; (2) one of the colliding particles has critical angular momentum; (3) the spin a of the extremal black hole satisfies (1/{radical}(3)){<=}(a/M){<=}1, where M is the mass of the Kerr-Newman black hole. The third condition implies that to obtain an arbitrarily high energy, the extremal Kerr-Newman black hole must have a large value of spin, which is a significant difference between the Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. Furthermore, we also show that, for a near-extremal black hole, there always exists a finite upper bound for center-of-mass energy, which decreases with the increase of the charge Q.

  5. Using FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code to develop parameterizations for fluence and energy deposition data for high-energy heavy charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittingham, John; Townsend, Lawrence; Barzilla, Janet; Lee, Kerry

    2012-03-01

    Monte Carlo codes provide an effective means of modeling three dimensional radiation transport; however, their use is both time- and resource-intensive. The creation of a lookup table or parameterization from Monte Carlo simulation allows users to perform calculations with Monte Carlo results without replicating lengthy calculations. FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code was used to develop lookup tables and parameterizations for data resulting from the penetration of layers of aluminum, polyethylene, and water with areal densities ranging from 0 to 100 g/cm2. Heavy charged ion radiation including ions from Z=1 to Z=26 and from 0.1 to 10 GeV/nucleon were simulated. Dose, dose equivalent, and fluence as a function of particle identity, energy, and scattering angle were examined at various depths. Calculations were compared to well-known data and the calculations of other deterministic and Monte Carlo codes. Results will be presented.

  6. Analysis of linear energy transfers and quality factors of charged particles produced by spontaneous fission neutrons from 252Cf and 244Pu in the human body.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akira; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2013-04-01

    Absorbed doses, linear energy transfers (LETs) and quality factors of secondary charged particles in organs and tissues, generated via the interactions of the spontaneous fission neutrons from (252)Cf and (244)Pu within the human body, were studied using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS) coupled with the ICRP Reference Phantom. Both the absorbed doses and the quality factors in target organs generally decrease with increasing distance from the source organ. The analysis of LET distributions of secondary charged particles led to the identification of the relationship between LET spectra and target-source organ locations. A comparison between human body-averaged mean quality factors and fluence-averaged radiation weighting factors showed that the current numerical conventions for the radiation weighting factors of neutrons, updated in ICRP103, and the quality factors for internal exposure are valid.

  7. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionization energy loss in pp collisions at s=13TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2016-06-28

    This study presents a search for massive charged long-lived particles produced in pp collisions at √s = 13TeV at the LHC using the ATLAS experiment. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb–1. Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of massive charged long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons. These massive particles are expected to be produced with a velocity significantly below the speed of light, and therefore to have a specific ionization higher than any Standard Model particle of unit charge at high momenta. The Pixel subsystem of the ATLAS detector is used tomore » measure the ionization energy loss of reconstructed charged particles and to search for such highly ionizing particles. The search presented here has much greater sensitivity than a similar search performed using the ATLAS detector in the √s = 8TeV data set, thanks to the increase in expected signal cross section due to the higher center-of-mass energy of collisions, to an upgraded detector with a new silicon layer close to the interaction point, and to analysis improvements. No significant deviation from Standard Model background expectations is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadron production cross sections and masses are set. Gluino R-hadrons with lifetimes above 0.4 ns and decaying to qq¯ plus a 100 GeV neutralino are excluded at the 95% confidence level, with lower mass limit ranging between 740 and 1590 GeV. In the case of stable R-hadrons the lower mass limit at the 95% confidence level is 1570 GeV.« less

  8. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionization energy loss in p p collisions at √{s }=13 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, Bh; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a search for massive charged long-lived particles produced in p p collisions at √{s }=13 TeV at the LHC using the ATLAS experiment. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1. Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of massive charged long-lived particles, such as R -hadrons. These massive particles are expected to be produced with a velocity significantly below the speed of light, and therefore to have a specific ionization higher than any Standard Model particle of unit charge at high momenta. The Pixel subsystem of the ATLAS detector is used to measure the ionization energy loss of reconstructed charged particles and to search for such highly ionizing particles. The search presented here has much greater sensitivity than a similar search performed using the ATLAS detector in the √{s }=8 TeV data set, thanks to the increase in expected signal cross section due to the higher center-of-mass energy of collisions, to an upgraded detector with a new silicon layer close to the interaction point, and to analysis improvements. No significant deviation from Standard Model background expectations is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R -hadron production cross sections and masses are set. Gluino R -hadrons with lifetimes above 0.4 ns and decaying to q q ¯ plus a 100 GeV neutralino are excluded at the 95% confidence level, with lower mass limit ranging between 740 and 1590 GeV. In the case of stable R -hadrons the lower mass limit at the 95% confidence level is 1570 GeV.

  9. Controlling Charged Particles with Inhomogeneous Electrostatic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An energy analyzer for a charged-particle spectrometer may include a top deflection plate and a bottom deflection plate. The top and bottom deflection plates may be non-symmetric and configured to generate an inhomogeneous electrostatic field when a voltage is applied to one of the top or bottom deflection plates. In some instances, the top and bottom deflection plates may be L-shaped deflection plates.

  10. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  11. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, Robert W.; Dobelbower, M. Christian

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  12. Future monitoring of charged particle energy deposition into the upper atmosphere and comments on possible relationships between atmospheric phenomena and solar and/or geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.; Grubb, R. N.; Evans, D. S.; Sauer, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Monitoring of earth's atmosphere was conducted for several years utilizing the ITOS series of low-altitude, polar-orbiting weather satellites. A space environment monitoring package was included in these satellites to perform measurements of a portion of earth's charged particle environment. The charged particle observations proposed for the low-altitude weather satellite TIROS N, are described which will provide the capability of routine monitoring of the instantaneous total energy deposition into the upper atmosphere by the precipitation of charged particles from higher altitudes. Such observations may be of use in future studies of the relationships between geomagnetic activity and atmospheric weather pattern developments. Estimates are given to assess the potential importance of this type of energy deposition. Discussion and examples are presented illustrating the importance of distinguishing between solar and geomagnetic activity as possible causative sources. Such differentiation is necessary because of the widely different spatial and time scales involved in the atmospheric energy input resulting from these various sources of activity.

  13. Design of a compact, low-energy-charged-particle-spectrometer for stellar nucleosynthesis experiments at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, E.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-10-01

    A compact ``Orange'' Spectrometer is being designed for measurements of alpha and proton spectra in the range of ~ 1-5 MeV, produced in low-yield 3He3He experiments at the OMEGA laser and at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Particle ray-tracing through magnetic fields, modeled by COMSOL, were conducted with the code Python. The goal is to identify an optimal setup for a spectrometer to measure alpha particles at relatively low energies and at low yield. Ability to study the alpha particles in addition to the protons is essential for understanding the nuclear physics governing the final-state interactions between pairs of particles in the three-body final state. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE and NLUF.

  14. Energetic charged particle interactions at icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T.; Hand, K. P.; Paranicas, C.; Howett, C.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Satellites embedded within planetary magnetospheres are typically exposed to bombardment by charged particles, from thermal plasma to more energetic particles at radiation belt energies. At many planetary satellites, energetic charged particles are typically unimpeded by patchy atmospheres or induced satellite magnetic fields and instead are stopped in the surface itself. Most of these primaries have ranges in porous water ice that are at most centimeters, but some of their secondary photons, emitted during the deceleration process, can reach meter depths [Paranicas et al., 2002, 2004; Johnson et al., 2004]. Examples of radiation-induced surface alteration includes sputtering, radiolysis and grain sintering, processes that are capable of significantly altering the physical properties of surface material. Thus, accurate characterization of energetic charged particle weathering at icy satellites is crucial to a more comprehensive understanding of these bodies. At Saturn's inner mid-size moons remote sensing observations by several instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft have revealed distinct weathering patterns which have been attributed to energetic electron bombardment of the surface [Howett et al., 2011, 2012, 2014; Schenk et al., 2011; Paranicas et al., 2014]. In the Jovian system, radiolytic production of oxidants has been invoked as a potential source of energy for life which may reside in the sub-surface ocean of its satellite Europa [Johnson et al., 2003; Hand et al., 2007; Vance et al., 2016]. Here we will discuss the near-surface energetic charged particle environment of icy satellites, with particular emphasis on comparative studies between the Saturnian and Jovian systems and interpretation of remote sensing observations by instruments onboard missions such as Cassini and Galileo. In addition, we will discuss implications for surface sampling by future lander missions (e.g. the proposed Europa lander now under study).

  15. Motion of particles near a magnetized tidal charged black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Kousar, Lubna

    2017-07-01

    This paper is devoted to study the effects of tidal charge on the motion of both neutral as well as charged particles around a magnetized tidal charged black hole. We analyze the innermost stable circular orbits and conditions for escape velocity. In order to discuss stability of orbits, we explore Lyapunov exponent and effective force on the particle. The center of mass energy of the interacting particles is studied in the presence/absence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the external magnetic field as well as tidal charge has a great influence on the particle's motion.

  16. Solar wind iron charge states as identifiers of coronal mass ejections and the characterization of a new low energy particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepri, Susan Therese

    2004-08-01

    We examine Fe charge state distributions in the solar wind. The ionic composition of the solar wind directly reflects corona conditions within 4 5 solar radii. Charge state information can be used to determine coronal electron temperatures of source region plasma. Examination of the Fe charge states obtained by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), shows a high correlation of the abundance ratio of Fe≥16+/FeTot > 10% with interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed at 1 A.U. We designate these as “hot ICMEs” due to their associated high charge states. We use the abundance ratio to develop a threshold average Fe charge state, threshold , applicable to charge state data from other spacecraft unable to determine charge state abundances. Applying the threshold to in-ecliptic data from ACE and data from Ulysses along its polar orbit, we identify hot ICMEs as a function of latitude. We find a factor of four fewer hot ICMEs at high latitude than in the ecliptic. After studying features on the Sun near the time of the ICME eruption, we determine that solar flares are likely the source of the observed high Fe charge states. This result has important implications in understanding the relationship between solar flares and CMEs. For years, a controversy has existed over the causal relationship between flares and CMEs. Now, through the work of this thesis, compositional data provides convincing evidence of an association of flares and CMEs. In addition, we also characterize a new delta-doped charge-coupled device (CCD). The new delta-doped CCD has a dead layer that is ˜1/10 th the thickness of previous SSDs used in ACE/SWIGS. Using this detector, we are able to detect H+ and N+ ions with energies ranging from 1 10 keV in the laboratory. This is a remarkable increase in sensitivity for solid-state particle detectors which currently can only detect particles with energies >30 keV. Application of

  17. Tunable resonant sensing means to sense a particular frequency in a high energy charged particle beam and generate a frequency-domain signal in response

    DOEpatents

    Nakamura, Michiyuki; Nolan, Marvin L.

    1988-01-01

    A frequency domain sensing system is disclosed for sensing the position of a high energy beam of charged particles traveling within a housing which comprises a plurality of sensors positioned in the wall of the housing radially around the axis of the beam. Each of the sensors further comprises a first electrode of predetermined shape received in a bore in the housing to define a fixed capacitance and an inductance structure attached to the electrode to provide an inductance for the sensing means which will provide an LC circuit which will resonate at a predetermined frequency known to exist in the beam of charged particles. The sensors are further provided with tuning apparatus associated with the inductance structure to vary the amount of the inductance to thereby tune the sensors to the predetermined frequency prior to transmission of the signal to signal detection circuitry.

  18. Optically powered charged particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesner, Larry D.

    1991-09-01

    A charged particle control apparatus provides very high voltage particle beams. One or more photocell arrays provide bias voltages for beam accelerating stages. The arrays are made from a number of microfabricated photocells connected in series to produce a voltage output that is the sum of the voltages from the individual cells. Arrays of each stage are connected in series to produce a cumulative stage voltage that is applied to an accelerating electrode made part of the stage. Optical power illuminates the stages to generate desired voltage biases to the accelerating electrodes. A light source is used to excite the photocathode when this emission source is used. Electrons from the emission source are accelerated electrodes and are emitted from the chamber which is typically conjoined with other apparatus. By utilizing photocell arrays to generate beam current and accelerating biases, as well as a photocathode for providing a source of electrons, the apparatus of the invention is completely optically isolated thereby requiring no direct electrical connections to the apparatus even though multiple accelerating stages are used to facilitate the achievement of very high voltage particle beams.

  19. Design of a compact, low energy charged particle spectrometer for stellar nucleosynthesis experiments at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, E.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Orozco, D.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-11-01

    Simulations have been used to model an ``Orange Spectrometer'' for measuring alpha and proton energy spectra in the range ~1-5 MeV for experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). An important application will be the study of stellar nucleosynthesis reactions, in particular 3He +3He --> α + p +p, which is a step in the solar proton-proton chain. Experiments to study this reaction have been undertaken at OMEGA before, but no diagnostics have been able to measure the low-energy, low-yield alpha particles generated in the reaction. Feasibility studies were performed with particle trajectory calculations utilizing magnetic field models from COMSOL, and several designs have been identified for testing and development. Ability to study the alpha particles in addition to the protons is essential for understanding the nuclear physics governing the final-state interactions between pairs of particles in the three-body final state. This work was supported in part by NLUF, DOE, and LLE.

  20. Forward energy flow, central charged-particle multiplicities, and pseudorapidity gaps in W and Z boson events from pp collisions at sqrt{s}= 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hänsel, S.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Trauner, C.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Benucci, L.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Devroede, O.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Hreus, T.; Marage, P. E.; Raval, A.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Adler, V.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; Ceard, L.; Cortina Gil, E.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Ovyn, S.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, S. S.; Darmenov, N.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Mateev, M.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Cabrera, A.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Lelas, K.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Gentit, F. X.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Marionneau, M.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Elgammal, S.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Wyslouch, B.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Greder, S.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Mikami, Y.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Lomidze, D.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Mohr, N.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Ata, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Erdmann, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoepfner, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Lanske, D.; Lingemann, J.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Bontenackels, M.; Davids, M.; Duda, M.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Giffels, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heydhausen, D.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Rennefeld, J.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Cakir, A.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Dammann, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flossdorf, A.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Hauk, J.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Olzem, J.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Rosin, M.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Tomaszewska, J.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Bobrovskyi, S.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nowak, F.; Pietsch, N.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Barth, C.; Bauer, J.; Berger, J.; Buege, V.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Dirkes, G.; Feindt, M.; Gruschke, J.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kuhr, T.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Renz, M.; Saout, C.; Scheurer, A.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Zhukov, V.; Ziebarth, E. B.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Petrakou, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Triantis, F. A.; Aranyi, A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Kapusi, A.; Krajczar, K.; Sikler, F.; Veres, G. I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Veszpremi, V.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Jindal, M.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, A. P.; Singh, J.; Singh, S. P.; Ahuja, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Gupta, P.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, S.; Jain, S.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mehta, P.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, D.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Saha, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Mondal, N. K.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Manna, N.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pierro, G. A.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Romano, F.; Roselli, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Trentadue, R.; Tupputi, S.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Grandi, C.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Mazzucato, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Nespolo, M.; Perrozzi, L.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Baesso, P.; Berzano, U.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Caponeri, B.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Santocchia, A.; Taroni, S.; Valdata, M.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Segneri, G.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Di Marco, E.; Diemoz, M.; Franci, D.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Sigamani, M.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Botta, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Graziano, A.; Mariotti, C.; Marone, M.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Mila, G.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Heo, S. G.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Chung, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Sim, K. S.; Choi, M.; Kang, S.; Kim, H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Martisiute, D.; Petrov, P.; Polujanskas, M.; Sabonis, T.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Tam, J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Ahmed, I.; Ansari, M. H.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Brona, G.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Musella, P.; Nayak, A.; Pela, J.; Ribeiro, P. Q.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Afanasiev, S.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Golutvin, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Toropin, A.; Troitsky, S.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Kaftanov, V.; Kossov, M.; Krokhotin, A.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cepeda, M.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Diez Pardos, C.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Jorda, C.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron Sanudo, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bell, A. J.; Benedetti, D.; Bernet, C.; Bialas, W.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bona, M.; Breuker, H.; Bunkowski, K.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Coarasa Perez, J. A.; Curé, B.; D'Enterria, D.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Gaddi, A.; Georgiou, G.; Gerwig, H.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Gouzevitch, M.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guiducci, L.; Hansen, M.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegeman, J.; Hegner, B.; Hoffmann, H. F.; Honma, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Maurisset, A.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Nesvold, E.; Nguyen, M.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rommerskirchen, T.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiropulu, M.; Stoye, M.; Tropea, P.; Tsirou, A.; Vichoudis, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Caminada, L.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Chen, Z.; Cittolin, S.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hintz, W.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marchica, C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Milenovic, P.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Punz, T.; Rizzi, A.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Sawley, M.-C.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, M.; Wehrli, L.; Weng, J.; Aguilo, E.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Schmidt, A.; Snoek, H.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Volpe, R.; Wu, J. H.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Uzun, D.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Demir, D.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Özbek, M.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Levchuk, L.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Cheng, T. L.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Hartley, D.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Camanzi, B.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Ballin, J.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; MacEvoy, B. C.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rompotis, N.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Tourneur, S.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Wardrope, D.; Whyntie, T.; Barrett, M.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Teodorescu, L.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Henderson, C.; Bose, T.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Avetisyan, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chou, J. P.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Friis, E.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Liu, H.; Maruyama, S.; Miceli, T.; Nikolic, M.; Pellett, D.; Robles, J.; Rutherford, B.; Salur, S.; Schwarz, T.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Veelken, C.; Andreev, V.; Arisaka, K.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Deisher, A.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Babb, J.; Chandra, A.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kao, S. C.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Shen, B. C.; Stringer, R.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pi, H.; Pieri, M.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; Vlimant, J. R.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Shin, K.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Jun, S. Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dinardo, M. E.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zang, S. L.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Henriksson, K.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Liu, Y.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Puigh, D.; Ryd, A.; Saelim, M.; Salvati, E.; Shi, X.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Biselli, A.; Cirino, G.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Atac, M.; Bakken, J. A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, W.; Eartly, D. P.; Elvira, V. D.; Esen, S.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jensen, H.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kousouris, K.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Limon, P.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Miao, T.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pivarski, J.; Pordes, R.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Goldberg, S.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Prescott, C.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Schmitt, M.; Scurlock, B.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Wang, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Sekmen, S.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Guragain, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kunde, G. J.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Silvestre, C.; Smoron, A.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Lae, C. K.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bonato, A.; Eskew, C.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N. V.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P., Iii; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Wan, Z.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Eno, S. C.; Ferencek, D.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Rossato, K.; Rumerio, P.; Santanastasio, F.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Alver, B.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Everaerts, P.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Jindal, P.; Keller, J.; Kelly, T.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Boeriu, O.; Chasco, M.; Reucroft, S.; Swain, J.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Kolberg, T.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Ziegler, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gu, J.; Hill, C.; Killewald, P.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Laird, E.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Safdi, B.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Bolla, G.; Borrello, L.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Liu, C.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Flacher, H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Orbaker, D.; Petrillo, G.; Sakumoto, W.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Atramentov, O.; Barker, A.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Patel, R.; Richards, A.; Rose, K.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Gurrola, A.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Safonov, A.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Weinberger, M.; Akchurin, N.; Bardak, C.; Damgov, J.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Mane, P.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.; Yazgan, E.; Appelt, E.; Brownson, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Gabella, W.; Issah, M.; Johns, W.; Johnston, C.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goadhouse, S.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Mattson, M.; Milstène, C.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Bellinger, J. N.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Efron, J.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Parker, W.; Reeder, D.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.; Weinberg, M.

    2012-01-01

    A study of forward energy flow and central charged-particle multiplicity in events with W and Z bosons decaying into leptons is presented. The analysis uses a sample of 7 TeV pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb-1, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The observed forward energy depositions, their correlations, and the central charged-particle multiplicities are not well described by the available non-diffractive soft-hadron production models. A study of about 300 events with no significant energy deposited in one of the forward calorimeters, corresponding to a pseudorapidity gap of at least 1.9 units, is also presented. An indication for a diffractive component in these events comes from the observation that the majority of the charged leptons from the W(Z) decays are found in the hemisphere opposite to the gap. When fitting the signed lepton pseudorapidity distribution of these events with predicted distributions from an admixture of diffractive ( pompyt) and non-diffractive ( pythia) Monte Carlo simulations, the diffractive component is determined to be (50.0 ± 9.3 (stat.) ± 5.2 (syst.))%.

  1. Forward energy flow, central charged-particle multiplicities, and pseudorapidity gaps in W and Z boson events from pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-01-01

    A study of forward energy flow and central charged-particle multiplicity in events with W and Z bosons decaying into leptons is presented. The analysis uses a sample of 7 TeV pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The observed forward energy depositions, their correlations, and the central charged-particle multiplicities are not well described by the available non-diffractive soft-hadron production models. A study of about 300 events with no significant energy deposited in one of the forward calorimeters, corresponding to a pseudorapidity gap of at least 1.9 units, is also presented. An indication for a diffractive component in these events comes from the observation that the majority of the charged leptons from the (W/Z) decays are found in the hemisphere opposite to the gap. When fitting the signed lepton pseudorapidity distribution of these events with predicted distributions from an admixture of diffractive (POMPYT) and non-diffractive (PYTHIA) Monte Carlo simulations, the diffractive component is determined to be (50.0 +/- 9.3 (stat.) +/- 5.2 (syst.))%.

  2. Means for counteracting charged particle beam divergence

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, Jr., Edwin B.

    1978-01-01

    To counteract charge particle beam divergence, magnetic field-generating means are positioned along the edges of a charged particle beam to be controlled, such as to deflect and redirect particles tending to diverge from a desired beam direction. By selective arrangement of the magnetic field-generating means, the entire beam may be deflected and guided into different directions.

  3. Treatment of cancer with heavy charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.; Saunders, W.M.; Tobias, C.A.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Curtis, S.; Lyman, J.T.; Collier, J.M.; Pitluck, S.; Woodruff, K.A.; Blakely, E.A.

    1982-12-01

    A clinical radiotherapeutic trial using heavy charged particles in the treatment of human cancers has accrued over 400 patients since 1975, 378 of whom were treated with particles and 28 with low LET photons as control patients. Heavy charged particle radiotherapy offers the potential advantages of improved dose localization and/or enhanced biologic effect, depending on particle selected for treatment. Target sites have included selected head and neck tumors, ocular melanomata, malignant gliomata of the brain, carcinoma of the esophagus, carcinoma of the stomach, carcinoma of the pancreas, selected juxtaspinal tumors and other locally advanced, unresectable tumors. A Phase III prospective clinical trial has been started in carcinoma of the pancreas using helium ions. Phase I-II studies are underway with heavier particles such as carbon, neon and argon ions in order to prepare for prospective Phase III trials. Silicon ions are also under consideration for clinical trial. These studies are supported by the United States Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health.

  4. Charged dilation black holes as particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2015-03-01

    We examine the possibility of arbitrarily high energy in the center-of-mass (CM) frame of colliding neutral particles in the vicinity of the horizon of a charged dilation black hole (BH). We show that it is possible to achieve the infinite energy in the background of the dilation black hole without fine-tuning of the angular momentum parameter. It is found that the CM energy (Ecm) of collisions of particles near the infinite red-shift surface of the extreme dilation BHs are arbitrarily large while the non-extreme charged dilation BHs have the finite energy. We have also compared the Ecm at the horizon with the ISCO (Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for extremal Reissner-Nordstrøm (RN) BH and Schwarzschild BH. We find that for extreme RN BH the inequality becomes Ecm|r+ >Ecm|rmb >Ecm|rISCO i.e. Ecm|r+=M :Ecm | rmb =(3 +√{ 5 }/2) M :Ecm| rISCO = 4 M = ∞ : 3.23 : 2.6 . While for Schwarzschild BH the ratio of CM energy is Ecm| r+ = 2 M :Ecm| rmb = 4 M :Ecm| rISCO = 6 M =√{ 5 } :√{ 2 } :√{ 13 }/3 . Also for Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GMGHS) BHs the ratio is being Ecm| r+ = 2 M :Ecm| rmb = 2 M :Ecm| rISCO = 2 M = ∞ : ∞ : ∞ .

  5. Dynamic properties of the energy loss of multi-MeV charged particles traveling in two-component warm dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhen-Guo; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Meng-Lei; Li, Da-Fang; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping

    2016-12-01

    The energy loss of multi-MeV charged particles moving in two-component warm dense plasmas (WDPs) is studied theoretically beyond the random-phase approximation. The short-range correlations between particles are taken into account via dynamic local field corrections (DLFC) in a Mermin dielectric function for two-component plasmas. The mean ionization states are obtained by employing the detailed configuration accounting model. The Yukawa-type effective potential is used to derive the DLFC. Numerically, the DLFC are obtained via self-consistent iterative operations. We find that the DLFC are significant around the maximum of the stopping power. Furthermore, by using the two-component extended Mermin dielectric function model including the DLFC, the energy loss of a proton with an initial energy of ˜15 MeV passing through a WDP of beryllium with an electronic density around the solid value ne≈3 ×1023cm-3 and with temperature around ˜40 eV is estimated numerically. The numerical result is reasonably consistent with the experimental observations [A. B. Zylsta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 215002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.215002]. Our results show that the partial ionization and the dynamic properties should be of importance for the stopping of charged particles moving in the WDP.

  6. The Response of the Ionospheric Cusp to the Solar Wind Through Two Perspectives: Low Energy Charged Particle In-Situ Measurements and Low-Energy Neutral Atom Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, V. N.; Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Giles, B. L.; Craven, P. D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission provides a new perspective on the study of the response of the magnetosphere/ionosphere system to changing solar wind conditions, particularly the variability of ion outflow. Learning to interpret this new type of data becomes an essential step in the process of melding these results with the wealth of in-situ charged particle observations obtained over the past 25 years. In order to understand how the in-situ data correspond to and contrast with IMAGE results we will perform a conjunctive study of event data from two instruments to shed light on the coupling of the solar wind and ionosphere from these different perspectives. We will use the Low Energy Neutral Atom instrument (LENA) which images energetic neutral atom emissions from upward flowing ionospheric ions and the Thermal Ion Dynamics Instrument (TIDE) on the Polar satellite which measures in-situ ion outflow from 0.3-300 eV. Our primary goal will be to understand how comparing the imaging and in-situ perspectives can aid in the analysis of both data sets.

  7. The Response of the Ionospheric Cusp to the Solar Wind Through Two Perspectives: Low Energy Charged Particle In-Situ Measurements and Low-Energy Neutral Atom Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, V. N.; Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Giles, B. L.; Craven, P. D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission provides a new perspective on the study of the response of the magnetosphere/ionosphere system to changing solar wind conditions, particularly the variability of ion outflow. Learning to interpret this new type of data becomes an essential step in the process of melding these results with the wealth of in-situ charged particle observations obtained over the past 25 years. In order to understand how the in-situ data correspond to and contrast with IMAGE results we will perform a conjunctive study of event data from two instruments to shed light on the coupling of the solar wind and ionosphere from these different perspectives. We will use the Low Energy Neutral Atom instrument (LENA) which images energetic neutral atom emissions from upward flowing ionospheric ions and the Thermal Ion Dynamics Instrument (TIDE) on the Polar satellite which measures in-situ ion outflow from 0.3-300 eV. Our primary goal will be to understand how comparing the imaging and in-situ perspectives can aid in the analysis of both data sets.

  8. Effects of Charged Particles on Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathryn D.; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Kaminuma, Takuya; Paz, Athena Evalour S.; Yoshida, Yukari; Liu, Qi; Willers, Henning; Takahashi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects, including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors, and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors, such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions, and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles. PMID:26904502

  9. Deposition of charged particles on lung airways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B S; Xiong, J Q; Fang, C P; Li, W

    1998-05-01

    The effect of a single electric charge on the efficiency with which ultrafine particles deposit in human airways has been investigated. When inhaled short-lived radon progeny are attached to electrically neutral particles their deposition efficiency is controlled by diffusion. But most ambient particles carry one, or a few, charges. We measured and compared the deposition (DE) of singly charged, charge-neutralized, and zero-charge 20-nm and 125-nm particles in hollow-cast models of human airways. These particle sizes were selected because they are about where modal peaks occur for the activity of the short-lived radon progeny in indoor air. For singly charged 20-nm particles deposition (+/- standard error) in the casts was 3.4 +/- 0.3 times that for charge neutralized aerosols and 5.3 +/- 0.3 times the amount deposited for zero-charged particles. Corresponding ratios for the 125-nm particles were 2.3 +/- 0.3 and 6.2 +/- 0.7. Since most ambient particles are charged this effect must be considered when models are used to predict dose from inhaled ultrafine particles.

  10. The joint NASA/Goddard-University of Maryland research program in charged particle and high energy photon detector technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The first measurements of Fe charge states in two coronal hole-association high speed streams, using the sensor on ISEE-3, are presented. Eight event intervals from the January to June 1983 timeframe were chosen for the study of magnetotail dynamics and its relationship to substorm activity and the possible formation of plasmoids. Techniques are being explored for measurement of secondary electrons which are characteristically emitted when ions hit a target material. Efforts are continuing to understand kilometer wavelength shock associated radio events. An all-sky survey of fast X-ray transients of duration of 5 to 10,000 s was completed. Research using high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of celestial sources in the 20 keV to 20 MeV range to search for and study narrow lines in low-energy gamma-ray spectrum continues. Research in high energy radiation from pulsars is being conducted.

  11. Particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles.

  12. Apparatus for measuring charged particle beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus to measure the incident charged particle beam flux while effectively eliminating losses to reflection and/or secondary emission of the charged particle beam being measured is described. It comprises a sense cup through which the charged particle beam enters. A sense cone forms the rear wall of the interior chamber with the cone apex adjacent the entry opening. An outer case surrounds the sense cup and is electrically insulated therefrom. Charged particles entering the interior chamber are trapped and are absorbed by the sense cup and cone and travel through a current measuring device to ground.

