Science.gov

Sample records for charged particle impact

  1. Charged-Particle Impact Ionization of Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bartschat, Klaus; Guan Xiaoxu

    2008-08-08

    We have developed a hybrid method to treat charged-particle impact ionization of complex atoms and ions. The essential idea is to describe the interaction between a fast projectile and the target perturbatively, up to second order, while the initial bound state and the ejected-electron--residual-ion interaction can be handled via a convergent R-matrix with pseudo-states (close-coupling) expansion. Example results for ionization of the heavy noble gases (Ne-Xe) by positron and electron impact are presented. The general scheme for a distorted-wave treatment of ionization by heavy-particle impact is described.

  2. Electrostatic Charging of Polymers by Particle Impact at Low Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Mantovani, J. G.; Buhler, C. R.; Hogue, M. D.; Nowicki, A. W.; Groop, E. E.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Studies of the electrostatic interaction between micrometer-sized particles and polymer surfaces are of great interest to NASA's planetary exploration program. The unmanned landing missions to Mars planned for this decade as well as the possible manned missions that might take place during the second decade of this century require a better understanding of the electrostatic response of the materials used in landing crafts and equipment when exposed to wind-blown dust or to surface dust and sand particles. We report on preliminary experiments designed to measure the electrostatic charge developed on five polymer surfaces as they are impacted simultaneously by Mars simulant particles less than 5 micrometers in diameter moving at 20 m/s. Experiments were performed in a CO2 atmosphere at 10 mbars of pressure using a particle delivery method that propels the particles with contact. Experiments were also performed in dry air at atmospheric pressures using a pressurized particle delivery system. The five polymer surfaces, commonly used in space applications, were chosen so that they span the triboelectric series.

  3. Physical sputtering of metallic systems by charged-particle impact

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.

    1989-12-01

    The present paper provides a brief overview of our current understanding of physical sputtering by charged-particle impact, with the emphasis on sputtering of metals and alloys under bombardment with particles that produce knock-on collisions. Fundamental aspects of ion-solid interactions, and recent developments in the study of sputtering of elemental targets and preferential sputtering in multicomponent materials are reviewed. We concentrate only on a few specific topics of sputter emission, including the various properties of the sputtered flux and depth of origin, and on connections between sputtering and other radiation-induced and -enhanced phenomena that modify the near-surface composition of the target. The synergistic effects of these diverse processes in changing the composition of the integrated sputtered-atom flux is described in simple physical terms, using selected examples of recent important progress. 325 refs., 27 figs.

  4. Particle charge spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An airflow through a tube is used to guide a charged particle through the tube. A detector may be used to detect charge passing through the tube on the particle. The movement of the particle through the tube may be used to both detect its charge and size.

  5. Charged Particle Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    Improved version of Faraday cup increases accuracy of measurements of flux density of charged particles incident along axis through collection aperture. Geometry of cone-and-sensing cup combination assures most particles are trapped.

  6. Streams of Charged Particles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-28

    This graphic shows the different streams of charged particles inside the bubble around our sun and outside, in the unexplored territory of interstellar space. The heliosheath, where NASA two Voyager spacecraft are now traveling, is shown in red.

  7. Nanoparticle diffusion within intestinal mucus: Three-dimensional response analysis dissecting the impact of particle surface charge, size and heterogeneity across polyelectrolyte, pegylated and viral particles.

    PubMed

    Abdulkarim, Muthanna; Agulló, Nuria; Cattoz, Beatrice; Griffiths, Peter; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas; Borros, Salvador Gómez; Gumbleton, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Multiple particle tracking (MPT) methodology was used to dissect the impact of nanoparticle surface charge and size upon particle diffusion through freshly harvested porcine jejunum mucus. The mucus was characterised rheologically and by atomic force microscopy. To vary nanoparticle surface charge we used a series of self-assembly polyelectrolyte particles composed of varying ratios of the negatively charged polyacrylic acid polymer and the positively charged chitosan polymer. This series included a neutral or near-neutral particle to correspond to highly charged but near-neutral viral particles that appear to effectively permeate mucus. In order to negate the confounding issue of self-aggregation of such neutral synthetic particles a sonication step effectively reduced particle size (to less than 340 nm) for a sufficient period to conduct the tracking experiments. Across the polyelectrolyte particles a broad and meaningful relationship was observed between particle diffusion in mucus (×1000 difference between slowest and fastest particle types), particle size (104-373 nm) and particle surface charge (-29 mV to +19.5 mV), where the beneficial characteristic promoting diffusion was a neutral or near-neutral charge. The diffusion of the neutral polyelectrolyte particle (0.02887 cm S(-1)×10(-9)) compared favourably with that of a highly diffusive PEGylated-PLGA particle (0.03182 cm(2) S(-1)×10(-9)), despite the size of the latter (54 nm diameter) accommodating a reduced steric hindrance with the mucin network. Heterogeneity of particle diffusion within a given particle type revealed the most diffusive 10% sub-population for the neutral polyelectrolyte formulation (5.809 cm(2) S(-1)×10(-9)) to be faster than that of the most diffusive 10% sub-populations obtained either for the PEGylated-PLGA particle (4.061 cm(2) S(-1)×10(-9)) or for a capsid adenovirus particle (1.922 cm(2) S(-1)×10(-9)). While this study has used a simple self-assembly polyelectrolyte system

  8. Secondary charging effects due to icy dust particle impacts on rocket payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassa, M.; Rapp, M.; Hartquist, T. W.; Havnes, O.

    2012-03-01

    We report measurements of dust currents obtained with a small probe and a larger probe during the flight of the ECOMA-4 rocket through the summer polar mesosphere. The payload included two small dust probes behind a larger dust probe located centrally at the front. For certain phases of the payload rotation, the current registered by one of the small dust probes was up to 2 times the current measured with the larger probe, even though the effective collection area of the larger probe was 4 times that of the small one. We analyze the phase dependence of the currents and their difference with a model based on the assumption that the small probe was hit by charged dust fragments produced in collisions of mesospheric dust with the payload body. Our results confirm earlier findings that secondary charge production in the collision of a noctilucent cloud/Polar Summer Mesospheric Echo (NLC/PMSE) dust particle with the payload body must be several orders of magnitude larger than might be expected from laboratory studies of collisions of pure ice particles with a variety of clean surfaces. An important consequence is that for some payload configurations, one should not assume that the current measured with a detector used to study mesospheric dust is simply proportional to the number density of ambient dust particles. The higher secondary charge production may be due to the NLC/PMSE particles containing multiple meteoric smoke particles.

  9. NASCAP modelling of high-voltage power system interactions with space charged-particle environments. [particle impact on solar satellite surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.; Roche, J. C.; Mandell, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP), an engineering tool capable of analyzing the impact of the charged particle environment on spacecraft surfaces and systems, is described. NASCAP is a quasi-static computational program which analyzes the charging of a 3-dimensional complex body as a function of time and system-generated voltages for given space environmental conditions. The material properties of the surfaces are taken into account; the surface potentials, low energy sheath, potential distribution in space and particle trajectories are calculated. An application of NASCAP to a simple space solar power station consisting of two 6 m by 18 m solar array wings surrounding a central body is presented. Each solar array wing is considered to be divided into three regions operating at 2000 volts. Results of NASCAP analysis of the system for a normal environment and a moderate geomagnetic substorm environment are discussed.

  10. Impact of the track structure of heavy charged particles on cytogenetic damage in human blood lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ryonfa; Nasonova, Elena; Sommer, Sylwetster; Hartel, Carola; Durante, Marco; Ritter, Sylvia

    In space, astronauts are unavoidably exposed to charged particles from protons to irons. For a better estimate of the health risks of astronauts, further knowledge on the biological effects of charged particles, in particular the induction of cytogenetic damage is required. One im-portant factor that determines the biological response is the track structure of particles, i.e. their microscopic dose deposition in cells. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of track structure of heavy ions on the yield and the quality of cytogenetic damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes representing normal tissue. Cells were irradiated with 9.5 MeV/u C-ions or 990 MeV/u Fe-ions which have a comparable LET (175 keV/µm and 155 keV/µm, respectively) but a different track radius (2.3 and 6200 µm, respectively). When aberrations were analyzed in first cycle metaphases collected at different post-irradiation times (48-84 h) following fluorescence plus Giemsa staining, an increase in the aberration yield with sampling time was observed for both radiation qualities reflecting a damage dependent cell cycle progression delay to mitosis. The pronounced differences in the aberration frequency per cell are attributable to the stochastic distribution of particle traversals per cell nucleus (radius: 2.8 µm). Following C-ion exposure we found a high fraction of non-aberrant cells in samples collected at 48 h which represent cells not directly hit by a particle and slightly damaged cells that successfully repaired the induced lesions. In addition, at higher C-ion fluences the aberra-tion yield saturated, suggesting that a fraction of lymphocytes receiving multiple particle hits is not able to reach mitosis. On the other hand, at 48 h after Fe-ion exposure the proportion of non-aberrant cells is lower than after C-ion irradiation clearly reflecting the track structure of high energy particles (i.e. more homogeneous dose deposition compared to low energy C

  11. Emission of secondary particles from metals and insulators at impact of slow highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.

    1996-10-31

    Emission of secondary electrons and ions from clean Au, CxHy-Au, and SiO{sub 2} surfaces at impact of slow (v{approx}0.3 v{sub Bohr}) ions were measured as function of incident ion charge for 1+{le}q{le}75+. Electron yields from thermal SiO{sub 2} films (150 mm on Si) were found to be lower than those from the other two for q>3+. Yields of negative secondary ions from SiO{sub 2} and CxHy-Au were recorded in parallel with electron emission data and exhibit a q{sub 4} dependency on incident ion charge. Direct comparison of collisional and electronic contributions to secondary ion production from SiO{sub 2} films using a beam of charge state equilibrated Xe (at 2.75 keV/u) shows positive and negative secondary ion yield increases with incident ion charge of >400. Results are discussed in relation to key signatures of electronic sputtering by Coulomb explosions.

  12. Charged-particle emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yijun; Caucci, Luca; Barrett, Harrison H

    2017-06-01

    Conventional charged-particle imaging techniques - such as autoradiography - provide only two-dimensional (2D) black ex vivo images of thin tissue slices. In order to get volumetric information, images of multiple thin slices are stacked. This process is time consuming and prone to distortions, as registration of 2D images is required. We propose a direct three-dimensional (3D) autoradiography technique, which we call charged-particle emission tomography (CPET). This 3D imaging technique enables imaging of thick tissue sections, thus increasing laboratory throughput and eliminating distortions due to registration. CPET also has the potential to enable in vivo charged-particle imaging with a window chamber or an endoscope. Our approach to charged-particle emission tomography uses particle-processing detectors (PPDs) to estimate attributes of each detected particle. The attributes we estimate include location, direction of propagation, and/or the energy deposited in the detector. Estimated attributes are then fed into a reconstruction algorithm to reconstruct the 3D distribution of charged-particle-emitting radionuclides. Several setups to realize PPDs are designed. Reconstruction algorithms for CPET are developed. Reconstruction results from simulated data showed that a PPD enables CPET if the PPD measures more attributes than just the position from each detected particle. Experiments showed that a two-foil charged-particle detector is able to measure the position and direction of incident alpha particles. We proposed a new volumetric imaging technique for charged-particle-emitting radionuclides, which we have called charged-particle emission tomography (CPET). We also proposed a new class of charged-particle detectors, which we have called particle-processing detectors (PPDs). When a PPD is used to measure the direction and/or energy attributes along with the position attributes, CPET is feasible. © 2017 The Authors. Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals

  13. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-04-01

    Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  14. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  15. Energetic Charged Particles Above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Diver, Declan; Pinçon, Jean-Louis; Phelps, Alan D. R.; Bourdon, Anne; Helling, Christiane; Blanc, Elisabeth; Honary, Farideh; Harrison, R. Giles; Sauvaud, Jean-André; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Lester, Mark; Rycroft, Michael; Kosch, Mike; Horne, Richard B.; Soula, Serge; Gaffet, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The French government has committed to launch the satellite TARANIS to study transient coupling processes between the Earth's atmosphere and near-Earth space. The prime objective of TARANIS is to detect energetic charged particles and hard radiation emanating from thunderclouds. The British Nobel prize winner C.T.R. Wilson predicted lightning discharges from the top of thunderclouds into space almost a century ago. However, new experiments have only recently confirmed energetic discharge processes which transfer energy from the top of thunderclouds into the upper atmosphere and near-Earth space; they are now denoted as transient luminous events, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and relativistic electron beams. This meeting report builds on the current state of scientific knowledge on the physics of plasmas in the laboratory and naturally occurring plasmas in the Earth's atmosphere to propose areas of future research. The report specifically reflects presentations delivered by the members of a novel Franco-British collaboration during a meeting at the French Embassy in London held in November 2011. The scientific subjects of the report tackle ionization processes leading to electrical discharge processes, observations of transient luminous events, electromagnetic emissions, energetic charged particles and their impact on the Earth's atmosphere. The importance of future research in this area for science and society, and towards spacecraft protection, is emphasized.

  16. Fog dispersion. [charged particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, L. S.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of using the charged particle technique to disperse warm fog at airports is investigated and compared with other techniques. The charged particle technique shows potential for warm fog dispersal, but experimental verification of several significant parameters, such as particle mobility and charge density, is needed. Seeding and helicopter downwash techniques are also effective for warm fog disperals, but presently are not believed to be viable techniques for routine airport operations. Thermal systems are currently used at a few overseas airports; however, they are expensive and pose potential environmental problems.

  17. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Schultz, Larry Joe; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Sossong, Michael James; Blanpied, Gary

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  18. Photoelectric Charging of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sickafoose, A.; Colwell, J.; Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.; Walch, B.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed on the photoelectric charging of dust particles which are either isolated or adjacent to a surface that is also a photoemitter. We find that zinc dust charges to a positive potential of a few volts when isolated in vacuum and that it charges to a negative potential of a few volts when passed by a photoemitting surface. The illumination is an arc lamp emitting wavelengths longer than 200 nm and the emitting surface is a zirconium foil.

  19. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  20. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  1. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  2. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  3. Reducing Collisional Breakup Of A System Of Charged Particles To Practical Computation: Electron-Impact Ionization Of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, C.W.; Baertschy, M.; Isaacs, W.A.; Rescigno, T.N.

    2001-08-24

    It has been a goal of researchers in the area of atomic collisions for nearly half a century to reduce to practical computation the simplest problem in collisional ionization: the electron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen. The principal barrier to solving this problem has been the difficult boundary conditions that apply to the complete breakup of a system charged particles. We describe how this goal has been accomplished in the last five years by the application of the mathematical transformation of ''exterior complex scaling'' together with an appropriate formalism for computing the breakup amplitudes from a numerical representation of the complete solution of the Schrodinger equation. Some successes of other recent approaches to this problem are also described.

  4. Coaxial charged particle energy analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael A. (Inventor); Bryson, III, Charles E. (Inventor); Wu, Warren (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A non-dispersive electrostatic energy analyzer for electrons and other charged particles having a generally coaxial structure of a sequentially arranged sections of an electrostatic lens to focus the beam through an iris and preferably including an ellipsoidally shaped input grid for collimating a wide acceptance beam from a charged-particle source, an electrostatic high-pass filter including a planar exit grid, and an electrostatic low-pass filter. The low-pass filter is configured to reflect low-energy particles back towards a charged particle detector located within the low-pass filter. Each section comprises multiple tubular or conical electrodes arranged about the central axis. The voltages on the lens are scanned to place a selected energy band of the accepted beam at a selected energy at the iris. Voltages on the high-pass and low-pass filters remain substantially fixed during the scan.

  5. Interplanetary charged particle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art knowledge of the solar wind, solar particle events, and galactic cosmic rays is reviewed for the development of space vehicle design criteria based on these interplanetary environments. These criteria are described quantitatively in terms of intensity, flux and fluence, and their dependences on time, position and energy, and the associated probabilities and related parameters, for electrons, protons and other ions.

  6. Evolution of the electric potential of an insulator under charged particle impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, E.; Guillous, S.; Cassimi, A.; Zhang, H. Q.; Nagy, G. U. L.; Tőkési, K.

    2017-03-01

    Insulating glass capillaries have been shown to lead to ion transmission without any change in either the ion charge state or in the ion kinetic energy. This surprising process has been attributed to a self-organized distribution of charge patches creating the necessary guiding electric potential on the capillary walls. By the use of our original electrometer, it has been possible to measure and monitor simultaneously and in a nondestructive way the electric potential and the transmitted beam intensity during the charging up by an Ar+ ion beam. We show that glass microcapillaries can reach potentials higher than 500 V, even in the case of singly charged ions, opening the possibility of high transmission rates and providing a renewed sight into ion beam transport by tapered capillaries. The setup, also suitable for the determination of leakage currents governing the capillary potential dynamics, allowed one to evidence that secondary electrons may strongly affect the rise of the capillary potential and consequently avoid Coulomb blocking of the beam transmission across insulating capillaries.

  7. EXTRACTOR FOR HIGH ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Lambertson, G.R.

    1964-04-01

    A particle-extracting apparatus for use with a beam of high-energy charged particles such as travel in an evacuated chamber along a circular equilibrium axis is described. A magnetized target is impacted relatively against the beam whereby the beam particles are deflected from the beam by the magnetic induction in the target. To this end the target may be moved into the beam or the beam may coast into the target and achieve high angular particle deflection and slow extraction. A deflecting septum magnet may additionally be used for deflection at even sharper angles. (AEC)

  8. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Allman, S.L.; Chunghsuan Chen; Chen, F.C.

    1993-02-02

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  9. Impact of Strong Magnetic Fields on Collision Mechanism for Transport of Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostan, Mihai; Gamba, Irene M.

    2012-09-01

    One of the main applications in plasma physics concerns the energy production through thermo-nuclear fusion. The controlled fusion is achieved by magnetic confinement i.e., the plasma is confined into a toroidal domain (tokamak) under the action of huge magnetic fields. Several models exist for describing the evolution of strongly magnetized plasmas, most of them by neglecting the collisions between particles. The subject matter of this paper is to investigate the effect of large magnetic fields with respect to a collision mechanism. We consider here linear collision Boltzmann operators and derive, by averaging with respect to the fast cyclotronic motion due to strong magnetic forces, their effective collision kernels.

  10. Electrodynamics of massless charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Kurt

    2015-02-15

    We derive the classical dynamics of massless charged particles in a rigorous way from first principles. Since due to ultraviolet divergences this dynamics does not follow from an action principle, we rely on (a) Maxwell’s equations, (b) Lorentz- and reparameterization-invariance, and (c) local conservation of energy and momentum. Despite the presence of pronounced singularities of the electromagnetic field along Dirac-like strings, we give a constructive proof of the existence of a unique distribution-valued energy-momentum tensor. Its conservation requires the particles to obey standard Lorentz equations and they experience, hence, no radiation reaction. Correspondingly, the dynamics of interacting classical massless charged particles can be consistently defined, although they do not emit bremsstrahlung end experience no self-interaction.

  11. Single and double ionization of helium by the impact of fast charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Madison, D. H.; Macek, Joseph H.

    2005-12-01

    A survey of the recent literature shows that paradoxes abound in electron- and ion-impact ionization of helium. For example, Schulz et al. [M. Schulz, R. Moshammer, D. Fischer, H. Kollmus, D.H. Madison, S. Jones, J. Ullrich, Nature 422 (2003) 48] found that first-Born and three-body distorted-wave (3DW) theories reproduced their data for single ionization of helium by very fast fully stripped carbon ions in the scattering plane, but not outside the scattering plane. For much slower impacting carbon ions, however, Madison et al. [D.H. Madison, D. Fischer, M. Foster, M. Schulz, R. Moshammer, S. Jones, J. Ullrich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 253201] found good agreement between 3DW theory and experiment, even outside the scattering plane. This creates a dilemma, since distorted-wave perturbation theories are generally thought to improve with increasing, not decreasing, projectile speed! In this contribution, we will address these and other issues, and suggest possible ways of proceeding.

  12. Charged Particle lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Research development in the Charged Particle Lunar Environment Experiment (CPLEE) is reported. The CPLEE is ion-electron spectrometer placed on the lunar surface for the purpose of measuring charged particle fluxes impacting the moon from a variety of regions and to study the interactions between space plasmas and the lunar surface. The principal accomplishments reported include: (1) furnishing design specifications for construction of the CPLEE instruments; (2) development of an advanced computer-controlled facility for automated instrument calibration; (3) active participation in the deployment and past-deployment operational phases with regard to data verification and operational mode selection; and (4) publication of research papers, including a study of lunar photoelectrons, a study of plasmas resulting from man-made lunar impart events, a study of magnetotail and magnetosheath particle populations, and a study of solar-flare interplanetary particles.

  13. Magnetic guidance of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbers, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Many experiments and devices in physics use static magnetic fields to guide charged particles from a source onto a detector, and we ask the innocent question: What is the distribution of particle intensity over the detector surface? One should think that the solution to this seemingly simple problem is well known. We show that, even for uniform guide fields, this is not the case, and we present analytical point spread functions (PSF) for magnetic transport that deviate strongly from previous results. The "magnetic" PSF shows unexpected singularities, which were recently also observed experimentally, and which make detector response very sensitive to minute changes of position, field amplitude, or particle energy. In the field of low-energy particle physics, these singularities may become a source of error in modern high precision experiments, or may be used for instrument tests.

  14. In-situ observations of mesospheric aerosol particles and their impact on the D-region charge balance: Highlights from the ECOMA sounding rocket program (2006 - 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, M.; Friedrich, M.; Strelnikov, B.; Hoppe, U.; Plane, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Over the years 2006 - 2010 a total of 9 sounding rockets was successfully launched in the scope of the Norwegian-German ECOMA (= Existence and Charge state Of Meteoric smoke particles in the middle Atmosphere) project. While the primary target of these observations was the characterization of the properties of meteoric smoke particles (MSP), both MSP and mesospheric ice particles in the vicinity of the cold polar summer mesopause were investigated. This presentation gives an overview of the major results of this project covering subjects such as the charging properties of MSP and ice particles, the impact of this charging process on the D-region charge balance, and the microphysical properties of the MSP. Concerning the latter, emphasis is spent on the most recent results from a campaign in December 2010 during which two sounding rockets were launched with improved particle detectors that were designed to provide constraints on the photoelectric work function of the particles. These experimental results are further discussed on the basis of quantum mechanical calculations of the electronic structure of cluster molecules which are likely candidates for MSP. These calculations allow a tentative interpretation of the observations in terms of MSP size and altitude variations as well as their photoelectric properties.

  15. Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Sachchida

    2010-05-01

    Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere Marykutty Michael1, Sachchida Nand Tripathi1,2,3, Pratima Arya1 1Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 2Oak Ridge Associated Universities 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Observations by two instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft, Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and CAssini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS), revealed the existence of heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile species with masses of several thousand atomic mass units at altitudes of 950 - 1400 km in the atmosphere of Titan (Waite et al., 2007; Crary et al., 2009). Though these particles were believed to be molecules, they are most likely aerosols formed by the clumping of smaller molecules (Waite et al., 2009). These particles were estimated to have a density of 10-3 kg m-3 and a size of up to 256 nm. The existence of very heavy ions has also been observed by the CAPS components with a mass by charge ratio of up to 10000 (Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Sittler et al., 2009). The goal of this paper is to find out whether the so called heavy ions (or charged particles) are generated by the charge transfer of ions and electrons to the particles. The charging of these particles has been studied by using the charge balance equations that include positive ions, negative ions, electrons, neutral and charged particles. Information on the most abundant ion clusters are obtained from Vuitton et al., (2009) and Wilson and Atreya, (2004). Mass by charge ratio thus calculated will be compared with those observed by Coates et al. (2007). References: Coates AJ, et al., Discovery of heavy negative ions in Titan's ionosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34:L22103, 2007. Coates AJ, et al., Heavy negative ions in titan's ionosphere: altitude and latitude dependence. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.05.009, 2009. Crary F.J., et al., Heavy ions, temperatures and winds in titan's ionosphere: Combined cassini caps and inms observations. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.006, 2009

  16. Static charging by collisions with ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, A. J.; Caranti, J.

    Recent laboratory work will be described which gives considerable insight into the fundamental processes of charge flow and separation which operate when small ice particles impact upon metal surfaces or upon a second ice surface. This work suggests that the charge transfer when ice contacts metal or ice should be to some extent predictable and dependent upon the work function of the metal and the surface or contact potential of the ice. This contact potential is different for ice formed in the atmosphere by different natural methods.

  17. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  18. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, Robert W.; Dobelbower, M. Christian

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  19. Adsorption of inorganic and organic ligands onto hydrous aluminum oxide: evaluation of surface charge and the impacts on particle and NOM removal during water treatment.

    PubMed

    Pommerenk, Peter; Schafran, Gary C

    2005-09-01

    The variable removal from solution of sulfate, orthophosphate, fluoride, five simple organic acids, and natural organic matterfromtwo sources by adsorption on aluminum hydroxide was examined to assess their potential influence on coagulation during drinking water treatment. Measurements of electrophoretic mobility were conducted with adsorption studies to provide means of evaluating the impact of the adsorption of these anions on the removal of particulate material during coagulation at water treatment facilities. The three inorganic ions exhibited widely different trends in terms of removal from solution and effect on the surface charge of the aluminum hydroxide. Phosphate was nearly completely removed from solution across a wide pH range and was observed to lower surface charge and shift the isoelectric point. Sulfate was removed to a lesser extent than phosphate, lowered the surface charge on the precipitate, but did not shiftthe isoelectric point. Fluoride was well-removed through adsorption but exhibited no influence on the charge of the hydrous aluminum oxide. The organic acids similarly displayed varying abilities to be removed through adsorption and different influences on surface charge. The results indicate the importance of the number and location of functional groups and their acid/ base properties. The ability to strongly influence surface charge illustrates the impact that adsorption of these anions can have on particle stability.

  20. Optically powered charged particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesner, Larry D.

    1991-09-01

    A charged particle control apparatus provides very high voltage particle beams. One or more photocell arrays provide bias voltages for beam accelerating stages. The arrays are made from a number of microfabricated photocells connected in series to produce a voltage output that is the sum of the voltages from the individual cells. Arrays of each stage are connected in series to produce a cumulative stage voltage that is applied to an accelerating electrode made part of the stage. Optical power illuminates the stages to generate desired voltage biases to the accelerating electrodes. A light source is used to excite the photocathode when this emission source is used. Electrons from the emission source are accelerated electrodes and are emitted from the chamber which is typically conjoined with other apparatus. By utilizing photocell arrays to generate beam current and accelerating biases, as well as a photocathode for providing a source of electrons, the apparatus of the invention is completely optically isolated thereby requiring no direct electrical connections to the apparatus even though multiple accelerating stages are used to facilitate the achievement of very high voltage particle beams.

  1. Means for counteracting charged particle beam divergence

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, Jr., Edwin B.

    1978-01-01

    To counteract charge particle beam divergence, magnetic field-generating means are positioned along the edges of a charged particle beam to be controlled, such as to deflect and redirect particles tending to diverge from a desired beam direction. By selective arrangement of the magnetic field-generating means, the entire beam may be deflected and guided into different directions.

  2. Deposition of charged particles on lung airways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B S; Xiong, J Q; Fang, C P; Li, W

    1998-05-01

    The effect of a single electric charge on the efficiency with which ultrafine particles deposit in human airways has been investigated. When inhaled short-lived radon progeny are attached to electrically neutral particles their deposition efficiency is controlled by diffusion. But most ambient particles carry one, or a few, charges. We measured and compared the deposition (DE) of singly charged, charge-neutralized, and zero-charge 20-nm and 125-nm particles in hollow-cast models of human airways. These particle sizes were selected because they are about where modal peaks occur for the activity of the short-lived radon progeny in indoor air. For singly charged 20-nm particles deposition (+/- standard error) in the casts was 3.4 +/- 0.3 times that for charge neutralized aerosols and 5.3 +/- 0.3 times the amount deposited for zero-charged particles. Corresponding ratios for the 125-nm particles were 2.3 +/- 0.3 and 6.2 +/- 0.7. Since most ambient particles are charged this effect must be considered when models are used to predict dose from inhaled ultrafine particles.

  3. Detection of Charged Particles with Charge Injection Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, K.A.; Apker, B.; Hammond, S.; Punaro, J.; Marshall, F.J.; Laine, J.; Forties, R.

    2007-07-02

    A method for using charge injection devices (CIDs) for detection of high-energy charged particles from inertial-confinement fusion reactions is described. Because of the relatively small depletion region of the CID camera (depletion depth of ~7 um), aluminum foils are placed in front of the device to reduce the energy of the charged particles and maximize the energy deposited in the CID. Simultaneous measurements of ^2H(d,p)^3H protons with a CID and a surface barrier detector indicate that the CID is an efficient detector of charged fusion products. Tests using high energy alpha particles emitted from a radium-226 source are also reported.

  4. Simulation of heavy charged particles damage on MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhnov, V.; Glushko, A.; Makarchuk, V.; Zinchenko, L.; Terekhov, V.; Mikhaylichenko, S.

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents computer simulation results of heavy charged particles radiation effect on elements of electrostatic microelectromechanical systems. Modeling methods of heavy charged particles impact on MEMS elements were envisaged. The radiation sensitivity of different types of fractal electrostatic MEMS were evaluated. Methods of reduction of radiation impact on electrostatic MEMS based on fractal theory were discussed. Conclusions about fractal electrostatic MEMS features were outlined.

  5. Particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles.

  6. Introduction of Electrostatically Charged Particles into Metal Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, Olga; Vorozhtsov, Sergey; Stepkina, Maria; Khrustalev, Anton

    2017-09-01

    One of the possible methods to produce composite alloys with improved mechanical characteristics is the modification of metal melts using submicron- or nanosized particles. Different methods, like ultrasonic or vibration processing, have been used to introduce these particles into the metal melt. The introduction of particles into a metal melt is prevented by the poor wettability of the liquid metal. The present study explores the use of electrostatic charge for increasing the wettability of the particles and preventing their agglomeration. The wettability of electrostatically charged particles by the metal melt under the impact of ultrasound has been studied. The relationships between the impact time and the physical and chemical properties of the particles and the melt along with the characteristics of the acoustic radiation have been studied. It was experimentally demonstrated that the introduction of electrostatically charged particles into the metal melt reduces the porosity and the crystal grain size.

  7. Apparatus for measuring charged particle beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus to measure the incident charged particle beam flux while effectively eliminating losses to reflection and/or secondary emission of the charged particle beam being measured is described. It comprises a sense cup through which the charged particle beam enters. A sense cone forms the rear wall of the interior chamber with the cone apex adjacent the entry opening. An outer case surrounds the sense cup and is electrically insulated therefrom. Charged particles entering the interior chamber are trapped and are absorbed by the sense cup and cone and travel through a current measuring device to ground.

  8. Electric charging of dust particles: Impact on the variations of electric field and electric resistivity of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seran, Elena; Zakharov, Alexander; Godefroy, Michel; Dolnikov, Gennady

    Abstract. Short Dipole Antenna is proposed in the frame of the Dust Package onboard the ROSCOSMOS- ESA ExoMars Lander. The SDA is developed to measure the electric field from few μV m-1 to few tens kV m-1 in the frequency range form DC to few kHz. The SDA concept and the model of its electric coupling with the air were tested and justified in the Nevada desert, in the conditions of dust devils generation. We illustrate our presentation with few examples of earth's observations, present simple models that explain the measured electric field and its correlation with the electric charge of the dust/sand particles, their density and motion. Comparative analysis between Earth and Mars cases is discussed.

  9. Bounding millimagnetically charged particles with magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Huang, Junwu

    2017-09-01

    Millimagnetically charged particles generically appear in scenarios with kinetic mixing. We present model independent bounds on these particles coming from magnetars. Schwinger pair production discharges the magnetic field of the magnetar. Thus the existence of large magnetic fields at magnetars place strong bounds on the millimagnetic charge to be smaller than 10-18 over a large mass range.

  10. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite. 1 fig.

  11. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, David K.; Haverty, Thomas W.; Nordin, Carl W.; Tyree, William H.

    1996-08-20

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  12. Electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Balmer, D.K.; Haverty, T.W.; Nordin, C.W.; Tyree, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    An electronically shielded solid state charged particle detector system having enhanced radio frequency interference immunity includes a detector housing with a detector entrance opening for receiving the charged particles. A charged particle detector having an active surface is disposed within the housing. The active surface faces toward the detector entrance opening for providing electrical signals representative of the received charged particles when the received charged particles are applied to the active surface. A conductive layer is disposed upon the active surface. In a preferred embodiment, a nonconductive layer is disposed between the conductive layer and the active surface. The conductive layer is electrically coupled to the detector housing to provide a substantially continuous conductive electrical shield surrounding the active surface. The inner surface of the detector housing is supplemented with a radio frequency absorbing material such as ferrite.

  13. Quantum and classical dissipation of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra-Sierra, V.G.; Anzaldo-Meneses, A.; Cardoso, J.L.; Hernández-Saldaña, H.; Kunold, A.; Roa-Neri, J.A.E.

    2013-08-15

    A Hamiltonian approach is presented to study the two dimensional motion of damped electric charges in time dependent electromagnetic fields. The classical and the corresponding quantum mechanical problems are solved for particular cases using canonical transformations applied to Hamiltonians for a particle with variable mass. Green’s function is constructed and, from it, the motion of a Gaussian wave packet is studied in detail. -- Highlights: •Hamiltonian of a damped charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Exact Green’s function of a charged particle in time dependent electromagnetic fields. •Time evolution of a Gaussian wave packet of a damped charged particle. •Classical and quantum dynamics of a damped electric charge.

  14. Effect of albedo particles on charge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, N.H.; Ahn, H.S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J.H.; Jeon, J.A.; Kim, C.H.; Kim, K.C.; Lee, M.H.; Lutz, L.; Malinin, A.; Nam, S.; Park, I.H.; Park, J.H.; Seo, E.S.; Walpole, P.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Yoo, J.H.; Yoon, Y.S.; Zinn, S.Y.

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) investigation is designed to make direct measurements of high energy cosmic-ray particles at the top of the atmosphere. The Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) provides charge measurements of all primary particles from protons to iron nuclei. As the SCD is mounted above the calorimeter, albedo particles backscattered from the calorimeter are one of the major background sources for charge measurements. The SCD with double layers of the silicon sensors in the calorimeter module was tested with high-energy electron and hadron beams at CERN in October 2006. The efficiency of the charge reconstruction is studied using the beam test data and GEANT based Monte Carlo simulation data. Effects of albedo particles on charge measurements will be discussed in this paper.

  15. Impact of Charged Particle Exposure on Homologous DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Blood-Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Rall, Melanie; Kraft, Daniela; Volcic, Meta; Cucu, Aljona; Nasonova, Elena; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Bönig, Halvard; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Fournier, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation generates DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) which, unless faithfully repaired, can generate chromosomal rearrangements in hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPC), potentially priming the cells towards a leukemic phenotype. Using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-based reporter system, we recently identified differences in the removal of enzyme-mediated DSB in human HSPC versus mature peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), particularly regarding homologous DSB repair (HR). Assessment of chromosomal breaks via premature chromosome condensation or γH2AX foci indicated similar efficiency and kinetics of radiation-induced DSB formation and rejoining in PBL and HSPC. Prolonged persistence of chromosomal breaks was observed for higher LET charged particles which are known to induce more complex DNA damage compared to X-rays. Consistent with HR deficiency in HSPC observed in our previous study, we noticed here pronounced focal accumulation of 53BP1 after X-ray and carbon ion exposure (intermediate LET) in HSPC versus PBL. For higher LET, 53BP1 foci kinetics was similarly delayed in PBL and HSPC suggesting similar failure to repair complex DNA damage. Data obtained with plasmid reporter systems revealed a dose- and LET-dependent HR increase after X-ray, carbon ion and higher LET exposure, particularly in HR-proficient immortalized and primary lymphocytes, confirming preferential use of conservative HR in PBL for intermediate LET damage repair. HR measured adjacent to the leukemia-associated MLL breakpoint cluster sequence in reporter lines revealed dose dependency of potentially leukemogenic rearrangements underscoring the risk of leukemia-induction by radiation treatment.

  16. Impact of Charged Particle Exposure on Homologous DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Blood-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rall, Melanie; Kraft, Daniela; Volcic, Meta; Cucu, Aljona; Nasonova, Elena; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Bönig, Halvard; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Fournier, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation generates DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) which, unless faithfully repaired, can generate chromosomal rearrangements in hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPC), potentially priming the cells towards a leukemic phenotype. Using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-based reporter system, we recently identified differences in the removal of enzyme-mediated DSB in human HSPC versus mature peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), particularly regarding homologous DSB repair (HR). Assessment of chromosomal breaks via premature chromosome condensation or γH2AX foci indicated similar efficiency and kinetics of radiation-induced DSB formation and rejoining in PBL and HSPC. Prolonged persistence of chromosomal breaks was observed for higher LET charged particles which are known to induce more complex DNA damage compared to X-rays. Consistent with HR deficiency in HSPC observed in our previous study, we noticed here pronounced focal accumulation of 53BP1 after X-ray and carbon ion exposure (intermediate LET) in HSPC versus PBL. For higher LET, 53BP1 foci kinetics was similarly delayed in PBL and HSPC suggesting similar failure to repair complex DNA damage. Data obtained with plasmid reporter systems revealed a dose- and LET-dependent HR increase after X-ray, carbon ion and higher LET exposure, particularly in HR-proficient immortalized and primary lymphocytes, confirming preferential use of conservative HR in PBL for intermediate LET damage repair. HR measured adjacent to the leukemia-associated MLL breakpoint cluster sequence in reporter lines revealed dose dependency of potentially leukemogenic rearrangements underscoring the risk of leukemia-induction by radiation treatment. PMID:26618143

  17. Charged particle therapy: the physics of interaction.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Antony J

    2009-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long and distinguished history with more than 50,000 patients having been treated, mainly with high-energy proton therapy. Particularly, for proton therapy, there is an increasing interest in exploiting the physical characteristics of charged particles for further improving the potential of radiation therapy. In this article, we review the most important interactions of charged particles with matter and describe the basic physical principles that underlie why particle beams behave the way they do and why such a behavior could bring many benefits in radiation therapy.

  18. Attractive interaction between similarly charged colloidal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, X.; Wasan, D.T.

    1996-12-01

    The pair interactions between the charged colloidal particles dispersed in a solvent are studied theoretically by the integral equation method. The pair potential of the mean forces, accounting for the effective pair interaction between colloidal particles, is calculated from the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the mean spherical approximation (MSA). An attractive interaction was found between two similarly charged colloidal particles in contrast with the purely repulsive force predicted by the Debye-Huckel theory. Such an attractive interaction provides physical insight for the condensed phenomena in charged colloidal dispersions, that is, the coexistence of a condensed phase and an expanded phase (voids). At the higher concentration and charge on colloidal particles, the effective pair interaction becomes oscillatory.

  19. Quenching gas for detectors of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1974-01-22

    Operation of detectors of charged particles such as wire counters and Geiger-Muller tubes is improved by filling the counters with a quenching-gas mixture of argon, isobutane and methylchloroform. (Official Gazette)

  20. Robust statistical reconstruction for charged particle tomography

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Larry Joe; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Morris, Christopher; Orum, John Christopher; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Sossong, Michael James; Hengartner, Nicolas W

    2013-10-08

    Systems and methods for charged particle detection including statistical reconstruction of object volume scattering density profiles from charged particle tomographic data to determine the probability distribution of charged particle scattering using a statistical multiple scattering model and determine a substantially maximum likelihood estimate of object volume scattering density using expectation maximization (ML/EM) algorithm to reconstruct the object volume scattering density. The presence of and/or type of object occupying the volume of interest can be identified from the reconstructed volume scattering density profile. The charged particle tomographic data can be cosmic ray muon tomographic data from a muon tracker for scanning packages, containers, vehicles or cargo. The method can be implemented using a computer program which is executable on a computer.

  1. Charged particle periodicity in the Saturnian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the first definitive evidence for charged particle modulations near the magnetic rotation period at Saturn. This periodicity is apparent in the ratios (and spectra) of low energy charged particles in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Most of the data presented were taken during the Voyager 2 outbound portion of the Saturn encounter. During this time the spacecraft was at high latitudes (approximately 30 deg) in the southern hemisphere of the Saturnian magnetosphere. The probe's trajectory was approximately along the dawn meridian at an essentially constant local time. The observation that the charged particle modulation is consistent with the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) period provides a basic input for the resolution of a puzzle which has existed ever since the discovery of the SKR modulation. The charged particle periodicity identified suggests that a basic asymmetry must exist in the Saturnian magnetosphere.

  2. Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument Assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    This image shows the low-energy charged particle instrument before it was installed on one of NASA Voyager spacecraft in 1977. The instrument includes a stepper motor that turns the platform on which the sensors are mounted.

  3. Electrostatic wire for stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Prono, Daniel S.; Caporaso, George J.; Briggs, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  4. The charged particle radiation environment for AXAF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, Marshall

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) will be subjected to several sources of charged particle radiation during its 15-year orbital lifetime: geomagnetically-trapped electrons and protons, galactic cosmic ray particles, and solar flare events. These radiation levels are presented for the AXAF orbit for use in the design of the observatory's science instruments.

  5. Discrete Element Modeling of Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Weitzman, Peter S.; Curry, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carry out experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. While simple Coulombic force between two particles is well understood, its operation in an ensemble of particles is more complex. When the tribocharging of particles and surfaces due to frictional contact is also considered, it is necessary to consider longer range of interaction of particles in response to electrostatic charging. The standard DEM algorithm accounts for particle mechanical properties and inertia as a function of particle shape and mass. If fluid drag is neglected, then particle dynamics are governed by contact between particles, between particles and equipment surfaces and gravity forces. Consideration of particle charge and any tribocharging and

  6. Charged particle concepts for fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Collins, F. G.; Koepf, D.

    1981-01-01

    Charged particle techniques hold promise for dispersing warm fog in the terminal area of commercial airports. This report focuses on features of the charged particle technique which require further study. The basic physical principles of the technique and the major verification experiments carried out in the past are described. The fundamentals of the nozzle operation are given. The nozzle characteristics and the theory of particle charging in the nozzle are discussed, including information from extensive literature on electrostatic precipitation relative to environmental pollution control and a description of some preliminary reported analyses on the jet characteristics and interaction with neighboring jets. The equation governing the transfer of water substances and of electrical charge is given together with a brief description of several semi-empirical, mathematical expressions necessary for the governing equations. The necessary ingredients of a field experiment to verify the system once a prototype is built are described.

  7. Acceleration technologies for charged particles: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Particle accelerators have many important uses in scientific experiments, in industry and in medicine. This paper reviews the variety of technologies which are used to accelerate charged particles to high energies. It aims to show how the capabilities and limitations of these technologies are related to underlying physical principles. The paper emphasises the way in which different technologies are used together to convey energy from the electrical supply to the accelerated particles.

  8. Why do particle clouds generate electric charges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pähtz, T.; Herrmann, H. J.; Shinbrot, T.

    2010-05-01

    Grains in desert sandstorms spontaneously generate strong electrical charges; likewise volcanic dust plumes produce spectacular lightning displays. Charged particle clouds also cause devastating explosions in food, drug and coal processing industries. Despite the wide-ranging importance of granular charging in both nature and industry, even the simplest aspects of its causes remain elusive, because it is difficult to understand how inert grains in contact with little more than other inert grains can generate the large charges observed. Here, we present a simple yet predictive explanation for the charging of granular materials in collisional flows. We argue from very basic considerations that charge transfer can be expected in collisions of identical dielectric grains in the presence of an electric field, and we confirm the model's predictions using discrete-element simulations and a tabletop granular experiment.

  9. Search milli-charged particles at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, W.G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. On charging of snow particles in blizzard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shio, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    The causes of the charge polarity on the blizzard, which consisted of fractured snow crystals and ice particles, were investigated. As a result, the charging phenomena showed that the characteristics of the blizzard are as follows: (1) In the case of the blizzard with snowfall, the fractured snow particles drifting near the surface of snow field (lower area: height 0.3 m) had positive charge, while those drifting at higher area (height 2 m) from the surface of snow field had negative charge. However, during the series of blizzards two kinds of particles positively and negatively charged were collected in equal amounts in a Faraday Cage. It may be considered that snow crystals with electrically neutral properties were separated into two kinds of snow flakes (charged positively and negatively) by destruction of the snow crystals. (2) In the case of the blizzard which consisted of irregularly formed ice drops (generated by peeling off the hardened snow field), the charge polarity of these ice drops salting over the snow field was particularly controlled by the crystallographic characteristics of the surface of the snow field hardened by the powerful wind pressure.

  11. Charged particle multiplicity studies with PHOBOS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2008-01-01

    Summary and conclusion: (1) Multiplicity - PHOBOS have performed complete charged particle multiplicity measurements for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions, System size dependence, and 'Complete' pseudorapidity distributions; 'Universality' compared to elementary e+e- collisions; and (2) Midrapidity multiplicity - Factorization of centrality and energy dependencies; (3) Limiting fragmentation - extended longitudinal scaling - Seen for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, and d+Au, Also observed in flow observables; (4) Total charged particle multiplicity - N{sub ch}/N{sub part} constant with centrality, (5) Future - Finish up many analysis and reviews.

  12. Charged Particle Monitor on the Astrosat Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. R.; Patil, M. H.; Bhargava, Yash; Khanna, Rakesh; Hingar, M. K.; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Basak, Rupal; Sreekumar, S.; Samuel, Essy; Priya, P.; Vinod, P.; Bhattacharya, D.; Bhalerao, V.; Vadawale, S. V.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Pandiyan, R.; Subbarao, K.; Seetha, S.; Sarma, K. Suryanarayana

    2017-06-01

    Charged Particle Monitor (CPM) on-board the Astrosat satellite is an instrument designed to detect the flux of charged particles at the satellite location. A Cesium Iodide Thallium (CsI(Tl)) crystal is used with a Kapton window to detect protons with energies greater than 1 MeV. The ground calibration of CPM was done using gamma-rays from radioactive sources and protons from particle accelerators. Based on the ground calibration results, energy deposition above 1 MeV are accepted and particle counts are recorded. It is found that CPM counts are steady and the signal for the onset and exit of South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region are generated in a very reliable and stable manner.

