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  1. Predicting mortality from change-over-time in the Charlson Comorbidity Index

    PubMed Central

    Fraccaro, Paolo; Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Sperrin, Matthew; Peek, Niels; Mallen, Christian; Urban, Philip; Buchan, Iain E.; Mamas, Mamas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Multimorbidity is common among older people and presents a major challenge to health systems worldwide. Metrics of multimorbidity are, however, crude: focusing on measuring comorbid conditions at single time-points rather than reflecting the longitudinal and additive nature of chronic conditions. In this paper, we explore longitudinal comorbidity metrics and their value in predicting mortality. Using linked primary and secondary care data, we conducted a retrospective cohort study on adults in Salford, UK from 2005 to 2014 (n = 287,459). We measured multimorbidity with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and quantified its changes in various time windows. We used survival models to assess the relationship between CCI changes and mortality, controlling for gender, age, baseline CCI, and time-dependent CCI. Goodness-of-fit was assessed with the Akaike Information Criterion and discrimination with the c-statistic. Overall, 15.9% patients experienced a change in CCI after 10 years, with a mortality rate of 19.8%. The model that included gender and time-dependent age, CCI, and CCI change across consecutive time windows had the best fit to the data but equivalent discrimination to the other time-dependent models. The absolute CCI score gave a constant hazard ratio (HR) of around 1.3 per unit increase, while CCI change afforded greater prognostic impact, particularly when it occurred in shorter time windows (maximum HR value for the 3-month time window, with 1.63 and 95% confidence interval 1.59–1.66). Change over time in comorbidity is an important but overlooked predictor of mortality, which should be considered in research and care quality management. PMID:27787358

  2. FCG (FLIPI, Charlson comorbidity index, and histological grade) score is superior to FLIPI in advanced follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mihaljevic, Biljana; Jelicic, Jelena; Andjelic, Bosko; Antic, Darko; Markovic, Olivera; Petkovic, Ivan; Jovanovic, Maja Perunicic; Trajkovic, Goran; Bila, Jelena; Djurasinovic, Vladislava; Sretenovic, Aleksandra; Vukovic, Vojin; Smiljanic, Mihailo; Balint, Milena Todorovic

    2016-12-01

    The Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index (FLIPI) is widely used in the identification of risk groups among follicular lymphoma (FL) patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of FLIPI combined with the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) and histological grade of lymphoma. 224 newly diagnosed FL patients (median age 56 years) treated with immunochemotherapy were retrospectively analysed. Low FLIPI had 21.0 % of patients, intermediate 28.1 % and high 46.9 %. 50.9 % of patients had no comorbidities. Only 7.1 % of patients had a high CCI score (≥2), while 25.9 % of patients were histological grade 3. Parameters that influenced overall survival were evaluated using Cox regression analysis, in which CCI, FLIPI and histological grade (p < 0.05) retained prognostic significance. By combining these parameters, we have developed the FCG score, which incorporates FLIPI, CCI, and histological grade. This score defines three risk categories (low: 41.5 %; intermediate: 37.5 %; high: 13.4 %), associated with significantly different survival (p < 0.0001); this consequently improves discriminative power by 9.1 % compared to FLIPI. FCG score represents a possible new prognostic index, highlighting the role of the patient's clinical state and the histological characteristics of disease, as indicated by comorbidity index and histological grade of lymphoma.

  3. Use of the Charlson Combined Comorbidity Index To Predict Postradiotherapy Quality of Life for Prostate Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlgren, Thomas; Levitt, Seymour; Kowalski, Jan; Nilsson, Sten; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the impact of pretreatment comorbidity on late health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores after patients have undergone combined radiotherapy for prostate cancer, including high-dose rate brachytherapy boost and hormonal deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: Results from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 questionnaire survey of 158 patients 5 years or more after completion of therapy were used from consecutively accrued subjects treated with curative radiotherapy at our institution, with no signs of disease at the time of questionnaire completion. HRQoL scores were compared with the Charlson combined comorbidity index (CCI), using analysis of covariance and multivariate regression models together with pretreatment factors including tumor stage, tumor grade, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, neoadjuvant hormonal treatment, diabetes status, cardiovascular status, and age and Charlson score as separate variables or the composite CCI. Results: An inverse correlation between the two HRQoL domains, long-term global health (QL) and physical function (PF) scores, and the CCI score was observed, indicating an impact of comorbidity in these function areas. Selected pretreatment factors poorly explained the variation in functional HRQoL in the multivariate models; however, a statistically significant impact was found for the CCI (with QL and PF scores) and the presence of diabetes (with QL and emotional function). Cognitive function and social function were not statistically significantly predicted by any of the pretreatment factors. Conclusions: The CCI proved to be valid in this context, but it seems useful mainly in predicting long-term QL and PF scores. Of the other variables investigated, diabetes had more impact than cardiovascular morbidity on HRQoL outcomes in prostate cancer.

  4. Adjusted Age-Adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index Score as a Risk Measure of Perioperative Mortality before Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Ming; Yin, Wen-Yao; Wei, Chang-Kao; Wu, Chin-Chia; Su, Yu-Chieh; Yu, Chia-Hui; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of patients at risk of death from cancer surgery should aid in preoperative preparation. The purpose of this study is to assess and adjust the age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index (ACCI) to identify cancer patients with increased risk of perioperative mortality. Methods We identified 156,151 patients undergoing surgery for one of the ten common cancers between 2007 and 2011 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Half of the patients were randomly selected, and a multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop an adjusted-ACCI score for estimating the risk of 90-day mortality by variables from the original ACCI. The score was validated. The association between the score and perioperative mortality was analyzed. Results The adjusted-ACCI score yield a better discrimination on mortality after cancer surgery than the original ACCI score, with c-statics of 0.75 versus 0.71. Over 80 years of age, 70–80 years, and renal disease had the strongest impact on mortality, hazard ratios 8.40, 3.63, and 3.09 (P < 0.001), respectively. The overall 90-day mortality rates in the entire cohort varied from 0.9%, 2.9%, 7.0%, and 13.2% in four risk groups stratifying by the adjusted-ACCI score; the adjusted hazard ratio for score 4–7, 8–11, and ≥ 12 was 2.84, 6.07, and 11.17 (P < 0.001), respectively, in 90-day mortality compared to score 0–3. Conclusions The adjusted-ACCI score helps to identify patients with a higher risk of 90-day mortality after cancer surgery. It might be particularly helpful for preoperative evaluation of patients over 80 years of age. PMID:26848761

  5. Age-adjusted charlson comorbidity index score as predictor of prolonged postoperative ileus in patients with colorectal cancer who underwent surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yaohua; Xu, Beibei; Yu, Guopei; Li, Yan; Liu, Hui

    2017-02-11

    Comorbidities had considerable effects on the development of postoperative ileus (POI). The primary aim of the present study was to determine the influence of the age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index (ACCI) score on the risk of prolonged POI in patients with colorectal cancer who underwent surgical resection. Using the electronic Hospitalization Summary Reports, we identified 11,397 patients with colorectal cancer who underwent surgical resection from 2013 through 2015. Logistic regression models were applied to evaluate the effect of the ACCI score on the risk of prolonged POI. The ACCI score had a positive graded association with the risk of prolonged POI in both colon and rectal cancer (P for trend < 0.05). Among patients with rectal cancer, after adjusting for potential confounders, those with an ACCI score of 4-5 had a 108% higher risk of prolonged POI than those with an ACCI score of 0-1 (odds ratio [OR], 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-3.98), and those with an ACCI score of ≥ 6 had a 130% higher risk (OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.08-4.89). Among patients with colon cancer, those with an ACCI score of ≥ 6 had a 47% greater risk of prolonged POI than those with an ACCI score of 0-1 (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.07-2.02). These findings suggested that a higher ACCI score was an independent predictor of the development of prolonged POI.

  6. Incidence of Post-Operative Sepsis and Role of Charlson Co-Morbidity Score for Predicting Postoperative Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan; Mohammadi, Atefeh; Alibakhshi, Abbas; Jalali, Mehdi; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa

    2016-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are among mortality causes following major surgeries. The Charlson co-morbidity index consists of 19 weighted categories related to chronic health which measures the burden of co-morbidity. The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of postoperative sepsis in patients underwent gynecological and gastrointestinal cancer surgeries and predictive role of Charlson index for this situation. Two hundred and twenty-two patients who underwent gynecological and gastrointestinal cancer surgeries were evaluated. Sixty-four (28.6%) patients developed SIRS postoperatively. Forty-four (19.7%) patients developed sepsis postoperatively. Mean age, duration of hospitalization and surgery, the Charlson score were significantly higher in patients who developed sepsis than other cases. Blood transfusion and Charlson score were independent predictors of sepsis occurrence. Charlson co-morbidity index is a predictive factor for developing postoperative sepsis.

  7. Enhanced International Prognostic Index (NCCN-IPI), Charlson Comorbidity Index and absolute lymphocyte count as predictors for survival of elderly patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma treated by immunochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jelicic, J; Todorovic Balint, M; Sretenovic, D Antic A; Balint, B; Perunicic Jovanovic, M; Andjelic, B; Vukovic, V; Djurasinovic, V; Bila, J; Pavlovic, M; Smiljanic, M; Mihaljevic, B

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) affects more commonly patients over 60 years. These patients have vast number of comorbidities which can modify survival as well as other clinical parameters. The aim of this study was to evaluate prognostic significance of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network International Prognostic Index (NCCN-IPI), absolute lymphocyte count (ALC), absolute monocyte count (AMC), lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) and comorbidities expressed with Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). A total of 182 DLBCL patients 60 years old and older were included, focusing on whole group and patients older than 70. All patients were treated with immunochemotherapy.Overall treatment response was achieved in 84.6% of patients. The NCCN-IPI was of highly prognostic value in the analyzed group (p<0.0001). Survival analysis showed that ALC>1.1x109/L, AMC≤0.59x109/L, and LMR>2.8 were associated with more favorable outcome (p=0.029, p=0.019, p=0.028, respectively). The patients with CCI≥2 had poorer outcome (p=0.008) compared to the patients with CCI 0-1. Multivariate analysis showed that among ALC, AMC, LMR, NCCN-IPI and CCI, the NCCN-IPI was the critical parameter that significantly affected survival (p<0.0001). Furthermore, comorbidities were also valuable independent factors which influenced survival (p=0.031) as well as the ALC (p=0.024). In elderly DLBCL patients, NCCN-IPI and ALC proved their prognostic validity, while poorer outcome could be expected in older patients with high CCI (≥2). Furthermore, mentioned prognostic parameters retained their prognostic value in the group of patients older than 70.