  13. Charged-particle telescope experiment on Clementine.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Kanekal, S; Blake, J B; Adams, J H

    1995-01-01

    The charged-particle telescope (CPT) onboard the Clementine spacecraft measured the fluxes of energetic protons emitted in solar energetic particle events. Protons in the energy range from 10 to 80 MeV were of greatest interest for radiation effects such as total dose and single event upsets. Energetic electrons were also of interest for spacecraft charging and their contribution to total dose. The lower-energy CPT electron channels (25-500 keV) were mainly of geophysical interest. While orbiting the moon, the CPT observed the wake created by the moon when it blocked the flow of energetic particles in the magnetotail region. The CPT provided opportunities to observe energetic electron bursts during magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms. CPT data are particularly useful in multispacecraft studies of interplanetary disturbances and their interaction with the magnetosphere. The proton channels on the CPT provided data on solar energetic protons and storm-time protons associated with the passage of an interplanetary shock at 0903 UT on Feb. 21, 1994. Results are compared with those from GOES-7, SAMPEX, and GEOTAIL.

  14. Electrostatic Confinement of Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Jose; Weathers, Duncan; Ordonez, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    Many experiments rely on the confinement of charged particles. Examples of these experiments range from fusion studies to antiproton-positron studies for antihydrogen production. Researchers have already developed a variety of techniques for controlling and trapping charged particles. Examples of systems devised for such purposes include electrostatic traps in the form of a cavity [1],[2] or in the form of a storage ring like ELISA [3]. For this project, we are pursuing a different approach [4], which relies on a purely electrostatic environment for ion confinement. This system consists of a periodic electrode configuration of cylindrical symmetry that acts to confine an ion beam in the radial direction. In this manner, it is expected that long particle lifetimes inside the trap will be achieved, and that the system will have an inherent scalability to different ion energy. Results obtained from simulation of the proposed system will be presented and discussed along with a brief overview of the steps taken to develop a laboratory prototype. [1] M. Dahan et al., Rev. Sci. Instr. 69 (1998) 76. [2] H. F. Krause et al., American Institute of Physics. CAARI 16^th Int'l Conf. (2001). [3] S.P. Moller et al., Proc. of the 1997 Particle Accelerator Conference. vol 1. pp 1027-1029. Vancouver, Canada. May 1997. [4] J.R. Correa et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. In Phys. Res. B 241 (2005) 909-912.

  15. An energy- and charge-conserving, nonlinearly implicit, electromagnetic 1D-3V Vlasov-Darwin particle-in-cell algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Chacón, L.

    2014-10-01

    A recent proof-of-principle study proposes a nonlinear electrostatic implicit particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in one dimension (Chen et al., 2011). The algorithm employs a kinetically enslaved Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method, and conserves energy and charge to numerical round-off. In this study, we generalize the method to electromagnetic simulations in 1D using the Darwin approximation to Maxwell's equations, which avoids radiative noise issues by ordering out the light wave. An implicit, orbit-averaged, time-space-centered finite difference scheme is employed in both the 1D Darwin field equations (in potential form) and the 1D-3V particle orbit equations to produce a discrete system that remains exactly charge- and energy-conserving. Furthermore, enabled by the implicit Darwin equations, exact conservation of the canonical momentum per particle in any ignorable direction is enforced via a suitable scattering rule for the magnetic field. We have developed a simple preconditioner that targets electrostatic waves and skin currents, and allows us to employ time steps O(√{mi /me } c /veT) larger than the explicit CFL. Several 1D numerical experiments demonstrate the accuracy, performance, and conservation properties of the algorithm. In particular, the scheme is shown to be second-order accurate, and CPU speedups of more than three orders of magnitude vs. an explicit Vlasov-Maxwell solver are demonstrated in the "cold" plasma regime (where kλD ≪ 1).

  16. Charge distribution of particles in an irradiated dust cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Sodha, Mahendra; Dixit, Amrit; Srivastava, Sweta; Mishra, S. K.; Verma, M. P.; Bhasin, L.

    2010-01-01

    This communication is a discussion on the charge distribution of the dust particles in an illuminated dust cloud in near space when the photoelectric emission is the dominant mechanism for electron generation. An analytical model has been developed on the basis of charge neutrality condition and balance of number density and energy of electrons; the approach of statistical mechanics has been followed. Computations correspond to a metallic dust cloud in near space environment, where Lyman-α spectral line radiation is the dominant one for photoelectric emission. A comparison of results from the present statistical theory of charge distribution with the uniform charge theory has been presented. As an interesting conclusion, the theory predicts negative charging of a few dust particles for a certain range of parameters leading to the formation of bigger particles on account of electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged particles.

  17. The Joint NASA/Goddard-University of Maryland Research Program in Charged Particle and High Energy Photon Detector Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.

    1990-01-01

    The Univ. of Maryland portion investigated the following areas. The Space Physics Group performed studies of data from the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft CHEM experiment and found that the ratio of solar wind to photospheric abundances decreased rather smoothly with the first ionization potential (FIP) of the ion with the low FIP ion being about a factor of two overabundant. Carbon and hydrogen fit this trend particularly well. Several occurrences were analyzed of field aligned beams observed when CCE was upstream of the Earth's bow shock. Also using CHEM data, ring current intensity and composition changes during the main and recovery phases of the great geomagnetic storm that occurred in February 1986 was examined in detail. Still using CHEM data, ring current characteristics were examined in a survey of 20 magnetic storms ranging in size from -50 nT to -312 nT. A study was done of energetic ion anisotropy characteristics in the Earth's magnetosheath region using data from the UMD/MPE experiment on ISEE-1. The properties were analyzed of approx. 30 to 130 keV/e protons and alpha particles upstream of six quasi-parallel interplanetary shocks that passed by the ISEE-3 spacecraft during 1978 to 1979. Work from NASA-Goddard include studies from the High Energy Cosmic Ray Group, Low Energy Cosmic Ray Group, Low Energy Gamma Ray Group, High Energy Astrophysics Theory Group, and the X ray Astronomy Group.

  18. Position sensitive disc for charged particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, V.; Palazzolo, F.; Scirè, A.; Sperduto, M. L.; Albergo, S.; Poli, G.; Potenza, R.; Randieri, C.; Russo, V.; Sutera, M. C.; Capogni, M.; Schaerf, C.; D'Angelo, A.; Moricciani, D.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Girolami, B.; Ghio, F.

    2001-04-01

    A plastic scintillating disc (NE102, 3 cm thick, 1 m diameter) has been designed for detecting charged pions in nuclear reactions at intermediate energy. A hole of 20 cm diameter was made in the middle of the disc in order to allow for the beam passage through the detector. The originality of the detector consists of the simultaneous use of four very compact central Photo Multiplier Tubes (PMT) and eight peripheral PMTs in order to retrieve the hitting point of a charged particle onto the disc surface with a space resolution of ±3 cm. The original method has been developed by using polar coordinates and only the Time-Of-Flight information (TOF) from three or four nearest PMTs, including at least one central PMT.

  19. Bounding millimagnetically charged particles with magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Huang, Junwu

    2017-09-01

    Millimagnetically charged particles generically appear in scenarios with kinetic mixing. We present model independent bounds on these particles coming from magnetars. Schwinger pair production discharges the magnetic field of the magnetar. Thus the existence of large magnetic fields at magnetars place strong bounds on the millimagnetic charge to be smaller than 10-18 over a large mass range.

  20. Neutron Time-of-Flight Measurements of Charged-Particle Energy Loss in Inertial Confinement Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Daniel; Cerjan, Charlie; Berzak Hopkins, Laura; Caggiano, Joseph; Divol, Laurent; Eckart, Mark; Graziani, Frank; Grim, Gary; Hartouni, Ed; Hatarik, Robert; Le Pape, Sebastien; MacKinnon, Andrew; Schneider, Dieter; Sepke, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Neutron time-of-flight measurements of inflight T (d , n) α reactions created during an implosion of a deuterium gas target have been performed at the National Ignition Facility, with order of magnitude improvements in statistics and resolution over past experiments. In the implosion, energetic tritons emitted by thermonuclear fusion within the deuterium plasma produced over 1011 inflight T (d , n) α reactions. The yield and particle spectrum of inflight reactions are sensitive to the triton's energy loss in the plasma, which, in this implosion, consisted of multi-keV temperatures and number densities above 1024 cm-3. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the implosion were adjusted to match the yield and broadening of the D (d , n) 3 He neutron peak. These same simulations give reasonable agreement with the measured T (d , n) α yield and neutron spectrum, and this provides a strong consistency check of the simulated plasma conditions and energy loss model. This research was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  2. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, David K.; Haverty, Thomas W.; Nordin, Carl W.; Tyree, William H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  3. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  4. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  5. Track-Structure Simulations for Charged Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track-structure simulations provide a detailed and accurate picture of radiation transport of charged particles through condensed matter of biological interest. Liquid water serves as surrogate for soft tissue and is used in most Monte-Carlo track-structure codes. Basic theories of radiation transport and track-structure simulations are discussed and differences to condensed history codes highlighted. Interaction cross sections for electrons, protons, alpha particles, light and heavy ions are required input data for track-structure simulations. Different calculation methods, including the plane-wave Born approximation, the dielectric theory, and semi-empirical approaches are presented using liquid water as a target. Low-energy electron transport and light ion transport are discussed as areas of special interest. PMID:23032889

  6. Charged particle distributions in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, N.; Garrett, H. B.

    1983-01-01

    In situ data from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, supplemented by earth-based observations and theoretical considerations, are used as the basis for the present quantitative, compact model of the 1 eV-several MeV charged particle distribution in the Jovian magnetosphere. The thermal plasma parameters of convection speed, number density, and characteristic energy, are specified as functions of position for electrons and for the ion species H(+), O(+), O(2+), S(+), S(2+), S(3+), and Na(+). Major features of the magnetic field, thermal plasma, and trapped particle distributions, are modeled and results for each plasma region are compared with observed spectra. Comparisons show that the model represents the data to within a factor of 2 + or - 1, except where time variations are significant. Practical applications of the model to spacecraft near Jupiter are given.

  7. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionisation energy loss in pp collisions at ${\\sqrt{s} = 8}$ s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-03

    Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged heavy long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons or charginos. These particles, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, should be moving non-relativistically and are therefore identifiable through the measurement of an anomalously large specific energy loss in the ATLAS pixel detector. Measuring heavy long-lived particles through their track parameters in the vicinity of the interaction vertex provides sensitivity to metastable particles with lifetimes from 0.6 ns to 30 ns. A search for such particles with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented, based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\(18.4\\) fb\\(^{-1}\\) of pp collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 8\\) TeV. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background expectation is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadrons and chargino production are set. Gluino R-hadrons with 10 ns lifetime and masses up to 1185 GeV are excluded at 95 \\(\\%\\) confidence level, and so are charginos with 15 ns lifetime and masses up to 482 GeV.

  8. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionisation energy loss in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV using the ATLAS experiment.

    PubMed

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Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged heavy long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons or charginos. These particles, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, should be moving non-relativistically and are therefore identifiable through the measurement of an anomalously large specific energy loss in the ATLAS pixel detector. Measuring heavy long-lived particles through their track parameters in the vicinity of the interaction vertex provides sensitivity to metastable particles with lifetimes from 0.6 ns to 30 ns. A search for such particles with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented, based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of [Formula: see text] fb[Formula: see text] of pp collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background expectation is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadrons and chargino production are set. Gluino R-hadrons with 10 ns lifetime and masses up to 1185 GeV are excluded at 95 [Formula: see text] confidence level, and so are charginos with 15 ns lifetime and masses up to 482 GeV.

  9. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionisation energy loss in pp collisions at $${\\sqrt{s} = 8}$$ s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-03

    Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged heavy long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons or charginos. These particles, if produced at the Large Hadron Collider, should be moving non-relativistically and are therefore identifiable through the measurement of an anomalously large specific energy loss in the ATLAS pixel detector. Measuring heavy long-lived particles through their track parameters in the vicinity of the interaction vertex provides sensitivity to metastable particles with lifetimes from 0.6 ns to 30 ns. A search for such particles with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented, based on a data samplemore » corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\(18.4\\) fb\\(^{-1}\\) of pp collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 8\\) TeV. No significant deviation from the Standard Model background expectation is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadrons and chargino production are set. Gluino R-hadrons with 10 ns lifetime and masses up to 1185 GeV are excluded at 95 \\(\\%\\) confidence level, and so are charginos with 15 ns lifetime and masses up to 482 GeV.« less

  10. Charged Dilation Black Holes as Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-07-01

    We examine the possibility of arbitrarily high energy in the Center-of-mass frame of colliding neutral particles in the vicinity of the horizon of a charged dilation black hole(BH). We show that it is possible to achieve the infinite energy in the background of the dilation black hole without fine-tuning of the angular momentum parameter. It is found that the center-of-mass energy (E_{cm}) of collisions of particles near the infinite red-shift surface of the extreme dilation BHs are arbitrarily large while the non-extreme charged dilation BHs have the finite energy. We have also compared the E_{cm} at the horizon with the ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for extremal RN BH and Schwarzschild BH. We find that for extreme RN BH the inequality becomes E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}}> E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}} i.e. E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}= ({3+√{5}}/{2})M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=4M} =∞ : 3.23 : 2.6 . While for Schwarzschild BH the ratio of CM energy is E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=4M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=6M} = √{5} : √{2} : {√{13}}/{3}. Also for Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GMGHS) BHs the ratio is being E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=2M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=2M}=∞ : ∞ : ∞.

  11. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system is a device that produces by acceleration high energy charged particles (e.g., electrons and protons...

  12. Quantum interface to charged particles in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    A superconducting qubit device suitable for interacting with a flying electron has recently been proposed [Okamoto and Nagatani, Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 062604 (2014), 10.1063/1.4865244]. Either a clockwise or counterclockwise directed loop of half magnetic flux quantum encodes a qubit, which naturally interacts with any single charged particle with arbitrary kinetic energy. Here, the device's properties, sources of errors, and possible applications are studied in detail. In particular, applications include detection of a charged particle essentially without applying a classical force to it. Furthermore, quantum states can be transferred between an array of the proposed devices and the charged particle.

  13. Charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions measured with the PHOBOS detector in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M. P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Vale, C.

    2011-02-15

    Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions over a wide energy range have been measured using the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The centrality dependence of both the charged particle distributions and the multiplicity at midrapidity were measured. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted with |{eta}|<5.4, which account for between 95% and 99% of the total charged-particle emission associated with collision participants, are presented for different collision centralities. Both the midrapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} and the total charged-particle multiplicity N{sub ch} are found to factorize into a product of independent functions of collision energy, {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}}), and centrality given in terms of the number of nucleons participating in the collision, N{sub part}. The total charged particle multiplicity, observed in these experiments and those at lower energies, assumes a linear dependence of (lns{sub N{sub N}}){sup 2} over the full range of collision energy of {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}})=2.7-200 GeV.

  14. Charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributionsmeasured with the PHOBOS detector in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions at ultra-relativistic energies.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Wuosmaa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions over a wide energy range have been measured using the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The centrality dependence of both the charged particle distributions and the multiplicity at midrapidity were measured. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted with |{eta}| < 5.4, which account for between 95% and 99% of the total charged-particle emission associated with collision participants, are presented for different collision centralities. Both the midrapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} and the total charged-particle multiplicity N{sub ch} are found to factorize into a product of independent functions of collision energy, {radical}s{sub NN}, and centrality given in terms of the number of nucleons participating in the collision, N{sub part}. The total charged particle multiplicity, observed in these experiments and those at lower energies, assumes a linear dependence of (lns{sub NN}){sup 2} over the full range of collision energy of {radical}s{sub NN} = 2.7-200 GeV.

  15. Quantum and classical dissipation of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra-Sierra, V.G.; Anzaldo-Meneses, A.; Cardoso, J.L.; Hernández-Saldaña, H.; Kunold, A.; Roa-Neri, J.A.E.

    2013-08-15

    A Hamiltonian approach is presented to study the two dimensional motion of damped electric charges in time dependent electromagnetic fields. The classical and the corresponding quantum mechanical problems are solved for particular cases using canonical transformations applied to Hamiltonians for a particle with variable mass. Green’s function is constructed and, from it, the motion of a Gaussian wave packet is studied in detail. -- Highlights: •Hamiltonian of a damped charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Exact Green’s function of a charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Time evolution of a Gaussian wave packet of a damped charged particle. •Classical and quantum dynamics of a damped electric charge.

  16. Interactive design environment transportation channel of relativistic charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadchuk, I. O.; Averyanov, G. P.; Budkin, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Considered a modern implementation of a computer environment for the design of channels of transportation of high-energy charged particle beams. The environment includes a software package for the simulation of the dynamics of charged particles in the channel, operating means for changing parameters of the channel, the elements channel optimization and processing of the output characteristics of the beam with the graphical output the main output parameters.

  17. Effect of surface energy constant and surface asymmetry constant in the charged particle emission cross-section for the reactions $ (78,82,86) Kr +(12) C $ 78 , 82 , 86 K r + 12 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarzadeh, P.; Davoodabadi, S.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of the surface energy constant and the surface asymmetry constant in the charged particle emission cross section, have been examined by using the proximity potentials Prox77, BW91, AW95. The charged particle emission cross-section for the reactions ^{78,82,86} Kr +^{12} C have been calculated. Good consistency between the results of this work and the experimental data have been obtained using appropriate values of these constants.

  18. Yields of clustered DNA damage induced by charged-particle radiations of similar kinetic energy per nucleon: LET dependence in different DNA microenvironments

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, D.J.; Sutherland, B. M.

    2010-08-01

    To determine the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of the biological effects of densely ionizing radiation in relation to changes in the ionization density along the track, we measured the yields and spectrum of clustered DNA damages induced by charged particles of different atomic number but similar kinetic energy per nucleon in different DNA microenvironments. Yeast DNA embedded in agarose in solutions of different free radical scavenging capacity was irradiated with 1 GeV protons, 1 GeV/nucleon oxygen ions, 980 MeV/nucleon titanium ions or 968 MeV/nucleon iron ions. The frequencies of double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites and oxypurine clusters were quantified. The total DNA damage yields per absorbed dose induced in non-radioquenching solution decreased with LET, with minor variations in radioquenching conditions being detected. However, the total damage yields per particle fluence increased with LET in both conditions, indicating a higher efficiency per particle to induce clustered DNA damages. The yields of DSBs and non-DSB clusters as well as the damage spectra varied with LET and DNA milieu, suggesting the involvement of more than one mechanism in the formation of the different types of clustered damages.

  19. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Wan, M.; Montgomery, D.

    2013-12-01

    Study of the transport and diffusion of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider Diffusion of charged particles in fully three dimensional statistically isotropic magnetic field turbulence with no mean field which is pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We classify different regions of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius of the charged particle to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. We propose three different theoretical models to calculate the diffusion coefficient each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared with those from computer simulations, showing very good agreement.

  20. On charged particle tracks in cellulose nitrate and Lexan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Henke, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations were performed aimed at developing plastic nuclear track detectors into quantitative tools for recording and measuring multicharged, heavy particles. Accurate track etch rate measurements as a function of LET were performed for cellulose nitrate and Lexan plastic detectors. This was done using a variety of incident charged particle types and energies. The effect of aging of latent tracks in Lexan in different gaseous atmospheres was investigated. Range distributions of high energy N-14 particle bevatron beams in nuclear emulsion were measured. Investigation of charge resolution and Bragg peak measurements were carried out using plastic nuclear track detectors.

  1. Nontargeted Stressful Effects in Normal Human Fibroblast Cultures Exposed to Low Fluences of High Charge, High Energy (HZE) Particles: Kinetics of Biologic Responses and Significance of Secondary Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Gonon, Géraldine; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Howell, Roger W.; Fromm, Michel; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2014-01-01

    The induction of nontargeted stressful effects in cell populations exposed to low fluences of high charge (Z) and high energy (E) particles is relevant to estimates of the health risks of space radiation. We investigated the up-regulation of stress markers in confluent normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to 1,000 MeV/u iron ions [linear energy transfer (LET) ~151 keV/μm] or 600 MeV/u silicon ions (LET ~50 keV/μm) at mean absorbed doses as low as 0.2 cGy, wherein 1–3% of the cells were targeted through the nucleus by a primary particle. Within 24 h postirradiation, significant increases in the levels of phospho-TP53 (serine 15), p21Waf1 (CDKN1A), HDM2, phospho-ERK1/2, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation were detected, which suggested participation in the stress response of cells not targeted by primary particles. This was supported by in situ studies that indicated greater increases in 53BP1 foci formation, a marker of DNA damage. than expected from the number of primary particle traversals. The effect was expressed as early as 15 min after exposure, peaked at 1 h and decreased by 24 h. A similar tendency occurred after exposure of the cell cultures to 0.2 cGy of 3.7 MeV α particles (LET ~109 keV/μm) that targets ~1.6% of nuclei, but not after 0.2 cGy from 290 MeV/u carbon ions (LET ~13 keV/μm) by which, on average, ~13% of the nuclei were hit, which highlights the importance of radiation quality in the induced effect. Simulations with the FLUKA multi-particle transport code revealed that fragmentation products, other than electrons, in cell cultures exposed to HZE particles comprise <1% of the absorbed dose. Further, the radial spread of dose due to secondary heavy ion fragments is confined to approximately 10–20 μm. Thus, the latter are unlikely to significantly contribute to stressful effects in cells not targeted by primary HZE particles. PMID:23465079

  2. Attractive interaction between similarly charged colloidal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, X.; Wasan, D.T.

    1996-12-01

    The pair interactions between the charged colloidal particles dispersed in a solvent are studied theoretically by the integral equation method. The pair potential of the mean forces, accounting for the effective pair interaction between colloidal particles, is calculated from the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the mean spherical approximation (MSA). An attractive interaction was found between two similarly charged colloidal particles in contrast with the purely repulsive force predicted by the Debye-Huckel theory. Such an attractive interaction provides physical insight for the condensed phenomena in charged colloidal dispersions, that is, the coexistence of a condensed phase and an expanded phase (voids). At the higher concentration and charge on colloidal particles, the effective pair interaction becomes oscillatory.

  3. Quenching gas for detectors of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1974-01-22

    Operation of detectors of charged particles such as wire counters and Geiger-Muller tubes is improved by filling the counters with a quenching-gas mixture of argon, isobutane and methylchloroform. (Official Gazette)

  4. Robust statistical reconstruction for charged particle tomography

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Larry Joe; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Morris, Christopher; Orum, John Christopher; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Sossong, Michael James; Hengartner, Nicolas W

    2013-10-08

    Systems and methods for charged particle detection including statistical reconstruction of object volume scattering density profiles from charged particle tomographic data to determine the probability distribution of charged particle scattering using a statistical multiple scattering model and determine a substantially maximum likelihood estimate of object volume scattering density using expectation maximization (ML/EM) algorithm to reconstruct the object volume scattering density. The presence of and/or type of object occupying the volume of interest can be identified from the reconstructed volume scattering density profile. The charged particle tomographic data can be cosmic ray muon tomographic data from a muon tracker for scanning packages, containers, vehicles or cargo. The method can be implemented using a computer program which is executable on a computer.

  5. Electrostatic wire for stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Prono, Daniel S.; Caporaso, George J.; Briggs, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  6. The charged particle radiation environment for AXAF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, Marshall

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) will be subjected to several sources of charged particle radiation during its 15-year orbital lifetime: geomagnetically-trapped electrons and protons, galactic cosmic ray particles, and solar flare events. These radiation levels are presented for the AXAF orbit for use in the design of the observatory's science instruments.

  7. Discrete Element Modeling of Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Weitzman, Peter S.; Curry, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carry out experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. While simple Coulombic force between two particles is well understood, its operation in an ensemble of particles is more complex. When the tribocharging of particles and surfaces due to frictional contact is also considered, it is necessary to consider longer range of interaction of particles in response to electrostatic charging. The standard DEM algorithm accounts for particle mechanical properties and inertia as a function of particle shape and mass. If fluid drag is neglected, then particle dynamics are governed by contact between particles, between particles and equipment surfaces and gravity forces. Consideration of particle charge and any tribocharging and

  8. Charged particle concepts for fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Collins, F. G.; Koepf, D.

    1981-01-01

    Charged particle techniques hold promise for dispersing warm fog in the terminal area of commercial airports. This report focuses on features of the charged particle technique which require further study. The basic physical principles of the technique and the major verification experiments carried out in the past are described. The fundamentals of the nozzle operation are given. The nozzle characteristics and the theory of particle charging in the nozzle are discussed, including information from extensive literature on electrostatic precipitation relative to environmental pollution control and a description of some preliminary reported analyses on the jet characteristics and interaction with neighboring jets. The equation governing the transfer of water substances and of electrical charge is given together with a brief description of several semi-empirical, mathematical expressions necessary for the governing equations. The necessary ingredients of a field experiment to verify the system once a prototype is built are described.

  9. Self-organization of charged particles in circular geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazmitdinov, R. G.; Puente, A.; Cerkaski, M.; Pons, M.

    2017-04-01

    The basic principles of self-organization of one-component charged particles, confined in disk and circular parabolic potentials, are proposed. A system of equations is derived, which allows us to determine equilibrium configurations for an arbitrary, but finite, number of charged particles that are distributed over several rings. Our approach reduces significantly the computational effort in minimizing the energy of equilibrium configurations and demonstrates a remarkable agreement with the values provided by molecular dynamics calculations. With the increase of particle number n >180 we find a steady formation of a centered hexagonal lattice that smoothly transforms to valence circular rings in the ground-state configurations for both potentials.

  10. Self-organization of charged particles in circular geometry.

    PubMed

    Nazmitdinov, R G; Puente, A; Cerkaski, M; Pons, M

    2017-04-01

    The basic principles of self-organization of one-component charged particles, confined in disk and circular parabolic potentials, are proposed. A system of equations is derived, which allows us to determine equilibrium configurations for an arbitrary, but finite, number of charged particles that are distributed over several rings. Our approach reduces significantly the computational effort in minimizing the energy of equilibrium configurations and demonstrates a remarkable agreement with the values provided by molecular dynamics calculations. With the increase of particle number n>180 we find a steady formation of a centered hexagonal lattice that smoothly transforms to valence circular rings in the ground-state configurations for both potentials.

  11. Streak Camera 101: Visualizing Charged-Particle Beam Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingxin

    2006-11-01

    Radiation generated by high-energy particle beams such as optical transition radiation (OTR) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) is widely used to characterize the beam properties. It has enabled dual-sweep streak cameras to visualize charged-particle beam dynamics. In this introductory paper, we will discuss properties of dual-sweep streak cameras and basic optics systems for imaging charged-particle bunches at different projection angles to produce top view, side view, and front view. Examples will be used to illustrate the beam dynamics that streak images reveal. We will also discuss practical considerations of optical transport line design to preserve spatial and temporal resolution of the camera system.

  12. Long-term biochemical and histological changes in the central nervous system of rats exposed to low fluences of high charge and high energy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Edouard; Rabin, Bernard

    Accumulating evidence indicates that exposure of rodents to even low fluences of high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) can disrupt their cognitive and behavioral per-formance. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these effects has been considered critical for adequately estimating the risks to astronauts during and subsequent to prolonged space flights. To gain a greater understanding of the biochemical and molecular changes underlying radiation effects in the central nervous system, we targeted the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats with mean doses ranging from 0.1 to 50 cGy from titanium or oxygen ions of different energies. Molecular, biochemical and histological analyses in the different compartment of the central nervous system of rats sacrificed 20 months after irradiation will be reported. The effect of radiation dose, energy and quality will be highlighted. Particular focus will be on changes in protein level, protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial function, the antioxidative network and apoptosis. The changes in brain tissues will be contrasted with biochemical and molecular changes in non-targeted tissues of the irradiated rats. Supported by grants from the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  13. Transverse energy production and charged-particle multiplicity at midrapidity in various systems from √{sN N}=7.7 to 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Danley, T. W.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Ge, H.; Germain, M.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Guragain, H.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isinhue, A.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kofarago, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of midrapidity charged-particle multiplicity distributions, d Nch/d η , and midrapidity transverse-energy distributions, d ET/d η , are presented for a variety of collision systems and energies. Included are distributions for Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 , 130, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 14.5, and 7.7 GeV, Cu +Cu collisions at √{sNN}=200 and 62.4 GeV, Cu +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV, U +U collisions at √{sNN}=193 GeV, d +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV, 3He+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV, and p +p collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. Centrality-dependent distributions at midrapidity are presented in terms of the number of nucleon participants, Npart, and the number of constituent quark participants, Nqp. For all A +A collisions down to √{sNN}=7.7 GeV, it is observed that the midrapidity data are better described by scaling with Nqp than scaling with Npart. Also presented are estimates of the Bjorken energy density, ɛBJ, and the ratio of d ET/d η to d Nch/d η , the latter of which is seen to be constant as a function of centrality for all systems.

  14. Why do particle clouds generate electric charges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pähtz, T.; Herrmann, H. J.; Shinbrot, T.

    2010-05-01

    Grains in desert sandstorms spontaneously generate strong electrical charges; likewise volcanic dust plumes produce spectacular lightning displays. Charged particle clouds also cause devastating explosions in food, drug and coal processing industries. Despite the wide-ranging importance of granular charging in both nature and industry, even the simplest aspects of its causes remain elusive, because it is difficult to understand how inert grains in contact with little more than other inert grains can generate the large charges observed. Here, we present a simple yet predictive explanation for the charging of granular materials in collisional flows. We argue from very basic considerations that charge transfer can be expected in collisions of identical dielectric grains in the presence of an electric field, and we confirm the model's predictions using discrete-element simulations and a tabletop granular experiment.