  13. Hybrid charged-particle guide for studying (n, charged particle) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; White, R.M.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1982-08-25

    Charged-particle transport systems consisting of magnetic quadrupole lenses have been employed in recent years in the study of (n, charged particle) reactions. We have completed a new transport system that is based both on magnetic lenses as well as electrostatic fields. The magnetic focusing of this charged-particle guide is provided by six magnetic quadrupole lenses arranged in a CDCCDC sequence (in the vertical plane). The electrostatic field is produced by a wire at high voltage which stretches the length of the guide and is physically at the center of the magnetic axis. The magnetic lenses are used for charged particles above 5 MeV; the electrostatic guide is used for lower energies. This hybrid system possesses the excellent focusing and background rejection properties of other magnetic systems. For low energy charged-particles, the electrostatic transport avoids the narrow band-passes in charged-particle energy which are a problem with purely magnetic transport systems. This system is installed at the LLNL Cyclograaff facility for the study of (n, charged particle) reactions at neutron energies up to 35 MeV.

  14. The charged particle accelerators subsystems modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, G. P.; Kobylyatskiy, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Presented web-based resource for information support the engineering, science and education in Electrophysics, containing web-based tools for simulation subsystems charged particle accelerators. Formulated the development motivation of Web-Environment for Virtual Electrophysical Laboratories. Analyzes the trends of designs the dynamic web-environments for supporting of scientific research and E-learning, within the framework of Open Education concept.

  15. Studying Charged Particle Optics: An Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovalle, V.; Otomar, D. R.; Pereira, J. M.; Ferreira, N.; Pinho, R. R.; Santos A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal…

  16. Studying Charged Particle Optics: An Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovalle, V.; Otomar, D. R.; Pereira, J. M.; Ferreira, N.; Pinho, R. R.; Santos A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal…

  17. Physical qubits from charged particles: Infrared divergences in quantum information

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Juan; Martin-Martinez, Eduardo

    2009-05-15

    We consider soft-photon effects (ir structure of QED) on the construction of physical qubits. Soft photons appear when we build charged qubits from the asymptotic states of QED. This construction is necessary in order to include the effect of soft photons on entanglement measures. The nonexistence of free charged particles (due to the long range of QED interactions) leads us to question the sense of the very concept of free charged qubit. In this work, using the ''dressing'' formalism, we build physical charged qubits from dressed fields which have the correct asymptotic behavior, are gauge invariant, have propagators with a particle pole structure, and are free from infrared divergences. Finally, we discuss the impact of the soft corrections on the entanglement measures.

  18. Impact of Li2O2 Particle Size on Li-O2 Battery Charge Process: Insights from a Multiscale Modeling Perspective.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yinghui; Gaya, Caroline; Torayev, Amangeldi; Thangavel, Vigneshwaran; Franco, Alejandro A

    2016-10-06

    We report a comprehensive multiscale model describing charge processes of Li-O2 batteries. On the basis of a continuum approach, the present model combines mathematical descriptions of mass transport of soluble species (O2, Li(+), LiO2) and elementary reaction kinetics, which are assumed to be dependent on the morphology of the Li2O2 formed during discharge. The simulated charge curves are in agreement with previously reported experimental studies. The model along with the assumed reaction mechanisms provides physical explanations for the two-step charge profiles. Furthermore, it suggests that these charge profiles depend on the size of the Li2O2 particles, which are determined by the applied current density during discharge. Therefore, the model underlines the strong link between discharge and charge processes.

  19. Induced-charge electroosmotic trapping of particles.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yukun; Liu, Weiyu; Jia, Yankai; Tao, Ye; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2015-05-21

    Position-controllable trapping of particles on the surface of a bipolar metal strip by induced-charge electroosmotic (ICEO) flow is presented herein. We demonstrate a nonlinear ICEO slip profile on the electrode surface accounting for stable particle trapping behaviors above the double-layer relaxation frequency, while no trapping occurs in the DC limit as a result of a strong upward fluidic drag induced by a linear ICEO slip profile. By extending an AC-flow field effect transistor from the DC limit to the AC field, we reveal that fixed-potential ICEO exceeding RC charging frequency can adjust the particle trapping position flexibly by generating controllable symmetry breaking in a vortex flow pattern. Our results open up new opportunities to manipulate microscopic objects in modern microfluidic systems by using ICEO.

  20. Charging and coagulation of radioactive and nonradioactive particles in the atmosphere

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Nenes, Athanasios; ...

    2016-01-01

    Charging and coagulation influence one another and impact the particle charge and size distributions in the atmosphere. However, few investigations to date have focused on the coagulation kinetics of atmospheric particles accumulating charge. This study presents three approaches to include mutual effects of charging and coagulation on the microphysical evolution of atmospheric particles such as radioactive particles. The first approach employs ion balance, charge balance, and a bivariate population balance model (PBM) to comprehensively calculate both charge accumulation and coagulation rates of particles. The second approach involves a much simpler description of charging, and uses a monovariate PBM and subsequentmore » effects of charge on particle coagulation. The third approach is further simplified assuming that particles instantaneously reach their steady-state charge distributions. It is found that compared to the other two approaches, the first approach can accurately predict time-dependent changes in the size and charge distributions of particles over a wide size range covering from the free molecule to continuum regimes. The other two approaches can reliably predict both charge accumulation and coagulation rates for particles larger than about 0.04 micrometers and atmospherically relevant conditions. These approaches are applied to investigate coagulation kinetics of particles accumulating charge in a radioactive neutralizer, the urban atmosphere, and an atmospheric system containing radioactive particles. Limitations of the approaches are discussed.« less

  1. Charging and coagulation of radioactive and nonradioactive particles in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Nenes, Athanasios; Tsouris, Costas

    2016-01-01

    Charging and coagulation influence one another and impact the particle charge and size distributions in the atmosphere. However, few investigations to date have focused on the coagulation kinetics of atmospheric particles accumulating charge. This study presents three approaches to include mutual effects of charging and coagulation on the microphysical evolution of atmospheric particles such as radioactive particles. The first approach employs ion balance, charge balance, and a bivariate population balance model (PBM) to comprehensively calculate both charge accumulation and coagulation rates of particles. The second approach involves a much simpler description of charging, and uses a monovariate PBM and subsequent effects of charge on particle coagulation. The third approach is further simplified assuming that particles instantaneously reach their steady-state charge distributions. It is found that compared to the other two approaches, the first approach can accurately predict time-dependent changes in the size and charge distributions of particles over a wide size range covering from the free molecule to continuum regimes. The other two approaches can reliably predict both charge accumulation and coagulation rates for particles larger than about 0.04 micrometers and atmospherically relevant conditions. These approaches are applied to investigate coagulation kinetics of particles accumulating charge in a radioactive neutralizer, the urban atmosphere, and an atmospheric system containing radioactive particles. Limitations of the approaches are discussed.

  2. Energetic charged particle interactions at icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordheim, T.; Hand, K. P.; Paranicas, C.; Howett, C.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Satellites embedded within planetary magnetospheres are typically exposed to bombardment by charged particles, from thermal plasma to more energetic particles at radiation belt energies. At many planetary satellites, energetic charged particles are typically unimpeded by patchy atmospheres or induced satellite magnetic fields and instead are stopped in the surface itself. Most of these primaries have ranges in porous water ice that are at most centimeters, but some of their secondary photons, emitted during the deceleration process, can reach meter depths [Paranicas et al., 2002, 2004; Johnson et al., 2004]. Examples of radiation-induced surface alteration includes sputtering, radiolysis and grain sintering, processes that are capable of significantly altering the physical properties of surface material. Thus, accurate characterization of energetic charged particle weathering at icy satellites is crucial to a more comprehensive understanding of these bodies. At Saturn's inner mid-size moons remote sensing observations by several instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft have revealed distinct weathering patterns which have been attributed to energetic electron bombardment of the surface [Howett et al., 2011, 2012, 2014; Schenk et al., 2011; Paranicas et al., 2014]. In the Jovian system, radiolytic production of oxidants has been invoked as a potential source of energy for life which may reside in the sub-surface ocean of its satellite Europa [Johnson et al., 2003; Hand et al., 2007; Vance et al., 2016]. Here we will discuss the near-surface energetic charged particle environment of icy satellites, with particular emphasis on comparative studies between the Saturnian and Jovian systems and interpretation of remote sensing observations by instruments onboard missions such as Cassini and Galileo. In addition, we will discuss implications for surface sampling by future lander missions (e.g. the proposed Europa lander now under study).

  3. New instrument for tribocharge measurement due to single particle impacts.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hideo; Ghadiri, Mojtaba; Matsuyama, Tatsushi; Ding, Yu Long; Pitt, Kendal G

    2007-02-01

    During particulate solid processing, particle-particle and particle-wall collisions can generate electrostatic charges. This may lead to a variety of problems ranging from fire and explosion hazards to segregation, caking, and blocking. A fundamental understanding of the particle charging in such situations is therefore essential. For this purpose we have developed a new device that can measure charge transfer due to impact between a single particle and a metal plate. The device consists of an impact test system and two sets of Faraday cage and preamplifier for charge measurement. With current amplifiers, high-resolution measurements of particle charges of approximately 1 and 10 fC have been achieved before and after the impact, respectively. The device allows charge measurements of single particles with a size as small as approximately 100 microm impacting on the target at different incident angles with a velocity up to about 80 m/s. Further analyses of the charge transfer as a function of particle initial charge define an equilibrium charge, i.e., an initial charge level prior to impact for which no net charge transfer would occur as a result of impact.

  4. New instrument for tribocharge measurement due to single particle impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hideo; Ghadiri, Mojtaba; Matsuyama, Tatsushi; Long Ding, Yu; Pitt, Kendal G.

    2007-02-01

    During particulate solid processing, particle-particle and particle-wall collisions can generate electrostatic charges. This may lead to a variety of problems ranging from fire and explosion hazards to segregation, caking, and blocking. A fundamental understanding of the particle charging in such situations is therefore essential. For this purpose we have developed a new device that can measure charge transfer due to impact between a single particle and a metal plate. The device consists of an impact test system and two sets of Faraday cage and preamplifier for charge measurement. With current amplifiers, high-resolution measurements of particle charges of approximately 1 and 10fC have been achieved before and after the impact, respectively. The device allows charge measurements of single particles with a size as small as ˜100μm impacting on the target at different incident angles with a velocity up to about 80m/s. Further analyses of the charge transfer as a function of particle initial charge define an equilibrium charge, i.e., an initial charge level prior to impact for which no net charge transfer would occur as a result of impact.

  5. New instrument for tribocharge measurement due to single particle impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Hideo; Ghadiri, Mojtaba; Matsuyama, Tatsushi; Ding Yulong; Pitt, Kendal G.

    2007-02-15

    During particulate solid processing, particle-particle and particle-wall collisions can generate electrostatic charges. This may lead to a variety of problems ranging from fire and explosion hazards to segregation, caking, and blocking. A fundamental understanding of the particle charging in such situations is therefore essential. For this purpose we have developed a new device that can measure charge transfer due to impact between a single particle and a metal plate. The device consists of an impact test system and two sets of Faraday cage and preamplifier for charge measurement. With current amplifiers, high-resolution measurements of particle charges of approximately 1 and 10 fC have been achieved before and after the impact, respectively. The device allows charge measurements of single particles with a size as small as {approx}100 {mu}m impacting on the target at different incident angles with a velocity up to about 80 m/s. Further analyses of the charge transfer as a function of particle initial charge define an equilibrium charge, i.e., an initial charge level prior to impact for which no net charge transfer would occur as a result of impact.

  6. Screening of charged spheroidal colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Carlos; Téllez, Gabriel

    2010-10-01

    We study the effective screened electrostatic potential created by a spheroidal colloidal particle immersed in an electrolyte, within the mean field approximation, using Poisson-Boltzmann equation in its linear and nonlinear forms, and also beyond the mean field by means of Monte Carlo computer simulation. The anisotropic shape of the particle has a strong effect on the screened potential, even at large distances (compared to the Debye length) from it. To quantify this anisotropy effect, we focus our study on the dependence of the potential on the position of the observation point with respect with the orientation of the spheroidal particle. For several different boundary conditions (constant potential, or constant surface charge) we find that, at large distance, the potential is higher in the direction of the large axis of the spheroidal particle.

  7. Treatment of cancer with heavy charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.; Saunders, W.M.; Tobias, C.A.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Curtis, S.; Lyman, J.T.; Collier, J.M.; Pitluck, S.; Woodruff, K.A.; Blakely, E.A.

    1982-12-01

    A clinical radiotherapeutic trial using heavy charged particles in the treatment of human cancers has accrued over 400 patients since 1975, 378 of whom were treated with particles and 28 with low LET photons as control patients. Heavy charged particle radiotherapy offers the potential advantages of improved dose localization and/or enhanced biologic effect, depending on particle selected for treatment. Target sites have included selected head and neck tumors, ocular melanomata, malignant gliomata of the brain, carcinoma of the esophagus, carcinoma of the stomach, carcinoma of the pancreas, selected juxtaspinal tumors and other locally advanced, unresectable tumors. A Phase III prospective clinical trial has been started in carcinoma of the pancreas using helium ions. Phase I-II studies are underway with heavier particles such as carbon, neon and argon ions in order to prepare for prospective Phase III trials. Silicon ions are also under consideration for clinical trial. These studies are supported by the United States Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health.

  8. Position Sensitive Detection System for Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coello, E. A.; Favela, F.; Curiel, Q.; Chavez, E; Huerta, A.; Varela, A.; Shapira, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The position sensitive detection system presented in this work employs the Anger logic algorithm to determine the position of the light spark produced by the passage of charged particles on a 170 x 170 x 10 mm3 scintillator material (PILOT-U). The detection system consists of a matrix of nine photomultipliers, covering a fraction of the back area of the scintillators. Tests made with a non-collimated alpha particle source together with a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the data, suggest an intrinsic position resolution of up to 6 mm is achieved.

  9. High gradient lens for charged particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-04-29

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A dynamically adjustable electric lens includes a series of alternating a series of alternating layers of insulators and conductors with a hollow center. The series of alternating layers when stacked together form a high gradient insulator (HGI) tube to allow propagation of the charged particle beam through the hollow center of the HGI tube. A plurality of transmission lines are connected to a plurality of sections of the HGI tube, and one or more voltage sources are provided to supply an adjustable voltage value to each transmission line of the plurality of transmission lines. By changing the voltage values supplied to each section of the HGI tube, any desired electric field can be established across the HGI tube. This way various functionalities including focusing, defocusing, acceleration, deceleration, intensity modulation and others can be effectuated on a time varying basis.

  10. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator includes an evacuated chamber having a gun for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam or ion beam. The beam is discharged through a beam exit in the chamber into a higher pressure region. A plasma interface is disposed at the beam exit and includes a plasma channel for bounding a plasma maintainable between a cathode and an anode disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel is coaxially aligned with the beam exit for propagating the beam from the chamber, through the plasma, and into the higher pressure region. The plasma is effective for pumping down the beam exit for preventing pressure increase in the chamber and provides magnetic focusing of the beam discharged into the higher pressure region 24. 7 figs.

  11. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. . Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Div. California Univ., San Francisco, CA . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  12. Charged Particle Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Heath D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the use of external beam radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been limited by toxicity to the uninvolved liver and surrounding structures. Advances in photon radiotherapy have improved dose conformality to the tumor and facilitated dose escalation, a key contributor to improved HCC radiation treatment outcomes. However, despite these advances in photon radiotherapy, significant volumes of liver still receive low doses of radiation that can preclude dose escalation, particularly in patients with limited functional liver reserves. By capitalizing on the lack of exit dose along the beam path beyond the tumor and higher biological effectiveness, charged particle therapy offers the promise of maximizing tumor control via dose escalation without excessive liver toxicity. In this review we discuss the distinctive biophysical attributes of both proton and carbon ion radiotherapy, particularly as they pertain to treatment of HCC. We also review the available literature regarding clinical outcomes and toxicity of using charged particles for the treatment of HCC. PMID:21939857

  13. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. |

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  14. Controlling Charged Particles with Inhomogeneous Electrostatic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An energy analyzer for a charged-particle spectrometer may include a top deflection plate and a bottom deflection plate. The top and bottom deflection plates may be non-symmetric and configured to generate an inhomogeneous electrostatic field when a voltage is applied to one of the top or bottom deflection plates. In some instances, the top and bottom deflection plates may be L-shaped deflection plates.

  15. Charged spinning black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Guo Heng; Fu Chune

    2010-11-15

    It has recently been pointed out that the spinning Kerr black hole with maximal spin could act as a particle collider with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy. In this paper, we will extend the result to the charged spinning black hole, the Kerr-Newman black hole. The center-of-mass energy of collision for two uncharged particles falling freely from rest at infinity depends not only on the spin a but also on the charge Q of the black hole. We find that an unlimited center-of-mass energy can be approached with the conditions: (1) the collision takes place at the horizon of an extremal black hole; (2) one of the colliding particles has critical angular momentum; (3) the spin a of the extremal black hole satisfies (1/{radical}(3)){<=}(a/M){<=}1, where M is the mass of the Kerr-Newman black hole. The third condition implies that to obtain an arbitrarily high energy, the extremal Kerr-Newman black hole must have a large value of spin, which is a significant difference between the Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. Furthermore, we also show that, for a near-extremal black hole, there always exists a finite upper bound for center-of-mass energy, which decreases with the increase of the charge Q.

  16. Electrostatic Confinement of Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Jose; Weathers, Duncan; Ordonez, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    Many experiments rely on the confinement of charged particles. Examples of these experiments range from fusion studies to antiproton-positron studies for antihydrogen production. Researchers have already developed a variety of techniques for controlling and trapping charged particles. Examples of systems devised for such purposes include electrostatic traps in the form of a cavity [1],[2] or in the form of a storage ring like ELISA [3]. For this project, we are pursuing a different approach [4], which relies on a purely electrostatic environment for ion confinement. This system consists of a periodic electrode configuration of cylindrical symmetry that acts to confine an ion beam in the radial direction. In this manner, it is expected that long particle lifetimes inside the trap will be achieved, and that the system will have an inherent scalability to different ion energy. Results obtained from simulation of the proposed system will be presented and discussed along with a brief overview of the steps taken to develop a laboratory prototype. [1] M. Dahan et al., Rev. Sci. Instr. 69 (1998) 76. [2] H. F. Krause et al., American Institute of Physics. CAARI 16^th Int'l Conf. (2001). [3] S.P. Moller et al., Proc. of the 1997 Particle Accelerator Conference. vol 1. pp 1027-1029. Vancouver, Canada. May 1997. [4] J.R. Correa et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. In Phys. Res. B 241 (2005) 909-912.

  17. Hybrid quantum systems with trapped charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J.

    2017-02-01

    Trapped charged particles have been at the forefront of quantum information processing (QIP) for a few decades now, with deterministic two-qubit logic gates reaching record fidelities of 99.9 % and single-qubit operations of much higher fidelity. In a hybrid system involving trapped charges, quantum degrees of freedom of macroscopic objects such as bulk acoustic resonators, superconducting circuits, or nanomechanical membranes, couple to the trapped charges and ideally inherit the coherent properties of the charges. The hybrid system therefore implements a "quantum transducer," where the quantum reality (i.e., superpositions and entanglement) of small objects is extended to include the larger object. Although a hybrid quantum system with trapped charges could be valuable both for fundamental research and for QIP applications, no such system exists today. Here we study theoretically the possibilities of coupling the quantum-mechanical motion of a trapped charged particle (e.g., an ion or electron) to the quantum degrees of freedom of superconducting devices, nanomechanical resonators, and quartz bulk acoustic wave resonators. For each case, we estimate the coupling rate between the charged particle and its macroscopic counterpart and compare it to the decoherence rate, i.e., the rate at which quantum superposition decays. A hybrid system can only be considered quantum if the coupling rate significantly exceeds all decoherence rates. Our approach is to examine specific examples by using parameters that are experimentally attainable in the foreseeable future. We conclude that hybrid quantum systems involving a single atomic ion are unfavorable compared with the use of a single electron because the coupling rates between the ion and its counterpart are slower than the expected decoherence rates. A system based on trapped electrons, on the other hand, might have coupling rates that significantly exceed decoherence rates. Moreover, it might have appealing properties such

  18. Location of Low-Energy Charged Particle Instrument

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    This graphic shows the NASA Voyager 1 spacecraft and the location of its low-energy charged particle instrument. A labeled close-up of the low-energy charged particle instrument appears as the inset image.

  19. Metastable states of plasma particles close to a charged surface

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2015-09-15

    The free energy of the plasma particles and the charged surface that form an electroneutral system is calculated on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It is shown that, owing to correlation of light plasma particles near the charged surface and close to heavy particles of high charge, there can be metastable states in plasma. The corresponding phase charts of metastable states of the separate components of plasma, and plasma as a whole, are constructed. These charts depend on temperature, the charge magnitude, the size of the particles, and the share of the charge of the light carriers out of the total charge of the plasma particles.

  20. Charge of particles in plasmas under external UV-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttscher, M.; Melzer, A.

    2011-11-01

    In this experiment we investigate the charge of dust particles when they are exposed to external UV-radiation. The determination of the changes in charge of the dust particles is given by a combination of two methods to evaluate electrical charge: the resonance method and the normal mode analysis. This contribution describes the experimental setup and the determination of the charge differences.

  1. A chemical analyzer for charged ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonser, S. G.; Held, A.

    2013-04-01

    New particle formation is a frequent phenomenon in the atmosphere and of major significance for the earth's climate and human health. To date the mechanisms leading to the nucleation of particles as well as to aerosol growth are not completely understood. A lack of appropriate measurement equipment for online analysis of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles is one major limitation. We have developed a Chemical Analyzer for Charged Ultrafine Particles (CAChUP) capable of analyzing particles with diameters below 30 nm. A bulk of size separated particles is collected electrostatically on a metal filament, resistively desorbed and consequently analyzed for its molecular composition in a time of flight mass spectrometer. We report of technical details as well as characterization experiments performed with the CAChUP. Our instrument was tested in the laboratory for its detection performance as well as for its collection and desorption capabilities. The manual application of known masses of camphene (C10H16) to the desorption filament resulted in a detection limit between 0.5 and 5 ng, and showed a linear response of the mass spectrometer. Flow tube experiments of 25 nm diameter secondary organic aerosol from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene also showed a linear relation between collection time and the mass spectrometer's signal intensity. The resulting mass spectra from the collection experiments are in good agreement with published work on particles generated by the ozonolysis of alpha-pinene. A sensitivity study shows that the current setup of CAChUP is ready for laboratory measurements and for the observation of new particle formation events in the field.

  2. A chemical analyzer for charged ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonser, S. G.; Held, A.

    2013-09-01

    New particle formation is a frequent phenomenon in the atmosphere and of major significance for the Earth's climate and human health. To date the mechanisms leading to the nucleation of particles as well as to aerosol growth are not completely understood. A lack of appropriate measurement equipment for online analysis of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles is one major limitation. We have developed a Chemical Analyzer for Charged Ultrafine Particles (CAChUP) capable of analyzing particles with diameters below 30 nm. A bulk of size-separated particles is collected electrostatically on a metal filament, resistively desorbed and subsequently analyzed for its molecular composition in a time of flight mass spectrometer. We report on technical details as well as characterization experiments performed with the CAChUP. Our instrument was tested in the laboratory for its detection performance as well as for its collection and desorption capabilities. The manual application of defined masses of camphene (C10H16) to the desorption filament resulted in a detection limit between 0.5 and 5 ng, and showed a linear response of the mass spectrometer. Flow tube experiments of 25 nm diameter secondary organic aerosol from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene also showed a linear relation between collection time and the mass spectrometer's signal intensity. The resulting mass spectra from the collection experiments are in good agreement with published work on particles generated by the ozonolysis of alpha-pinene. A sensitivity study shows that the current setup of CAChUP is ready for laboratory measurements and for the observation of new particle formation events in the field.

  3. Charged-particle telescope experiment on Clementine.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Kanekal, S; Blake, J B; Adams, J H

    1995-01-01

    The charged-particle telescope (CPT) onboard the Clementine spacecraft measured the fluxes of energetic protons emitted in solar energetic particle events. Protons in the energy range from 10 to 80 MeV were of greatest interest for radiation effects such as total dose and single event upsets. Energetic electrons were also of interest for spacecraft charging and their contribution to total dose. The lower-energy CPT electron channels (25-500 keV) were mainly of geophysical interest. While orbiting the moon, the CPT observed the wake created by the moon when it blocked the flow of energetic particles in the magnetotail region. The CPT provided opportunities to observe energetic electron bursts during magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms. CPT data are particularly useful in multispacecraft studies of interplanetary disturbances and their interaction with the magnetosphere. The proton channels on the CPT provided data on solar energetic protons and storm-time protons associated with the passage of an interplanetary shock at 0903 UT on Feb. 21, 1994. Results are compared with those from GOES-7, SAMPEX, and GEOTAIL.

  4. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clauser, C. F. Farengo, R.

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  5. Position sensitive disc for charged particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, V.; Palazzolo, F.; Scirè, A.; Sperduto, M. L.; Albergo, S.; Poli, G.; Potenza, R.; Randieri, C.; Russo, V.; Sutera, M. C.; Capogni, M.; Schaerf, C.; D'Angelo, A.; Moricciani, D.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Girolami, B.; Ghio, F.

    2001-04-01

    A plastic scintillating disc (NE102, 3 cm thick, 1 m diameter) has been designed for detecting charged pions in nuclear reactions at intermediate energy. A hole of 20 cm diameter was made in the middle of the disc in order to allow for the beam passage through the detector. The originality of the detector consists of the simultaneous use of four very compact central Photo Multiplier Tubes (PMT) and eight peripheral PMTs in order to retrieve the hitting point of a charged particle onto the disc surface with a space resolution of ±3 cm. The original method has been developed by using polar coordinates and only the Time-Of-Flight information (TOF) from three or four nearest PMTs, including at least one central PMT.

  6. REVISED BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS WITH LONG-LIVED, NEGATIVELY CHARGED MASSIVE PARTICLES: UPDATED RECOMBINATION RATES, PRIMORDIAL {sup 9}Be NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND IMPACT OF NEW {sup 6}Li LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: kyungsik@kau.ac.kr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp E-mail: gmathews@nd.edu

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X {sup –}, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X {sup –} particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the {sup 6,} {sup 7}Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, {sup 7}Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X {sup –} particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 4}He with X {sup –}. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X {sup –} mass, m{sub X} ≳ 100 GeV, the d-wave → 2P transition is most important for {sup 7}Li and {sup 7,} {sup 9}Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the {sup 7}Be recombination for m{sub X} = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for {sup 9}Be production: the recombination of {sup 7}Li and X {sup –} followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of {sup 7}Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of {sup 7}Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X {sup –} are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial {sup 6}Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the {sup 7}Li problem and the primordial {sup 9}Be abundances are revised.

  7. Revised Big Bang Nucleosynthesis with Long-lived, Negatively Charged Massive Particles: Updated Recombination Rates, Primordial 9Be Nucleosynthesis, and Impact of New 6Li Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant. J.

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X -, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X - particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the 6, 7Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, 7Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X - particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of 7Be, 7Li, 9Be, and 4He with X -. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X - mass, mX >~ 100 GeV, the d-wave → 2P transition is most important for 7Li and 7, 9Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the 7Be recombination for mX = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for 9Be production: the recombination of 7Li and X - followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of 7Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of 7Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X - are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial 6Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the 7Li problem and the primordial 9Be abundances are revised.

  8. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.

    1994-10-01

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed.

  9. Track-Structure Simulations for Charged Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track-structure simulations provide a detailed and accurate picture of radiation transport of charged particles through condensed matter of biological interest. Liquid water serves as surrogate for soft tissue and is used in most Monte-Carlo track-structure codes. Basic theories of radiation transport and track-structure simulations are discussed and differences to condensed history codes highlighted. Interaction cross sections for electrons, protons, alpha particles, light and heavy ions are required input data for track-structure simulations. Different calculation methods, including the plane-wave Born approximation, the dielectric theory, and semi-empirical approaches are presented using liquid water as a target. Low-energy electron transport and light ion transport are discussed as areas of special interest. PMID:23032889

  10. Particle Catcher Using Induced-Charge Electroosmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    Finding an innovative separation mechanism is a central task in future microfluidic systems. We propose a size-controllable microfluidic catching device that has a face-to-face structure consisting of elastic beams that change the acceptable particle size dynamically by hydrodynamic force due to induced charge electroosmosis (ICEO) in water and numerically examine the novel separation mechanism consisting of catching and releasing motions with size selectivity. By an implicit strongly coupled simulation technique between a fluid and an elastic structure based on the boundary element method, along with the thin double-layer approximation, we find that the catching device works effectively at low applied voltages in a realistic microfluidic channel and shows a wide range dynamic size selectivity. Furthermore, by modeling the ICEO phenomena with elastic motion, we successfully explain the acceptable particle size of the catching device. We believe that our proposed device will contribute to realizing innovative microfluidic systems in the future.

  11. Charged particle distributions in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, N.; Garrett, H. B.

    1983-01-01

    In situ data from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, supplemented by earth-based observations and theoretical considerations, are used as the basis for the present quantitative, compact model of the 1 eV-several MeV charged particle distribution in the Jovian magnetosphere. The thermal plasma parameters of convection speed, number density, and characteristic energy, are specified as functions of position for electrons and for the ion species H(+), O(+), O(2+), S(+), S(2+), S(3+), and Na(+). Major features of the magnetic field, thermal plasma, and trapped particle distributions, are modeled and results for each plasma region are compared with observed spectra. Comparisons show that the model represents the data to within a factor of 2 + or - 1, except where time variations are significant. Practical applications of the model to spacecraft near Jupiter are given.

  12. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2008-05-12

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Pm and 84{<=}Z{<=}99 elements) at the surface of the magnetic star HD101065, also known as Przybylski's star. This star is know to be a chemically peculiar star and its anomalous 38charged-particles, mainly protons and {alpha}-particles, that in turn can by interaction with the stellar material modify the surface content.The present contribution explores to what extent the spallation processes resulting from the interaction of the stellar material with stellar energetic particle can by themselves only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of HD101065. We show that specific parametric simulations can explain many different observational aspects, and in particular that a significant production of Z>30 heavy elements can be achieved. In this nucleosynthesis process, the secondary-neutron captures play a crucial role. The most attractive feature of the spallation process is the systematic production of Pm and Tc and the possible synthesis of actinides and sub-actinides.Based on such a parametric model, it is also shown that intense fluences of accelerated charged-particles interacting with surrounding material can efficiently produce elements heavier than iron. Different regimes are investigated and shown to be at the origin of p- and s-nuclei in the case of high-fluence low-flux events and r-nuclei for high-fluence high-flux irradiations. The possible existence of such irradiation events need to be confirmed by hydrodynamics simulations, but most of all by spectroscopic observations through the detection of short-lived radio-elements.

  13. Bare and Effective Charge of Mesoporous Silica Particles.

    PubMed

    Valetti, Sabrina; Feiler, Adam; Trulsson, Martin

    2017-07-25

    We develop and combine a novel numerical model, within the Poisson-Boltzmann framework, with classical experimental titration techniques for mesoporous silica particles to study the charging behavior as both pH and the amount of monovalent salt are varied. One key finding is that these particles can be considered to have an effectively or apparent electroneutral inner core with an effectively charged rim. As a consequence, the total apparent charge of the particle is several orders of magnitude smaller than that of the bare silica charge, which accounts only for the charged silanol groups of the mesoporous silica particles and which has its major contribution from the interior. Hence, the interior dictates the mesoporous silicas' bare charge while the rim its effective charge. We furthermore report density, charge, and accumulated charge profiles across the particle's interface.

  14. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator 14,14b includes an evacuated chamber 16a,b having a gun 18,18b for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam 12 or ion beam 12b. The beam 12,12b is discharged through a beam exit 22 in the chamber 16a,b into a higher pressure region 24. A plasma interface 34 is disposed at the beam exit 22 and includes a plasma channel 38 for bounding a plasma 40 maintainable between a cathode 42 and an anode 44 disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel 38 is coaxially aligned with the beam exit 22 for propagating the beam 12,12b from the chamber 16a,b, through the plasma 40, and into the higher pressure region 24. The plasma 40 is effective for pumping down the beam exit 22 for preventing pressure increase in the chamber 16a,b, and provides magnetic focusing of the beam 12,12b discharged into the higher pressure region 24.

  15. Charged dilation black holes as particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2015-03-01

    We examine the possibility of arbitrarily high energy in the center-of-mass (CM) frame of colliding neutral particles in the vicinity of the horizon of a charged dilation black hole (BH). We show that it is possible to achieve the infinite energy in the background of the dilation black hole without fine-tuning of the angular momentum parameter. It is found that the CM energy (Ecm) of collisions of particles near the infinite red-shift surface of the extreme dilation BHs are arbitrarily large while the non-extreme charged dilation BHs have the finite energy. We have also compared the Ecm at the horizon with the ISCO (Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for extremal Reissner-Nordstrøm (RN) BH and Schwarzschild BH. We find that for extreme RN BH the inequality becomes Ecm|r+ >Ecm|rmb >Ecm|rISCO i.e. Ecm|r+=M :Ecm | rmb =(3 +√{ 5 }/2) M :Ecm| rISCO = 4 M = ∞ : 3.23 : 2.6 . While for Schwarzschild BH the ratio of CM energy is Ecm| r+ = 2 M :Ecm| rmb = 4 M :Ecm| rISCO = 6 M =√{ 5 } :√{ 2 } :√{ 13 }/3 . Also for Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GMGHS) BHs the ratio is being Ecm| r+ = 2 M :Ecm| rmb = 2 M :Ecm| rISCO = 2 M = ∞ : ∞ : ∞ .

  16. Effects of Spray Surfactant and Particle Charge on Respirable Coal Dust Capture.

    PubMed

    Tessum, Mei W; Raynor, Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Surfactant-containing water sprays are commonly used in coal mines to collect dust. This study investigates the dust collection performance of different surfactant types for a range of coal dust particle sizes and charges. Bituminous coal dust aerosol was generated in a wind tunnel. The charge of the aerosol was either left unaltered, charge-neutralized with a neutralizer, or positively- or negatively-charged using a diffusion charger after the particles were neutralized. An anionic, cationic, or nonionic surfactant spray or a plain water spray was used to remove the particles from the air flow. Some particles were captured while passing through spray section, whereas remaining particles were charge-separated using an electrostatic classifier. Particle size and concentration of the charge-separated particles were measured using an aerodynamic particle sizer. Measurements were made with the spray on and off to calculate overall collection efficiencies (integrated across all charge levels) and efficiencies of particles with specific charge levels. The diameter of the tested coal dust aerosol was 0.89 μm ± 1.45 [geometric mean ± geometric standard deviations (SD)]. Respirable particle mass was collected with 75.5 ± 5.9% (mean ± SD) efficiency overall. Collection efficiency was correlated with particle size. Surfactant type significantly impacted collection efficiency: charged particle collection by nonionic surfactant sprays was greater than or equal to collection by other sprays, especially for weakly-charged aerosols. Particle charge strength was significantly correlated with collection efficiency. Surfactant type affects charged particle spray collection efficiency. Nonionic surfactant sprays performed well in coal dust capture in many of the tested conditions.

  17. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/μm to 975 KeV/gmm with particle energy (on the cells) between 94 - 603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/μm. The inactivation cross-section (αi) and the action-section for mutant induction (αm) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 μm2 and 0.09 to 5.56 × 10-3 μm2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/μm. The mutagenicity (αm/αi) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 × 10-5 with the maximum value at 150 keV/μm. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  18. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  19. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  20. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  1. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  2. Production of carbon monoxide by charged particle deposition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Sawada, T.; Edgar, B. C.; Uman, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Recent studies of electron energy deposition in CO2 and CO based upon a large set of electron impact cross sections are utilized to estimate the telluric CO directly produced by various charged-particle deposition mechanisms. The mechanisms considered are (1) lightning, (2) cloud coronal discharges, (3) background radioactivity, (4) natural electrostatic discharges, (5) photoelectrons in the ionosphere, (6) auroral electrons, (7) auroral protons, (8) cosmic rays, and (9) solar wind. 'Ball park' estimates of the global CO production by each of these mechanisms are given. Apart from mechanisms 1, 2, and 5, all CO production mechanisms are estimated to be small compared to artificial sources. If, as appears to be the case, the hot oxygen atoms and ions and other atomic species immediately produced by these three charged-particle deposition mechanisms react rapidly with CO2 to produce CO, these mechanisms can readily lead to CO production levels in the multimegaton-per-year range.

  3. Mapping of electrical potential distributions with charged particle beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for measuring electrostatic potentials on and near dielectric surfaces charged to several kilovolts are studied. Secondary emission from those charged dielectrics is measured. Candidates for potential measurement include the induced charge, from which potential is calculated; the trajectory endpoints of either high or low energy particles traversing the region near the surface; trajectory impact on the surface; and creating ions at points of interest near the surface. Some of the methods require computer simulations and iterative calculation if potential maps are to be generated. Several approaches are described and compared. A method using a half-cylinder as a test chamber and low-energy probing beams is adapted for the measurement of seconary emission.

  4. A search for free fractional electric charge elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halyo, Valerie

    2001-07-01

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied-about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 × 10-22 particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  5. A Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Halyo, Valerie

    2000-12-04

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied| about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  6. A Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Halyo, Valerie

    2000-12-04

    A direct search was carried out in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied--about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  7. Apparatus for Suspension of Charged Particles and Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, T. G. Owe

    1969-01-01

    Describes an apparatus designed to study the properties of charged particles suspended in an electric field. The apparatus consists of a suspension chamber, an optical system and power supplies and controls. Experiments conducted include determination of particle size, charge-to-mass ratio and particle collisions and exchange. (LC)

  8. Apparatus for Suspension of Charged Particles and Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, T. G. Owe

    1969-01-01

    Describes an apparatus designed to study the properties of charged particles suspended in an electric field. The apparatus consists of a suspension chamber, an optical system and power supplies and controls. Experiments conducted include determination of particle size, charge-to-mass ratio and particle collisions and exchange. (LC)

  9. Charged particle radiation exposure of geocentric satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1989-01-01

    The near-earth radiation environment is characterized, summarizing published data on trapped and transient charged particles and their potential effects on hardware systems and the crews of manned missions. Topics examined include the role of the magnetosphere, the five radiation domains, cyclic and sporadic variations in the radiation environment, the potential effect of a high-altitude nuclear explosion, NASA empirical models for predicting trapped proton and electron fluxes, and the South Atlantic anomaly and the estimation of flux-free periods. Consideration is given to solar cosmic rays and heavy ions, Galactic cosmic rays, geomagnetic shielding, secondary radiation, the design of shielding systems, variables affecting dose evaluations, and ionizing-radiation doses. Extensive diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  10. Mutations induced by heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    The relative biological-effectiveness of radiation is increased when cells or tissue are exposed to densely ionizing (high-LET) radiation. A large number of studies focus on the following aspects of the biological effects of high-LET radiation: (i) basic understanding of radiation damage and repair; (ii) developing radiotherapy protocols for accelerated charged particles; and (iii) estimation of human risks from exposure to high-LET heavy charged particles. The increased lethal effectiveness (cell inactivation) of high-LET radiation contributes to new methods for using radiation therapy, but it is also necessary to study the enhanced mutagenic effect of high LET radiation, because higher frequencies of mutation can be expected to provide higher rates of carcinogenicity with human exposure. It is important to note that both measures of biological effectiveness (lethality and mutagenicity) depend on the quality of radiation, the dose, dose-rate effects, and the biological endpoints studied. This paper is intended to provide a review of current research on the mutagenic effects of high-LET radiation, and is organized into three sections. First, are descriptions of the induced mutations studied with various detection systems (section 1) because the detectable mutations induced by ionizing radiation, including heavy-ions, depend largely on the detection system used. Second is a discussion of the biological significance of the dependence of induced mutations on LET (section 2). This is related to the molecular nature of radiation lesions and to the repair mechanisms used to help cells recover from such damage. Finally, applications of mutation detection systems for studies in space (section 3) are described, in which the carcinogenic effects of space environmental radiation are considered.

  11. Charged Dilation Black Holes as Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-07-01

    We examine the possibility of arbitrarily high energy in the Center-of-mass frame of colliding neutral particles in the vicinity of the horizon of a charged dilation black hole(BH). We show that it is possible to achieve the infinite energy in the background of the dilation black hole without fine-tuning of the angular momentum parameter. It is found that the center-of-mass energy (E_{cm}) of collisions of particles near the infinite red-shift surface of the extreme dilation BHs are arbitrarily large while the non-extreme charged dilation BHs have the finite energy. We have also compared the E_{cm} at the horizon with the ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for extremal RN BH and Schwarzschild BH. We find that for extreme RN BH the inequality becomes E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}}> E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}} i.e. E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}= ({3+√{5}}/{2})M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=4M} =∞ : 3.23 : 2.6 . While for Schwarzschild BH the ratio of CM energy is E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=4M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=6M} = √{5} : √{2} : {√{13}}/{3}. Also for Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GMGHS) BHs the ratio is being E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=2M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=2M}=∞ : ∞ : ∞.

  12. Precipitation particle charge distribution and evolution of East Asian rainbands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2012-11-01

    Numerous videosondes, balloon-borne surveyors of precipitation particle morphology and charge, have been launched into cloud systems in many, disparate locations in East Asia. Reported here are videosonde-based observations of early summer, Baiu rainbands at Tanegashima in southern Japan and of summer rainbands at Chiang Rai in northern Thailand. Precipitation particles are mapped by type and charge over the course of cloud development, allowing particle and charge evolution to be derived. The basic charge distribution as observed in Hokuriku winter thunderclouds at different cloud life stages was seen at different locations characterized by vertical velocity profiles in the cloud. The charge structure of the rainbands in both locations was a basic tripole. The major charge carriers were graupel and ice crystals. As graupel and ice crystal concentrations increased, not only did space charge increase, but per-particle charge also increased. Increased lightning activity was associated with higher particle space charge and lower cloud-top temperature. The particle charge evolution of these systems includes several fundamental features: a. active negative charging of graupel in an intense updraft, b. descent of negative graupel along the edge of an updraft column, c. merging of negative graupel with positively charged raindrops falling in the central cloud, and d. extended distribution of positive ice crystals in the stratiform cloud. The observations suggest that riming electrification was the main charge separation mechanism.

  13. Particle Simulation Schemes for High Intensity Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li; Startsev, Edward; Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-10-01

    Numerical schemes for the electromagnetic particle simulations of high intensity charged particle beams have been developed. The purpose of devising these schemes is to avoid the numerical difficulties associated with the direct calculation of the time derivatives of the vector potential, partial A / partial t, in the Darwin model, for which the transverse induction current in Ampere's law is neglected. The first scheme requires the calculations of higher order velocity moments of the distribution function to obtain the time derivatives for both the scalar potential Φ and A, similar to the method used for shear-Alfven waves.[1] The second uses the canonical momentum P = p + q A/c in the equations of motion as a means to eliminate the troublesome time derivatives.[2] The use of these schemes for physics problems in heavy ion fusion systems will be reported. [1] W. W. Lee, J. L. V. Lewandowski, T. S. Hahm, and Z. Lin, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4435 (2001). [2] W. W. Lee, E. Startsev, H. Qin and R. C. Davidson, Proceedings of 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference 1906 (2001).

  14. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Jason, Andrew J.; Blind, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  15. Searches for Fractionally Charged Particles: What Should Be Done Next?

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    Since the initial measurements of the electron charge a century ago, experimenters have faced the persistent question as to whether elementary particles exist that have charges that are fractional multiples of the electron charge. I concisely review the results of the last 50 years of searching for fractional charge particles with no confirmed positive results. I discuss the question of whether more searching is worthwhile?

  16. A particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1988-02-25

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles. 3 figs.

  17. Boundary effects of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations on charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiang, J.-T.; Wu, T.-H.; Leet, D.-S.

    2008-10-10

    The nature of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations in the presence of the boundary is investigated from their effects on the dynamics of charged particles. These effects may be observable via the velocity fluctuations of the charge particles near the conducting plate, where the effects of vacuum fluctuations are found to be anisotrpoic. The corresponding stochastic equation of motion for the charged particle is also derived under the semiclassical approximation.

  18. Charged particles and cluster ions produced during cooking activities.

    PubMed

    Stabile, L; Jayaratne, E R; Buonanno, G; Morawska, L

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies showed that a significant number of the particles present in indoor air are generated by cooking activities, and measured particle concentrations and exposures have been used to estimate the related human dose. The dose evaluation can be affected by the particle charge level which is usually not considered in particle deposition models. To this purpose, in this paper we show, for the very first time, the electric charge of particles generated during cooking activities and thus extending the interest on particle charging characterization to indoor micro-environments, so far essentially focused on outdoors. Particle number, together with positive and negative cluster ion concentrations, was monitored using a condensation particle counter and two air ion counters, respectively, during different cooking events. Positively-charged particle distribution fractions during gas combustion, bacon grilling, and eggplant grilling events were measured by two Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer spectrometers, used with and without a neutralizer. Finally, a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer was used to measure the charge specific particle distributions of bacon and eggplant grilling experiments, selecting particles of 30, 50, 80 and 100 nm in mobility diameter. The total fraction of positively-charged particles was 4.0%, 7.9%, and 5.6% for gas combustion, bacon grilling, and eggplant grilling events, respectively, then lower than other typical outdoor combustion-generated particles.

  19. Bipolar charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Fortov, V. E.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Pal', A. F.; Petrov, O. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Sarkarov, N. E.

    2011-05-15

    The photoemission charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation from a xenon lamp has been investigated. The velocities of yttrium dust particles with a work function of 3.3 eV and their charges have been determined experimentally; the latter are about 400-500 and about 100 elementary charges per micron of radius for the positively and negatively charged fractions, respectively. The dust particle charging and the dust cloud evolution in a photoemission cell after exposure to an ultraviolet radiation source under the applied voltage have been simulated numerically. The photoemission charging of dust particles has been calculated on the basis of nonlocal and local charging models. Only unipolar particle charging is shown to take place in a system of polydisperse dust particles with the same photoemission efficiency. It has been established that bipolar charging is possible in the case of monodisperse particles with different quantum efficiencies. Polydispersity in this case facilitates the appearance of oppositely charged particles in a photoemission plasma.

  20. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. However, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. A charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. The study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify themore » particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.« less

  2. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  3. Motion of particles near a magnetized tidal charged black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Kousar, Lubna

    2017-07-01

    This paper is devoted to study the effects of tidal charge on the motion of both neutral as well as charged particles around a magnetized tidal charged black hole. We analyze the innermost stable circular orbits and conditions for escape velocity. In order to discuss stability of orbits, we explore Lyapunov exponent and effective force on the particle. The center of mass energy of the interacting particles is studied in the presence/absence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the external magnetic field as well as tidal charge has a great influence on the particle's motion.