  8. Examining the Association Between Comorbidity Indexes and Functional Status in Hospitalized Medicare Fee-for-Service Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Graham, James E.; Resnik, Linda; Karmarkar, Amol M.; Deutsch, Anne; Tan, Alai; Al Snih, Soham; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Medicare data from acute hospitals do not contain information on functional status. This lack of information limits the ability to conduct rehabilitation-related health services research. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between 5 comorbidity indexes derived from acute care claims data and functional status assessed at admission to an inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF). Comorbidity indexes included tier comorbidity, Functional Comorbidity Index (FCI), Charlson Comorbidity Index, Elixhauser Comorbidity Index, and Hierarchical Condition Category (HCC). Design This was a retrospective cohort study. Methods Medicare beneficiaries with stroke, lower extremity joint replacement, and lower extremity fracture discharged to an IRF in 2011 were studied (N=105,441). Data from the beneficiary summary file, Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MedPAR) file, and Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility–Patient Assessment Instrument (IRF-PAI) file were linked. Inpatient rehabilitation facility admission functional status was used as a proxy for acute hospital discharge functional status. Separate linear regression models for each impairment group were developed to assess the relationships between the comorbidity indexes and functional status. Base models included age, sex, race/ethnicity, disability, dual eligibility, and length of stay. Subsequent models included individual comorbidity indexes. Values of variance explained (R2) with each comorbidity index were compared. Results Base models explained 7.7% of the variance in motor function ratings for stroke, 3.8% for joint replacement, and 7.3% for fracture. The R2 increased marginally when comorbidity indexes were added to base models for stroke, joint replacement, and fracture: Charlson Comorbidity Index (0.4%, 0.5%, 0.3%), tier comorbidity (0.2%, 0.6%, 0.5%), FCI (0.4%, 1.2%, 1.6%), Elixhauser Comorbidity Index (1.2%, 1.9%, 3.5%), and HCC (2.2%, 2.1%, 2.8%). Limitation Patients

  9. Impact of the AYA HOPE comorbidity index on assessing health care service needs and health status among adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Prasad, Pinki K.; Landry, Ian; Harlan, Linda C.; Parsons, Helen M.; Lynch, Charles F; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Hamilton, Ann S.; Keegan, Theresa H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Existing comorbidity indices were not developed for adolescent and young adults (AYA) 15–39 years of age. The aim of this study was to assess impact of comorbidities on healthcare service needs and health status among AYA cancer survivors using the newly developed AYA HOPE comorbidity index in comparison with the existing indices. Methods Data on comorbid conditions were obtained from medical records and service needs and health status were from a survey of AYA cancer survivors. Prevalence of comorbidities based on the AYA HOPE index. Charlson and NCI indices) were compared. Multivariable logistic regression was employed. Results Of the 485 patients, 14.6% had ≥2 comorbidities based on the AYA HOPE Index. Prevalence of mental illness and obesity/overweight, which were not included in existing indices, were 8.2% and 5.8%, respectively. Prevalence of cardiovascular, endocrine, gastrointestinal and neurologic conditions were higher with the AYA HOPE Index than the other two indices. Forty percent of AYA patients reported service needs, particularly for mental health services (25.2%) and support groups (17.7%). Having ≥2 comorbidities on the AYA index was associated with higher mental health service needs (OR: 2.05; 95% CI 1.10–3.82) adjusting for demographic and clinical factors. Comorbidities were associated with fair/poor self-reported health status. Conclusion The AYA HOPE Index is a more comprehensive comorbidity index for AYA cancer patients than existing indices and the number of comorbidities is associated with service needs and health status. Impact The AYA HOPE index could identify patients’ additional service needs early in therapy. PMID:26420768

  10. Geriatric assessment in multiple myeloma patients: validation of the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) score and comparison with other common comorbidity scores

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Monika; Dold, Sandra Maria; Ihorst, Gabriele; Zober, Alexander; Möller, Mandy; Reinhardt, Heike; Hieke, Stefanie; Schumacher, Martin; Wäsch, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    This first validation of the International Myeloma Working Group geriatric assessment in 125 newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients was performed using the International Myeloma Working Group score based on age, the Charlson Comorbidity Index and cognitive and physical conditions (Activities of Daily Living / Instrumental Activities of Daily Living) to classify patients as fit, intermediate-fit or frail. We verified the International Myeloma Working Group score’s impact on outcome, and whether additional tools complement it. Since our prior analyses determined renal, lung and Karnofsky performance impairment as multivariate risks, and the inclusion of frailty, age and cytogenetics complements this, we included the revised myeloma comorbidity index, the Charlson Comorbidity Index, the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index and the Kaplan-Feinstein Index in this assessment. Multivariate analysis confirmed cytogenetics, Activities of Daily Living, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and the Charlson Comorbidity Index as risks: 3-year overall survival for fit, intermediate-fit and frail patients was 91%, 77% and 47%, respectively. Using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index, the Kaplan-Feinstein Index and the revised Myeloma Comorbidity Index allowed us to define fit and frail patients with distinct progression-free and overall survival rates, with the most pronounced differences evidenced via the International Myeloma Working Group score, the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the revised Myeloma Comorbidity Index. Since the Charlson Comorbidity Index is included in the International Myeloma Working Group score, we propose the latter and the revised Myeloma Comorbidity Index for future frailty measurements. Both are useful instruments for identifying myeloma patients with a geriatric risk profile and have a strong prognostic value for functional decline and overall survival. The study was registered

  11. Health Impact Index. Development and Validation of a Method for Classifying Comorbid Disease Measured against Self-Reported Health

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method of classifying comorbid conditions that accounts for both the severity and joint effects of the diseases. The Tromsø Study is a cohort study with a longitudinal design utilizing a survey approach with physical examinations in the Tromsø municipality from 1974 to 2008, where in total 40051 subjects participated. We used Tromsø 4 as reference population and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (FHI) panel as validation population. Ordinal regression was used to assess the effect of comorbid disease on Self-Reported Health (SRH). The model is controlled for interaction between diseases, mental health, age, and gender. The health impact index estimated levels of SRH. The comparison of predicted and observed SRH showed no significant differences. Spearman’s correlation showed that increasing levels of comorbidity were related to lower levels of SRH (RS = -0.36, p <.001). The Charlson Comorbidity Index(CCI) was also associated with SRH (r = -.25, p <.001). When focusing on only individuals with a comorbid disease, the relation between SRH and the Health Impact Index (HII) was strengthened (r = -.42, p <.001), while the association between SRH and CCI was attenuated (r = -.14, p <.001). CCI was designed to control for comorbid conditions when survival/mortality is the outcome of interest but is inaccurate when the outcome is SRH. We conclude that HII should be used when SRH is not available, and well-being or quality of survival/life is the outcome of interest. PMID:26849044

  12. Comparison of Elixhauser and Charlson Methods for Predicting Oral Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Heng-Jui; Chen, Po-Chun; Yang, Ching-Chieh; Su, Yu-Chieh; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cancer survival correlates not only with the features of primary malignancy but also with the degree of underlying comorbidities. Of the multiple methods used for evaluating the impact of comorbidities on survival, the Charlson and Elixhauser methods are most common. This study compared these 2 comorbidity measures for predicting survival in oral cancer patients. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance claims data (2008–2011), we acquired data regarding patients’ characteristics, comorbidities, and survival from 3583 oral cancer patients. Comorbidity was classified according to both the Charlson comorbidity and Elixhauser comorbidity based on the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision. The Elixhauser comorbidity score and Charlson comorbidity score were also calculated. The prediction of survival was determined using measures of discrimination, including the Akaike information criterion and Harrell C (C-statistic). The mean age of the study cohort was 52 ± 10 years, and 94.9% of the patients were male. The median follow-up time was 30.1 months, and the 3-year overall survival was 61.6%. Elixhauser comorbidity method added higher discrimination, compared with the Charlson comorbidity method (Harrell C, 0.677 vs 0.651). Furthermore, the Elixhauser comorbidity score outperformed the Charlson comorbidity score in continuous variable (Harrell C, 0.654 vs 0.646) and category (Harrell C, 0.658 vs 0.645). The Elixhauser method is a superior comorbidity risk-adjustment model for oral cancer survival prediction. Utilization of the Elixhauser comorbidity method may be encouraged for risk adjustment in oral cancer study. PMID:26886653

  13. Comorbidity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ...

  14. New Morbidity and Comorbidity Scores based on the Structure of the ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Hagn, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Measures of morbidity and comorbidity are frequently used for the control of confounding, particularly in health services research. Several proposals for those measures are defined with ICD-coded diagnoses available in hospital routine data. However, a measure that makes use of the ICD structure is missing. Objective of this work was to elaborate the power of the ICD structure for defining morbidity and comorbidity measures. Routine data from three German hospitals with inpatients discharged 2008 were used for model development; routine data from 36 German hospitals with inpatients admitted and discharged 2010 were used for model evaluation. Two different risk models were developed, one based on ICD-10 chapters, the other based on ICD-10 groups. The models were transformed into sum scores using whole-number weights. Models and scores were compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities using the receiver operating characteristic. Dependent variable was hospital death. Logistic regression was used to derive the new models. Charlson Index and Elixhauser Comorbidities were mapped to the German ICD-10. According to the receiver operating characteristic, the quality of the measures based on the structure of the ICD-10 was superior compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities. The best result was achieved with the measure based on ICD-10-groups with an area under curve of 0.910 (95% confidence interval = 0.907-0.913). The sum scores showed a comparable performance. The developed new measures may be used to control for confounding.

  15. New Morbidity and Comorbidity Scores based on the Structure of the ICD-10

    PubMed Central

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Hagn, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Measures of morbidity and comorbidity are frequently used for the control of confounding, particularly in health services research. Several proposals for those measures are defined with ICD-coded diagnoses available in hospital routine data. However, a measure that makes use of the ICD structure is missing. Objective of this work was to elaborate the power of the ICD structure for defining morbidity and comorbidity measures. Routine data from three German hospitals with inpatients discharged 2008 were used for model development; routine data from 36 German hospitals with inpatients admitted and discharged 2010 were used for model evaluation. Two different risk models were developed, one based on ICD-10 chapters, the other based on ICD-10 groups. The models were transformed into sum scores using whole-number weights. Models and scores were compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities using the receiver operating characteristic. Dependent variable was hospital death. Logistic regression was used to derive the new models. Charlson Index and Elixhauser Comorbidities were mapped to the German ICD-10. According to the receiver operating characteristic, the quality of the measures based on the structure of the ICD-10 was superior compared with the Charlson Index and the Elixhauser Comorbidities. The best result was achieved with the measure based on ICD-10-groups with an area under curve of 0.910 (95% confidence interval = 0.907–0.913). The sum scores showed a comparable performance. The developed new measures may be used to control for confounding. PMID:26656501

  16. Reduced body mass index in Parkinson's disease: contribution of comorbid depression.

    PubMed

    Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Kroemer, Nils B; Schneider, Christine; Ebersbach, Georg; Jost, Wolfgang H; Fuchs, Gerd; Odin, Per; Reifschneider, Gerd; Bauer, Michael; Reichmann, Heinz; Storch, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Courses of Parkinson's disease (PD) that are complicated by weight loss result in poorer overall treatment outcome and lower quality of life. To determine the contribution of depression, which has not yet been specified in the etiology of weight loss in PD, symptomatology and anamnesis from 215 outpatients diagnosed with PD were assessed using a comprehensive battery of neuropsychiatric scales. A percentage of 31 comorbid depressed patients and a comparison with a control population allowed an accurate characterization of effect sizes, sex differences, and patterns of the contribution of comorbid depression to weight loss. Our study showed that comorbid depression had a clinically relevant effect concerning reduced body mass index in male (0.3; Hedges' g) but not in female PD patients. Although some possible confounders are not controlled here, our results support the need of monitoring depressive symptoms in the courses of PD, particularly in male patients.