  15. On charging of snow particles in blizzard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shio, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    The causes of the charge polarity on the blizzard, which consisted of fractured snow crystals and ice particles, were investigated. As a result, the charging phenomena showed that the characteristics of the blizzard are as follows: (1) In the case of the blizzard with snowfall, the fractured snow particles drifting near the surface of snow field (lower area: height 0.3 m) had positive charge, while those drifting at higher area (height 2 m) from the surface of snow field had negative charge. However, during the series of blizzards two kinds of particles positively and negatively charged were collected in equal amounts in a Faraday Cage. It may be considered that snow crystals with electrically neutral properties were separated into two kinds of snow flakes (charged positively and negatively) by destruction of the snow crystals. (2) In the case of the blizzard which consisted of irregularly formed ice drops (generated by peeling off the hardened snow field), the charge polarity of these ice drops salting over the snow field was particularly controlled by the crystallographic characteristics of the surface of the snow field hardened by the powerful wind pressure.

  16. Quantum-size effects in the energy loss of charged particles interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. G.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2006-01-15

    Time-dependent density-functional theory is used to calculate quantum-size effects in the energy loss of antiprotons interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas. The antiprotons follow a trajectory normal to jellium circular clusters of variable size, crossing every cluster at its geometrical center. Analysis of the characteristic time scales that define the process is made. For high-enough velocities, the interaction time between the projectile and the target electrons is shorter than the time needed for the density excitation to travel along the cluster. The finite-size object then behaves as an infinite system, and no quantum-size effects appear in the energy loss. For small velocities, the discretization of levels in the cluster plays a role and the energy loss does depend on the system size. A comparison to results obtained using linear theory of screening is made, and the relative contributions of electron-hole pair and plasmon excitations to the total energy loss are analyzed. This comparison also allows us to show the importance of a nonlinear treatment of the screening in the interaction process.

  17. Charged Particle lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Research development in the Charged Particle Lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE) is reported. The CPLEE is ion-electron spectrometer placed on the lunar surface for the purpose of measuring charged particle fluxes impacting the moon from a variety of regions and to study the interactions between space plasmas and the lunar surface. The principal accomplishments reported include: (1) furnishing design specifications for construction of the CPLEE instruments; (2) development of an advanced computer-controlled facility for automated instrument calibration; (3) active participation in the deployment and past-deployment operational phases with regard to data verification and operational mode selection; and (4) publication of research papers, including a study of lunar photoelectrons, a study of plasmas resulting from man-made lunar impart events, a study of magnetotail and magnetosheath particle populations, and a study of solar-flare interplanetary particles.

  18. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Blasi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.; Chuychai, P.; Dmitruk, P.; Wan, M.; Parashar, T. N.; Chhiber, R.

    2017-03-01

    The investigation of the diffusive transport of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider the diffusion of charged particles in fully three-dimensional isotropic turbulent magnetic fields with no mean field, which may be pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We identify different ranges of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. Two different theoretical models are proposed to calculate the diffusion coefficient, each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared to those from computer simulations, showing good agreement.

  19. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  20. Modulation of graphene field effect by heavy charged particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazalas, Edward; Sarker, Biddut K.; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-12-01

    Device architectures based on the two-dimensional material graphene can be used for sensing of electromagnetic and particle radiation. The sensing mechanism may be direct, by absorbance of radiation by the graphene or the immediately adjacent material, and indirect, via the field effect principle, whereby the change in conductivity within a semiconducting absorber substrate induces electric field change at graphene. Here, we report on a graphene field effect transistor (GFET) sensitive to heavy charged particle radiation (α particles) at MeV energies by use of the indirect sensing mechanism. Both the continuous and discrete changes of graphene are observed, and the latter are attributed to single α particle interactions with the GFET. While this study provides the basis for understanding of the irradiation effects, it also opens prospects for the use of GFETs as heavy charged particle detectors.

  1. The charged particle accelerators subsystems modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, G. P.; Kobylyatskiy, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Presented web-based resource for information support the engineering, science and education in Electrophysics, containing web-based tools for simulation subsystems charged particle accelerators. Formulated the development motivation of Web-Environment for Virtual Electrophysical Laboratories. Analyzes the trends of designs the dynamic web-environments for supporting of scientific research and E-learning, within the framework of Open Education concept.

  2. Studying Charged Particle Optics: An Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovalle, V.; Otomar, D. R.; Pereira, J. M.; Ferreira, N.; Pinho, R. R.; Santos A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal…

  3. Studying Charged Particle Optics: An Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovalle, V.; Otomar, D. R.; Pereira, J. M.; Ferreira, N.; Pinho, R. R.; Santos A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal…

  4. {Lambda} single particle energies

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, Q.N.; Bodmer, A.R. |

    1999-11-01

    The {Lambda} single-particle energies B{sub {Lambda}} of hypernuclei (HN) are calculated microscopically using the Fermi hypernetted chain method to obtain for our {Lambda}N and {Lambda}NN potentials the {Lambda} binding D({rho}) to nuclear matter, and the effective mass m{sub {Lambda}}{sup {asterisk}}({rho}) at densities {rho}{le}{rho}{sub 0} ({rho}{sub 0} is normal nuclear density), and also the corresponding effective {Lambda}N and {Lambda}NN potentials. The {Lambda} core-nucleus potential U{sub {Lambda}}(r) is obtained by suitably folding these into the core density. The Schr{umlt o}dinger equation for U{sub {Lambda}} and m{sub {Lambda}}{sup {asterisk}} is solved for B{sub {Lambda}}. The fringing field (FF) due to the finite range of the effective potentials is theoretically required. We use a dispersive {Lambda}NN potential but also include a phenomenological {rho} dependence allowing for less repulsion for {rho}{lt}{rho}{sub 0}, i.e., in the surface. The best fits to the data with a FF give a large {rho} dependence, equivalent to an {ital A} dependent strength consistent with variational calculations of {sub {Lambda}}{sup 5}He, indicating an effective {Lambda}NN dispersive potential increasingly repulsive with {ital A} whose likely interpretation is in terms of dispersive plus two-pion-exchange {Lambda}NN potentials. The well depth is 29{plus_minus}1&hthinsp;MeV. The {Lambda}N space-exchange fraction corresponds to m{sub {Lambda}}{sup {asterisk}}({rho}){approx}0.75{endash}0.80 and a ratio of {ital p}- to {ital s}-state potentials of {approx}0.5{plus_minus}0.1. Charge symmetry breaking (CSB) is significant for heavy HN with a large neutron excess; with a FF the strength agrees with that obtained from the A=4&hthinsp;HN. The fits without FF are excellent but inconsistent with the requirement for a FF, with {sub {Lambda}}{sup 5}He, and also with the CSB sign for A=4. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. First Results from the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semones, Edward; Zeitland, Cary

    2016-01-01

    The Charged Particle Detector (CPD) subsystem of the ISS-RAD detector has been making measurements of high-energy charged and neutral particles since the unit was deployed on Feb. 1, 2016. The CPD is nearly identical to the MSL-RAD instrument, but onboard data processing has been significantly modified to meet ISS requirements. We will present dose rates and LET spectra obtained over the first six months of operations, as well as preliminary results obtained from the limited sample of pulse-height analyzed raw data that has been telemetered to Earth.

  6. Perturbation theory for charged-particle transport in one dimension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Lamkin, S. L.

    1975-01-01

    Perturbation theory, when applied to charged-particle transport, generates a series solution that requires a double quadrature per term. The continuity of higher-order terms leads to numerical evaluation of the series. The high rate of convergence of the series makes the method a practical tool for charged-particle transport problems. The coupling of the neutron component in the case of proton transport in tissue does not greatly alter the rate of convergence. The method holds promise for a practical high-energy proton transport theory.

  7. The response of thermally and optically stimulated luminescence from Al2O3:C to high-energy heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Gaza, R; Yukihara, E G; McKeever, S W S

    2004-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) response of Al2O3 dosimeters to high-energy heavy charged particles (HCP) has been studied using the heavy ion medical accelerator at Chiba, Japan. The samples were Al2O3 single-crystal chips, of the type usually known as TLD-500, and Luxel(TM) dosimeters (Al2O3:C powder in plastic) from Landauer Inc. The samples were exposed to 4He (150 MeV/u), 12C (400 MeV/u), 28Si (490 MeV/us) and 56Fe (500 MeV/u) ions, with linear energy transfer values covering the range from 2.26 to 189 keV/micrometers in water and doses from 1 to 100 mGy (to water). A 90Sr/90Y beta source, calibrated against a 60Co secondary standard, was used for calibration purposes. For OSL, we used both continuous-wave OSL measurements (CW-OSL, using green light stimulation at 525 nm) and pulsed OSL measurements (POSL, using 532 nm stimulation from a Nd:YAG Q-switched laser). The efficiencies (eta HCP, gamma) of the different HCPs at producing OSL or TL were observed to depend not only upon the linear energy transfer (LET) of the HCP, but also upon the sample type (single crystal chip or Luxel(TM)) and the luminescence method used to define the signal--i.e. TL, CW-OSL initial intensity, CW-OSL total area, or POSL. Observed changes in shape of the decay curve lead to potential methods for extracting LET information of unknown radiation fields. A discussion of the results is given, including the potential use of OSL from Al2O3 in the areas of space radiation dosimetry and radiation oncology.

  8. The response of thermally and optically stimulated luminescence from Al2O3:C to high-energy heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaza, R.; Yukihara, E. G.; McKeever, S. W. S.

    2004-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) response of Al2O3 dosimeters to high-energy heavy charged particles (HCP) has been studied using the heavy ion medical accelerator at Chiba, Japan. The samples were Al2O3 single-crystal chips, of the type usually known as TLD-500, and Luxel(TM) dosimeters (Al2O3:C powder in plastic) from Landauer Inc. The samples were exposed to 4He (150 MeV/u), 12C (400 MeV/u), 28Si (490 MeV/us) and 56Fe (500 MeV/u) ions, with linear energy transfer values covering the range from 2.26 to 189 keV/micrometers in water and doses from 1 to 100 mGy (to water). A 90Sr/90Y beta source, calibrated against a 60Co secondary standard, was used for calibration purposes. For OSL, we used both continuous-wave OSL measurements (CW-OSL, using green light stimulation at 525 nm) and pulsed OSL measurements (POSL, using 532 nm stimulation from a Nd:YAG Q-switched laser). The efficiencies (eta HCP, gamma) of the different HCPs at producing OSL or TL were observed to depend not only upon the linear energy transfer (LET) of the HCP, but also upon the sample type (single crystal chip or Luxel(TM)) and the luminescence method used to define the signal--i.e. TL, CW-OSL initial intensity, CW-OSL total area, or POSL. Observed changes in shape of the decay curve lead to potential methods for extracting LET information of unknown radiation fields. A discussion of the results is given, including the potential use of OSL from Al2O3 in the areas of space radiation dosimetry and radiation oncology. c2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The response of thermally and optically stimulated luminescence from Al2O3:C to high-energy heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaza, R.; Yukihara, E. G.; McKeever, S. W. S.

    2004-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) response of Al2O3 dosimeters to high-energy heavy charged particles (HCP) has been studied using the heavy ion medical accelerator at Chiba, Japan. The samples were Al2O3 single-crystal chips, of the type usually known as TLD-500, and Luxel(TM) dosimeters (Al2O3:C powder in plastic) from Landauer Inc. The samples were exposed to 4He (150 MeV/u), 12C (400 MeV/u), 28Si (490 MeV/us) and 56Fe (500 MeV/u) ions, with linear energy transfer values covering the range from 2.26 to 189 keV/micrometers in water and doses from 1 to 100 mGy (to water). A 90Sr/90Y beta source, calibrated against a 60Co secondary standard, was used for calibration purposes. For OSL, we used both continuous-wave OSL measurements (CW-OSL, using green light stimulation at 525 nm) and pulsed OSL measurements (POSL, using 532 nm stimulation from a Nd:YAG Q-switched laser). The efficiencies (eta HCP, gamma) of the different HCPs at producing OSL or TL were observed to depend not only upon the linear energy transfer (LET) of the HCP, but also upon the sample type (single crystal chip or Luxel(TM)) and the luminescence method used to define the signal--i.e. TL, CW-OSL initial intensity, CW-OSL total area, or POSL. Observed changes in shape of the decay curve lead to potential methods for extracting LET information of unknown radiation fields. A discussion of the results is given, including the potential use of OSL from Al2O3 in the areas of space radiation dosimetry and radiation oncology. c2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transverse energy production and charged-particle multiplicity at midrapidity in various systems from sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; ...

    2016-02-03

    Measurements of midrapidity charged-particle multiplicity distributions, dNch/dη, and midrapidity transverse-energy distributions, dET/dη, are presented for a variety of collision systems and energies. Included are distributions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200, 130, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 14.5, and 7.7 GeV, Cu+Cu collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV, Cu+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, U+U collisions at√sNN=193 GeV, d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, He3+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, and p+p collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. We present centrality-dependent distributions at midrapidity in terms of the number of nucleon participants, Npart, and the number of constituent quark participants, Nqp. For all A+A collisions down tomore » √sNN=7.7 GeV, we observed that the midrapidity data are better described by scaling with Nqp than scaling with Npart. Finally, our estimates of the Bjorken energy density, εBJ, and the ratio of dET/dη to dNch/dη are presented, the latter of which is seen to be constant as a function of centrality for all systems.« less

  11. Charging Graphene for Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun

    2014-10-06

    Since 2004, graphene, including single atomic layer graphite sheet, and chemically derived graphene sheets, has captured the imagination of researchers for energy storage because of the extremely high surface area (2630 m2/g) compared to traditional activated carbon (typically below 1500 m2/g), excellent electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and potential for low cost manufacturing. These properties are very desirable for achieving high activity, high capacity and energy density, and fast charge and discharge. Chemically derived graphene sheets are prepared by oxidation and reduction of graphite1 and are more suitable for energy storage because they can be made in large quantities. They still contain multiply stacked graphene sheets, structural defects such as vacancies, and oxygen containing functional groups. In the literature they are also called reduced graphene oxide, or functionalized graphene sheets, but in this article they are all referred to as graphene for easy of discussion. Two important applications, batteries and electrochemical capacitors, have been widely investigated. In a battery material, the redox reaction occurs at a constant potential (voltage) and the energy is stored in the bulk. Therefore, the energy density is high (more than 100 Wh/kg), but it is difficult to rapidly charge or discharge (low power, less than 1 kW/kg)2. In an electrochemical capacitor (also called supercapacitors or ultracapacitor in the literature), the energy is stored as absorbed ionic species at the interface between the high surface area carbon and the electrolyte, and the potential is a continuous function of the state-of-charge. The charge and discharge can happen rapidly (high power, up to 10 kW/kg) but the energy density is low, less than 10 Wh/kg2. A device that can have both high energy and high power would be ideal.

  12. Induced-charge electroosmotic trapping of particles.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yukun; Liu, Weiyu; Jia, Yankai; Tao, Ye; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2015-05-21

    Position-controllable trapping of particles on the surface of a bipolar metal strip by induced-charge electroosmotic (ICEO) flow is presented herein. We demonstrate a nonlinear ICEO slip profile on the electrode surface accounting for stable particle trapping behaviors above the double-layer relaxation frequency, while no trapping occurs in the DC limit as a result of a strong upward fluidic drag induced by a linear ICEO slip profile. By extending an AC-flow field effect transistor from the DC limit to the AC field, we reveal that fixed-potential ICEO exceeding RC charging frequency can adjust the particle trapping position flexibly by generating controllable symmetry breaking in a vortex flow pattern. Our results open up new opportunities to manipulate microscopic objects in modern microfluidic systems by using ICEO.

  13. DNA fragmentation by charged particle tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenerlöw, B.; Höglund, E.; Carlsson, J.

    High-LET (linear energy transfer) charged particles induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in a non-random fashion in mammalian cells. The clustering of DSB, probably determined by track structure as well as chromatin conformation, results in an excess of small- and intermediate-sized DNA fragments. DNA fragmentation in normal human fibroblasts (GM5758) was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after irradiation with photons ( 60Co) or 125 keV/μm nitrogen ions. Compared to conventional DSB analysis, i.e. assays only measuring the fraction of DNA smaller than a single threshold, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for DSB induction increased with 100%. Further, the size distribution of DNA fragments showed a significant dependence on radiation quality, with an excess of fragments up to 1 Mbp. Irradiation of naked genomic DNA without histone proteins increased the DSB yields 25 and 13 times for photons and nitrogen ions, respectively. The results suggest possible roles of both track structure and chromatin organization in the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks along the chromosome.

  14. Experimental Studying of Dust Particles Charging by Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Petrov, O. F.; Vorona, N. A.; Vasiliev, M. N.

    2008-09-07

    The studying of the dusty plasma properties under electron beam action are of great interest because it gives the unique opportunities for experimental investigation of strongly coupled systems as well as for developing the new dusty plasma technologies of creating the new composite materials. Highly charged dust particle generates electrostatic field that can accelerate positive ions to high power. It gives the unique possibilities of using these macroparticles (for deeply ions implantation, as catalysts for increasing rate of reactions with the high energy barrier, in the new ionic engines etc.). Presented work deals with the experimental investigation of dust particles charging under direct influence of electron beam. On the basis of experimental data the average velocities of dust particles were obtained and the charge of macroparticle was estimated.

  15. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  16. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  17. Relative optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence efficiencies of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C dosimeters to heavy charged particles with energies relevant to space and radiotherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sawakuchi, G. O.; Yukihara, E. G.; McKeever, S. W. S.; Benton, E. R.; Gaza, R.; Uchihori, Y.; Yasuda, N.; Kitamura, H.

    2008-12-15

    This article presents a comprehensive characterization of the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) relative luminescence efficiencies of carbon-doped aluminum (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) for heavy charged particles (HCPs) with atomic numbers ranging from 1 (proton) to 54 (xenon) and energies ranging from 7 to 1000 MeV/u, and investigates the dependence of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C response on experimental conditions. Relative luminescence efficiency values are presented for 19 primary charge/energy combinations, plus 31 additional charge/energy combinations obtained by introducing absorbers in the primary beam. Our results show that for energies of hundreds of MeV/u the data can be described by a single curve of relative luminescence efficiency versus linear energy transfer (LET). This information is needed to compensate for the reduced OSL efficiency to high-LET particles in such applications as space dosimetry. For lower energies, the relative luminescence efficiency as function of LET cannot be described by a single curve; instead, it separates into different components corresponding to different particles. We also present data on the low-LET dose response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, measured under the same experimental conditions in which the relative luminescence efficiencies to HCPs were obtained, providing information relevant to future theoretical investigations of HCP energy deposition and luminescence production in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C.

  18. Charged-particle absorption by Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, M.; Eviatar, A.

    1976-01-01

    An idealized two-dimensional model of the distorted electric field configuration, in the limit of a perfectly conducting satellite or satellite ionosphere, has been constructed. This model has been used to trace the adiabatic guiding-center trajectories of energetic protons and electrons across Jupiter's magnetic-field lines, which are taken as rectilinear. The adiabatic trajectories of very low-energy particles (cold-plasma) are thus found to avoid the satellite and escape absorption. In the limit of very high particle energies the adiabatic trajectories are undistorted, and absorption proceeds as if Io were an insulator. The particle absorbing characteristics of an electrically conducting Jovian satellite are found to depend on both the species and the energy of the incident particle, and the satellite's particle-absorbing cross section differs systematically from its geometric cross section.

  19. Charged-particle spectroscopy in organic semiconducting single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ciavatti, A.; Basiricò, L.; Fraboni, B.; Fraleoni-Morgera, A.

    2016-04-11

    The use of organic materials as radiation detectors has grown, due to the easy processability in liquid phase at room temperature and the possibility to cover large areas by means of low cost deposition techniques. Direct charged-particle detectors based on solution-grown Organic Semiconducting Single Crystals (OSSCs) are shown to be capable to detect charged particles in pulse mode, with very good peak discrimination. The direct charged-particle detection in OSSCs has been assessed both in the planar and in the vertical axes, and a digital pulse processing algorithm has been used to perform pulse height spectroscopy and to study the charge collection efficiency as a function of the applied bias voltage. Taking advantage of the charge spectroscopy and the good peak discrimination of pulse height spectra, an Hecht-like behavior of OSSCs radiation detectors is demonstrated. It has been possible to estimate the mobility-lifetime value in organic materials, a fundamental parameter for the characterization of radiation detectors, whose results are equal to μτ{sub coplanar} = (5 .5 ± 0.6 ) × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/V and μτ{sub sandwich} = (1 .9 ± 0.2 ) × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/V, values comparable to those of polycrystalline inorganic detectors. Moreover, alpha particles Time-of-Flight experiments have been carried out to estimate the drift mobility value. The results reported here indicate how charged-particle detectors based on OSSCs possess a great potential as low-cost, large area, solid-state direct detectors operating at room temperature. More interestingly, the good detection efficiency and peak discrimination observed for charged-particle detection in organic materials (hydrogen-rich molecules) are encouraging for their further exploitation in the detection of thermal and high-energy neutrons.

  20. Charged-particle spectroscopy in organic semiconducting single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavatti, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Basiricò, L.; Fraleoni-Morgera, A.; Fraboni, B.

    2016-04-01

    The use of organic materials as radiation detectors has grown, due to the easy processability in liquid phase at room temperature and the possibility to cover large areas by means of low cost deposition techniques. Direct charged-particle detectors based on solution-grown Organic Semiconducting Single Crystals (OSSCs) are shown to be capable to detect charged particles in pulse mode, with very good peak discrimination. The direct charged-particle detection in OSSCs has been assessed both in the planar and in the vertical axes, and a digital pulse processing algorithm has been used to perform pulse height spectroscopy and to study the charge collection efficiency as a function of the applied bias voltage. Taking advantage of the charge spectroscopy and the good peak discrimination of pulse height spectra, an Hecht-like behavior of OSSCs radiation detectors is demonstrated. It has been possible to estimate the mobility-lifetime value in organic materials, a fundamental parameter for the characterization of radiation detectors, whose results are equal to μτcoplanar = (5 .5 ± 0.6 ) × 10-6 cm2/V and μτsandwich = (1 .9 ± 0.2 ) × 10-6 cm2/V, values comparable to those of polycrystalline inorganic detectors. Moreover, alpha particles Time-of-Flight experiments have been carried out to estimate the drift mobility value. The results reported here indicate how charged-particle detectors based on OSSCs possess a great potential as low-cost, large area, solid-state direct detectors operating at room temperature. More interestingly, the good detection efficiency and peak discrimination observed for charged-particle detection in organic materials (hydrogen-rich molecules) are encouraging for their further exploitation in the detection of thermal and high-energy neutrons.

  1. Guiding of charged particles through capillaries in insulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolterfoht, Nikolaus; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2016-04-01

    Studies of charged particle guiding through capillaries in insulating materials, performed during the last decade, are reviewed in a comprehensive manner. First, the principles of capillary guiding of slow highly charged ions are introduced describing the self-organized formation of charge patches. Basic quantities are defined, such as the guiding power characterizing a capillary. Challenges of the guiding experiments are pointed out. Then, experiments are described with emphasis on the guiding of highly charged ions in the keV energy range. Samples with an array of nanocapillaries as well as single macrocapillaries are treated. Emission profiles of transmitted ions are analyzed to establish scaling laws for the guiding angle, which quantifies the guiding power. Oscillations of the mean ion emission angle reveal the temporal dynamics of the charge patch formation. Next, experiments with ions of high (MeV) energies are focused on single tapered capillaries allowing for the production of a microbeam for various applications. Experiments concerning electrons are presented showing that apart from being elastically scattered these negative particles may enter into the capillary surface where they suffer energy losses. Finally, theoretical concepts of the capillary guiding are discussed. Simulations based on different charge transport methods clearly support the understanding of the guiding mechanisms. Altogether, capillary guiding involves several novel phenomena for which understanding have progressed far beyond their infancy.

  2. MASS SEPARATION OF HIGH ENERGY PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, L.

    1962-09-25

    An apparatus and method are described for separating charged, high energy particles of equal momentum forming a beam where the particles differ slightly in masses. Magnetic lenses are utilized to focus the beam and maintain that condition while electrostatic fields located between magnetic lenses are utilized to cause transverse separation of the particles into two beams separated by a sufficient amount to permit an aperture to block one beam. (AEC)

  3. Static charging by collisions with ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, A. J.; Caranti, J.

    Recent laboratory work will be described which gives considerable insight into the fundamental processes of charge flow and separation which operate when small ice particles impact upon metal surfaces or upon a second ice surface. This work suggests that the charge transfer when ice contacts metal or ice should be to some extent predictable and dependent upon the work function of the metal and the surface or contact potential of the ice. This contact potential is different for ice formed in the atmosphere by different natural methods.

  4. Screening of charged spheroidal colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Carlos; Téllez, Gabriel

    2010-10-01

    We study the effective screened electrostatic potential created by a spheroidal colloidal particle immersed in an electrolyte, within the mean field approximation, using Poisson-Boltzmann equation in its linear and nonlinear forms, and also beyond the mean field by means of Monte Carlo computer simulation. The anisotropic shape of the particle has a strong effect on the screened potential, even at large distances (compared to the Debye length) from it. To quantify this anisotropy effect, we focus our study on the dependence of the potential on the position of the observation point with respect with the orientation of the spheroidal particle. For several different boundary conditions (constant potential, or constant surface charge) we find that, at large distance, the potential is higher in the direction of the large axis of the spheroidal particle.

  5. Charged-Particle Impact Ionization of Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bartschat, Klaus; Guan Xiaoxu

    2008-08-08

    We have developed a hybrid method to treat charged-particle impact ionization of complex atoms and ions. The essential idea is to describe the interaction between a fast projectile and the target perturbatively, up to second order, while the initial bound state and the ejected-electron--residual-ion interaction can be handled via a convergent R-matrix with pseudo-states (close-coupling) expansion. Example results for ionization of the heavy noble gases (Ne-Xe) by positron and electron impact are presented. The general scheme for a distorted-wave treatment of ionization by heavy-particle impact is described.

  6. Position Sensitive Detection System for Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coello, E. A.; Favela, F.; Curiel, Q.; Chavez, E; Huerta, A.; Varela, A.; Shapira, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The position sensitive detection system presented in this work employs the Anger logic algorithm to determine the position of the light spark produced by the passage of charged particles on a 170 x 170 x 10 mm3 scintillator material (PILOT-U). The detection system consists of a matrix of nine photomultipliers, covering a fraction of the back area of the scintillators. Tests made with a non-collimated alpha particle source together with a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the data, suggest an intrinsic position resolution of up to 6 mm is achieved.

  7. Charge exchange and energy loss of slow highly charged ions in 1 nm thick carbon nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Richard A; Gruber, Elisabeth; Ritter, Robert; Heller, René; Facsko, Stefan; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2014-04-18

    Experimental charge exchange and energy loss data for the transmission of slow highly charged Xe ions through ultrathin polymeric carbon membranes are presented. Surprisingly, two distinct exit charge state distributions accompanied by charge exchange dependent energy losses are observed. The energy loss for ions exhibiting large charge loss shows a quadratic dependency on the incident charge state indicating that equilibrium stopping force values do not apply in this case. Additional angle resolved transmission measurements point on a significant contribution of elastic energy loss. The observations show that regimes of different impact parameters can be separated and thus a particle's energy deposition in an ultrathin solid target may not be described in terms of an averaged energy loss per unit length.

  8. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  9. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator includes an evacuated chamber having a gun for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam or ion beam. The beam is discharged through a beam exit in the chamber into a higher pressure region. A plasma interface is disposed at the beam exit and includes a plasma channel for bounding a plasma maintainable between a cathode and an anode disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel is coaxially aligned with the beam exit for propagating the beam from the chamber, through the plasma, and into the higher pressure region. The plasma is effective for pumping down the beam exit for preventing pressure increase in the chamber and provides magnetic focusing of the beam discharged into the higher pressure region 24. 7 figs.

  10. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. . Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Div. California Univ., San Francisco, CA . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  11. Charged Particle Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Heath D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the use of external beam radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been limited by toxicity to the uninvolved liver and surrounding structures. Advances in photon radiotherapy have improved dose conformality to the tumor and facilitated dose escalation, a key contributor to improved HCC radiation treatment outcomes. However, despite these advances in photon radiotherapy, significant volumes of liver still receive low doses of radiation that can preclude dose escalation, particularly in patients with limited functional liver reserves. By capitalizing on the lack of exit dose along the beam path beyond the tumor and higher biological effectiveness, charged particle therapy offers the promise of maximizing tumor control via dose escalation without excessive liver toxicity. In this review we discuss the distinctive biophysical attributes of both proton and carbon ion radiotherapy, particularly as they pertain to treatment of HCC. We also review the available literature regarding clinical outcomes and toxicity of using charged particles for the treatment of HCC. PMID:21939857

  12. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. |

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  13. Charged Particle Environment Definition for NGST: Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Evans, Steven W.; Hardage, Donna M.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    NGST will operate in a halo orbit about the L2 point, 1.5 million km from the Earth, where the spacecraft will periodically travel through the magnetotail region. There are a number of tools available to calculate the high energy, ionizing radiation particle environment from galactic cosmic rays and from solar disturbances. However, space environment tools are not generally available to provide assessments of charged particle environment and its variations in the solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetotail at L2 distances. An engineering-level phenomenology code (LRAD) was therefore developed to facilitate the definition of charged particle environments in the vicinity of the L2 point in support of the NGST program. LRAD contains models tied to satellite measurement data of the solar wind and magnetotail regions. The model provides particle flux and fluence calculations necessary to predict spacecraft charging conditions and the degradation of materials used in the construction of NGST. This paper describes the LRAD environment models for the deep magnetotail (XGSE < -100 Re) and solar wind, and presents predictions of the charged particle environment for NGST.