  4. Effects of Charged Particles on Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathryn D.; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Kaminuma, Takuya; Paz, Athena Evalour S.; Yoshida, Yukari; Liu, Qi; Willers, Henning; Takahashi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects, including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors, and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors, such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions, and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles. PMID:26904502

  5. DNA fragmentation by charged particle tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenerlöw, B.; Höglund, E.; Carlsson, J.

    High-LET (linear energy transfer) charged particles induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in a non-random fashion in mammalian cells. The clustering of DSB, probably determined by track structure as well as chromatin conformation, results in an excess of small- and intermediate-sized DNA fragments. DNA fragmentation in normal human fibroblasts (GM5758) was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after irradiation with photons ( 60Co) or 125 keV/μm nitrogen ions. Compared to conventional DSB analysis, i.e. assays only measuring the fraction of DNA smaller than a single threshold, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for DSB induction increased with 100%. Further, the size distribution of DNA fragments showed a significant dependence on radiation quality, with an excess of fragments up to 1 Mbp. Irradiation of naked genomic DNA without histone proteins increased the DSB yields 25 and 13 times for photons and nitrogen ions, respectively. The results suggest possible roles of both track structure and chromatin organization in the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks along the chromosome.

  6. Ferroelectric Devices Emit Charged Particles and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Felsteiner, Joshua; Karsik, Yakov

    2005-01-01

    Devices called solid-state ferroelectric- based sources (SSFBSs) are under development as sources of electrons, ions, ultraviolet light, and x-rays for diverse applications in characterization and processing of materials. Whereas heretofore it has been necessary to use a different device to generate each of the aforementioned species of charged particles or radiation, a single SSFBS can be configured and operated to selectively generate any of the species as needed using a single source. Relative to comparable prior sources based, variously, on field emission, thermionic emission, and gaseous discharge plasmas, SSFBSs demand less power, and are compact and lightweight. An SSFBS exploits the unique physical characteristics of a ferroelectric material in the presence of a high-frequency pulsed electric field. The basic building block of an SSFBS is a ferroelectric cathode -- a ferroelectric wafer with a solid electrode covering its rear face and a grid electrode on its front face (see figure). The application of a voltage pulse -- typically having amplitude of several kilovolts and duration of several nanoseconds -- causes dense surface plasma to form near the grid wires on the front surface.

  7. Apparatus for the Study of Charged Particles and Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, T. G. Owe; Gaulkler, T. A.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an apparatus for the free suspension of charged particles and droplets in the range 5-200u and for their study with respect to charge and mass and their variations with time in various gaseous environments. High-speed photography is used to determine the motion of particles. (LC)

  8. Determination of Dusty Particle Charge Taking into Account Ion Drag

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Amangaliyeva, R. Zh.; Orazbayev, S. A.; Petrov, O. F.; Antipov, S. N.

    2008-09-07

    This work is devoted to the experimental estimation of charge of dust particle that levitates in the stratum of dc glow discharge. Particle charge is determined on the basis of the balance between ion drag force, gravitational and electric forces. Electric force is obtained from the axial distribution of the light intensity of strata.

  9. Peculiarities of propagation of charged particles in solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morozova, E. I.; Pisarenko, N. F.; Mikryukova, N. A.; Klimenko, V. V.; Timofeev, V. E.; Shafer, Y. G.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of boundaries of the large scale unipolar magnetic regions (UMR) on the Sun upon the charged particle propagation in the solar corona and interplanetary space is investigated. Increases of the charged particle fluxes from solar flares on November 4 and 20, 1978 detected by Venera-11 and Prognoz-1 and on December 7, 1982 by Venera-13 and "GMS-2" were analyzed.

  10. Space Charge Models for Particle Tracking on Long Time Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Shishlo, Andrei P; Potts III, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    In order to efficiently track charged particles over long times, most tracking codes use either analytic charge distributions or particle-in-cell (PIC) methods based on fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). While useful for theoretical studies, analytic distribution models do not allow accurate simulation of real machines. PIC calculations can utilize realistic space charge distributions, but these methods suffer from the presence of discretization errors. We examine the situation for particle tracking with space charge over long times, and consider possible ideas to improve the accuracy of such calculations.

  11. Analysis of LEAM experiment response to charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, D.

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of the Lunar Ejecta and Meteorites Experiment (LEAM) were to measure the long-term variations in cosmic dust influx rates and the extent and nature of the lunar ejecta. While analyzing these characteristics in the data, it was discovered that a majority of the events could not be associated with hypervelocity particle impacts of the type usually identified with cosmic dust, but could only be correlated with the lunar surface and local sun angle. The possibility that charged particles could be incident on the sensors led to an analysis of the electronics to determine if such signals could cause the large pulse height analysis (PHA) signals. A qualitative analysis of the PHA circuit showed that an alternative mode of operation existed if the input signal were composed of pulses with pulse durations very long compared to the durations for which it was designed. This alternative mode would give large PHA outputs even though the actual input amplitudes were small. This revelation led to the examination of the sensor and its response to charged particles to determine the type of signals that could be expected.

  12. Charge distribution of particles in an irradiated dust cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Sodha, Mahendra; Dixit, Amrit; Srivastava, Sweta; Mishra, S. K.; Verma, M. P.; Bhasin, L.

    2010-01-01

    This communication is a discussion on the charge distribution of the dust particles in an illuminated dust cloud in near space when the photoelectric emission is the dominant mechanism for electron generation. An analytical model has been developed on the basis of charge neutrality condition and balance of number density and energy of electrons; the approach of statistical mechanics has been followed. Computations correspond to a metallic dust cloud in near space environment, where Lyman-α spectral line radiation is the dominant one for photoelectric emission. A comparison of results from the present statistical theory of charge distribution with the uniform charge theory has been presented. As an interesting conclusion, the theory predicts negative charging of a few dust particles for a certain range of parameters leading to the formation of bigger particles on account of electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged particles.

  13. Particle impact location detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S. O.

    1974-01-01

    Detector includes delay lines connected to each detector surface strip. When several particles strike different strips simultaneously, pulses generated by each strip are time delayed by certain intervals. Delay time for each strip is known. By observing time delay in pulse, it is possible to locate strip that is struck by particle.

  14. Determination of time zero from a charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jesse Andrew [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-15

    A method, system and computer program is used to determine a linear track having a good fit to a most likely or expected path of charged particle passing through a charged particle detector having a plurality of drift cells. Hit signals from the charged particle detector are associated with a particular charged particle track. An initial estimate of time zero is made from these hit signals and linear tracks are then fit to drift radii for each particular time-zero estimate. The linear track having the best fit is then searched and selected and errors in fit and tracking parameters computed. The use of large and expensive fast detectors needed to time zero in the charged particle detectors can be avoided by adopting this method and system.

  15. Charged particle acceleration in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S.V.; Naumova, N.M.; Dudnikova, G.I.; Vshivkov, V.A.; Pegoraro, F.; Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-11-01

    The high-gradient electron acceleration schemes that have been demonstrated using LWFA appear promising for the development of plasma-based laser accelerators into practical devices. However, a question still exists: how to avoid the wake field deterioration and the loss of the phase synchronism between the plasma wave and the electrons that prevent them from being accelerated up to the theoretical limit. In order to obtain the highest possible values of the wake electric field one must use as intense laser pulses as possible i.e., pulses with dimensionless amplitudes a {much_gt} 1. Pulses that have a dimensionless amplitude larger than one tend to be subject to a host of instabilities, such as relativistic self-focusing, self modulation and stimulated Raman scattering, that affect their propagation in the plasma. Such processes could be beneficial, in so far as they increase the pulse energy density, enhance the wake field generation, and provide the mechanism for transporting the laser radiation over several Rayleigh lengths without diffraction spreading. However, it is still far from certain that these processes can be exploited in a controlled form and can lead to regular, stationary wake fields. It is known that, in order to create good quality wake fields, it would be preferable to use laser pulses with steep fronts of order {lambda}{sub p}. The present paper aims at analyzing the influence of the laser pulse shape and of the plasma nonuniformity on the charged particle acceleration. This study is based on the results obtained with one dimensional PIC simulations.

  16. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    SciTech Connect

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2014-10-15

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  17. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2014-10-01

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  18. Ionization of multielectron atoms by fast charged particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.; Kyle, H. L.; Sullivan, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Using plane waves to describe the incident and scattered particles, and screened hydrogenic and Coulomb functions to describe the atomic electrons before and after ejections, we have calculated the differential and total ionization cross sections of 11 atoms and one ion by electron impact, and ionization of helium by proton impact. The effective charges of the screened hydrogenic functions are fixed by the Hartree-Fock calculations. Calculations have been carried out for the atomic s, p, and d electrons. For low atomic numbers, we find reasonable agreement with the experimental data. For intermediate atomic numbers, we expect our results to overestimate the actual cross sections, since our choice of a unit charge for the Coulomb function of the ejected electrons will overestimate the atomic dipole potential strength, and in turn the high-energy cross sections. The advantage of the method presented here is that the ionization amplitude is given in analytic form. This may allow further analysis on this amplitude, and facilitates extension of the numerical integration for the cross section to high impact energies.

  19. Anomalous mobility of highly charged particles in pores

    DOE PAGES

    Qiu, Yinghua; Yang, Crystal; Hinkle, Preston; ...

    2015-07-16

    Single micropores in resistive-pulse technique were used to understand a complex dependence of particle mobility on its surface charge density. We show that the mobility of highly charged carboxylated particles decreases with the increase of the solution pH due to an interplay of three effects: (i) ion condensation, (ii) formation of an asymmetric electrical double layer around the particle, and (iii) electroosmotic flow induced by the charges on the pore walls and the particle surfaces. The results are important for applying resistive-pulse technique to determine surface charge density and zeta potential of the particles. As a result, the experiments alsomore » indicate the presence of condensed ions, which contribute to the measured current if a sufficiently high electric field is applied across the pore.« less

  20. Anomalous mobility of highly charged particles in pores

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Yinghua; Yang, Crystal; Hinkle, Preston; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Siwy, Zuzanna S.

    2015-07-16

    Single micropores in resistive-pulse technique were used to understand a complex dependence of particle mobility on its surface charge density. We show that the mobility of highly charged carboxylated particles decreases with the increase of the solution pH due to an interplay of three effects: (i) ion condensation, (ii) formation of an asymmetric electrical double layer around the particle, and (iii) electroosmotic flow induced by the charges on the pore walls and the particle surfaces. The results are important for applying resistive-pulse technique to determine surface charge density and zeta potential of the particles. As a result, the experiments also indicate the presence of condensed ions, which contribute to the measured current if a sufficiently high electric field is applied across the pore.

  1. Quantum interface to charged particles in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    A superconducting qubit device suitable for interacting with a flying electron has recently been proposed [Okamoto and Nagatani, Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 062604 (2014), 10.1063/1.4865244]. Either a clockwise or counterclockwise directed loop of half magnetic flux quantum encodes a qubit, which naturally interacts with any single charged particle with arbitrary kinetic energy. Here, the device's properties, sources of errors, and possible applications are studied in detail. In particular, applications include detection of a charged particle essentially without applying a classical force to it. Furthermore, quantum states can be transferred between an array of the proposed devices and the charged particle.

  2. Search for fractional-charge particles in meteoritic material.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter C; Lee, Eric R; Lee, Irwin T; Perl, Martin L; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-19

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5 microm with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth's surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3 x 10(-21) particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9 x 10(-23) particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  3. Search for Fractional-Charge Particles in Meteoritic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Perl, Martin L.; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-01

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5μm with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth‘s surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3×10-21 particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9×10-23 particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  4. Mechanisms of Particle Charging by Surfactants in Nonpolar Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyung; Zhou, Zhang-Lin; Alas, Guillermo; Behrens, Sven Holger

    2015-11-10

    Electric charging of colloidal particles in nonpolar solvents plays a crucial role for many industrial applications and products, including rubbers, engine oils, toners, or electronic displays. Although disfavored by the low solvent permittivity, particle charging can be induced by added surfactants, even nonionic ones, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood, and neither the magnitude nor the sign of charge can generally be predicted from the particle and surfactant properties. The conclusiveness of scientific studies has been limited partly by a traditional focus on few surfactant types with many differences in their chemical structure and often poorly defined composition. Here we investigate the surface charging of poly(methyl methacrylate) particles dispersed in hexane-based solutions of three purified polyisobutylene succinimide polyamine surfactants with "subtle" structural variations. We precisely vary the surfactant chemistry by replacing only a single electronegative atom located at a fixed position within the polar headgroup. Electrophoresis reveals that these small differences between the surfactants lead to qualitatively different particle charging. In the respective particle-free surfactant solutions we also find potentially telling differences in the size of the surfactant aggregates (inverse micelles), the residual water content, and the electric solution conductivity as well as indications for a significant size difference between oppositely charged inverse micelles of the most hygroscopic surfactant. An analysis that accounts for the acid/base properties of all constituents suggests that the observed particle charging is better described by asymmetric adsorption of charged inverse micelles from the liquid bulk than by charge creation at the particle surface. Intramicellar acid-base interaction and intermicellar surfactant exchange help rationalize the formation of micellar ions pairs with size asymmetry.

  5. A simultaneous charge and size measurement method for individual airborne particles using digital holographic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Adam; Dou, Zhongwang; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Recently, significant inquiry to understand the effects of particle charge on particle laden flow have been made, particularly in the study of Lagrangian particle-pair statistics. Quantification of individual particle charge allows relation of inter-particle electric forces and turbulence-induced forces. Here we offer a simultaneous, individual particle charge and size measurement technique utilizing in-line digital holographic Particle Tracking Velocimetry (hPTV). The method measures particle electric mobility through its velocity response within a uniform electric field using a sequence of holograms, next the particle diameter is measured with the same holograms using a matched-filter developed by Lu et al. (2012) as an input for calculation of charge. Consequently, a benefit of this method is that particle charge is calculated on the individual level, versus a mean charge calculated from a group of particles, offering improved estimations of charge distributions for studies of particle laden flow. This work was supported by NSF CBET-0967407 and CBET-0967349.

  6. Large Bulk Matter Search for Fractional Charge Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Irwin T

    2002-06-11

    We have carried out the largest search for stable particles with fractional electric charge, based on an oil drop method that incorporates a horizontal electric field and upward air flow. No evidence for such particles was found, giving a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.17 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon on the abundance of fractional charge particles in silicone oil for 0.18e {le} |Q{sub residual}| {le} 0.82e. Since this is the first use of this new method we describe the advantages and limitations of the method.

  7. Large Bulk Matter Search for Fractional Charge Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Irwin T

    2002-12-04

    We have carried out the largest search for stable particles with fractional electric charge, based on an oil drop method that incorporates a horizontal electric field and upward air flow. No evidence for such particles was found, giving a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.17 x 10{sup -22} particles per nucleon on the abundance of fractional charge particles in silicone oil for 0.18e {le} |Q{sub residual}| {le} 0.82e. Since this is the first use of this new method we describe the advantages and limitations of the method.

  8. Nonequatorial charged particle confinement around Kerr black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Preti, Giovanni

    2010-01-15

    We analyze the nonequatorial charged particle dynamics around a rotating black hole in the presence of an external magnetic field, the latter being given by Wald's exact analytical solution to the Maxwell's equations in the Kerr background. At variance with the corresponding Schwarzschild case, the behavior of the particle becomes here markedly charge-sign dependent, and the more so the more the Kerr parameter increases. The interplay between the rotating black hole and the magnetic field is shown to provide a mechanism both for selective charge ejection in axially collimated jetlike trajectories, and for selective charge confinement into nonequatorial bound orbits around the hole; the possibility of such a confinement allows the fate of an accreting particle to not necessarily be doomed: infall into the hole can be prevented, and the neutrality of the Kerr source could therefore be preserved, while the charge is safely parked into bound cross-equatorial orbits all around it.

  9. Electrostatic interactions between charged dielectric particles in an electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, Ivan N.; Filippov, Anatoly V.; Stace, Anthony J.; Besley, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Theory is developed to address a significant problem of how two charged dielectric particles interact in the presence of a polarizable medium that is a dilute solution of a strong electrolyte. The electrostatic force is defined by characteristic parameters for the interacting particles (charge, radius, and dielectric constant) and for the medium (permittivity and Debye length), and is expressed in the form of a converging infinite series. The limiting case of weak screening and large inter-particle separation is considered, which corresponds to small (macro)ions that carry constant charge. The theory yields a solution in the limit of monopole and dipole terms that agrees exactly with existing analytical expressions, which are generally used to describe ion-ion and ion-molecular interactions in a medium. Results from the theory are compared with DLVO theory and with experimental measurements for the electrostatic force between two PMMA particles contained in a nonpolar solvent (hexadecane) with an added charge control agent.

  10. Charged particle beam scanning using deformed high gradient insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu -Jiuan

    2015-10-06

    Devices and methods are provided to allow rapid deflection of a charged particle beam. The disclosed devices can, for example, be used as part of a hadron therapy system to allow scanning of a target area within a patient's body. The disclosed charged particle beam deflectors include a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) with a hollow center and a dielectric wall that is substantially parallel to a z-axis that runs through the hollow center. The dielectric wall includes one or more deformed high gradient insulators (HGIs) that are configured to produce an electric field with an component in a direction perpendicular to the z-axis. A control component is also provided to establish the electric field component in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis and to control deflection of a charged particle beam in the direction perpendicular to the z-axis as the charged particle beam travels through the hollow center of the DWA.

  11. Charged-particle absorption by Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, M.; Eviatar, A.

    1976-01-01

    An idealized two-dimensional model of the distorted electric field configuration, in the limit of a perfectly conducting satellite or satellite ionosphere, has been constructed. This model has been used to trace the adiabatic guiding-center trajectories of energetic protons and electrons across Jupiter's magnetic-field lines, which are taken as rectilinear. The adiabatic trajectories of very low-energy particles (cold-plasma) are thus found to avoid the satellite and escape absorption. In the limit of very high particle energies the adiabatic trajectories are undistorted, and absorption proceeds as if Io were an insulator. The particle absorbing characteristics of an electrically conducting Jovian satellite are found to depend on both the species and the energy of the incident particle, and the satellite's particle-absorbing cross section differs systematically from its geometric cross section.

  12. Interactive design environment transportation channel of relativistic charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadchuk, I. O.; Averyanov, G. P.; Budkin, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Considered a modern implementation of a computer environment for the design of channels of transportation of high-energy charged particle beams. The environment includes a software package for the simulation of the dynamics of charged particles in the channel, operating means for changing parameters of the channel, the elements channel optimization and processing of the output characteristics of the beam with the graphical output the main output parameters.

  13. A fast numerical integrator for relativistic charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we report on a fast second-order numerical integrator to solve the Lorentz force equations of a relativistic charged particle in electromagnetic fields. This numerical integrator shows less numerical error than the popular Boris algorithm in tracking the relativistic particle subject to electric and magnetic space-charge fields and requires less number of operations than another recently proposed relativistic integrator.

  14. Proposal to Search for Magnetically Charged Particles with Magnetic Charge 1e

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Michael K.; Fryberger, David

    2015-11-02

    A model for composite elementary Standard Model (SM) particles based upon magnetically bound vorton pairs, we briefly introduce here, predicts the existence of a complete family of magnetically charged particles, as well as their neutral isotopic partners (all counterparts to the SM elementary particles), in which the lowest mass (charged) particle would be an electrically neutral stable lepton, but which carries a magnetic charge equivalent to 1e. This new particle, which we call a magneticon (a counterpart to the electron) would be pair produced at all e+e- colliders at an Ecm above twice its mass. In addition, PP and PPbar colliders should also be able to produce these new particles through the Drell-Yan process. To our knowledge, no monopole search experiment has been sensitive to such a low-charged magnetic monopole above a particle mass of about 5 GeV/c2. Hence, we propose that a search for such a stable particle of magnetic charge 1e should be undertaken. We have taken the ATLAS detector at the LHC as an example in which this search might be done. To this end, we modeled the magnetic fields and muon trigger chambers of this detector. We show results from a simple Monte Carlo simulation program to indicate how these particles might look in the detector and describe how one might search for these new particles in the ATLAS data stream.

  15. Reduction of surface charges during coalescence of elastomer particles.

    PubMed

    Gauer, Cornelius; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-07-15

    Reaction-limited aggregation of soft elastomer particles has been studied with specific attention to the fate of surface charges during coalescence. The employed system is an aqueous dispersion of fluoroelastomer particles, which are known to coalesce completely at 70 degrees C. In contrast to diffusion-limited conditions, under reaction-limited conditions the stability of the system is expected to change during aggregation because of surface reduction and charge accumulation resulting from coalescence. This allows investigating the mechanism of charge relocation during cluster coalescence. For particles stabilized by ionic surfactants, it has been found that the charges are mobile (i.e., they redistribute between aqueous solution and particle surface according to their adsorption equilibrium) (Gauer, C.; Jia, Z.; Wu, H.; Morbidelli, M. Langmuir 2009, 25, 9703). In this work, we consider the case of fixed charges, as those given by charged polymer end groups covalently bound to the particle surface. We demonstrate that a loss of fixed surface charges occurs during the coalescence and strongly affects the time evolution and the shape of the resulting cluster mass distribution.

  16. Indirect Charged Particle Detection: Concepts and a Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nicholas B.; Horányi, Mihály; Collette, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We describe the principles of macroscopic charged particle detection in the laboratory and their connections to concepts taught in the physics classroom. Electrostatic dust accelerator systems, capable of launching charged dust grains at hypervelocities (1-100 km/s), are a critical tool for space exploration. Dust grains in space typically have…

  17. Indirect Charged Particle Detection: Concepts and a Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Nicholas B.; Horányi, Mihály; Collette, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We describe the principles of macroscopic charged particle detection in the laboratory and their connections to concepts taught in the physics classroom. Electrostatic dust accelerator systems, capable of launching charged dust grains at hypervelocities (1-100 km/s), are a critical tool for space exploration. Dust grains in space typically have…

  18. An improved search for elementary particles with fractional electric charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.R.

    1996-08-01

    The SLAC Quark Search Group has demonstrated successful operation of a low cost, high mass throughput Millikan apparatus designed to search for fractionally charged particles. About six million silicone oil drops were measured with no evidence of fractional charges. A second experiment is under construction with 100 times greater throughput which will utilize optimized search fluids.

  19. Return flux of neutral and charged particles in geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. D.; Fong, Michael C.; Neier, Karen L.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes a model for the return flux of neutral and charged particles to a satellite in geosynchronous earth orbit. For neutral particles, the main return flux mechanisms is back-scattering via self-collisions among molecules outgassed or vented from the satellite; whereas for charged particles, the main mechanism is electrostatic re-attraction of ionized outgassed or vented molecules to a negatively charged satellite. Computer codes that simulate spacecraft charging typically contain a 3D charged particle trajectory-tracking procedure that, in principle, could be used for contamination studies. In practice, however, it is difficult to obtain quantitative results on the return flux distribution by this method. This makes such a code impractical to use as an engineering tool for identifying contamination problems reliably and evaluating corrective measures through simulation. To achieve a practical engineering tool, we prose an alternative to the particle tracking technique. We treat the problem for both neutral and charged particles in a unified manner by direct numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation in the BGK approximation. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by favorable numerical results presented for the simplified geometry of a spherical spacecraft.

  20. Optical characterization of electrically charged particles using discrete dipole approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Kundracik, František; Videen, Gorden

    2016-11-01

    The dependence of the electric potential on the absorption and scattering of light by small particles has emerged as an interesting research topic, as the unexpected amplified optical signatures of a system of electrically charged particles were satisfactory predicted recently for homogeneous, uniformly charged spheres. However, natural particles are rarely of spherical shape. A comprehensive understanding of how arbitrarily shaped, charged particles interact with electromagnetic radiation has been missing. The approach we present here attempts to fill this gap by introducing a numerical formulation of the electromagnetic scattering problem for these particles. The first results from the intercomparison of numerical and analytical solutions for a pseudosphere show that the resonance features found are largely consistent, except for the magnitude and width of the peak amplitude, which may be due to inherent differences in the approaches used.

  1. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Wan, M.; Montgomery, D.

    2013-12-01

    Study of the transport and diffusion of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider Diffusion of charged particles in fully three dimensional statistically isotropic magnetic field turbulence with no mean field which is pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We classify different regions of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius of the charged particle to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. We propose three different theoretical models to calculate the diffusion coefficient each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared with those from computer simulations, showing very good agreement.

  2. Cyclotron motion of a charged particle with anisotropic mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftja, Orion; Livingston, Victoria; Thomas, Elsa

    2017-05-01

    The cyclotron motion of a charged particle subject to a uniform magnetic field is thoroughly described in many classical physics textbooks. Although the assumption of a particle with isotropic mass is taken for granted in classical physics, a key concept in condensed matter physics is that of particles with an effective anisotropic mass, such as electrons in the context of band structure studies of solids. Since some exposure to the concept of anisotropic mass is important within the framework of classical physics, here we consider the cyclotron motion of a charged particle with anisotropic mass in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. The exact solution of this problem exposes a broad audience of readers to concepts in condensed matter physics that are rarely mentioned within the framework of classical physics. Key ideas on the topic are illustrated in a pedagogical way by considering specific examples that show how an anisotropic mass modifies the cyclotron motion of a charged particle.

  3. Noncommutative magnetic moment of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Adorno, T. C.; Gitman, D. M.; Shabad, A. E.; Vassilevich, D. V.

    2011-10-15

    It has been argued that in noncommutative field theories, the sizes of physical objects cannot be taken smaller than an ''elementary length'' related to noncommutativity parameters. By gauge covariantly extending field equations of noncommutative U(1){sub *} theory to cover the presence of external sources, we find electric and magnetic fields produced by an extended static charge. We find that such a charge, apart from being an ordinary electric monopole, is also a magnetic dipole. By writing off the existing experimental clearance in the value of the lepton magnetic moments for the present effect, we get the bound on noncommutativity at the level of 10{sup 4} TeV.

  4. Charged particle detectors with active detector surface for partial energy deposition of the charged particles and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Gerts, David W; Bean, Robert S; Metcalf, Richard R

    2013-02-19

    A radiation detector is disclosed. The radiation detector comprises an active detector surface configured to generate charge carriers in response to charged particles associated with incident radiation. The active detector surface is further configured with a sufficient thickness for a partial energy deposition of the charged particles to occur and permit the charged particles to pass through the active detector surface. The radiation detector further comprises a plurality of voltage leads coupled to the active detector surface. The plurality of voltage leads is configured to couple to a voltage source to generate a voltage drop across the active detector surface and to separate the charge carriers into a plurality of electrons and holes for detection. The active detector surface may comprise one or more graphene layers. Timing data between active detector surfaces may be used to determine energy of the incident radiation. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed herein.

  5. Cadmium zinc telluride charged particle nuclear detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, J.E. |; James, R.B.; Antolak, A.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the improvements in understanding of transport phenomena in cadmium zinc telluride radiation sensors achieved through studies of alpha particle response and spatially resolved photoconductivity mapping. Alpha particle response waveforms and photocurrent profiles both indicate non-uniformities in the electric field which may have detrimental effects on detector performance. Identifying and eliminating the sources of these nonuniformities will ultimately lead to improved detector performance.

  6. Electromagnetic wave attenuation due to the charged particles in dust&sand (DUSA) storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, X. Q.; Xie, L.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we calculated the attenuation of the electromagnetic waves (EMWs) propagating through the dust&sand (DUSA) storms using the predicting model based on Mie theory, in which the charges carried on the DUSA particles, the ambient relative humidity (RH) and the particle size distribution are considered simultaneously. It can be found that the charges carried on the DUSA particles and the RH can change the value of the absorption and scattering efficiency, but they can't change the domain attenuation mechanism caused by the DUSA storms in the EMWs frequency regions (3 GHz, 4 GHz), (8 GHz, 40 GHz) and (75 GHz, 100 GHz). Whatever the DUSA storms are formed by equal-size particles or the mixed-size particles, the charge carried on the particle surface and the RH have a significant impact on the attenuation caused by the DUSA storms, and the change ratio of the attenuation caused by the charge or RH depends on the particle size. By the comparison of the calculated attenuation with the measured one, we found that the charges carried on the particles and the RH will be important factors to affect the attenuation of the EMWs.

  7. High Energy Charged Particles in Space at One Astronomical Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Gabriel, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    Single event effects and many other spacecraft anomalies are caused by positively charged high energy particles impinging on the vehicle and its component parts. Reviewed here are the current knowledge of the interplanetary particle environment in the energy ranges that are most important for these effects. State-of-the-art engineering models are briefly described along with comments on the future work required.

  8. High Energy Charged Particles in Space at One Astronomical Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Gabriel, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    Single event effects and many other spacecraft anomalies are caused by positively charged high energy particles impinging on the vehicle and its component parts. Reviewed here are the current knowledge of the interplanetary particle environment in the energy ranges that are most important for these effects. State-of-the-art engineering models are briefly described along with comments on the future work required.

  9. Longitudinal Control of Intense Charged Particle Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    contained using longitudinal focusing, I have shown that errors in the applied focusing fields induce space-charge waves at the bunch edges that...profile along the bunch length. When the bunch is contained using longitudinal focusing, I have shown that errors in the applied focusing fields ...90 5.1.1 Beam Expansion without Longitudinal Containment................................ 90 5.1.2 Application of Focusing Fields

  10. Self-organization of charged particles in circular geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazmitdinov, R. G.; Puente, A.; Cerkaski, M.; Pons, M.

    2017-04-01

    The basic principles of self-organization of one-component charged particles, confined in disk and circular parabolic potentials, are proposed. A system of equations is derived, which allows us to determine equilibrium configurations for an arbitrary, but finite, number of charged particles that are distributed over several rings. Our approach reduces significantly the computational effort in minimizing the energy of equilibrium configurations and demonstrates a remarkable agreement with the values provided by molecular dynamics calculations. With the increase of particle number n >180 we find a steady formation of a centered hexagonal lattice that smoothly transforms to valence circular rings in the ground-state configurations for both potentials.

  11. Self-organization of charged particles in circular geometry.

    PubMed

    Nazmitdinov, R G; Puente, A; Cerkaski, M; Pons, M

    2017-04-01

    The basic principles of self-organization of one-component charged particles, confined in disk and circular parabolic potentials, are proposed. A system of equations is derived, which allows us to determine equilibrium configurations for an arbitrary, but finite, number of charged particles that are distributed over several rings. Our approach reduces significantly the computational effort in minimizing the energy of equilibrium configurations and demonstrates a remarkable agreement with the values provided by molecular dynamics calculations. With the increase of particle number n>180 we find a steady formation of a centered hexagonal lattice that smoothly transforms to valence circular rings in the ground-state configurations for both potentials.

  12. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiping; Wei, Haofei

    2010-11-01

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  13. Motion of charged test particles in Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, Daniela; Quevedo, Hernando; Ruffini, Remo

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the circular motion of charged test particles in the gravitational field of a charged mass described by the Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime. We study in detail all the spatial regions where circular motion is allowed around either black holes or naked singularities. The effects of repulsive gravity are discussed by finding all the circles at which a particle can have vanishing angular momentum. We show that the geometric structure of stable accretion disks, made of only test particles moving along circular orbits around the central body, allows us to clearly distinguish between black holes and naked singularities.

  14. On charged particle tracks in cellulose nitrate and Lexan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Henke, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations were performed aimed at developing plastic nuclear track detectors into quantitative tools for recording and measuring multicharged, heavy particles. Accurate track etch rate measurements as a function of LET were performed for cellulose nitrate and Lexan plastic detectors. This was done using a variety of incident charged particle types and energies. The effect of aging of latent tracks in Lexan in different gaseous atmospheres was investigated. Range distributions of high energy N-14 particle bevatron beams in nuclear emulsion were measured. Investigation of charge resolution and Bragg peak measurements were carried out using plastic nuclear track detectors.

  15. Current and future accelerator technologies for charged particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Hywel; Lomax, Antony; Jolly, Simon

    2016-02-01

    The past few years have seen significant developments both of the technologies available for proton and other charged particle therapies, and of the number and spread of therapy centres. In this review we give an overview of these technology developments, and outline the principal challenges and opportunities we see as important in the next decade. Notable amongst these is the ever-increasing use of superconductivity both in particle sources and for treatment delivery, which is likely to greatly increase the accessibility of charged particle therapy treatments to hospital centres worldwide.

  16. Streak Camera 101: Visualizing Charged-Particle Beam Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingxin

    2006-11-01

    Radiation generated by high-energy particle beams such as optical transition radiation (OTR) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) is widely used to characterize the beam properties. It has enabled dual-sweep streak cameras to visualize charged-particle beam dynamics. In this introductory paper, we will discuss properties of dual-sweep streak cameras and basic optics systems for imaging charged-particle bunches at different projection angles to produce top view, side view, and front view. Examples will be used to illustrate the beam dynamics that streak images reveal. We will also discuss practical considerations of optical transport line design to preserve spatial and temporal resolution of the camera system.

  17. Modification of electrostatic charge on inhaled carrier lactose particles by addition of fine particles.

    PubMed

    Bennett, F S; Carter, P A; Rowley, G; Dandiker, Y

    1999-01-01

    Triboelectrification affects particle adhesion and agglomeration and hence the formulation, manufacture, and use of dry powder inhaler (DPI) devices. Electrostatic charge measurement of two component mixes of spray-dried or crystalline lactose fine particles (< 10 microns) 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30% w/w with spray-dried or crystalline lactose 63-90 microns, respectively, has been undertaken using a system incorporating pneumatic transport of the mixed powders to a stainless steel cyclone charging device. The magnitude of charge on the mixes was shown to decrease with increased fine particle content, and there was no significant difference in charge for each concentration between spray-dried and crystalline lactose. Both the variation of charge and powder adhesion to the cyclone surface increased with increase in fine particle content. The proportion of fine particles in carrier systems in DPIs may thus have an important role where triboelectrification is involved.

  18. Late time CMB anisotropies constrain mini-charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, C.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.; Jaeckel, J. E-mail: joerg.jaeckel@durham.ac.uk E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de

    2009-11-01

    Observations of the temperature anisotropies induced as light from the CMB passes through large scale structures in the late universe are a sensitive probe of the interactions of photons in such environments. In extensions of the Standard Model which give rise to mini-charged particles, photons propagating through transverse magnetic fields can be lost to pair production of such particles. Such a decrement in the photon flux would occur as photons from the CMB traverse the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters. Therefore late time CMB anisotropies can be used to constrain the properties of mini-charged particles. We outline how this test is constructed, and present new constraints on mini-charged particles from observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Coma cluster.

  19. Model independent constraints on charges of new particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chway, Dongjin; Dermíšek, Radovan; Jung, Tae Hyun; Kim, Hyung Do

    2017-06-01

    Any particle that is charged under S U (3 )C and U (1 )EM can mediate the g g →γ γ process through loops. Near the threshold for the new particle pair production, gauge boson exchanges necessitate the resummation of ladder diagrams. We discuss the leading log order matching of the one-loop result with the nonrelativistic effective theory resummed result. We show how the diphoton invariant mass spectrum varies depending on decay width, color representation, and electric charge of the new particle. The exclusion limits on the product of S U (3 )C and U (1 )EM charges of the new scalar or fermion particle are obtained from current LHC data.

  20. Systems for detecting charged particles in object inspection

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2013-08-20

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons. In one implementation, a monitoring system has a cosmic ray-produced charged particle tracker with a plurality of drift cells. The drift cells, which can be for example aluminum drift tubes, can be arranged at least above and below a volume to be scanned to thereby track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons, while also detecting gamma rays. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can also detect any radioactive sources occupying the volume from gamma rays emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift tubes can be sealed to eliminate the need for a gas handling system. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  1. Electrostatic adhesion of multiple non-uniformly charged dielectric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, B. A.; Whitney, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Charged particle adhesion measurements can be as much as one order of magnitude higher than theoretical calculations. This discrepancy has ignited a debate as to the nature of the physics occurring with microscopic particle adhesion. Attempts to bring calculations closer to measured results have produced models that include multiple particle interactions, dielectric polarization, and non-uniform charge. Individually, each of these models can only produce a 2× to 5× enhancement in predicted adhesion force over simple Coulombic attraction. In this correspondence, an analytical model of electrostatic particle forces is developed, which allows for independent assignment of dielectric constant and non-uniform surface charge distribution to an arbitrary number of particles. Because the model can include an image plane, it is ideal for electrostatic adhesion calculations. Application to a monolayer of printed toner particles predicts nearly an order of magnitude increase in adhesion force over Coulombic attraction. These results are the first analytical results to place predictions of charged particle adhesion on the same order of magnitude with measurements.

  2. Multipole radiation in charged-particle scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper formulates the general problem of photon emission in particle scattering using a classical and quantum mechanical approach. The connection between the classical short collision time (SCT) and Born results is examined for various special classifications of problems. In the dipole case the two formulations yield results that can be expressed in the same form and for arbitrary scattering potential. For quadrupole emission the SCT and Born results are the same only for a short-range potential, however. The quadrupole problem is more sensitive to details in the process because the calculation requires an expansion of the total amplitude for the process to lowest order in the photon wave number or momentum. The special case of photon emission associated with spin-flip transitions during scattering is considered for spin-1/2 particles. Like classical magnetic dipole radiation, there is no infrared divergence feature for this type of emission.

  3. Detection of charged particles in superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Bandler, Simon R.

    1994-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with the use of a large superfluid helium detector for the detection of solar neutrinos. A small-scale prototype of this type of detector has been constructed and tested. In this thesis the author discussed in detail the design of the apparatus, the experiments which have been carried out, and what has been learned about the important physical processes involved in this type of detector. These processes include the anisotropic generation of phonons and rotons by the recoiling particle, the propagation of the phonons and rotons in the liquid, the evaporation process at the liquid surface, and the adsorption of the helium atoms onto the wafers. In addition he discusses the generation and detection of fluorescent photons from recoiling particles. The implications of these results to the design of a full-scale detector of neutrinos are discussed.

  4. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  5. Charged-particle spectroscopy in organic semiconducting single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ciavatti, A.; Basiricò, L.; Fraboni, B.; Fraleoni-Morgera, A.

    2016-04-11

    The use of organic materials as radiation detectors has grown, due to the easy processability in liquid phase at room temperature and the possibility to cover large areas by means of low cost deposition techniques. Direct charged-particle detectors based on solution-grown Organic Semiconducting Single Crystals (OSSCs) are shown to be capable to detect charged particles in pulse mode, with very good peak discrimination. The direct charged-particle detection in OSSCs has been assessed both in the planar and in the vertical axes, and a digital pulse processing algorithm has been used to perform pulse height spectroscopy and to study the charge collection efficiency as a function of the applied bias voltage. Taking advantage of the charge spectroscopy and the good peak discrimination of pulse height spectra, an Hecht-like behavior of OSSCs radiation detectors is demonstrated. It has been possible to estimate the mobility-lifetime value in organic materials, a fundamental parameter for the characterization of radiation detectors, whose results are equal to μτ{sub coplanar} = (5 .5 ± 0.6 ) × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/V and μτ{sub sandwich} = (1 .9 ± 0.2 ) × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/V, values comparable to those of polycrystalline inorganic detectors. Moreover, alpha particles Time-of-Flight experiments have been carried out to estimate the drift mobility value. The results reported here indicate how charged-particle detectors based on OSSCs possess a great potential as low-cost, large area, solid-state direct detectors operating at room temperature. More interestingly, the good detection efficiency and peak discrimination observed for charged-particle detection in organic materials (hydrogen-rich molecules) are encouraging for their further exploitation in the detection of thermal and high-energy neutrons.

  6. Charged-particle spectroscopy in organic semiconducting single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavatti, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Basiricò, L.; Fraleoni-Morgera, A.; Fraboni, B.

    2016-04-01

    The use of organic materials as radiation detectors has grown, due to the easy processability in liquid phase at room temperature and the possibility to cover large areas by means of low cost deposition techniques. Direct charged-particle detectors based on solution-grown Organic Semiconducting Single Crystals (OSSCs) are shown to be capable to detect charged particles in pulse mode, with very good peak discrimination. The direct charged-particle detection in OSSCs has been assessed both in the planar and in the vertical axes, and a digital pulse processing algorithm has been used to perform pulse height spectroscopy and to study the charge collection efficiency as a function of the applied bias voltage. Taking advantage of the charge spectroscopy and the good peak discrimination of pulse height spectra, an Hecht-like behavior of OSSCs radiation detectors is demonstrated. It has been possible to estimate the mobility-lifetime value in organic materials, a fundamental parameter for the characterization of radiation detectors, whose results are equal to μτcoplanar = (5 .5 ± 0.6 ) × 10-6 cm2/V and μτsandwich = (1 .9 ± 0.2 ) × 10-6 cm2/V, values comparable to those of polycrystalline inorganic detectors. Moreover, alpha particles Time-of-Flight experiments have been carried out to estimate the drift mobility value. The results reported here indicate how charged-particle detectors based on OSSCs possess a great potential as low-cost, large area, solid-state direct detectors operating at room temperature. More interestingly, the good detection efficiency and peak discrimination observed for charged-particle detection in organic materials (hydrogen-rich molecules) are encouraging for their further exploitation in the detection of thermal and high-energy neutrons.

  7. Super-stoichiometric charge neutralization in particle-polyelectrolyte systems.

    PubMed

    Kleimann, Jörg; Gehin-Delval, Cécile; Auweter, Helmut; Borkovec, Michal

    2005-04-12

    The adsorption of poly(vinylamine) (PVA) on poly(styrene sulfate) latex particles is studied, and its consequences on the charging behavior and suspension stability are investigated. The adsorption process is assessed by batch depletion experiments and time-resolved electrophoretic mobility measurements. The adsorption of PVA appears to be basically irreversible. The rate of adsorption decreases with decreasing polymer dose. At low polymer dose, the polymer coverage corresponds to the amount of the polyelectrolyte added, while at high polymer dose, the polymer coverage saturates the surface. Stability ratios are determined by dynamic light scattering, and strongly depend on the polymer dose and salt level. The aggregation is rapid near the isoelectric point (IEP), and it slows down when moving away from it. The charge neutralization is highly nonstoichiometric with charging ratios (CR) larger than unity, meaning that several charges on an adsorbed polyelectrolyte chain are necessary to neutralize a single charge on the particle surface. By comparing the IEP for particles and polyelectrolytes of different charge densities, we find a strong dependence of the CR on the mismatch between the average distances between individual charges on the surface and on the polyelectrolyte. A simple model is proposed to explain this trend.

  8. Modulation of graphene field effect by heavy charged particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazalas, Edward; Sarker, Biddut K.; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-12-01

    Device architectures based on the two-dimensional material graphene can be used for sensing of electromagnetic and particle radiation. The sensing mechanism may be direct, by absorbance of radiation by the graphene or the immediately adjacent material, and indirect, via the field effect principle, whereby the change in conductivity within a semiconducting absorber substrate induces electric field change at graphene. Here, we report on a graphene field effect transistor (GFET) sensitive to heavy charged particle radiation (α particles) at MeV energies by use of the indirect sensing mechanism. Both the continuous and discrete changes of graphene are observed, and the latter are attributed to single α particle interactions with the GFET. While this study provides the basis for understanding of the irradiation effects, it also opens prospects for the use of GFETs as heavy charged particle detectors.

  9. Analysis of ``soft`` recovered shaped charge jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    A shaped charge with an 81 mm diameter, 42{degree} apex angle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper conical liner was fired into a ``soft`` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 g, of which 184 g was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g., dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work the authors present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet they find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  10. Numerical modelling of electrochemical polarization around charged metallic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bücker, Matthias; Undorf, Sabine; Flores Orozco, Adrián; Kemna, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We extend an existing analytical model and carry out numerical simulations to study the polarization process around charged metallic particles immersed in an electrolyte solution. Electro-migration and diffusion processes in the electrolyte are described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck system of partial differential equations. To model the surface charge density, we consider a time- and frequency-invariant electric potential at the particle surface, which leads to the build-up of a static electrical double layer (EDL). Upon excitation by an external electric field at low frequencies, we observe the superposition of two polarization processes. On the one hand, the induced dipole moment on the metallic particle leads to the accumulation of opposite charges in the electrolyte. This charge polarization corresponds to the long-known response of uncharged metallic particles. On the other hand, the unequal cation and anion concentrations in the EDL give rise to a salinity gradient between the two opposite sides of the metallic particle. The resulting concentration polarization enhances the magnitude of the overall polarization response. Furthermore, we use our numerical model to study the effect of relevant model parameters such as surface charge density and ionic strength of the electrolyte on the resulting spectra of the effective conductivity of the composite model system. Our results do not only give interesting new insight into the time-harmonic variation of electric potential and ion concentrations around charged metallic particle. They are also able to reduce incongruities between earlier model predictions and geophysical field and laboratory measurements. Our model thereby improves the general understanding of IP signatures of metallic particles and represents the next step towards a quantitative interpretation of IP imaging results. Part of this research is funded by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy under the Raw Materials Initiative.

  11. Complex Kepler Orbits and Particle Aggregation in Charged Microscopic Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victor; Waitukaitis, Scott; Miskin, Marc; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2015-03-01

    Kepler orbits are usually associated with the motion of astronomical objects such as planets or comets. Here we observe such orbits at the microscale in a system of charged, insulating grains. By letting the grains fall freely under vacuum, we eliminate the effects of air drag and gravity, and by imaging them with a co-falling high-speed camera we track the relative positions of individual particles with high spatial and temporal precision. This makes it possible to investigate the behaviors caused by the combination of long-range electrostatic interactions and short-range, dissipative, contact interactions in unprecedented detail. We make the first direct observations of microscopic elliptical and hyperbolic Kepler orbits, collide-and-capture events between pairs of charged grains, and particle-by-particle aggregation into larger clusters. Our findings provide experimental evidence for electrostatic mechanisms that have been suspected, but not previously observed at the single-event level, as driving the early stages of particle aggregation in systems ranging from fluidized particle bed reactors to interstellar protoplanetary disks. Furthermore, since particles of different net charge and size are seen to aggregate into characteristic spatial configurations, our results suggest new possibilities for the formation of charge-stabilized ``granular molecules''. We can reproduce the observed molecule configurations by taking many-body, dielectric polarization effects into account.