  17. Comorbidity-Age Index: A Clinical Measure of Biologic Age Before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Storb, Rainer F.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Maris, Michael B.; Bhatia, Smita; Ostronoff, Fabiana; Deeg, H. Joachim; Syrjala, Karen L.; Estey, Elihu; Maloney, David G.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Martin, Paul J.; Storer, Barry E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Age has long been used as a major factor for assessing suitability for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The HCT-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) was developed as a measure of health status to predict mortality risk after HCT. Whether age, comorbidities, or both should guide decision making for HCT is unknown. Patients and Methods Data from 3,033 consecutive recipients of HLA-matched grafts from five institutions contributed to this analysis. Patients were randomly divided into a training set to develop weights for age intervals and a validation set to assess the performance of prognostic models. Results In the training set, patients age 20 to 39 years, 40 to 49 years, 50 to 59 years, and ≥ 60 years had hazard ratios for nonrelapse mortality (NRM) of 1.21 (P = .29), 1.48 (P = .04), 1.75 (P = .004), and 1.84 (P = .005), respectively, compared with those age younger than 20 years. Consequently, age ≥ 40 years was assigned a weight of 1 to be added to the HCT-CI to constitute a composite comorbidity/age index. In the validation set, the composite comorbidity/age score had statistically significantly higher c-statistic estimates for prediction of NRM (0.664 v 0.556; P < .001) and survival (0.682 v 0.560; P < .001) compared with age, respectively. Patients with comorbidity/age scores of 0 to 2 had comparable mortality risks regardless of conditioning regimens. Patients with scores of 3 to 4 and ≥ 5 had statistically significant higher mortality risks after high-dose versus nonmyeloablative regimens. Conclusion Age is a poor prognostic factor. The proposed composite measure allows integration of both comorbidities and age into clinical decision making and comparative-effectiveness research of HCT. PMID:25154831

  18. Impact of Age and Comorbidity on Cervical and Breast Cancer Literacy of African Americans, Latina, and Arab Women.

    PubMed

    Talley, Costellia H; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2015-09-01

    This study examines the relationship between age, comorbidity, and breast and cervical cancer literacy in a sample of African American, Latina, and Arab women (N = 371) from Detroit, Michigan. The Age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (ACC) was used characterize the impact of age and comorbidity on breast and cervical cancer literacy. The relationship between ACC and breast and cervical cancer screening, and group differences, were assessed. There was a statistically significant difference between breast cancer literacy scores. ACC had a greater impact on breast cancer literacy for African Americans.

  19. Determinants of Noninvasive Ventilation Outcomes during an Episode of Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The Effects of Comorbidities and Causes of Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pacilli, Angela Maria Grazia; Valentini, Ilaria; Carbonara, Paolo; Marchetti, Antonio; Nava, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the effect of the cause of acute respiratory failure and the role of comorbidities both acute and chronic on the outcome of COPD patients admitted to Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU) with acute respiratory failure and treated with NIV. Design. Observational prospective study. Patients and Methods. 176 COPD patients consecutively admitted to our RICU over a period of 3 years and treated with NIV were evaluated. In all patients demographic, clinical, and functional parameters were recorded including the cause of acute respiratory failure, SAPS II score, Charlson comorbidity index, and further comorbidities not listed in the Charlson index. NIV success was defined as clinical improvement leading to discharge to regular ward, while exitus or need for endotracheal intubation was considered failure. Results. NIV outcome was successful in 134 patients while 42 underwent failure. Univariate analysis showed significantly higher SAP II score, Charlson index, prevalence of pneumonia, and lower serum albumin level in the failure group. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant predictive value for pneumonia and albumin. Conclusions. The most important determinants of NIV outcome in COPD patients are the presence of pneumonia and the level of serum albumin as an indicator of the patient nutritional status. PMID:24563868

  20. Prospective Validation of the Predictive Power of the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comorbidity Index: A CIBMTR® Study

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Logan, Brent R.; Zhu, Xiaochun; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Cooke, Kenneth R.; McCarthy, Philip L; Ho, Vincent T.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2015-01-01

    Prospective validation of the hematopoietic cell transplantation-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) using contemporary patients treated with HCT across the Unites States is necessary to confirm its widespread applicability. We performed a prospective observational study including all patients (8115 recipients of allogeneic and 11,652 recipients of autologous HCT) who underwent first HCT that was reported to the CIBMTR between 2007 and 2009. In proportional hazards models, increased HCT-CI scores were independently associated with increases in hazard ratios for NRM (p<0.0001) and overall mortality (p<0.0001) among recipients of allogeneic HCT. HCT-CI Scores of ≥3 were uniformly associated with higher risks for outcomes in both allogeneic and autologous HCT, and all subgroups regardless of diagnoses, age, and conditioning intensity. Recipients of allogeneic HCT with scores of 1–2 who were aged <18 or were treated with lower intensity conditioning regimens had similar outcomes compared to those with score 0. Higher risks for overall mortality, but not for NRM, were observed among recipients of autologous HCT with scores of 1–2 versus 0. Our results confirm the validity the HCT-CI in both allogeneic and autologous HCT. The index should be used as a valid standard-of-care health measure in counseling patients for HCT, in clinical trial design, and in adjusting outcome analyses. PMID:25862591

  1. Barrier Buster: Kim Charlson--Perkins School for the Blind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Kim Charlson believes everyone should live life to the fullest no matter what their handicaps. Blind since early childhood, she chose librarianship because, as a braille reader and avid user of talking books, she wanted to be "in a decision-making capacity in the library field and influence the direction of library services for people with…

  2. Impairments and comorbidities of polyneuropathy revealed by population-based analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Staff, Nathan P.; Robb, Jared M.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Dyck, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To quantify polyneuropathy impairments and comorbidities utilizing the Rochester Epidemiology Project (2010 census = 148,201). Methods: ICD-9-CM coding identified polyneuropathy cases (2006–2010) and their 5:1 age- and sex-matched controls. Mortality and impairments were evaluated while identifying and adjusting for Charlson Index comorbidities. Results: Overall prevalence of polyneuropathy was 1.66%, and markedly rose to 6.6% in persons older than 60 years. Cases (n = 2,892) had more comorbidities than controls (n = 14,435) with higher median Charlson Index (6 vs 3, p < 0.001). Diabetes with end-organ disease represented the largest increased comorbidity in cases compared with controls (46.8% vs 6.5%). Diabetic polyneuropathy was the most common specific subtype (38.2%). Miscoded idiopathic cases and false-negative controls also commonly had diabetic polyneuropathy. Median modified Rankin Scale score was considerably higher for cases than controls (4 vs 1, p < 0.001). Multiple comorbidities were found associated with polyneuropathy after adjusting for diabetes co-occurrence, including pulmonary disease, dementia, and others. Polyneuropathy was an independent contributor to multiple functional impairments including difficulty walking (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9), climbing stairs (OR = 2.0), using an assistive device (OR = 2.0), fall tendency (OR = 2.4), work disability (OR = 4.2), lower limb amputations (OR = 3.9), and opioid use (OR = 2.7). Prevalent cases had a younger median age at death than controls (80 vs 86 years, p < 0.001), and incident cases had a 6-month shorter survival. Conclusions: Polyneuropathies have notable neurologic impairments beyond their identified multiple comorbidities. Life expectancy is shortened. Diabetic polyneuropathy is underidentified. The quantified extent of the disease burden and refined comorbidity associations emphasize that greater research efforts and health care initiatives are needed. PMID:25832668

  3. Effect of comorbidities and medications on frequency of primary care visits among older patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tina; Dattani, Neil D.; Cox, Kelly Anne; Au, Bonnie; Xu, Leo; Melady, Don; Jaakkimainen, Liisa; Jain, Rahul; Charles, Jocelyn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine if comorbidities and high-risk medications affect the frequency of family physician visits among older patients. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Academic family health team at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, Ont. Participants Among patients aged 65 years and older who were registered patients of the family health team between July 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014, the 5% who visited their family physicians most frequently and the 5% who visited their family physicians least frequently were selected for the study (N = 265). Main outcome measures Predictors of frequent visits to family physicians. Results The significant predictors of being a high-frequency user were female sex (odds ratio [OR] = 2.20, P = .03), age older than 85 years (OR = 5.35, P = .001), and higher total number of medications (OR = 1.49, P < .001). Age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index score, number of Beers criteria medications, and Anticholinergic Risk Scale score were not significant predictors (P > .05). Conclusion Female sex, age older than 85, and higher total number of medications were independent significant predictors of higher frequency of family physician visits among older patients. Validated tools, such as the Charlson comorbidity index, Beers criteria, and Anticholinergic Risk Scale, did not independently predict the frequency of visits, indicating that predicting frequency of visits is likely complex. PMID:28115442

  4. Assessing the Influence of Different Comorbidities Indexes on the Outcomes of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Gustavo Machado; Bittencourt, Henrique; Rezende, Suely Meireles

    2015-01-01

    Although the application of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-specific Comorbidity Index (HCT-CI) has enabled better prediction of transplant-related mortality (TRM) in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants (AHSCT), data from developing countries are scarce. This study prospectively evaluated the HCT-CI and the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation (ACE-27), in its original and in a modified version, as predictors of post-transplant complications in adults undergoing a first related or unrelated AHSCT in Brazil. Both bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) as graft sources were included. We analyzed the cumulative incidence of granulocyte and platelet recovery, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, relapse and transplant-related mortality, and rates of event-free survival and overall survival. Ninety-nine patients were assessed. Median age was 38 years (18–65 years); HCT-CI ≥ 3 accounted for only 8% of cases; hematologic malignancies comprised 75.8% of the indications for AHSCT. There was no association between the HCT-CI or the original or modified ACE-27 with TRM or any other studied outcomes after AHSCT. These results show that, in the population studied, none of the comorbidity indexes seem to be associated with AHSCT outcomes. A significantly low frequency of high-risk (HCT-CI ≥ 3) in this Brazilian population might justify these results. PMID:26394228

  5. Comorbidity and Chronic Conditions in the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP), Wave 2

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Ashwin; Huisingh-Scheetz, Megan J.; Waite, Linda J.; McClintock, Martha K.; Dale, William

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The goals of this paper were: (a) to promote research using the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP) Wave 2 data by providing relevant background information for a broad range of chronic conditions and (b) to provide a framework for combining these chronic conditions into informative comorbidity indices. Method. The chronic conditions measured in NSHAP Wave 2 were grouped across several health domains: cardiovascular, endocrine and metabolic, cancer, lung, inflammatory and bone, neurological, and sensorimotor. Prevalences for each condition were reported as percentages and were also estimated separately by age group and gender. Additionally, 2 comorbidity indices were created: a Modified Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) that included conditions associated with mortality risk and the NSHAP Comorbidity Index (NCI) that included conditions from the Modified CCI as well as additional conditions related to overall health and function. Results. Hypertension, incontinence, arthritis, heart conditions, cancer, and diabetes were the most prevalent conditions. In general, prevalences of most chronic conditions increased with age. Additionally, there were several notable gender differences in chronic condition prevalence. Due to the inclusion of highly prevalent conditions, such as hypertension and incontinence, the mean comorbidity index score of the NCI was higher than that of the Modified CCI. Discussion. Wave 2 of NSHAP included a variety of measures assessing the chronic conditions that are the most prevalent in older adults. These data are a valuable resource for the study of the impact of chronic conditions on overall health and aging. PMID:25360017

  6. Impact of comorbidities on overall survival in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: results of the randomized CML Study IV

    PubMed Central

    Krauß, Marie-Paloma; Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Lauseker, Michael; Proetel, Ulrike; Kalmanti, Lida; Hanfstein, Benjamin; Fabarius, Alice; Kraemer, Doris; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Bentz, Martin; Staib, Peter; de Wit, Maike; Wernli, Martin; Zettl, Florian; Hebart, Holger F.; Hahn, Markus; Heymanns, Jochen; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo; Schmitz, Norbert; Eckart, Michael J.; Gassmann, Winfried; Bartholomäus, Andrea; Pezzutto, Antonio; Leibundgut, Elisabeth Oppliger; Heim, Dominik; Krause, Stefan W.; Burchert, Andreas; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Hasford, Joerg; Hochhaus, Andreas; Pfirrmann, Markus; Müller, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the influence of comorbidities on remission rate and overall survival (OS) in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Participants of the CML Study IV, a randomized 5-arm trial designed to optimize imatinib therapy, were analyzed for comorbidities at diagnosis using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI); 511 indexed comorbidities were reported in 1519 CML patients. Age was an additional risk factor in 863 patients. Resulting CCI scores were as follows: CCI 2, n = 589; CCI 3 or 4, n = 599; CCI 5 or 6, n = 229; and CCI ≥ 7, n = 102. No differences in cumulative incidences of accelerated phase, blast crisis, or remission rates were observed between patients in the different CCI groups. Higher CCI was significantly associated with lower OS probabilities. The 8-year OS probabilities were 93.6%, 89.4%, 77.6%, and 46.4% for patients with CCI 2, 3 to 4, 5 to 6, and ≥7, respectively. In multivariate analysis, CCI was the most powerful predictor of OS, which was still valid after removal of its age-related components. Comorbidities have no impact on treatment success but do have a negative effect on OS, indicating that survival of patients with CML is determined more by comorbidities than by CML itself. OS may therefore be inappropriate as an outcome measure for specific CML treatments. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00055874. PMID:25918346