  14. Charged particle acceleration in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S.V.; Naumova, N.M.; Dudnikova, G.I.; Vshivkov, V.A.; Pegoraro, F.; Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-11-01

    The high-gradient electron acceleration schemes that have been demonstrated using LWFA appear promising for the development of plasma-based laser accelerators into practical devices. However, a question still exists: how to avoid the wake field deterioration and the loss of the phase synchronism between the plasma wave and the electrons that prevent them from being accelerated up to the theoretical limit. In order to obtain the highest possible values of the wake electric field one must use as intense laser pulses as possible i.e., pulses with dimensionless amplitudes a {much_gt} 1. Pulses that have a dimensionless amplitude larger than one tend to be subject to a host of instabilities, such as relativistic self-focusing, self modulation and stimulated Raman scattering, that affect their propagation in the plasma. Such processes could be beneficial, in so far as they increase the pulse energy density, enhance the wake field generation, and provide the mechanism for transporting the laser radiation over several Rayleigh lengths without diffraction spreading. However, it is still far from certain that these processes can be exploited in a controlled form and can lead to regular, stationary wake fields. It is known that, in order to create good quality wake fields, it would be preferable to use laser pulses with steep fronts of order {lambda}{sub p}. The present paper aims at analyzing the influence of the laser pulse shape and of the plasma nonuniformity on the charged particle acceleration. This study is based on the results obtained with one dimensional PIC simulations.

  15. Hybrid quantum systems with trapped charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J.

    2017-02-01

    Trapped charged particles have been at the forefront of quantum information processing (QIP) for a few decades now, with deterministic two-qubit logic gates reaching record fidelities of 99.9 % and single-qubit operations of much higher fidelity. In a hybrid system involving trapped charges, quantum degrees of freedom of macroscopic objects such as bulk acoustic resonators, superconducting circuits, or nanomechanical membranes, couple to the trapped charges and ideally inherit the coherent properties of the charges. The hybrid system therefore implements a "quantum transducer," where the quantum reality (i.e., superpositions and entanglement) of small objects is extended to include the larger object. Although a hybrid quantum system with trapped charges could be valuable both for fundamental research and for QIP applications, no such system exists today. Here we study theoretically the possibilities of coupling the quantum-mechanical motion of a trapped charged particle (e.g., an ion or electron) to the quantum degrees of freedom of superconducting devices, nanomechanical resonators, and quartz bulk acoustic wave resonators. For each case, we estimate the coupling rate between the charged particle and its macroscopic counterpart and compare it to the decoherence rate, i.e., the rate at which quantum superposition decays. A hybrid system can only be considered quantum if the coupling rate significantly exceeds all decoherence rates. Our approach is to examine specific examples by using parameters that are experimentally attainable in the foreseeable future. We conclude that hybrid quantum systems involving a single atomic ion are unfavorable compared with the use of a single electron because the coupling rates between the ion and its counterpart are slower than the expected decoherence rates. A system based on trapped electrons, on the other hand, might have coupling rates that significantly exceed decoherence rates. Moreover, it might have appealing properties such

  16. Effect of collisions on dust particle charging via particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovagnati, B.; Davoudabadi, M.; Lapenta, G.; Mashayek, F.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of collisions on the charging and shielding of a single dust particle immersed in an infinite plasma is studied. A Monte-Carlo collision (MCC) algorithm is implemented in the particle-in-cell DEMOCRITUS code to account for the collisional phenomena which are typical of dusty plasmas in plasma processing, namely, electron-neutral elastic scattering, ion-neutral elastic scattering, and ion-neutral charge exchange. Both small and large dust particle radii, as compared to the characteristic Debye lengths, are considered. The trends of the steady-state dust particle potential at increasing collisionality are presented and discussed. The ions and electron energy distributions at various locations and at increasing collisionality in the case of large particle radius are shown and compared to their local Maxwellians. The ion-neutral charge-exchange collision is found to be by far the most important collisional phenomenon. For small particle radius, collisional effects are found to be important also at low level of collisionality, as more ions are collected by the dust particle due to the destruction of trapped ion orbits. For large particle radius, the major collisional effect is observed to take place in proximity of the presheath. Finally, the species energy distribution functions are found to approach their local Maxwellians at increasing collisionality.

  17. Charge of particles in plasmas under external UV-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttscher, M.; Melzer, A.

    2011-11-01

    In this experiment we investigate the charge of dust particles when they are exposed to external UV-radiation. The determination of the changes in charge of the dust particles is given by a combination of two methods to evaluate electrical charge: the resonance method and the normal mode analysis. This contribution describes the experimental setup and the determination of the charge differences.

  18. Shock drift acceleration. [of charged particles in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Thomas P.; Pesses, Mark E.; Decker, Robert B.

    1985-01-01

    This is a review of the fundamental physics of the interactions of charged particles treated individually while they interact with fast mode magnetohydrodynamic shocks. Numerical simulation and analytical theory are used to develop predictions of the expected characteristics of this process strong upstream anisotropies directed along the magnetic field and downstream anisotropies tending to be peaked more perpendicular to the field; relatively more of the enhancement of higher-energy particles occurring upstream; sensitive dependence on shock normal to magnetic field angle of the efficiency of energization. Observations which display all of the above characteristics are reviewed. Also discussed is the relationship of shock drift acceleration to the models for stochastic transport of charged particles in the vicinity of shocks. Extensions of this work in both the observational and theoretical approaches are discussed.

  19. Dynamics of a charged particle around a weakly magnetized naked singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babar, Gulmina Zaman; Jamil, Mubasher; Lim, Yen-Kheng

    2016-12-01

    We examine the motion of a charged particle in the vicinity of a weakly magnetized naked singularity. The escape velocity and energy of the particle moving around the naked singularity after being kicked by another particle or photon are investigated. Also at innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) escape velocity and energy are examined. Effective potential and angular momentum of the particle are also discussed. We discuss the center-of-mass energy after collision between two particles having same mass and opposite charges moving along the same circular orbit in the opposite direction. It is investigated that under what conditions maximum energy can be produced as a result of collision.

  20. A chemical analyzer for charged ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonser, S. G.; Held, A.

    2013-04-01

    New particle formation is a frequent phenomenon in the atmosphere and of major significance for the earth's climate and human health. To date the mechanisms leading to the nucleation of particles as well as to aerosol growth are not completely understood. A lack of appropriate measurement equipment for online analysis of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles is one major limitation. We have developed a Chemical Analyzer for Charged Ultrafine Particles (CAChUP) capable of analyzing particles with diameters below 30 nm. A bulk of size separated particles is collected electrostatically on a metal filament, resistively desorbed and consequently analyzed for its molecular composition in a time of flight mass spectrometer. We report of technical details as well as characterization experiments performed with the CAChUP. Our instrument was tested in the laboratory for its detection performance as well as for its collection and desorption capabilities. The manual application of known masses of camphene (C10H16) to the desorption filament resulted in a detection limit between 0.5 and 5 ng, and showed a linear response of the mass spectrometer. Flow tube experiments of 25 nm diameter secondary organic aerosol from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene also showed a linear relation between collection time and the mass spectrometer's signal intensity. The resulting mass spectra from the collection experiments are in good agreement with published work on particles generated by the ozonolysis of alpha-pinene. A sensitivity study shows that the current setup of CAChUP is ready for laboratory measurements and for the observation of new particle formation events in the field.

  1. A chemical analyzer for charged ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonser, S. G.; Held, A.

    2013-09-01

    New particle formation is a frequent phenomenon in the atmosphere and of major significance for the Earth's climate and human health. To date the mechanisms leading to the nucleation of particles as well as to aerosol growth are not completely understood. A lack of appropriate measurement equipment for online analysis of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles is one major limitation. We have developed a Chemical Analyzer for Charged Ultrafine Particles (CAChUP) capable of analyzing particles with diameters below 30 nm. A bulk of size-separated particles is collected electrostatically on a metal filament, resistively desorbed and subsequently analyzed for its molecular composition in a time of flight mass spectrometer. We report on technical details as well as characterization experiments performed with the CAChUP. Our instrument was tested in the laboratory for its detection performance as well as for its collection and desorption capabilities. The manual application of defined masses of camphene (C10H16) to the desorption filament resulted in a detection limit between 0.5 and 5 ng, and showed a linear response of the mass spectrometer. Flow tube experiments of 25 nm diameter secondary organic aerosol from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene also showed a linear relation between collection time and the mass spectrometer's signal intensity. The resulting mass spectra from the collection experiments are in good agreement with published work on particles generated by the ozonolysis of alpha-pinene. A sensitivity study shows that the current setup of CAChUP is ready for laboratory measurements and for the observation of new particle formation events in the field.

  2. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clauser, C. F. Farengo, R.

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  3. Mapping of electrical potential distributions with charged particle beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for measuring electrostatic potentials on and near dielectric surfaces charged to several kilovolts are studied. Secondary emission from those charged dielectrics is measured. Candidates for potential measurement include the induced charge, from which potential is calculated; the trajectory endpoints of either high or low energy particles traversing the region near the surface; trajectory impact on the surface; and creating ions at points of interest near the surface. Some of the methods require computer simulations and iterative calculation if potential maps are to be generated. Several approaches are described and compared. A method using a half-cylinder as a test chamber and low-energy probing beams is adapted for the measurement of seconary emission.

  4. Rotating Charged Hairy Black Hole in (2+1) Dimensions and Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, J.; Pourhassan, B.; Farahani, H.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we construct rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions for infinitesimal black hole charge and rotation parameters. Then we consider this black hole as particle accelerator and calculate the center-of-mass energy of two colliding test particles near the rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions. As we expected, the center-of-mass energy has infinite value.

  5. Simulation of impulse effects from explosive charges containing metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, K.; Nance, D. V.; Menon, S.

    2010-06-01

    The propagation of an explosive blast wave containing inert metal particles is investigated numerically using a robust two-phase methodology with appropriate models to account for real gas behavior, inter-phase interactions, and inter-particle collisions to study the problem of interest. A new two-phase Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation is proposed that can handle the dense nature of the flow-field. The velocity and momentum profiles of the gas and particle phases are analyzed and used to elucidate the inter-phase momentum transfer, and its effect on the impulsive aspects of heterogeneous explosive charges. The particles are found to pick up significant amounts of momentum and kinetic energy from the gas, and by virtue of their inertia, are observed to sustain it for a longer time. The impulse characteristics of heterogeneous explosives are compared with a homogeneous explosive containing the same amount of high explosive, and it is observed that the addition of solid particles augments the impulsive loading significantly in the near-field, and to a smaller extent in the far-field. The total impulsive loading is found to be insensitive to the particle size added to the explosive charge above a certain cut-off radius, but the individual impulse components are found to be sensitive, and particles smaller than this cut-off size deliver about 8% higher total impulse than the larger ones. Overall, this study provides crucial insights to understand the impulsive loading characteristics of heterogeneous explosives.

  6. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.

    1994-10-01

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed.

  7. Particle Catcher Using Induced-Charge Electroosmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    Finding an innovative separation mechanism is a central task in future microfluidic systems. We propose a size-controllable microfluidic catching device that has a face-to-face structure consisting of elastic beams that change the acceptable particle size dynamically by hydrodynamic force due to induced charge electroosmosis (ICEO) in water and numerically examine the novel separation mechanism consisting of catching and releasing motions with size selectivity. By an implicit strongly coupled simulation technique between a fluid and an elastic structure based on the boundary element method, along with the thin double-layer approximation, we find that the catching device works effectively at low applied voltages in a realistic microfluidic channel and shows a wide range dynamic size selectivity. Furthermore, by modeling the ICEO phenomena with elastic motion, we successfully explain the acceptable particle size of the catching device. We believe that our proposed device will contribute to realizing innovative microfluidic systems in the future.

  8. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2008-05-12

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Pm and 84{<=}Z{<=}99 elements) at the surface of the magnetic star HD101065, also known as Przybylski's star. This star is know to be a chemically peculiar star and its anomalous 38charged-particles, mainly protons and {alpha}-particles, that in turn can by interaction with the stellar material modify the surface content.The present contribution explores to what extent the spallation processes resulting from the interaction of the stellar material with stellar energetic particle can by themselves only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of HD101065. We show that specific parametric simulations can explain many different observational aspects, and in particular that a significant production of Z>30 heavy elements can be achieved. In this nucleosynthesis process, the secondary-neutron captures play a crucial role. The most attractive feature of the spallation process is the systematic production of Pm and Tc and the possible synthesis of actinides and sub-actinides.Based on such a parametric model, it is also shown that intense fluences of accelerated charged-particles interacting with surrounding material can efficiently produce elements heavier than iron. Different regimes are investigated and shown to be at the origin of p- and s-nuclei in the case of high-fluence low-flux events and r-nuclei for high-fluence high-flux irradiations. The possible existence of such irradiation events need to be confirmed by hydrodynamics simulations, but most of all by spectroscopic observations through the detection of short-lived radio-elements.

  9. Bare and Effective Charge of Mesoporous Silica Particles.

    PubMed

    Valetti, Sabrina; Feiler, Adam; Trulsson, Martin

    2017-07-25

    We develop and combine a novel numerical model, within the Poisson-Boltzmann framework, with classical experimental titration techniques for mesoporous silica particles to study the charging behavior as both pH and the amount of monovalent salt are varied. One key finding is that these particles can be considered to have an effectively or apparent electroneutral inner core with an effectively charged rim. As a consequence, the total apparent charge of the particle is several orders of magnitude smaller than that of the bare silica charge, which accounts only for the charged silanol groups of the mesoporous silica particles and which has its major contribution from the interior. Hence, the interior dictates the mesoporous silicas' bare charge while the rim its effective charge. We furthermore report density, charge, and accumulated charge profiles across the particle's interface.

  10. Large-size CsI(Tl) crystal read-out by SiPM for low-energy charged-particles detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondí, M.; Battaglieri, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Celentano, A.; De Napoli, M.; De Vita, R.; Marsicano, L.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Smith, E. S.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photomultipliers are a novel technology for the detection of photons in near ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectral ranges. Their application is rapidly growing and extending to many fields in physics, replacing traditional PMTs and APDs. In this study a large-size CsI(Tl) crystal coupled to small-area SiPM (3 × 3mm2) was used to detect α-particles and low energy protons. In particular, the detector was irradiated with proton beams accelerated by the Tandem Van-der-Graff of the INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), at incident energies between 2.5 MeV and 24 MeV. The detector performance was studied in terms of light yield, linearity and energy resolution. In addition, we investigated the dependence of the detector response on the impact point of the particles.

  11. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator 14,14b includes an evacuated chamber 16a,b having a gun 18,18b for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam 12 or ion beam 12b. The beam 12,12b is discharged through a beam exit 22 in the chamber 16a,b into a higher pressure region 24. A plasma interface 34 is disposed at the beam exit 22 and includes a plasma channel 38 for bounding a plasma 40 maintainable between a cathode 42 and an anode 44 disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel 38 is coaxially aligned with the beam exit 22 for propagating the beam 12,12b from the chamber 16a,b, through the plasma 40, and into the higher pressure region 24. The plasma 40 is effective for pumping down the beam exit 22 for preventing pressure increase in the chamber 16a,b, and provides magnetic focusing of the beam 12,12b discharged into the higher pressure region 24.

  12. Fluctuation of charge on dust particles in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha; Srivastava, Sweta

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents an analytical model for the evaluation of the fluctuation of the charge on the dust particles in a complex plasma. In contrast to earlier analyses, which ignored the effect of dust particles on density and temperature of electrons and ions, the present model takes into account the number and energy balance of electrons and ions. Three cases, viz., (i) no emission, (ii) thermionic emission, and (iii) photoelectric emission of electrons from the dust particles, have been considered. The results have been graphically illustrated for typical parameters. It is seen that the plasma parameters, and hence the fluctuations, are considerably affected by the consideration of number and energy balance of electrons and ions. A comparison of the results of the present analysis with those of earlier works has also been made.

  13. Cataract production in mice by heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.; Jose, U.; Yang, V. V.; Barker, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The cataractogenic effects of heavy charged particles are evaluated in mice in relation to dose and ionization density. The relative biological effectiveness in relation to linear energy transfer for various particles is considered. Results indicated that low single doses (5 to 20 rad) of Fe 56 or Ar 40 particles are cataractogenic at 11 to 18 months after irradiation; onset and density of the opacification are dose related and cataract density (grade) at 9, 11, 13, and 16 months after irradiation shows partial linear energy transfer dependence. The severity of cataracts is reduced significantly when 417 rad of Co 60 gamma radiation is given in 24 weekly 17 rad fractions compared to giving this radiation as a single dose, but cataract severity is not reduced by fractionation of C12 doses over 24 weeks.

  14. Measuring Landau damping in Particle-in-Cell simulations using particles of different charge-weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, C.; Sarkar, A.; Cao, Y.-X.; Huang, M. C.; Li, J.

    2016-10-01

    We study whether putting more particles in ``region of interest (ROI)'' in phase space can efficiently increase Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation accuracy. We use Landau damping of a plasma wave as a figure of merit and set the ROI near the phase velocity of the wave. Improvement in Landau damping rate measurement is observed in 1D PIC simulations when employing more particles in the ROI but the effect is not monotonic. This is partly due to energy transfer from particles of large charge weights to those of smaller weights through the electric fields. Possible strategies to mitigate the energy transfer will also be discussed. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1314734 and by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0012316.

  15. Production of carbon monoxide by charged particle deposition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Sawada, T.; Edgar, B. C.; Uman, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Recent studies of electron energy deposition in CO2 and CO based upon a large set of electron impact cross sections are utilized to estimate the telluric CO directly produced by various charged-particle deposition mechanisms. The mechanisms considered are (1) lightning, (2) cloud coronal discharges, (3) background radioactivity, (4) natural electrostatic discharges, (5) photoelectrons in the ionosphere, (6) auroral electrons, (7) auroral protons, (8) cosmic rays, and (9) solar wind. 'Ball park' estimates of the global CO production by each of these mechanisms are given. Apart from mechanisms 1, 2, and 5, all CO production mechanisms are estimated to be small compared to artificial sources. If, as appears to be the case, the hot oxygen atoms and ions and other atomic species immediately produced by these three charged-particle deposition mechanisms react rapidly with CO2 to produce CO, these mechanisms can readily lead to CO production levels in the multimegaton-per-year range.

  16. A search for free fractional electric charge elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halyo, Valerie

    2001-07-01

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied-about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 × 10-22 particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  17. A Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Halyo, Valerie

    2000-12-04

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied| about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  18. A Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Halyo, Valerie

    2000-12-04

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied--about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  19. Repetitive heterocoagulation of oppositely charged particles for enhancement of magnetic nanoparticle loading into monodisperse silica particles.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideki; Nagao, Daisuke; Konno, Mikio

    2010-03-16

    Oppositely charged particles were repetitively heterocoagulated to fabricate highly monodisperse magnetic silica particles with high loading of magnetic nanoparticles. Positively charged magnetic nanoparticles prepared by surface modification with N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (TSA) were used to heterocoagulate with silica particles under basic conditions to give rise to negative silica surface charge and prevent the oxidation of the magnetic nanoparticles. The resultant particles of silica core homogeneously coated with the magnetic nanoparticles were further coated with thin silica layer with sodium silicate in order to enhance colloidal stability and avoid desorption of the magnetic nanoparticles from the silica cores. Five repetitions of the heterocoagulation and the silica coating could increase saturation magnetization of the magnetic silica particles to 27.7 emu/g, keeping the coefficient of variation of particle sizes (C(V)) less than 6.5%. Highly homogeneous loading of the magnetic component was confirmed by measuring Fe-to-Si atomic ratios of individual particles with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  20. A single particle energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R. |; Usmani, Q.N.; Sami, M.

    1993-09-01

    We consider the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei (HN), in particular the single-particle (s.p.) energy data, which have been obtained for a wide range of HN with mass numbers A {le} 89 and for orbital angular momenta {ell}{sub {Lambda}} {le} 4. We briefly review some of the relevant properties of A hypernuclei. These are nuclei {sub {Lambda}}{sup A}Z with baryon number A in which a single {Lambda} hyperon (baryon number = 1) is bound to an ordinary nucleus {sup A}Z consisting of A - 1 nucleons = Z protons + N neutrons. The {Lambda} hyperon is neutral, has spin 1/2, strangeness S = {minus}1, isospin I = O and a mass M{sub {Lambda}} = 1116 MeV/c{sup 2}. Although the {Lambda} interacts with a nucleon, its interaction is only about half as strong as that between two nucleons, and thus very roughly V{sub {Lambda}N} {approx} 0.5 V{sub NN}. As a result, the two-body {Lambda}N system is unbound, and the lightest bound HN is the three-body hypertriton {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H in which the {Lambda} is bound to a deuteron with the {Lambda}-d separation energy being only {approx} 0.1 MeV corresponding to an exponential tail of radius {approx} 15 fm! In strong interactions the strangeness S is of course conserved, and the {Lambda} is distinct from the nucleons. In a HN strangeness changes only in the weak decays of the {Lambda} which can decay either via ``free`` pionic decay {Lambda} {yields} N + {pi} or via induced decay {Lambda} + N {yields} N + N which is only possible in the presence of nucleons. Because of the small energy release the pionic decay is strongly suppressed in all but the lightest HN and the induced decay dominates. However, the weak decay lifetime {approx} 10{sup {minus}10}s is in fact close to the lifetime of a free {Lambda}. Since this is much longer than the strong interaction time {approx} 10{sup {minus}22}s we can ignore the weak interactions when considering the binding of HN, just as for ordinary nuclei.

  1. Inclusive charged particle cross sections in photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Ahmed, T.; Andreev, V.; Aid, S.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bärwolff, H.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Biddulph, P.; Binder, E.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Bosetti, P. C.; Boudry, V.; Bourdarios, C.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braun, U.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Chyla, J.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Colombo, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dann, A. W. E.; Dau, W. D.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; Devel, M.; De Roeck, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dingus, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Drescher, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebbinghaus, R.; Eberle, M.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellis, N. N.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Fensome, I. F.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Flauger, W.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuhrmann, P.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Gennis, M.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Godfrey, L.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Greif, H.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Harjes, J.; Haydar, R.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Huot, N.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kazarian, S.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Langkau, R.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Leuschner, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Lewin, D.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lüers, D.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, A.; Maxfiedl, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Monnier, E.; Moreau, F.; Moreels, J.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Murray, S. A.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Orenstein, S.; Ould-Saada, F.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Peters, S.; Phillips, H. T.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pilgram, W.; Pitzl, D.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Rauschnabel, K.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rudowicz, M.; Ruffer, M.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitz, W.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schulz, M.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Scobel, W.; Seehausen, U.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Tichomirov, I.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Urban, L.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Vick, R.; Villet, G.; Vogel, E.; Wacker, K.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wolff, Th.; Womersley, L. A.; Wright, A. E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Cross sections are presented for the inclusive production of charged particles measured in electron-proton collisions at low Q2 with the H1 detector at HERA. The transverse momentum distribution extends up to 8 GeV/ c. Its shape is found to be harder than that observed in overlinepp collisions at comparable centre-of-mass energies √S γp ≈ √S overlinepp ≈ 200 GeV, and also harder than in γp collisions at lower energies √ Sγp ≈ 18 GeV. Results from quantum chromodynamics (QCD) calculations agree with the measured transverse momentum and pseudorapidity cross sections.

  2. Apparatus for Suspension of Charged Particles and Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, T. G. Owe

    1969-01-01

    Describes an apparatus designed to study the properties of charged particles suspended in an electric field. The apparatus consists of a suspension chamber, an optical system and power supplies and controls. Experiments conducted include determination of particle size, charge-to-mass ratio and particle collisions and exchange. (LC)

  3. Apparatus for Suspension of Charged Particles and Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, T. G. Owe

    1969-01-01

    Describes an apparatus designed to study the properties of charged particles suspended in an electric field. The apparatus consists of a suspension chamber, an optical system and power supplies and controls. Experiments conducted include determination of particle size, charge-to-mass ratio and particle collisions and exchange. (LC)

  4. Charged particle radiation exposure of geocentric satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1989-01-01

    The near-earth radiation environment is characterized, summarizing published data on trapped and transient charged particles and their potential effects on hardware systems and the crews of manned missions. Topics examined include the role of the magnetosphere, the five radiation domains, cyclic and sporadic variations in the radiation environment, the potential effect of a high-altitude nuclear explosion, NASA empirical models for predicting trapped proton and electron fluxes, and the South Atlantic anomaly and the estimation of flux-free periods. Consideration is given to solar cosmic rays and heavy ions, Galactic cosmic rays, geomagnetic shielding, secondary radiation, the design of shielding systems, variables affecting dose evaluations, and ionizing-radiation doses. Extensive diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  5. Mutations induced by heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    The relative biological-effectiveness of radiation is increased when cells or tissue are exposed to densely ionizing (high-LET) radiation. A large number of studies focus on the following aspects of the biological effects of high-LET radiation: (i) basic understanding of radiation damage and repair; (ii) developing radiotherapy protocols for accelerated charged particles; and (iii) estimation of human risks from exposure to high-LET heavy charged particles. The increased lethal effectiveness (cell inactivation) of high-LET radiation contributes to new methods for using radiation therapy, but it is also necessary to study the enhanced mutagenic effect of high LET radiation, because higher frequencies of mutation can be expected to provide higher rates of carcinogenicity with human exposure. It is important to note that both measures of biological effectiveness (lethality and mutagenicity) depend on the quality of radiation, the dose, dose-rate effects, and the biological endpoints studied. This paper is intended to provide a review of current research on the mutagenic effects of high-LET radiation, and is organized into three sections. First, are descriptions of the induced mutations studied with various detection systems (section 1) because the detectable mutations induced by ionizing radiation, including heavy-ions, depend largely on the detection system used. Second is a discussion of the biological significance of the dependence of induced mutations on LET (section 2). This is related to the molecular nature of radiation lesions and to the repair mechanisms used to help cells recover from such damage. Finally, applications of mutation detection systems for studies in space (section 3) are described, in which the carcinogenic effects of space environmental radiation are considered.

  6. Precipitation particle charge distribution and evolution of East Asian rainbands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2012-11-01

    Numerous videosondes, balloon-borne surveyors of precipitation particle morphology and charge, have been launched into cloud systems in many, disparate locations in East Asia. Reported here are videosonde-based observations of early summer, Baiu rainbands at Tanegashima in southern Japan and of summer rainbands at Chiang Rai in northern Thailand. Precipitation particles are mapped by type and charge over the course of cloud development, allowing particle and charge evolution to be derived. The basic charge distribution as observed in Hokuriku winter thunderclouds at different cloud life stages was seen at different locations characterized by vertical velocity profiles in the cloud. The charge structure of the rainbands in both locations was a basic tripole. The major charge carriers were graupel and ice crystals. As graupel and ice crystal concentrations increased, not only did space charge increase, but per-particle charge also increased. Increased lightning activity was associated with higher particle space charge and lower cloud-top temperature. The particle charge evolution of these systems includes several fundamental features: a. active negative charging of graupel in an intense updraft, b. descent of negative graupel along the edge of an updraft column, c. merging of negative graupel with positively charged raindrops falling in the central cloud, and d. extended distribution of positive ice crystals in the stratiform cloud. The observations suggest that riming electrification was the main charge separation mechanism.

  7. Particle Simulation Schemes for High Intensity Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li; Startsev, Edward; Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-10-01

    Numerical schemes for the electromagnetic particle simulations of high intensity charged particle beams have been developed. The purpose of devising these schemes is to avoid the numerical difficulties associated with the direct calculation of the time derivatives of the vector potential, partial A / partial t, in the Darwin model, for which the transverse induction current in Ampere's law is neglected. The first scheme requires the calculations of higher order velocity moments of the distribution function to obtain the time derivatives for both the scalar potential Φ and A, similar to the method used for shear-Alfven waves.[1] The second uses the canonical momentum P = p + q A/c in the equations of motion as a means to eliminate the troublesome time derivatives.[2] The use of these schemes for physics problems in heavy ion fusion systems will be reported. [1] W. W. Lee, J. L. V. Lewandowski, T. S. Hahm, and Z. Lin, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4435 (2001). [2] W. W. Lee, E. Startsev, H. Qin and R. C. Davidson, Proceedings of 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference 1906 (2001).

  8. Charged Particle Acceleration by Lasers in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2007-07-11

    Several physical processes of laser electron acceleration in plasmas are revisited. A laser beam can drive plasma waves which in turn can accelerate resonant electrons. If these plasma waves can reach amplitude limited only by wave breaking alone, then the corresponding accelerating gradient in the plasma wave is of the order of electron rest mass energy per plasma skin depth, typically about GEV per centimeter. This is several orders of magnitudes higher than the conventional RF field gradient, giving rise to the possibility of compact accelerators needed for high energy physics research as well as medical and other applications. The chirped short pulse laser, with intensity exceeding the threshold for relativistic self focusing, can generate ion bubble in its wake by expelling electrons. The electrons at the bubble boundary, surge toward the stagnation point and pile up there. As the pile acquires a critical size, these electrons are injected into the bubble and accelerated by the combined fields of ion space charge and the plasma wave to Gev in energy. Most remarkably these electrons are bunched in phase space while being accelerated to high energy, resulting in near mono-energetic electron beam of high beam quality, with narrow energy spread. We review also other processes related to laser electron acceleration, such as acceleration in plasma wave assisted by ponderomotive force and betatron acceleration.

  9. Searches for Fractionally Charged Particles: What Should Be Done Next?

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    Since the initial measurements of the electron charge a century ago, experimenters have faced the persistent question as to whether elementary particles exist that have charges that are fractional multiples of the electron charge. I concisely review the results of the last 50 years of searching for fractional charge particles with no confirmed positive results. I discuss the question of whether more searching is worthwhile?

  10. Measuring charged particle multiplicity with early ATLAS public data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Üstün, G.; Barut, E.; Bektaş, E.; Özcan, V. E.

    2017-07-01

    We study 100 images of early LHC collisions that were recorded by the ATLAS experiment and made public for outreach purposes, and extract the charged particle multiplicity as a function of momentum for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. As these collisions have already been pre-processed by the ATLAS Collaboration, the particle tracks are visible, but are available to the public only in the form of low-resolution bitmaps. We describe two separate image processing methods, one based on the industry-standard OpenCV library and C++, another based on self-developed algorithms in Python. We present our analysis of the transverse momentum and azimuthal angle distributions of the particles, in agreement with the literature.