  12. Turbulent Equilibria for Charged Particles in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that the solar wind electron distribution function is apparently composed of several components, but the energetic tail population is well fitted with kappa distribution function. It is also well established that the solar wind protons possess quasi power-law tail distribution function that is well fitted with an inverse power law model. In the recent past, the present author developed a theory that describes a system of electrons and Langmuir turbulence that are in dynamical steady-state. In such a model, the kappa distribution function for the electrons emerges as a unique solution of the steady-state weak turbulence plasma kinetic equation. For the proton inverse power-law tail problem, Fisk and Gloeckler’s theory of compressional turbulence received much attention in the literature. In the present paper, their model is revisited in the light of plasma kinetic theory that involves low-frequency kinetic Alfvén wave fluctuations. It is shown that the proton kappa distribution function satisfies the steady-state proton particle kinetic equation. The steady-state wave kinetic equation for the kinetic Alfvén wave is also solved. This shows that the proton suprathermal distribution with an inverse power law velocity dependence may indeed result from a steady-state wave-particle interaction of the compressional kinetic Alfvénic fluctuations in the solar wind, thus providing support for, and also providing an alternative view of Fisk and Gloeckler’s model. However, in the absence of additional constraint that may arise from the balance of nonlinear wave-particle interaction terms within the wave kinetic equations for kinetic Alfvénic waves, the index of inverse power-law velocity tail distribution is undetermined. This calls for further investigation of nonlinear kinetic Alfvénic turbulence.

  13. Electric birefringence anomaly of solutions of ionically charged anisometric particles.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, H; Gräbner, Dieter

    2015-02-01

    The term "electric birefringence anomaly" is known as the electric birefringence (EB) signal that occurs in solutions of ionically charged anisometric particles in a narrow concentration region. The signal is of opposite sign to the normal birefringence that occurs below and above this narrow concentration region. The normal electric birefringence signals in the dilute and more concentrated regions are due to the orientation of the particles in the direction of the applied electric field. The origin for the anomalous signal was not completely understood until now. The article summarises previous results in which the anomalous results had been observed but not well understood. It shows that the birefringence anomaly occurs in systems as diverse as micellar solutions, polyelectrolytes, solutions of clays, viruses and fibres. In all these systems the anomaly signals are present at the concentration when the length of the colloidal particles including the thickness of the electric double layer are about the same as the mean distance between the colloidal particles. Under these conditions the electric double layers of the particles overlap along the main axis of the particles but not in the direction across the particles. As a consequence of this situation a dipole is built up across the particles by the migration of the counter-ions of the particles in the electric field and this dipole leads to an orientation of the particles perpendicular to the electric field. The anomalous signal can usually be observed simultaneously with the normal signal. The amplitude of the anomalous signal can be larger than the amplitude of the normal signal. As a consequence the total birefringence changes its sign in the anomalous concentration region. The anomaly signal of the clays can also be explained by a fluctuating dipole around the particles, which is due to the fact that the centre of the ionic charges of the particles does not fall on the centre of the ionic charge of the counter

  14. Highly Charged Particles Cause a Larger Current Blockage in Micropores Compared to Neutral Particles.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yinghua; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Hinkle, Preston; Plett, Timothy S; Yang, Crystal; Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Digman, Michelle A; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Hsu, Jyh-Ping; Siwy, Zuzanna S

    2016-09-27

    Single pores in the resistive-pulse technique are used as an analytics tool to detect, size, and characterize physical as well as chemical properties of individual objects such as molecules and particles. Each object passing through a pore causes a transient change of the transmembrane current called a resistive pulse. In high salt concentrations when the pore diameter is significantly larger than the screening Debye length, it is assumed that the particle size and surface charge can be determined independently from the same experiment. In this article we challenge this assumption and show that highly charged hard spheres can cause a significant increase of the resistive-pulse amplitude compared to neutral particles of a similar diameter. As a result, resistive pulses overestimate the size of charged particles by even 20%. The observation is explained by the effect of concentration polarization created across particles in a pore, revealed by numerical modeling of ionic concentrations, ion current, and local electric fields. It is notable that in resistive-pulse experiments with cylindrical pores, concentration polarization was previously shown to influence ionic concentrations only at pore entrances; consequently, additional and transient modulation of resistive pulses was observed when a particle entered or left the pore. Here we postulate that concentration polarization can occur across transported particles at any particle position along the pore axis and affect the magnitude of the entire resistive pulse. Consequently, the recorded resistive pulses of highly charged particles reflect not only the particles' volume but also the size of the depletion zone created in front of the moving particle. Moreover, the modeling identified that the effective surface charge density of particles depended not only on the density of functional groups on the particle but also on the capacitance of the Stern layer. The findings are of crucial importance for sizing particles and

  15. On gel electrophoresis of dielectric charged particles with hydrophobic surface: A combined theoretical and numerical study.

    PubMed

    Majee, Partha Sarathi; Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Gopmandal, Partha Pratim; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-21

    A theoretical study on the gel electrophoresis of a charged particle incorporating the effects of dielectric polarization and surface hydrophobicity at the particle-liquid interface is made. A simplified model based on the weak applied field and low charge density assumption is also presented and compared with the full numerical model for a nonpolarizable particle to elucidate the nonlinear effects such as double layer polarization and relaxation as well as surface conduction. The main motivation of this study is to analyze the electrophoresis of the surface functionalized nanoparticle with tunable hydrophobicity or charged fluid drop in gel medium by considering the electrokinetic effects and hydrodynamic interactions between the particle and the gel medium. An effective medium approach, in which the transport in the electrolyte saturated hydrogel medium is governed by the Brinkman equation, is adopted in the present analysis. The governing electrokinetic equations based on the conservation principles is solved numerically. The Navier-slip boundary condition along with the continuity condition of dielectric displacement are imposed on the surface of the hydrophobic polarizable particle. The impact of the slip length on the electrophoresis is profound for a thinner Debye layer, however, surface conduction effect also becomes significant for a hydrophobic particle. Impact of hydrophobicity and relaxation effects are higher for a larger particle. Dielectric polarization creates a reduction in its electrophoretic propulsion and has negligible impact at the thinner Debye length as well as lower gel screening length. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Relativistic mixtures of charged and uncharged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-01-14

    Mixtures of relativistic gases within the framework of Boltzmann equation are analyzed. Three systems are considered. The first one refers to a mixture of uncharged particles by using Grad’s moment method, where the relativistic mixture is characterized by the moments of the distribution functions: particle four-flows, energy-momentum tensors, and third-order moment tensors. In the second Fick’s law for a mixture of relativistic gases of non-disparate rest masses in a Schwarzschild metric are derived from an extension of Marle and McCormack model equations applied to a relativistic truncated Grad’s distribution function, where it is shown the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the gravitational potential. The third one consists in the derivation of the relativistic laws of Ohm and Fourier for a binary mixtures of electrons with protons and electrons with photons subjected to external electromagnetic fields and in presence of gravitational fields by using the Anderson and Witting model of the Boltzmann equation.

  17. Early experiments in charged particle beams from the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Banks, P. M.; Williamson, P. R.; Baker, K. D.; Obayashi, T.; Burch, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of studies on board the Shuttle involving the interaction of particle beams with the atmosphere and the ionosphere, and the effects of the beams on the electrical potential of the platform, are discussed. Noting that the Shuttle allows greater weight and power demands by scientific payloads than previous satellite launches, the OSS-1 Vehicle Charging and Potential experiment and the Spacelab 1 Particle Accelerator and Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams are described. Instrumentation details are provided, including charge and current probes, the Spherical Retarding Potential Analyzer, the Fast Pulse Electron Generator, and digital control and interface units. The SEPAC equipment, which comprises an electron beam accelerator, and MPD plasma jet, and diagnostic units are detailed, and operating procedures and experiment objectives are outlined.

  18. Experimental Studying of Dust Particles Charging by Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Petrov, O. F.; Vorona, N. A.; Vasiliev, M. N.

    2008-09-07

    The studying of the dusty plasma properties under electron beam action are of great interest because it gives the unique opportunities for experimental investigation of strongly coupled systems as well as for developing the new dusty plasma technologies of creating the new composite materials. Highly charged dust particle generates electrostatic field that can accelerate positive ions to high power. It gives the unique possibilities of using these macroparticles (for deeply ions implantation, as catalysts for increasing rate of reactions with the high energy barrier, in the new ionic engines etc.). Presented work deals with the experimental investigation of dust particles charging under direct influence of electron beam. On the basis of experimental data the average velocities of dust particles were obtained and the charge of macroparticle was estimated.

  19. Preparation of Panel and Charged Particles for Electrophoretic Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyung Suk; Park, Jin Woo; Park, Lee Soon; Lee, Jung Kyung; Han, Yoon Soo; Kwon, Younghwan

    Studies on the formulation of photosensitive paste for transparent soft mold press (TSMP) method have been performed. With the optimum formulation of the photosensitive paste the box-type barrier rib with good flexibility and high solvent resistance was fabricated, suitable for the panel material of the electrophoretic display. Cationically-charged white particles were prepared by using TiO2 nanoparticles, silane coupling agent with amino groups, dispersant and acetic acid. The cationically charged TiO2 particles exhibited 74.09 mV of zeta potential and 3.11 × 10-5 cm2/Vs of mobility. Electrophoretic display fabricated with the charged TiO2 particles exhibited 10 V of low driving voltage and maximum contrast ratio (5.3/1) at 30 V.

  20. APPARATUS FOR CLEANING GASES WITH ELECTROSTATICALLY CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, H.F.

    1960-02-01

    An apparatus is described for cleaning gases with the help of electrostatically charged pellets. The pellets are blown past baffles in a conduit and into the center of a rotuting body of the gas to be cleaned. The pellets are charged electrostatically by impinging on the baffles. The pellets collect the particles suspended in the gas in their passage from the center of the rotating body to its edge.

  1. Charged Particle Acceleration by Lasers in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2007-07-11

    Several physical processes of laser electron acceleration in plasmas are revisited. A laser beam can drive plasma waves which in turn can accelerate resonant electrons. If these plasma waves can reach amplitude limited only by wave breaking alone, then the corresponding accelerating gradient in the plasma wave is of the order of electron rest mass energy per plasma skin depth, typically about GEV per centimeter. This is several orders of magnitudes higher than the conventional RF field gradient, giving rise to the possibility of compact accelerators needed for high energy physics research as well as medical and other applications. The chirped short pulse laser, with intensity exceeding the threshold for relativistic self focusing, can generate ion bubble in its wake by expelling electrons. The electrons at the bubble boundary, surge toward the stagnation point and pile up there. As the pile acquires a critical size, these electrons are injected into the bubble and accelerated by the combined fields of ion space charge and the plasma wave to Gev in energy. Most remarkably these electrons are bunched in phase space while being accelerated to high energy, resulting in near mono-energetic electron beam of high beam quality, with narrow energy spread. We review also other processes related to laser electron acceleration, such as acceleration in plasma wave assisted by ponderomotive force and betatron acceleration.

  2. Clustering of settling charged particles in turbulence: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiang; Nordsiek, Hansen; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric clouds, electrosprays and protoplanetary nebula (dusty plasma) contain electrically charged particles embedded in turbulent flows, often under the influence of an externally imposed, approximately uniform gravitational or electric force. We have developed a theoretical description of the dynamics of such systems of charged, sedimenting particles in turbulence, allowing radial distribution functions (RDFs) to be predicted for both monodisperse and bidisperse particle size distributions. The governing parameters are the particle Stokes number (particle inertial time scale relative to turbulence dissipation time scale), the Coulomb-turbulence parameter (ratio of Coulomb 'terminal' speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale) and the settling parameter (the ratio of the gravitational terminal speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale). The theory is compared to measured RDFs for water particles in homogeneous, isotropic air turbulence. The RDFs are obtained from particle positions measured in three dimensions using digital holography. The measurements verify the general theoretical expression, consisting of a power law increase in particle clustering due to particle response to dissipative turbulent eddies, modulated by an exponential electrostatic interaction term. Both terms are modified as a result of the gravitational diffusion-like term, and the role of 'gravity' is explored by imposing a macroscopic uniform electric field to create an enhanced, effective gravity.

  3. First Results from the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semones, Edward; Zeitland, Cary

    2016-01-01

    The Charged Particle Detector (CPD) subsystem of the ISS-RAD detector has been making measurements of high-energy charged and neutral particles since the unit was deployed on Feb. 1, 2016. The CPD is nearly identical to the MSL-RAD instrument, but onboard data processing has been significantly modified to meet ISS requirements. We will present dose rates and LET spectra obtained over the first six months of operations, as well as preliminary results obtained from the limited sample of pulse-height analyzed raw data that has been telemetered to Earth.

  4. Perturbation theory for charged-particle transport in one dimension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Lamkin, S. L.

    1975-01-01

    Perturbation theory, when applied to charged-particle transport, generates a series solution that requires a double quadrature per term. The continuity of higher-order terms leads to numerical evaluation of the series. The high rate of convergence of the series makes the method a practical tool for charged-particle transport problems. The coupling of the neutron component in the case of proton transport in tissue does not greatly alter the rate of convergence. The method holds promise for a practical high-energy proton transport theory.

  5. Self-Assembly of Heterogeneously Charged Particles under Confinement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly—the spontaneous organization of microscopic units into well-defined mesoscopic structures—is a fundamental mechanism for a broad variety of nanotechnology applications in material science. The central role played by the anisotropy resulting from asymmetric shapes of the units and/or well-defined bonding sites on the particle surface has been widely investigated, highlighting the importance of properly designing the constituent entities in order to control the resulting mesoscopic structures. Anisotropy driven self-assembly can also result from the multipolar interactions characterizing many naturally occurring systems, such as proteins and viral capsids, as well as experimentally synthesized colloidal particles. Heterogeneously charged particles represent a class of multipolar units that are characterized by a competitive interplay between anisotropic attractive and repulsive interactions, due to the repulsion/attraction between charged-like/oppositely charged regions on the particle surface. In the present work, axially symmetric quadrupolar colloids are considered in a confined planar geometry; the role of both the overall particle charge and the patch extension as well as the effect of the substrate charge are studied in thermodynamic conditions such that the formation of extended structures is favored. A general tendency to form quasi-two-dimensional aggregates where particles align their symmetry axes within the plane is observed; among these planar self-assembled scenarios, a clear distinction between the formation of microcrystalline gels—branched networks consisting of purely crystalline domains—as opposed to disordered aggregates can be observed based on the specific features of the particle–particle interaction. Additionally, the possible competition of interparticle and particle–substrate interactions affects the size and the internal structure of the aggregates and can possibly inhibit the aggregation process. PMID:23627740

  6. Charged Particle Environment Definition for NGST: Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Evans, Steven W.; Hardage, Donna M.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    NGST will operate in a halo orbit about the L2 point, 1.5 million km from the Earth, where the spacecraft will periodically travel through the magnetotail region. There are a number of tools available to calculate the high energy, ionizing radiation particle environment from galactic cosmic rays and from solar disturbances. However, space environment tools are not generally available to provide assessments of charged particle environment and its variations in the solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetotail at L2 distances. An engineering-level phenomenology code (LRAD) was therefore developed to facilitate the definition of charged particle environments in the vicinity of the L2 point in support of the NGST program. LRAD contains models tied to satellite measurement data of the solar wind and magnetotail regions. The model provides particle flux and fluence calculations necessary to predict spacecraft charging conditions and the degradation of materials used in the construction of NGST. This paper describes the LRAD environment models for the deep magnetotail (XGSE < -100 Re) and solar wind, and presents predictions of the charged particle environment for NGST.

  7. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Blasi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.; Chuychai, P.; Dmitruk, P.; Wan, M.; Parashar, T. N.; Chhiber, R.

    2017-03-01

    The investigation of the diffusive transport of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider the diffusion of charged particles in fully three-dimensional isotropic turbulent magnetic fields with no mean field, which may be pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We identify different ranges of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. Two different theoretical models are proposed to calculate the diffusion coefficient, each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared to those from computer simulations, showing good agreement.

  8. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  9. Surface modification for polystyrene colloidal particles with controlled charge densities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongman; Kwon, Oh-Sun; Shin, Kwanwoo; Song, Ju-Myung; Kim, Joon-Seop; Seo, Young-Soo; Tael, Giyoong; Jon, Sangyong

    2007-11-01

    A significant amount of polystyrene sulfonated acid (PSSA) and poly(styrene-ran-acrylic acid) (PSAA) random copolymer can be adsorbed by dispersion of PS particles via a swelling-quenching process. A THF-water mixed solvent was used in the swelling process and a large amount of pure water was used, to give a low concentration of THF% in quenching process. Our results showed that functional PSSA groups were randomly and tightly adsorbed to the PS particles. When the mol.% of charged segments was increased, the progressive adsorption of PSSA chains to the PS particles leads to an increase in the electrophoretic mobility and zeta-potential of aqueous dispersions. Thus, we were able to obtain well-distributed surface charge density on the PS particles.

  10. Internal bremsstrahlung of strongly interacting charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgalin, S. D.; Tchuvil'sky, Yu. M.; Churakova, T. A.

    2016-11-01

    A universal theoretical model intended for calculating internal-bremsstrahlung spectra is proposed. In this model, which can be applied to describing nuclear decays of various type (such as alpha decay, cluster decay, and proton emission), use is made of realistic nucleus-nucleus potentials. Theoretical internal-bremsstrahlung spectra were obtained for the alpha decay of the 214Po nucleus, as well as for the decay of the 222Ra nucleus via the emission of a 14C cluster and for the decay of the 113Cs nucleus via proton emission, and the properties of these spectra were studied. The contributions of various regions (internal, subbarrier, and external) to the internal-bremsstrahlung amplitude were analyzed in detail. It is shown that the contribution of the internal region to the amplitude for internal bremsstrahlung generated in nuclear decay via proton emission is quite large, but that this is not so for alpha decay and decay via cluster emission. Thus, a process in which strong interaction of nuclear particles affects the internal-bremsstrahlung spectrum if found.

  11. Energetic charged particles in the uranian magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Stone, E C; Cooper, J F; Cummings, A C; McDonald, F B; Trainor, J H; Lal, N; McGuire, R; Chenette, D L

    1986-07-04

    During the encounter with Uranus, the cosmic ray system on Voyager 2 measured significant fluxes of energetic electrons and protons in the regions of the planets magnetosphere where these particles could be stably trapped. The radial distribution of electrons with energies of megaelectron volts is strongly modulated by the sweeping effects ofthe three major inner satellites Miranda, Ariel, and Umbriel. The phase space density gradient of these electrons indicates that they are diffusing radially inward from a source in the outer magnetosphere or magnetotail. Differences in the energy spectra of protons having energies of approximately 1 to 8 megaelectron volts from two different directions indicate a strong dependence on pitch angle. From the locations of the absorption signatures observed in the electron flux, a centered dipole model for the magnetic field of Uranus with a tilt of 60.1 degrees has been derived, and a rotation period of the planet of 17.4 hours has also been calculated. This model provides independent confirmaton of more precise determinations made by other Voyager experiments.

  12. Internal bremsstrahlung of strongly interacting charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kurgalin, S. D.; Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M.; Churakova, T. A.

    2016-11-15

    A universal theoretical model intended for calculating internal-bremsstrahlung spectra is proposed. In this model, which can be applied to describing nuclear decays of various type (such as alpha decay, cluster decay, and proton emission), use is made of realistic nucleus–nucleus potentials. Theoretical internal-bremsstrahlung spectra were obtained for the alpha decay of the {sup 214}Po nucleus, as well as for the decay of the {sup 222}Ra nucleus via the emission of a {sup 14}C cluster and for the decay of the {sup 113}Cs nucleus via proton emission, and the properties of these spectra were studied. The contributions of various regions (internal, subbarrier, and external) to the internal-bremsstrahlung amplitude were analyzed in detail. It is shown that the contribution of the internal region to the amplitude for internal bremsstrahlung generated in nuclear decay via proton emission is quite large, but that this is not so for alpha decay and decay via cluster emission. Thus, a process in which strong interaction of nuclear particles affects the internal-bremsstrahlung spectrum if found.

  13. Generation of narrow peaks in spectroscopy of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbers, Dirk; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    In spectroscopy of charged particles, narrow peaks may appear in continuous spectra if magnetic transport of the particles is involved. These artefacts, which so far have escaped the attention of investigators, can develop whenever geometric detection efficiency is less than 100%. As such peaks may be misinterpreted as new physics, their generation is investigated, both analytically and experimentally, for various detector configurations, including those used in searches for the spontaneous decay of the vacuum in heavy-ion collisions.

  14. Aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere through particle charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, P.; Yelle, R. V.; Koskinen, T.; Bazin, A.; Vuitton, V.; Vigren, E.; Galand, M. F.; Wellbrock, A.; Coates, A. J.; Wahlund, J.; Crary, F.; Snowden, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of Titan's lower thermosphere and ionosphere by Cassini instruments demonstrate the presence of large mass negative ions of a few thousand amu, and the presence of positive ions up to a few hundred amu [1,2]. The mechanisms though responsible for the production of these large ions have so far remained elusive. A recent Titan flyby that probed deeper layers of Titan's thermosphere than usual, revealed a discrepancy in the observed positive ion and electron density, with the electron density lower than the abundance required to satisfy charge balance [3]. The remaining electron density was found in the form of the large mass negative ions. Aerosols can be charged on interaction with electrons and ions, while this charge can affect the particle coagulation, thus, their subsequent growth. Given the above observations we investigate here the potential role of aerosols in Titan's ionosphere and how this interaction affects the aerosol evolution. This investigation is performed with the use of a model that couples between the ionospheric photochemical evolution and the microphysical growth of aerosols in a self-consistent approach. Our results show that particle charging has an important role in the ionosphere. Most of the produced particles in the ionosphere attain a negative charge. Thus, they act as a sink for the free electrons with the remaining free electron densities consistent with the recent Cassini observations. Being negatively charged, the particles repel each other reducing in this way the coagulation rates and the growth of the aerosols. On the other hand, the negatively charged particles attract the abundant positive ions, which results to enhanced collisions between them. The mass added to the particles by the ions leads to an increase in their size and an increase in the resulting mass flux of the aerosols. Our simulated mass per charge spectra provide excellent fits to the observed positive and negative ion spectra from the Cassini Plasma

  15. Charged-particle acceleration in braking plasma jets.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we describe the mechanism of the charged particle acceleration in space plasma systems. We consider the interaction of nonrelativistic particles with a sub-Alfvenic plasma jet originated from the magnetic reconnection. The sharp front with increased magnetic field amplitude forms in the jet leading edge. Propagation of the jet in the inhomogeneous background plasma results in front braking. We show that particles can interact with this front in a resonance manner. Synchronization of particle reflections from the front and the front braking provides the stable trapping of particles in the vicinity of the front. This trapping supports the effective particle acceleration along the front. The mechanism of acceleration is potentially important due to the prevalence of the magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas.

  16. Method of measuring a profile of the density of charged particles in a particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, L.G.; Jankowski, D.J.

    1975-10-01

    A profile of the relative density of charged particles in a beam is obtained by disposing a number of rods parallel to each other in a plane perpendicular to the beam and shadowing the beam. A second number of rods is disposed perpendicular to the first rods in a plane perpendicular to the beam and also shadowing the beam. Irradiation of the rods by the beam of charged particles creates radioactive isotopes in a quantity proportional to the number of charged particles incident upon the rods. Measurement of the radioactivity of each of the rods provides a measure of the quantity of radioactive material generated thereby and, together with the location of the rods, provides information sufficient to identify a profile of the density of charged particles in the beam.

  17. Investigations of charged particle motion on the surfaces of dusty, airless solar system bodies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, A.; Colwell, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic charging conditions exist on the dusty surfaces of planetary bodies such as the Moon, asteroids, and the moons of Mars. On these so-called 'airless bodies', the motions of dust particles above the surface become complex due to grain-grain and grain-plasma interactions. For example, tribocharging and other charge transfer processes can occur due to relative dust grain movements, and charged dust grains immersed in plasma interact with local electromagnetic forces. This is thought to lead to effects such as the lunar 'horizon glow,' (Rennilson and Criswell, 1974, The Moon, 10) and potential dusty 'fountains' above the lunar surface (Stubbs et al., 2006, Adv. Sp. Res., 37). Regolith grains can be mobilized by impacts or other mechanical disturbances, or simply by the Coulomb force acting on grains. Previous work has increased our theoretical understanding of the behavior of charged particles in these low-gravity environments (i.e. Poppe and Horanyi, 2010, JGR, A115; Colwell et al., 2007, Rev. Geophys., 45 (and references therein)). Experimental work has also analyzed grain surface charging due to plasma or tribocharging (Sickafoose et al., 2001, JGR, 106) and the motion of grains on surfaces in the presence of an electric field (Wang et al., 2009, JGR, 114). Occasionally, there is disagreement between theoretical predictions and observations. We present the results of new laboratory experiments aimed at understanding particle charging and the dynamics of charged particles on the surfaces of airless bodies. In the initial experiments, we analyze the motion of particles in the presence of an electric field in vacuum, either in a bell-jar or in a 0.75-second microgravity drop tower experiment box. Prior to motion, particles may be charged due to triboelectric effects, plasma interactions, or a combination of the two. Motion is induced by shaking or by low-velocity impacts in order to simulate the natural motion of slow-moving objects on regolith surfaces, or

  18. Ultrafast charge separation driven by differential particle and hole mobilities.

    PubMed

    Dutoi, Anthony D; Wormit, Michael; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2011-01-14

    The process of a local excitation evolving into an intramolecular charge-separated state is followed and compared for several systems by directly simulating the time propagation of the electronic wavefunction. The wavefunction and Hamiltonian are handled using the extended second-order algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC(2)-x), which explicitly accounts for electron correlation in the dynamic many-particle state. The details of the charge separation can be manipulated according to the chemical composition of the system; atoms which dope the conjugated system with either particles or holes are shown to effect whether the particle or hole is more mobile. Initially, the charges oscillate between the ends of linear molecules (with different rates), separating periodically, but, at long times, both charges tend to spread over the whole molecule. Charge separation is also shown to occur for asymmetric systems, where it may eventually be experimentally feasible to excite a localized resonance (nonstationary state) on one end of the molecule preferentially and follow the ensuing dynamics.

  19. Electromagnetic field of fractal distribution of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2005-08-15

    Electric and magnetic fields of fractal distribution of charged particles are considered. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. The fractional integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Using the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equation, the simple examples of the fields of homogeneous fractal distribution are considered. The electric dipole and quadrupole moments for fractal distribution are derived.

  20. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  1. Functionally charged nanosize particles differentially activate BV2 microglia.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Nanosize (860-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) were coated with carboxyl (COOH-) or dimethyl amino (CH3)2-N- groups to give a net negative or p...

  2. Quantum aspects of charged-particle beam optics

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Sameen Ahmed

    2016-06-10

    The classical treatments have been successful in designing numerous charged-particle devices. It is natural to develop a quantum prescription, since all systems are fundamentally quantum mechanical in nature. The quantum theory leads to new insights accompanied with wavelength-dependent contributions. The action of a magnetic quadrupole is derived from the Dirac equation.

  3. Functionally charged nanosize particles differentially activate BV2 microglia.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Nanosize (860-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) were coated with carboxyl (COOH-) or dimethyl amino (CH3)2-N- groups to give a net negative or p...

  4. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  5. A search for charged massive particles in IMP 8 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden-Ifft, D. P.; Barwick, S. W.; Price, P. B.

    1990-01-01

    Data from the IMP 8 satellite are used here to rule out charged massive particles (CHAMPs) with masses between 2.4 and 56,000 TeV as the source of the dark matter in the Galactic halo. This limit is achieved under the assumption that CHAMPs are virialized.

  6. Charged particle in higher dimensional weakly charged rotating black hole spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Krtous, Pavel

    2011-01-15

    We study charged particle motion in weakly charged higher dimensional black holes. To describe the electromagnetic field we use a test field approximation and the higher dimensional Kerr-NUT-(A)dS metric as a background geometry. It is shown that for a special configuration of the electromagnetic field, the equations of motion of charged particles are completely integrable. The vector potential of such a field is proportional to one of the Killing vectors (called a primary Killing vector) from the 'Killing tower' of symmetry generating objects which exists in the background geometry. A free constant in the definition of the adopted electromagnetic potential is proportional to the electric charge of the higher dimensional black hole. The full set of independent conserved quantities in involution is found. We demonstrate that Hamilton-Jacobi equations are separable, as is the corresponding Klein-Gordon equation and its symmetry operators.

  7. Charging of heated colloidal particles using the electrolyte Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Majee, Arghya; Würger, Alois

    2012-03-16

    We propose a novel actuation mechanism for colloids, which is based on the Seebeck effect of the electrolyte solution: Laser heating of a nonionic particle accumulates in its vicinity a net charge Q, which is proportional to the excess temperature at the particle surface. The corresponding long-range thermoelectric field E is proportional to 1/r(2) provides a tool for controlled interactions with nearby beads or with additional molecular solutes. An external field E(ext) drags the thermocharged particle at a velocity that depends on its size and absorption properties; the latter point could be particularly relevant for separating carbon nanotubes according to their electronic band structure.

  8. Charge fluctuations for particles on a surface exposed to plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T. E.; Hayes, A.

    2011-02-28

    We develop a stochastic model for the charge fluctuations on a microscopic dust particle resting on a surface exposed to plasma. We find in steady state that the fluctuations are normally distributed with a standard deviation that is proportional to (CT{sub e}){sup 1/2}, where C is the particle-surface capacitance and T{sub e} is the plasma electron temperature. The time for an initially uncharged ensemble of particles to reach the steady state distribution is directly proportional to CT{sub e}.

  9. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  10. Guiding of charged particles through capillaries in insulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolterfoht, Nikolaus; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2016-04-01

    Studies of charged particle guiding through capillaries in insulating materials, performed during the last decade, are reviewed in a comprehensive manner. First, the principles of capillary guiding of slow highly charged ions are introduced describing the self-organized formation of charge patches. Basic quantities are defined, such as the guiding power characterizing a capillary. Challenges of the guiding experiments are pointed out. Then, experiments are described with emphasis on the guiding of highly charged ions in the keV energy range. Samples with an array of nanocapillaries as well as single macrocapillaries are treated. Emission profiles of transmitted ions are analyzed to establish scaling laws for the guiding angle, which quantifies the guiding power. Oscillations of the mean ion emission angle reveal the temporal dynamics of the charge patch formation. Next, experiments with ions of high (MeV) energies are focused on single tapered capillaries allowing for the production of a microbeam for various applications. Experiments concerning electrons are presented showing that apart from being elastically scattered these negative particles may enter into the capillary surface where they suffer energy losses. Finally, theoretical concepts of the capillary guiding are discussed. Simulations based on different charge transport methods clearly support the understanding of the guiding mechanisms. Altogether, capillary guiding involves several novel phenomena for which understanding have progressed far beyond their infancy.

  11. Simulation of impulse effects from explosive charges containing metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, K.; Nance, D. V.; Menon, S.

    2010-06-01

    The propagation of an explosive blast wave containing inert metal particles is investigated numerically using a robust two-phase methodology with appropriate models to account for real gas behavior, inter-phase interactions, and inter-particle collisions to study the problem of interest. A new two-phase Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation is proposed that can handle the dense nature of the flow-field. The velocity and momentum profiles of the gas and particle phases are analyzed and used to elucidate the inter-phase momentum transfer, and its effect on the impulsive aspects of heterogeneous explosive charges. The particles are found to pick up significant amounts of momentum and kinetic energy from the gas, and by virtue of their inertia, are observed to sustain it for a longer time. The impulse characteristics of heterogeneous explosives are compared with a homogeneous explosive containing the same amount of high explosive, and it is observed that the addition of solid particles augments the impulsive loading significantly in the near-field, and to a smaller extent in the far-field. The total impulsive loading is found to be insensitive to the particle size added to the explosive charge above a certain cut-off radius, but the individual impulse components are found to be sensitive, and particles smaller than this cut-off size deliver about 8% higher total impulse than the larger ones. Overall, this study provides crucial insights to understand the impulsive loading characteristics of heterogeneous explosives.

  12. Glass transition of charged particles in two-dimensional confinement.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Anoosheh; Heinen, Marco; Ivlev, Alexei; Löwen, Hartmut; Sperl, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    The glass transition of mesoscopic charged particles in two-dimensional confinement is studied by mode-coupling theory. We consider two types of effective interactions between the particles, corresponding to two different models for the distribution of surrounding ions that are integrated out in coarse-grained descriptions. In the first model, a planar monolayer of charged particles is immersed in an unbounded isotropic bath of ions, giving rise to an isotropically screened Debye-Hückel (Yukawa)-type effective interaction. The second, experimentally more relevant system is a monolayer of negatively charged particles that levitate atop a flat horizontal electrode, as frequently encountered in laboratory experiments with complex (dusty) plasmas. A steady plasma current toward the electrode gives rise to an anisotropic effective interaction potential between the particles, with an algebraically long-ranged in-plane decay. In a comprehensive parameter scan that covers the typical range of experimentally accessible plasma conditions, we calculate and compare the mode-coupling predictions for the glass transition in both kinds of systems.

  13. Monitoring of Hadrontherapy Treatments by Means of Charged Particle Detection.

    PubMed

    Muraro, Silvia; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Fiore, Salvatore; Frallicciardi, Paola; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Morganti, Silvio; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Traini, Giacomo; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the incoming beam radiation with the patient body in hadrontherapy treatments produces secondary charged and neutral particles, whose detection can be used for monitoring purposes and to perform an on-line check of beam particle range. In the context of ion-therapy with active scanning, charged particles are potentially attractive since they can be easily tracked with a high efficiency, in presence of a relatively low background contamination. In order to verify the possibility of exploiting this approach for in-beam monitoring in ion-therapy, and to guide the design of specific detectors, both simulations and experimental tests are being performed with ion beams impinging on simple homogeneous tissue-like targets (PMMA). From these studies, a resolution of the order of few millimeters on the single track has been proven to be sufficient to exploit charged particle tracking for monitoring purposes, preserving the precision achievable on longitudinal shape. The results obtained so far show that the measurement of charged particles can be successfully implemented in a technology capable of monitoring both the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target and finally lead to the design of a novel profile detector. Crucial aspects to be considered are the detector positioning, to be optimized in order to maximize the available statistics, and the capability of accounting for the multiple scattering interactions undergone by the charged fragments along their exit path from the patient body. The experimental results collected up to now are also valuable for the validation of Monte Carlo simulation software tools and their implementation in Treatment Planning Software packages.

  14. Monitoring of Hadrontherapy Treatments by Means of Charged Particle Detection

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, Silvia; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Fiore, Salvatore; Frallicciardi, Paola; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Morganti, Silvio; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Traini, Giacomo; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the incoming beam radiation with the patient body in hadrontherapy treatments produces secondary charged and neutral particles, whose detection can be used for monitoring purposes and to perform an on-line check of beam particle range. In the context of ion-therapy with active scanning, charged particles are potentially attractive since they can be easily tracked with a high efficiency, in presence of a relatively low background contamination. In order to verify the possibility of exploiting this approach for in-beam monitoring in ion-therapy, and to guide the design of specific detectors, both simulations and experimental tests are being performed with ion beams impinging on simple homogeneous tissue-like targets (PMMA). From these studies, a resolution of the order of few millimeters on the single track has been proven to be sufficient to exploit charged particle tracking for monitoring purposes, preserving the precision achievable on longitudinal shape. The results obtained so far show that the measurement of charged particles can be successfully implemented in a technology capable of monitoring both the dose profile and the position of the Bragg peak inside the target and finally lead to the design of a novel profile detector. Crucial aspects to be considered are the detector positioning, to be optimized in order to maximize the available statistics, and the capability of accounting for the multiple scattering interactions undergone by the charged fragments along their exit path from the patient body. The experimental results collected up to now are also valuable for the validation of Monte Carlo simulation software tools and their implementation in Treatment Planning Software packages. PMID:27536555

  15. Brownian dynamics of charged particles in a constant magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, L. J.; Piel, A.; Miskovic, Z. L.; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-05-15

    Numerical algorithms are proposed for simulating the Brownian dynamics of charged particles in an external magnetic field, taking into account the Brownian motion of charged particles, damping effect, and the effect of magnetic field self-consistently. Performance of these algorithms is tested in terms of their accuracy and long-time stability by using a three-dimensional Brownian oscillator model with constant magnetic field. Step-by-step recipes for implementing these algorithms are given in detail. It is expected that these algorithms can be directly used to study particle dynamics in various dispersed systems in the presence of a magnetic field, including polymer solutions, colloidal suspensions, and, particularly, complex (dusty) plasmas. The proposed algorithms can also be used as thermostat in the usual molecular dynamics simulation in the presence of magnetic field.

  16. Shock drift acceleration. [of charged particles in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Thomas P.; Pesses, Mark E.; Decker, Robert B.

    1985-01-01

    This is a review of the fundamental physics of the interactions of charged particles treated individually while they interact with fast mode magnetohydrodynamic shocks. Numerical simulation and analytical theory are used to develop predictions of the expected characteristics of this process strong upstream anisotropies directed along the magnetic field and downstream anisotropies tending to be peaked more perpendicular to the field; relatively more of the enhancement of higher-energy particles occurring upstream; sensitive dependence on shock normal to magnetic field angle of the efficiency of energization. Observations which display all of the above characteristics are reviewed. Also discussed is the relationship of shock drift acceleration to the models for stochastic transport of charged particles in the vicinity of shocks. Extensions of this work in both the observational and theoretical approaches are discussed.

  17. Peculiarities of charged particle dynamics under cyclotron resonance conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseev, S. S.; Buts, V. A.; Erokhin, N. S.

    2016-08-15

    Peculiarities of the dynamics of charged particles interacting with electromagnetic radiation under nearly autoresonance conditions are analyzed. In particular, analysis of nonlinear cyclotron resonances shows that their widths increase when the autoresonance conditions are approached. In this case, however, the distance between nonlinear resonances increases even faster, due to which nonlinear resonances do not overlap and, accordingly, regimes with dynamic chaos do not occur. According to calculations, the dynamics of charged particles under the autoresonance conditions is very sensitive to fluctuations, the effect of which can be anomalously large and lead to superdiffusion. It is shown that, under the autoresonance conditions, particle dynamics on small time intervals can differ significantly from that on large time intervals. This effect is most pronounced in the presence of fluctuations in the system.

  18. Multiple scattering and charged-particle - hydrogen-atom collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Thomas, B. K.

    1979-01-01

    Glauber-approximation scattering amplitudes for charged-particle - hydrogen-atom elastic and inelastic collisions are derived directly in terms of the known particle-electron and particle-proton Coulomb scattering amplitudes and the known hydrogen-atom form factors. It is shown that the particle-hydrogen amplitude contains no single-scattering term. The double-scattering term is obtained as a two-dimensional integral in momentum space. It is demonstrated how the result can be used as the starting point for an alternative and relatively simple derivation, in closed form, of the Glauber particle-hydrogen scattering amplitude for transitions from the ground state to an arbitrary (nlm) state.

  19. Effect of Charge, Size and Temperature on Stability of Charged Colloidal Nano Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golchoobi, A.; Khosravi, A.; Modarress, H.; Ahmadzadeh, A.

    2012-10-01

    Molecular simulation of charged colloidal suspension is performed in NVT canonical ensemble using Monte Carlo method and primitive model. The well-known Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory is applied to account for effective interactions between particles. Effect of temperature, valance of micro-ions and the size of colloidal particles on the phase stability of the solution is investigated. The results indicate that the suspension is more stable at higher temperatures. On the other hand, for a more stable suspension to exist, lower micro-ion valance is favorable. For micro-ions of higher charge the number of aggregates and the number of particle in each of aggregate on average is higher. However for the best of our results larger colloidal particle are less stable. Comparing the results with theoretical formula considering the influence of surface curvature shows qualitative consistency.

  20. Charge neutrality of fine particle (dusty) plasmas and fine particle cloud under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuji, Hiroo

    2017-03-01

    The enhancement of the charge neutrality due to the existence of fine particles is shown to occur generally under microgravity and in one-dimensional structures under gravity. As an application of the latter, the size and position of fine particle clouds relative to surrounding plasmas are determined under gravity.

  1. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  2. Surface charge features of kaolinite particles and their interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vishal

    Kaolinite is both a blessing and a curse. As an important industrial mineral commodity, kaolinite clays are extensively used in the paper, ceramic, paint, plastic and rubber industries. In all these applications the wettability, aggregation, dispersion, flotation and thickening of kaolinite particles are affected by its crystal structure and surface properties. It is therefore the objective of this research to investigate selected physical and surface chemical properties of kaolinite, specifically the surface charge of kaolinite particles. A pool of advanced analytical techniques such as XRD, XRF, SEM, AFM, FTIR and ISS were utilized to investigate the morphological and surface chemistry features of kaolinite. Surface force measurements revealed that the silica tetrahedral face of kaolinite is negatively charged at pH>4, whereas the alumina octahedral face of kaolinite is positively charged at pH<6, and negatively charged at pH>8. Based on electrophoresis measurements, the apparent iso-electric point for kaolinite particles was determined to be less than pH 3. In contrast, the point of zero charge was determined to be pH 4.5 by titration techniques, which corresponds to the iso-electric point of between pH 4 and 5 as determined by surface force measurements. Results from kaolinite particle interactions indicate that the silica face--alumina face interaction is dominant for kaolinite particle aggregation at low and intermediate pH values, which explains the maximum shear yield stress at pH 5-5.5. Lattice resolution images reveal the hexagonal lattice structure of these two face surfaces of kaolinite. Analysis of the silica face of kaolinite showed that the center of the hexagonal ring of oxygen atoms is vacant, whereas the alumina face showed that the hexagonal surface lattice ring of hydroxyls surround another hydroxyl in the center of the ring. High resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of kaolinite has indicated that kaolinite is indeed

  3. Charged-particle motion in multidimensional magnetic-field turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the fundamental physics of charged-particle motion in a turbulent magnetic field using a numerical simulation. The magnetic field fluctuations are taken to be static and to have a power spectrum which is Kolmogorov. The charged particles are treated as test particles. It is shown that when the field turbulence is independent of one coordinate (i.e., k lies in a plane), the motion of these particles across the magnetic field is essentially zero, as required by theory. Consequently, the only motion across the average magnetic field direction that is allowed is that due to field-line random walk. On the other hand, when a fully three-dimensional realization of the turbulence is considered, the particles readily cross the field. Transport coefficients both along and across the ambient magnetic field are computed. This scheme provides a direct computation of the Fokker-Planck coefficients based on the motions of individual particles, and allows for comparison with analytic theory.

  4. Charged-particle motion in multidimensional magnetic-field turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the fundamental physics of charged-particle motion in a turbulent magnetic field using a numerical simulation. The magnetic field fluctuations are taken to be static and to have a power spectrum which is Kolmogorov. The charged particles are treated as test particles. It is shown that when the field turbulence is independent of one coordinate (i.e., k lies in a plane), the motion of these particles across the magnetic field is essentially zero, as required by theory. Consequently, the only motion across the average magnetic field direction that is allowed is that due to field-line random walk. On the other hand, when a fully three-dimensional realization of the turbulence is considered, the particles readily cross the field. Transport coefficients both along and across the ambient magnetic field are computed. This scheme provides a direct computation of the Fokker-Planck coefficients based on the motions of individual particles, and allows for comparison with analytic theory.

  5. Nonstationary stochastic charge fluctuations of a dust particle in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shotorban, B.

    2011-06-15

    Stochastic charge fluctuations of a dust particle that are due to discreteness of electrons and ions in plasmas can be described by a one-step process master equation [T. Matsoukas and M. Russell, J. Appl. Phys. 77, 4285 (1995)] with no exact solution. In the present work, using the system size expansion method of Van Kampen along with the linear noise approximation, a Fokker-Planck equation with an exact Gaussian solution is developed by expanding the master equation. The Gaussian solution has time-dependent mean and variance governed by two ordinary differential equations modeling the nonstationary process of dust particle charging. The model is tested via the comparison of its results to the results obtained by solving the master equation numerically. The electron and ion currents are calculated through the orbital motion limited theory. At various times of the nonstationary process of charging, the model results are in a very good agreement with the master equation results. The deviation is more significant when the standard deviation of the charge is comparable to the mean charge in magnitude.

  6. Electrorotation of colloidal particles and cells depends on surface charge.

    PubMed Central

    Maier, H

    1997-01-01

    The importance of surface conductivity to the frequency-dependent polarizability and the rotation of particles in circular electric fields (electrorotation) is emphasized by various theoretical and experimental investigations. Although surface conductivity seems to be naturally related to the ionic double layer, there is rare experimental evidence of a direct relationship. To highlight the role of surface charges in electrorotation, an apparatus was developed with a symmetrical three-electrode arrangement for field frequencies between 25 Hz and 80 MHz. The three-dimensional electrostatic field distribution between the electrodes was evaluated numerically. With this device, rotating, gradient, and homogeneous electric fields of defined precision and homogeneity could be applied to slightly conducting suspensions. Surface properties of monodisperse latex particles (O 9.67 microm), carrying weak acid groups, were characterized by suspension conductometric titration. This procedure determined the amount of carboxyl groups and showed that strong acid groups were missing on the surface of these particles. To obtain the electrophoretic mobility, the spheres were separated by free-flow electrophoresis, and the zeta-potential was calculated from these data. Single-particle rotation experiments on fractions of specified electrophoretic mobility were carried out at frequencies between 25 Hz and 20 MHz. By analyzing the pH dependence of the rotation velocity, it could be shown that the rotation rate is determined by surface charges, both at the peak in rotation rate near the Maxwell-Wagner frequency (MWF) and at low frequencies. The inversion of the rotation direction at the MWF peak for vanishing surface charges was demonstrated. An analytical model for the double layer and dissociation on a charged surface was developed that is valid for low and high zeta-potentials. This model could provide convincing evidence of the linear dependence of the MWF rotation velocity on surface

  7. Charged Particle Therapy with Mini-Segmented Beams

    PubMed Central

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Eley, John G.; Rusek, Adam; Krishnan, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    One of the fundamental attributes of proton therapy and carbon ion therapy is the ability of these charged particles to spare tissue distal to the targeted tumor. This significantly reduces normal tissue toxicity and has the potential to translate to a wider therapeutic index. Although, in general, particle therapy also reduces dose to the proximal tissues, particularly in the vicinity of the target, dose to the skin and to other very superficial tissues tends to be higher than that of megavoltage x-rays. The methods presented here, namely, “interleaved carbon minibeams” and “radiosurgery with arrays of proton and light ion minibeams,” both utilize beams segmented into arrays of parallel “minibeams” of about 0.3 mm incident-beam size. These minibeam arrays spare tissues, as demonstrated by synchrotron x-ray experiments. An additional feature of particle minibeams is their gradual broadening due to multiple Coulomb scattering as they penetrate tissues. In the case of interleaved carbon minibeams, which do not broaden much, two arrays of planar carbon minibeams that remain parallel at target depth, are aimed at the target from 90° angles and made to “interleave” at the target to produce a solid radiation field within the target. As a result, the surrounding tissues are exposed only to individual carbon minibeam arrays and are therefore spared. The method was used in four-directional geometry at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to ablate a 6.5-mm target in a rabbit brain at a single exposure with 40 Gy physical absorbed dose. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and histology 6-month later showed very focal target necrosis with nearly no damage to the surrounding brain. As for minibeams of protons and light ions, for which the minibeam broadening is substantial, measurements at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX, USA; and Monte Carlo simulations showed that the broadening minibeams will merge with their neighbors at a certain

  8. Big bang nucleosynthesis with long-lived charged massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Takayama, Fumihiro

    2007-09-15

    We consider big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) with long-lived charged massive particles. Before decaying, the long-lived charged particle recombines with a light element to form a bound state like a hydrogen atom. This effect modifies the nuclear-reaction rates during the BBN epoch through the modifications of the Coulomb field and the kinematics of the captured light elements, which can change the light element abundances. It is possible for heavier nuclei abundances such as {sup 7}Li and {sup 7}Be to decrease sizably, while the ratios Y{sub p}, D/H, and {sup 3}He/H remain unchanged. This may solve the current discrepancy between the BBN prediction and the observed abundance of {sup 7}Li. If future collider experiments find signals of a long-lived charged particle inside the detector, the information of its lifetime and decay properties could provide insights into not only the particle physics models but also the phenomena in the early Universe, in turn.