  7. Comorbidities against Quality Control of VKA Therapy in Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation: A French National Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Rouaud, Agnes; Hanon, Olivier; Boureau, Anne-Sophie; Chapelet, Guillaume Gilles; de Decker, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the prevalence of non-valvular atrial fibrillation in the geriatric population, thromboembolic prevention by means of vitamin K antagonists (VKA) is one of the most frequent daily concerns of practitioners. The effectiveness and safety of treatment with VKA correlates directly with maximizing the time in therapeutic range, with an International Normalized Ratio (INR) of 2.0-3.0. The older population concentrates many of factors known to influence INR rate, particularly concomitant medications and concurrent medical conditions, also defined as comorbidities. Objective Determine whether a high burden on comorbidities, defined by a Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) of 3 or greater, is associated a lower quality of INR control. Study-Design Cross-sectional study. Settings French geriatric care units nationwide. Participants 2164 patients aged 80 and over and treated with vitamin K antagonists. Measurements Comorbidities were assessed using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). The recorded data included age, sex, falls, kidney failure, hemorrhagic event, VKA treatment duration, and the number and type of concomitant medications. Quality of INR control, defined as time in therapeutic range (TTR), was assessed using the Rosendaal method. Results 487 patients were identified the low-quality control of INR group. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, low-quality control of INR was independently associated with a CCI ≥3 (OR = 1.487; 95% CI [1.15; 1.91]). The other variables associated with low-quality control of INR were: hemorrhagic event (OR = 3.151; 95% CI [1.64; 6.07]), hospitalization (OR = 1.614, 95% CI [1.21; 2.14]). Conclusion An elevated CCI score (≥3) was associated with low-quality control of INR in elderly patients treated with VKA. Further research is needed to corroborate this finding. PMID:25789771

  8. Frailty and comorbidity are independent predictors of outcome in patients referred for pre-dialysis education

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Julia; Aggett, Justine; Goodland, Annwen; Prichard, Alison; Thomas, Nerys; Donovan, Kieron; Roberts, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is rising and is likely to continue to do so for the foreseeable future, with the fastest growth seen among adults ≥75 years of age. Elderly patients with advanced CKD are likely to have a higher burden of comorbidity and frailty, both of which may influence their disease outcome. For these patients, treatment decisions can be complex, with the current lack of robust prognostic tools hindering the shared decision-making process. The current study aims to assess the impact of comorbidity and frailty on the outcomes of patients referred for pre-dialysis education. Methods We performed a single-centre study of patients (n = 283) referred for pre-dialysis education between 2010 and 2012. The Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) were used to assess comorbid disease burden and frailty, respectively. Follow-up data were collected until February 2015. Results The CCI and CFS scores at the time of referral to the pre-dialysis service were independent predictors of mortality. Within the study follow-up period, 76% of patients with a high CFS score at the time of pre-dialysis education had died, with 63% of these patients not commencing dialysis before death. Conclusion A relatively simple frailty scale and comorbidity score could be used to predict survival and better inform the shared decision-making process for patients with advanced kidney disease. PMID:26985387

  9. Comorbidity negatively influences prognosis in patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Guerra-Vales, Juan-Manuel; Colina-Ruizdelgado, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the outcome and prognostic factors in a series of patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and determine the impact of comorbidity on survival. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 68 patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (perihilar, n = 37; distal, n = 31) seen at a single tertiary-care institution during the period 1999-2003 was performed. Data on presentation, management, and outcome were assessed by chart review. Pathologic confirmation was obtained in 37 cases (54.4%). Comorbidity was evaluated by using the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). RESULTS: Mean age at diagnosis was 73.4 ± 11.5 years. Jaundice was the most common symptom presented (86.8%). Median CCI score was 1 (range, 0 to 4). Nineteen patients (27.9%) underwent tumor resection. Palliative biliary drainage was performed in 39 patients (57.4%), and 6 patients (8.8%) received only best supportive care. Tumor-free margin status (R0) was achieved in 15 cases (78.9% of resection group). Baseline serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) level was revealed to be an independent predictor of surgical treatment (P = 0.026). Overall median survival was 3.1 ± 0.9 mo, with 1- and 2-year survival rates of 21% and 7%, respectively. In the univariate analysis, tumor resection, CCI score, and serum CA 19-9 levels correlated significantly with outcome. In the multivariate analysis, only resection (HR 0.10; 95% CI, 0.02-0.51, P = 0.005) and a CCI score ≥ 2 (HR 3.36; 95% CI, 1.0-10.9, P = 0.045) were found to independently predict survival. CONCLUSION: Tumor resection and comorbidity emerged as significant prognostic variables in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Comorbidity evaluation instruments should be applied in the clinical management of such patients. PMID:19908335

  10. Reproducibility, reliability and validity of population-based administrative health data for the assessment of cancer non-related comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with comorbidities do not receive optimal treatment for their cancer, leading to lower cancer survival. Information on individual comorbidities is not straightforward to derive from population-based administrative health datasets. We described the development of a reproducible algorithm to extract the individual Charlson index comorbidities from such data. We illustrated the algorithm with 1,789 laryngeal cancer patients diagnosed in England in 2013. We aimed to clearly set out and advocate the time-related assumptions specified in the algorithm by providing empirical evidence for them. Methods Comorbidities were assessed from hospital records in the ten years preceding cancer diagnosis and internal reliability of the hospital records was checked. Data were right-truncated 6 or 12 months prior to cancer diagnosis to avoid inclusion of potentially cancer-related comorbidities. We tested for collider bias using Cox regression. Results Our administrative data showed weak to moderate internal reliability to identify comorbidities (ICC ranging between 0.1 and 0.6) but a notably high external validity (86.3%). We showed a reverse protective effect of non-cancer related Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) when the effect is split into cancer and non-cancer related COPD (Age-adjusted HR: 0.95, 95% CI:0.7–1.28 for non-cancer related comorbidities). Furthermore, we showed that a window of 6 years before diagnosis is an optimal period for the assessment of comorbidities. Conclusion To formulate a robust approach for assessing common comorbidities, it is important that assumptions made are explicitly stated and empirically proven. We provide a transparent and consistent approach useful to researchers looking to assess comorbidities for cancer patients using administrative health data. PMID:28263996

  11. Comorbidity, age and mortality among adults treated intensively for acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Bernard; Pardee, Timothy; Isom, Scott; Sliesoraitis, Sarunas; Winter, Allison; Lawrence, Julia; Powell, Bayard L.; Klepin, Heidi D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to characterize comorbidities among adults receiving intensive therapy for AML, and investigate their association with outcomes. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 277 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed AML treated intensively at the Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University from 2002–2009. Pretreatment comorbidities were identified by ICD-9 codes and chart review. Comorbidity burden (modified Charlson Comorbidity Index [CCI]) and specific conditions were analyzed individually. Outcomes were overall survival (OS), remission, and 30-day mortality. Covariates included age, gender, cytogenetic characteristics, hemoglobin, white cell count, lactate dehydrogenase, body mass index, and insurance type. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate OS; logistic regression was used for remission and 30-day mortality. Results In this series, 144 patients were ≥60 years old (median age 70 years, median survival 8.7 months) and 133 were <60 years (median age 47 years, median survival 23.1 months). Older patients had a higher comorbidity burden (CCI≥1 58% versus 26%, p<0.001). Prevalent comorbid conditions differed by age (diabetes 19.2% versus 7.5%; cardiovascular disease 12.5% versus 4.5%, for older versus younger patients, respectively). The CCI was not independently associated with OS or 30-day mortality in either age group. Among older patients, diabetes was associated with higher 30-day mortality (33.3% vs. 12.0% in diabetic vs. non diabetic patients, p =0.006). Controlling for age, cytogenetic characteristics and other comorbidities, the presence of diabetes increased the odds of 30-day mortality by 4.9 (CI 1.6–15.2) times. Discussion Diabetes is adversely associated with 30-day survival in older AML patients receiving intensive therapy. PMID:26527394

  12. Predictive Accuracy of 29-Comorbidity Index for In-Hospital Deaths in US Adult Hospitalizations with a Diagnosis of Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, James; Abe, Karon; Boulet, Sheree L.; Beckman, Michele G.; Hooper, W. Craig; Grant, Althea M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE), comprising deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a significant source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. By analyzing data of the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), we evaluated the predictive accuracy of the AHRQ’s 29-comorbidity index with in-hospital death among US adult hospitalizations with a diagnosis of VTE. Methods We assessed the case-fatality and prevalence of comorbidities among a sample of 153,518 adult hospitalizations with a diagnosis of VTE that comprised 87,605 DVTs and 65,913 PEs (with and without DVT). We estimated adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals with multivariable logistic regression models by using comorbidities as predictors and status of in-hospital death as an outcome variable. We assessed the c-statistics for the predictive accuracy of the logistic regression models. Results In 2010, approximately 41,944 in-hospital deaths (20,212 with DVT and 21,732 with PE) occurred among 770,137 hospitalizations with a diagnosis of VTE. When compared separately to hospitalizations with VTE, DVT, or PE that had no corresponding comorbidities, congestive heart failure, chronic pulmonary disease, coagulopathy, liver disease, lymphoma, fluid and electrolyte disorders, metastatic cancer, other neurological disorders, peripheral vascular disorders, pulmonary circulation disorders, renal failure, solid tumor without metastasis, and weight loss were positively and independently associated with 10%−125% increased likelihoods of in-hospital death. The c-statistic values ranged from 0.776 to 0.802. Conclusion The results of this study indicated that comorbidity was associated independently with risk of death among hospitalizations with VTE and among hospitalizations with DVT or PE. The AHRQ 29-comorbidity index provides acceptable to excellent predictive accuracy for in-hospital deaths among adult hospitalizations with VTE

  13. Co-morbidities in persons infected with HIV: increased burden with older age and negative effects on health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Penney, Alan T; Iudicello, Jennifer E; Riggs, Patricia K; Doyle, Katie; Ellis, Ronald J; Letendre, Scott L; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine the synergistic effects of age and HIV infection on medical co-morbidity burden, along with its clinical correlates and impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) across the lifespan in HIV. Participants included 262 individuals across four groups stratified by age (≤40 and ≥50 years) and HIV serostatus. Medical co-morbidity burden was assessed using a modified version of the Charlson Co-morbidity Index (CCI). Multiple regression accounting for potentially confounding demographic, psychiatric, and medical factors revealed an interaction between age and HIV infection on the CCI, with the highest medical co-morbidity burden in the older HIV+cohort. Nearly half of the older HIV+group had at least one major medical co-morbidity, with the most prevalent being diabetes (17.8%), syndromic neurocognitive impairment (15.4%), and malignancy (12.2%). Affective distress and detectable plasma viral load were significantly associated with the CCI in the younger and older HIV-infected groups, respectively. Greater co-morbidity burden was uniquely associated with lower physical HRQoL across the lifespan. These findings highlight the prevalence and clinical impact of co-morbidities in older HIV-infected adults and underscore the importance of early detection and treatment efforts that might enhance HIV disease outcomes.