  11. Determining Charged Particle Flux Direction in MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, J. K.; Kohler, J.; Guo, J.; Ehresmann, B.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Rafkin, S. C.; Boehm, E.; Böttcher, S. I.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Brinza, D. E.; Weigle, E.; Lohf, H.; Burmeister, S.; Reitz, G.; Matthiae, D.; Posner, A.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is an instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity, currently characterizing the radiation environment on the surface of Mars. The radiation entering the instrument from above consists mostly of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) modulated by the Martian atmosphere. From below, the instrument is exposed to secondary radiation produced by the interactions of the GCR with the soil. This secondary radiation gets further modulated going through the rover body before entering RAD. We developed a method of determining the direction of the charged particles measured by RAD. This method also extends the energy range possible for measurements with RAD beyond the intruments design limit. Using a combination of GEANT4 and Planetocosmics simulations, we reconstructed the expected charged particle spectra and intensities for upward and downward directed radiation which can be compared with observations. With the developed method, we are able to, for the first time, measure the upward charged particle flux with RAD both during the cruise phase and the surface science phase. Comparing the results of the simulations with the instrument data sets enables us to evaluate the simulation tools used to predict the Martian radiation envronment.

  12. Measurement of the yields of positively charged particles at an angle of 35 Degree-Sign in proton interactions with nuclear targets at an energy of 50 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ammosov, V. V.; Antonov, N. N.; Baldin, A. A.; Viktorov, V. A.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gapienko, G. S.; Golovin, A. A.; Gres, V. N.; Ivanilov, A. A.; Koreshev, V. I.; Korotkov, V. A.; Mysnik, A. I.; Prudkoglyad, A. F.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Semak, A. A. Terekhov, V. I.; Uglekov, V. Ya.; Ukhanov, M. N.; Chujko, B. V.; Shimanskii, S. S.

    2013-10-15

    Momentum spectra of cumulative particles in the region of high transverse momenta (P{sub T}) in pA {yields} h{sup +} + X reactions were obtained for the first time. The experiment in which this was done was performed at the SPIN setup (Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino) in a beam of 50-GeV protons interacting with C, Al, Cu, and W nuclei. Positively charged particles were detected at a laboratory angle of 35 Degree-Sign and in the transverse-momentum range between 0.6 and 3.7 GeV/c. A strong dependence of the particle-production cross section on the atomic number was observed. A comparison with the results of calculations based on the HIJING and UrQMD models was performed in the subcumulative region.

  13. A particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1988-02-25

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles. 3 figs.

  14. Boundary effects of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations on charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiang, J.-T.; Wu, T.-H.; Leet, D.-S.

    2008-10-10

    The nature of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations in the presence of the boundary is investigated from their effects on the dynamics of charged particles. These effects may be observable via the velocity fluctuations of the charge particles near the conducting plate, where the effects of vacuum fluctuations are found to be anisotrpoic. The corresponding stochastic equation of motion for the charged particle is also derived under the semiclassical approximation.

  15. Charged particles and cluster ions produced during cooking activities.

    PubMed

    Stabile, L; Jayaratne, E R; Buonanno, G; Morawska, L

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies showed that a significant number of the particles present in indoor air are generated by cooking activities, and measured particle concentrations and exposures have been used to estimate the related human dose. The dose evaluation can be affected by the particle charge level which is usually not considered in particle deposition models. To this purpose, in this paper we show, for the very first time, the electric charge of particles generated during cooking activities and thus extending the interest on particle charging characterization to indoor micro-environments, so far essentially focused on outdoors. Particle number, together with positive and negative cluster ion concentrations, was monitored using a condensation particle counter and two air ion counters, respectively, during different cooking events. Positively-charged particle distribution fractions during gas combustion, bacon grilling, and eggplant grilling events were measured by two Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer spectrometers, used with and without a neutralizer. Finally, a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer was used to measure the charge specific particle distributions of bacon and eggplant grilling experiments, selecting particles of 30, 50, 80 and 100 nm in mobility diameter. The total fraction of positively-charged particles was 4.0%, 7.9%, and 5.6% for gas combustion, bacon grilling, and eggplant grilling events, respectively, then lower than other typical outdoor combustion-generated particles.

  16. Bipolar charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Pal', A. F.; Petrov, O. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Sarkarov, N. E.

    2011-05-15

    The photoemission charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation from a xenon lamp has been investigated. The velocities of yttrium dust particles with a work function of 3.3 eV and their charges have been determined experimentally; the latter are about 400-500 and about 100 elementary charges per micron of radius for the positively and negatively charged fractions, respectively. The dust particle charging and the dust cloud evolution in a photoemission cell after exposure to an ultraviolet radiation source under the applied voltage have been simulated numerically. The photoemission charging of dust particles has been calculated on the basis of nonlocal and local charging models. Only unipolar particle charging is shown to take place in a system of polydisperse dust particles with the same photoemission efficiency. It has been established that bipolar charging is possible in the case of monodisperse particles with different quantum efficiencies. Polydispersity in this case facilitates the appearance of oppositely charged particles in a photoemission plasma.

  17. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. However, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. A charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. The study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify themore » particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.« less

  19. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  20. Laser magneto-cumulative accelerator of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Skvortsov, V.

    2011-02-01

    High energy ion generation (energy in order of 10 Gev) have been estimated by interaction of picosecond laser pulses with an intensity of 6x1014 W/cm2 with metallic target in vacuum and gas atmosphere. In this paper we shall discuss the production of very high magnetic fields by flux compression in laser-induced plasmas and show experimental results on particle acceleration due to an explosively collapsed magnetic fields. Different nuclear track detectors have been used for heavy charged particle identification: synthetic mica, plastic nuclear detector CR-39, and glasses. Magnetic fields generated in laser-induced plasmas of order 30 -130 MGauss have been estimated by means of Faraday rotation and interferometric diagnostics with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  1. Laser magneto-cumulative accelerator of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Skvortsov, V.

    2010-09-01

    High energy ion generation (energy in order of 10 Gev) have been estimated by interaction of picosecond laser pulses with an intensity of 6x1014 W/cm2 with metallic target in vacuum and gas atmosphere. In this paper we shall discuss the production of very high magnetic fields by flux compression in laser-induced plasmas and show experimental results on particle acceleration due to an explosively collapsed magnetic fields. Different nuclear track detectors have been used for heavy charged particle identification: synthetic mica, plastic nuclear detector CR-39, and glasses. Magnetic fields generated in laser-induced plasmas of order 30 -130 MGauss have been estimated by means of Faraday rotation and interferometric diagnostics with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  2. GENERAL: Hawking Radiation of Charged Particles in Reissner-Nordström Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ren; Zhang, Li-Chun; Li, Huai-Fan

    2010-03-01

    We extend the method that Banerjee and Majhi have used to discuss Hawking radiation. Under the condition that the total energy and electrical charge of spacetime are conserved, we investigate Hawking radiation of the charged black hole by a new Tortoise coordinate transformation. Taking the reaction of the radiation of the particle to the spacetime into consideration, we not only derive the radiation spectrum that satisfies the unitary principle in quantum mechanics but also show that the contribution of ingoing particles is equal to the one of outgoing particles on the similar chemical potential term in radiation spectrum caused by charged particles.

  3. Charged Particle Trajectories in Sweeper Magnet for LISA Commissioning Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Alyson; Garrett, Sierra; Taylor, Nathaniel; Rogers, Warren F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) located at NSCL, MSU, is used in conjunction with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Sweeper Magnet for experiments investigating the properties of exotic neutron-rich nuclei near the neutron dripline. In the LISA commissioning experiment, designed to study neutron unstable 24O excited states, decay energy calculations require careful determination of charged fragment and neutron trajectories following breakup. Tracking of charged particles through the Sweeper Chamber is accomplished using two Cathode Readout Drift Chamber (CRDC) detectors separated by 1.8 m. During analysis of individual charged fragment passages through both CRDCs we recognized a majority of events had incomplete charge collection in the center pads. Without correction, standard peak location algorithms incorrectly determined the individual event centroids thereby reducing trajectory resolution. We developed a method and algorithm for correctly determining the centroids to restore trajectory resolution, critical for neutron breakup event reconstruction and decay energy determination. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  4. Explicit K-symplectic algorithms for charged particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Zhou, Zhaoqi; Sun, Yajuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong

    2017-02-01

    We study the Lorentz force equation of charged particle dynamics by considering its K-symplectic structure. As the Hamiltonian of the system can be decomposed as four parts, we are able to construct the numerical methods that preserve the K-symplectic structure based on Hamiltonian splitting technique. The newly derived numerical methods are explicit, and are shown in numerical experiments to be stable over long-term simulation. The error convergency as well as the long term energy conservation of the numerical solutions is also analyzed by means of the Darboux transformation.

  5. Can Coulomb repulsion for charged particle beams be overcome?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    Mutual repulsion of discrete charged particles or Coulomb repulsion is widely considered to be an ultimate hard limit in charged particle optics. It prevents the ability to finely focus high current beams into a small spots at large distances from the defining apertures. A classic example is the 1970s era "Star Wars" study of an electron beam directed energy weapon as an orbiting antiballistic missile device. After much analysis, it was considered physically impossible to focus a 1000-amp 1-GeV beam into a 1-cm diameter spot 1000-km from the beam generator. The main reason was that a 1-cm diameter beam would spread to 5-m diameter at 1000-km due to Coulomb repulsion. Since this could not be overcome, the idea was abandoned. But is this true? What if the rays were reversed? That is, start with a 5-m beam converging slightly with the same nonuniform angular and energy distribution as the electrons from the original problem were spreading at 1000-km distance. Could Coulomb repulsion be overcome? Looking at the terms in computational studies, some are reversible while others are not. Since the nonreversible terms should be small, it might be possible to construct an electron beam directed energy weapon.

  6. Ferroelectric Devices Emit Charged Particles and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Felsteiner, Joshua; Karsik, Yakov

    2005-01-01

    Devices called solid-state ferroelectric- based sources (SSFBSs) are under development as sources of electrons, ions, ultraviolet light, and x-rays for diverse applications in characterization and processing of materials. Whereas heretofore it has been necessary to use a different device to generate each of the aforementioned species of charged particles or radiation, a single SSFBS can be configured and operated to selectively generate any of the species as needed using a single source. Relative to comparable prior sources based, variously, on field emission, thermionic emission, and gaseous discharge plasmas, SSFBSs demand less power, and are compact and lightweight. An SSFBS exploits the unique physical characteristics of a ferroelectric material in the presence of a high-frequency pulsed electric field. The basic building block of an SSFBS is a ferroelectric cathode -- a ferroelectric wafer with a solid electrode covering its rear face and a grid electrode on its front face (see figure). The application of a voltage pulse -- typically having amplitude of several kilovolts and duration of several nanoseconds -- causes dense surface plasma to form near the grid wires on the front surface.

  7. Charged Particle Multiplicity Analysis in MicroBooNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Aleena; MicroBooNE Experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    MicroBooNE is a short baseline neutrino experiment that utilizes 89 ton active volume liquid argon Time Projection Chamber (TPC) situated on the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab. It is the first of three liquid argon TPC detectors planned for the Fermilab Short Baseline Neutrino program and will directly probe the source of the anomalous excess of electron-like events in MiniBooNE, while also measuring low-energy neutrino cross sections and providing important R&D for future detectors. In this talk, a study of charged particle multiplicity using neutrino charged-current inclusive events is presented. This analysis can be used to test models of neutrino-argon scattering, and it may be particularly sensitive to nuclear final state interaction effects. Kansas State University.

  8. Charged iron particles, components of space radiation, destroy ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Birendra; Ortiz, Laura; Luderer, Ulrike

    2016-08-01

    Do charged iron particles, components of space radiation, cause premature ovarian failure? Exposure to charged iron particles causes ovarian DNA damage, oxidative damage and apoptosis, resulting in premature ovarian failure. The ovary is very sensitive to follicle destruction by low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, such as X-rays and γ-rays. However, it is completely unknown whether high-LET radiation, such as charged iron particles, also destroys ovarian follicles. Twelve week old C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to single doses of 0, 5, 30 or 50 cGy (n = 8/group) charged iron particles (LET = 179 keV/µm) at energy of 600 MeV/u. Two groups were irradiated at the highest dose, one fed AIN-93M chow and the other fed AIN-93M chow supplemented with 150 mg/kg diet alpha lipoic acid (ALA). We quantified the numbers of ovarian follicles, measured serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations, and analyzed histone H2AX phosphorylation, oxidative damage and apoptosis markers in the ovarian follicles. H2AX phosphorylation, lipid peroxidation, protein nitration and apoptosis were highly induced in ovarian follicles at 6 h and remained increased 1 week after irradiation. As a result, numbers of healthy ovarian follicles were significantly and dose-dependently depleted at 1 and 8 weeks post-irradiation, with 57, 84 and 99% decreases in primordial follicles at 8 weeks at the 5, 30 and 50 cGy doses, respectively (P < 0.05 versus 0 cGy). Consistent with near-total depletion of ovarian follicles in the 50 cGy group, serum concentrations of FSH and LH were significantly elevated at 8 weeks. Dietary supplementation with ALA partially prevented the adverse ovarian effects of 50 cGy iron particles. About 21% of the estimated radiation dose from exposure to galactic cosmic rays during a multi-year Mars mission will be due to high-LET particles, of which iron is only one. The effects of galactic cosmic rays, which contain a mixture of

  9. Apparatus for the Study of Charged Particles and Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, T. G. Owe; Gaulkler, T. A.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an apparatus for the free suspension of charged particles and droplets in the range 5-200u and for their study with respect to charge and mass and their variations with time in various gaseous environments. High-speed photography is used to determine the motion of particles. (LC)

  10. Determination of Dusty Particle Charge Taking into Account Ion Drag

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Amangaliyeva, R. Zh.; Orazbayev, S. A.; Petrov, O. F.; Antipov, S. N.

    2008-09-07

    This work is devoted to the experimental estimation of charge of dust particle that levitates in the stratum of dc glow discharge. Particle charge is determined on the basis of the balance between ion drag force, gravitational and electric forces. Electric force is obtained from the axial distribution of the light intensity of strata.

  11. Peculiarities of propagation of charged particles in solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morozova, E. I.; Pisarenko, N. F.; Mikryukova, N. A.; Klimenko, V. V.; Timofeev, V. E.; Shafer, Y. G.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of boundaries of the large scale unipolar magnetic regions (UMR) on the Sun upon the charged particle propagation in the solar corona and interplanetary space is investigated. Increases of the charged particle fluxes from solar flares on November 4 and 20, 1978 detected by Venera-11 and Prognoz-1 and on December 7, 1982 by Venera-13 and "GMS-2" were analyzed.

  12. Space Charge Models for Particle Tracking on Long Time Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Shishlo, Andrei P; Potts III, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    In order to efficiently track charged particles over long times, most tracking codes use either analytic charge distributions or particle-in-cell (PIC) methods based on fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). While useful for theoretical studies, analytic distribution models do not allow accurate simulation of real machines. PIC calculations can utilize realistic space charge distributions, but these methods suffer from the presence of discretization errors. We examine the situation for particle tracking with space charge over long times, and consider possible ideas to improve the accuracy of such calculations.

  13. Energetic charged particles in the uranian magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Cooper, J F; Cummings, A C; McDonald, F B; Trainor, J H; Lal, N; McGuire, R; Chenette, D L

    1986-07-04

    During the encounter with Uranus, the cosmic ray system on Voyager 2 measured significant fluxes of energetic electrons and protons in the regions of the planets magnetosphere where these particles could be stably trapped. The radial distribution of electrons with energies of megaelectron volts is strongly modulated by the sweeping effects ofthe three major inner satellites Miranda, Ariel, and Umbriel. The phase space density gradient of these electrons indicates that they are diffusing radially inward from a source in the outer magnetosphere or magnetotail. Differences in the energy spectra of protons having energies of approximately 1 to 8 megaelectron volts from two different directions indicate a strong dependence on pitch angle. From the locations of the absorption signatures observed in the electron flux, a centered dipole model for the magnetic field of Uranus with a tilt of 60.1 degrees has been derived, and a rotation period of the planet of 17.4 hours has also been calculated. This model provides independent confirmaton of more precise determinations made by other Voyager experiments.

  14. Calibration and Readiness of the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, R.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is an intravehicular energetic particle detector designed to measure a broad spectrum of charged particle and neutron radiation unique to the ISS radiation environment. In this presentation, a summary of calibration and readiness of the RAD Sensor Head (RSH) - also referred to as the Charged Particle Detector (CPD) - for ISS will be presented. Calibration for the RSH consists of p, He, C, O, Si, and Fe ion data collected at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) and Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). The RSH consists of four detectors used in measuring the spectroscopy of charged particles - A, B, C, and D; high-energy neutral particles and charged particles are measured in E; and the last detector - F - is an anti-coincidence detector. A, B, and C are made from Si; D is made from BGO; E and F are made from EJ260XL plastic scintillator.

  15. Laboratory investigation of electric charging of dust particles by electrons, ions, and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Jiri; Pinter, S.; Gruen, E.

    1989-01-01

    In many cosmic environments electric charging of dust particles occurs by electrons, ions, and UV radiation. In case of interstellar dust particles the value of their electric charge can have, for instance, very important consequences for their destruction rate in supernova remnant's shock waves and can globally influence the overall life cycle of dust particles in galaxies. For experimental simulation of charging processes a vacuum chamber was used in which the particles fall through an electron or ion beam of energies up to 10 KeV. The aim of the experiments was to attain maximum charge of dust particles. Furthermore the influence of the rest gas was also determined because electrons and ions produced by collisional ionization of the rest gas can result in significant effects. For measurement particles from 1 to 100 microns from glass, carbon, Al, Fe, MgO, and very loosely bound conglomerates of Al2O3 were used.

  16. Determination of time zero from a charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jesse Andrew [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-15

    A method, system and computer program is used to determine a linear track having a good fit to a most likely or expected path of charged particle passing through a charged particle detector having a plurality of drift cells. Hit signals from the charged particle detector are associated with a particular charged particle track. An initial estimate of time zero is made from these hit signals and linear tracks are then fit to drift radii for each particular time-zero estimate. The linear track having the best fit is then searched and selected and errors in fit and tracking parameters computed. The use of large and expensive fast detectors needed to time zero in the charged particle detectors can be avoided by adopting this method and system.

  17. Search for new charged massive stable particles at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CDF Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    We report on a general search at CDF for new particles which are electrically charged and sufficiently long-lived to allow detection (γ c τ >= 1m). Examples of such particles include free quarks, 4th generation leptons which are lighter than their neutrino, and sextet quarks. Their signature would be particles with high momentum but relatively low velocity, β <= 0.7, which would result in large ionization energy losses (dE/dx). Having observed no evidence for the production of new particles of this type, we set 95% confidence limits on their possible masses. *We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation. Supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03000.

  18. Relativistic mixtures of charged and uncharged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-01-14

    Mixtures of relativistic gases within the framework of Boltzmann equation are analyzed. Three systems are considered. The first one refers to a mixture of uncharged particles by using Grad’s moment method, where the relativistic mixture is characterized by the moments of the distribution functions: particle four-flows, energy-momentum tensors, and third-order moment tensors. In the second Fick’s law for a mixture of relativistic gases of non-disparate rest masses in a Schwarzschild metric are derived from an extension of Marle and McCormack model equations applied to a relativistic truncated Grad’s distribution function, where it is shown the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the gravitational potential. The third one consists in the derivation of the relativistic laws of Ohm and Fourier for a binary mixtures of electrons with protons and electrons with photons subjected to external electromagnetic fields and in presence of gravitational fields by using the Anderson and Witting model of the Boltzmann equation.

  19. [Galactic heavy charged particles damaging effect on biological structures].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Krasavin, E A; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2013-03-01

    A concept of the radiation risk of the manned interplanetary flights is proposed and substantiated. Heavy charged particles that are a component of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have a high damaging effect on the biological structures as great amount of energy is deposited in heavy particle tracks. The high biological effectiveness of heavy ions is observed in their action on cell genetic structures and the whole organism, including the brain structures. The hippocampus is the part of the central nervous system that is the most sensitive to radiation--first of all, to heavy charged particles. Irradiation of animals with accelerated iron ions at doses corresponding to the real fluxes of GCR heavy nuclei, to which Mars mission crews can be exposed, leads to marked behavioral function disorders in the post-irradiation period. To evaluate the radiation risk for the interplanetary flight crews, the concept of successful mission accomplishment is introduced. In these conditions, the central nervous system structures can be the critical target of GCR heavy nuclei. Their damage can modify the higher integrative functions of the brain and cause disorders in the crew members' operator performances.

  20. Search for Charged Massive Long-Lived Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alimena J.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; et al.

    2012-03-21

    We report on a search for charged massive long-lived particles (CMLLPs), based on 5.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. We search for events in which one or more particles are reconstructed as muons but have speed and ionization energy loss (dE/dx) inconsistent with muons produced in beam collisions. CMLLPs are predicted in several theories of physics beyond the standard model. We exclude pair-produced long-lived gaugino-like charginos below 267 GeV and Higgsino-like charginos below 217 GeV at 95% C.L., as well as long-lived scalar top quarks with mass below 285 GeV.

  1. Roles of the major, small, acid-soluble spore proteins and spore-specific and universal DNA repair mechanisms in resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores to ionizing radiation from X rays and high-energy charged-particle bombardment.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Setlow, Peter; Horneck, Gerda; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther; Rettberg, Petra; Doherty, Aidan J; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2008-02-01

    The role of DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination, spore photoproduct lyase, and DNA polymerase I and genome protection via alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) in Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to accelerated heavy ions (high-energy charged [HZE] particles) and X rays has been studied. Spores deficient in NHEJ and alpha/beta-type SASP were significantly more sensitive to HZE particle bombardment and X-ray irradiation than were the recA, polA, and splB mutant and wild-type spores, indicating that NHEJ provides an efficient DNA double-strand break repair pathway during spore germination and that the loss of the alpha/beta-type SASP leads to a significant radiosensitivity to ionizing radiation, suggesting the essential function of these spore proteins as protectants of spore DNA against ionizing radiation.

  2. Collective effects in the flotation of electrically charged particles at an interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Cictua, Pietro; Vella, Dominic

    2015-11-01

    We study the flotation of electrically charged line particles at a liquid-gas interface. Motivated by recent experiments on the anomalous attraction of charged and magnetic particles at interfaces, we consider the equilibrium of the particles, accounting for the weight of each as well as the electrical and surface tension forces acting on them. Our numerical solution of the force balance equations shows that as the number of particles increases, the particles sink deeper into the liquid and ultimately sink. To understand whether the clumps of particles that are formed are stable, we use a free energy analysis; this shows that as the number of particles N increases, the binding energy per particle increases also. We compare our numerical results with scaling and experimental analyses.

  3. Exponential discontinuous finite element scheme for coupled charged-uncharged particle transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Aller, Alejandro

    High energy beams for cancer therapy, ion implantation in semiconductor materials, accelerator transmutation of waste and cosmic ray interactions with materials are problems of interest to the nuclear engineering community. High energy radiation can produce a variety of particles as a result of fragmented nuclei and the emitted particles can undergo further collisions creating a cascade. Charged and uncharged particles differ in their energy deposition. Uncharged particles can travel large distances between collisions and can produce charged particles deep into the material. These penetrating secondary charged particles deposit their energy through electronic collisions. These effects require that an accurate dose calculation be performed. Monte Carlo calculations have been the traditional methods of evaluation but require a high computational cost. To overcome the difficulties encountered by Monte Carlo methods, the exponential discontinuous finite element method has been applied to model energy deposition by high energy particle cascades. The straight ahead approximation with CSD energy loss is used and all physical data is taken to be piecewise constant in each cell. Initially the ED method was shown not to capture the primary particle's Bragg peak, but, isolating and treating the primary particle distribution exactly removed this difficulty. The ED method was used to model secondary distribution. The ED method was benchmarked against exact solutions and together with accuracy tests it is shown to be an efficient method for representing the secondary distribution.

  4. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    SciTech Connect

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2014-10-15

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  5. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2014-10-01

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  6. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor’s p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles’ LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90–300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  7. Examining the Dynamics of Llow-Energy Electrons in Saturn's Magnetosphere by combining Cassini CAPS-ELS Data with Charged Particle Transport Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Costa, D.; Hill, T. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Rymer, A.; Paty, P. S.; Coates, A. J.; Young, D. T.; Bolton, S. J.; Menietti, J. D.; Dougherty, M.

    2007-12-01

    Our first analysis of electron populations using a diffusion theory model allowed the discussion of plasma production and its distribution in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. Our results in modeling the interactions between low-energy electrons and different components of the Kronian system (satellites, dust, and neutral clouds) showed that 1) part of the cold plasma observed by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer is produced during the impact-ionization of neutrals, and 2) during such a process, the hot component of the electron populations is redistributed along the field lines. Our primary result was then the theoretical demonstration that the impact- ionization process contributes to the `bimodal' energy distributions and `butterfly' pitch-angle distributions. We now present our recent investigation of the sources, sinks and transports of electron plasma populations obtained by combining CAPS-ELS data with our physical particle transport model. We will focus on presenting our results for the period where Cassini was orbiting near the equatorial plane (from late 2005 to early 2006). Plasma data will be used for constraining our modeling, and assisting with the validation of our new simulations. Interaction with neutrals will be studied in the purpose of analyzing the various Saturnian plasma domains. We will also reexamine the diffusive radial transport by discussing magnetospheric processes susceptible to drive inward transport and outward plasma flow.

  8. Enke-like method for tracing trajectories of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabin, K.; Bonner, G.

    2013-12-01

    Using analytical properties of particle dynamics is often beneficial for numerical solutions of the equations of motion. Enke's method, sometimes used in Astrodynamics and Orbital Mechanics, is a good example of such an approach. In Enke's method, instead of solving the equations of motion directly one solves for the deviation from an exact solution of a more tractable problem (the 'osculating solution'). For the motion of charged particles, the simplest osculating solution corresponds to gyration in a constant magnetic field. We apply this method to trace electrons in a geomagnetic field; this initial work focuses on equatorially mirroring particles. We find that solving for the deviations from the gyration motion substantially improves the accuracy as well as stability of the integration. Reasonable approximations to particles' trajectories are obtained with time steps as large as half of the gyroperiod. Another benefit of Enke's method is a superior conservation of energy. Although not symplectic by design, Enke's method is almost completely free of secular error for the energy, in sharp contrast to most commonly-used Runge-Kutta methods. Further improvements in accuracy can be achieved by using more sophisticated osculating solutions which account for the gradient-curvature drift of the particles. Enke's method can be straightforwardly applied as an integration scheme for test-particle simulation of radiation belt or ring current electrons and protons and it can be used with any empirical or MHD model of the magnetic field. We suggest that, with small time steps Enke's approach may be valuable in applications where high accuracy is required. We also suggest that with large time steps it may be used as an alternative to a guiding center approximation.

  9. Charged particle multiplicities in ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2006-01-01

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  10. Screening of a charged dust particle within a nonlocal charging theory

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, I. N.; Filippov, A. V.

    2013-03-15

    We study the influence of the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function on the dust particle charge screening in a two-component plasma of various inert gases and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. For our analytical and numerical calculations, we have chosen the point sink model in the diffusion-drift approximation, which, in addition to the bulk production and loss of electrons and ions, also includes the heterogeneous processes of their absorption by a dust particle. We have established that the dust particle potential distribution in the problem under consideration is a superposition of three Debye exponentials with three different screening constants. The first constant practically coincides with the inverse Debye length. The second constant is determined by the inverse length travelled by the electrons and ions in the ambipolar diffusion process in the characteristic recombination time. The third constant coincides with the inverse characteristic distance of electron energy transfer through heat conduction in the characteristic time of electron energy establishment in the processes of heating by a beam of fast electrons and energy losses in elastic and inelastic collisions. We compare our numerical calculations of the screening constants with the analytical estimates obtained in the ambipolar diffusion approximation.

  11. Introduction of Electrostatically Charged Particles into Metal Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, Olga; Vorozhtsov, Sergey; Stepkina, Maria; Khrustalev, Anton

    2017-09-01

    One of the possible methods to produce composite alloys with improved mechanical characteristics is the modification of metal melts using submicron- or nanosized particles. Different methods, like ultrasonic or vibration processing, have been used to introduce these particles into the metal melt. The introduction of particles into a metal melt is prevented by the poor wettability of the liquid metal. The present study explores the use of electrostatic charge for increasing the wettability of the particles and preventing their agglomeration. The wettability of electrostatically charged particles by the metal melt under the impact of ultrasound has been studied. The relationships between the impact time and the physical and chemical properties of the particles and the melt along with the characteristics of the acoustic radiation have been studied. It was experimentally demonstrated that the introduction of electrostatically charged particles into the metal melt reduces the porosity and the crystal grain size.

  12. Statistical charge distribution over dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha

    2014-07-15

    On the basis of statistical mechanics and charging kinetics, the charge distribution over uniform size spherical dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma is investigated. Two specific situations, viz., (i) the plasma in thermal equilibrium and (ii) non-equilibrium state where the plasma is dark (no emission) or irradiated by laser light (including photoemission) are taken into account. The formulation includes the population balance equation for the charged particles along with number and energy balance of the complex plasma constituents. The departure of the results for the Lorentzian plasma, from that in case of Maxwellian plasma, is graphically illustrated and discussed; it is shown that the charge distribution tends to results corresponding to Maxwellian plasma for large spectral index. The charge distribution predicts the opposite charging of the dust particles in certain cases.

  13. Space charge effects in the SSC Low Energy Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Mahale, N.K.; Mehta, N.; Pilat, F.; Talman, R.; York, R.C.

    1991-05-01

    By means of multi-particle tracking, we explore space charge effects in the Low Energy Booster (LEB) which has a strong requirement for small transverse emittance. Macro-particles are tracked in a self-consistent manner in six dimensional phase space with transverse space charge kicks so that the emittance evolution as well as the particle distribution are simulated as a function of time. Among recent improvements of the code, the longitudinal motion, i.e. synchrotron oscillations as well as acceleration, makes it possible to simulate the capture process of linac microbunches. The code was calibrated by comparing with the experimental results at the Fermilab Booster. Preliminary results of the LEB show slow emittance growth due to the space charge. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. New State of Nuclear Matter: Nearly Perfect Fluid of Quarks and Gluons in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC Energies From Charged Particle Density to Jet Quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Nouicer, R.