  9. Charged Particle Therapy Steps Into the Clinical Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberer, Th.

    Beams of heavy charged particles like protons or carbon ions represent the ideal tool for the treatment of deep-seated, inoperable and radioresistant tumors. For more than 4 decades research with beams of charged particles has been performed. In total more than 40000 patients have been treated, mostly using protons being delivered by accelerators that were designed for basic research centers. In Berkeley, USA heavier particles like helium or neon ions were used to conduct clinical trials until 1992. Based on that somewhat limited technological standard and triggered by the promising results from Berkeley the first dedicated charged particle facilities were constructed. In order to maximally exploit the advantageous physical and radiobiological characteristics of these beams enormous effort was put into developing dynamic beam delivery techniques and tailoring the capabilities of the accelerators, the planning systems and the quality assurance procedures and equipment to the requirements resulting from these new treatment modalities. Active beam delivery systems integrated in rotating gantries, if necessary, will allow the production of superior dose distributions that precisely follow the medical prescription. The technological progress being made during the last 10 years defines the state of the art of the upcoming next-generation facilities for the clinical environment in Europe and Japan.

  10. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system is a device that produces by acceleration high energy charged particles (e.g., electrons and protons...

  11. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  12. Charge, energy, and LET spectra measurements of charged particles in P0006 experiment of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Oda, K.; Henke, R. P.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Frigo, L. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Derrickson, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements are under way of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite using stacks of plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) placed in different locations of the satellite. In the initial work, the charge, energy, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles were measured with CR-39 double layer PNTDs located on the west end of the satellite. Primary and secondary stopping heavy ions as well as relativistic galactic cosmic rays (mostly iron particles) were measured separately. The results will be compared with similar measurements in other locations on LDEF with different orientation and shielding conditions. The remarkably detailed study of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite will lead to a better understanding of the radiation environment of the Space Station Freedom. It will enable more accurate prediction of single event upsets (SEUs) in microelectronics and, especially, more accurate assessment of the risk, contributed by the different components of the radiation field to the health and safety of crew members.

  13. Charge collection studies in irradiated HV-CMOS particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolder, A.; Andelković, M.; Arndt, K.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Buttar, C.; Caragiulo, P.; Cindro, V.; Das, D.; Dopke, J.; Dragone, A.; Ehrler, F.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Gorišek, A.; Grabas, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grillo, A.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Huffman, T.; John, J.; Kanisauskas, K.; Kenney, C.; Kramberger, G.; Liang, Z.; Mandić, I.; Maneuski, D.; McMahon, S.; Mikuž, M.; Muenstermann, D.; Nickerson, R.; Perić, I.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Rubbo, F.; Segal, J.; Seiden, A.; Shipsey, I.; Song, W.; Stanitzki, M.; Su, D.; Tamma, C.; Turchetta, R.; Vigani, L.; Volk, J.; Wang, R.; Warren, M.; Wilson, F.; Worm, S.; Xiu, Q.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, H.

    2016-04-01

    Charge collection properties of particle detectors made in HV-CMOS technology were investigated before and after irradiation with reactor neutrons. Two different sensor types were designed and processed in 180 and 350 nm technology by AMS. Edge-TCT and charge collection measurements with electrons from 90Sr source were employed. Diffusion of generated carriers from undepleted substrate contributes significantly to the charge collection before irradiation, while after irradiation the drift contribution prevails as shown by charge measurements at different shaping times. The depleted region at a given bias voltage was found to grow with irradiation in the fluence range of interest for strip detectors at the HL-LHC. This leads to large gains in the measured charge with respect to the one before irradiation. The increase of the depleted region was attributed to removal of effective acceptors. The evolution of depleted region with fluence was investigated and modeled. Initial studies show a small effect of short term annealing on charge collection.

  14. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  15. Cataract production in mice by heavy charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, E.H.; Jose, J.; Yang, V.V.; Barker, M.E.

    1981-03-01

    The cataractogenic effects of heavy charged particles have been evaluated in mice in relation to dose and ionization density (LET/sub infinity/). The study was undertaken due to the high potential for eye exposures to HZE particles among SPS personnel working in outer space. This has made it imperative that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in relation to LET/sub infinity/ for various particles be defined so that appropriate quality factors (Q) could be assigned for estimation of risk. Although mice and men differ in susceptibility to radiation-induced cataracts, the results from this project should assist in defining appropriate quality factors in relation to LET/sub infinity/, particle mass, charge, or velocity. Evaluation of results indicated that : (1) low single doses (5 to 20 rad) of iron (/sup 56/Fe) or argon (/sup 40/Ar) particles are cataractogenic at 11 to 18 months after irradiation; (2) onset and density of the opacification are dose related; (3) cataract density (grade) at 9, 11, 13, and 16 months after irradiation shows partial LET/sub infinity/-dependence; and (4) the severity of cataracts is reduced significantly when 417 rad of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation is given in 24 weekly 17 rad fractions compared to giving this radiation as a single dose, but cataract severity is not reduced by fractionation of /sup 12/C doses over 24 weeks.

  16. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINING CHARGED PARTICLE MOTION

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1959-08-01

    An analog system for determining the motion of charged particles in three dimensional electrical fields is described. A model electrode structure is formed and potentials are applied to the electrodes to provide an analog of the field which is to be studied. To simulate charged particles within the model, conducting spheres are placed at points from which particle motion is to be traced. To free the spheres from gravitational attraction in order that they will be electrostatically accelerated through the model, the apparatus is suspended and dropped. During the pericd that the model is dropping the spheres move through the electrcde structure with a motion corresponding to that of particles in the real system. The model is photographed in the course of falling so that the instantaneous position of the spheres within the simulated field at selected times may be observed and measured. The device thus gives data of particles in the real system. The model is photographed in the course of falling so that the instantaneous position of the spheres within the simulated field at selected times may be observed and measured. The device thus gives data which frequently can otherwise be obtained only with a digital computer.

  17. Radial distribution of charged particles in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Broussard, L. J.; Makela, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.

    2015-02-01

    The radial spread of charged particles emitted from a point source in a magnetic field is a potential source of systematic error for any experiment where magnetic fields guide charged particles to detectors with finite size. Assuming uniform probability as a function of the phase along the particle's helical trajectory, an analytic solution for the radial probability distribution function follows which applies to experiments in which particles are generated throughout a volume that spans a sufficient length along the axis of a homogeneous magnetic field. This approach leads to the same result as a different derivation given by Dubbers et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 763, 112-119 (2014). But the constant phase approximation does not strictly apply to finite source volumes or fixed positions, which lead to local maxima in the radial distribution of emitted particles at the plane of the detector. A simple method is given to calculate such distributions, then the effect is demonstrated with data from a 207Bi electron-conversion source in the superconducting solenoid magnet spectrometer of the Ultracold Neutron facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Implications for neutron beta decay spectroscopy are discussed.

  18. Charged-particle transport in turbulent astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, C. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of electromagnetic fluctuations, or plasma turbulence, on the motion of the individual particles in a plasma is investigated. Two alternative methods are used to find a general equation governing the time-evolution of a distribution of charged particles subject to both an external force field and the random fields of the fluctuations. It is found that, for the high-temperature, low-density plasmas frequently encountered in the study of astrophysics, the presence of even a small amount of turbulence can have a very important effect on the behavior of the plasma. Two problems in which turbulence plays an important role are treated.

  19. Trajectories of charged particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, M. Kaan

    2012-05-01

    This article presents the theory of relativistic charged-particle motion in Earth's magnetosphere, at a level suitable for undergraduate courses. I discuss particle and guiding center motion and derive the three adiabatic invariants associated with the three periodic motions in a dipolar field. I provide 12 computational exercises that can be used as classroom assignments or for self-study. Two of the exercises, drift-shell bifurcation and Speiser orbits, are adapted from active magnetospheric research. The PYTHON code provided in the supplement can be used to replicate the trajectories and can be easily extended for different field geometries.

  20. Transverse-structure electrostatic charged particle beam lens

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Electrostatic particle-beam lenses using a concentric co-planar array of independently biased rings can be advantageous for some applications. Traditional electrostatic lenses often consist of axial series of biased rings, apertures, or tubes. The science of lens design has devoted much attention to finding axial arrangements that compensate for the substantial optical aberrations of the individual elements. Thus, as with multi-element lenses for light, a multi-element charged-particle lens can have optical behavior that is far superior to that of the individual elements. Transverse multiple-concentric-ring lenses achieve high performance, while also having advantages in terms of compactness and optical versatility.

  1. Transverse-structure electrostatic charged particle beam lens

    DOEpatents

    Moran, M.J.

    1998-10-13

    Electrostatic particle-beam lenses using a concentric co-planar array of independently biased rings can be advantageous for some applications. Traditional electrostatic lenses often consist of axial series of biased rings, apertures, or tubes. The science of lens design has devoted much attention to finding axial arrangements that compensate for the substantial optical aberrations of the individual elements. Thus, as with multi-element lenses for light, a multi-element charged-particle lens can have optical behavior that is far superior to that of the individual elements. Transverse multiple-concentric-ring lenses achieve high performance, while also having advantages in terms of compactness and optical versatility. 7 figs.

  2. Arnold Diffusion of Charged Particles in ABC Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, Alejandro; Peralta-Salas, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    We prove the existence of diffusing solutions in the motion of a charged particle in the presence of ABC magnetic fields. The equations of motion are modeled by a 3DOF Hamiltonian system depending on two parameters. For small values of these parameters, we obtain a normally hyperbolic invariant manifold and we apply the so-called geometric methods for a priori unstable systems developed by A. Delshams, R. de la Llave and T.M. Seara. We characterize explicitly sufficient conditions for the existence of a transition chain of invariant tori having heteroclinic connections, thus obtaining global instability (Arnold diffusion). We also check the obtained conditions in a computer-assisted proof. ABC magnetic fields are the simplest force-free-type solutions of the magnetohydrodynamics equations with periodic boundary conditions, and can be considered as an elementary model for the motion of plasma-charged particles in a tokamak.

  3. First- and second-order charged particle optics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1984-07-01

    Since the invention of the alternating gradient principle there has been a rapid evolution of the mathematics and physics techniques applicable to charged particle optics. In this publication we derive a differential equation and a matrix algebra formalism valid to second-order to present the basic principles governing the design of charged particle beam transport systems. A notation first introduced by John Streib is used to convey the essential principles dictating the design of such beam transport systems. For example the momentum dispersion, the momentum resolution, and all second-order aberrations are expressed as simple integrals of the first-order trajectories (matrix elements) and of the magnetic field parameters (multipole components) characterizing the system. 16 references, 30 figures.

  4. Wake effect in graphene due to moving charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radović, I.; Borka, D.; Mišković, Z. L.

    2014-12-01

    We study the wake effect in a supported graphene layer induced by external charged particles moving parallel to it by using the dynamic polarization function of graphene within the random phase approximation for its π electrons described as Dirac's fermions. We explore the effects of a substrate assuming that graphene is supported by an insulating substrate, such as SiO2, and a strongly polar substrate, such as SiC, under the gating conditions. Strong effects are observed in the wake pattern in the induced density of charge carriers in supported graphene due to finite size of the graphene-substrate gap, as well as due to strong coupling effects, and plasmon damping of graphene's π electrons. We find that the excitation of surface phonons in the substrate may exert quite strong influences on the wake effect in the total electrostatic potential in the graphene plane at low particle speeds.

  5. Anisotropy-driven collective instability in intense charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2005-12-01

    The classical electrostatic Harris instability is generalized to the case of a one-component intense charged particle beam with anisotropic temperature including the important effects of finite transverse geometry and beam space charge. For a long, coasting beam, the eigenmode code bEASt have been used to determine detailed 3D stability properties over a wide range of temperature anisotropy and beam intensity. A simple theoretical model is developed which describes the essential features of the linear stage of the instability. Both the simulations and the analytical theory clearly show that moderately intense beams are linearly unstable to short-wavelength perturbations provided the ratio of the longitudinal temperature to the transverse temperature is smaller than some threshold value. The delta-f particle-in-cell code BEST has been used to study the detailed nonlinear evolution and saturation of the instability.

  6. Visual Basic VPython Interface: Charged Particle in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayaga, Chandra

    2006-12-01

    A simple Visual Basic (VB) to VPython interface is described and illustrated with the example of a charged particle in a magnetic field. This interface allows data to be passed to Python through a text file read by Python. The first component of the interface is a user-friendly data entry screen designed in VB, in which the user can input values of the charge, mass, initial position and initial velocity of the particle, and the magnetic field. Next, a command button is coded to write these values to a text file. Another command button starts the VPython program, which reads the data from the text file, numerically solves the equation of motion, and provides the 3d graphics animation. Students can use the interface to run the program several times with different data and observe changes in the motion.

  7. Effect of collisions on dust particle charging via particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovagnati, B.; Davoudabadi, M.; Lapenta, G.; Mashayek, F.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of collisions on the charging and shielding of a single dust particle immersed in an infinite plasma is studied. A Monte-Carlo collision (MCC) algorithm is implemented in the particle-in-cell DEMOCRITUS code to account for the collisional phenomena which are typical of dusty plasmas in plasma processing, namely, electron-neutral elastic scattering, ion-neutral elastic scattering, and ion-neutral charge exchange. Both small and large dust particle radii, as compared to the characteristic Debye lengths, are considered. The trends of the steady-state dust particle potential at increasing collisionality are presented and discussed. The ions and electron energy distributions at various locations and at increasing collisionality in the case of large particle radius are shown and compared to their local Maxwellians. The ion-neutral charge-exchange collision is found to be by far the most important collisional phenomenon. For small particle radius, collisional effects are found to be important also at low level of collisionality, as more ions are collected by the dust particle due to the destruction of trapped ion orbits. For large particle radius, the major collisional effect is observed to take place in proximity of the presheath. Finally, the species energy distribution functions are found to approach their local Maxwellians at increasing collisionality.

  8. Plugin-docking system for autonomous charging using particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyasu, Hiroshi; Wada, Masayoshi

    2017-03-01

    Autonomous charging of the robot battery is one of the key functions for the sake of expanding working areas of the robots. To realize it, most of existing systems use custom docking stations or artificial markers. By the other words, they can only charge on a few specific outlets. If the limit can be removed, working areas of the robots significantly expands. In this paper, we describe a plugin-docking system for the autonomous charging, which does not require any custom docking stations or artificial markers. A single camera is used for recognizing the 3D position of an outlet socket. A particle filter-based image tracking algorithm which is robust to the illumination change is applied. The algorithm is implemented on a robot with an omnidirectional moving system. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our system.

  9. Diffusion Limit of Kinetic Equations for Multiple Species Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Lin, Tai-Chia; Liu, Chun

    2015-02-01

    In ionic solutions, there are multi-species charged particles (ions) with different properties like mass, charge etc. Macroscopic continuum models like the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) systems have been extensively used to describe the transport and distribution of ionic species in the solvent. Starting from the kinetic theory for the ion transport, we study a Vlasov-Poisson-Fokker-Planck (VPFP) system in a bounded domain with reflection boundary conditions for charge distributions and prove that the global renormalized solutions of the VPFP system converge to the global weak solutions of the PNP system, as the small parameter related to the scaled thermal velocity and mean free path tends to zero. Our results may justify the PNP system as a macroscopic model for the transport of multi-species ions in dilute solutions.

  10. Stopping power of charged particles due to ion wave excitations.

    PubMed

    Nitta, H; Muroki, C; Nambu, M

    2002-08-01

    Stopping power due to ion wave excitations is derived for a charged particle moving in a two-component plasma. Unlike previous theories based on ion-acoustic-wave approximation (IAWA), the excitation of short-wavelength ion waves is taken into account. The obtained stopping power has a magnitude larger than that of IAWA. Stopping power at subsonic velocities, where stopping power in IAWA disappears, is even larger than that of supersonic velocities.

  11. Stopping power of charged particles due to ion wave excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, H.; Muroki, C.; Nambu, M.

    2002-08-01

    Stopping power due to ion wave excitations is derived for a charged particle moving in a two-component plasma. Unlike previous theories based on ion-acoustic-wave approximation (IAWA), the excitation of short-wavelength ion waves is taken into account. The obtained stopping power has a magnitude larger than that of IAWA. Stopping power at subsonic velocities, where stopping power in IAWA disappears, is even larger than that of supersonic velocities.

  12. Canonical algorithms for numerical integration of charged particle motion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, I. N.; Morozov, E. A.; Morozova, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    A technique for numerically integrating the equation of charged particle motion in a magnetic field is considered. It is based on the canonical transformations of the phase space in Hamiltonian mechanics. The canonical transformations make the integration process stable against counting error accumulation. The integration algorithms contain a minimum possible amount of arithmetics and can be used to design accelerators and devices of electron and ion optics.

  13. Motion of charged particles in planetary magnetospheres with nonelectromagnetic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Hill, T. W.; Wolf, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Expressions are derived for the mirror point, the bounce period, the second adiabatic invariant, and the bounce-averaged azimuthal drift velocity as functions of equatorial pitch angle for a charged particle in a dipole magnetic field in the presence of centrifugal, gravitational, and Coriolis forces. These expressions are evaluated numerically, and the results are displayed graphically. The average azimuthal drift speed for a flux tube containing a thermal equilibrium plasma distribution is also evaluated.

  14. Electrostatic energy analyzers for high energy charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. M.; Ilyina, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    The electrostatic energy analyzers for high energy charged particle beams emitted from extended large-size objects as well as from remote point sources are proposed. Results of the analytical trajectory solutions in ideal cylindrical field provide focusing characteristics for both configurations. The instruments possess of simple compact design, based on an ideal cylindrical field with entrance window arranged in the end-boundary between electrodes and can be used for measurements in space technologies, plasma and nuclear physics.

  15. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  16. Genetic Regulation of Charged Particle Mutagenesis in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, S.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C.; Liu, W.; Wiese, C.

    1999-01-01

    Our studies use a series of syngeneic, and where possible, isogenic human B-lymphoblastoid cell lines to assess the genetic factors that modulate susceptibility apoptosis and their impact on the mutagenic risks of low fluence exposures to 1 GeV Fe ions and 55 MeV protons. These ions are representative of the types of charged particle radiation that are of particular significance for human health in the space radiation environment. The model system employs cell lines derived from the male donor WIL-2. These cells have a single X chromosome and they are hemizygous for one mutation marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). TK6 and WTK1 cells were each derived from descendants of WIL-2 and were each selected as heterozygotes for a second mutation marker, the thymidine kinase (TK) gene located on chromosome 17q. The HPRT and TK loci can detect many different types of mutations, from single basepair substitutions up to large scale loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The single expressing copy of TK in the TK6 and WTKI cell lines is found on the same copy of chromosome 17, and this allele can be identified by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) identified when high molecular weight DNA is digested by the SacI restriction endonuclease and hybridized against the cDNA probe for TK. A large series of polymorphic linked markers has been identified that span more than 60 cM of DNA (approx. 60 megabasepairs) and distinguish the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the initially active TK allele from the copy of chromosome 17 bearing the silent TK allele in both TK6 and WTKI cells. TK6 cells express normal p53 protein while WTKI cells express homozygous mutant p53. Expression of mutant p53 can increase susceptibility to x-ray-induced mutations. It's been suggested that the increased mutagenesis in p53 mutant cells might be due to reduced apoptosis.

  17. The Average Quality Factors by TEPC for Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2004-01-01

    The quality factor used in radiation protection is defined as a function of LET, Q(sub ave)(LET). However, tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) measure the average quality factors as a function of lineal energy (y), Q(sub ave)(Y). A model of the TEPC response for charged particles considers energy deposition as a function of impact parameter from the ion s path to the volume, and describes the escape of energy out of sensitive volume by delta-rays and the entry of delta rays from the high-density wall into the low-density gas-volume. A common goal for operational detectors is to measure the average radiation quality to within accuracy of 25%. Using our TEPC response model and the NASA space radiation transport model we show that this accuracy is obtained by a properly calibrated TEPC. However, when the individual contributions from trapped protons and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are considered; the average quality factor obtained by TEPC is overestimated for trapped protons and underestimated for GCR by about 30%, i.e., a compensating error. Using TEPC's values for trapped protons for Q(sub ave)(y), we obtained average quality factors in the 2.07-2.32 range. However, Q(sub ave)(LET) ranges from 1.5-1.65 as spacecraft shielding depth increases. The average quality factors for trapped protons on STS-89 demonstrate that the model of the TEPC response is in good agreement with flight TEPC data for Q(sub ave)(y), and thus Q(sub ave)(LET) for trapped protons is overestimated by TEPC. Preliminary comparisons for the complete GCR spectra show that Q(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is approximately 3.2-4.1, while TEPC measures 2.9-3.4 for QQ(sub ave)(y), indicating that QQ(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is underestimated by TEPC.

  18. The Average Quality Factors by TEPC for Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2004-01-01

    The quality factor used in radiation protection is defined as a function of LET, Q(sub ave)(LET). However, tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) measure the average quality factors as a function of lineal energy (y), Q(sub ave)(Y). A model of the TEPC response for charged particles considers energy deposition as a function of impact parameter from the ion s path to the volume, and describes the escape of energy out of sensitive volume by delta-rays and the entry of delta rays from the high-density wall into the low-density gas-volume. A common goal for operational detectors is to measure the average radiation quality to within accuracy of 25%. Using our TEPC response model and the NASA space radiation transport model we show that this accuracy is obtained by a properly calibrated TEPC. However, when the individual contributions from trapped protons and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are considered; the average quality factor obtained by TEPC is overestimated for trapped protons and underestimated for GCR by about 30%, i.e., a compensating error. Using TEPC's values for trapped protons for Q(sub ave)(y), we obtained average quality factors in the 2.07-2.32 range. However, Q(sub ave)(LET) ranges from 1.5-1.65 as spacecraft shielding depth increases. The average quality factors for trapped protons on STS-89 demonstrate that the model of the TEPC response is in good agreement with flight TEPC data for Q(sub ave)(y), and thus Q(sub ave)(LET) for trapped protons is overestimated by TEPC. Preliminary comparisons for the complete GCR spectra show that Q(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is approximately 3.2-4.1, while TEPC measures 2.9-3.4 for QQ(sub ave)(y), indicating that QQ(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is underestimated by TEPC.

  19. Determining Charged Particle Flux Direction in MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, J. K.; Kohler, J.; Guo, J.; Ehresmann, B.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Rafkin, S. C.; Boehm, E.; Böttcher, S. I.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Brinza, D. E.; Weigle, E.; Lohf, H.; Burmeister, S.; Reitz, G.; Matthiae, D.; Posner, A.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is an instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity, currently characterizing the radiation environment on the surface of Mars. The radiation entering the instrument from above consists mostly of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) modulated by the Martian atmosphere. From below, the instrument is exposed to secondary radiation produced by the interactions of the GCR with the soil. This secondary radiation gets further modulated going through the rover body before entering RAD. We developed a method of determining the direction of the charged particles measured by RAD. This method also extends the energy range possible for measurements with RAD beyond the intruments design limit. Using a combination of GEANT4 and Planetocosmics simulations, we reconstructed the expected charged particle spectra and intensities for upward and downward directed radiation which can be compared with observations. With the developed method, we are able to, for the first time, measure the upward charged particle flux with RAD both during the cruise phase and the surface science phase. Comparing the results of the simulations with the instrument data sets enables us to evaluate the simulation tools used to predict the Martian radiation envronment.

  20. Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hei, T K; Chen, D J; Brenner, D J; Hall, E J

    1988-07-01

    The mutagenic potential of charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) was assessed using the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus (HGPRT) in primary human fibroblasts. Exponentially growing cultures of early passaged fibroblasts were grown as monolayers on thin mylar sheets and were irradiated with accelerated protons, deuterons or helium-3 ions. The mutation rates were compared with those generated by 137Cs gamma-rays. LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, using the track segment mode, ranged from 10 to 150 keV/micron. After irradiation, cells were trypsinized, subcultured and assayed for both cytotoxicity and 6-thioguanine resistance. For gamma-rays, and for the charged particles of lower LET, the dose-response curves for cell survival were characterized by a marked initial shoulder, but approximated to an exponential function of dose for higher LETs. Mutation frequencies, likewise, showed a direct correlation to LET over the dose range examined. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for mutagenesis, based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, ranged from 1.30 for 10 keV/micron protons to 9.40 for 150 keV/micron helium-3 ions. Results of the present studies indicate that high-LET radiations, apart from being efficient inducers of cell lethality, are even more efficient in mutation induction as compared to low-LET ionizing radiation. These data are consistent with results previously obtained with both rodent and human fibroblast cell lines.

  1. TIME BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLES INJECTED BY 1962 HIGH ALTITUDE RUSSIAN NUCLEAR TESTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CHARGED PARTICLES, FALLOUT, GEOPHYSICS, HIGH ALTITUDE , USSR, NUCLEAR RADIATION SPECTROMETERS, RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, SCIENTIFIC SATELLITES, GEOMAGNETISM, BETA PARTICLES, RADIOACTIVE DECAY, SCINTILLATION COUNTERS.

  2. Particle-impact noise detector (PIND)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, R. J.; Jackson, D. E.; Leaf, W. D.; Meza, R. G.; Rader, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    Package, in page assembly, is subjected to low-frequency vibration, and noise generated by particle impacts is picked up by transducer. Test procedure calls for three transverse shocks to be applied to page to dislodge any trapped particles.

  3. Measurements of the Charged and Neutral Particle Spectra on the Martian Surface with MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Jan

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard Mars Science Laboratory’s rover Curiosity is the first ever instrument to measure the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars. Charged particles are a major component of this environment, both galactic cosmic rays propagating to the Martian surface and secondary particles created by interactions of these cosmic rays with the atoms of the Martian atmosphere and soil. Another important factor for determining the biological impact of the Martian surface radiation is the specific contribution of neutrons, which possess a high biological effectiveness. In contrast to charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays are generally only measured indirectly. Their measurement is the result of a complex convolution of the incident particle spectrum with the measurement process. We apply an inversion method to calculate the gamma/neutron spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. Here we show first surface measurements of the Martian particle spectra and compare them to theoretical predictions. Measuring the Martian particle spectra is an essential step for determining the mutagenic influences to past or present life at or beneath the Martian surface as well as the radiation hazard for future human exploration, including the shielding design of a potential habitat.

  4. Improved search for elementary particles with fractional electric charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, Nancy M.; Lee, Eric R.; Fleming, George R.; Casey, Brendan C. K.; Perl, Martin L.; Garwin, Edward L.; Hendricks, Charles D.; Lackner, Klaus S.; Shaw, Gordon L.

    1996-06-01

    We have devised and demonstrated the successful operation of a low-cost, high-mass throughput technique capable of performing bulk matter searches for fractionally charged particles based on an improved Millikan liquid drop method. The method uses a stroboscopic lamp and a charge coupled device video camera to image the trajectories of silicone oil drops falling through air in the presence of a vertical, alternating electric field. The images of the trajectories are computer processed in real time, the electric charge on a drop being measured with an rms error of 0.025 of an electron charge. This error is dominated by Brownian motion. In the first use of this method, we have looked at 5 974 941 drops and found no evidence for fractional charges in 1.07 mg of oil. With 95% confidence, the concentration of isolated quarks with +/-1/3e or +/-2/3e in silicone oil is less than one per 2.14×1020 nucleons.

  5. Repetitive heterocoagulation of oppositely charged particles for enhancement of magnetic nanoparticle loading into monodisperse silica particles.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideki; Nagao, Daisuke; Konno, Mikio

    2010-03-16

    Oppositely charged particles were repetitively heterocoagulated to fabricate highly monodisperse magnetic silica particles with high loading of magnetic nanoparticles. Positively charged magnetic nanoparticles prepared by surface modification with N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (TSA) were used to heterocoagulate with silica particles under basic conditions to give rise to negative silica surface charge and prevent the oxidation of the magnetic nanoparticles. The resultant particles of silica core homogeneously coated with the magnetic nanoparticles were further coated with thin silica layer with sodium silicate in order to enhance colloidal stability and avoid desorption of the magnetic nanoparticles from the silica cores. Five repetitions of the heterocoagulation and the silica coating could increase saturation magnetization of the magnetic silica particles to 27.7 emu/g, keeping the coefficient of variation of particle sizes (C(V)) less than 6.5%. Highly homogeneous loading of the magnetic component was confirmed by measuring Fe-to-Si atomic ratios of individual particles with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  6. Charged-Particle Acceleration and Energy Loss Measurements on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Ram, A. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Soures, J. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Roberts, S.; Sorce, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Phillips, T. W.

    2000-10-01

    Measurements have been made of charged fusion products produced in D ^3He-filled targets irradiated on OMEGA. Comparing the energy shifts of four particle types has probed two distinct physical processes: electrostatic acceleration in the low-density corona and energy loss in the high-density target. When the burn occurred during the laser pulse, particle energy shifts were dominated by acceleration effects. Using a simple mode, the time history of the target's electrostatic potential was found and shown to decay to zero soon after laser irradiation was complete. When the burn occurred after the pulse, particle energy shifts were dominated by energy losses in the target, allowing charged-particle stopping-power predictions to be tested. The results provide the first verification of the general form of stopping power theories over a wide velocity range. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of ICF under Coop. Agreem. No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  7. Radial distribution of charged particles in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, S. K. L. Broussard, L. J.; Makela, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.

    2015-02-15

    The radial spread of charged particles emitted from a point source in a magnetic field is a potential source of systematic error for any experiment where magnetic fields guide charged particles to detectors with finite size. Assuming uniform probability as a function of the phase along the particle’s helical trajectory, an analytic solution for the radial probability distribution function follows which applies to experiments in which particles are generated throughout a volume that spans a sufficient length along the axis of a homogeneous magnetic field. This approach leads to the same result as a different derivation given by Dubbers et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 763, 112–119 (2014). But the constant phase approximation does not strictly apply to finite source volumes or fixed positions, which lead to local maxima in the radial distribution of emitted particles at the plane of the detector. A simple method is given to calculate such distributions, then the effect is demonstrated with data from a {sup 207}Bi electron-conversion source in the superconducting solenoid magnet spectrometer of the Ultracold Neutron facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Implications for neutron beta decay spectroscopy are discussed.

  8. Human fibrinogen adsorption on positively charged latex particles.

    PubMed

    Zeliszewska, Paulina; Bratek-Skicki, Anna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2014-09-23

    Fibrinogen (Fb) adsorption on positively charged latex particles (average diameter of 800 nm) was studied using the microelectrophoretic and the concentration depletion methods based on AFM imaging. Monolayers on latex were adsorbed from diluted bulk solutions at pH 7.4 and an ionic strength in the range of 10(-3) to 0.15 M where fibrinogen molecules exhibited an average negative charge. The electrophoretic mobility of the latex after controlled fibrinogen adsorption was systematically measured. A monotonic decrease in the electrophoretic mobility of fibrinogen-covered latex was observed for all ionic strengths. The results of these experiments were interpreted according to the three-dimensional electrokinetic model. It was also determined using the concentration depletion method that fibrinogen adsorption was irreversible and the maximum coverage was equal to 0.6 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 10(-3) M and 1.3 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 0.15 M. The increase of the maximum coverage was confirmed by theoretical modeling based on the random sequential adsorption approach. Paradoxically, the maximum coverage of fibrinogen on positively charged latex particles was more than two times lower than the maximum coverage obtained for negative latex particles (3.2 mg m(-2)) at pH 7.4 and ionic strength of 0.15 M. This was interpreted as a result of the side-on adsorption of fibrinogen molecules with their negatively charged core attached to the positively charged latex surface. The stability and acid base properties of fibrinogen monolayers on latex were also determined in pH cycling experiments where it was observed that there were no irreversible conformational changes in the fibrinogen monolayers. Additionally, the zeta potential of monolayers was more positive than the zeta potential of fibrinogen in the bulk, which proves a heterogeneous charge distribution. These experimental data reveal a new, side-on adsorption mechanism of fibrinogen on positively charged surfaces and

  9. First detection of charged dust particles in the Earth's mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havnes, O.; Trøim, J.; Blix, T.; Mortensen, W.; Næsheim, L. I.; Thrane, E.; Tønnesen, T.

    1996-05-01

    Some theories for the observed anomalous radar backscatter during the summer (polar mesospheric summer echoes, or PMSE) and electron bite outs measured by rockets require the presence of charged dust. To investigate this, two dust probes have been launched in 1994 from Andyøa Rocket Range and we here report the results from the dust and an electron probe on the two payloads. The dust probes were designed to block out the electron and ion components at the mesopause but to detect primary currents due to impacts of charged dust and also to detect secondary plasma production during dust impacts. The results indicate that both during PMSE and noctilucent cloud (NLC) conditions, large amounts of dust, with average sizes apparently of about 0.1 μm and less, were present. The number densities Nd can be up to many thousand per cubic centimeter, and the charge density NdZd likewise. Large local gradients in density and charge density of dust are detected. Dust carrying both positive and negative charges can apparently be present on different occasions. In some parts of the NLC/PMSE layers we find that the negative charge density locked in grains is so large that the number of free electrons is significantly reduced there because the dust acts like sinks for electrons, and an electron bite out results. We also find that in one case the presence of positive dust leads to an increase in the local electron density by photoionization. The main uncertainties in the data analysis are the structure of the dust and the secondary plasma production at the comparatively low dust impact velocities (1 kms-1) in the experiment.

  10. High Pressure Quick Disconnect Particle Impact Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed particle impact testing to determine whether there is a particle impact ignition hazard in the quick disconnects (QDs) in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) on the International Space Station (ISS). Testing included standard supersonic and subsonic particle impact tests on 15-5 PH stainless steel, as well as tests performed on a QD simulator. This paper summarizes the particle impact tests completed at WSTF. Although there was an ignition in Test Series 4, it was determined the ignition was caused by the presence of a machining imperfection. The sum of all the test results indicates that there is no particle impact ignition hazard in the ISS ECLSS QDs. KEYWORDS: quick disconnect, high pressure, particle impact testing, stainless steel

  11. Fluctuation of charge on dust particles in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha; Srivastava, Sweta

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents an analytical model for the evaluation of the fluctuation of the charge on the dust particles in a complex plasma. In contrast to earlier analyses, which ignored the effect of dust particles on density and temperature of electrons and ions, the present model takes into account the number and energy balance of electrons and ions. Three cases, viz., (i) no emission, (ii) thermionic emission, and (iii) photoelectric emission of electrons from the dust particles, have been considered. The results have been graphically illustrated for typical parameters. It is seen that the plasma parameters, and hence the fluctuations, are considerably affected by the consideration of number and energy balance of electrons and ions. A comparison of the results of the present analysis with those of earlier works has also been made.

  12. Note on the field of a fast, charged particle

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, B.A.

    1984-08-01

    As the velocity of a charged particle increases, its electric flux lines become more and more concentrated about the transverse plane. This picture is sometimes construed to mean that the electric field is zero in front of a very fast particle. For many purposes, this is a valid approximation, but we must remember that it is still an approximation. No matter what the velocity of the particle, the field ahead of it never is zero. This becomes apparent if the field component along the direction of motion is integrated over the transverse plane. Here, Gauss' Theorem constrains the longitudinal field component to be finite, and the approximation that sets it equal to zero breaks down.

  13. Measuring charged particle multiplicity with early ATLAS public data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Üstün, G.; Barut, E.; Bektaş, E.; Özcan, V. E.

    2017-07-01

    We study 100 images of early LHC collisions that were recorded by the ATLAS experiment and made public for outreach purposes, and extract the charged particle multiplicity as a function of momentum for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. As these collisions have already been pre-processed by the ATLAS Collaboration, the particle tracks are visible, but are available to the public only in the form of low-resolution bitmaps. We describe two separate image processing methods, one based on the industry-standard OpenCV library and C++, another based on self-developed algorithms in Python. We present our analysis of the transverse momentum and azimuthal angle distributions of the particles, in agreement with the literature.

  14. Cataract production in mice by heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.; Jose, U.; Yang, V. V.; Barker, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The cataractogenic effects of heavy charged particles are evaluated in mice in relation to dose and ionization density. The relative biological effectiveness in relation to linear energy transfer for various particles is considered. Results indicated that low single doses (5 to 20 rad) of Fe 56 or Ar 40 particles are cataractogenic at 11 to 18 months after irradiation; onset and density of the opacification are dose related and cataract density (grade) at 9, 11, 13, and 16 months after irradiation shows partial linear energy transfer dependence. The severity of cataracts is reduced significantly when 417 rad of Co 60 gamma radiation is given in 24 weekly 17 rad fractions compared to giving this radiation as a single dose, but cataract severity is not reduced by fractionation of C12 doses over 24 weeks.

  15. Analytical description of the charged particle dynamics in the field of a spherical magnetic dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baev, V. K.; Bogdanovich, B. Yu.; Nesterovich, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The equations of charged particle motion in the earth's magnetic field are analyzed. Analytical data allow us to estimate important parameters of the charge dynamics, such as the charge capture conditions, oscillation amplitude and frequency, and longitudinal drift, and also relate these parameters to the parameters of the charged particles and the height of their trajectory. The results may be used in designing space vehicles intended for investigation of the near-earth space, specifically, earth's magnetosphere, with charged particle beams.

  16. Coherent Light induced in Optical Fiber by a Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, Xavier; Ray, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Coherent light production in an optical fiber by a charged particle (named PIGL, for particle-induced guided, light) is reviewed. From the microscopic point of view, light is emitted by transient electric dipoles induced in the fiber medium by the Coulomb field of the particle. The phenomenon can also considered as the capture of virtual photons of the particle field by the fiber. Two types of captures are distinguished. Type-I takes place in a uniform part of the fiber; then the photon keeps its longitudinal momentum pz . Type-II takes place near an end or in a non-uniform part of the fiber; then pz is not conserved. Type-I PIGL is not affected by background lights external to the fiber. At grazing incidence it becomes nearly monochromatic. Its circular polarization depends on the angular momentum of the particle about the fiber and on the relative velocity between the particle and the guided wave. A general formula for the yield of Type-II radiation, based on the reciprocity theorem, is proposed. This radiation can be assisted by metallic objects stuck to the fiber, via plasmon excitation. A periodic structure leads to a guided Smith-Purcell radiation. Applications of PIGL in beam diagnostics are considered.

  17. Charged iron particles, components of space radiation, destroy ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Birendra; Ortiz, Laura; Luderer, Ulrike

    2016-08-01

    Do charged iron particles, components of space radiation, cause premature ovarian failure? Exposure to charged iron particles causes ovarian DNA damage, oxidative damage and apoptosis, resulting in premature ovarian failure. The ovary is very sensitive to follicle destruction by low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, such as X-rays and γ-rays. However, it is completely unknown whether high-LET radiation, such as charged iron particles, also destroys ovarian follicles. Twelve week old C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to single doses of 0, 5, 30 or 50 cGy (n = 8/group) charged iron particles (LET = 179 keV/µm) at energy of 600 MeV/u. Two groups were irradiated at the highest dose, one fed AIN-93M chow and the other fed AIN-93M chow supplemented with 150 mg/kg diet alpha lipoic acid (ALA). We quantified the numbers of ovarian follicles, measured serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations, and analyzed histone H2AX phosphorylation, oxidative damage and apoptosis markers in the ovarian follicles. H2AX phosphorylation, lipid peroxidation, protein nitration and apoptosis were highly induced in ovarian follicles at 6 h and remained increased 1 week after irradiation. As a result, numbers of healthy ovarian follicles were significantly and dose-dependently depleted at 1 and 8 weeks post-irradiation, with 57, 84 and 99% decreases in primordial follicles at 8 weeks at the 5, 30 and 50 cGy doses, respectively (P < 0.05 versus 0 cGy). Consistent with near-total depletion of ovarian follicles in the 50 cGy group, serum concentrations of FSH and LH were significantly elevated at 8 weeks. Dietary supplementation with ALA partially prevented the adverse ovarian effects of 50 cGy iron particles. About 21% of the estimated radiation dose from exposure to galactic cosmic rays during a multi-year Mars mission will be due to high-LET particles, of which iron is only one. The effects of galactic cosmic rays, which contain a mixture of

  18. Investigation of charge multiplication in single crystalline CVD diamond particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muškinja, M.; Cindro, V.; Gorišek, A.; Kagan, H.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Phan, S.; Smith, D. S.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2017-01-01

    A special metallization pattern was created on a single crystalline diamond detector aimed at creating high enough electric field for impact ionization in the detector material. Electric field line focusing through electrode design and very high bias voltages were used to obtain high electric fields. Previous measurements and theoretical calculations indicated that drifting charge multiplication by impact ionization could take place. A large increase of induced charge was observed for the smallest dot electrode which points to charge multiplication while for the large dot and pad detector structure no such effect was observed. The evolution of induced currents was also monitored with the transient current technique. Induced current pulses with duration of order 1 μs were measured. The multiplication gain was found to depend on the particle rate.

  19. Impact of Hight Velocity Cold Spray Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.; Gilmore, D.L.; Jiang, X.; Neiser, R.A.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.F.

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents experimental data and an computational model of the cold spray solid particle impact process. Copper particles impacting onto a polished stainless steel substrate are examined. The high velocity impact causes significant plastic deformation of both the particle and the sub- strate, but no melting is observed. The plastic deformation exposes clean surfaces that, under the high impact pressures, result in significant bond strengths between the particle and substrate. Experimental measurements of the splat and crater sizes compare well with the numerical calculations. It is shown that the crater depth is significant and increases with impact velocity. However, the splat diameter is much less sensitive to the impact velocity. It is also shown that the geometric lengths of the splat and crater scale linearly with the diameter of the impacting particle. It is hoped that the results presented will allow better understanding of the bonding process during cold spray.

  20. Bounding Lorentz violation at particle colliders by tracking the motion of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2011-10-01

    In the presence of Lorentz violation, the motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field is distorted. By measuring the eccentricities of particles' elliptical orbits and studying how those eccentricities vary with the absolute orientation of the laboratory, it is possible to constrain the Lorentz-violating c{sub JK} parameters. For each observed species, this method can provide constraints on four linear combinations of coefficients for which, in some species, there are presently no two-sided bounds.

  1. The present status of the LLNL Evaluated Charged Particle Library (ECPL)

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Gregor, M.H.

    1987-03-13

    The present report is written with two purposes in mind: to summarize the charged-particle reactions that presently exist in Evaluated Charge Particle Library; and to list all of the low-Z charged-particle reactions for which data exist in the Livermore experimental data compilation. 2 tabs.

  2. Charge cluster distribution in nanosites traversed by a single ionizing particle An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pszona, S.; Bantsar, A.; Kula, J.

    2008-11-01

    A method for modeling charge cluster formation by a single ionizing particle in nanoelectronic structures of few nanometres size is presented. The method is based on experimental modeling of charge formation in the equivalent gaseous nanosites irradiated by single charged particles and the subsequent scaling procedure to a needed medium. Propane irradiated by alpha particles is presented as an example.

  3. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor’s p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles’ LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90–300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  4. Diffusiophoresis of a charged particle in a microtube.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Han C; Keh, Huan J

    2017-04-19

    The diffusiophoresis of a charged sphere along the axis of a circular microtube filled with an electrolyte solution is studied theoretically. The tube wall may be either nonconductive and impermeable or prescribed with a linear electrolyte concentration distribution. The electric double layers at the solid surfaces are thin, but the diffuse-layer polarization effect over the particle surface is considered. The general solutions to the electrokinetic differential equations are expressed in spherical and cylindrical coordinates, whereas the boundary conditions at the particle surface are satisfied by a collocation technique. The collocation solutions for the diffusiophoretic velocity of the particle, which are in good agreement with the asymptotic formula derived from a reflection method, are obtained for various values of the radius ratio and zeta potential ratio between the particle and the microtube and of other relevant parameters. The contributions from the diffusioosmotic flow along the tube wall and wall-corrected diffusiophoretic driving force to the particle velocity can be superimposed due to the linearity. Although the diffusiophoretic velocity in an uncharged microtube is in general a decreasing function of the particle-to-tube radius ratio and can reverse its direction, it can increase with increases in this ratio due to the competition of the wall effects of possible electrochemical enhancement and hydrodynamic retardation to the particle motion. When the zeta potentials associated with the tube and particle are equivalent, the diffusioosmotic flow induced by the tube wall dominates the diffusiophoretic motion. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Particle-drop Impact in Midair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirfazli, Alidad; Strzebin, Stefan; Peise, Oliver; Chevrollier, David

    2011-11-01

    For the first time the impact of a drop and particle in the mid-air is studied, which is a fundamental physical phenomenon relevant to many applications involving a fluidized bed and a liquid jet, e.g. drug particle coating, and upgrading of heavy oil. To date it has not been clear what happens when a particle and drop collide in midair. An apparatus was build to allow deterministic impact of a particle and drop to occur in midair. Using high speed imaging the impact of three different particles with water drops is studied at different relative velocities. Possible collision outcomes are elucidated in terms of particle-drop diameter ratio, Weber number, and particle wettability. Three distinct regimes of bonding, ripping and coating, and shattering are identified and discussed in this novel study. The differences between on-axis versus off-axis impact is also briefly discussed. NSERC & Canada Research Chairs.

  6. CHARGED PARTICLE MOTION IN AN EXPLOSIVELY GENERATED IONIZING SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, Christopher J.; O'Connor, Patrick D.