  14. Prognostic Value of the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comorbidity Index for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Cord Blood Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Salit, Rachel B; Oliver, David C; Delaney, Colleen; Sorror, Mohamed L; Milano, Filippo

    2017-04-01

    The Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comorbidity Index (HCT-CI) has been validated as a tool for evaluating the risk of treatment-related mortality (TRM) in HLA-matched sibling and matched unrelated donor bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation patients. However, the role of the HCT-CI after cord blood transplantation (CBT) has not been fully investigated. In this analysis, we sought to evaluate the predictive value of the HCT-CI in patients undergoing reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) CBT. Between 2006 and 2013, HCT-CI scores were prospectively tabulated for patients with hematologic malignancies sequentially enrolled on multicenter RIC CBT studies coordinated by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center: 151 patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 101), chronic myeloid leukemia (n = 3), acute lymphocytic leukemia (n = 24), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 8), Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 3), and other hematologic malignancies (n = 12) underwent RIC CBT and were included. Two patients received a single CBT and the remaining 149 received a double CBT. All patients received cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Median HCT-CI for the whole group was 3 (range, 0 to 8). Using the HCT-CI categories of low (0), intermediate (1 or 2), and high risk (>3), there was no significant difference in TRM between the 3 groups. However, when the patients were divided into 2 groups, HCT-CI ≤ 3 or > 3, the incidence of TRM at 3 years after transplantation was 26% (95% confidence interval [CI], 17 to 36) in the HCT-CI ≤ 3 group versus 50% (95% CI, 30 to 67) in the HCT-CI > 3 group (P = .01). Overall survival for patients with HCT-CI ≤ 3 was 40% (95% CI, 27 to 51) versus 29% in patients with HCT-CI >3 (95% CI, 12 to 48) (P = .08). Our study demonstrates that HCT-CI score > 3 is associated with an increased risk of TRM at 3 years after

  15. The Measured Effect Magnitude of Co-Morbidities on Burn injury Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Knowlin, Laquanda; Stanford, Lindsay; Moore, Danier; Cairns, Bruce; Charles, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The ability to better prognosticate burn injury outcome is challenging and historically, most center use the Baux or revised Baux score to help prognosticate burn outcome, however, the weighted contribution of comorbidity on burn mortality has traditionally not been accounted for nor adequately studied. We therefore sought to determine the effect of comorbidities, using the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) on burn mortality. Methods The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of comorbidities on burn injury mortality as determined by the LA50 (lethal TBSA burn at which 50% of the cohort will succumb from the burn injury) in a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to a regional burn center from 2002–2012. Independent variables analyzed included basic demographics, burn mechanism, presence of inhalation injury, TBSA (total body surface area), length of hospital stay, and pre-existing comorbidities. Bivariate analysis was performed and logistic regression modeling using significant variables was utilized to estimate odds of death. Results 7640 patients were included in this study. Overall survival rate was 96%. 40% of our burn cohort had at least one comorbidity. There was a linear increase in the likelihood of death with an increase in CCI. The logistic regression model for mortality outcomes identified four statistically significant variables: age, TBSA, inhalational injury and the presence of comorbidities (OR = 1.59 for each 1 point increase in CCI; 95% CI 1.44–1.77). The unadjusted LA50 was 53% for the entire cohort. Partial adjustment multivariate regression controlling for burn mechanism and inhalation injury only, produced a slight reduction in LA50 for the 0–18 and 19–64 age categories to 76% and 48%, respectively, but a significant decrease occurred in the ≥ 65 years age group with a reduced LA50 to 20% (p<0.001). After full adjustment for all significant covariates, including comorbidities, the independent magnitude of

  16. Three-year mortality in previously hospitalized older patients from rural areas - the importance of co-morbidity and self-reported poor health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk factors for mortality after hospitalization in older persons are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the three-year (1,096 days) mortality in previously hospitalized older patients from rural areas, and to explore how objectively and self-reported health indicators at baseline were associated with mortality. Methods The study included 484 (241 men) medical inpatients with age range 65–101 (mean 80.7, SD 7.4) years. Baseline information included the following health measures: the Charlson Index, the Mini-Mental-State Examination, Lawton and Brody’s scales for physical self-maintenance and the instrumental activities of daily living, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, self-reported health (one item), and perceived social functioning (one item) and assistance in living at discharge. Results In all, 172 (35.5%) of those patients included had died within the three years of the follow-up period. Three-year mortality was associated with a high score at baseline on the Charlson Index (HR 1.73, 95%CI 1.09-2.74) and poor self-reported health (HR 1.52, 95%CI 1.03-2.25) in a Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, other objectively measured health indicators, and perceived impaired social functioning. Conclusion In a study of older adults admitted to a general hospital for a wide variety of disorders, we found co-morbidity (as measured with the Charlson Index) and poor self-reported health associated with three-year mortality in analysis adjusting for age, gender, and other health-related indicators. The results suggest that self-reported health is a measure that should be included in future studies. PMID:23419167

  17. A comparison of two comorbidity instruments in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, S E; Crowson, C S; O'Fallon, W M

    1999-12-01

    Comorbidity (CM) is a powerful predictor of health outcome and cost, as well as an important confounder in many epidemiologic studies. However, choosing the most appropriate CM measurement instrument is difficult because comparative data on how the available instruments perform in various disease settings are limited. We collected CM data (from the complete medical records) for two population-based prevalence cohorts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) and a comparison cohort without arthritis (NA), using two different CM instruments: the Charlson CM index (Charl), which is based on 17 diagnoses each weighted by mortality risk, and the Index of Coexistent Diseases (ICED), which estimates the severity and frequency of 14 comorbid conditions and provides an assessment of the impairment or disability caused by each. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to assess the impact of the two types of comorbidity scores (Charl and ICED) on survival after prevalence (index) date, adjusting for the age, sex, and disease status. There were 450, 441, and 889 individuals in the RA, OA, and NA groups, respectively, with a mean follow-up period of 10.6 years. During the follow-up, 293, 307, and 546 deaths occurred in the RA, OA, and NA groups, respectively. The mean age and percent females were: 63.3 years, 74%; 70.7 years, 74%; and 67.5 years, 75% for the RA, OA, and NA groups, respectively. Comorbidity was highest in RA, intermediate in OA, and lowest in NA by both Charl and ICED. Cox proportional hazards modeling demonstrated that both Charl and ICED were highly statistically significant predictors of mortality (P<0.0001) after adjusting for age, sex, and disease state (RA, OA, or NA) and that ICED remained highly significant as a predictor of mortality, even after adjusting for Charl. We conclude that estimating CM from medical records using ICED, an instrument that incorporates an assessment of impairment and disability, is feasible and that such as

  18. Are Preexisting Retinal and Central Nervous System-Related Comorbidities Risk Factors for Complications Following Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, David; Cusano, Antonio; Haddock, Peter; Staff, Ilene; Wagner, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess whether retinal and central nervous system (CNS) comorbidities are risk factors for complications following robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of our RALP database identified 1868 patients who underwent RALP by a single surgeon between December 10, 2003-March 14, 2014. We hypothesized that patients with preexisting retinal or CNS comorbidities were at a greater risk of suffering retinal and CNS complications following RALP. Perioperative complications and risk of recurrence were graded using the Clavien and D'Amico systems, respectively. Results: 40 (2.1%) patients had retinal or CNS-related comorbidities, of which 15 had a history of retinal surgery and 24 had a history of cerebrovascular accident, aneurysm and/or neurosurgery. One additional patient had a history of both retinal and CNS events. Patients with retinal or CNS comorbidities were significantly older, had elevated PSA levels and CCI (Charlson Comorbidity Index) scores than the control group. Blood loss, length of stay, surgical duration, BMI, diagnostic Gleason score and T-stage were not statistically different between groups. No retinal or CNS complications occurred in either group. The distribution of patients between D'Amico risk categories was not statistically different between the groups. There was also no difference in the incidence of total complications between the groups. Conclusions: RALP-associated retinal and CNS complications are rare. While our RALP database is large, the cohort of patients with retinal or CNS-related comorbidities was relatively small. Our dataset suggests retinal and CNS pathology presents no greater risk of suffering from perioperative complications following RALP. PMID:26401857

  19. Racial/ethnic differences in obesity and comorbidities between safety-net- and non safety-net integrated health systems

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Bijal A.; Garcia, Michael P.; Corley, Douglas A.; Doubeni, Chyke A.; Haas, Jennifer S.; Kamineni, Aruna; Quinn, Virginia P.; Wernli, Karen; Zheng, Yingye; Skinner, Celette Sugg

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Previous research shows that patients in integrated health systems experience fewer racial disparities compared with more traditional healthcare systems. Little is known about patterns of racial/ethnic disparities between safety-net and non safety-net integrated health systems. We evaluated racial/ethnic differences in body mass index (BMI) and the Charlson comorbidity index from 3 non safety-net- and 1 safety-net integrated health systems in a cross-sectional study. Multinomial logistic regression modeled comorbidity and BMI on race/ethnicity and health care system type adjusting for age, sex, insurance, and zip-code-level income The study included 1.38 million patients. Higher proportions of safety-net versus non safety-net patients had comorbidity score of 3+ (11.1% vs. 5.0%) and BMI ≥35 (27.7% vs. 15.8%). In both types of systems, blacks and Hispanics were more likely than whites to have higher BMIs. Whites were more likely than blacks or Hispanics to have higher comorbidity scores in a safety net system, but less likely to have higher scores in the non safety-nets. The odds of comorbidity score 3+ and BMI 35+ in blacks relative to whites were significantly lower in safety-net than in non safety-net settings. Racial/ethnic differences were present within both safety-net and non safety-net integrated health systems, but patterns differed. Understanding patterns of racial/ethnic differences in health outcomes in safety-net and non safety-net integrated health systems is important to tailor interventions to eliminate racial/ethnic disparities in health and health care. PMID:28296752

  20. Racial/ethnic differences in obesity and comorbidities between safety-net- and non safety-net integrated health systems.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Bijal A; Garcia, Michael P; Corley, Douglas A; Doubeni, Chyke A; Haas, Jennifer S; Kamineni, Aruna; Quinn, Virginia P; Wernli, Karen; Zheng, Yingye; Skinner, Celette Sugg

    2017-03-01

    Previous research shows that patients in integrated health systems experience fewer racial disparities compared with more traditional healthcare systems. Little is known about patterns of racial/ethnic disparities between safety-net and non safety-net integrated health systems.We evaluated racial/ethnic differences in body mass index (BMI) and the Charlson comorbidity index from 3 non safety-net- and 1 safety-net integrated health systems in a cross-sectional study. Multinomial logistic regression modeled comorbidity and BMI on race/ethnicity and health care system type adjusting for age, sex, insurance, and zip-code-level incomeThe study included 1.38 million patients. Higher proportions of safety-net versus non safety-net patients had comorbidity score of 3+ (11.1% vs. 5.0%) and BMI ≥35 (27.7% vs. 15.8%). In both types of systems, blacks and Hispanics were more likely than whites to have higher BMIs. Whites were more likely than blacks or Hispanics to have higher comorbidity scores in a safety net system, but less likely to have higher scores in the non safety-nets. The odds of comorbidity score 3+ and BMI 35+ in blacks relative to whites were significantly lower in safety-net than in non safety-net settings.Racial/ethnic differences were present within both safety-net and non safety-net integrated health systems, but patterns differed. Understanding patterns of racial/ethnic differences in health outcomes in safety-net and non safety-net integrated health systems is important to tailor interventions to eliminate racial/ethnic disparities in health and health care.