    2016-03-28

    This article reviews several important results from RHIC experiments and discusses their implications. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD matter at temperatures and densities that exceed the limits wherein hadrons can exist as individual entities and raises to prominence the quark-gluon degrees of freedom. These findings are supported by major experimental observations via measuring of the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, and elliptic ow; followed by hard probe measurements: high-pT hadron suppression, dijet fragment azimuthal correlations, and heavy favor probes. These measurements are presented for particles of different species as a function of system sizes, collision centrality, and energy carried out in RHIC experiments. The results reveal that a dense, strongly-interacting medium is created in central Au + Au collisions at p sNN = 200 GeV at RHIC. This revelation of a new state of nuclear matter has also been observed in measurements at the LHC. Further, the IP-Glasma model coupled with viscous hydrodynamic models, which assumes the formation of a QGP, reproduces well the experimental ow results from Au + Au at p sNN = 200 GeV. This implies that the fluctuations in the initial geometry state are important and the created medium behaves as a nearly perfect liquid of nuclear matter because it has an extraordinarily low ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, =s 0.12. However, these discoveries are far from being fully understood. Furthermore, recent experimental results from RHIC and LHC in small p + A, d + Au and 3He+Au collision systems provide brand new insight into the role of initial and final state effects. These have proven to be interesting and more surprising than originally anticipated; and could conceivably shed new light in our understanding of collective behavior in heavy-ion physics. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments at both facilities RHIC and the LHC

  15. New State of Nuclear Matter: Nearly Perfect Fluid of Quarks and Gluons in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC Energies From Charged Particle Density to Jet Quenching

    DOE PAGES

    Nouicer, R.

    2016-03-28

    This article reviews several important results from RHIC experiments and discusses their implications. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD matter at temperatures and densities that exceed the limits wherein hadrons can exist as individual entities and raises to prominence the quark-gluon degrees of freedom. These findings are supported by major experimental observations via measuring of the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, and elliptic ow; followed by hard probe measurements: high-pT hadron suppression, dijet fragment azimuthal correlations, and heavy favor probes. These measurements are presented for particles of different species asmore » a function of system sizes, collision centrality, and energy carried out in RHIC experiments. The results reveal that a dense, strongly-interacting medium is created in central Au + Au collisions at p sNN = 200 GeV at RHIC. This revelation of a new state of nuclear matter has also been observed in measurements at the LHC. Further, the IP-Glasma model coupled with viscous hydrodynamic models, which assumes the formation of a QGP, reproduces well the experimental ow results from Au + Au at p sNN = 200 GeV. This implies that the fluctuations in the initial geometry state are important and the created medium behaves as a nearly perfect liquid of nuclear matter because it has an extraordinarily low ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, =s 0.12. However, these discoveries are far from being fully understood. Furthermore, recent experimental results from RHIC and LHC in small p + A, d + Au and 3He+Au collision systems provide brand new insight into the role of initial and final state effects. These have proven to be interesting and more surprising than originally anticipated; and could conceivably shed new light in our understanding of collective behavior in heavy-ion physics. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments at both facilities RHIC and

  16. New state of nuclear matter: Nearly perfect fluid of quarks and gluons in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies. From charged particle density to jet quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouicer, R.

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews several important results from RHIC experiments and discusses their implications. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD matter at temperatures and densities that exceed the limits wherein hadrons can exist as individual entities and raises to prominence the quark-gluon degrees of freedom. These findings are supported by major experimental observations via measuring of the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, and elliptic flow; followed by hard probe measurements: high- pT hadron suppression, dijet fragment azimuthal correlations, and heavy-flavor probes. These measurements are presented for particles of different species as a function of system sizes, collision centrality, and energy carried out in RHIC experiments. The results reveal that a dense, strongly interacting medium is created in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV at RHIC. This revelation of a new state of nuclear matter has also been observed in measurements at the LHC. Further, the IP-Glasma model coupled with viscous hydrodynamic models, which assumes the formation of a QGP, reproduces well the experimental flow results from Au+Au at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV. This implies that the fluctuations in the initial geometry state are important and the created medium behaves as a nearly perfect liquid of nuclear matter because it has an extraordinarily low ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, η/s≈ 0.12. However, these discoveries are far from being fully understood. Furthermore, recent experimental results from RHIC and LHC in small p+A, d+ Au and 3He+Au collision systems provide brand new insight into the role of initial and final state effects. These have proven to be interesting and more surprising than originally anticipated; and could conceivably shed new light in our understanding of collective behavior in heavy-ion physics. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments at both

  17. Charge and Energy Stored in a Capacitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    Using a data-acquisition system, the charge and energy stored in a capacitor are measured and displayed during the charging/discharging process. The experiment is usable as a laboratory work and/or a lecture demonstration. (Contains 3 figures.)

  18. Charge and Energy Stored in a Capacitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    Using a data-acquisition system, the charge and energy stored in a capacitor are measured and displayed during the charging/discharging process. The experiment is usable as a laboratory work and/or a lecture demonstration. (Contains 3 figures.)

  19. Energetic charged particle beams for disablement of mines

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.

    1995-03-27

    LLNL has an ongoing program of weapons disablement using energetic charged particle beams; this program combines theoretical and experimental expertise in accelerators, high-energy and nuclear physics, plasma physics and hydrodynamics to simulate/measure effects of electron and proton beams on weapons. This paper reviews work by LLNL, LANL and NSWC on detonating sensitive and insensitive high explosives and land mines using high-current electron beams. Computer simulations are given. 20--160 MeV electron beams incident on wet/dry soils are being studied, along with electron beam propagation in air. Compact high current, high energy accelerators are being developed for mine clearing. Countermine missions of interest are discussed. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  1. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-03

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation.

  2. Maximizing Ion Current by Space Charge Neutralization using Negative Ions and Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2005-01-25

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space charge neutralization are introduced. Space charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  3. Anomalous mobility of highly charged particles in pores

    DOE PAGES

    Qiu, Yinghua; Yang, Crystal; Hinkle, Preston; ...

    2015-07-16

    Single micropores in resistive-pulse technique were used to understand a complex dependence of particle mobility on its surface charge density. We show that the mobility of highly charged carboxylated particles decreases with the increase of the solution pH due to an interplay of three effects: (i) ion condensation, (ii) formation of an asymmetric electrical double layer around the particle, and (iii) electroosmotic flow induced by the charges on the pore walls and the particle surfaces. The results are important for applying resistive-pulse technique to determine surface charge density and zeta potential of the particles. As a result, the experiments alsomore » indicate the presence of condensed ions, which contribute to the measured current if a sufficiently high electric field is applied across the pore.« less

  4. Anomalous mobility of highly charged particles in pores

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Yinghua; Yang, Crystal; Hinkle, Preston; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Siwy, Zuzanna S.

    2015-07-16

    Single micropores in resistive-pulse technique were used to understand a complex dependence of particle mobility on its surface charge density. We show that the mobility of highly charged carboxylated particles decreases with the increase of the solution pH due to an interplay of three effects: (i) ion condensation, (ii) formation of an asymmetric electrical double layer around the particle, and (iii) electroosmotic flow induced by the charges on the pore walls and the particle surfaces. The results are important for applying resistive-pulse technique to determine surface charge density and zeta potential of the particles. As a result, the experiments also indicate the presence of condensed ions, which contribute to the measured current if a sufficiently high electric field is applied across the pore.

  5. Energy storage device with large charge separation

    SciTech Connect

    Holme, Timothy P.; Prinz, Friedrich B.; Iancu, Andrei

    2016-04-12

    High density energy storage in semiconductor devices is provided. There are two main aspects of the present approach. The first aspect is to provide high density energy storage in semiconductor devices based on formation of a plasma in the semiconductor. The second aspect is to provide high density energy storage based on charge separation in a p-n junction.

  6. On the motion of a charged particle in a plane monochromatic electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Stepan N; Makarov, Vyacheslav P; Rukhadze, Anri A

    2009-01-31

    The motion of a charged particle in the external specified field of a plane electromagnetic wave of large amplitude, when the relativistic consideration is required, is analysed in detail. The cases of different initial conditions for the motion of the charged particle and different polarisations of the wave are studied. It is shown that the expression for the kinetic energy of an electron oscillating in the transverse field of the wave, proposed in [1], is valid only in the nonrelativistic limit. (superstrong fields)

  7. Integral charged particle nuclear date bibliography. Editon 1, Supplement 2

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Ramavataram, S.; Dunford, C.L.

    1986-04-01

    This bibliography is divided into three sections, ''References'', ''Target Index'', and ''Residual Index.'' The ''References'' section contains all references satisfying the following criteria: excitation functions, thick targets, or product yield leading to the formation of a ground or metastable state; the atomic mass and charge of the incident particle must be greater than or equal to 1; the atomic mass of the target must be greater than or equal to 1; and the atomic masses of the outgoing and residual nuclei must be greater than or equal to 1 with the exception of processes which do not lead to a definite residual nucleus and of gamma-ray production cross sections. The ''Target Index'' section contains the incident particle energy and the abbreviated reference lines for all the entries, which contain information on a definite target nucleus and reaction. These reference lines contain the Journal name, followed by the volume and page number. The ''Residual Index'' section also contains the incident particle energy and the abbreviated reference lines for all the entries, which contain information on a definite residual nucleus and a definite target-reaction.

  8. Accelerators for heavy-charged-particle radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, George B

    2007-08-01

    This paper focuses on current and future designs of medical hadron accelerators for treating cancers and other diseases. Presently, five vendors and several national laboratories have produced heavy-particle medical accelerators for accelerating nuclei from hydrogen (protons) up through carbon and oxygen. Particle energies are varied to control the beam penetration depth in the patient. As of the end of 2006, four hospitals and one clinic in the United States offer proton treatments; there are five more such facilities in Japan. In most cases, these facilities use accelerators designed explicitly for cancer treatments. The accelerator types are a combination of synchrotrons, cyclotrons, and linear accelerators; some carry advanced features such as respiration gating, intensity modulation, and rapid energy changes, which contribute to better dose conformity on the tumor when using heavy charged particles. Recent interest in carbon nuclei for cancer treatment has led some vendors to offer carbon-ion and proton capability in their accelerator systems, so that either ion can be used. These features are now being incorporated for medical accelerators in new facilities.

  9. Histogramming of the Charged Particle Measurements with MSL/RAD - Comparison of Histogram Data with Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehresmann, B.; Zeitlin, C.; Hassler, D. M.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Boettcher, S.; Koehler, J.; Martin, C.; Brinza, D.; Rafkin, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on-board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is designed to measure a broad range of energetic particle radiation. A significant part of this radiation consists of charged particles, which mainly stem from cosmic background radiation, Solar particle events, and secondaries created by the interaction of these particles with the Martian atmosphere and soil. To measure charged particles RAD is equipped with a set of detectors: a particle telescope consisting of three silicon Solid-State Detectors (SSDs), a CsI scintillator and a plastic scintillator, as well as a further plastic scintillator used as anti-coincidence. RAD uses an elaborate post-processing logic to analyze if a measured event qualifies as a charged particle, as well as to distinguish between particles stopping in any one of the detectors and particles penetrating the whole detector stack. RAD then arranges these qualifying events in an appropriate stopping or penetrating charged particle histogram, reducing the data volume necessary to maintain crucial information about the measured particle. For ground-based data analysis it is of prime importance to derive information, such as particle species or energy, from the data in the downloaded histograms. Here, we will present how the chosen binning of these histograms enables us to derive this information. Pre-flight, we used the Monte-Carlo code GEANT4 to simulate the expected particle radiation and its interactions with a full model of the RAD sensor head. By mirroring the on-board processing logic, we derived statistics of which particle species and energies populate any one bin in the set of charged particle histograms. Finally, we will compare the resulting histogram data from RAD cruise and surface observations with simulations. RAD is supported by NASA (HEOMD) under JPL subcontract #1273039 to SwRI, and by DLR in Germany under contract to Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel (CAU).

  10. Energy Gap of Neutral Excitations Implies Vanishing Charge Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruki

    2017-03-01

    In quantum many-body systems with a U(1) symmetry, such as particle number conservation and axial spin conservation, there are two distinct types of excitations: charge-neutral excitations and charged excitations. The energy gaps of these excitations may be independent from each other in strongly correlated systems. The static susceptibility of the U(1) charge vanishes when the charged excitations are all gapped, but its relation to the neutral excitations is not obvious. Here we show that a finite excitation gap of the neutral excitations is, in fact, sufficient to prove that the charge susceptibility vanishes (i.e., the system is incompressible). This result gives a partial explanation for why the celebrated quantization condition n (S -mz)∈Z at magnetization plateaus works even in spatial dimensions greater than one.

  11. Hawking radiation of charged Dirac particles from a Kerr-Newman black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Shiwei; Liu Wenbiao

    2008-05-15

    Charged Dirac particles' Hawking radiation from a Kerr-Newman black hole is calculated using Damour-Ruffini's method. When energy conservation and the backreaction of particles to the space-time are considered, the emission spectrum is not purely thermal anymore. The leading term is exactly the Boltzman factor, and the deviation from the purely thermal spectrum can bring some information out, which can be treated as an explanation to the information loss paradox. The result can also be treated as a quantum-corrected radiation temperature, which is dependent on the black hole background and the radiation particle's energy, angular momentum, and charge.

  12. Search for fractional-charge particles in meteoritic material.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter C; Lee, Eric R; Lee, Irwin T; Perl, Martin L; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-19

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5 microm with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth's surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3 x 10(-21) particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9 x 10(-23) particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  13. Search for Fractional-Charge Particles in Meteoritic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Perl, Martin L.; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-01

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5μm with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth‘s surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3×10-21 particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9×10-23 particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  14. Mechanisms of Particle Charging by Surfactants in Nonpolar Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyung; Zhou, Zhang-Lin; Alas, Guillermo; Behrens, Sven Holger

    2015-11-10

    Electric charging of colloidal particles in nonpolar solvents plays a crucial role for many industrial applications and products, including rubbers, engine oils, toners, or electronic displays. Although disfavored by the low solvent permittivity, particle charging can be induced by added surfactants, even nonionic ones, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood, and neither the magnitude nor the sign of charge can generally be predicted from the particle and surfactant properties. The conclusiveness of scientific studies has been limited partly by a traditional focus on few surfactant types with many differences in their chemical structure and often poorly defined composition. Here we investigate the surface charging of poly(methyl methacrylate) particles dispersed in hexane-based solutions of three purified polyisobutylene succinimide polyamine surfactants with "subtle" structural variations. We precisely vary the surfactant chemistry by replacing only a single electronegative atom located at a fixed position within the polar headgroup. Electrophoresis reveals that these small differences between the surfactants lead to qualitatively different particle charging. In the respective particle-free surfactant solutions we also find potentially telling differences in the size of the surfactant aggregates (inverse micelles), the residual water content, and the electric solution conductivity as well as indications for a significant size difference between oppositely charged inverse micelles of the most hygroscopic surfactant. An analysis that accounts for the acid/base properties of all constituents suggests that the observed particle charging is better described by asymmetric adsorption of charged inverse micelles from the liquid bulk than by charge creation at the particle surface. Intramicellar acid-base interaction and intermicellar surfactant exchange help rationalize the formation of micellar ions pairs with size asymmetry.

  15. A simultaneous charge and size measurement method for individual airborne particles using digital holographic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Adam; Dou, Zhongwang; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Recently, significant inquiry to understand the effects of particle charge on particle laden flow have been made, particularly in the study of Lagrangian particle-pair statistics. Quantification of individual particle charge allows relation of inter-particle electric forces and turbulence-induced forces. Here we offer a simultaneous, individual particle charge and size measurement technique utilizing in-line digital holographic Particle Tracking Velocimetry (hPTV). The method measures particle electric mobility through its velocity response within a uniform electric field using a sequence of holograms, next the particle diameter is measured with the same holograms using a matched-filter developed by Lu et al. (2012) as an input for calculation of charge. Consequently, a benefit of this method is that particle charge is calculated on the individual level, versus a mean charge calculated from a group of particles, offering improved estimations of charge distributions for studies of particle laden flow. This work was supported by NSF CBET-0967407 and CBET-0967349.

  16. Influence of numerical schemes on statistical properties of computed charged particle trajectories in turbulent electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lalescu, C.C.; Teaca, B.; Carati, D.

    2013-05-15

    A class of numerical schemes is developed for the study of charged particle transport in complex stationary electromagnetic fields and tested for fields obtained from a numerical solution of the magneto-hydrodynamic equation. The performances of these schemes are evaluated by analyzing the conservation of energy and the statistical properties of the trajectories. Energy conservation is affected by the interpolation technique used to estimate the field value at the particle position. However, the particle transport properties are more robust, except in the limit of low energy when a significant fraction of the particles are trapped.

  17. Pacemakers charging using body energy

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Dinesh; Bairagi, Sweeti; Goel, Sanat; Jangra, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Life-saving medical implants like pacemakers and defibrillators face a big drawback that their batteries eventually run out and patients require frequent surgery to have these batteries replaced. With the advent of technology, alternatives can be provided for such surgeries. To power these devices, body energy harvesting techniques may be employed. Some of the power sources are patient's heartbeat, blood flow inside the vessels, movement of the body parts, and the body temperature (heat). Different types of sensors are employed, such as for sensing the energy from the heartbeat the piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled nanowires are used that convert the mechanical energy into electricity. Similarly, for sensing the blood flow energy, nanogenerators driven by ultrasonic waves are used that have the ability to directly convert the hydraulic energy in human body to electrical energy. Another consideration is to use body heat employing biothermal battery to generate electricity using multiple arrays of thermoelectric generators built into an implantable chip. These generators exploit the well-known thermocouple effect. For the biothermal device to work, it needs a 2°C temperature difference across it. But there are many parts of the body where a temperature difference of 5°C exists – typically in the few millimeters just below the skin, where it is planned to place this device. This study focuses on using body heat as an alternative energy source to recharge pacemaker batteries and other medical devices and prevent the possibility of life-risk during repeated surgery. PMID:21814432

  18. Pacemakers charging using body energy.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Dinesh; Bairagi, Sweeti; Goel, Sanat; Jangra, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Life-saving medical implants like pacemakers and defibrillators face a big drawback that their batteries eventually run out and patients require frequent surgery to have these batteries replaced. With the advent of technology, alternatives can be provided for such surgeries. To power these devices, body energy harvesting techniques may be employed. Some of the power sources are patient's heartbeat, blood flow inside the vessels, movement of the body parts, and the body temperature (heat). Different types of sensors are employed, such as for sensing the energy from the heartbeat the piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled nanowires are used that convert the mechanical energy into electricity. Similarly, for sensing the blood flow energy, nanogenerators driven by ultrasonic waves are used that have the ability to directly convert the hydraulic energy in human body to electrical energy. Another consideration is to use body heat employing biothermal battery to generate electricity using multiple arrays of thermoelectric generators built into an implantable chip. These generators exploit the well-known thermocouple effect. For the biothermal device to work, it needs a 2°C temperature difference across it. But there are many parts of the body where a temperature difference of 5°C exists - typically in the few millimeters just below the skin, where it is planned to place this device. This study focuses on using body heat as an alternative energy source to recharge pacemaker batteries and other medical devices and prevent the possibility of life-risk during repeated surgery.

  19. Large Bulk Matter Search for Fractional Charge Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Irwin T

    2002-06-11

    We have carried out the largest search for stable particles with fractional electric charge, based on an oil drop method that incorporates a horizontal electric field and upward air flow. No evidence for such particles was found, giving a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.17 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon on the abundance of fractional charge particles in silicone oil for 0.18e {le} |Q{sub residual}| {le} 0.82e. Since this is the first use of this new method we describe the advantages and limitations of the method.

  20. Large Bulk Matter Search for Fractional Charge Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Irwin T

    2002-12-04

    We have carried out the largest search for stable particles with fractional electric charge, based on an oil drop method that incorporates a horizontal electric field and upward air flow. No evidence for such particles was found, giving a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.17 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon on the abundance of fractional charge particles in silicone oil for 0.18e {le} |Q{sub residual}| {le} 0.82e. Since this is the first use of this new method we describe the advantages and limitations of the method.

  1. Nonequatorial charged particle confinement around Kerr black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Preti, Giovanni

    2010-01-15

    We analyze the nonequatorial charged particle dynamics around a rotating black hole in the presence of an external magnetic field, the latter being given by Wald's exact analytical solution to the Maxwell's equations in the Kerr background. At variance with the corresponding Schwarzschild case, the behavior of the particle becomes here markedly charge-sign dependent, and the more so the more the Kerr parameter increases. The interplay between the rotating black hole and the magnetic field is shown to provide a mechanism both for selective charge ejection in axially collimated jetlike trajectories, and for selective charge confinement into nonequatorial bound orbits around the hole; the possibility of such a confinement allows the fate of an accreting particle to not necessarily be doomed: infall into the hole can be prevented, and the neutrality of the Kerr source could therefore be preserved, while the charge is safely parked into bound cross-equatorial orbits all around it.

  2. Electrostatic interactions between charged dielectric particles in an electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, Ivan N.; Filippov, Anatoly V.; Stace, Anthony J.; Besley, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Theory is developed to address a significant problem of how two charged dielectric particles interact in the presence of a polarizable medium that is a dilute solution of a strong electrolyte. The electrostatic force is defined by characteristic parameters for the interacting particles (charge, radius, and dielectric constant) and for the medium (permittivity and Debye length), and is expressed in the form of a converging infinite series. The limiting case of weak screening and large inter-particle separation is considered, which corresponds to small (macro)ions that carry constant charge. The theory yields a solution in the limit of monopole and dipole terms that agrees exactly with existing analytical expressions, which are generally used to describe ion-ion and ion-molecular interactions in a medium. Results from the theory are compared with DLVO theory and with experimental measurements for the electrostatic force between two PMMA particles contained in a nonpolar solvent (hexadecane) with an added charge control agent.

  3. Charged particle beam scanning using deformed high gradient insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu -Jiuan

    2015-10-06

    Devices and methods are provided to allow rapid deflection of a charged particle beam. The disclosed devices can, for example, be used as part of a hadron therapy system to allow scanning of a target area within a patient's body. The disclosed charged particle beam deflectors include a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) with a hollow center and a dielectric wall that is substantially parallel to a z-axis that runs through the hollow center. The dielectric wall includes one or more deformed high gradient insulators (HGIs) that are configured to produce an electric field with an component in a direction perpendicular to the z-axis. A control component is also provided to establish the electric field component in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis and to control deflection of a charged particle beam in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis as the charged particle beam travels through the hollow center of the DWA.

  4. A fast numerical integrator for relativistic charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we report on a fast second-order numerical integrator to solve the Lorentz force equations of a relativistic charged particle in electromagnetic fields. This numerical integrator shows less numerical error than the popular Boris algorithm in tracking the relativistic particle subject to electric and magnetic space-charge fields and requires less number of operations than another recently proposed relativistic integrator.

  5. Simulation of heavy charged particles damage on MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhnov, V.; Glushko, A.; Makarchuk, V.; Zinchenko, L.; Terekhov, V.; Mikhaylichenko, S.

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents computer simulation results of heavy charged particles radiation effect on elements of electrostatic microelectromechanical systems. Modeling methods of heavy charged particles impact on MEMS elements were envisaged. The radiation sensitivity of different types of fractal electrostatic MEMS were evaluated. Methods of reduction of radiation impact on electrostatic MEMS based on fractal theory were discussed. Conclusions about fractal electrostatic MEMS features were outlined.

  6. Proposal to Search for Magnetically Charged Particles with Magnetic Charge 1e

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Michael K.; Fryberger, David

    2015-11-02

    A model for composite elementary Standard Model (SM) particles based upon magnetically bound vorton pairs, we briefly introduce here, predicts the existence of a complete family of magnetically charged particles, as well as their neutral isotopic partners (all counterparts to the SM elementary particles), in which the lowest mass (charged) particle would be an electrically neutral stable lepton, but which carries a magnetic charge equivalent to 1e. This new particle, which we call a magneticon (a counterpart to the electron) would be pair produced at all e+e- colliders at an Ecm above twice its mass. In addition, PP and PPbar colliders should also be able to produce these new particles through the Drell-Yan process. To our knowledge, no monopole search experiment has been sensitive to such a low-charged magnetic monopole above a particle mass of about 5 GeV/c2. Hence, we propose that a search for such a stable particle of magnetic charge 1e should be undertaken. We have taken the ATLAS detector at the LHC as an example in which this search might be done. To this end, we modeled the magnetic fields and muon trigger chambers of this detector. We show results from a simple Monte Carlo simulation program to indicate how these particles might look in the detector and describe how one might search for these new particles in the ATLAS data stream.

  7. Reduction of surface charges during coalescence of elastomer particles.

    PubMed

    Gauer, Cornelius; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-07-15

    Reaction-limited aggregation of soft elastomer particles has been studied with specific attention to the fate of surface charges during coalescence. The employed system is an aqueous dispersion of fluoroelastomer particles, which are known to coalesce completely at 70 degrees C. In contrast to diffusion-limited conditions, under reaction-limited conditions the stability of the system is expected to change during aggregation because of surface reduction and charge accumulation resulting from coalescence. This allows investigating the mechanism of charge relocation during cluster coalescence. For particles stabilized by ionic surfactants, it has been found that the charges are mobile (i.e., they redistribute between aqueous solution and particle surface according to their adsorption equilibrium) (Gauer, C.; Jia, Z.; Wu, H.; Morbidelli, M. Langmuir 2009, 25, 9703). In this work, we consider the case of fixed charges, as those given by charged polymer end groups covalently bound to the particle surface. We demonstrate that a loss of fixed surface charges occurs during the coalescence and strongly affects the time evolution and the shape of the resulting cluster mass distribution.

  8. Ionization of multielectron atoms by fast charged particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.; Kyle, H. L.; Sullivan, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Using plane waves to describe the incident and scattered particles, and screened hydrogenic and Coulomb functions to describe the atomic electrons before and after ejections, we have calculated the differential and total ionization cross sections of 11 atoms and one ion by electron impact, and ionization of helium by proton impact. The effective charges of the screened hydrogenic functions are fixed by the Hartree-Fock calculations. Calculations have been carried out for the atomic s, p, and d electrons. For low atomic numbers, we find reasonable agreement with the experimental data. For intermediate atomic numbers, we expect our results to overestimate the actual cross sections, since our choice of a unit charge for the Coulomb function of the ejected electrons will overestimate the atomic dipole potential strength, and in turn the high-energy cross sections. The advantage of the method presented here is that the ionization amplitude is given in analytic form. This may allow further analysis on this amplitude, and facilitates extension of the numerical integration for the cross section to high impact energies.

  9. Indirect Charged Particle Detection: Concepts and a Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nicholas B.; Horányi, Mihály; Collette, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We describe the principles of macroscopic charged particle detection in the laboratory and their connections to concepts taught in the physics classroom. Electrostatic dust accelerator systems, capable of launching charged dust grains at hypervelocities (1-100 km/s), are a critical tool for space exploration. Dust grains in space typically have…

  10. Indirect Charged Particle Detection: Concepts and a Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nicholas B.; Horányi, Mihály; Collette, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We describe the principles of macroscopic charged particle detection in the laboratory and their connections to concepts taught in the physics classroom. Electrostatic dust accelerator systems, capable of launching charged dust grains at hypervelocities (1-100 km/s), are a critical tool for space exploration. Dust grains in space typically have…

  11. An improved search for elementary particles with fractional electric charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.R.

    1996-08-01

    The SLAC Quark Search Group has demonstrated successful operation of a low cost, high mass throughput Millikan apparatus designed to search for fractionally charged particles. About six million silicone oil drops were measured with no evidence of fractional charges. A second experiment is under construction with 100 times greater throughput which will utilize optimized search fluids.

  12. The Influence of Trapped Ions and Non-equilibrium EDF on Dust Particle Charging

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.; Antipov, S. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    Dust particles charging in a low-pressure glow discharge was investigated theoretically with the help of model for trapped and free ions coupled with the self-consistent solution of Poisson equation for electric potential. Non-equilibrium (non-Maxwellian) character of electron energy distribution function depending on gas pressure and electric field was also taken into account on the basis of the solution of kinetic Boltzmann equation. The results were compared with the experimental measurements of dust particle charge depending on gas pressure. It was shown that the calculated effective charge, i.e. the difference of the dust particle charge and trapped ion charge, is in a fairly good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Return flux of neutral and charged particles in geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. D.; Fong, Michael C.; Neier, Karen L.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes a model for the return flux of neutral and charged particles to a satellite in geosynchronous earth orbit. For neutral particles, the main return flux mechanisms is back-scattering via self-collisions among molecules outgassed or vented from the satellite; whereas for charged particles, the main mechanism is electrostatic re-attraction of ionized outgassed or vented molecules to a negatively charged satellite. Computer codes that simulate spacecraft charging typically contain a 3D charged particle trajectory-tracking procedure that, in principle, could be used for contamination studies. In practice, however, it is difficult to obtain quantitative results on the return flux distribution by this method. This makes such a code impractical to use as an engineering tool for identifying contamination problems reliably and evaluating corrective measures through simulation. To achieve a practical engineering tool, we prose an alternative to the particle tracking technique. We treat the problem for both neutral and charged particles in a unified manner by direct numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation in the BGK approximation. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by favorable numerical results presented for the simplified geometry of a spherical spacecraft.

  14. Optical characterization of electrically charged particles using discrete dipole approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Kundracik, František; Videen, Gorden

    2016-11-01

    The dependence of the electric potential on the absorption and scattering of light by small particles has emerged as an interesting research topic, as the unexpected amplified optical signatures of a system of electrically charged particles were satisfactory predicted recently for homogeneous, uniformly charged spheres. However, natural particles are rarely of spherical shape. A comprehensive understanding of how arbitrarily shaped, charged particles interact with electromagnetic radiation has been missing. The approach we present here attempts to fill this gap by introducing a numerical formulation of the electromagnetic scattering problem for these particles. The first results from the intercomparison of numerical and analytical solutions for a pseudosphere show that the resonance features found are largely consistent, except for the magnitude and width of the peak amplitude, which may be due to inherent differences in the approaches used.