    2009-12-28

    Different aspects of the plasma generated in a gas contained in a tube due to detonation of a small explosive charge located at one end of the tube are presented. The motion of the charged particles within the plasma is monitored using Rogowski coils. Using time-resolved emission spectroscopy the temperature and species in the detonation products and compressed gas behind the shock wave are recorded. From the spectral lines of the emission profiles the temperatures and electron density were evaluated to be in the vicinity of 7,000 K and 5x10{sup 22} m{sup -3}. An ultra fast wave traveling down the guide tube ahead of the hydrodynamic shock and causing any charged particles there to move fast enough to be detected by the Rogowski coils was recorded. From the measurements the phase velocity of the wave was calculated at 525 km/s when krypton filled the tube, and 1300 km/s in the case of argon. The temperature and density measurements are consistent with the data reported in the literature for similar tests. The electrostatic pulse measurements are a new phenomena not previously observed.

  7. Moving charged particles in lattice Boltzmann-based electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuron, Michael; Rempfer, Georg; Schornbaum, Florian; Bauer, Martin; Godenschwager, Christian; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2016-12-01

    The motion of ionic solutes and charged particles under the influence of an electric field and the ensuing hydrodynamic flow of the underlying solvent is ubiquitous in aqueous colloidal suspensions. The physics of such systems is described by a coupled set of differential equations, along with boundary conditions, collectively referred to as the electrokinetic equations. Capuani et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 973 (2004)] introduced a lattice-based method for solving this system of equations, which builds upon the lattice Boltzmann algorithm for the simulation of hydrodynamic flow and exploits computational locality. However, thus far, a description of how to incorporate moving boundary conditions into the Capuani scheme has been lacking. Moving boundary conditions are needed to simulate multiple arbitrarily moving colloids. In this paper, we detail how to introduce such a particle coupling scheme, based on an analogue to the moving boundary method for the pure lattice Boltzmann solver. The key ingredients in our method are mass and charge conservation for the solute species and a partial-volume smoothing of the solute fluxes to minimize discretization artifacts. We demonstrate our algorithm's effectiveness by simulating the electrophoresis of charged spheres in an external field; for a single sphere we compare to the equivalent electro-osmotic (co-moving) problem. Our method's efficiency and ease of implementation should prove beneficial to future simulations of the dynamics in a wide range of complex nanoscopic and colloidal systems that were previously inaccessible to lattice-based continuum algorithms.

  8. Moving charged particles in lattice Boltzmann-based electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Kuron, Michael; Rempfer, Georg; Schornbaum, Florian; Bauer, Martin; Godenschwager, Christian; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2016-12-07

    The motion of ionic solutes and charged particles under the influence of an electric field and the ensuing hydrodynamic flow of the underlying solvent is ubiquitous in aqueous colloidal suspensions. The physics of such systems is described by a coupled set of differential equations, along with boundary conditions, collectively referred to as the electrokinetic equations. Capuani et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 973 (2004)] introduced a lattice-based method for solving this system of equations, which builds upon the lattice Boltzmann algorithm for the simulation of hydrodynamic flow and exploits computational locality. However, thus far, a description of how to incorporate moving boundary conditions into the Capuani scheme has been lacking. Moving boundary conditions are needed to simulate multiple arbitrarily moving colloids. In this paper, we detail how to introduce such a particle coupling scheme, based on an analogue to the moving boundary method for the pure lattice Boltzmann solver. The key ingredients in our method are mass and charge conservation for the solute species and a partial-volume smoothing of the solute fluxes to minimize discretization artifacts. We demonstrate our algorithm's effectiveness by simulating the electrophoresis of charged spheres in an external field; for a single sphere we compare to the equivalent electro-osmotic (co-moving) problem. Our method's efficiency and ease of implementation should prove beneficial to future simulations of the dynamics in a wide range of complex nanoscopic and colloidal systems that were previously inaccessible to lattice-based continuum algorithms.

  9. Control Experiment of Positively Charged Fine Particles at the Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Toshiaki; Ando, Ayumi; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2005-10-31

    It is already reported that the negatively charged fine particle flow was controlled by application of external electric field. The control of positively charged fine particles was examined in this experiment.The fine particles are able to take charges in the air under the atmospheric pressure by irradiation of UV light. The control of the positively charged fine particles has been attempted by the external electric field applied the negative potential. The fine particles for experiments are volcanic ashes, nylon 16, glass, and ice. Experiment was performed in the T-shaped glass chamber under the atmospheric pressure. The halogen lamp (500 W) was used to exit the electrons from particles by photo-emission. The ring and disk electrodes to control the positively charged particles were set at the bottom of chamber. The parallel electrodes were set at the middle of chamber and horizontal static electric fields (E = 0 {approx} 210 V/cm) were created in order to estimate the charge of fine particles. The charges of particle were estimated by the deflection of particle trajectory in the static electric fields and particle velocity. The estimated charges were 104e {approx} 5x106e and 103e {approx} 105e for volcanic ashes and nylon 16, respectively. When positively charged particles were introduced into collecting electrodes, the fine particles are collected in the electrodes. The result of control of positively charged fine particles is shown in this conference.

  10. Electromagnetic fields and potentials generated by massless charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Azzurli, Francesco; Lechner, Kurt

    2014-10-15

    We provide for the first time the exact solution of Maxwell’s equations for a massless charged particle moving on a generic trajectory at the speed of light. In particular we furnish explicit expressions for the vector potential and the electromagnetic field, which were both previously unknown, finding that they entail different physical features for bounded and unbounded trajectories. With respect to the standard Liénard–Wiechert field the electromagnetic field acquires singular δ-like contributions whose support and dimensionality depend crucially on whether the motion is (a) linear, (b) accelerated unbounded, (c) accelerated bounded. In the first two cases the particle generates a planar shock-wave-like electromagnetic field traveling along a straight line. In the second and third cases the field acquires, in addition, a δ-like contribution supported on a physical singularity-string attached to the particle. For generic accelerated motions a genuine radiation field is also present, represented by a regular principal-part type distribution diverging on the same singularity-string. - Highlights: • First exact solution of Maxwell’s equations for massless charges in arbitrary motion. • Explicit expressions of electromagnetic fields and potentials. • Derivations are rigorous and based on distribution theory. • The form of the field depends heavily on whether the motion is bounded or unbounded. • The electromagnetic field contains unexpected Dirac-delta-function contributions.

  11. [Galactic heavy charged particles damaging effect on biological structures].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Krasavin, E A; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2013-03-01

    A concept of the radiation risk of the manned interplanetary flights is proposed and substantiated. Heavy charged particles that are a component of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have a high damaging effect on the biological structures as great amount of energy is deposited in heavy particle tracks. The high biological effectiveness of heavy ions is observed in their action on cell genetic structures and the whole organism, including the brain structures. The hippocampus is the part of the central nervous system that is the most sensitive to radiation--first of all, to heavy charged particles. Irradiation of animals with accelerated iron ions at doses corresponding to the real fluxes of GCR heavy nuclei, to which Mars mission crews can be exposed, leads to marked behavioral function disorders in the post-irradiation period. To evaluate the radiation risk for the interplanetary flight crews, the concept of successful mission accomplishment is introduced. In these conditions, the central nervous system structures can be the critical target of GCR heavy nuclei. Their damage can modify the higher integrative functions of the brain and cause disorders in the crew members' operator performances.

  12. Charged Particle Trajectories in Sweeper Magnet for LISA Commissioning Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Alyson; Garrett, Sierra; Taylor, Nathaniel; Rogers, Warren F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) located at NSCL, MSU, is used in conjunction with the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Sweeper Magnet for experiments investigating the properties of exotic neutron-rich nuclei near the neutron dripline. In the LISA commissioning experiment, designed to study neutron unstable 24O excited states, decay energy calculations require careful determination of charged fragment and neutron trajectories following breakup. Tracking of charged particles through the Sweeper Chamber is accomplished using two Cathode Readout Drift Chamber (CRDC) detectors separated by 1.8 m. During analysis of individual charged fragment passages through both CRDCs we recognized a majority of events had incomplete charge collection in the center pads. Without correction, standard peak location algorithms incorrectly determined the individual event centroids thereby reducing trajectory resolution. We developed a method and algorithm for correctly determining the centroids to restore trajectory resolution, critical for neutron breakup event reconstruction and decay energy determination. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  13. Charged Particle Effects on Solar Sails - An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Program is currently sponsoring a comprehensive look at the effects of the charged particle environment on the first generation of Solar Sail propulsion systems. As part of this, a joint NASA MSFC/JPL team is investigating the effects of spacecraft charging on the preliminary ISP Solar Sail mission designs. This paper will begin by reviewing the plasma environments being proposed for such missions-these range from the ambient solar wind at approximately 1 AU in the ecliptic plane, approximately 0.5 AU solar-polar orbit, and geosynchronous orbit. Following a discussion of the critical design issues associated with Solar Sails from a charging standpoint, a simple Sail configuration for modeling purposes will be presented. Results for the various environments will be illustrated in terms of the estimated surface potentials for the Solar Sail using the NASCAP-2K charging analysis program. Based on these potentials, representative plasma flow fields and potential contours surrounding the Solar Sail will then be presented. The implications of these results--the surface potentials and plasma flow--will be discussed in the context of their effects on Solar Sail operations and structural configurations.

  14. Charged Particle Effects on Solar Sails - An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Program is currently sponsoring a comprehensive look at the effects of the charged particle environment on the first generation of Solar Sail propulsion systems. As part of this, a joint NASA MSFC/JPL team is investigating the effects of spacecraft charging on the preliminary ISP Solar Sail mission designs. This paper will begin by reviewing the plasma environments being proposed for such missions-these range from the ambient solar wind at approximately 1 AU in the ecliptic plane, approximately 0.5 AU solar-polar orbit, and geosynchronous orbit. Following a discussion of the critical design issues associated with Solar Sails from a charging standpoint, a simple Sail configuration for modeling purposes will be presented. Results for the various environments will be illustrated in terms of the estimated surface potentials for the Solar Sail using the NASCAP-2K charging analysis program. Based on these potentials, representative plasma flow fields and potential contours surrounding the Solar Sail will then be presented. The implications of these results--the surface potentials and plasma flow--will be discussed in the context of their effects on Solar Sail operations and structural configurations.

  15. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE ON NANO-PARTICLES ACTIVATES CNS MACROPHAGES (MICROGLIA).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  16. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE ON NANO-PARTICLES ACTIVATES CNS MACROPHAGES (MICROGLIA).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  17. Charged Particle Multiplicity Analysis in MicroBooNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Aleena; MicroBooNE Experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    MicroBooNE is a short baseline neutrino experiment that utilizes 89 ton active volume liquid argon Time Projection Chamber (TPC) situated on the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab. It is the first of three liquid argon TPC detectors planned for the Fermilab Short Baseline Neutrino program and will directly probe the source of the anomalous excess of electron-like events in MiniBooNE, while also measuring low-energy neutrino cross sections and providing important R&D for future detectors. In this talk, a study of charged particle multiplicity using neutrino charged-current inclusive events is presented. This analysis can be used to test models of neutrino-argon scattering, and it may be particularly sensitive to nuclear final state interaction effects. Kansas State University.

  18. Improved non-invasive method for aerosol particle charge measurement employing in-line digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Anjan Kumar

    Electrically charged particles are found in a wide range of applications ranging from electrostatic powder coating, mineral processing, and powder handling to rain-producing cloud formation in atmospheric turbulent flows. In turbulent flows, particle dynamics is influenced by the electric force due to particle charge generation. Quantifying particle charges in such systems will help in better predicting and controlling particle clustering, relative motion, collision, and growth. However, there is a lack of noninvasive techniques to measure particle charges. Recently, a non-invasive method for particle charge measurement using in-line Digital Holographic Particle Tracking Velocimetry (DHPTV) technique was developed in our lab, where charged particles to be measured were introduced to a uniform electric field, and their movement towards the oppositely charged electrode was deemed proportional to the amount of charge on the particles (Fan Yang, 2014 [1]). However, inherent speckle noise associated with reconstructed images was not adequately removed and therefore particle tracking data was contaminated. Furthermore, particle charge calculation based on particle deflection velocity neglected the particle drag force and rebound effect of the highly charged particles from the electrodes. We improved upon the existing particle charge measurement method by: 1) hologram post processing, 2) taking drag force into account in charge calculation, 3) considering rebound effect. The improved method was first fine-tuned through a calibration experiment. The complete method was then applied to two different experiments, namely conduction charging and enclosed fan-driven turbulence chamber, to measure particle charges. In all three experiments conducted, the particle charge was found to obey non-central t-location scale family of distribution. It was also noted that the charge distribution was insensitive to the change in voltage applied between the electrodes. The range of voltage

  19. Non-intrusive measurement of particle charge: Electrostatic dry coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Research continued on dry coal cleaning. Triboelectric charging/electrostatic separation experiments were performed using silica, alumina and glassy carbon samples. The average charge on silica and alumina particles was a near-linear function of their velocity in the Cu tribocharge loop, with their charge distribution becoming wider at higher velocities. The average charge of glassy carbon particles was near zero; this charge distribution caused particles to deposit on both positive and negative electrodes. An improved theory for particle charging and electrostatic separation was developed. It includes the use of probability functions.

  20. Electromagnetic potential vectors and the Lagrangian of a charged particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1992-01-01

    Maxwell's equations can be shown to imply the existence of two independent three-dimensional potential vectors. A comparison between the potential vectors and the electric and magnetic field vectors, using a spatial Fourier transformation, reveals six independent potential components but only four independent electromagnetic field components for each mode. Although the electromagnetic fields determined by Maxwell's equations give a complete description of all possible classical electromagnetic phenomena, potential vectors contains more information and allow for a description of such quantum mechanical phenomena as the Aharonov-Bohm effect. A new result is that a charged particle Lagrangian written in terms of potential vectors automatically contains a 'spontaneous symmetry breaking' potential.

  1. Lamb shift contribution of very light charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Glueck, M.; Rakshit, S.; Reya, E.

    2007-11-01

    The leading-order vacuum polarization contribution of very light millicharged fermions and scalar (spin-0) particles with charge {epsilon}e and mass {mu} to the Lamb shift of the hydrogen atom is shown to imply universal, i.e. {mu}-independent, upper bounds on {epsilon}: {epsilon} < or approx. 10{sup -4} for {mu} < or approx. 1 keV in the case of fermions, and for scalars this bound is increased by a factor of 2. This is in contrast to expectations based on the commonly used approximation to the Uehling potential relevant only for conventionally large fermion (and scalar) masses.

  2. Inclusive charged particle cross sections in photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Ahmed, T.; Andreev, V.; Aid, S.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bärwolff, H.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Biddulph, P.; Binder, E.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Bosetti, P. C.; Boudry, V.; Bourdarios, C.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braun, U.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Chyla, J.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Colombo, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dann, A. W. E.; Dau, W. D.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; Devel, M.; De Roeck, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dingus, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Drescher, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebbinghaus, R.; Eberle, M.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellis, N. N.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Fensome, I. F.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Flauger, W.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuhrmann, P.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Gennis, M.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Godfrey, L.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Greif, H.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Harjes, J.; Haydar, R.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Huot, N.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kazarian, S.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Langkau, R.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Leuschner, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Lewin, D.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lüers, D.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, A.; Maxfiedl, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Monnier, E.; Moreau, F.; Moreels, J.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Murray, S. A.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Orenstein, S.; Ould-Saada, F.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Peters, S.; Phillips, H. T.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pilgram, W.; Pitzl, D.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Rauschnabel, K.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rudowicz, M.; Ruffer, M.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitz, W.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schulz, M.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Scobel, W.; Seehausen, U.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Tichomirov, I.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Urban, L.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Vick, R.; Villet, G.; Vogel, E.; Wacker, K.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wolff, Th.; Womersley, L. A.; Wright, A. E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziaeepour, H.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Cross sections are presented for the inclusive production of charged particles measured in electron-proton collisions at low Q2 with the H1 detector at HERA. The transverse momentum distribution extends up to 8 GeV/ c. Its shape is found to be harder than that observed in overlinepp collisions at comparable centre-of-mass energies √S γp ≈ √S overlinepp ≈ 200 GeV, and also harder than in γp collisions at lower energies √ Sγp ≈ 18 GeV. Results from quantum chromodynamics (QCD) calculations agree with the measured transverse momentum and pseudorapidity cross sections.

  3. Explicit K-symplectic algorithms for charged particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Zhou, Zhaoqi; Sun, Yajuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong

    2017-02-01

    We study the Lorentz force equation of charged particle dynamics by considering its K-symplectic structure. As the Hamiltonian of the system can be decomposed as four parts, we are able to construct the numerical methods that preserve the K-symplectic structure based on Hamiltonian splitting technique. The newly derived numerical methods are explicit, and are shown in numerical experiments to be stable over long-term simulation. The error convergency as well as the long term energy conservation of the numerical solutions is also analyzed by means of the Darboux transformation.

  4. The one charged particle decay modes of the tau

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1987-11-01

    Tables of measurements of the total branching fraction of tau lepton decays to modes with one charged particle are given along with the major individual branching fractions. The reason a combination of measurements and calculations is needed to display the discrepancy is described briefly. It is argued that uncertainties in measurements of the branching fractions for multiple photon decay modes prevent complete reliance on experiment. The multiple photon modes are discussed in more detail. Present research on experimental technique problems relative to the apparent discrepancy is summarized. (LEW)

  5. Laser-driven deflection arrangements and methods involving charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Plettner, Tomas [San Ramon, CA; Byer, Robert L [Stanford, CA

    2011-08-09

    Systems, methods, devices and apparatus are implemented for producing controllable charged particle beams. In one implementation, an apparatus provides a deflection force to a charged particle beam. A source produces an electromagnetic wave. A structure, that is substantially transparent to the electromagnetic wave, includes a physical structure having a repeating pattern with a period L and a tilted angle .alpha., relative to a direction of travel of the charged particle beam, the pattern affects the force of the electromagnetic wave upon the charged particle beam. A direction device introduces the electromagnetic wave to the structure to provide a phase-synchronous deflection force to the charged particle beam.

  6. Interplanetary charged particle models (1974). [and the effects of cosmic exposure upon spacecraft and spacecraft components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, N.

    1975-01-01

    The design of space vehicles for operation in interplanetary space is given, based on descriptions of solar wind, solar particle events, and galactic cosmic rays. A state-of-the-art review is presented and design criteria are developed from experiment findings aboard interplanetary and high-altitude earth-orbiting spacecraft. Solar cells were found to be particularly sensitive. Solar protons may also impact the reliability of electric propulsion systems and spacecraft surfaces, as well as causing interference, detector saturation, and spurious signals. Galactic cosmic-ray impact can lead to similar electronic failure and interference and may register in photographic films and other emulsions. It was concluded that solar wind electron measurements might result from differential charging when shadowed portions of the spacecraft acquired a negative charge from electron impact.

  7. Supersonic Particle Impact Test Capabilities: Investigative Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa

    2007-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed particle impact flow tests to determine the maximum capabilities of the particle impact test systems in different configurations. Additional flow tests were performed to determine the target pressures at given upstream conditions to supplement the WSTF data located in ASTM Manual 36 (2000).

  8. Inclusive photoproduction of single charged particles at high p T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Atkinson, M.; Baake, M.; Bagdasarian, L. S.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brook, N.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A. B.; Coyle, P.; Danaher, S.; Danagulian, S.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Eades, J.; Ellison, R. J.; Flower, P. S.; Foster, J. M.; Galbraith, W.; Galumian, P. I.; Gapp, C.; Gebert, F.; Hallewell, G.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hickman, M. T.; Hoeger, C.; Holzkamp, S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H. P.; Joseph, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Kingler, J.; Koersgen, G.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; McCann, H.; McClatchey, R.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J. A. G.; Morris, J. V.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Oedingen, R.; Oganesian, A. G.; Ottewell, P. J.; Paterson, C. N.; Paul, E.; Reid, D.; Rotscheidt, H.; Sharp, P. H.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Thacker, N. A.; Thompson, L.; Thompson, R. J.; Voigtlaender-Tetzner, A.; Waterhouse, J.; Weigend, A. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    1989-03-01

    Single charged-particle inclusive cross sections for photon, pion and kaon beams on hydrogen at the CERN-SPS are presented as functions of p T and x F . Data cover the range 0.0< p T <5.0 GeV/c and 0.0< x F <1.0 at incident momenta from 70 to 170 GeV/c. The comparison between photon- and hadron-induced data indicates a relative excess of particles with p T >1.6 GeV/c for the photon-induced data. Using the hadron-induced data to estimate the hadronic behaviour of the photon, the difference distributions and ratios of cross sections are a measure of the contribution of the point-like photon interactions. The data are compared with QCD calculations and show broadly similar features.

  9. Mars Dust: Characterization of Particle Size and Electrostatic Charge Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Saini, D.; Biris, A. S.; Sriama, P. K.; Calle, C.; Buhler, C.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the latest pictures of Mars surface sent by NASA's Spirit rover in early January, 2004, show very cohesive, "mud-like" dust layers. Significant amounts of dust clouds are present in the atmosphere of Mars [1-4]. NASA spacecraft missions to Mars confirmed hypotheses from telescopic work that changes observed in the planet's surface markings are caused by wind-driven redistribution of dust. In these dust storms, particles with a wide range of diameters (less than 1 micrometer to 50 micrometers) are a serious problem to solar cells, spacecraft, and spacesuits. Dust storms may cover the entire planet for an extended period of time [5]. It is highly probable that the particles are charged electrostatically by triboelectrification and by UV irradiation.

  10. Laser magneto-cumulative accelerator of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Skvortsov, V.

    2011-02-01

    High energy ion generation (energy in order of 10 Gev) have been estimated by interaction of picosecond laser pulses with an intensity of 6x1014 W/cm2 with metallic target in vacuum and gas atmosphere. In this paper we shall discuss the production of very high magnetic fields by flux compression in laser-induced plasmas and show experimental results on particle acceleration due to an explosively collapsed magnetic fields. Different nuclear track detectors have been used for heavy charged particle identification: synthetic mica, plastic nuclear detector CR-39, and glasses. Magnetic fields generated in laser-induced plasmas of order 30 -130 MGauss have been estimated by means of Faraday rotation and interferometric diagnostics with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  11. Laser magneto-cumulative accelerator of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Skvortsov, V.

    2010-09-01

    High energy ion generation (energy in order of 10 Gev) have been estimated by interaction of picosecond laser pulses with an intensity of 6x1014 W/cm2 with metallic target in vacuum and gas atmosphere. In this paper we shall discuss the production of very high magnetic fields by flux compression in laser-induced plasmas and show experimental results on particle acceleration due to an explosively collapsed magnetic fields. Different nuclear track detectors have been used for heavy charged particle identification: synthetic mica, plastic nuclear detector CR-39, and glasses. Magnetic fields generated in laser-induced plasmas of order 30 -130 MGauss have been estimated by means of Faraday rotation and interferometric diagnostics with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  12. Mars Dust: Characterization of Particle Size and Electrostatic Charge Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Saini, D.; Biris, A. S.; Srirama, P. K.; Calle, C.; Buhler, C.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the latest pictures of Mars surface sent by NASA s Spirit rover in early January, 2004, show very cohesive, mud-like dust layers. Significant amounts of dust clouds are present in the atmosphere of Mars. NASA spacecraft missions to Mars confirmed hypotheses from telescopic work that changes observed in the planet s surface markings are caused by wind-driven redistribution of dust. In these dust storms, particles with a wide range of diameters (< 1 m to 50 m) are a serious problem to solar cells, spacecraft, and spacesuits. Dust storms may cover the entire planet for an extended period of time. It is highly probable that the particles are charged electrostatically by triboelectrification and by UV irradiation.

  13. Search for Charged Massive Long-Lived Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alimena J.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; et al.

    2012-03-21

    We report on a search for charged massive long-lived particles (CMLLPs), based on 5.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. We search for events in which one or more particles are reconstructed as muons but have speed and ionization energy loss (dE/dx) inconsistent with muons produced in beam collisions. CMLLPs are predicted in several theories of physics beyond the standard model. We exclude pair-produced long-lived gaugino-like charginos below 267 GeV and Higgsino-like charginos below 217 GeV at 95% C.L., as well as long-lived scalar top quarks with mass below 285 GeV.

  14. A Search for Charged Massive Stable Particles at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Eads, Michael Terry

    2005-08-01

    A search for charged massive stable particles has been performed with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The signature is two particles reconstructed as muons, but with speed and invariant mass inconsistent with beam-produced muons. No excess of events is observed and limits are set on the production cross-section for pair-produced stable stau sleptons based on 390 pb-1 of data. Limits vary from 0.06 pb to 0.62 pb, depending on the stau mass, and are the strictest Tevatron limits to date. Mass limits are also set for stable charginos. The limits are 140 GeV/c2 for a higgsino-like chargino and 174 GeV/c2 for a gaugino-like chargino. These are currently the best limits to date for stable charginos.

  15. Resistive cooling circuits for charged particle traps using crystal resonators.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbacher, T; Caspers, F; Doser, M; Kellerbauer, A; Pribyl, W

    2011-11-01

    The paper addresses a novel method to couple a signal from charged particles in a Penning trap to a high Q resonant circuit using a crystal resonator. Traditionally, the trap capacity is converted into a resonator by means of an inductance. The tuned circuit's Q factor is directly linked to the input impedance "seen" by the trapped particles at resonance frequency. This parallel resonance impedance is a measure of the efficiency of resistive cooling and thus it should be optimized. We propose here a commercially available crystal resonator since it exhibits a very high Q value and a parallel resonance impedance of several MΩ. The possibility to tune the parallel resonance frequency of the quartz results in filter behavior that allows covering a range of some tens of its 3dB bandwidth by means of tuning.

  16. High Pressure Quick Disconnect Particle Impact Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Stephen; Rosales, Keisa; Smith, Sarah R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether there is a particle impact ignition hazard in the quick disconnects (QDs) in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) on the International Space Station (ISS), NASA Johnson Space Center requested White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to perform particle impact testing. Testing was performed from November 2006 through May 2007 and included standard supersonic and subsonic particle impact tests on 15-5 PH stainless steel, as well as tests performed on a QD simulator. This report summarizes the particle impact tests completed at WSTF. Although there was an ignition in Test Series 4, it was determined the ignition was caused by the presence of a machining imperfection. The sum of all the test results indicates that there is no particle impact ignition hazard in the ISS ECLSS QDs.

  17. Search for new charged massive stable particles at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CDF Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    We report on a general search at CDF for new particles which are electrically charged and sufficiently long-lived to allow detection (γ c τ >= 1m). Examples of such particles include free quarks, 4th generation leptons which are lighter than their neutrino, and sextet quarks. Their signature would be particles with high momentum but relatively low velocity, β <= 0.7, which would result in large ionization energy losses (dE/dx). Having observed no evidence for the production of new particles of this type, we set 95% confidence limits on their possible masses. *We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation. Supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03000.

  18. Hamilton-Dirac systems for charged particles in gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we use the Sternberg phase space (which may be considered as the classical phase space of particles in gauge fields) in order to explore the dynamics of such particles in the context of Hamilton-Dirac systems and their associated Hamilton-Pontryagin variational principles. For this, we develop an analogue of the Pontryagin bundle in the case of the Sternberg phase space. Moreover, we show the link of this new bundle to the so-called magnetized Tulczyjew triple, which is an analogue of the link between the Pontryagin bundle and the usual Tulczyjew triple. Taking advantage of the symplectic nature of the Sternberg space, we induce a Dirac structure on the Sternberg-Pontryagin bundle which leads to the Hamilton-Dirac structure that we are looking for. We also analyze the intrinsic and variational nature of the equations of motion of particles in gauge fields in regards of the defined new geometry. Lastly, we illustrate our theory through the case of a U(1) gauge group, leading to the paradigmatic example of an electrically charged particle in an electromagnetic field.

  19. Enke-like method for tracing trajectories of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabin, K.; Bonner, G.

    2013-12-01

    Using analytical properties of particle dynamics is often beneficial for numerical solutions of the equations of motion. Enke's method, sometimes used in Astrodynamics and Orbital Mechanics, is a good example of such an approach. In Enke's method, instead of solving the equations of motion directly one solves for the deviation from an exact solution of a more tractable problem (the 'osculating solution'). For the motion of charged particles, the simplest osculating solution corresponds to gyration in a constant magnetic field. We apply this method to trace electrons in a geomagnetic field; this initial work focuses on equatorially mirroring particles. We find that solving for the deviations from the gyration motion substantially improves the accuracy as well as stability of the integration. Reasonable approximations to particles' trajectories are obtained with time steps as large as half of the gyroperiod. Another benefit of Enke's method is a superior conservation of energy. Although not symplectic by design, Enke's method is almost completely free of secular error for the energy, in sharp contrast to most commonly-used Runge-Kutta methods. Further improvements in accuracy can be achieved by using more sophisticated osculating solutions which account for the gradient-curvature drift of the particles. Enke's method can be straightforwardly applied as an integration scheme for test-particle simulation of radiation belt or ring current electrons and protons and it can be used with any empirical or MHD model of the magnetic field. We suggest that, with small time steps Enke's approach may be valuable in applications where high accuracy is required. We also suggest that with large time steps it may be used as an alternative to a guiding center approximation.

  20. Energy losses of positive and negative charged particles in electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diachenko, M. M.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2017-02-01

    A heavy charged particle propagation through electron gas has been studied using combination of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and the Green’s functions method. The energy loss of a charged particle has been found in the case of large transferred momentum taking into account the interference term in the expression for the rate. The dependence of the energy loss of a charged particles in electron gas with nonzero temperature on the sign of the charge has been obtained.

  1. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Iyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  2. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Lyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0, 30, 45, and 60. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  3. Modeling of mesoscopic electrokinetic phenomena using charged dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Mingge; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we propose a charged dissipative particle dynamics (cDPD) model for investigation of mesoscopic electrokinetic phenomena. In particular, this particle-based method was designed to simulate micro- or nano- flows which governing by Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equation coupled with Navier-Stokes (NS) equation. For cDPD simulations of wall-bounded fluid systems, a methodology for imposing correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions for both PNP and NS equations is developed. To validate the present cDPD model and the corresponding boundary method, we perform cDPD simulations of electrostatic double layer (EDL) in the vicinity of a charged wall, and the results show good agreement with the mean-field theoretical solutions. The capacity density of a parallel plate capacitor in salt solution is also investigated with different salt concentration. Moreover, we utilize the proposed methodology to study the electroosmotic and electroosmotic/pressure-driven flow in a micro-channel. In the last, we simulate the dilute polyelectrolyte solution both in bulk and micro-channel, which show the flexibility and capability of this method in studying complex fluids. This work was sponsored by the Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4) supported by DOE.

  4. Diagnostic resonant cavity for a charged particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Barov, Nikolai

    2007-10-02

    Disclosed is a diagnostic resonant cavity for determining characteristics of a charged particle beam, such as an electron beam, produced in a charged particle accelerator. The cavity is based on resonant quadrupole-mode and higher order cavities. Enhanced shunt impedance in such cavities is obtained by the incorporation of a set of four or more electrically conductive rods extending inwardly from either one or both of the end walls of the cavity, so as to form capacitive gaps near the outer radius of the beam tube. For typical diagnostic cavity applications, a five-fold increase in shunt impedance can be obtained. In alternative embodiments the cavity may include either four or more opposing pairs of rods which extend coaxially toward one another from the opposite end walls of the cavity and are spaced from one another to form capacitative gaps; or the cavity may include a single set of individual rods that extend from one end wall to a point adjacent the opposing end wall.

  5. Negatively-charged particle pickup in the Enceladus plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. H.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Kriegel, H.; Meier, P.

    2013-09-01

    One of the key discoveries of the Cassini spacecraft's traverses of the Enceladus plume was that of negatively-charged nanograins and ions, as detected by CAPS- ELS. The trajectories of these charged particles are expected to be affected by the motional electric field in the vicinity of the moon, especially those of the low mass ions. During some Enceladus encounters, the particles have been observed arriving at the spacecraft in the local ram direction, i.e. close to being at rest with respect to Enceladus, presumably shortly after their formation and before the acceleration associated with the pickup process. During other encounters however, the ions have been observed to arrive at the spacecraft well away from the ram direction, in the gyroplane at ~90 degrees to the local magnetic field direction, indicating their pickup by the local plasma flow. We present an overview of observations of these negative pickup nanograins in the Enceladus plume, and our interpretation of these observations, and attempts to trace the origins of the grains using a hybrid simulation of the plume.

  6. Can Coulomb repulsion for charged particle beams be overcome?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    Mutual repulsion of discrete charged particles or Coulomb repulsion is widely considered to be an ultimate hard limit in charged particle optics. It prevents the ability to finely focus high current beams into a small spots at large distances from the defining apertures. A classic example is the 1970s era "Star Wars" study of an electron beam directed energy weapon as an orbiting antiballistic missile device. After much analysis, it was considered physically impossible to focus a 1000-amp 1-GeV beam into a 1-cm diameter spot 1000-km from the beam generator. The main reason was that a 1-cm diameter beam would spread to 5-m diameter at 1000-km due to Coulomb repulsion. Since this could not be overcome, the idea was abandoned. But is this true? What if the rays were reversed? That is, start with a 5-m beam converging slightly with the same nonuniform angular and energy distribution as the electrons from the original problem were spreading at 1000-km distance. Could Coulomb repulsion be overcome? Looking at the terms in computational studies, some are reversible while others are not. Since the nonreversible terms should be small, it might be possible to construct an electron beam directed energy weapon.

  7. Boron concentration measurement in biological tissues by charged particle spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of boron concentration in biological tissues is a fundamental aspect of boron neutron capture therapy, because the outcome of the therapy depends on the distribution of boron at a cellular level, besides on its overall concentration. This work describes a measurement technique based on the spectroscopy of the charged particles emitted in the reaction (10)B(n,α)(7)Li induced by thermal neutrons, allowing for a quantitative determination of the boron concentration in the different components that may be simultaneously present in a tissue sample, such as healthy cells, tumor cells and necrotic cells. Thin sections of tissue containing (10)B are cut at low temperatures and irradiated under vacuum in a thermal neutron field. The charged particles arising from the sample during the irradiation are collected by a thin silicon detector, and their spectrum is used to determine boron concentration through relatively easy calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique are here described, and validation of the method using tissue standards with known boron concentrations is presented.

  8. Visualizing powder de-agglomeration upon impact with simultaneous flowing charge behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwek, Jin Wang; Heng, Desmond; Lee, Sie Huey; Ng, Wai Kiong; Chan, Hak-Kim; Heng, Jerry; Tan, Reginald

    2013-06-01

    The effectiveness of the dry powder inhaler (DPI) in treating respiratory diseases lies in its ability to deliver consistent and reliable drug dosage with each actuation. From aerosolization upon actuation to throat impaction, the deagglomeration with subsequent detachment of the drug from the carrier particles depend on the interaction forces, including electrostatic contributions, between the particles themselves or with the inhaler wall and the extent of which could depend on the surface roughness of the carrier particles. In this study, we have simultaneously investigated the contributions of the electrostatic forces while visualizing the de-agglomeration and impaction behaviours of carrier powders in an impaction throat model using a non-contact vibrating capacitive probe and a high speed camera respectively. Rough and smooth carrier particles were obtained by spray drying and then aerosolized at 60 L/min in the model. Higher flowing charges were observed for the rough aerosolized carrier particles while experiencing rebound or limited agglomerate fracture upon impaction. On the other hand, smooth particles were broken up upon impaction resulting in a 'plume-like' re-entrainment. Further analyses revealed that the increased moisture sorption on the larger specific surface area of the rough particles would have facilitated the accumulation of surface charges that could in turn contribute to the cohesiveness of the rough particles. Combined high speed imaging with electrostatic monitoring has proved to be useful in investigating the mechanisms of powder de-agglomeration upon impaction.

  9. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    On the discovery of coherent Bremsstrahlung in a single crystal at the Frascati National Laboratories / C. Barbiellini, G. P. Murtas and S. B. Dabagov -- Advances in coherent Bremsstrahlung and LPM-effect studies (to the lOOth anniversary from the birth of L. D. Landau) / N. F. Shul'ga -- Spectra of radiation and created particles at intermediate energy in oriented crystal taking into account energy loss / V. N. Baier and V. M. Katkov -- The coherent Bremsstrahlung beam at MAX-lab facility / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Radiation from thin, structured targets (CERN NA63) / A. Dizdar -- Hard incoherent radiation in thick crystals / N. F. Shul'ga, V. V. Syshchenko and A. I. Tarnovsky -- Coherent Bremsstrahlung in periodically deformed crystals with a complex base / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Induction of coherent x-ray Bremsstrahlung in crystals under the influence of acoustic waves / A. R. Mkrtchyan and V. V. Parazian -- Coherent processes in bent single crystals / V. A. Maisheev -- Experimental and theoretical investigation of complete transfer phenomenon for media with various heat exchange coefficients / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. E. Movsisyan and V. R. Kocharyan -- Coherent pair production in crystals / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Negative particle planar and axial channeling and channeling collimation / R. A. Carrigan, Jr. -- CERN crystal-based collimation in modern hadron colliders / W. Scandale -- Studies and application of bent crystals for beam steering at 70 GeV IHEP accelerator / A. G. Afonin ... [et al.] -- Crystal collimation studies at the Tevatron (T-980) / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of crystals for channeling of particles in accellerators / A. Mazzolari ... [et al.] -- New possibilities to facilitate collimation of both positively and negatively charged particle beams by crystals / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- Increase of probability of particle capture into the channeling

  10. Fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronel-Escamilla, A.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Guerrero-Ramírez, G. V.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    In many physical applications the electrons play a relevant role. For example, when a beam of electrons accelerated to relativistic velocities is used as an active medium to generate Free Electron Lasers (FEL), the electrons are bound to atoms, but move freely in a magnetic field. The relaxation time, longitudinal effects and transverse variations of the optical field are parameters that play an important role in the efficiency of this laser. The electron dynamics in a magnetic field is a means of radiation source for coupling to the electric field. The transverse motion of the electrons leads to either gain or loss energy from or to the field, depending on the position of the particle regarding the phase of the external radiation field. Due to the importance to know with great certainty the displacement of charged particles in a magnetic field, in this work we study the fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields. Newton’s second law is considered and the order of the fractional differential equation is (0;1]. Based on the Grünwald-Letnikov (GL) definition, the discretization of fractional differential equations is reported to get numerical simulations. Comparison between the numerical solutions obtained on Euler’s numerical method for the classical case and the GL definition in the fractional approach proves the good performance of the numerical scheme applied. Three application examples are shown: constant magnetic field, ramp magnetic field and harmonic magnetic field. In the first example the results obtained show bistability. Dissipative effects are observed in the system and the standard dynamic is recovered when the order of the fractional derivative is 1.

  11. Measuring Landau damping in Particle-in-Cell simulations using particles of different charge-weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, C.; Sarkar, A.; Cao, Y.-X.; Huang, M. C.; Li, J.

    2016-10-01

    We study whether putting more particles in ``region of interest (ROI)'' in phase space can efficiently increase Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation accuracy. We use Landau damping of a plasma wave as a figure of merit and set the ROI near the phase velocity of the wave. Improvement in Landau damping rate measurement is observed in 1D PIC simulations when employing more particles in the ROI but the effect is not monotonic. This is partly due to energy transfer from particles of large charge weights to those of smaller weights through the electric fields. Possible strategies to mitigate the energy transfer will also be discussed. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1314734 and by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0012316.

  12. Search for Free Fractional Electric Charge Elementary Particles Using an Automated Millikan Oil Drop Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halyo, V.; Kim, P.; Lee, E. R.; Lee, I. T.; Loomba, D.; Perl, M. L.

    2000-03-01

    We have carried out a direct search in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied-about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16e ( e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71×10-22 particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  13. Search for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using an automated millikan oil drop technique

    PubMed

    Halyo; Kim; Lee; Lee; Loomba; Perl

    2000-03-20

    We have carried out a direct search in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied-about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0. 16e ( e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71x10(-22) particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  14. The search for free particles with fractional charge;Experimental survey and new results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halyo, Valerie; Kim, Peter; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Loomba, Dinesh; Perl, Martin L.

    2000-04-01

    We have carried out a direct search in bulk matter for free fractional electric charge elementary particles using the largest mass single sample ever studied--- about 17.4 mg of silicone oil. The search used an improved and highly automated Millikan oil drop technique. No evidence for fractional charge particles was found. The concentration of particles with fractional charge more than 0.16 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 4.71×10-22 particles per nucleon with 95% confidence.

  15. Chaotic phenomena of charged particles in crystal lattices.

    PubMed

    Desalvo, Agostino; Giannerini, Simone; Rosa, Rodolfo

    2006-06-01

    In this article, we have applied the methods of chaos theory to channeling phenomena of positive charged particles in crystal lattices. In particular, we studied the transition between two ordered types of motion; i.e., motion parallel to a crystal axis (axial channeling) and to a crystal plane (planar channeling), respectively. The transition between these two regimes turns out to occur through an angular range in which the particle motion is highly disordered and the region of phase space spanned by the particle is much larger than the one swept in the two ordered motions. We have evaluated the maximum Lyapunov exponent with the method put forward by Rosenstein et al. [Physica D 65, 117 (1993)] and by Kantz [Phys. Lett. A 185, 77 (1994)]. Moreover, we estimated the correlation dimension by using the Grassberger-Procaccia method. We found that at the transition the system exhibits a very complex behavior showing an exponential divergence of the trajectories corresponding to a positive Lyapunov exponent and a noninteger value of the correlation dimension. These results turn out to be linked to a physical interpretation. The Lyapunov exponents are in agreement with the model by Akhiezer et al. [Phys. Rep. 203, 289 (1991)], based on the equivalence between the ion motion along the crystal plane described as a "string of strings" and the "kicked" rotator. The nonintegral value of the correlation dimension can be explained by the nonconservation of transverse energy at the transition.

  16. Integral charged particle nuclear date bibliography. Editon 1, Supplement 2

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Ramavataram, S.; Dunford, C.L.

    1986-04-01

    This bibliography is divided into three sections, ''References'', ''Target Index'', and ''Residual Index.'' The ''References'' section contains all references satisfying the following criteria: excitation functions, thick targets, or product yield leading to the formation of a ground or metastable state; the atomic mass and charge of the incident particle must be greater than or equal to 1; the atomic mass of the target must be greater than or equal to 1; and the atomic masses of the outgoing and residual nuclei must be greater than or equal to 1 with the exception of processes which do not lead to a definite residual nucleus and of gamma-ray production cross sections. The ''Target Index'' section contains the incident particle energy and the abbreviated reference lines for all the entries, which contain information on a definite target nucleus and reaction. These reference lines contain the Journal name, followed by the volume and page number. The ''Residual Index'' section also contains the incident particle energy and the abbreviated reference lines for all the entries, which contain information on a definite residual nucleus and a definite target-reaction.

  17. Accelerators for heavy-charged-particle radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, George B

    2007-08-01

    This paper focuses on current and future designs of medical hadron accelerators for treating cancers and other diseases. Presently, five vendors and several national laboratories have produced heavy-particle medical accelerators for accelerating nuclei from hydrogen (protons) up through carbon and oxygen. Particle energies are varied to control the beam penetration depth in the patient. As of the end of 2006, four hospitals and one clinic in the United States offer proton treatments; there are five more such facilities in Japan. In most cases, these facilities use accelerators designed explicitly for cancer treatments. The accelerator types are a combination of synchrotrons, cyclotrons, and linear accelerators; some carry advanced features such as respiration gating, intensity modulation, and rapid energy changes, which contribute to better dose conformity on the tumor when using heavy charged particles. Recent interest in carbon nuclei for cancer treatment has led some vendors to offer carbon-ion and proton capability in their accelerator systems, so that either ion can be used. These features are now being incorporated for medical accelerators in new facilities.

  18. The impact of electrically charged microspheres with planar surfaces under vacuum conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caylor, Michael Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The normal and oblique impact of electrically charged microspheres with planar surfaces under vacuum conditions is examined experimentally. The experimental methods and results are presented. An analytical model for the normal impact case is used to examine the empirical results. The impact experiments were performed in a vacuum test cell maintained at pressures near 1 x 10(exp -4) Torr. Three types of microspheres (approximately 1 to 50 microns diameter) were used including silver-coated glass, stainless steel and nickel. The particles were impacted against a set of five planar, target surfaces including three metallic surfaces, a polymer surface and a glass-coated surface. The particles were electrostatically charged by induction (from approximately 0.1 to 10 fC) and dispensed using an electrostatic particle dispenser. The particle velocities were controlled to provide the desired range of incident velocities (approximately 1 to 20 m/s). A one-component Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA), which also provided a particle sizing capability, was used to measure incident and rebound velocities for the normal impact experiments. A particle trajectory imaging system (PTIS) was developed and used for velocity measurements for the oblique impact tests. Average particle electrostatic charge was determined using a charge sensitive amplifier and from electrometer current measurements. This unique experimental approach permitted the examination of individual impact events. The coefficient of restitution, e, was determined by a matching algorithm that paired corresponding incident and rebound velocities. Average values of e ranged from 0.45 to 0.85. The data demonstrated the presence of adhesion effects at low incident velocities (below 2 m/s). An analytical model of this type of impact process showed that the magnitude of van der Waals force was dependent on the amount of elastic deformation during impact. For the particle charge levels of approximately 0.5 fC, the

  19. Particle Segregation at Contact Lines of Evaporating Colloidal Drops: Influence of the Substrate Wettability and Particle Charge-Mass Ratio.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Marín, Diego; Moraila-Martínez, Carmen L; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A

    2015-06-23

    Segregation of particles during capillary/convective self-assembly is interesting for self-stratification in colloidal deposits. In evaporating drops containing colloidal particles, the wettability properties of substrate and the sedimentation of particles can affect their accumulation at contact lines. In this work we studied the size segregation and discrimination of charged particles with different densities. We performed in-plane particle counting at evaporating triple lines by using fluorescence confocal microscopy. We studied separately substrates with very different wettability properties and particles with different charge-mass ratios at low ionic strength. We used binary colloidal suspensions to compare simultaneously the deposition of two different particles. The particle deposition rate strongly depends on the receding contact angle of the substrate. We further observed a singular behavior of charged polystyrene particles in binary mixtures under "salt-free" conditions explained by the "colloidal Brazil nut" effect.

  20. Search for multiply charged Heavy Stable Charged Particles in data collected with the CMS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh

    2013-10-30

    Several models of new physics yield particles that are massive, long-lived, and have an electric charge, Q, greater than that of the electron, e. A search for evidence of such particles was performed using 5.0 fb-1 and 18.8 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at √s = 7 TeV and √s = 8 TeV, respectively, with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The distinctive detector signatures of these particles are that they are slow-moving and highly ionizing. Ionization energy loss and time-of- flight measurements were made using the inner tracker and the muon system, respectively. The search is sensitive to 1e ≤ |Q| ≤ 8e. Data were found to be consistent with standard model expectations and upper limits on the production cross section of these particles were computed using a Drell-Yan-like production model. Masses below 517, 687, 752, 791, 798, 778, 753, and 724 GeV are excluded for |Q| = 1e, 2e, 3e, 4e, 5e, 6e, 7e, and 8e, respectively.