  1. Impact of Age and Comorbidity on Cervical and Breast Cancer Literacy of African Americans, Latina, and Arab women

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Costellia H.; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate and timely screening can significantly reduce breast and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. Racial/ethnic minorities and immigrant populations have lower screening rates and delays in follow-up after abnormal tests. Purpose In this study, we examined the relationship between age, comorbidity, breast and cervical cancer literacy in a sample of African American, Latina, and Arab women (N=371) from Detroit, Michigan. Methods Age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (ACC) was used characterize the impact of age and comorbidity has on breast and cervical cancer literacy; Breast Cancer Literacy Assessment Tool was used to assess breast cancer literacy; Cervical Cancer Literacy Assessment Tool was used to assess cervical cancer literacy. ANOVA was used to assess the relationship between ACC, breast and cervical cancer screening and group differences. Results There was a statistically significant difference between breast cancer literacy (Breast-CLAT total scores) scores (F(2,367)= 17.31, p= < 0.01). ACC had a greater impact on breast cancer literacy for African American F(2,214) =11, p = <0.01. PMID:26333609

  2. Design and Validation of an Augmented Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index Comprising Pretransplant Ferritin, Albumin, and Platelet Count for Prediction of Outcomes after Allogeneic Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Jennifer E; Storer, Barry E; Armand, Philippe; Raimondi, Roberto; Gibson, Christopher; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Oneto, Rosi; Bruno, Benedetto; Martin, Paul J; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storb, Rainer; Sorror, Mohamed L

    2015-08-01

    Pretransplant values of serum ferritin, albumin, and peripheral blood counts were previously suggested to provide prognostic information about hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes. Whether these "biomarkers" have prognostic value independent of each other and the HCT-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) is unknown. We analyzed data from 3917 allogeneic HCT recipients at multiple sites in the United States and Italy using multivariate models including each biomarker and the HCT-CI. Data from all sites were then randomly divided into a training set (n = 2352) to develop weights for the relevant biomarkers to be added to the HCT-CI scores and a validation set (n = 1407) to validate an augmented HCT-CI compared with the original index. Multivariate analysis with data from one site showed that ferritin, albumin, and platelets-not neutrophils or hemoglobin-were independently associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and decreased overall survival. Findings were validated in data from the other sites. Subsequently, in a training set from all sites, ferritin >2500 mg/dL (hazard ratio [HR], 1.69); albumin 3 to 3.5 g/dL (HR, 1.61) and <3.0 g/dL (HR, 2.27); and platelets 50 to <100,000 (HR, 1.28), 20 to <50,000 (HR, 1.29), and <20,000 (HR, 1.55) were statistically significantly associated with NRM. Weights were assigned to these laboratory values following the same equation used to design the original index. In the validation set, the addition of the biomarkers to the original index to develop an augmented HCT-CI resulted in a statistically significant increase in a higher c-statistic estimate for prediction of NRM (P = .0007). Ferritin, albumin, and platelet counts are important prognostic markers that further refine the discriminative power of the HCT-CI for transplant outcomes.

  3. Design and Validation of an Augmented Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index Comprising Pre-transplant Ferritin, Albumin and Platelet Count for Prediction of Outcomes after Allogeneic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Jennifer E.; Storer, Barry; Armand, Philippe; Raimondi, Roberto; Gibson, Christopher; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Oneto, Rosi; Bruno, Benedetto; Martin, Paul J.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storb, Rainer; Sorror, Mohamed L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pre-transplant values of serum ferritin, albumin and peripheral blood counts were previously suggested to provide prognostic information about hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes. Whether these “biomarkers” have prognostic value independent of each other and the HCT-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) is unknown. Patients and Methods We analyzed data from 3917 allogeneic HCT recipients at multiple sites in the US and Italy using multivariate models including each biomarker and the HCT-CI. Data from all sites were then randomly divided into a training set (n=2352) to develop weights for the relevant biomarkers to be added to the HCT-CI scores and a validation set (n=1407) to validate an augmented HCT-CI compared to the original index. Results Multivariate analysis with data from one site showed that ferritin, albumin and platelets-- not neutrophils or hemoglobin--were independently associated with increased non-relapse mortality (NRM) and decreased overall survival. Findings were validated in data from the other sites. Subsequently, in a training set from all sites, ferritin >2500 mg/dL (HR:1.69); albumin 3–3.5 g/dL (HR:1.61) and <3.0 g/dL (HR:2.27); and platelets 50–<100,000 (HR:1.28), 20–<50,000 (HR:1.29) and <20,000 (HR:1.55) were statistically significantly associated with NRM. Weights were assigned to these laboratory values following the same equation used to design the original index. In the validation set, The addition of the biomarkers to the original index to develop an augmented HCT-CI resulted in a statistically significant increase in higher c-statistic estimate for prediction of NRM. (p=0.0007). Conclusion Ferritin, albumin, and platelet counts are important prognostic markers that further refine the discriminative power of the HCT-CI for transplant outcomes. PMID:25862589

  4. Changes in cardiovascular risk associated with phentermine and topiramate extended-release in participants with comorbidities and a body mass index ≥27 kg/m(2).

    PubMed

    Davidson, Michael H; Tonstad, Serena; Oparil, Suzanne; Schwiers, Michael; Day, Wesley W; Bowden, Charles H

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this analysis was to evaluate changes in cardiovascular risk factors in obese patients with dyslipidemia and/or hypertension receiving phentermine (PHEN) and topiramate extended-release (TPM ER). In the 56-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter CONQUER trial, PHEN/TPM ER demonstrated significant weight loss compared with placebo in overweight or obese participants with ≥2 weight-related co-morbidities. Participants with body mass indexes of 27 to 45 kg/m(2) were randomized to placebo, PHEN 7.5 mg/TPM ER 46 mg, or PHEN 15 mg/TPM ER 92 mg; participants also received lifestyle modification counseling. Primary end points were percentage weight loss and the proportion of participants achieving ≥5% weight loss. Additional end points were changes in lipid variables in the dyslipidemia population and blood pressure in the hypertensive population, stratified by treatment and magnitude of weight loss. PHEN/TPM ER produced significantly greater dose-related mean percentage weight loss compared with placebo in the subgroups of participants with dyslipidemia and those with hypertension. Regardless of treatment group assignment, participants with dyslipidemia who lost ≥5% of their baseline weight experienced significantly greater reductions in triglycerides (-14.5% to -39.8%), and in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-9.4% to -14.8%) than those losing <5% of their weight (p <0.05). Similarly, participants with hypertension at baseline showed reduced systolic blood pressure by -7.5 to -11.8 mm Hg (p <0.001 vs those with <5% weight loss). In conclusion, the dose-related weight loss induced by PHEN/TPM ER treatment was accompanied by significant improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors in participants who had dyslipidemia or hypertension at baseline, suggesting that facilitating weight loss by augmenting lifestyle changes with pharmacotherapies may decrease the risk for cardiovascular disease in obese and overweight

  5. Delirium Detection and Impact of Comorbid Health Conditions in a Post-Acute Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Stelmokas, Julija; Gabel, Nicolette; Flaherty, Jennifer M.; Rayson, Katherine; Tran, Kathileen; Anderson, Jason R.; Bieliauskas, Linas A.

    2016-01-01

    Misdiagnosis and under-detection of delirium may occur in many medical settings. This is important to address as delirium clearly increases risk of morbidity and mortality in such settings. This study assessed whether Veterans who screened positive on a delirium severity measure (Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale; MDAS) differed from those with and without corresponding medical documentation of delirium in terms of cognitive functioning, psychiatric/medical history, and medication use. A medical record review of 266 inpatients at a VA post-acute rehabilitation unit found that 10.9% were identified as delirious according to the MDAS and/or medical records. Of the Veterans who screened positive on the MDAS (N = 19), 68.4% went undetected by medical screening. Undetected cases had a higher number of comorbid medical conditions as measured by the Age-Adjusted Charlson Index (AACI) scores (median = 9, SD = 3.15; U = 5.5, p = .003) than medically documented cases. For Veterans with a score of 7 or greater on the AACI, the general relative risk for delirium was 4.46. Delirium is frequently under-detected in a post-acute rehabilitation unit, particularly for Veterans with high comorbid illness. The relative risk of delirium is up to 4.46 for those with high medical burden, suggesting the need for more comprehensive delirium screening in these patients. PMID:27902744

  6. Comorbidities, not age, are predictive of survival after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma in patients older than 50 years.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Jorge, A S; Pereira, A; Moreno, M; Núñez, J; Gayoso, J; Gonzalez-Medina, J; Revilla, N; Sampol, A; Domingo-Domenech, E; de la Cruz, F; Morales, A; Rodriguez-Salazar, M J; Valiente, S; Pérez-Ceballos, E; de Oteyza, J Pérez; García-Sanz, R

    2017-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) is the standard of care for young patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). However, there is limited experience of its efficacy and feasibility in older patients. The characteristics and outcomes of 121 patients aged ≥50 years (42 of them are ≥60 years old) with R/R HL who underwent AHCT were reviewed. After a median follow-up of 3.1 years, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) at 5 years were 64 and 55 %, respectively, with no differences between 50-59-year-old and ≥60-year-old patients. Hematological and extra-hematological toxicities after AHCT were comparable between the two groups of age. In univariate analysis, poorer OS and PFS were associated with disease status other than complete remission, hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index (HCT-CI) scores >1, and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) scores >1. HCT-CI scores >1 were also associated with a higher risk of grade 3-4 extrahematologic toxicity. In multivariate analysis, HCT-CI and CCI remained significantly associated with OS and PFS after adjustment for disease status. Our data show that AHCT can be performed in selected patients with R/R HL ≥50 years with acceptable outcome and toxicity. Comorbidities appear to impact AHCT outcome more than age.

  7. Impact of comorbidities on TNF inhibitor persistence in rheumatoid arthritis patients: an analysis of Korean National Health Insurance claims data.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo-Kyung; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor persistence and the impact of comorbidity on treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In a Korean National Health Insurance claims database, patients with a diagnosis code of RA (M05 or M06) who started TNF inhibitor therapy between July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2008 were enrolled. The study cohort was followed until December 31, 2009. Persistence was examined using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were developed to examine the potential impact of comorbidities on drug persistence. A total of 388 patients were enrolled in the study cohort. The mean persistence rate in the overall population was 61% at 18 months. Drug survival rates for adalimumab and etanercept at 6 months were 82 and 85%, respectively, and 73 and 78%, respectively, at 12 months. Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) scores and comorbidities such as diabetes, chronic pulmonary disease, mild liver disease, and depression at initiation were not related with drug persistence, while peptic ulcer disease (PUD) lowered the risk of discontinuation of TNF inhibitors (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.55-0.97). Old age (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.09-2.33) and prescription of inhibitors by an internist (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.02-2.48) were associated with discontinuation of TNF inhibitors. The persistence of TNF inhibitors was 61% at 18 months. CCI score and other comorbidities were not related with early discontinuation of TNF inhibitors, while PUD was an independent contributing factor to TNF inhibitor persistence.

  8. Patient comorbidity predicts hospital length of stay after robot-assisted prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Potretzke, Aaron M; Kim, Eric H; Knight, Brent A; Anderson, Barrett G; Park, Alyssa M; Sherburne Figenshau, R; Bhayani, Sam B

    2016-06-01

    We sought to examine the impact of baseline patient characteristics and perioperative outcomes on postoperative hospital length of stay (LOS), following the robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). We retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients receiving RARP at our institution by two surgeons between January 2012 and March 2014 (n = 274). Baseline patient characteristics were collected, including Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Discharge criteria were identical for all patients and included: return of bowel function, pain controlled with oral medications, and ambulation without assistance. LOS was calculated as the number of midnights spent in the hospital following surgery. Postoperative hospital LOS was equal to 1 day for 225 patients and >1 day for 49 patients. Baseline patient and tumor characteristics, including age, race, body-mass index (BMI), pathologic stage, and Gleason score, were not significantly different. Mean operative time was shorter for patients with LOS > 1 day (155 vs. 173 min, p < 0.01) on univariate analysis. Patients with LOS > 1 day were more likely to have had a complication: 8/49 (17 %) vs. 14/225 (6 %), p < 0.01. However, multivariate logistic regression found baseline CCI > 2 as the only independent predictor of LOS > 1 day (OR = 3.2, p = 0.03), controlling for age, race, BMI, Gleason score, tumor stage, blood loss, operative time, and occurrence of complication. In our experience, baseline patient comorbidity, quantified by CCI, was the only independent predictor of hospital LOS greater than 1 day following RARP. Preoperative assessment of patient comorbidity should be used to better counsel patients on their anticipated postoperative course.