  15. Cyclotron motion of a charged particle with anisotropic mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftja, Orion; Livingston, Victoria; Thomas, Elsa

    2017-05-01

    The cyclotron motion of a charged particle subject to a uniform magnetic field is thoroughly described in many classical physics textbooks. Although the assumption of a particle with isotropic mass is taken for granted in classical physics, a key concept in condensed matter physics is that of particles with an effective anisotropic mass, such as electrons in the context of band structure studies of solids. Since some exposure to the concept of anisotropic mass is important within the framework of classical physics, here we consider the cyclotron motion of a charged particle with anisotropic mass in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. The exact solution of this problem exposes a broad audience of readers to concepts in condensed matter physics that are rarely mentioned within the framework of classical physics. Key ideas on the topic are illustrated in a pedagogical way by considering specific examples that show how an anisotropic mass modifies the cyclotron motion of a charged particle.

  16. Noncommutative magnetic moment of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Adorno, T. C.; Gitman, D. M.; Shabad, A. E.; Vassilevich, D. V.

    2011-10-15

    It has been argued that in noncommutative field theories, the sizes of physical objects cannot be taken smaller than an ''elementary length'' related to noncommutativity parameters. By gauge covariantly extending field equations of noncommutative U(1){sub *} theory to cover the presence of external sources, we find electric and magnetic fields produced by an extended static charge. We find that such a charge, apart from being an ordinary electric monopole, is also a magnetic dipole. By writing off the existing experimental clearance in the value of the lepton magnetic moments for the present effect, we get the bound on noncommutativity at the level of 10{sup 4} TeV.

  17. Particle Emission and Charging Effects Induced by Fracture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-15

    recombination with mobile charge carriers). These processes are initiated by bond breaking resulting in the creation of localized departures from...subsequendy decay to yield after-emission. Thermally stimulated relaxation involving mobile charge carriers releasing energy at appropriate recombination...region of contact. This flow of charge is slow because of the poor charge mobility in the rubber. In addition, any oxide layer on the metal also

  18. Global Aspects of Charged Particle Motion in Axially Symmetric Multipole Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    The motion of a single charged particle in the space outside of a compact region of steady currents is investigated. The charged particle is assumed to produce negligible electromagnetic radiation, so that its energy is conserved. The source of the magnetic field is represented as a point multipole. After a general description, attention is focused on magnetic fields with axial symmetry. Lagrangian dynamical theory is utilized to identify constants of the motion as well as the equations of motion themselves. The qualitative method of Stonner is used to examine charged particle motion in axisymmetric multipole fields of all orders. Although the equations of motion generally have no analytical solutions and must be integrated numerically to produce a specific orbit, a topological examination of dynamics is possible, and can be used, d la Stonner, to completely describe the global aspects of the motion of a single charged particle in a space with an axisymmetric multipole magnetic field.

  19. Search for multiply charged Heavy Stable Charged Particles in data collected with the CMS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh

    2013-10-30

    Several models of new physics yield particles that are massive, long-lived, and have an electric charge, Q, greater than that of the electron, e. A search for evidence of such particles was performed using 5.0 fb-1 and 18.8 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at √s = 7 TeV and √s = 8 TeV, respectively, with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The distinctive detector signatures of these particles are that they are slow-moving and highly ionizing. Ionization energy loss and time-of- flight measurements were made using the inner tracker and the muon system, respectively. The search is sensitive to 1e ≤ |Q| ≤ 8e. Data were found to be consistent with standard model expectations and upper limits on the production cross section of these particles were computed using a Drell-Yan-like production model. Masses below 517, 687, 752, 791, 798, 778, 753, and 724 GeV are excluded for |Q| = 1e, 2e, 3e, 4e, 5e, 6e, 7e, and 8e, respectively.

  20. Chaotic phenomena of charged particles in crystal lattices.

    PubMed

    Desalvo, Agostino; Giannerini, Simone; Rosa, Rodolfo

    2006-06-01

    In this article, we have applied the methods of chaos theory to channeling phenomena of positive charged particles in crystal lattices. In particular, we studied the transition between two ordered types of motion; i.e., motion parallel to a crystal axis (axial channeling) and to a crystal plane (planar channeling), respectively. The transition between these two regimes turns out to occur through an angular range in which the particle motion is highly disordered and the region of phase space spanned by the particle is much larger than the one swept in the two ordered motions. We have evaluated the maximum Lyapunov exponent with the method put forward by Rosenstein et al. [Physica D 65, 117 (1993)] and by Kantz [Phys. Lett. A 185, 77 (1994)]. Moreover, we estimated the correlation dimension by using the Grassberger-Procaccia method. We found that at the transition the system exhibits a very complex behavior showing an exponential divergence of the trajectories corresponding to a positive Lyapunov exponent and a noninteger value of the correlation dimension. These results turn out to be linked to a physical interpretation. The Lyapunov exponents are in agreement with the model by Akhiezer et al. [Phys. Rep. 203, 289 (1991)], based on the equivalence between the ion motion along the crystal plane described as a "string of strings" and the "kicked" rotator. The nonintegral value of the correlation dimension can be explained by the nonconservation of transverse energy at the transition.

  1. Fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronel-Escamilla, A.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Guerrero-Ramírez, G. V.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    In many physical applications the electrons play a relevant role. For example, when a beam of electrons accelerated to relativistic velocities is used as an active medium to generate Free Electron Lasers (FEL), the electrons are bound to atoms, but move freely in a magnetic field. The relaxation time, longitudinal effects and transverse variations of the optical field are parameters that play an important role in the efficiency of this laser. The electron dynamics in a magnetic field is a means of radiation source for coupling to the electric field. The transverse motion of the electrons leads to either gain or loss energy from or to the field, depending on the position of the particle regarding the phase of the external radiation field. Due to the importance to know with great certainty the displacement of charged particles in a magnetic field, in this work we study the fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields. Newton’s second law is considered and the order of the fractional differential equation is (0;1]. Based on the Grünwald-Letnikov (GL) definition, the discretization of fractional differential equations is reported to get numerical simulations. Comparison between the numerical solutions obtained on Euler’s numerical method for the classical case and the GL definition in the fractional approach proves the good performance of the numerical scheme applied. Three application examples are shown: constant magnetic field, ramp magnetic field and harmonic magnetic field. In the first example the results obtained show bistability. Dissipative effects are observed in the system and the standard dynamic is recovered when the order of the fractional derivative is 1.

  2. Synergistic Effect of High Charge and Energy Particle Radiation and Chronological Age on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Tissue Degeneration: A Ground-Based Study Using the Vertebrate Laboratory Model Organism Oryzias latipes

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Xuan; Zhang, Xinyan; Ding, Lingling; ...

    2014-11-06

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are a main hazard of the space radiation environment. Uncertainty regarding their health effects is a limiting factor in the design of human exploration-class space missions, that is, missions beyond low earth orbit. Previous work has shown that HZE exposure increases cancer risk and elicits other aging-like phenomena in animal models. Here, we investigate how a single exposure to HZE particle radiation, early in life, influences the subsequent age-dependent evolution of oxidative stress and appearance of degenerative tissue changes. Embryos of the laboratory model organism, Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), were exposed to HZEmore » particle radiation at doses overlapping the range of anticipated human exposure. A separate cohort was exposed to reference γ-radiation. Survival was monitored for 750 days, well beyond the median lifespan. The population was also sampled at intervals and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. HZE particle radiation dose and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in PPARGC1A mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of oxidative stress defense genes and for mitochondrial maintenance. Consistent with chronic oxidative stress, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Livers also had distinctive, cystic lesions. Depending on the endpoint, effects of γ-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Results provide a quantitative and qualitative framework for understanding relative contributions of HZE particle radiation exposure and aging to chronic oxidative stress and tissue degeneration.« less

  3. Synergistic Effect of High Charge and Energy Particle Radiation and Chronological Age on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Tissue Degeneration: A Ground-Based Study Using the Vertebrate Laboratory Model Organism Oryzias latipes

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xuan; Zhang, Xinyan; Ding, Lingling; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Weinberger, Paul M.; Dynan, William S.

    2014-11-06

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are a main hazard of the space radiation environment. Uncertainty regarding their health effects is a limiting factor in the design of human exploration-class space missions, that is, missions beyond low earth orbit. Previous work has shown that HZE exposure increases cancer risk and elicits other aging-like phenomena in animal models. Here, we investigate how a single exposure to HZE particle radiation, early in life, influences the subsequent age-dependent evolution of oxidative stress and appearance of degenerative tissue changes. Embryos of the laboratory model organism, Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), were exposed to HZE particle radiation at doses overlapping the range of anticipated human exposure. A separate cohort was exposed to reference γ-radiation. Survival was monitored for 750 days, well beyond the median lifespan. The population was also sampled at intervals and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. HZE particle radiation dose and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in PPARGC1A mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of oxidative stress defense genes and for mitochondrial maintenance. Consistent with chronic oxidative stress, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Livers also had distinctive, cystic lesions. Depending on the endpoint, effects of γ-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Results provide a quantitative and qualitative framework for understanding relative contributions of HZE particle radiation exposure and aging to chronic oxidative stress and tissue degeneration.

  4. Synergistic effect of high charge and energy particle radiation and chronological age on biomarkers of oxidative stress and tissue degeneration: a ground-based study using the vertebrate laboratory model organism Oryzias latipes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuan; Zhang, Xinyan; Ding, Lingling; Lee, Jeffrey R; Weinberger, Paul M; Dynan, William S

    2014-01-01

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are a main hazard of the space radiation environment. Uncertainty regarding their health effects is a limiting factor in the design of human exploration-class space missions, that is, missions beyond low earth orbit. Previous work has shown that HZE exposure increases cancer risk and elicits other aging-like phenomena in animal models. Here, we investigate how a single exposure to HZE particle radiation, early in life, influences the subsequent age-dependent evolution of oxidative stress and appearance of degenerative tissue changes. Embryos of the laboratory model organism, Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), were exposed to HZE particle radiation at doses overlapping the range of anticipated human exposure. A separate cohort was exposed to reference γ-radiation. Survival was monitored for 750 days, well beyond the median lifespan. The population was also sampled at intervals and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. HZE particle radiation dose and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in PPARGC1A mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of oxidative stress defense genes and for mitochondrial maintenance. Consistent with chronic oxidative stress, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Livers also had distinctive, cystic lesions. Depending on the endpoint, effects of γ-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Results provide a quantitative and qualitative framework for understanding relative contributions of HZE particle radiation exposure and aging to chronic oxidative stress and tissue degeneration.

  5. Synergistic Effect of High Charge and Energy Particle Radiation and Chronological Age on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Tissue Degeneration: A Ground-Based Study Using the Vertebrate Laboratory Model Organism Oryzias latipes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xuan; Zhang, Xinyan; Ding, Lingling; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Weinberger, Paul M.; Dynan, William S.

    2014-01-01

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are a main hazard of the space radiation environment. Uncertainty regarding their health effects is a limiting factor in the design of human exploration-class space missions, that is, missions beyond low earth orbit. Previous work has shown that HZE exposure increases cancer risk and elicits other aging-like phenomena in animal models. Here, we investigate how a single exposure to HZE particle radiation, early in life, influences the subsequent age-dependent evolution of oxidative stress and appearance of degenerative tissue changes. Embryos of the laboratory model organism, Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), were exposed to HZE particle radiation at doses overlapping the range of anticipated human exposure. A separate cohort was exposed to reference γ-radiation. Survival was monitored for 750 days, well beyond the median lifespan. The population was also sampled at intervals and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. HZE particle radiation dose and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in PPARGC1A mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of oxidative stress defense genes and for mitochondrial maintenance. Consistent with chronic oxidative stress, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Livers also had distinctive, cystic lesions. Depending on the endpoint, effects of γ-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Results provide a quantitative and qualitative framework for understanding relative contributions of HZE particle radiation exposure and aging to chronic oxidative stress and tissue degeneration. PMID:25375139

  6. Cadmium zinc telluride charged particle nuclear detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, J.E. |; James, R.B.; Antolak, A.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the improvements in understanding of transport phenomena in cadmium zinc telluride radiation sensors achieved through studies of alpha particle response and spatially resolved photoconductivity mapping. Alpha particle response waveforms and photocurrent profiles both indicate non-uniformities in the electric field which may have detrimental effects on detector performance. Identifying and eliminating the sources of these nonuniformities will ultimately lead to improved detector performance.

  7. Simulating the transport of heavy charged particles through trabecular spongiosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh, Jacob A.

    As planning continues for manned missions far beyond Low Earth Orbit, a paramount concern remains the flight crew's exposure to galactic cosmic radiation. When humans exit the protective magnetic field of Earth, they become subject to bombardment by highly-reactive heavy charged (HZE) particles. A possible consequence of this two- to three-year-long mission is the onset of radiation-induced leukemia, a disorder with a latency period as short as two to three years. Because data on risk to humans from exposure to HZE particles is non-existent, studies of leukemia in animals are now underway to investigate the relative effectiveness of HZE exposures. Leukemogenesis can result from energy depositions occurring within marrow contained in the trabecular spongiosa. Trabecular spongiosa is found in flat bones and within the ends of long bones, and is characterized by an intricate matrix of interconnected bone tissue forming cavities that house marrow. The microscopic internal dimensions of spongiosa vary between species. As radiation traverses this region, interface-induced dose perturbations that occur at the interfaces between bone and marrow affect the patterns of energy deposition within the region. An aim of this project is to determine the extent by which tissue heterogeneity and microscopic dimensions have on patterns of energy deposition within the trabecular spongiosa. This leads to the development of PATHFIT, a computer code capable of generating simple quadric-based geometric models of trabecular spongiosa for both humans and mice based on actual experimentally-determined internal dimensions of trabecular spongiosa. Following the creation of spongiosa models, focus is placed on the development of HITSPAP, a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport code system that combines capabilities of the MC code PENELOPE and MC code PARTRAC. This code is capable of simulating the transport of HZE particles through accurate models of trabecular spongiosa. The final and

  8. Charged particle pseudorapidity density near mid-rapidity in ultrarelativistic gold + gold collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Michael Anthony

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides access to the highest center-of-mass energies achieved in the field of relativistic heavy-ion physics. During the year 2000, RHIC produced Au+Au collisions at sNN = 56 and 130 GeV. In 2001, Au+Au collisions at the design energy of sNN = 200 GeV were achieved. These unprecedented energies allow for the continued search for a state of deconfined hadronic matter produced in the collisions. Part of that search will be to measure global event characteristics of the collisions. Global event characterization is an important task which provides a baseline for understanding the overall physics governing this new collision environment. One topic of global event characterization is the energy density present in the collision region, especially near mid-rapidity. The energy density is proportional to the observed particle production. The PHOBOS detector is designed to provide measurements of global event characteristics in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions including charged particle production. This thesis explores the charged particle production (dN ch/dη) in Au+Au collisions for the previously mentioned energies at RHIC averaged over |η| < 1. The PHOBOS Vertex detector was used to obtain the measurement of charged particle production through the use of tracklets. The conversion of hits in the Vertex detector to tracklets to dNch/dη will be discussed. The dependence of the measured charged particle production on energy and collision geometry will be detailed. Relations to particle production results from the AGS, the SPS and high-energy physics experiments will also be presented. Comparison to model predictions and post-dictions of the charged particle production will also be discussed.

  9. Acceleration of charged particles in magnetic reconnection Solar flares, the magnetosphere, and solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ambrosiano, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A possible source of free energy available for accelerating charged particles is conversion of magnetic energy to particle energy in reconnecting magnetic fields. Recent simulations using test particles suggests that reconnection may efficiently accelerate particles to the maximum energies that are observed in several astrophysical contexts. A simple analytic formula is used in conjunction with the simulation results to predict the maximum energy achievable in a particular plasma environment with the result that in solar flares reconnection is capable of accelerating particles to several GeV. In magnetospheric substorms the predicted maximum can reach several hundred keV, and near magnetic sector crossings in the solar wind the maximum energy can approach 100 keV.

  10. Particle-like representation for the field of a moving point charge in nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitman, D. M.; E Shabad, A.; Shishmarev, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    In a simple nonlinear model stemming from quantum electrodynamics wherein the pointlike charge has finite field-self-energy, we demonstrate that the latter can be presented as a soliton with its energy-momentum vector satisfying the standard mechanical relation characteristic of a free moving massive relativistic particle.

  11. Transition radiations in X-ray region. [considering charged particle passage through Mylar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of production of radiations in the transoptical region by the passage of high energy charged particles through the interface of two media is discussed. Based on the theoretical model, calculations are made for electrons of selected energy range passing through Mylar.

  12. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    On the discovery of coherent Bremsstrahlung in a single crystal at the Frascati National Laboratories / C. Barbiellini, G. P. Murtas and S. B. Dabagov -- Advances in coherent Bremsstrahlung and LPM-effect studies (to the lOOth anniversary from the birth of L. D. Landau) / N. F. Shul'ga -- Spectra of radiation and created particles at intermediate energy in oriented crystal taking into account energy loss / V. N. Baier and V. M. Katkov -- The coherent Bremsstrahlung beam at MAX-lab facility / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Radiation from thin, structured targets (CERN NA63) / A. Dizdar -- Hard incoherent radiation in thick crystals / N. F. Shul'ga, V. V. Syshchenko and A. I. Tarnovsky -- Coherent Bremsstrahlung in periodically deformed crystals with a complex base / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Induction of coherent x-ray Bremsstrahlung in crystals under the influence of acoustic waves / A. R. Mkrtchyan and V. V. Parazian -- Coherent processes in bent single crystals / V. A. Maisheev -- Experimental and theoretical investigation of complete transfer phenomenon for media with various heat exchange coefficients / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. E. Movsisyan and V. R. Kocharyan -- Coherent pair production in crystals / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Negative particle planar and axial channeling and channeling collimation / R. A. Carrigan, Jr. -- CERN crystal-based collimation in modern hadron colliders / W. Scandale -- Studies and application of bent crystals for beam steering at 70 GeV IHEP accelerator / A. G. Afonin ... [et al.] -- Crystal collimation studies at the Tevatron (T-980) / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of crystals for channeling of particles in accellerators / A. Mazzolari ... [et al.] -- New possibilities to facilitate collimation of both positively and negatively charged particle beams by crystals / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- Increase of probability of particle capture into the channeling

  13. Longitudinal Control of Intense Charged Particle Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    contained using longitudinal focusing, I have shown that errors in the applied focusing fields induce space-charge waves at the bunch edges that...profile along the bunch length. When the bunch is contained using longitudinal focusing, I have shown that errors in the applied focusing fields ...90 5.1.1 Beam Expansion without Longitudinal Containment................................ 90 5.1.2 Application of Focusing Fields

  14. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiping; Wei, Haofei

    2010-11-01

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  15. Motion of charged test particles in Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, Daniela; Quevedo, Hernando; Ruffini, Remo

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the circular motion of charged test particles in the gravitational field of a charged mass described by the Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime. We study in detail all the spatial regions where circular motion is allowed around either black holes or naked singularities. The effects of repulsive gravity are discussed by finding all the circles at which a particle can have vanishing angular momentum. We show that the geometric structure of stable accretion disks, made of only test particles moving along circular orbits around the central body, allows us to clearly distinguish between black holes and naked singularities.

  16. Current and future accelerator technologies for charged particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Hywel; Lomax, Antony; Jolly, Simon

    2016-02-01

    The past few years have seen significant developments both of the technologies available for proton and other charged particle therapies, and of the number and spread of therapy centres. In this review we give an overview of these technology developments, and outline the principal challenges and opportunities we see as important in the next decade. Notable amongst these is the ever-increasing use of superconductivity both in particle sources and for treatment delivery, which is likely to greatly increase the accessibility of charged particle therapy treatments to hospital centres worldwide.

  17. Modification of electrostatic charge on inhaled carrier lactose particles by addition of fine particles.

    PubMed

    Bennett, F S; Carter, P A; Rowley, G; Dandiker, Y

    1999-01-01

    Triboelectrification affects particle adhesion and agglomeration and hence the formulation, manufacture, and use of dry powder inhaler (DPI) devices. Electrostatic charge measurement of two component mixes of spray-dried or crystalline lactose fine particles (< 10 microns) 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30% w/w with spray-dried or crystalline lactose 63-90 microns, respectively, has been undertaken using a system incorporating pneumatic transport of the mixed powders to a stainless steel cyclone charging device. The magnitude of charge on the mixes was shown to decrease with increased fine particle content, and there was no significant difference in charge for each concentration between spray-dried and crystalline lactose. Both the variation of charge and powder adhesion to the cyclone surface increased with increase in fine particle content. The proportion of fine particles in carrier systems in DPIs may thus have an important role where triboelectrification is involved.

  18. Static analysis of possible emittance growth of intense charged particle beams with thermal equilibrium distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-15

    Possible emittance growths of intense, nonuniform beams during a transport in a focusing channel are derived as a function of nonlinear field energy and space charge tune depression factors. The nonlinear field energy of the beam with thermal equilibrium distribution is estimated by considering the particle distribution across the cross section of the beam. The results show that the possible emittance growth can be suppressed by keeping the beam particle in thermal equilibrium distribution during the beam transport.

  19. Late time CMB anisotropies constrain mini-charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, C.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.; Jaeckel, J. E-mail: joerg.jaeckel@durham.ac.uk E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de

    2009-11-01

    Observations of the temperature anisotropies induced as light from the CMB passes through large scale structures in the late universe are a sensitive probe of the interactions of photons in such environments. In extensions of the Standard Model which give rise to mini-charged particles, photons propagating through transverse magnetic fields can be lost to pair production of such particles. Such a decrement in the photon flux would occur as photons from the CMB traverse the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters. Therefore late time CMB anisotropies can be used to constrain the properties of mini-charged particles. We outline how this test is constructed, and present new constraints on mini-charged particles from observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Coma cluster.

  20. Model independent constraints on charges of new particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chway, Dongjin; Dermíšek, Radovan; Jung, Tae Hyun; Kim, Hyung Do

    2017-06-01

    Any particle that is charged under S U (3 )C and U (1 )EM can mediate the g g →γ γ process through loops. Near the threshold for the new particle pair production, gauge boson exchanges necessitate the resummation of ladder diagrams. We discuss the leading log order matching of the one-loop result with the nonrelativistic effective theory resummed result. We show how the diphoton invariant mass spectrum varies depending on decay width, color representation, and electric charge of the new particle. The exclusion limits on the product of S U (3 )C and U (1 )EM charges of the new scalar or fermion particle are obtained from current LHC data.

  1. Systems for detecting charged particles in object inspection

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2013-08-20

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons. In one implementation, a monitoring system has a cosmic ray-produced charged particle tracker with a plurality of drift cells. The drift cells, which can be for example aluminum drift tubes, can be arranged at least above and below a volume to be scanned to thereby track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons, while also detecting gamma rays. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can also detect any radioactive sources occupying the volume from gamma rays emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift tubes can be sealed to eliminate the need for a gas handling system. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  2. The lateral distributions of charged particles of energy greater than 0.3 E sub crit in electron-photon cascades in lead and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, A.; Krys, E.

    1985-01-01

    In recent investigations, both theoretical and experimental, the agreement between cascade theory and experimental data is pointed out. The radial distributions obtained from the Monte Carlo simulation are compared ith the results of the analytical theory for all particles in cascades. The data on the mean radius of electron lateral distribution in air are compared with those in lead.

  3. Electrostatic adhesion of multiple non-uniformly charged dielectric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, B. A.; Whitney, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Charged particle adhesion measurements can be as much as one order of magnitude higher than theoretical calculations. This discrepancy has ignited a debate as to the nature of the physics occurring with microscopic particle adhesion. Attempts to bring calculations closer to measured results have produced models that include multiple particle interactions, dielectric polarization, and non-uniform charge. Individually, each of these models can only produce a 2× to 5× enhancement in predicted adhesion force over simple Coulombic attraction. In this correspondence, an analytical model of electrostatic particle forces is developed, which allows for independent assignment of dielectric constant and non-uniform surface charge distribution to an arbitrary number of particles. Because the model can include an image plane, it is ideal for electrostatic adhesion calculations. Application to a monolayer of printed toner particles predicts nearly an order of magnitude increase in adhesion force over Coulombic attraction. These results are the first analytical results to place predictions of charged particle adhesion on the same order of magnitude with measurements.

  4. How to model the interaction of charged Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieronimus, Reint; Raschke, Simon; Heuer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the interaction of charged Janus particles including screening effects. The explicit interaction is mapped via a least square method on a variable number n of systematically generated tensors that reflect the angular dependence of the potential. For n = 2 we show that the interaction is equivalent to a model previously described by Erdmann, Kröger, and Hess (EKH). Interestingly, this mapping is for n = 2 not able to capture the subtleties of the interaction for small screening lengths. Rather, a larger number of tensors has to be used. We find that the characteristics of the Janus type interaction plays an important role for the aggregation behavior. We obtained cluster structures up to the size of 13 particles for n = 2 and 36 and screening lengths κ-1 = 0.1 and 1.0 via Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of the screening length is analyzed and the structures are compared to results for an electrostatic-type potential and for the multipole-expanded Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We find that a dipole-like potential (EKH or dipole DLVO approximation) is not able to sufficiently reproduce the anisotropy effects of the potential. Instead, a higher order expansion has to be used to obtain cluster structures that are compatible with experimental observations. The resulting minimum-energy clusters are compared to those of sticky hard sphere systems. Janus particles with a short-range screened interaction resemble sticky hard sphere clusters for all considered particle numbers, whereas for long-range screening even very small clusters are structurally different.

  5. Energy and Charge Localization in Irradiated DNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    suggested that fast heavy ions with lar stopping power result in Eawy god ap Loadhnou in DNXA (00)19 transient localized hewaid relion around the io tracks...isolated pair of oppositely charged geminae particles can be considered as an isolated system, was developed in the late 1930’s by Onsager /49,W0 and...refinement of replacing the original Onsager assumption of a point sink at the origin by a recombination sphere of finite radius and recombination velocity

  6. Multipole radiation in charged-particle scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper formulates the general problem of photon emission in particle scattering using a classical and quantum mechanical approach. The connection between the classical short collision time (SCT) and Born results is examined for various special classifications of problems. In the dipole case the two formulations yield results that can be expressed in the same form and for arbitrary scattering potential. For quadrupole emission the SCT and Born results are the same only for a short-range potential, however. The quadrupole problem is more sensitive to details in the process because the calculation requires an expansion of the total amplitude for the process to lowest order in the photon wave number or momentum. The special case of photon emission associated with spin-flip transitions during scattering is considered for spin-1/2 particles. Like classical magnetic dipole radiation, there is no infrared divergence feature for this type of emission.

  7. Detection of charged particles in superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Bandler, Simon R.

    1994-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with the use of a large superfluid helium detector for the detection of solar neutrinos. A small-scale prototype of this type of detector has been constructed and tested. In this thesis the author discussed in detail the design of the apparatus, the experiments which have been carried out, and what has been learned about the important physical processes involved in this type of detector. These processes include the anisotropic generation of phonons and rotons by the recoiling particle, the propagation of the phonons and rotons in the liquid, the evaporation process at the liquid surface, and the adsorption of the helium atoms onto the wafers. In addition he discusses the generation and detection of fluorescent photons from recoiling particles. The implications of these results to the design of a full-scale detector of neutrinos are discussed.

  8. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  9. Measuring Colloidal Charges in Low Polar Media from Statistics of Particle Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Daniel Jo

    This thesis presents insights into the mechanism by which colloidal particles can acquire electrostatic charges in apolar media. It introduces advances in experimental techniques for measuring electrostatic interactions between colloidal particles suspended in such media and applies those techniques to a model system. We present precision measurements of the pair interactions between micron-scale poly (methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) spheres dispersed in a fluid medium with a low dielectric constant. Our measurement technique is based on blinking optical tweezer manipulation of dielectric spheres using digital high-speed video microscopy. We extract interaction measurements from particle trajectories using artifact-free particle tracking, making use of optimal statistical methods to reduce measurement errors to the femtonewton frontier while covering an extremely wide range of interaction energies. Despite the absence of charge control agents or added organic salts, these measurements reveal strong and long-ranged electrostatic repulsions consistent with substantial charges on the particles whose interactions are screened by trace concentrations of mobile ions in solution. Electrostatic interactions are revealed to be consistent with the screened-Coulomb potential predicted by DLVO theory. The hydrodynamic interaction is described by low-Reynolds number hydrodynamic coupling for two-spheres in a quiescent fluid. Linear dependence of the estimated charge on particle radius is consistent with charge renormalization theory, and offers insights into the charging mechanism in this interesting class of systems.

  10. Effective atomic number, energy loss and radiation damage studies in some materials commonly used in nuclear applications for heavy charged particles such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Commonly used nuclear physics materials such as water, concrete, Pb-glass, paraffin, freon and P 10 gases, some alloys such as brass, bronze, stainless-steel and some scintillators such as anthracene, stilbene and toluene have been investigated with respect to the heavy charged particle interaction as means of projected range and effective atomic number (Zeff) in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. Calculations were performed for heavy ions such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U. Also, the energy loss and radiation damage were studied using SRIM Monte Carlo code for anthracene for different heavy ions of 100 keV kinetic energy. It has been observed that the variation in Zeff becomes less when the atomic number of the ions increase. Glass-Pb, bronze, brass, stainless-steel and Freon gas were found to vary less than 10% in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. For total proton interaction, discrepancies up to 10% and 18% between two databases namely PSTAR and SRIM were noted in mass stopping power and Zeff of water, respectively. The range calculations resulted with a conclusion that the metal alloys and glass-Pb have lowest values of ranges confirming best shielding against energetic heavy ions whereas freon and P 10 gases have the highest values of ranges in the entire energy region. The simulation results showed that the energy loss (%) to target electrons decreases as the Z of the incident ion increases. Also, it was observed that the radiation damage first increases with Z of the ion and then keeps almost constant for ions with Z≥52.