  1. How to model the interaction of charged Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieronimus, Reint; Raschke, Simon; Heuer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the interaction of charged Janus particles including screening effects. The explicit interaction is mapped via a least square method on a variable number n of systematically generated tensors that reflect the angular dependence of the potential. For n = 2 we show that the interaction is equivalent to a model previously described by Erdmann, Kröger, and Hess (EKH). Interestingly, this mapping is for n = 2 not able to capture the subtleties of the interaction for small screening lengths. Rather, a larger number of tensors has to be used. We find that the characteristics of the Janus type interaction plays an important role for the aggregation behavior. We obtained cluster structures up to the size of 13 particles for n = 2 and 36 and screening lengths κ-1 = 0.1 and 1.0 via Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of the screening length is analyzed and the structures are compared to results for an electrostatic-type potential and for the multipole-expanded Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We find that a dipole-like potential (EKH or dipole DLVO approximation) is not able to sufficiently reproduce the anisotropy effects of the potential. Instead, a higher order expansion has to be used to obtain cluster structures that are compatible with experimental observations. The resulting minimum-energy clusters are compared to those of sticky hard sphere systems. Janus particles with a short-range screened interaction resemble sticky hard sphere clusters for all considered particle numbers, whereas for long-range screening even very small clusters are structurally different.

  2. Weakly nonlinear electrophoresis of a highly charged colloidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Zeyde, Roman; Yavneh, Irad; Yariv, Ehud

    2013-05-01

    At large zeta potentials, surface conduction becomes appreciable in thin-double-layer electrokinetic transport. In the linear weak-field regime, where this effect is quantified by the Dukhin number, it is manifested in non-Smoluchowski electrophoretic mobilities. In this paper we go beyond linear response, employing the recently derived macroscale model of Schnitzer and Yariv ["Macroscale description of electrokinetic flows at large zeta potentials: Nonlinear surface conduction," Phys. Rev. E 86, 021503 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.021503] as the infrastructure for a weakly nonlinear analysis of spherical-particle electrophoresis. A straightforward perturbation in the field strength is frustrated by the failure to satisfy the far-field conditions, representing a non-uniformity of the weak-field approximation at large distances away from the particle, where salt advection becomes comparable to diffusion. This is remedied using inner-outer asymptotic expansions in the spirit of Acrivos and Taylor ["Heat and mass transfer from single spheres in Stokes flow," Phys. Fluids 5, 387 (1962), 10.1063/1.1706630], with the inner region representing the particle neighborhood and the outer region corresponding to distances scaling inversely with the field magnitude. This singular scheme furnishes an asymptotic correction to the electrophoretic velocity, proportional to the applied field cubed, which embodies a host of nonlinear mechanisms unfamiliar from linear electrokinetic theories. These include the effect of induced zeta-potential inhomogeneity, animated by concentration polarization, on electro-osmosis and diffuso-osmosis; bulk advection of salt; nonuniform bulk conductivity; Coulomb body forces acting on bulk volumetric charge; and the nonzero electrostatic force exerted upon the otherwise screened particle-layer system. A numerical solution of the macroscale model validates our weakly nonlinear analysis.

  3. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in Reservoirs throughout the Heliosphere: 1. Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    2015-09-01

    “Reservoirs” of energetic charged particles are regions where the particle population is quasi-trapped in large-scale (relative to the gyroradii) magnetic field structures. Reservoirs are found throughout the heliosphere: the huge heliosheath (90charged particles within these reservoirs is produced by the interaction when the particle magnetic drifts have a component along the large-scale electric fields produced by plasma convection. The appropriate description of this transport is “weak scattering”, in which the particle's first adiabatic invariant (magnetic moment) is approximately conserved while the particle itself moves rather freely along magnetic field lines. Considerable insight into the observed properties of energization processes can be gained from a remarkably simple equation that describes the particle's fractional time-rate-of-change of momentum (dlnp/dt) which depends only upon its pitch angle, the divergence of the plasma velocity (V⊥) transverse to the magnetic field), and the inner product of (V⊥) with the curvature vector of the field lines. The possibilities encompassed in this simple (but general) equation are quite rich, so we restrict our application of it in this paper to the compressive acceleration of SEPs within CMEs.

  4. Detection of electromagnetic pulses produced by hypervelocity micro particle impact plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Sigrid; Lee, Nicolas; Johnson, Theresa; Goel, Ashish; Fletcher, Alexander; Linscott, Ivan; Strauss, David; Lauben, David; Srama, Ralf; Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian

    2013-09-15

    Hypervelocity micro particles (mass < 1 ng), including meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and produce plasmas that are initially dense (∼10{sup 28} m{sup −3}), but rapidly expand into the surrounding vacuum. We report the detection of radio frequency (RF) emission associated with electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) from hypervelocity impacts of micro particles in ground-based experiments using micro particles that are 15 orders of magnitude less massive than previously observed. The EMP production is a stochastic process that is influenced by plasma turbulence such that the EMP detection rate that is strongly dependent on impact speed and on the electrical charge conditions at the impact surface. In particular, impacts of the fastest micro particles occurring under spacecraft charging conditions representative of high geomagnetic activity are the most likely to produce RF emission. This new phenomenon may provide a source for unexplained RF measurements on spacecraft charged to high potentials.

  5. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  6. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  7. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  8. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  9. Channeling and electromagnetic radiation of relativistic charged particles in metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevago, N. K.; Glebov, V. I.

    2017-06-01

    We have developed the theory of electromagnetic interaction of relativistic charged particles with metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The electrostatic potential and electron number density distribution in MOFs were calculated using the most accurate data for the atomic form factors. Peculiarities of axial channeling of fast charged particles and various types of electromagnetic radiation from relativistic particles has been discussed.

  10. Three charged particles in the continuum: astrophysical examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, V. B.; Levin, S. B.; Yakovlev, S. L.

    2004-03-01

    We suggest a new adiabatic approach for the description of three charged particles in the continuum. This approach is based on the Coulomb-Fourier transformation of a three-body Hamiltonian, which allows us to develop a scheme, alternative to the Born-Oppenheimer one. The approach appears as an expansion of the kernels of corresponding integral transformations in terms of small mass-ratio parameter. To be specific, the results are presented for the system ppe in the continuum. The wavefunction of such a system is compared with the one which is used for the estimation of the rate for triple reaction p + p + e rarr d + ngr, which takes place as a step of the pp-cycle in the centre of the Sun. The problem of microscopic screening for this particular reaction is discussed.

  11. Energetic Charged Particles in Saturn's Magnetosphere: Voyager 2 Results.

    PubMed

    Vogt, R E; Chenette, D L; Cummings, A C; Garrard, T L; Stone, E C; Schardt, A W; Trainor, J H; Lal, N; McDonald, F B

    1982-01-29

    Results from the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 in Saturn's magnetosphere are presented. During the inbound pass through the outer magnetosphere, the >/= 0.43-million-electron-volt proton flux was more intense, and both the proton and electron fluxes were more variable, than previously observed. These changes are attributed to the influence on the magnetosphere of variations in the solar wind conditions. Outbound, beyond 18 Saturn radii, impulsive bursts of 0.14- to > 1.0- million-electron-volt electrons were observed. In the inner magnetosphere, the charged particle absorption signatures of Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys are used to constrain the possible tilt and offset of Saturn's internal magnetic dipole. At approximately 3 Saturn radii, a transient decrease was observed in the electron flux which was not due to Mimas. Characteristics of this decrease suggest the existence of additional material, perhaps another satellite, in the orbit of Mimas.

  12. Charged particle motion in the vicinity of a neutral plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D.

    1972-01-01

    The motion of a charged particle in a 2-dimensional neutral sheet with linear magnetic field variation is analyzed by Hamiltonian methods. From the basic Hamiltonian formulation, results of Sonnerup are recovered and given intuitive interpretation. The transformed Hamiltonian is used to derive the correct frequency of oscillation and serves as the basis of analytical treatment of perturbed versions of the motion, e.g. with electric field added. For 2-dimensional fields with slightly differing configurations - in particular, with added small field component orthogonal to the sheet, with an X-type null or with a chain of null points - two alternative methods are developed, reducing the problem either to motion in a 2-dimensional potential or to a pair of coupled oscillators.

  13. The ST environment: Expected charged particle radiation levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    The external (surface incident) charged particle radiation, predicted for the ST satellite at the three different mission altitudes, was determined in two ways: (1) by orbital flux-integration and (2) by geographical instantaneous flux-mapping. The latest standard models of the environment were used in this effort. Magnetic field definitions for three nominal circular trajectories and for the geographic mapping positions were obtained from a current field model. Spatial and temporal variations or conditions affecting the static environment models were considered and accounted for, wherever possible. Limited shielding and dose evaluations were performed for a simple geometry. Results, given in tabular and graphical form, are analyzed, explained, and discussed. Conclusions are included.

  14. Early and late mammalian responses to heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    This overview summarizes murine results on acute lethality responses, inactivation of marrow CFU-S and intestinal microcolonies, testes weight loss, life span shortening, and posterior lens opacification in mice irradiated with heavy charged particles. RBE-LET relationships for these mammalian responses are compared with results from in vitro studies. The trend is that the maximum RBE for in vivo responses tends to be lower and occurs at a lower LET than for inactivation of V79 and T-1 cells in culture. Based on inactivation cross sections, the response of CFU-S in vivo conforms to expectations from earlier studies with prokaryotic systems and mammalian cells in culture. Effects of heavy ions are compared with fission spectrum neutrons, and the results are consistent with the interpretation that RBEs are lower than for fission neutrons at about the same LET, probably due to differences in track structure.

  15. Explicit symplectic methods for solving charged particle trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaoqi; He, Yang; Sun, Yajuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the Lorentz force system based on its Hamiltonian formulation. We decompose the Lorentz force system into four subsystems which can be solved with the help of coordinate transformations. Via the coordinate transformations, three kinds of explicit symplectic numerical methods have been established for simulating the motion of charged particles under the time-independent electromagnetic field. We generalize our methods to solve the system with time-dependent external electromagnetic fields, and also the system with a relativistic effect. In numerical experiments, the computing efficiency and accuracy over a long time for the newly derived methods are demonstrated. Also, the long-term simulation for the dynamics of runaway electrons is performed.

  16. Early and late mammalian responses to heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    This overview summarizes murine results on acute lethality responses, inactivation of marrow CFU-S and intestinal microcolonies, testes weight loss, life span shortening, and posterior lens opacification in mice irradiated with heavy charged particles. RBE-LET relationships for these mammalian responses are compared with results from in vitro studies. The trend is that the maximum RBE for in vivo responses tends to be lower and occurs at a lower LET than for inactivation of V79 and T-1 cells in culture. Based on inactivation cross sections, the response of CFU-S in vivo conforms to expectations from earlier studies with prokaryotic systems and mammalian cells in culture. Effects of heavy ions are compared with fission spectrum neutrons, and the results are consistent with the interpretation that RBEs are lower than for fission neutrons at about the same LET, probably due to differences in track structure.

  17. Systems and methods of varying charged particle beam spot size

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-09-02

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A modified dielectric wall accelerator includes a high gradient lens section and a main section. The high gradient lens section can be dynamically adjusted to establish the desired electric fields to minimize undesirable transverse defocusing fields at the entrance to the dielectric wall accelerator. Once a baseline setting with desirable output beam characteristic is established, the output beam can be dynamically modified to vary the output beam characteristics. The output beam can be modified by slightly adjusting the electric fields established across different sections of the modified dielectric wall accelerator. Additional control over the shape of the output beam can be excreted by introducing intentional timing de-synchronization offsets and producing an injected beam that is not fully matched to the entrance of the modified dielectric accelerator.

  18. Iron free permanent magnet systems for charged particle beam optics

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S.M.; Halbach, K.

    1995-09-03

    The strength and astounding simplicity of certain permanent magnet materials allow a wide variety of simple, compact configurations of high field strength and quality multipole magnets. Here we analyze the important class of iron-free permanent magnet systems for charged particle beam optics. The theory of conventional segmented multipole magnets formed from uniformly magnetized block magnets placed in regular arrays about a circular magnet aperture is reviewed. Practical multipole configurations resulting are presented that are capable of high and intermediate aperture field strengths. A new class of elliptical aperture magnets is presented within a model with continuously varying magnetization angle. Segmented versions of these magnets promise practical high field dipole and quadrupole magnets with an increased range of applicability.

  19. Energetic charged particles in Saturn's magnetosphere: Voyager 2 results

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.E.; Chenette, D.L.; Cummings, A.C.; Garrard, T.L.; Stone, E.C.; Schardt, A.W.; Trainor, J.H.; Lal, N.; McDonald, F.B.

    1982-01-29

    Results from the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 in Saturn's magnetosphere are presented. During the inbound pass through the outer magnetosphere, the greater than or equal to 0.43-million-electron-volt proton flux was more intense, and both the proton and electron fluxes were more varible, than previously observed. These changes are attributed to the influence on the magnetosphere of variations in the solar wind conditions. Outbound, beyond 18 Saturn radii, impulsive bursts of 0.14- to > 1.0-million-electron-volt electrons were observed. In the inner magnetosphere, the charged particle absorption signatures of Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys are used to constrain the possible tilt and offset of Saturn's internal magnetic dipole. At approx. 3 Saturn radii, a transient decrease was observed in the electron flux which was not due to Mimas. Characteristics of this decrease suggest the existence of additional material, perhaps another satellite, in the orbit of Mimas.

  20. Energetic charged particle beams for disablement of mines

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.

    1995-03-27

    LLNL has an ongoing program of weapons disablement using energetic charged particle beams; this program combines theoretical and experimental expertise in accelerators, high-energy and nuclear physics, plasma physics and hydrodynamics to simulate/measure effects of electron and proton beams on weapons. This paper reviews work by LLNL, LANL and NSWC on detonating sensitive and insensitive high explosives and land mines using high-current electron beams. Computer simulations are given. 20--160 MeV electron beams incident on wet/dry soils are being studied, along with electron beam propagation in air. Compact high current, high energy accelerators are being developed for mine clearing. Countermine missions of interest are discussed. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Energetic charged particles in Saturn's magnetosphere - Voyager 2 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R. E.; Chenette, D. L.; Cummings, A. C.; Garrard, T. L.; Stone, E. C.; Schardt, A. W.; Trainor, J. H.; Lal, N.; McDonald, F. B.

    1982-01-01

    Results from the cosmic-ray system on Voyager 2 in Saturn's magnetosphere are presented. During the inbound pass through the outer magnetosphere, the not less than 0.43-million-electron-volt proton flux was more intense, and both the proton and electron fluxes were more variable, than previously observed. These changes are attributed to the influence on the magnetosphere of variations in the solar wind conditions. Outbound, beyond 18 Saturn radii, impulsive bursts of 0.14to greater than 1.0-million-electron-volt electrons were observed. In the inner magnetosphere, the charged particle absorption signatures of Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys are used to constrain the possible tilt and offset of Saturn's internal magnetic dipole. At approximately 3 Saturn radii, a transient decrease was observed in the electron flux which was not due to Mimas. Characteristics of this decrease suggest the existence of additional material, perhaps another satellite, in the orbit of Mimas.

  2. Photonic crystal devices formed by a charged-particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Koops, Hans W. P.

    2000-01-01

    A photonic crystal device and method. The photonic crystal device comprises a substrate with at least one photonic crystal formed thereon by a charged-particle beam deposition method. Each photonic crystal comprises a plurality of spaced elements having a composition different from the substrate, and may further include one or more impurity elements substituted for spaced elements. Embodiments of the present invention may be provided as electromagnetic wave filters, polarizers, resonators, sources, mirrors, beam directors and antennas for use at wavelengths in the range from about 0.2 to 200 microns or longer. Additionally, photonic crystal devices may be provided with one or more electromagnetic waveguides adjacent to a photonic crystal for forming integrated electromagnetic circuits for use at optical, infrared, or millimeter-wave frequencies.

  3. Energy loss of a heavy particle near 3D charged rotating hairy black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Jalil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider a charged rotating black hole in three dimensions with a scalar charge and discuss the energy loss of a heavy particle moving near the black-hole horizon. We also study quasi-normal modes and find the dispersion relations. We find that the effect of scalar charge and electric charge increases the energy loss.

  4. Impact debris particles in Jupiter's stratosphere.

    PubMed

    West, R A; Karkoschka, E; Friedson, A J; Seymour, M; Baines, K H; Hammel, H B

    1995-03-03

    The aftermath of the impacts of periodic comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter was studied with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The impact debris particles may owe their dark brown color to organic material rich in sulfur and nitrogen. The total volume of aerosol 1 day after the last impact is equal to the volume of a sphere of radius 0.5 kilometer. In the optically thick core regions, the particle mean radius is between 0.15 and 0.3 micrometer, and the aerosol is spread over many scale heights, from approximately 1 millibar to 200 millibars of pressure or more. Particle coagulation can account for the evolution of particle radius and total optical depth during the month following the impacts.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Polyelectrolyte Grafted Charged Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Priti Sundar; Harada, Tamotsu; Matsumoto, Kozo; Matsuoka, Hideki

    2006-05-01

    Novel polyelectrolyte grafted charged colloidal particles have been synthesized via emulsion polymerization method using block copolymer as an emulsifier and have been characterized by determining the surface charge number (Z), chain density (σ) using conductometric titration, the size distribution, hydrodynamic (Rh) radius by dynamic light scattering and the core radius (Rc) by atomic force microscopy. The structural ordering and dynamics have been investigated in a very dilute concentration and the effect of salt concentration (Cs) on hydrodynamic radius have also been studied using dynamic light scattering. The conductivity titration curve was found to show two equivalence points and the potentiometric titration curves are found to sensitive only after a critical salt concentrations. The corresponding measured hydrodynamic radius is also found to decrease after a critical salt concentration. At high salt concentration, the hydrodynamic radius shows a close agreement with that of the core radius measured by the atomic force microscope. These experimental results are in agreement with the recent theoretical prediction and experimental observation that most of the counterions are confined inside the brush region which led to stretching of the chains at low salt concentration.

  6. The impact of surface properties on particle-interface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anna; Kaz, David; McGorty, Ryan; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2013-03-01

    The propensity for particles to bind to oil-water interfaces was first noted by Ramsden and Pickering over a century ago, and has been attributed to the huge reduction in surface energy when a particle breaches an oil-water interface and straddles it at its equilibrium height. Since then materials on a variety of length scales have been fabricated using particles at interfaces, from Pickering emulsions to Janus particles. In these applications, it is simply assumed that the particle sits at its hugely energetically favourable equilibrium position. However, it was recently shown that the relaxation of particles towards their equilibrium position is logarithmic in time and could take months, much longer than typical experiments. Here we investigate how surface charge and particle 'hairiness' impact the interaction between micron-sized particles and oil-water interfaces, and explore a molecular kinetic theory model to help understand these results. We use digital holographic microscopy to track micron-sized particles as they approach an oil-water interface with a resolution of 2 nm in all three dimensions at up to thousands of frames per second.

  7. Chaotic motion of charged particles in toroidal magnetic configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; Dumont, Rémi; Garbet, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    We study the motion of a charged particle in a tokamak magnetic field and discuss its chaotic nature. Contrary to most of recent studies, we do not make any assumption on any constant of the motion and solve numerically the cyclotron gyration using Hamiltonian formalism. We take advantage of a symplectic integrator allowing us to make long-time simulations. First considering an idealized magnetic configuration, we add a nongeneric perturbation corresponding to a magnetic ripple, breaking one of the invariant of the motion. Chaotic motion is then observed and opens questions about the link between chaos of magnetic field lines and chaos of particle trajectories. Second, we return to an axisymmetric configuration and tune the safety factor (magnetic configuration) in order to recover chaotic motion. In this last setting with two constants of the motion, the presence of chaos implies that no third global constant exists, we highlight this fact by looking at variations of the first order of the magnetic moment in this chaotic setting. We are facing a mixed phase space with both regular and chaotic regions and point out the difficulties in performing a global reduction such as gyrokinetics.

  8. Stochastization of charged particle motion near magnetotail current layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I. I.; Geviksman, Kh. V.; Kropotkin, A. P.; Sitnov, M. I.

    Charged particle dynamics near the magnetotail current layer in the parabolic magnetic field model, B = B(sub 0)(Z/L)e(sub x) + B(sub n)e(sub z), are considered (L is the typical acceleration scale of the B(sub 0) field component, parallel to the layer) in the area of kappa = (B(sub n)/B(sub 0))(L/rho(sub 0))exp 1/2 much less than 1 (rho(sub 0) - larmor particle radius in the B(sub 0) field). In this area, it is shown that stochastization of motion can be at least of two types, corresponding to the local and global (in the layer plane) adiabaticity violation. The model proposed to describe the second type stochasticity agrees with results of numeric simulation and in particular describes in the right way the dependence of stochasticity area size on the kappa parameter as well as the presence of resonance necklace at the boundary of this area. Evaluation of the diffusion coefficient near the boundary of the stochasticity area is conducted.

  9. A novel silicon array designed for intraoperative charged particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Tornai, Martin P; Patt, Bradley E; Iwanczyk, Jan S; Tull, Carolyn R; MacDonald, Lawrence R; Hoffman, Edward J

    2002-11-01

    A novel Si-PIN imaging array is under investigation for a charged particle (beta, positron, or alpha) sensitive intraoperative camera to be used for (residual) tumor identification during surgery. This class of collimator-less nuclear imaging device has a higher signal response for direct interactions than its scintillator-optical detector-based counterparts. Monte Carlo simulations with 635 keV betas were performed, yielding maximum and projected ranges of 1.64 and 0.55 mm in Si. Up to 90% of these betas were completely absorbed in the first 0.30 mm. Based on these results, 300 microm thick prototype Si detector arrays were designed in a 16 x 16 crossed-grid arrangement with 0.8 mm wide orthogonal strips on 1.0 mm pitch. A NIM- and CAMAC-based high-density data acquisition and processing system was used to collect the list mode data. The system was calibrated by comparisons of measured spectra to energy deposition simulations or by direct measurement of various >100 keV conversion electron or beta emitters. Mean electronic noise per strip was <3.6 keV FWHM at room temperature. When detecting positrons, which have an accompanying 511 keV annihilation background, the flood irradiated beta/gamma ratio was approximately 40, indicating that beta images could be made without the use of background rejection techniques. The intrinsic spatial resolution corresponds to the 1 x 1 mm2 pixel size, and measurements of beta emitting point and line sources yielded FWHM resolutions of 1.5 (lateral) and 2.5 mm (diagonal), respectively, with the larger widths due to particle range blurting effects. Deconvolution of the finite source size yielded intrinsic resolutions that corresponded to the image pixel size. Transmission images of circle and line phantoms with various hole sizes and pitch were resolved with either pure beta or positron irradiation without a background correction. This novel semiconductor imaging device facilitates high charged particle and low gamma sensitivity

  10. Simulating the transport of heavy charged particles through trabecular spongiosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh, Jacob A.

    As planning continues for manned missions far beyond Low Earth Orbit, a paramount concern remains the flight crew's exposure to galactic cosmic radiation. When humans exit the protective magnetic field of Earth, they become subject to bombardment by highly-reactive heavy charged (HZE) particles. A possible consequence of this two- to three-year-long mission is the onset of radiation-induced leukemia, a disorder with a latency period as short as two to three years. Because data on risk to humans from exposure to HZE particles is non-existent, studies of leukemia in animals are now underway to investigate the relative effectiveness of HZE exposures. Leukemogenesis can result from energy depositions occurring within marrow contained in the trabecular spongiosa. Trabecular spongiosa is found in flat bones and within the ends of long bones, and is characterized by an intricate matrix of interconnected bone tissue forming cavities that house marrow. The microscopic internal dimensions of spongiosa vary between species. As radiation traverses this region, interface-induced dose perturbations that occur at the interfaces between bone and marrow affect the patterns of energy deposition within the region. An aim of this project is to determine the extent by which tissue heterogeneity and microscopic dimensions have on patterns of energy deposition within the trabecular spongiosa. This leads to the development of PATHFIT, a computer code capable of generating simple quadric-based geometric models of trabecular spongiosa for both humans and mice based on actual experimentally-determined internal dimensions of trabecular spongiosa. Following the creation of spongiosa models, focus is placed on the development of HITSPAP, a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport code system that combines capabilities of the MC code PENELOPE and MC code PARTRAC. This code is capable of simulating the transport of HZE particles through accurate models of trabecular spongiosa. The final and

  11. The "Puck" Energetic Charged Particle Detector: Design, Heritage, and Advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of approximately 10 kiloelectronvolts to several megaelectronvolts. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of kiloelectronvolts to about 1 megaelectronvolt. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 kiloelectronvolt per nucleon,with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  12. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  13. The "Puck" Energetic Charged Particle Detector: Design, Heritage, and Advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of approximately 10 kiloelectronvolts to several megaelectronvolts. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of kiloelectronvolts to about 1 megaelectronvolt. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 kiloelectronvolt per nucleon,with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  14. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements.

    PubMed

    Clark, G; Cohen, I; Westlake, J H; Andrews, G B; Brandt, P; Gold, R E; Gkioulidou, M A; Hacala, R; Haggerty, D; Hill, M E; Ho, G C; Jaskulek, S E; Kollmann, P; Mauk, B H; McNutt, R L; Mitchell, D G; Nelson, K S; Paranicas, C; Paschalidis, N; Schlemm, C E

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  15. Screening of a charged dust particle within a nonlocal charging theory

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, I. N.; Filippov, A. V.

    2013-03-15

    We study the influence of the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function on the dust particle charge screening in a two-component plasma of various inert gases and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. For our analytical and numerical calculations, we have chosen the point sink model in the diffusion-drift approximation, which, in addition to the bulk production and loss of electrons and ions, also includes the heterogeneous processes of their absorption by a dust particle. We have established that the dust particle potential distribution in the problem under consideration is a superposition of three Debye exponentials with three different screening constants. The first constant practically coincides with the inverse Debye length. The second constant is determined by the inverse length travelled by the electrons and ions in the ambipolar diffusion process in the characteristic recombination time. The third constant coincides with the inverse characteristic distance of electron energy transfer through heat conduction in the characteristic time of electron energy establishment in the processes of heating by a beam of fast electrons and energy losses in elastic and inelastic collisions. We compare our numerical calculations of the screening constants with the analytical estimates obtained in the ambipolar diffusion approximation.

  16. Use of zeolites in the capture of charged particles from plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sung Il; Lee, Seong Eui; Kim, Sun Ho; Cho, Kwan Hyun; Choi, Kyung Cheol

    2008-08-01

    The zeolites NaA and 13X were introduced to a coplanar discharge cell to investigate the behavior of charged particles from plasma. The zeolite crystals were attached to the surface without blocking their nanopores. The memory margin related to the accumulated charged particles on the surface indicated that the zeolites absorb charged particles. This phenomenon was also observed at the displacement and discharge current plots. Zeolites with a different window size cause abnormally high displacement and a saturation phenomenon of discharge currents. Note in particular that NaA seems to not only absorb charged particles but also capture gas molecules.

  17. Non-intrusive measurement of particle charge: Electrostatic dry coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, J.L.; Stencel, J.M.; Ban, H.

    1992-01-01

    A test apparatus utilizing a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer was developed to non-intrusively determine charge on small particles. Optimum operating conditions for the system were determined using highly characterized silica spheres with an average particle diameter of 60{mu} in a dry N{sub 2} gas. The silica spheres were triboelectrically charged, and passed through a high intensity electric field. The charged particle trajectories, diameter, and number density were monitored using a two component laser PDPA. From this data and known operating parameters charge magnitude was determined.

  18. Effect of magnetic helicity upon rectilinear propagation of charged particles in random magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, James A.

    1992-01-01

    When charged particles spiral along a large constant magnetic field, their trajectories are scattered by any random field components that are superposed on the guiding field. If the random field configuration embodies helicity, the scattering is asymmetrical with respect to a plane perpendicular to the guiding field, for particles moving into the forward hemisphere are scattered at different rates from those moving into the backward hemisphere. This asymmetry gives rise to new terms in the transport equations that describe propagation of charged particles. Helicity has virtually no impact on qualitative features of the diffusive mode of propagation. However, characteristic velocities of the coherent modes that appear after a highly anisotropic injection exhibit an asymmetry related to helicity. Explicit formulas, which embody the effects of helicity, are given for the anisotropies, the coefficient diffusion, and the coherent velocities. Predictions derived from these expressions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport, but the simulations reveal certain phenomena whose explanation calls for further analytical work.

  19. Layout-aware Soft Error Rate Estimation Technique for Integrated Circuits under the Environment with Energetic Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbekov, A. O.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Bobkov, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Single Event Transient (SET) is a current and voltage disturbance in an integrated circuit (IC), caused by charged particle impact. In modern IC technologies single charged particle can cause multiple SETs on multiple electrical nodes, this can lead to faults. There are several mitigation techniques with their drawbacks affecting circuit performance. This work presents a comparison of experimental data with simulation results acquired by the means of our technique and tools. Our technique is able to simulate sub-100 nm IC performance under multiple SET using industry standard SPICE simulator, without incorporation of a T-CAD or physical measurements, and taking into account layout of the device.

  20. Generalized power-spectrum Larmor formula for an extended charged particle embedded in a harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, Edwin A.; Khodja, Mohamed R.

    2006-09-01

    The nonrelativistic Larmor radiation formula, giving the power radiated by an accelerated charged point particle, is generalized for a spatially extended particle in the context of the classical charged harmonic oscillator. The particle is modeled as a spherically symmetric rigid charge distribution that possesses both translational and spinning degrees of freedom. The power spectrum obtained exhibits a structure that depends on the form factor of the particle, but reduces, in the limit of an infinitesimally small particle and for the charge distributions considered, to Larmor’s familiar result. It is found that for finite-duration small-enough accelerations as well as perpetual uniform accelerations the power spectrum of the spatially extended particle reduces to that of a point particle. It is also found that when the acceleration is violent or the size parameter of the particle is very large compared to the wavelength of the emitted radiation the power spectrum is highly suppressed. Possible applications are discussed.

  1. Charging of mesospheric particles - Implications for electron density and particle coagulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Thomas, Gary E.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between N(e) and mesospheric aerosols near the mesopause is studied. The full distribution of charges on mesospheric aerosols is calculated, including dust and ice particles with radii ranging from 1 to 400 nm. The N(e) and ion density N(i) are obtained and ionization height profiles are calculated. The effects of dust and ice particles on N(e) and N(i) are studied for a wide range of assumed conditions. The results indicate that aerosol concentrations associated with visible polar mesospheric clouds are unlikely to cause a severe N(e) depletion. The pronounced 'bite-out' of N(e) at about 87 km in the summertime may be caused by a large concentration of small ice particles in a narrow cold layer near the mesosphere. Net negative charge on mesospheric aerosols may severely inihibit coagulation, so that mesospheric dust would not grow significantly. A higher supersaturation with respect to water vapor would be needed for heterogeneous nucleation of ice crystals.

  2. Intermediate regime of charged particle scattering in the field-reversal configuration.

    PubMed

    Shustov, P I; Artemyev, A V; Yushkov, E V

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the charged particle scattering in the magnetic field configuration with stretched magnetic field lines. This scattering results from the violation of the adiabaticity of charged particle motion in the region with the strong gradient of the magnetic field. We consider the intermediate regime of charged particle dynamics, when the violation of the adiabaticity is significant enough, but particle motion is not chaotic. We demonstrate and describe the significant scattering of particles with large adiabatic invariants (magnetic moment). We discuss a possible application of obtained results for description of the peculiarities of pitch-angle diffusion of relativistic electrons in the Earth radiation belts.

  3. Intermediate regime of charged particle scattering in the field-reversal configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, P. I. Yushkov, E. V.; Artemyev, A. V.

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the charged particle scattering in the magnetic field configuration with stretched magnetic field lines. This scattering results from the violation of the adiabaticity of charged particle motion in the region with the strong gradient of the magnetic field. We consider the intermediate regime of charged particle dynamics, when the violation of the adiabaticity is significant enough, but particle motion is not chaotic. We demonstrate and describe the significant scattering of particles with large adiabatic invariants (magnetic moment). We discuss a possible application of obtained results for description of the peculiarities of pitch-angle diffusion of relativistic electrons in the Earth radiation belts.

  4. Theory of using magnetic deflections to combine charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckbeck, Mackenzie K.; Doyle, Barney Lee

    2014-09-01

    Several radiation effects projects in the Ion Beam Lab (IBL) have recently required two disparate charged particle beams to simultaneously strike a single sample through a single port of the target chamber. Because these beams have vastly different mass–energy products (MEP), the low-MEP beam requires a large angle of deflection toward the sample by a bending electromagnet. A second electromagnet located further upstream provides a means to compensate for the small angle deflection experienced by the high-MEP beam during its path through the bending magnet. This paper derives the equations used to select the magnetic fields required by these two magnets to achieve uniting both beams at the target sample. A simple result was obtained when the separation of the two magnets was equivalent to the distance from the bending magnet to the sample, and the equation is given by: Bs= 1/2(rc/rs) Bc, where Bs and Bc are the magnetic fields in the steering and bending magnet and rc/rs is the ratio of the radii of the bending magnet to that of the steering magnet. This result is not dependent upon the parameters of the high MEP beam, i.e. energy, mass, charge state. Therefore, once the field of the bending magnet is set for the low-MEP beam, and the field in the steering magnet is set as indicted in the equation, the trajectory path of any high-MEP beam will be directed into the sample.

  5. Mass-analysis of Charged Aerosol Particles in a PMSE/NLC Layer by a Rocket-borne Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.; Knappmiller, S.; Kohnert, R.; Sternovsky, Z.; Holzworth, R.; Shimogawa, M.; Friedrich, M.; Gumbel, J.; Khaplanov, M.; Megner, L.; Baumgarten, G.; Latteck, R.; Rapp, M.; Hoppe, U.

    2007-12-01

    The first of two "MASS" (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer) rockets was launched from the Andoya Rocket Range at 22:51 UTC on 3 August 2007 into PMSE and NLC approximately 26 minutes after an AIM satellite overpass. The sun was 4 degrees below the horizon and the local riometer indicated that the ionospheric conditions were rather quiet, i.e., day time conditions as far as negative cluster ions are concerned. NLC were seen in the previous hour at 83 km by the ALOMAR RMR lidar pointed along the rocket trajectory and were detected at the same altitude by rocket-borne photometer measurements. The rocket carried an electrostatic mass analyzer for the charged fraction of the aerosol particles and both forward and aft deployable electric field booms. The mass analyzer was mounted on the tip of the payload and pointed in the ram direction. It has a forward inlet slit with area of 25 square centimeters and side vents for air exit. Aerosol particles with different ranges of charge-to-mass ratio are collected within the instrument housing on two sets of four biased collector plates, with one set for positive particles and one set for negative particles. A preliminary analysis of the data shows the density of negative particles with radius greater than 3 nm rising sharply at 83 and continuing to 89 km, collocated with PMSE detected by the ALWIN radar. Particles with 1-2 nm radii with both signs of charge and positive particles with less than1 nm radius were detected at 86-88 km. Initial charge-density estimates are several thousands per cubic centimeter for each of these size ranges. The E field booms detected significant potential variations in the PMSE/NLC region. Further analysis will examine in more detail the effects of aerodynamics, payload charging, and spurious charge generation by particle impacts.

  6. Charge-to-mass Ratio of Saltating Particles in Wind-Blown Sand

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Tian-Li; Zhang, Huan; Zheng, Xiao-Jing

    2014-01-01

    The electrification of sand particles plays an important role in aeolian events. In this paper, the charge-to-mass ratio vertical profiles of saltating particles in wind-blown sand were measured by a field experiments. By combining the results of field measurements with our previous wind-tunnel measurements, we discussed the factors affecting the charge-to-mass ratio of saltating particles. It reveals that the magnitude of the charge-to-mass ratio increases exponentially with height above the surface. In addition, the charge polarity of saltating particles depends on the relative size between saltating and creeping particles, and the magnitude of charge-to-mass ratio is determined by wind velocity and the relative size difference ratio between saltating and creeping particles. PMID:24998641

  7. Dynamical derivation of momentum diffusion coefficients at collisions of relativistic charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ognivenko, V. V.

    2016-01-15

    An expression has been obtained for the diffusion tensor of particles in the momentum space on the basis of the dynamics of particles motion. The general equations have been used to determine the rms momentum spread at collisions of relativistic charged particles at times shorter than the time of randomization of particles motion and at greater times when motion is completely random.

  8. Measurements of Lunar Dust Charging Properties by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, Dragana; Craven, Paul D.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; LeClair, Andre; Spann, James F.; Norwood, Joseph K.

    2009-01-01

    Dust grains in the lunar environment are believed to be electrostatically charged predominantly by photoelectric emissions resulting from solar UV radiation on the dayside, and on the nightside by interaction with electrons in the solar wind plasma. In the high vacuum environment on the lunar surface with virtually no atmosphere, the positive and negative charge states of micron/submicron dust grains lead to some unusual physical and dynamical dust phenomena. Knowledge of the electrostatic charging properties of dust grains in the lunar environment is required for addressing their hazardous effect on the humans and mechanical systems. It is well recognized that the charging properties of individual small micron size dust grains are substantially different from the measurements on bulk materials. In this paper we present the results of measurements on charging of individual Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust grains by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-100 eV energy range. The charging/discharging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of approx. 0.1 to 5 micron radii are discussed in terms of the sticking efficiencies and secondary electron yields. The secondary electron emission process is found to be a complex and effective charging/discharging mechanism for incident electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with a strong dependence on particle size. Implications of the laboratory measurements on the nature of dust grain charging in the lunar environment are discussed.

  9. Discrimination of charged particles in a neutral beam line by using a solid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jong-Kwan; Ko, Jewou; Liu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    In the past several decades, many studies have been conducted to search for non-baryonic dark matter, such as weakly interactive massive particles (WIMPs). In the search for WIMPs, charged particles incident on the detector are background particles because WIMPs are neutral. Charged particles originate from various sources, such as cosmic rays and laboratory materials surrounding the main detector. Therefore, a veto that discriminates charged particles can improve the particle-detection efficiency of the entire experiment for detecting WIMPs. Here, we investigate in the thickness range of 1 mm to 5 mm, the optimal thickness of a polystyrene scintillator as a chargedparticle veto detector. We found that 3-mm-thick polystyrene provides the best performance to veto charged particles and the charged-particle background in the search for the WIMP signal. Furthermore, we fabricated 3-mm-thick and 5-mm-thick polystyrene charged particle veto detectors that will be used in an underground laboratory in the search for WIMP dark matter. After exposing those detectors are the actual beam line, we compared the rate of charged particles measured using those detectors and the rate simulated through a Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. Kinetics of charged particles in a high-voltage gas discharge in a nonuniform electrostatic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, V. A.; Krichevskii, S. V.; Markushin, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    A high-voltage gas discharge is of interest as a possible means of generating directed flows of low-temperature plasma in the off-electrode space distinguished by its original features [1-4]. We propose a model for calculating the trajectories of charges particles in a high-voltage gas discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.15 Torr existing in a nonuniform electrostatic field and the strength of this field. Based on the results of our calculations, we supplement and refine the extensive experimental data concerning the investigation of such a discharge published in [1, 2, 5-8]; good agreement between the theory and experiment has been achieved. The discharge burning is initiated and maintained through bulk electron-impact ionization and ion-electron emission. We have determined the sizes of the cathode surface regions responsible for these processes, including the sizes of the axial zone involved in the discharge generation. The main effect determining the kinetics of charged particles consists in a sharp decrease in the strength of the field under consideration outside the interelectrode space, which allows a free motion of charges with specific energies and trajectories to be generated in it. The simulation results confirm that complex electrode systems that allow directed plasma flows to be generated at a discharge current of hundreds or thousands of milliamperes and a voltage on the electrodes of 0.3-1 kV can be implemented in practice [3, 9, 10].

  11. O the Penetration of Fast-Charged Particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, David John

    The work presented here is intended to provide theoretical support for medical physicists who are interested in improving radiotherapy treatment plans involving charged particle beams. These plans still rely heavily on empirical behavior rather than theory as a basis for making predictions. In the most frequent therapy applications, electron beams, typically with initial energies between 5-20 MeV, penetrate materials of low atomic number. Energy loss is predominately by ionization and the effects of multiple scattering by repeated Coulomb deflections from nuclei are of primary interest. Our development is strongly influenced by these applications and so we begin our work with a review of Fermi-Eyges theory. This theory and ideas which were equivalent to it have dramatically improved electron beam treatment plans over the last several years, as is now generally recognized. This theory also has significant limitations due to the approximations or assumptions that it makes. Since we can improve and extend these results by relaxing some of the key assumptions, we continue by considering some generalizations of this basic theory and we discuss those which were given by Snyder-Scott, Lewis and Yang in some detail. Yang's theory had significant potential for applications but this theory will not work properly unless its time development is handled differently. This leads us to present a wave solution to the penetration problem in our final chapter. Sample calculations of the most important distributions are given there as well.

  12. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PULSING A CHARGED PARTICLE BEAM

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.; Kuenning, R.W.; Harmon, R.K.

    1961-05-01

    A system is offered for pulsing a continuous beam of charged particles to form beam pulses that are consistently rectangular and of precise time durations which may be varied over an extremely wide range at a widely variable range of repetition rates. The system generally comprises spaced deflection plates on opposite sides of a beam axis in between which a unidirectional bias field is established to deflect the beam for impingement on an off-axis collector. The bias field is periodically neutralized by the application of fast rise time substantially rectangular pulses to one of the deflection plates in opposition to the bias field and then after a time delay to the other deflection plate in aiding relation to the bias field and during the flat crest portion of the bias opposing pulses. The voltage distribution of the resulting deflection field then includes neutral or zero portions which are of symmetrical substantially rectangular configuration relative to time and during which the beam axially passes the collector in the form of a substantially rectangular beam pulse.

  13. Coherent pulses in the diffusive transport of charged particles`

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kota, J.

    1994-01-01

    We present exact solutions to the diffusive transport of charged particles following impulsive injection for a simple model of scattering. A modified, two-parameter relaxation-time model is considered that simulates the low rate of scattering through perpendicular pitch-angle. Scattering is taken to be isotropic within each of the foward- and backward-pointing hemispheres, respectively, but, at the same time, a reduced rate of sccattering is assumed from one hemisphere to the other one. By applying a technique of Fourier- and Laplace-transform, the inverse transformation can be performed and exact solutions can be reached. By contrast with the first, and so far only exact solutions of Federov and Shakov, this wider class of solutions gives rise to coherent pulses to appear. The present work addresses omnidirectional densities for isotropic injection from an instantaneous and localized source. The dispersion relations are briefly discussed. We find, for this particular model, two diffusive models to exist up to a certain limiting wavenumber. The corresponding eigenvalues are real at the lowest wavenumbers. Complex eigenvalues, which are responsible for coherent pulses, appear at higher wavenumbers.

  14. Charged Particle Alterations of Surfaces in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    The surfaces of 'airless' bodies in the solar system are exposed to the ambient plasma, micrometeorites, and the solar UV. The effects of these space weathering agents on surfaces in the solar system has been studied in this project. In the last three years work was carried out on volatile depletion at Mars, on sputtering of the lunar surface, on absorption by implanted S in vapor-deposited H2O and its relevance to observations of Europa's surface in the UV, and on the spectral changes produced on irradiating SO2 and its possible relevance to Io. In addition, the role of plasma-induced charging of E-ring grains was evaluated because of its relevance to E-ring particle source and the lifetime of the E-ring. Finally, the detection of sputtered material from Dione by the CAPS instrument on CASSINI was evaluated as a tool for analysis of satellite surface composition, and the role of sputtering on the ambient OH in the vicinity of the ice satellites and the E-ring was evaluated.

  15. Method and system for treating an interior surface of a workpiece using a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, David Richard

    2007-05-23

    A method and system of treating an interior surface on an internal cavity of a workpiece using a charged particle beam. A beam deflector surface of a beam deflector is placed within the internal cavity of the workpiece and is used to redirect the charged particle beam toward the interior surface to treat the interior surface.

  16. BDO-RFQ Program Complex of Modelling and Optimization of Charged Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsyannikov, D. A.; Ovsyannikov, A. D.; Antropov, I. V.; Kozynchenko, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The article is dedicated to BDO Code program complex used for modelling and optimization of charged particle dynamics with consideration of interaction in RFQ accelerating structures. The structure of the program complex and its functionality are described; mathematical models of charged particle dynamics, interaction models and methods of optimization are given.

  17. Particle Emission and Charging Effects Induced by Fracture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-15

    recombination with mobile charge carriers). These processes are initiated by bond breaking resulting in the creation of localized departures from...subsequendy decay to yield after-emission. Thermally stimulated relaxation involving mobile charge carriers releasing energy at appropriate recombination...region of contact. This flow of charge is slow because of the poor charge mobility in the rubber. In addition, any oxide layer on the metal also

  18. Momentum Flux Measuring Instrument for Neutral and Charged Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schafer, Charles F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An instrument to measure the momentum flux (total pressure) of plasma and neutral particle jets onto a surface has been developed. While this instrument was developed for magnetized plasmas, the concept works for non-magnetized plasmas as well. We have measured forces as small as 10(exp -4) Newtons on a surface immersed in the plasma where small forces are due to ionic and neutral particles with kinetic energies on the order of a few eV impacting the surface. This instrument, a force sensor, uses a target plate (surface) that is immersed in the plasma and connected to one end of an alumina rod while the opposite end of the alumina rod is mechanically connected to a titanium beam on which four strain gauges are mounted. The force on the target generates torque causing strain in the beam. The resulting strain measurements can be correlated to a force on the target plate. The alumina rod electrically and thermally isolates the target plate from the strain gauge beam and allows the strain gauges to be located out of the plasma flow while also serving as a moment arm of several inches to increase the strain in the beam at the strain gauge location. These force measurements correspond directly to momentum flux and may be used with known plasma conditions to place boundaries on the kinetic energies of the plasma and neutral particles. The force measurements may also be used to infer thrust produced by a plasma propulsive device. Stainless steel, titanium, molybdenum, and aluminum flat target plates have been used. Momentum flux measurements of H2, D2, He, and Ar plasmas produced in a magnetized plasma device have been performed.

  19. The formation of molecular hydrogen from water ice in the lunar regolith by energetic charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Wilson, J. K.