  9. Duration of first remission, hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index and patient age predict survival of patients with AML transplanted in second CR.

    PubMed

    Michelis, F V; Atenafu, E G; Gupta, V; Kim, D D; Kuruvilla, J; Lambie, A; Lipton, J H; Loach, D; Messner, H A

    2013-11-01

    Allo-SCT is potentially curative for patients with AML. Patients transplanted in CR2 tend to experience inferior survival compared with those in CR1. We retrospectively investigated the impact of pretransplant variables on the outcome of patients transplanted with AML in CR2. Ninety-four patients with AML in CR2 received a transplant between 1999 and 2011 with myeloablative (MA, n=65) or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens (RIC, n=29). Variables investigated included cytogenetic risk at diagnosis (SWOG), hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI), CMV status, duration of CR1 and age. Median age of all patients was 47 years (range 18-70). Multivariable analysis for OS identified three prognostically significant categories: a favorable risk group included patients with duration of CR1 ≥6 months, age <55 years and HCT-CI score 0-3, an intermediate risk group with duration of CR1 ≥6 months, age <55 years and HCT-CI score 4-5 and a high-risk group with duration of CR1 <6 months or age ≥55 years (P=0.0001) with 5-year survivals of 53%, 31% and 6%, respectively. Acute and chronic GVHD did not influence this risk stratification. The stated risk factors discriminate patients with different OS and may assist in decision making for allo-SCT.

  10. Comorbidity as a contributor to frequent severe acute exacerbation in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Suk Hyeon; Lee, Hyun; Carriere, KC; Shin, Sun Hye; Moon, Seong Mi; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Koh, Won-Jung; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Comorbidities have a serious impact on the frequent severe acute exacerbations (AEs) in patients with COPD. Previous studies have used the Charlson comorbidity index to represent a conglomerate of comorbidities; however, the respective contribution of each coexisting disease to the frequent severe AEs remains unclear. Methods A retrospective, observational study was performed in 77 COPD patients who experienced severe AE between January 2012 and December 2014 and had at least 1-year follow-up period from the date of admission for severe AE. We explored the incidence of frequent severe AEs (≥2 severe AEs during 1-year period) in these patients and investigated COPD-related factors and comorbidities as potential risk factors of these exacerbations. Results Out of 77 patients, 61 patients (79.2%) had at least one comorbidity. During a 1-year follow-up period, 29 patients (37.7%) experienced frequent severe AEs, approximately two-thirds (n=19) of which occurred within the first 90 days after admission. Compared with patients not experiencing frequent severe AEs, these patients were more likely to have poor lung function and receive home oxygen therapy and long-term oral steroids. In multiple logistic regression analysis, coexisting asthma (adjusted odds ratio [OR] =4.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.30–12.46, P=0.016), home oxygen therapy (adjusted OR =9.39, 95% CI =1.60–55.30, P=0.013), and C-reactive protein (adjusted OR =1.09, 95% CI =1.01–1.19, P=0.036) were associated with frequent severe AEs. In addition, poor lung function, as measured by forced expiratory volume in 1 second (adjusted OR =0.16, 95% CI =0.04–0.70, P=0.015), was inversely associated with early (ie, within 90 days of admission) frequent severe AEs. Conclusion Based on our study, among COPD-related comorbidities, coexisting asthma has a significant impact on the frequent severe AEs in COPD patients. PMID:27536097

  11. Reproductive History and Later-Life Comorbidity Trajectories: A Medicare Linked Cohort Study From the Utah Population Database

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Heidi A.; Smith, Ken R.; Zimmer, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive lives of men and women may provide significant insight into later-life morbidity and mortality. Sociological, biological, and evolutionary theories predict a relationship between reproductive history and later-life health; however, current research is lacking consensus on the direction of the relationship. Parity, early age at first birth and last birth, birth weight of offspring, having a child die as an infant, and having a preterm birth may have long-term effects on health for both men and women. In this study, the relationship between these measures of reproductive history and later-life health is examined using the Utah Population Database (a rich source of longitudinal data), and Medicare claims data from 1992–2009. Later-life health is measured using annual Charlson comorbidity index scores, a construct that summarizes most serious illnesses afflicting older individuals. Group-based trajectory modeling that accounts for nonrandom attrition due to death is used to identify the number and types of morbidity trajectories by sex and age for 52,924 individuals aged 65–84 in 1992. For females, early age at first birth, high parity, and having a preterm or high-birth-weight baby are associated with increased risks of comorbidity; later age at last birth is associated with a decreased risk of comorbidity. For males, early age at first birth and having a child with an abnormal birth weight leads to increased risk of comorbidity. The results suggest that both biological and social factors play important roles in the relationships between fertility and morbidity profiles at older ages. PMID:26527471

  12. COPD comorbidities network.

    PubMed

    Divo, Miguel J; Casanova, Ciro; Marin, Jose M; Pinto-Plata, Victor M; de-Torres, Juan P; Zulueta, Javier J; Cabrera, Carlos; Zagaceta, Jorge; Sanchez-Salcedo, Pablo; Berto, Juan; Davila, Rebeca Baz; Alcaide, Ana B; Cote, Claudia; Celli, Bartolome R

    2015-09-01

    Multimorbidity frequently affects the ageing population and their co-existence may not occur at random. Understanding their interactions and that with clinical variables could be important for disease screening and management.In a cohort of 1969 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and 316 non-COPD controls, we applied a network-based analysis to explore the associations between multiple comorbidities. Clinical characteristics (age, degree of obstruction, walking, dyspnoea, body mass index) and 79 comorbidities were identified and their interrelationships quantified. Using network visualisation software, we represented each clinical variable and comorbidity as a node with linkages representing statistically significant associations.The resulting COPD comorbidity network had 428, 357 or 265 linkages depending on the statistical threshold used (p≤0.01, p≤0.001 or p≤0.0001). There were more nodes and links in COPD compared with controls after adjusting for age, sex and number of subjects. In COPD, a subset of nodes had a larger number of linkages representing hubs. Four sub-networks or modules were identified using an inter-linkage affinity algorithm and their display provided meaningful interactions not discernible by univariate analysis.COPD patients are affected by larger number of multiple interlinked morbidities which clustering pattern may suggest common pathobiological processes or be utilised for screening and/or therapeutic interventions.

  13. Predicting 30-Day Readmissions: Performance of the LACE Index Compared with a Regression Model among General Medicine Patients in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lian Leng; Lee, Kheng Hock; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng; Wang, Sijia; Tan, Shu Yun; Thumboo, Julian; Liu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    The LACE index (length of stay, acuity of admission, Charlson comorbidity index, CCI, and number of emergency department visits in preceding 6 months) derived in Canada is simple and may have clinical utility in Singapore to predict readmission risk. We compared the performance of the LACE index with a derived model in identifying 30-day readmissions from a population of general medicine patients in Singapore. Additional variables include patient demographics, comorbidities, clinical and laboratory variables during the index admission, and prior healthcare utilization in the preceding year. 5,862 patients were analysed and 572 patients (9.8%) were readmitted in the 30 days following discharge. Age, CCI, count of surgical procedures during index admission, white cell count, serum albumin, and number of emergency department visits in previous 6 months were significantly associated with 30-day readmission risk. The final logistic regression model had fair discriminative ability c-statistic of 0.650 while the LACE index achieved c-statistic of 0.628 in predicting 30-day readmissions. Our derived model has the advantage of being available early in the admission to identify patients at high risk of readmission for interventions. Additional factors predicting readmission risk and machine learning techniques should be considered to improve model performance. PMID:26682212

  14. The Use of a Bayesian Hierarchy to Develop and Validate a Co-Morbidity Score to Predict Mortality for Linked Primary and Secondary Care Data from the NHS in England

    PubMed Central

    Card, Tim R.; West, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Background We have assessed whether the linkage between routine primary and secondary care records provided an opportunity to develop an improved population based co-morbidity score with the combined information on co-morbidities from both health care settings. Methods We extracted all people older than 20 years at the start of 2005 within the linkage between the Hospital Episodes Statistics, Clinical Practice Research Datalink, and Office for National Statistics death register in England. A random 50% sample was used to identify relevant diagnostic codes using a Bayesian hierarchy to share information between similar Read and ICD 10 code groupings. Internal validation of the score was performed in the remaining 50% and discrimination was assessed using Harrell’s C statistic. Comparisons were made over time, age, and consultation rate with the Charlson and Elixhauser indexes. Results 657,264 people were followed up from the 1st January 2005. 98 groupings of codes were derived from the Bayesian hierarchy, and 37 had an adjusted weighting of greater than zero in the Cox proportional hazards model. 11 of these groupings had a different weighting dependent on whether they were coded from hospital or primary care. The C statistic reduced from 0.88 (95% confidence interval 0.88–0.88) in the first year of follow up, to 0.85 (0.85–0.85) including all 5 years. When we stratified the linked score by consultation rate the association with mortality remained consistent, but there was a significant interaction with age, with improved discrimination and fit in those under 50 years old (C = 0.85, 0.83–0.87) compared to the Charlson (C = 0.79, 0.77–0.82) or Elixhauser index (C = 0.81, 0.79–0.83). Conclusions The use of linked population based primary and secondary care data developed a co-morbidity score that had improved discrimination, particularly in younger age groups, and had a greater effect when adjusting for co-morbidity than existing scores. PMID:27788230

  15. Evidence of functional declining and global comorbidity measured at baseline proved to be the strongest predictors for long-term death in elderly community residents aged 85 years: a 5-year follow-up evaluation, the OCTABAIX study

    PubMed Central

    Formiga, Francesc; Ferrer, Assumpta; Padros, Gloria; Montero, Abelardo; Gimenez-Argente, Carme; Corbella, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the predictive value of functional impairment, chronic conditions, and laboratory biomarkers of aging for predicting 5-year mortality in the elderly aged 85 years. Methods Predictive value for mortality of different geriatric assessments carried out during the OCTABAIX study was evaluated after 5 years of follow-up in 328 subjects aged 85 years. Measurements included assessment of functional status comorbidity, along with laboratory tests on vitamin D, cholesterol, CD4/CD8 ratio, hemoglobin, and serum thyrotropin. Results Overall, the mortality rate after 5 years of follow-up was 42.07%. Bivariate analysis showed that patients who survived were predominantly female (P=0.02), and they showed a significantly better baseline functional status for both basic (P<0.001) and instrumental (P<0.001) activities of daily living (Barthel and Lawton index), better cognitive performance (Spanish version of the Mini-Mental State Examination) (P<0.001), lower comorbidity conditions (Charlson) (P<0.001), lower nutritional risk (Mini Nutritional Assessment) (P<0.001), lower risk of falls (Tinetti gait scale) (P<0.001), less percentage of heart failure (P=0.03) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P=0.03), and took less chronic prescription drugs (P=0.002) than nonsurvivors. Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified a decreased score in the Lawton index (hazard ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.78–0.91) and higher comorbidity conditions (hazard ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval: 1.08–1.33) as independent predictors of mortality at 5 years in the studied population. Conclusion The ability to perform instrumental activities of daily living and the global comorbidity assessed at baseline were the predictors of death, identified in our 85-year-old community-dwelling subjects after 5 years of follow-up. PMID:27143867