  11. Super-stoichiometric charge neutralization in particle-polyelectrolyte systems.

    PubMed

    Kleimann, Jörg; Gehin-Delval, Cécile; Auweter, Helmut; Borkovec, Michal

    2005-04-12

    The adsorption of poly(vinylamine) (PVA) on poly(styrene sulfate) latex particles is studied, and its consequences on the charging behavior and suspension stability are investigated. The adsorption process is assessed by batch depletion experiments and time-resolved electrophoretic mobility measurements. The adsorption of PVA appears to be basically irreversible. The rate of adsorption decreases with decreasing polymer dose. At low polymer dose, the polymer coverage corresponds to the amount of the polyelectrolyte added, while at high polymer dose, the polymer coverage saturates the surface. Stability ratios are determined by dynamic light scattering, and strongly depend on the polymer dose and salt level. The aggregation is rapid near the isoelectric point (IEP), and it slows down when moving away from it. The charge neutralization is highly nonstoichiometric with charging ratios (CR) larger than unity, meaning that several charges on an adsorbed polyelectrolyte chain are necessary to neutralize a single charge on the particle surface. By comparing the IEP for particles and polyelectrolytes of different charge densities, we find a strong dependence of the CR on the mismatch between the average distances between individual charges on the surface and on the polyelectrolyte. A simple model is proposed to explain this trend.

  12. Analysis of ``soft`` recovered shaped charge jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    A shaped charge with an 81 mm diameter, 42{degree} apex angle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper conical liner was fired into a ``soft`` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 g, of which 184 g was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g., dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work the authors present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet they find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  13. Numerical modelling of electrochemical polarization around charged metallic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bücker, Matthias; Undorf, Sabine; Flores Orozco, Adrián; Kemna, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We extend an existing analytical model and carry out numerical simulations to study the polarization process around charged metallic particles immersed in an electrolyte solution. Electro-migration and diffusion processes in the electrolyte are described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck system of partial differential equations. To model the surface charge density, we consider a time- and frequency-invariant electric potential at the particle surface, which leads to the build-up of a static electrical double layer (EDL). Upon excitation by an external electric field at low frequencies, we observe the superposition of two polarization processes. On the one hand, the induced dipole moment on the metallic particle leads to the accumulation of opposite charges in the electrolyte. This charge polarization corresponds to the long-known response of uncharged metallic particles. On the other hand, the unequal cation and anion concentrations in the EDL give rise to a salinity gradient between the two opposite sides of the metallic particle. The resulting concentration polarization enhances the magnitude of the overall polarization response. Furthermore, we use our numerical model to study the effect of relevant model parameters such as surface charge density and ionic strength of the electrolyte on the resulting spectra of the effective conductivity of the composite model system. Our results do not only give interesting new insight into the time-harmonic variation of electric potential and ion concentrations around charged metallic particle. They are also able to reduce incongruities between earlier model predictions and geophysical field and laboratory measurements. Our model thereby improves the general understanding of IP signatures of metallic particles and represents the next step towards a quantitative interpretation of IP imaging results. Part of this research is funded by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy under the Raw Materials Initiative.

  14. Light charged particles emitted in fission reactions induced by protons on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Paradela, C.; Ayyad, Y.; Casarejos, E.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-09-01

    Light charged particles emitted in proton-induced fission reactions on 208Pb have been measured at different kinetic energies: 370 A ,500 A , and 650 A MeV. The experiment was performed by the SOFIA Collaboration at the GSI facilities in Darmstadt (Germany). The inverse kinematics technique was combined with a setup especially designed to measure light charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments. This measurement allowed us, for the first time, to obtain correlations between the light charged particles emitted during the fission process and the charge distributions of the fission fragments. These correlations were compared with different model calculations to assess the ground-to-saddle dynamics. The results confirm that transient and dissipative effects are required for an accurate description of the fission observables.

  15. Complex Kepler Orbits and Particle Aggregation in Charged Microscopic Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victor; Waitukaitis, Scott; Miskin, Marc; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2015-03-01

    Kepler orbits are usually associated with the motion of astronomical objects such as planets or comets. Here we observe such orbits at the microscale in a system of charged, insulating grains. By letting the grains fall freely under vacuum, we eliminate the effects of air drag and gravity, and by imaging them with a co-falling high-speed camera we track the relative positions of individual particles with high spatial and temporal precision. This makes it possible to investigate the behaviors caused by the combination of long-range electrostatic interactions and short-range, dissipative, contact interactions in unprecedented detail. We make the first direct observations of microscopic elliptical and hyperbolic Kepler orbits, collide-and-capture events between pairs of charged grains, and particle-by-particle aggregation into larger clusters. Our findings provide experimental evidence for electrostatic mechanisms that have been suspected, but not previously observed at the single-event level, as driving the early stages of particle aggregation in systems ranging from fluidized particle bed reactors to interstellar protoplanetary disks. Furthermore, since particles of different net charge and size are seen to aggregate into characteristic spatial configurations, our results suggest new possibilities for the formation of charge-stabilized ``granular molecules''. We can reproduce the observed molecule configurations by taking many-body, dielectric polarization effects into account.

  16. Turbulent Equilibria for Charged Particles in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that the solar wind electron distribution function is apparently composed of several components, but the energetic tail population is well fitted with kappa distribution function. It is also well established that the solar wind protons possess quasi power-law tail distribution function that is well fitted with an inverse power law model. In the recent past, the present author developed a theory that describes a system of electrons and Langmuir turbulence that are in dynamical steady-state. In such a model, the kappa distribution function for the electrons emerges as a unique solution of the steady-state weak turbulence plasma kinetic equation. For the proton inverse power-law tail problem, Fisk and Gloeckler’s theory of compressional turbulence received much attention in the literature. In the present paper, their model is revisited in the light of plasma kinetic theory that involves low-frequency kinetic Alfvén wave fluctuations. It is shown that the proton kappa distribution function satisfies the steady-state proton particle kinetic equation. The steady-state wave kinetic equation for the kinetic Alfvén wave is also solved. This shows that the proton suprathermal distribution with an inverse power law velocity dependence may indeed result from a steady-state wave-particle interaction of the compressional kinetic Alfvénic fluctuations in the solar wind, thus providing support for, and also providing an alternative view of Fisk and Gloeckler’s model. However, in the absence of additional constraint that may arise from the balance of nonlinear wave-particle interaction terms within the wave kinetic equations for kinetic Alfvénic waves, the index of inverse power-law velocity tail distribution is undetermined. This calls for further investigation of nonlinear kinetic Alfvénic turbulence.

  17. Adenylate energy pool and energy charge in maturing rape seeds.

    PubMed

    Ching, T M; Crane, J M

    1974-11-01

    A study of energy state and chemical composition of pod walls and seeds of maturing rape (Brassica napus L.) was conducted on two varieties, Victor and Gorczanski. Total adenosine phosphates, ATP, and adenylate energy charge increased with increasing cell number and cellular synthesis during the early stages, remained high at maximum dry weight accumulation and maximum substrate influx time, and decreased with ripening. A temporal control of energy supply and ATP concentration is evident in developing tissues with determined functions; whereas the association of a high energy charge and active cellular biosynthesis occurs only in tissues with a stabilized cell number.

  18. Electric birefringence anomaly of solutions of ionically charged anisometric particles.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, H; Gräbner, Dieter

    2015-02-01

    The term "electric birefringence anomaly" is known as the electric birefringence (EB) signal that occurs in solutions of ionically charged anisometric particles in a narrow concentration region. The signal is of opposite sign to the normal birefringence that occurs below and above this narrow concentration region. The normal electric birefringence signals in the dilute and more concentrated regions are due to the orientation of the particles in the direction of the applied electric field. The origin for the anomalous signal was not completely understood until now. The article summarises previous results in which the anomalous results had been observed but not well understood. It shows that the birefringence anomaly occurs in systems as diverse as micellar solutions, polyelectrolytes, solutions of clays, viruses and fibres. In all these systems the anomaly signals are present at the concentration when the length of the colloidal particles including the thickness of the electric double layer are about the same as the mean distance between the colloidal particles. Under these conditions the electric double layers of the particles overlap along the main axis of the particles but not in the direction across the particles. As a consequence of this situation a dipole is built up across the particles by the migration of the counter-ions of the particles in the electric field and this dipole leads to an orientation of the particles perpendicular to the electric field. The anomalous signal can usually be observed simultaneously with the normal signal. The amplitude of the anomalous signal can be larger than the amplitude of the normal signal. As a consequence the total birefringence changes its sign in the anomalous concentration region. The anomaly signal of the clays can also be explained by a fluctuating dipole around the particles, which is due to the fact that the centre of the ionic charges of the particles does not fall on the centre of the ionic charge of the counter

  19. Highly Charged Particles Cause a Larger Current Blockage in Micropores Compared to Neutral Particles.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yinghua; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Hinkle, Preston; Plett, Timothy S; Yang, Crystal; Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Digman, Michelle A; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Hsu, Jyh-Ping; Siwy, Zuzanna S

    2016-09-27

    Single pores in the resistive-pulse technique are used as an analytics tool to detect, size, and characterize physical as well as chemical properties of individual objects such as molecules and particles. Each object passing through a pore causes a transient change of the transmembrane current called a resistive pulse. In high salt concentrations when the pore diameter is significantly larger than the screening Debye length, it is assumed that the particle size and surface charge can be determined independently from the same experiment. In this article we challenge this assumption and show that highly charged hard spheres can cause a significant increase of the resistive-pulse amplitude compared to neutral particles of a similar diameter. As a result, resistive pulses overestimate the size of charged particles by even 20%. The observation is explained by the effect of concentration polarization created across particles in a pore, revealed by numerical modeling of ionic concentrations, ion current, and local electric fields. It is notable that in resistive-pulse experiments with cylindrical pores, concentration polarization was previously shown to influence ionic concentrations only at pore entrances; consequently, additional and transient modulation of resistive pulses was observed when a particle entered or left the pore. Here we postulate that concentration polarization can occur across transported particles at any particle position along the pore axis and affect the magnitude of the entire resistive pulse. Consequently, the recorded resistive pulses of highly charged particles reflect not only the particles' volume but also the size of the depletion zone created in front of the moving particle. Moreover, the modeling identified that the effective surface charge density of particles depended not only on the density of functional groups on the particle but also on the capacitance of the Stern layer. The findings are of crucial importance for sizing particles and

  20. Detection of charged particles with a methylammonium lead tribromide perovskite single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiang; Wei, Haotong; Wei, Wei; Chuirazzi, William; DeSantis, Dylan; Huang, Jinsong; Cao, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr3) perovskite crystals have attracted significant attention due to their attractive performance in various optoelectronic applications such as solar cells, light-emitting devices, photodetectors, and recently in X-ray detectors. In this study, we demonstrate a possible use of perovskite-based devices for detection of charged particles (which can be applied in basic scientific research, health physics, and environmental analysis) and investigate the mechanism of fundamental charge transport inside perovskite crystals. It was found that inexpensive MAPbBr3 single crystals could be used for measuring the energy spectrum of charged particles through direct collection of the produced charge. After fitting the plot of the centroid peak position versus voltage with the Hecht equation for single-polarity charge transport, the obtained hole mobility-lifetime product was in the range of (0.4-1.6)×10-3 cm2/V.

  1. Physical qubits from charged particles: Infrared divergences in quantum information

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Juan; Martin-Martinez, Eduardo

    2009-05-15

    We consider soft-photon effects (ir structure of QED) on the construction of physical qubits. Soft photons appear when we build charged qubits from the asymptotic states of QED. This construction is necessary in order to include the effect of soft photons on entanglement measures. The nonexistence of free charged particles (due to the long range of QED interactions) leads us to question the sense of the very concept of free charged qubit. In this work, using the ''dressing'' formalism, we build physical charged qubits from dressed fields which have the correct asymptotic behavior, are gauge invariant, have propagators with a particle pole structure, and are free from infrared divergences. Finally, we discuss the impact of the soft corrections on the entanglement measures.

  2. Early experiments in charged particle beams from the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Banks, P. M.; Williamson, P. R.; Baker, K. D.; Obayashi, T.; Burch, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of studies on board the Shuttle involving the interaction of particle beams with the atmosphere and the ionosphere, and the effects of the beams on the electrical potential of the platform, are discussed. Noting that the Shuttle allows greater weight and power demands by scientific payloads than previous satellite launches, the OSS-1 Vehicle Charging and Potential experiment and the Spacelab 1 Particle Accelerator and Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams are described. Instrumentation details are provided, including charge and current probes, the Spherical Retarding Potential Analyzer, the Fast Pulse Electron Generator, and digital control and interface units. The SEPAC equipment, which comprises an electron beam accelerator, and MPD plasma jet, and diagnostic units are detailed, and operating procedures and experiment objectives are outlined.

  3. Preparation of Panel and Charged Particles for Electrophoretic Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyung Suk; Park, Jin Woo; Park, Lee Soon; Lee, Jung Kyung; Han, Yoon Soo; Kwon, Younghwan

    Studies on the formulation of photosensitive paste for transparent soft mold press (TSMP) method have been performed. With the optimum formulation of the photosensitive paste the box-type barrier rib with good flexibility and high solvent resistance was fabricated, suitable for the panel material of the electrophoretic display. Cationically-charged white particles were prepared by using TiO2 nanoparticles, silane coupling agent with amino groups, dispersant and acetic acid. The cationically charged TiO2 particles exhibited 74.09 mV of zeta potential and 3.11 × 10-5 cm2/Vs of mobility. Electrophoretic display fabricated with the charged TiO2 particles exhibited 10 V of low driving voltage and maximum contrast ratio (5.3/1) at 30 V.

  4. Contributions of R.H. Ritchie to the understanding of charged particle penetration phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Oakley H.

    1995-05-01

    Contributions of R.H. Ritchie to the understanding of phenomena associated with the penetration of charged particles in condensed matter are reviewed. Ritchie was the first to predict the existence of the surface plasmon and to suggest how it might be observed experimentally, and has since made many contributions related to it. He pioneered in developing theoretical concepts and methods in numerous other areas including energy loss of charged particles, transport theory, nonlinear response of solids, the charged-particle wake, stopping power for slow ions, self-energy of slow electrons, and theoretical electron microscopy. Other trailblazing work of his, including various aspects of radiation dosimetry, and instrument theory and design, are discussed briefly.

  5. Theory of using magnetic deflections to combine charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckbeck, Mackenzie K.; Doyle, Barney Lee

    2014-09-01

    Several radiation effects projects in the Ion Beam Lab (IBL) have recently required two disparate charged particle beams to simultaneously strike a single sample through a single port of the target chamber. Because these beams have vastly different mass–energy products (MEP), the low-MEP beam requires a large angle of deflection toward the sample by a bending electromagnet. A second electromagnet located further upstream provides a means to compensate for the small angle deflection experienced by the high-MEP beam during its path through the bending magnet. This paper derives the equations used to select the magnetic fields required by these two magnets to achieve uniting both beams at the target sample. A simple result was obtained when the separation of the two magnets was equivalent to the distance from the bending magnet to the sample, and the equation is given by: Bs= 1/2(rc/rs) Bc, where Bs and Bc are the magnetic fields in the steering and bending magnet and rc/rs is the ratio of the radii of the bending magnet to that of the steering magnet. This result is not dependent upon the parameters of the high MEP beam, i.e. energy, mass, charge state. Therefore, once the field of the bending magnet is set for the low-MEP beam, and the field in the steering magnet is set as indicted in the equation, the trajectory path of any high-MEP beam will be directed into the sample.

  6. APPARATUS FOR CLEANING GASES WITH ELECTROSTATICALLY CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, H.F.

    1960-02-01

    An apparatus is described for cleaning gases with the help of electrostatically charged pellets. The pellets are blown past baffles in a conduit and into the center of a rotuting body of the gas to be cleaned. The pellets are charged electrostatically by impinging on the baffles. The pellets collect the particles suspended in the gas in their passage from the center of the rotating body to its edge.

  7. Charged-Particle Spectra Using Particle Tracking on a Two-Dimensional Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Skupsky, S.; Soures, J. M.; Cremer, S.; Petrasso, R. D.

    1999-11-01

    IRIS-2D is an extension of the spherically symmetric Monte Carlo particle-tracking code IRIS. It tracks particles on a two-dimensional Lagrangian grid and will be used as a post- processor to 2-D hydrocodes to simulate experimental neutron and charged-particle spectra. In this talk, we use IRIS-2D to study the effect of asymmetry and instability-induced mix on the knock-on deuteron (deuterons elastically scattered off the 14-MeV DT neutron) spectrum and its angular distribution. We will present time-integrated knock-on deuteron spectra obtained by post-processing implosion calculations using the 2-D hydrocode ORCHID. Preliminary comparisons of these spectra with experiment will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  8. SCATHA (Spacecraft Charging AT High Altitudes) Plasma Interaction Experiment: SC-3 High Energy Particle Spectrometer; SC-8 Energetic Ion Composition Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-30

    Professor at the University of Bern. I am indebted to Professor J. Geisa and Dr. R. Balsiger for making the visit possible and wish to thank then and...dispersion by the local time at which the low-energy (< 100 eV) part of events [ Balsiger et al.. 1982; Johnson et at.. 19821. In this the dispersing plasma

  9. Directly resolving particles in an electric field: local charge, force, torque, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianlong

    2011-11-01

    Prosperetti's seminal Physalis method for fluid flows with suspended particles is extended to electric fields to directly resolve finite-sized particles and to investigate accurately the mutual fluid-particle, particle-particle, and particle-boundary interactions. The method can be used for uncharged/charged dielectrics, uncharged/charged conductors, conductors with specified voltage, and general weak and strong discontinuous interface conditions. These interface conditions can be in terms of field variable, its gradients, and surface integration which has not been addesed by other numerical methods. In addition, for the first time, we rigorously derive the force and torque on the finite-sized particles resulting from the interactions between harmonics. The method, for the first time, directly resolves the particles with accurate local charge distribution, force, and torque on the particles, making many applications in engineering, mechanics, physics, chemistry, and biology possible, such as heterogeneous materials, microfluidics, electrophotography, electric double layer capacitors, and microstructures of nanodispersions. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated with up to one hundred thousand 3D particles, which suggests that the method can be used for many important engineering applications of broad interest. This research is supported by the Department of Energy under funding for an EFRC (the HeteroFoaM Center), grant no. DE-SC0001061.

  10. The "Puck" Energetic Charged Particle Detector: Design, Heritage, and Advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of approximately 10 kiloelectronvolts to several megaelectronvolts. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of kiloelectronvolts to about 1 megaelectronvolt. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 kiloelectronvolt per nucleon,with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  11. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  12. The "Puck" Energetic Charged Particle Detector: Design, Heritage, and Advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of approximately 10 kiloelectronvolts to several megaelectronvolts. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of kiloelectronvolts to about 1 megaelectronvolt. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 kiloelectronvolt per nucleon,with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  13. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements.

    PubMed

    Clark, G; Cohen, I; Westlake, J H; Andrews, G B; Brandt, P; Gold, R E; Gkioulidou, M A; Hacala, R; Haggerty, D; Hill, M E; Ho, G C; Jaskulek, S E; Kollmann, P; Mauk, B H; McNutt, R L; Mitchell, D G; Nelson, K S; Paranicas, C; Paschalidis, N; Schlemm, C E

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  14. Clustering of settling charged particles in turbulence: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiang; Nordsiek, Hansen; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric clouds, electrosprays and protoplanetary nebula (dusty plasma) contain electrically charged particles embedded in turbulent flows, often under the influence of an externally imposed, approximately uniform gravitational or electric force. We have developed a theoretical description of the dynamics of such systems of charged, sedimenting particles in turbulence, allowing radial distribution functions (RDFs) to be predicted for both monodisperse and bidisperse particle size distributions. The governing parameters are the particle Stokes number (particle inertial time scale relative to turbulence dissipation time scale), the Coulomb-turbulence parameter (ratio of Coulomb 'terminal' speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale) and the settling parameter (the ratio of the gravitational terminal speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale). The theory is compared to measured RDFs for water particles in homogeneous, isotropic air turbulence. The RDFs are obtained from particle positions measured in three dimensions using digital holography. The measurements verify the general theoretical expression, consisting of a power law increase in particle clustering due to particle response to dissipative turbulent eddies, modulated by an exponential electrostatic interaction term. Both terms are modified as a result of the gravitational diffusion-like term, and the role of 'gravity' is explored by imposing a macroscopic uniform electric field to create an enhanced, effective gravity.

  15. Techniques for precise energy calibration of particle pixel detectors.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, M; Campbell-Ricketts, T; Bahadori, A; Empl, A

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate techniques to improve the accuracy of the energy calibration of Timepix pixel detectors, used for the measurement of energetic particles. The typical signal from such particles spreads among many pixels due to charge sharing effects. As a consequence, the deposited energy in each pixel cannot be reconstructed unless the detector is calibrated, limiting the usability of such signals for calibration. To avoid this shortcoming, we calibrate using low energy X-rays. However, charge sharing effects still occur, resulting in part of the energy being deposited in adjacent pixels and possibly lost. This systematic error in the calibration process results in an error of about 5% in the energy measurements of calibrated devices. We use FLUKA simulations to assess the magnitude of charge sharing effects, allowing a corrected energy calibration to be performed on several Timepix pixel detectors and resulting in substantial improvement in energy deposition measurements. Next, we address shortcomings in calibration associated with the huge range (from kiloelectron-volts to megaelectron-volts) of energy deposited per pixel which result in a nonlinear energy response over the full range. We introduce a new method to characterize the non-linear response of the Timepix detectors at high input energies. We demonstrate improvement using a broad range of particle types and energies, showing that the new method reduces the energy measurement errors, in some cases by more than 90%.

  16. Techniques for precise energy calibration of particle pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, M.; Campbell-Ricketts, T.; Bahadori, A.; Empl, A.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate techniques to improve the accuracy of the energy calibration of Timepix pixel detectors, used for the measurement of energetic particles. The typical signal from such particles spreads among many pixels due to charge sharing effects. As a consequence, the deposited energy in each pixel cannot be reconstructed unless the detector is calibrated, limiting the usability of such signals for calibration. To avoid this shortcoming, we calibrate using low energy X-rays. However, charge sharing effects still occur, resulting in part of the energy being deposited in adjacent pixels and possibly lost. This systematic error in the calibration process results in an error of about 5% in the energy measurements of calibrated devices. We use FLUKA simulations to assess the magnitude of charge sharing effects, allowing a corrected energy calibration to be performed on several Timepix pixel detectors and resulting in substantial improvement in energy deposition measurements. Next, we address shortcomings in calibration associated with the huge range (from kiloelectron-volts to megaelectron-volts) of energy deposited per pixel which result in a nonlinear energy response over the full range. We introduce a new method to characterize the non-linear response of the Timepix detectors at high input energies. We demonstrate improvement using a broad range of particle types and energies, showing that the new method reduces the energy measurement errors, in some cases by more than 90%.

  17. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Richard J.; Mazarakis, Michael G.; Miller, Robert B.; Shope, Steven L.; Smith, David L.

    1986-01-01

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  18. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Adler, R.J.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.M.; Shope, S.L.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-10-31

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  19. O the Penetration of Fast-Charged Particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, David John

    The work presented here is intended to provide theoretical support for medical physicists who are interested in improving radiotherapy treatment plans involving charged particle beams. These plans still rely heavily on empirical behavior rather than theory as a basis for making predictions. In the most frequent therapy applications, electron beams, typically with initial energies between 5-20 MeV, penetrate materials of low atomic number. Energy loss is predominately by ionization and the effects of multiple scattering by repeated Coulomb deflections from nuclei are of primary interest. Our development is strongly influenced by these applications and so we begin our work with a review of Fermi-Eyges theory. This theory and ideas which were equivalent to it have dramatically improved electron beam treatment plans over the last several years, as is now generally recognized. This theory also has significant limitations due to the approximations or assumptions that it makes. Since we can improve and extend these results by relaxing some of the key assumptions, we continue by considering some generalizations of this basic theory and we discuss those which were given by Snyder-Scott, Lewis and Yang in some detail. Yang's theory had significant potential for applications but this theory will not work properly unless its time development is handled differently. This leads us to present a wave solution to the penetration problem in our final chapter. Sample calculations of the most important distributions are given there as well.

  20. Self-Assembly of Heterogeneously Charged Particles under Confinement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly—the spontaneous organization of microscopic units into well-defined mesoscopic structures—is a fundamental mechanism for a broad variety of nanotechnology applications in material science. The central role played by the anisotropy resulting from asymmetric shapes of the units and/or well-defined bonding sites on the particle surface has been widely investigated, highlighting the importance of properly designing the constituent entities in order to control the resulting mesoscopic structures. Anisotropy driven self-assembly can also result from the multipolar interactions characterizing many naturally occurring systems, such as proteins and viral capsids, as well as experimentally synthesized colloidal particles. Heterogeneously charged particles represent a class of multipolar units that are characterized by a competitive interplay between anisotropic attractive and repulsive interactions, due to the repulsion/attraction between charged-like/oppositely charged regions on the particle surface. In the present work, axially symmetric quadrupolar colloids are considered in a confined planar geometry; the role of both the overall particle charge and the patch extension as well as the effect of the substrate charge are studied in thermodynamic conditions such that the formation of extended structures is favored. A general tendency to form quasi-two-dimensional aggregates where particles align their symmetry axes within the plane is observed; among these planar self-assembled scenarios, a clear distinction between the formation of microcrystalline gels—branched networks consisting of purely crystalline domains—as opposed to disordered aggregates can be observed based on the specific features of the particle–particle interaction. Additionally, the possible competition of interparticle and particle–substrate interactions affects the size and the internal structure of the aggregates and can possibly inhibit the aggregation process. PMID:23627740

  1. Charged Particle Spectroscopy on Omega (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, K.; Padalino, S.; Schwartz, B.; Olsen, M.; Wakeman, T.; Petrasso, R.

    2001-01-01

    Using the 2-MeV Van de Graaf Accelerator at SUNY Geneseo's Nuclear Structure Laboratory, a {sup 3}He-implanted tantalum target was bombarded by 450-keV deuterons to produce high energy protons via the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He reaction. A 1500-{micro}m surface barrier detector with a 3/16 inch diameter collimator was placed at 8.75 cm from the target and 135{sup o} from the incident beam. A movable arm was setup so that an array of aluminum filters of varying thicknesses could be rotated in front of the detector. A 6-{micro}m mylar filter was also mounted on the movable arm and was used to calibrate the detector as described in the CR-39 experiment report. Eight aluminum filters with thicknesses ranging from 250pm to 1100{micro}m were in turn rotated in front of the collimator and spectra were taken for each. The results are shown on the attached graphs. The theoretical curve for each graph was generated using TRIM The exact energy distribution of the proton beam incident on the target was not known; because no such spectrum could be taken due to the high count rate for elastically scattered deuterons. Instead, it was assumed that the incident beam had a distribution similar to that measured through the 6-{micro}m mylar, namely, an average energy of 13.798 MeV with a standard deviation of 0.027 MeV. A program developed locally was used to generate an input file for TRIM with this distribution. Using this input file, TRIM simulations were run for various thicknesses of Aluminum, from 200 to 1100 {micro}m in 50-{micro}m increments. The solid line on the graph indicates the energies of the transmitted protons. The two dashed lines indicate one standard deviation above and below the average exit energy. TRIM agrees well with the experimental results.

  2. Surface modification for polystyrene colloidal particles with controlled charge densities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongman; Kwon, Oh-Sun; Shin, Kwanwoo; Song, Ju-Myung; Kim, Joon-Seop; Seo, Young-Soo; Tael, Giyoong; Jon, Sangyong

    2007-11-01

    A significant amount of polystyrene sulfonated acid (PSSA) and poly(styrene-ran-acrylic acid) (PSAA) random copolymer can be adsorbed by dispersion of PS particles via a swelling-quenching process. A THF-water mixed solvent was used in the swelling process and a large amount of pure water was used, to give a low concentration of THF% in quenching process. Our results showed that functional PSSA groups were randomly and tightly adsorbed to the PS particles. When the mol.% of charged segments was increased, the progressive adsorption of PSSA chains to the PS particles leads to an increase in the electrophoretic mobility and zeta-potential of aqueous dispersions. Thus, we were able to obtain well-distributed surface charge density on the PS particles.

  3. Charge Identification of Highly Ionizing Particles in Desensitized Nuclear Emulsion Using High Speed Read-Out System

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanematsu, N.; Komori, M.; Sato, S.; Asai, M.; /Nagoya U. /Aichi U. of Education /Gunma U., Maebashi /JAXA, Sagamihara /KEK, Tsukuba /Kobe U. /Chiba, Natl. Inst. Rad. Sci. /SLAC /Toho U.

    2006-05-10

    We performed an experimental study of charge identification of heavy ions from helium to carbon having energy of about 290 MeV/u using an emulsion chamber. Emulsion was desensitized by means of forced fading (refreshing) to expand a dynamic range of response to highly charged particles. For the track reconstruction and charge identification, the fully automated high speed emulsion read-out system, which was originally developed for identifying minimum ionizing particles, was used without any modification. Clear track by track charge identification up to Z=6 was demonstrated. The refreshing technique has proved to be a powerful technique to expand response of emulsion film to highly ionizing particles.

  4. Internal bremsstrahlung of strongly interacting charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgalin, S. D.; Tchuvil'sky, Yu. M.; Churakova, T. A.

    2016-11-01

    A universal theoretical model intended for calculating internal-bremsstrahlung spectra is proposed. In this model, which can be applied to describing nuclear decays of various type (such as alpha decay, cluster decay, and proton emission), use is made of realistic nucleus-nucleus potentials. Theoretical internal-bremsstrahlung spectra were obtained for the alpha decay of the 214Po nucleus, as well as for the decay of the 222Ra nucleus via the emission of a 14C cluster and for the decay of th