    2013-06-01

    On 9 October 2009, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission impacted a spent Centaur rocket into the permanently shadowed region (PSR) within Cabeus crater and detected water vapor and ice, as well as other volatiles, in the ejecta plume. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), a far ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), observed this plume as FUV emissions from the fluorescence of sunlight by molecular hydrogen (H2) and other constituents. Energetic charged particles, such as galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs), can dissociate the molecules in water ice to form H2. We examine how much H2can be formed by these types of particle radiation interacting with water ice sequestered in the regolith within PSRs, and we assess whether it can account for the H2 observed by LAMP. To estimate H2formation, we use the GCR and SEP radiation dose rates measured by the LRO Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER). The exposure time of the ice is calculated by considering meteoritic gardening and the penetration depth of the energetic particles. We find that GCRs and SEPs could convert at least 1-7% of the original water molecules into H2. Therefore, given the amount of water detected by LCROSS, such particle radiation‒induced dissociation of water ice could likely account for a significant percentage (10-100%) of the H2measured by LAMP.

  20. Search for fractionally charged particles in pp collisions at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.

    2013-05-01

    A search is presented for free heavy long-lived fractionally charged particles produced in pp collisions at s=7TeV. The data sample was recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. Candidate fractionally charged particles are identified by selecting tracks with associated low charge measurements in the silicon tracking detector. Observations are found to be consistent with expectations for background processes. The results of the search are used to set upper limits on the cross section for pair production of fractionally charged, massive spin-1/2 particles that are neutral under SU(3)C and SU(2)L. We exclude at 95% confidence level such particles with electric charge ±2e/3 with masses below 310 GeV, and those with charge ±e/3 with masses below 140 GeV.

  1. Polyvinylidene fluoride dust detector response to particle impacts.

    PubMed

    James, D; Hoxie, V; Horanyi, M

    2010-03-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detectors have flown on many space missions since their first use on the Vega 1 and 2 spacecraft. The fundamental operating principle of these detectors is the production of a charge upon impact by a hypervelocity dust particle. This measured signal, N, depends on the speed, v, and mass, m, of the particle. The relationship between N, v, and m was first empirically derived by Simpson and Tuzzolino. All of the PVDF dust instruments prior to the Student Dust Counter on the New Horizons mission use their formula for the calibration of the detectors. This paper provides additional dust impact calibration data, proposes a modification in the exponents for m and v, and investigates the relationship between detector temperature and detector signal.

  2. Influence of gravitation on the self-energy of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zel'nikov, A.; Frolov, V.

    1982-02-01

    The influence of the gravitational field of a charged black hole on the self-energy of an electric and scalar charge at rest in this field is investigated. An exact expression is obtained for the energy of the charged particle, and the transition to the limit of a homogeneous gravitational field is investigated.

  3. Production of leading charged particles and leading charged-particle jets at small transverse momenta in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-12-01

    The per-event yield of the highest transverse momentum charged particle and charged-particle jet, integrated above a given pminT threshold starting at pminT=0.8 and 1 GeV, respectively, is studied in pp collisions at s√=8 TeV. Furthermore, the particles and the jets are measured in the pseudorapidity ranges |η|<2.4 and 1.9, respectively. Our data are sensitive to the momentum scale at which parton densities saturate in the proton, to multiple partonic interactions, and to other key aspects of the transition between the soft and hard QCD regimes in hadronic collisions.

  4. Impact dynamics of particle-coated droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supakar, T.; Kumar, A.; Marston, J. O.

    2017-01-01

    We present findings from an experimental study of the impact of liquid marbles onto solid surfaces. Using dual-view high-speed imaging, we reveal details of the impact dynamics previously not reported. During the spreading stage it is observed that particles at the surface flow rapidly to the periphery of the drop, i.e., the lamella. We characterize the spreading with the maximum spread diameter, comparing to impacts of pure liquid droplets. The principal result is a power-law scaling for the normalized maximum spread in terms of the impact Weber number, Dmax/D0˜Weα , with α ≈1 /3 . However, the best description of the spreading is obtained by considering a total energy balance, in a similar fashion to Pasandideh-Fard et al. [Phys. Fluids 8, 650 (1996)], 10.1063/1.868850. By using hydrophilic target surfaces, the marble integrity is lost even for moderate impact speeds as the particles at the surface separate and allow liquid-solid contact to occur. Remarkably, however, we observe no significant difference in the maximum spread between hydrophobic and hydrophilic targets, which is rationalized by the presence of the particles. Finally, for the finest particles used, we observe the formation of nonspherical arrested shapes after retraction and rebound from hydrophobic surfaces, which is quantified by a circularity measurement of the side profiles.

  5. Rotating Charged Hairy Black Hole in (2+1) Dimensions and Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, J.; Pourhassan, B.; Farahani, H.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we construct rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions for infinitesimal black hole charge and rotation parameters. Then we consider this black hole as particle accelerator and calculate the center-of-mass energy of two colliding test particles near the rotating charged hairy black hole in (2+1) dimensions. As we expected, the center-of-mass energy has infinite value.

  6. First direct limits on lightly ionizing particles with electric charge less than e/6.

    PubMed

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Balakishiyeva, D; Basu Thakur, R; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Lopez Asamar, E; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nelson, H; Nelson, R H; Ogburn, R W; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2015-03-20

    While the standard model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than e/6. A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers finds no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between e/6 and e/200.

  7. Hawking Radiation of the Charged Particle via Tunneling from the Kaluza-Klein Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Jin; Han, Yan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, by applying the Lagrangian analysis on the action, we first redefine the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle. Then, basing on the new definition of the geodesic equation, we revisit the Hawking radiation of the charged massive particle via tunneling from the event horizon of the Kaluza-Klein black hole. In our treatment, the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle is defined uniformly with that of the massless particle, which overcomes the shortcomings of its previous definition, and is more suitable for the tunneling mechanism. The highlight of our work is a new and important development for the Parikh-Wilczek's tunneling method.

  8. GENERAL: Hawking Radiation of Charged Particles in Reissner-Nordström Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ren; Zhang, Li-Chun; Li, Huai-Fan

    2010-03-01

    We extend the method that Banerjee and Majhi have used to discuss Hawking radiation. Under the condition that the total energy and electrical charge of spacetime are conserved, we investigate Hawking radiation of the charged black hole by a new Tortoise coordinate transformation. Taking the reaction of the radiation of the particle to the spacetime into consideration, we not only derive the radiation spectrum that satisfies the unitary principle in quantum mechanics but also show that the contribution of ingoing particles is equal to the one of outgoing particles on the similar chemical potential term in radiation spectrum caused by charged particles.

  9. Transverse energy distribution, charged particle multiplicities and spectra in /sup 16/O-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sunier, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The HELIOS (High Energy Lepton and Ion Spectrometer) experiment, installed at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron, proposes to examine in details the physical properties of a state of high energy created in nuclei by ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. It is generally believed that, at high densities or temperatures, a phase transition to a plasma of quark and gluons will occur. The dynamic of the expansion of such a plasma and its subsequent condensation into a hadron gas should markedly affect the composition and momentum distribution of the emerging particles and photons. The HELIOS experimental setup therefore combines 4..pi.. calorimetric coverage with measurements of inclusive particle spectra, two particle correlations, low and high mass lepton pairs and photons. The emphasis is placed on transverse energy flow (E/sub T/) measurements with good energy resolution, and the ability to trigger the acquisition of data in a variety of E/sub T/ ranges, thereby selecting the impact parameter or the violence of the collisions. This short note presents HELIOS results, for the most part still preliminary, on /sup 16/O-nucleus collisions at the incident energies of 60 and 200 GeV per nucleon. The E/sub T/ distributions from Al, Ag and W targets are discussed and compared to the associated charged particle multiplicities from W. Charged particle and (converted) photon spectra measured with the external magnetic spectrometer are compared for /sup 16/O + W and p + W collisions at 200 GeV per nucleon. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Calibration and Readiness of the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, R.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is an intravehicular energetic particle detector designed to measure a broad spectrum of charged particle and neutron radiation unique to the ISS radiation environment. In this presentation, a summary of calibration and readiness of the RAD Sensor Head (RSH) - also referred to as the Charged Particle Detector (CPD) - for ISS will be presented. Calibration for the RSH consists of p, He, C, O, Si, and Fe ion data collected at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) and Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). The RSH consists of four detectors used in measuring the spectroscopy of charged particles - A, B, C, and D; high-energy neutral particles and charged particles are measured in E; and the last detector - F - is an anti-coincidence detector. A, B, and C are made from Si; D is made from BGO; E and F are made from EJ260XL plastic scintillator.

  11. Laboratory investigation of electric charging of dust particles by electrons, ions, and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Jiri; Pinter, S.; Gruen, E.

    1989-01-01

    In many cosmic environments electric charging of dust particles occurs by electrons, ions, and UV radiation. In case of interstellar dust particles the value of their electric charge can have, for instance, very important consequences for their destruction rate in supernova remnant's shock waves and can globally influence the overall life cycle of dust particles in galaxies. For experimental simulation of charging processes a vacuum chamber was used in which the particles fall through an electron or ion beam of energies up to 10 KeV. The aim of the experiments was to attain maximum charge of dust particles. Furthermore the influence of the rest gas was also determined because electrons and ions produced by collisional ionization of the rest gas can result in significant effects. For measurement particles from 1 to 100 microns from glass, carbon, Al, Fe, MgO, and very loosely bound conglomerates of Al2O3 were used.

  12. Impact of a nonuniform charge distribution on virus assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siyu; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; van der Schoot, Paul; Zandi, Roya

    2017-08-01

    Many spherical viruses encapsulate their genomes in protein shells with icosahedral symmetry. This process is spontaneous and driven by electrostatic interactions between positive domains on the virus coat proteins and the negative genomes. We model the effect of the nonuniform icosahedral charge distribution from the protein shell instead using a mean-field theory. We find that this nonuniform charge distribution strongly affects the optimal genome length and that it can explain the experimentally observed phenomenon of overcharging of virus and viruslike particles.

  13. Charged-Particle Spectra Using Particle Tracking on a Two-Dimensional Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Skupsky, S.; Soures, J. M.; Cremer, S.; Petrasso, R. D.

    1999-11-01

    IRIS-2D is an extension of the spherically symmetric Monte Carlo particle-tracking code IRIS. It tracks particles on a two-dimensional Lagrangian grid and will be used as a post- processor to 2-D hydrocodes to simulate experimental neutron and charged-particle spectra. In this talk, we use IRIS-2D to study the effect of asymmetry and instability-induced mix on the knock-on deuteron (deuterons elastically scattered off the 14-MeV DT neutron) spectrum and its angular distribution. We will present time-integrated knock-on deuteron spectra obtained by post-processing implosion calculations using the 2-D hydrocode ORCHID. Preliminary comparisons of these spectra with experiment will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  14. Photoelectric charging of dust particles: Effect of spontaneous and light induced field emission of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Dixit, A.

    2009-09-07

    The authors have analyzed the charging of dust particles in a plasma, taking into account the electron/ion currents to the particles, electron/ion generation and recombination, electric field emission, photoelectric emission and photoelectric field emission of electrons under the influence of light irradiation; the irradiance has been assumed to be at a level, which lets the particles retain the negative sign of the charge. Numerical results and discussion conclude the papers.

  15. Phase Separation of Binary Charged Particle Systems with Small Size Disparities using a Dusty Plasma.

    PubMed

    Killer, Carsten; Bockwoldt, Tim; Schütt, Stefan; Himpel, Michael; Melzer, André; Piel, Alexander

    2016-03-18

    The phase separation in binary mixtures of charged particles has been investigated in a dusty plasma under microgravity on parabolic flights. A method based on the use of fluorescent dust particles was developed that allows us to distinguish between particles of slightly different size. A clear trend towards phase separation even for smallest size (charge) disparities is observed. The diffusion flux is directly measured from the experiment and uphill diffusion coefficients have been determined.

  16. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1992-09-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a new computational technique uniquely suited to computation of hypervelocity impact phenomena. This paper reviews the characteristics, philosophy, and a bit of the derivation of the method. As illustrations of the technique, several test case computations and several application computations are shown.

  17. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a new computational technique uniquely suited to computation of hypervelocity impact phenomena. This paper reviews the characteristics, philosophy, and a bit of the derivation of the method. As illustrations of the technique, several test case computations and several application computations are shown.

  18. Dynamics of a charged particle around a weakly magnetized naked singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babar, Gulmina Zaman; Jamil, Mubasher; Lim, Yen-Kheng

    2016-12-01

    We examine the motion of a charged particle in the vicinity of a weakly magnetized naked singularity. The escape velocity and energy of the particle moving around the naked singularity after being kicked by another particle or photon are investigated. Also at innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) escape velocity and energy are examined. Effective potential and angular momentum of the particle are also discussed. We discuss the center-of-mass energy after collision between two particles having same mass and opposite charges moving along the same circular orbit in the opposite direction. It is investigated that under what conditions maximum energy can be produced as a result of collision.

  19. Double ionization of helium by particle impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, Finn M.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are reviewed of the ratio, R sq., of double to single ionization of He by proton, antiproton, electron and positron impact in the energy range from 0.15 to about 10 MeV/amu. At high velocities (greater than 1 to 2 MeV/amu) values of R sq. caused by electron impact merge with those for the proton with the antiproton, electron values being up to a factor of 2 greater than that for the p, positron. At these velocities the single ionization cross sections caused by impact of any of these four particles are indistinguishable.

  20. Liquid and Solid Particle Impact Erosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    SYSTEMS COMMAND WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OHIO 45433 ~O 2 11 fl2 [ I’ N(O!ZCN When Government drawings, specifications, or other data are used for...IMPACT EROIN -Jn 7 7. AU THOR(A) AT04GATNME(& ( O George F/cmt 2 . PERII-ORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS IF pr r 7F’A ;I~ET, -PROJCT, SP Air Force...identify by block number) 2 The state-ofe-thae#-art in liquid drop Impact and solid particle impact erosion is reviewed with emphasis on erosion

  1. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) can be used to model hypervelocity impact phenomena via the addition of a strength of materials treatment. SPH is the only technique that can model such problems efficiently due to the combination of 3-dimensional geometry, large translations of material, large deformations, and large void fractions for most problems of interest. This makes SPH an ideal candidate for modeling of asteroid impact, spacecraft shield modeling, and planetary accretion. In this paper we describe the derivation of the strength equations in SPH, show several basic code tests, and present several impact test cases with experimental comparisons.

  2. Statistical charge distribution over dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha

    2014-07-15

    On the basis of statistical mechanics and charging kinetics, the charge distribution over uniform size spherical dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma is investigated. Two specific situations, viz., (i) the plasma in thermal equilibrium and (ii) non-equilibrium state where the plasma is dark (no emission) or irradiated by laser light (including photoemission) are taken into account. The formulation includes the population balance equation for the charged particles along with number and energy balance of the complex plasma constituents. The departure of the results for the Lorentzian plasma, from that in case of Maxwellian plasma, is graphically illustrated and discussed; it is shown that the charge distribution tends to results corresponding to Maxwellian plasma for large spectral index. The charge distribution predicts the opposite charging of the dust particles in certain cases.

  3. Trajectory of Charged Particle in Combined Electric and Magnetic Fields Using Interactive Spreadsheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambade, Popat S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to graphically illustrate to the students the physical phenomenon of motion of charged particle under the action of simultaneous electric and magnetic fields by simulating particle motion on a computer. Differential equations of motions are solved analytically and path of particle in three-dimensional space are…

  4. Charging Guidance of Electric Taxis Based on Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Liyong; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    Electric taxis are playing an important role in the application of electric vehicles. The actual operational data of electric taxis in Shenzhen, China, is analyzed, and, in allusion to the unbalanced time availability of the charging station equipment, the electric taxis charging guidance system is proposed basing on the charging station information and vehicle information. An electric taxis charging guidance model is established and guides the charging based on the positions of taxis and charging stations with adaptive mutation particle swarm optimization. The simulation is based on the actual data of Shenzhen charging stations, and the results show that electric taxis can be evenly distributed to the appropriate charging stations according to the charging pile numbers in charging stations after the charging guidance. The even distribution among the charging stations in the area will be achieved and the utilization of charging equipment will be improved, so the proposed charging guidance method is verified to be feasible. The improved utilization of charging equipment can save public charging infrastructure resources greatly. PMID:26236770

  5. Charging Guidance of Electric Taxis Based on Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization.

    PubMed

    Niu, Liyong; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    Electric taxis are playing an important role in the application of electric vehicles. The actual operational data of electric taxis in Shenzhen, China, is analyzed, and, in allusion to the unbalanced time availability of the charging station equipment, the electric taxis charging guidance system is proposed basing on the charging station information and vehicle information. An electric taxis charging guidance model is established and guides the charging based on the positions of taxis and charging stations with adaptive mutation particle swarm optimization. The simulation is based on the actual data of Shenzhen charging stations, and the results show that electric taxis can be evenly distributed to the appropriate charging stations according to the charging pile numbers in charging stations after the charging guidance. The even distribution among the charging stations in the area will be achieved and the utilization of charging equipment will be improved, so the proposed charging guidance method is verified to be feasible. The improved utilization of charging equipment can save public charging infrastructure resources greatly.

  6. Self assembly of oppositely charged latex particles at oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Trivikram; Ragothaman, Srikanth; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2017-01-15

    In this study we explore the self assembly of oppositely charged latex particles at decane water interfaces. Two spreading protocols have been proposed in this context. In the first method oppositely charged particles are mixed prior to spreading at the interface, this is called "premixed-mixtures". In the second protocol negatively charged particles are first spread at the interface at known coverage followed by spreading positively charged particles at known coverage and this is called "sequential-mixtures". In premixed mixtures depending on particle mixing ratio (composition) and total surface coverage a number of 2d structures ranging from 2d crystals, aggregate-crystal coexistence and 2d-gels are observed. A detailed phase diagram of this system has been explored. In sequential-mixtures for the first time we observed a new phase in colloidal monolayers called 2d-bi crystalline domains. These structures consisted regions of two crystal phases of oppositely charged particles separated by a one dimensional chain of alternating positive and negative particles. Phase diagram of this system has also been explored at various combinations of first spread and second spread particles. A possible mechanism leading to formation of these 2d bi crystalline structures has been discussed. A direct visualization of breakage and reformation of particle barriers separating the crystal phases has been demonstrated through videos. Effect of salt in the water sub phase and particle hydrophobicity on domain formation is also investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Brief Review of the Search for Isolatable Fractional Charge Elementary Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.

    2005-01-31

    Since the initial measurements of the electron charge a century ago, experimenters have faced the persistent question as to whether elementary particles exist that have charges that are fractional multiples of the electron charge. In the standard model of particle physics the quarks are such particles, but it is assumed that quarks cannot be individually isolated, the quarks always being confined inside hadrons. This paper is a brief review of the present status of searches for isolatable fractional charge particles such as a lepton-like particle with fractional charge or an unconfined quark. There have been a very large number of searches but there is no confirmed evidence for existence of isolatable fractional charge particles. It may be that they do not exist, but it is also possible that they are very massive or that their production mechanisms are very small so that they have been missed by existing searches. Therefore the aim of this review is to urge (a) the invention of ways to substantially increase the range of known search methods and (b) to urge the invention of new search methods for isolatable fractional charge particles.

  8. Ionic charge distributions of energetic particles from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.; Waldron, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects which solar flare X-rays have on the charge states of solar cosmic rays is determined quantitatively. Rather than to characterize the charge distribution by temperature alone, it is proposed that the X-ray flux at the acceleration site also is used. The effects of flare X-rays are modeled mathematically.

  9. Dipole Moment of a Charged Particle Trapped at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Bohinc, Klemen; Brown, Matthew A; May, Sylvio

    2016-07-07

    The interaction between two charged particles (such as nanoparticles or colloids) trapped at the air-water interface becomes dipolar at large separations. The corresponding dipole moment can be modeled by considering a single point charge located exactly at the interface, but this model fails to correctly predict the dipole moment's dependence on the salt concentration in the aqueous medium. We extend the single point charge model to two point charges that are separated by a fixed distance and are located at the air-water interface, with one charge being immersed in air and the other in the solvent. The two point charges represent the surface charges at the air-exposed and water-exposed regions of an interface-trapped particle. The two point charges also account for the spatial extension of the particle. On the basis of the Debye-Hückel model, we derive mathematical expressions for the interaction between two pairs of charges and discuss the salt concentration dependence of the dipolar moment at large separations. Our results reveal a residual dipole moment in the limit of large salt content that originates from the charge attached to the air-exposed region of the particle. We discuss nonlinear screening effects and compare the predicted dipolar moments with recent experimental results.

  10. Comment on ‘The effect of single-particle charge limits on charge distributions in dusty plasmas’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijmans, L. C. J.; van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-09-01

    It was recently suggested that the electron affinity may pose an additional upper limit on the charge of a single particle in a plasma, in addition to the electron field emission limit. Here we will, however, show that these two limits both rely on the same physical process and that the limit is only relevant for small particles, because it relies on electron tunneling. Plasma-produced particles of only several nanometres (≲ 10~\\text{nm} ) in size are actively studied, for example in the application of quantum dots and the implications of the proposed charge limit are certainly significant there. However, care must be taken to extend the results to larger particles, which are also actively studied in the field of dusty plasma physics, where typically the limit can be neglected, as we will also show.

  11. The characteristics of particle charging and deposition during powder coating processes with ultrafine powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangbo; Zhu, Jingxu Jesse; Zhang, Hui

    2009-03-01

    In a preceding work, the mechanisms of particle charging and deposition during powder coating processes were explored with coarse polyurethane powder. In this paper, the developed mechanisms were further examined with ultrafine polyurethane powder in order to meet the growing needs for ultrafine powder in finishing industries. This study first verified the previous findings in particle deposition, which account for a cone-shaped pattern formed by deposited particles on the substrate and a rise in particle accumulation in the fringe region. It was further demonstrated with ultrafine powder that, as disclosed by using coarse powder, the primary charging of in-flight particles competes with back corona in particle deposition processes, and the highest deposition efficiency is a compromise by balancing their effects. In comparison with coarse powder, ultrafine powder presents a faster reduction in the deposition rate with extended spraying duration, but shows some superiority in the uniformity of the deposited layer. In the case of charging characteristics of the deposited particles, it was further substantiated with ultrafine powder that the secondary charging mechanism takes predominance in determining the distribution of local charge-to-mass ratios. It was also disclosed that ultrafine powder shows a decreasing charge-to-mass ratio with increased charging voltage in the deposited layer, opposite to the increasing tendency of coarse powder. However, it was commonly demonstrated by both coarse and ultrafine powders that the charge-to-mass ratio of the deposited particles decreases with the extended spraying durations. In comparison, ultrafine powder is more likely to produce uniform charge-to-mass ratio distributions in the deposited layer, which contrast sharply with the ones associated with the coarse powder. In conclusion, it is believed that this study supplements the preceding study and is of great help in providing a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms

  12. Heavy Charged Particle Radiobiology: Using Enhanced Biological Effectiveness and Improved Beam Focusing to Advance Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B.; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation. PMID:21376738

  13. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-03

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation.

  14. Electrostatic analysis of the interactions between charged particles of dielectric materials.

    PubMed

    Bichoutskaia, Elena; Boatwright, Adrian L; Khachatourian, Armik; Stace, Anthony J

    2010-07-14

    An understanding of the electrostatic interactions that exist between charged particles of dielectric materials has applications that span much of chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering. Areas of interest include cloud formation, ink-jet printing, and the stability of emulsions. A general solution to the problem of calculating electrostatic interactions between charged dielectric particles is presented. The solution converges very rapidly for low values of the dielectric constant and is stable up to the point where particles touch. Through applications to unspecified particles with a range of size and charge ratios, the model shows that there exist distinct regions of dielectric space where particles with the same sign of charge are strongly attracted to one another.

  15. A moment-preserving nonanalog method for charged particle transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Prinja, Anil K.; Franke, Brian Claude; Fichtl, Erin; Harding, Lee T.

    2004-09-01

    Extremely short collision mean free paths and near-singular elastic and inelastic differential cross sections (DCS) make analog Monte Carlo simulation an impractical tool for charged particle transport. The widely used alternative, the condensed history method, while efficient, also suffers from several limitations arising from the use of precomputed smooth distributions for sampling. There is much interest in developing computationally efficient algorithms that implement the correct transport mechanics. Here we present a nonanalog transport-based method that incorporates the correct transport mechanics and is computationally efficient for implementation in single event Monte Carlo codes. Our method systematically preserves important physics and is mathematically rigorous. It builds on higher order Fokker-Planck and Boltzmann Fokker-Planck representations of the scattering and energy-loss process, and we accordingly refer to it as a Generalized Boltzmann Fokker-Planck (GBFP) approach. We postulate the existence of nonanalog single collision scattering and energy-loss distributions (differential cross sections) and impose the constraint that the first few momentum transfer and energy loss moments be identical to corresponding analog values. This is effected through a decomposition or hybridizing scheme wherein the singular forward peaked, small energy-transfer collisions are isolated and de-singularized using different moment-preserving strategies, while the large angle, large energy-transfer collisions are described by the exact (analog) DCS or approximated to a high degree of accuracy. The inclusion of the latter component allows the higher angle and energy-loss moments to be accurately captured. This procedure yields a regularized transport model characterized by longer mean free paths and smoother scattering and energy transfer kernels than analog. In practice, acceptable accuracy is achieved with two rigorously preserved moments, but accuracy can be

  16. Ice Particle Impacts on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Ruggeri, Charles; Struk, Peter M.; Pereira, Mike; Revilock, Duane; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted at the Ballistic Laboratory of NASA Glenn Research Center to study the impact of ice particles on a stationary flat surface target set at 45 degrees with respect to the direction of motion of the impinging particle (Figure 1). The experiment is part of NASA efforts to study the physics involved in engine power-loss events due to ice-crystal ingestion and ice accretion formation inside engines. These events can occur when aircraft encounter high-altitude convective weather.

  17. Histogramming of the Charged Particle Measurements with MSL/RAD - Comparison of Histogram Data with Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehresmann, B.; Zeitlin, C.; Hassler, D. M.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Boettcher, S.; Koehler, J.; Martin, C.; Brinza, D.; Rafkin, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on-board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is designed to measure a broad range of energetic particle radiation. A significant part of this radiation consists of charged particles, which mainly stem from cosmic background radiation, Solar particle events, and secondaries created by the interaction of these particles with the Martian atmosphere and soil. To measure charged particles RAD is equipped with a set of detectors: a particle telescope consisting of three silicon Solid-State Detectors (SSDs), a CsI scintillator and a plastic scintillator, as well as a further plastic scintillator used as anti-coincidence. RAD uses an elaborate post-processing logic to analyze if a measured event qualifies as a charged particle, as well as to distinguish between particles stopping in any one of the detectors and particles penetrating the whole detector stack. RAD then arranges these qualifying events in an appropriate stopping or penetrating charged particle histogram, reducing the data volume necessary to maintain crucial information about the measured particle. For ground-based data analysis it is of prime importance to derive information, such as particle species or energy, from the data in the downloaded histograms. Here, we will present how the chosen binning of these histograms enables us to derive this information. Pre-flight, we used the Monte-Carlo code GEANT4 to simulate the expected particle radiation and its interactions with a full model of the RAD sensor head. By mirroring the on-board processing logic, we derived statistics of which particle species and energies populate any one bin in the set of charged particle histograms. Finally, we will compare the resulting histogram data from RAD cruise and surface observations with simulations. RAD is supported by NASA (HEOMD) under JPL subcontract #1273039 to SwRI, and by DLR in Germany under contract to Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel (CAU).

  18. Means and method for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1983-07-05

    A novel apparatus and method for focussing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The quadrupole arrays may comprise electrodes which are shared by two or more quadrupoles. Such quadrupole arrays are particularly adapted to providing strong focussing forces for high current, high brightness, beams of charged particles, said beams further comprising a plurality of parallel beams, or beamlets, each such beamlet being focussed by one quadrupole of the array. Such arrays may be incorporated in various devices wherein beams of charged particles are accelerated or transported, such as linear accelerators, klystron tubes, beam transport lines, etc.

  19. Charged particle multiplicities in ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2006-01-01

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  20. Direct simulation of electroosmosis around a spherical particle with inhomogeneously acquired surface charge.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Amer; Wang, Moran

    2017-03-01

    Uncovering electroosmosis around an inhomogeneously acquired charge spherical particle in a confined space could provide detailed insights into its broad applications from biology to geology. In the present study, we developed a direct simulation method with the effects of inhomogeneously acquired charges on the particle surface considered, which has been validated by the available analytical and experimental data. Modeling results reveal that the surface charge and zeta potential, which are acquired through chemical interactions, strongly depend on the local solution properties and the particle size. The surface charge and zeta potential of the particle would significantly vary with the tangential positions on the particle surface by increasing the particle radius. Moreover, regarding the streaming potential for a particle-fluid tube system, our results uncover that the streaming potential has a reverse relation with the particle size in a micro or nanotube. To explain this phenomenon, we present a simple relation that bridges the streaming potential with the particle size and tube radius, zeta potential, bulk and surface conductivity. This relation could predict good results specifically for higher ion concentrations and provide deeper understanding of the particle size effects on the streaming potential measurements of the particle fluid tube system. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Irradiation of Neurons with High-Energy Charged Particles: An In Silico Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Murat; Parihar, Vipan K.; Limoli, Charles L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a stochastic computational model of microscopic energy deposition events is used to study for the first time damage to irradiated neuronal cells of the mouse hippocampus. An extensive library of radiation tracks for different particle types is created to score energy deposition in small voxels and volume segments describing a neuron’s morphology that later are sampled for given particle fluence or dose. Methods included the construction of in silico mouse hippocampal granule cells from neuromorpho.org with spine and filopodia segments stochastically distributed along the dendritic branches. The model is tested with high-energy 56Fe, 12C, and 1H particles and electrons. Results indicate that the tree-like structure of the neuronal morphology and the microscopic dose deposition of distinct particles may lead to different outcomes when cellular injury is assessed, leading to differences in structural damage for the same absorbed dose. The significance of the microscopic dose in neuron components is to introduce specific local and global modes of cellular injury that likely contribute to spine, filopodia, and dendrite pruning, impacting cognition and possibly the collapse of the neuron. Results show that the heterogeneity of heavy particle tracks at low doses, compared to the more uniform dose distribution of electrons, juxtaposed with neuron morphology make it necessary to model the spatial dose painting for specific neuronal components. Going forward, this work can directly support the development of biophysical models of the modifications of spine and dendritic morphology observed after low dose charged particle irradiation by providing accurate descriptions of the underlying physical insults to complex neuron structures at the nano-meter scale. PMID:26252394

  2. Cosmic Li6 and Li7 problems and BBN with long-lived charged massive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Karsten

    2008-03-01

    Charged massive particles (CHAMPs), when present during the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) era, may significantly alter the synthesis of light elements when compared to a standard BBN scenario. This is due to the formation of bound states with nuclei. This paper presents a detailed numerical and analytical analysis of such CHAMP BBN. All reactions important for predicting light-element yields are calculated within the Born approximation. Three previously neglected effects are treated in detail: (a) photodestruction of bound states due to electromagnetic cascades induced by the CHAMP decay, (b) late-time efficient destruction/production of H2, Li6, and Li7 due to reactions on charge Z=1 nuclei bound to CHAMPs, and (c) CHAMP exchange between nuclei. Each of these effects may induce orders-of-magnitude changes in the final abundance yields. The study focuses on the impact of CHAMPs on a possible simultaneous solution of the Li6 and Li7 problems. It is shown that a previously suggested simultaneous solution of the Li6 and Li7 problems for a relic decaying at τx≈1000sec⁡ is only weakly dependent on the relic being neutral or charged, unless its hadronic branching ratio is small, Bh≪10-4. By use of a Monte Carlo analysis it is shown that within CHAMP BBN the existence of further parameter space for a simultaneous solution of the Li6 and Li7 problem for long decay times τx≳106sec⁡ seems possible but fairly unlikely.

  3. Discrete Element Modeling (DEM) of Triboelectrically Charged Particles: Revised Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Curry, D. R.; Weitzman, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    In a previous work, the addition of basic screened Coulombic electrostatic forces to an existing commercial discrete element modeling (DEM) software was reported. Triboelectric experiments were performed to charge glass spheres rolling on inclined planes of various materials. Charge generation constants and the Q/m ratios for the test materials were calculated from the experimental data and compared to the simulation output of the DEM software. In this paper, we will discuss new values of the charge generation constants calculated from improved experimental procedures and data. Also, planned work to include dielectrophoretic, Van der Waals forces, and advanced mechanical forces into the software will be discussed.

  4. Charged-particle multiplicities in B-meson decay

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.S.; Csorna, S.E.; Fridman, A.; Hicks, R.G.; Panvini, R.S.; Andrews, D.; Avery, P.; Berkelman, K.; Cabenda, R.; Cassel, D.G.; DeWire, J.W.; Ehrlich, R.; Ferguson, T.; Gilchriese, M.G.D.; Gittelman, B.; Hartill, D.L.; Herrup, D.; Herzlinger, M.; Holzner, S.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D.L.; Mistry, N.B.; Morrow, F.; Nordberg, E.; Perchonok, R.; Plunkett, R.; Silverman, A.; Stein, P.C.; Stone, S.; Weber, D.; Wilcke, R.; Sadoff, A.J.; Bebek, C.; Haggerty, J.; Hempstead, M.; Izen, J.M.; Loomis, W.A.; MacKay, W.W.; Pipkin, F.M.; Rohlf, J.; Tanenbaum, W.; Wilson, R.; Chadwick, K.; Chauveau, J.; Ganci, P.; Gentile, T.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.L.; Poling, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rucinski, G.; Thorndike, E.H.; Green, J.; Sannes, F.; Skubic, P.; Snyder, A.; Stone, R.; Brody, A.; Chen, A.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Lipari, P.; Kooy, H.; Moneti, G.C.; Pistilli, P.

    1982-08-09

    The charged multiplicity has been measured at the UPSILON(4S) and a value of 5.75 +- 0.1 +- 0.2 has been obtained for the mean charged multiplicity in B-meson decay. Combining this result with the measurement of prompt letpons from B decay, the values 4.1 +- 0.35 +- 0.2 and 6.3 +- 0.2 +- 0.2 are found for the semileptonic and nonleptonic charged multiplicities, respectively. If b..-->..c dominance is assumed for the weak decay of the B meson, then the semileptonic multiplicity is consistent with the recoil mass determined from the lepton momentum spectrum.

  5. Exposure to heavy charged particles affects thermoregulation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Dalton, T.K.; Joseph, J.A.; Harris, A.H.; Rabin, B.M. |

    1994-09-01

    Rats exposed to 0.1-5 Gy of heavy particles ({sup 56}Fe, {sup 40}Ar, {sup 20}Ne or {sup 4}He) showed dose-dependent changes in body temperature. Lower doses of all particles produced hyperthermia, and higher doses of {sup 20}Ne and {sup 56}Fe produced hypothermia. Of the four HZE particles, {sup 56}Fe particles were the most potent and {sup 4}He particles were the least potent in producing changes in thermoregulation. The {sup 20}Ne and {sup 40}Ar particles produced an intermediate level of change in body temperature. Significantly greater hyperthermia was produced by exposure to 1 Gy of {sup 20}Ne, {sup 40}Ar and {sup 56}Fe particles than by exposure to 1 Gy of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays. Pretreating rats with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor indomethacin attenuated the hyperthermia produced by exposure to 1 Gy of {sup 56}Fe particles, indicating that prostaglandins mediate {sup 56}Fe-particle-induced hyperthermia. The hypothermia produced by exposure to 5 Gy of {sup 56}Fe particles is mediated by histamine and can be attenuated by treatment with the antihistamines mepyramine and cimetidine. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Induced-charge electroosmotic flow around dielectric particles in uniform electric field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Dongqing

    2013-11-15

    The current research of induced-charge electroosmotic flow (ICEOF) is mostly confined to systems with ideally or fully polarizable surfaces (e.g., metal). However, most materials in nature have various degrees of polarizability, which directly affects the induced charges and subsequently the induced-charge electroosmotic flow. This paper studied the effect of the polarizability of the materials on the ICEOF. An analytical expression of the induced potential on the surface of a dielectric particle in a uniform electrical field was derived. Three-dimensional transient numerical simulations of the ICEOF and the motion of dielectric particles were performed to study the effect of the polarizability. Simulation results show that the transportation of the dielectric particle in a microchannel is not affected by the polarizability of the particle; however, the interaction of two dielectric particles is sensitive to the polarizability of the particles.

  7. Collective effects in the flotation of electrically charged particles at an interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Cictua, Pietro; Vella, Dominic

    2015-11-01

    We study the flotation of electrically charged line particles at a liquid-gas interface. Motivated by recent experiments on the anomalous attraction of charged and magnetic particles at interfaces, we consider the equilibrium of the particles, accounting for the weight of each as well as the electrical and surface tension forces acting on them. Our numerical solution of the force balance equations shows that as the number of particles increases, the particles sink deeper into the liquid and ultimately sink. To understand whether the clumps of particles that are formed are stable, we use a free energy analysis; this shows that as the number of particles N increases, the binding energy per particle increases also. We compare our numerical results with scaling and experimental analyses.

  8. Diffusion Dynamics of Charged Dust Particles in Capacitively Coupled RF Discharge System

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, W. X.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.; Tan, K. S.

    2011-03-30

    Dusty plasma is loosely defined as electron-ion plasma with additional charged components of micron-sized dust particles. In this study, we developed a particle diagnostic technique based on light scattering and particle tracking velocimetry to investigate the dynamics of micron-sized titanium oxide particles in Argon gas capacitively coupled rf-discharge. The particle trajectories are constructed from sequence of image frames and treated as sample paths of charged Brownian motion. At specific sets of plasma parameters, disordered liquid-like dust particle configuration are observed. Mean-square-displacement of the particle trajectories are determined to characterize the transport dynamics. We showed that the dust particles in disordered liquid phase exhibit anomalous diffusion with different scaling exponents for short and large time scales, indicating the presence of slow and fast modes which can be related to caging effect and dispersive transport, respectively.

  9. Charged spinning black holes as accelerators of spinning particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Peng; Gu, Bao-Min; Wei, Shao-Wen; Yang, Jie; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that some black holes can act as accelerators for particles without spin. Recently, some works have considered the collision of two spinning particles in the background of Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes and it has been shown that the center-of-mass energy of the test particles is related to the spin. In this paper we extend the results to some more general cases. We consider Kerr-Newman black holes as accelerators for spinning particles. We derive the center-of-mass energy of the spinning particles and use numerical method to investigate how the center-of-mass energy is affected by the properties of the black holes and spinning particles.

  10. Dust particle charge and screening in the collisional RF plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Job; Trienekens, Dirk; Kroesen, Gerrit

    2012-10-01

    Once immersed in plasma, a dust particle gathers a highly negative charge due to the net collection of free electrons. In most plasma's on earth and with particle sizes is in the micrometer range, the gravitational force is dominant and consequently the particle ends up within the plasma sheath region where it is confined due to balancing gravitational and electrical forces. In the plasma sheath region, the Orbital Motion Limited theory predicts charge values that significantly deviate from reality. This is due electron depletion and due the large directed drift velocity of ions, complexifying the prediction of the particle's charge dramatically. We have developed a novel method to measure the charge of a microparticle (10 μm in diameter and confined in a flat potential well above an RF powered electrode) by studying the horizontal interaction with another particle (equally in size) when the angle of the flat part of the potential well is varied with respect to the earth's horizontal plane. Measured particle charges are within the error bars of earlier measurements of the charge of the same particles and comparable plasma conditions during experiments under hyper-gravity conditions in a centrifuge.

  11. Beyond Millikan: The Dynamics of Charging Events on Individual Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beunis, Filip; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    By measuring the stable charge on oil drops in air, Millikan demonstrated the discrete nature of electric charge. We extend his approach to the charge on solid-liquid interfaces, and focus on the dynamics of the discrete fluctuations. Our measurements are accurate and fast enough to observe changes of one elementary charge. Experiments over thousands of seconds yield information about the fast dynamics of electrochemical reactions, relevant for physicochemical and biological systems. As an example, we study (dis)charging processes on colloidal particles in a nonpolar liquid.

  12. Beyond Millikan: the dynamics of charging events on individual colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Beunis, Filip; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-01-06

    By measuring the stable charge on oil drops in air, Millikan demonstrated the discrete nature of electric charge. We extend his approach to the charge on solid-liquid interfaces, and focus on the dynamics of the discrete fluctuations. Our measurements are accurate and fast enough to observe changes of one elementary charge. Experiments over thousands of seconds yield information about the fast dynamics of electrochemical reactions, relevant for physicochemical and biological systems. As an example, we study (dis)charging processes on colloidal particles in a nonpolar liquid.

  13. Strong Deformation of the Thick Electric Double Layer around a Charged Particle during Sedimentation or Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Khair, Aditya S

    2017-08-15

    The deformation of the electric double layer around a charged colloidal particle during sedimentation or electrophoresis in a binary, symmetric electrolyte is studied. The surface potential of the particle is assumed to be small compared to the thermal voltage scale. Additionally, the Debye length is assumed to be large compared to the particle size. These assumptions enable a linearization of the electrokinetic equations. The particle appears as a point charge in this thick-double-layer limit; the distribution of charge in the diffuse cloud surrounding it is determined by a balance of advection due to the particle motion, Brownian diffusion of ions, and electrostatic screening of the particle by the cloud. The ability of advection to deform the charge cloud from its equilibrium state is parametrized by a Péclet number, Pe. For weak advection (Pe ≪ 1), the cloud is only slightly deformed. In contrast, the cloud can be completely stripped from the particle at Pe ≫ 1; consequently, electrokinetic effects on the particle motion vanish in this regime. Therefore, in sedimentation the drag limits to Stokes' law for an uncharged particle as Pe → ∞. Likewise, the particle velocity for electrophoresis approaches Huckel's result. The strongly deformed cloud at large Pe is predicted to generate a concomitant increase in the sedimentation field in a dilute settling suspension.

  14. Impact of Fast Charging on Life of EV Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Wood, Eric; Burton, Evan; Smith, Kandler; Pesaran, Ahmad A.

    2015-05-03

    Utilization of public charging infrastructure is heavily dependent on user-specific travel behavior. The availability of fast chargers can positively affect the utility of battery electric vehicles, even given infrequent use. Estimated utilization rates do not appear frequent enough to significantly impact battery life. Battery thermal management systems are critical in mitigating dangerous thermal conditions on long distance tours with multiple fast charge events.

  15. Shielding of a Moving Charged Dust Particle in the Nonequilibrium Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V.; Pal, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Momot, A. I.; Zagorodny, A. G.

    2008-09-07

    Study of shielding of a moving charged dust particle in the nonequilibrium plasma was performed. It is known that in the collisionless so-called Vlasov plasma the electric field of a slowly moving charged particle at high distances corresponds to quadrupole [1, 2, 3]. It was found that in the collisional plasma the electric field of a moving dust particle had the dipole component and the long distance behavior of the electric fields was defined by this component. Therefore the interaction of dust particles in plasma flow became dependent on the relative orientation of the interpaticle radius-vector and the flow velocity vector.

  16. The Influence of Trapped Ions and Non-equilibrium EDF on Dust Particle Charging

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.; Antipov, S. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    Dust particles charging in a low-pressure glow discharge was investigated theoretically with the help of model for trapped and free ions coupled with the self-consistent solution of Poisson equation for electric potential. Non-equilibrium (non-Maxwellian) character of electron energy distribution function depending on gas pressure and electric field was also taken into account on the basis of the solution of kinetic Boltzmann equation. The results were compared with the experimental measurements of dust particle charge depending on gas pressure. It was shown that the calculated effective charge, i.e. the difference of the dust particle charge and trapped ion charge, is in a fairly good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. A Closed Parameterization of DNA–Damage by Charged Particles, as a Function of Energy — A Geometrical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To present a closed formalism calculating charged particle radiation damage induced in DNA. The formalism is valid for all types of charged particles and due to its closed nature is suited to provide fast conversion of dose to DNA-damage. Methods The induction of double strand breaks in DNA–strings residing in irradiated cells is quantified using a single particle model. This leads to a proposal to use the cumulative Cauchy distribution to express the mix of high and low LET type damage probability generated by a single particle. A microscopic phenomenological Monte Carlo code is used to fit the parameters of the model as a function of kinetic energy related to the damage to a DNA molecule embedded in a cell. The model is applied for four particles: electrons, protons, alpha–particles, and carbon ions. A geometric interpretation of this observation using the impact ionization mean free path as a quantifier, allows extension of the model to very low energies. Results The mathematical expression describes the model adequately using a chi–square test (). This applies to all particle types with an almost perfect fit for protons, while the other particles seem to result in some discrepancies at very low energies. The implementation calculating a strict version of the RBE based on complex damage alone is corroborated by experimental data from the measured RBE. The geometric interpretation generates a unique dimensionless parameter for each type of charged particle. In addition, it predicts a distribution of DNA damage which is different from the current models. PMID:25340636

  18. Global Aspects of Charged Particle Motion in Axially Symmetric Multipole Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    The motion of a single charged particle in the space outside of a compact region of steady currents is investigated. The charged particle is assumed to produce negligible electromagnetic radiation, so that its energy is conserved. The source of the magnetic field is represented as a point multipole. After a general description, attention is focused on magnetic fields with axial symmetry. Lagrangian dynamical theory is utilized to identify constants of the motion as well as the equations of motion themselves. The qualitative method of Stonner is used to examine charged particle motion in axisymmetric multipole fields of all orders. Although the equations of motion generally have no analytical solutions and must be integrated numerically to produce a specific orbit, a topological examination of dynamics is possible, and can be used, d la Stonner, to completely describe the global aspects of the motion of a single charged particle in a space with an axisymmetric multipole magnetic field.

  19. A model for electrophoretic transport of charged particles through membrane before steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Tatiana Miranda; Fragoso, Viviane Muniz da Silva; Cruz, Frederico Alan de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we are presenting a model for electrophoretic motion of a charged particle through the membrane before it reaches the steady state, based on concepts of Physics. Some results from analysis of the model are discussed.

  20. Construction of the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Masami, Mukai; Yutaka, Ando; Yasuo, Okuda; Naoto, Takahashi; Yoshihisa, Yoda; Hiroshi, Tsuji; Tadashi, Kamada

    2013-01-01

    Our hospital started the charged particle therapy since 1996. New institutions for charged particle therapy are planned in the world. Our hospital are accepting many visitors from those newly planned medical institutions and having many opportunities to provide with the training to them. Based upon our experiences, we have developed the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle therapy. We adopted the PowerPoint of Microsoft as a basic framework of our teaching files system. By using our export function of the viewer any physician can create teaching files easily and effectively. Now our teaching file system has 33 cases for clinical and physics contents. We expect that we can improve the safety and accuracy of charged particle therapy by using our teaching files system substantially.