  16. Age and Comorbid Illness Are Associated With Late Rectal Toxicity Following Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Stenmark, Matt H.; Ritter, Tim; Litzenberg, Dale; Jackson, William; Johnson, Skyler; Albrecht-Unger, Liesel; Donaghy, Alex; Phelps, Laura; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schuyler; Marsh, Robin; Olson, Karin; Feng, Felix Y.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the impacts of patient age and comorbid illness on rectal toxicity following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to assess the Qualitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model in this context. Methods and Materials: Rectal toxicity was analyzed in 718 men previously treated for prostate cancer with EBRT (≥75 Gy). Comorbid illness was scored using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCMI), and the NTCP was evaluated with the QUANTEC model. The influence of clinical and treatment-related parameters on rectal toxicity was assessed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: The cumulative incidence of rectal toxicity grade ≥2 was 9.5% and 11.6% at 3 and 5 years and 3.3% and 3.9% at 3 and 5 years for grade ≥3 toxicity, respectively. Each year of age predicted an increasing relative risk of grade ≥2 (P<.03; hazard ratio [HR], 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.06]) and ≥3 rectal toxicity (P<.0001; HR, 1.14 [95% CI,1.07-1.22]). Increasing CCMI predicted rectal toxicity where a history of either myocardial infarction (MI) (P<.0001; HR, 5.1 [95% CI, 1.9-13.7]) or congestive heart failure (CHF) (P<.0006; HR, 5.4 [95% CI, 0.6-47.5]) predicted grade ≥3 rectal toxicity, with lesser correlation with grade ≥2 toxicity (P<.02 for MI, and P<.09 for CHF). An age comorbidity model to predict rectal toxicity was developed and confirmed in a validation cohort. The use of anticoagulants increased toxicity independent of age and comorbidity. NTCP was prognostic for grade ≥3 (P=.015) but not grade ≥2 (P=.49) toxicity. On multivariate analysis, age, MI, CHF, and an NTCP >20% all correlated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: Patient age and a history of MI or CHF significantly impact rectal toxicity following EBRT for the treatment of prostate cancer, even after controlling for NTCP.

  17. The impact of patient comorbidity on cancer stage at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, Jason; Sarfati, Diana; Stanley, James

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is known that cancer stage is affected by comorbidity, but the evidence regarding the magnitude and even direction of this effect is highly inconsistent and poorly understood. The aims of this study were to establish the impact of comorbidity on cancer stage at diagnosis, using both specific individual comorbid conditions and a global measure of comorbidity; and to assess whether this impact varied by cancer site, level of comorbidity burden and individual comorbidity type. Methods: We examined comorbidity among 14 096 patients with breast, colon, rectal, liver, stomach, ovarian, uterine, bladder or kidney cancer. Patients were identified from cancer registry data, and then linked to hospitalisation data to determine the presence of comorbidity in the 5 years preceding cancer diagnosis. Individual comorbid conditions were identified using ICD-10 codes, and overall burden of comorbidity attributed using a cancer-specific measure of comorbidity (C3 Index). Results: We observed that the presence of patient comorbidity (a) increases the odds of being diagnosed with distant metastases, (b) does not lead to earlier diagnosis and (c) increases the likelihood of a patient receiving no stage of disease at diagnosis. Conclusions: Patient comorbidity has a substantial impact on cancer stage at diagnosis; however, this impact varies considerably by cancer type, individual comorbid condition and overall comorbidity burden. PMID:26461060

  18. Comorbidities Among Persons With Incident Psychiatric Condition

    PubMed Central

    Fluegge, Kyle R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: I sought to determine how medical comorbidities co-exist with incident psychiatric condition. Method: I used data from all 11 available waves (1992-2012) of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). I identified 4,358 index participants with self-reported incident psychiatric condition. I collected comorbidity data from participants preceding, including, and succeeding that incident wave. Comorbidities assessed included high blood pressure (HBP), diabetes mellitus, cancer, lung disease, heart disease, stroke, and arthritis. Modified Poisson regression combined with log-linked binomial regression was used to estimate relative risks (RRs) of reporting a comorbidity preceding and following the incident wave. Multiple comparison testing dictated significance of RRs with p < .007. Results: For the waves preceding the index wave, the RRs of reporting all comorbidities except HBP and cancer were significantly (p < .007) increased. For the waves following incident psychiatric condition, the risks of reporting heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease were significantly (p < .007) increased. These results were adjusted for participant age, race, gender, other comorbidities listed, and the wave in which a comorbidity was reported. Conclusion: The bidirectional association between a psychiatric condition and medical illnesses could only be statistically confirmed for lung disease, diabetes, and heart disease. It is of interest to determine how reporting a psychiatric condition may affect the sequelae of health care use and treatment outcomes for patients with either of these comorbidities or a combination of them. PMID:28008416

  19. Age influences initial dose and compliance to imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia elderly patients but concomitant comorbidities appear to influence overall and event-free survival.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Luciano, Luigiana; Latagliata, Roberto; Castagnetti, Fausto; Ferrero, Dario; Cavazzini, Francesco; Trawinska, Malgorzata Monica; Annunziata, Mario; Stagno, Fabio; Tiribelli, Mario; Binotto, Gianni; Crisà, Elena; Musto, Pellegrino; Gozzini, Antonella; Cavalli, Laura; Montefusco, Enrico; Iurlo, Alessandra; Russo, Sabina; Cedrone, Michele; Rossi, Antonella Russo; Pregno, Patrizia; Endri, Mauro; Spadea, Antonio; Molica, Matteo; Giglio, Gianfranco; Celesti, Francesca; Sorà, Federica; Storti, Sergio; D'Addosio, Ada; Cambrin, Giovanna Rege; Isidori, Alessandro; Sica, Simona; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Speccha, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-10-01

    We applied Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) stratification on a large cohort of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) very elderly patients (>75 years) treated with imatinib, in order to observe the impact of concomitant diseases on both compliance and outcome. One hundred and eighty-one patients were recruited by 21 Italian centers. There were 95 males and 86 females, median age 78.6 years (range 75-93.6). According to Sokal score, 106 patients were classified as intermediate risk and 55 as high risk (not available in 20 patients). According to CCI stratification, 71 patients had score 0 and 110 a score ≥ 1. Imatinib standard dose was reduced at start of therapy (200-300 mg/day) in 68 patients independently from the evaluation of baseline comorbidities, but based only on physician judgement: 43.6% of these patients had score 0 compared to 34% of patients who had score ≥ 1. Significant differences were found in terms of subsequent dose reduction (39% of patients with score 0 compared to 53% of patients with score ≥ 1) and in terms of drug discontinuation due to toxicity (35% of patients with score 0 vs 65% of patients with score ≥ 1). We did not find significant differences as regards occurrence of hematologic side effects, probably as a consequence of the initial dose reduction: 39% of patients with score 0 experienced grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity (most commonly anemia) compared to 42% of patients with score ≥ 1. Independently from the initial dose, comorbidities again did not have an impact on development of grade 3/4 non-hematologic side effects (most commonly skin rash, muscle cramps and fluid retention): 62% of patients with score 0 compared to 52.5% of patients with score ≥ 1. Notwithstanding the reduced dose and the weight of comorbidities we did not find significant differences but only a trend in terms of efficacy: 66% of patients with score 0 achieved a CCyR compared to 54% of patients with score ≥ 1. Comorbidities appeared to have an impact on

  20. Complexity, comorbidity, and health care costs associated with chronic widespread pain in primary care.

    PubMed

    Morales-Espinoza, Enma Marianela; Kostov, Belchin; Salami, Daniel Cararach; Perez, Zoe Herreras; Rosalen, Anna Pereira; Molina, Jacinto Ortiz; Gonzalez-de Paz, Luis; Momblona, Josep Miquel Sotoca; Àreu, Jaume Benavent; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    The objective was to estimate the prevalence of chronic widespread pain (CWP) and compare the quality-of-life (QoL), cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidity, complexity, and health costs with the reference population. A multicenter case-control study was conducted at 3 primary care centers in Barcelona between January and December 2012: 3048 randomized patients were evaluated for CWP according to the American College of Rheumatology definition. Questionnaires on pain, QoL, disability, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and sleep quality were administered. Cardiovascular risk and the Charlson index were calculated. We compared the complexity of cases and controls using Clinical Risk Groups, severity and annual direct and indirect health care costs. CWP criteria were found in 168 patients (92.3% women, prevalence 5.51% [95% confidence interval: 4.75%-6.38%]). Patients with CWP had worse QoL (34.2 vs 44.1, P < 0.001), and greater disability (1.04 vs 0.35; P < 0.001), anxiety (43.9% vs 13.3%; P < 0.001), depression (27% vs 5.8%; P < 0.001), sleep disturbances, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and number of cardiovascular events (13.1% vs 4.8%; P = 0.028) and higher rates of complexity, severity, hospitalization, and mortality. Costs were &OV0556;3751 per year in patients with CWP vs &OV0556;1397 in controls (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the average patient with CWP has a worse QoL and a greater burden of mental health disorders and cardiovascular risk. The average annual cost associated with CWP is nearly 3 times higher than that of patients without CWP, controlling for other clinical factors. These findings have implications for disease management and budgetary considerations.

  1. Low co-morbidity, low levels of malnutrition, and low risk of falls in a community-dwelling sample of 85-year-olds are associated with successful aging: the Octabaix study.

    PubMed

    Formiga, Francesc; Ferrer, Assumpta; Megido, Maria Jesus; Chivite, David; Badia, Teresa; Pujol, Ramón

    2011-06-01

    The population is aging throughout the world. Preserving physical and cognitive functions is crucial to successful aging. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of 85-year-old community-dwelling subjects aging successfully, applying a quantitative approach, and assessing the association of successful aging with sociodemographic data, global geriatric assessment, and co-morbidity. This was a community-based survey of inhabitants aged 85 years, with 328 out of 487 subjects born in 1924 assigned to seven primary health-care teams, representing a participation rate of 67.5%. Sociodemographic variables, Barthel index (BI), the Spanish version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MEC), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Charlson Index, Gait Rating Scale, social risk, quality of life (QoL), and prevalent chronic diseases were assessed. Subjects scoring higher than 90 on the BI and higher than 24 on the MEC were compared with the rest. Multiple regression analysis was performed. Using these criteria, successful aging status was defined in 162 (49.3%) subjects. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, successful agers had significantly lower co-morbidity scores (p < 0.02, odds ratio [OR] = 0.791, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.657-0.952), higher scores on the Gait Rating Scale identifying lower risk of falls (p < 0.0001, OR = 1.753, 95% CI 1.501-2.046), and higher scores on the MNA, indicating lower risk of malnutrition (p < 0.0001, OR = 1.190, 95% CI 1.090-01.299). Regarding QoL, successful agers had significantly higher values than their unsuccessful aging counterparts (p > 0.0001). Almost half of the individuals presented successful aging. Successful agers had less co-morbidity and a lower risk of falls or malnutrition, and they had higher scores on the QoL scale.

  2. Is comorbid status the best predictor of one-year mortality in patients with severe sepsis and sepsis with shock?

    PubMed

    Huddle, N; Arendts, G; Macdonald, S P J; Fatovich, D M; Brown, S G A

    2013-07-01

    Understanding longer term outcomes in critically ill patients will assist treatment decisions, allocation of scarce resources and clinical research in that population. The aim of this study was to compare a well-validated means of determining comorbidity, the Charlson Comorbidity Score, to other verified risk stratification models in predicting one-year mortality and other outcomes in emergency department patients with severe sepsis and sepsis with shock. We conducted a planned subgroup analysis of a prospective observational study, the Critical Illness and Shock Study, in adult patients with sepsis meeting study criteria for critical illness. From emergency department arrival, patients were prospectively enrolled with data collected for a minimum of one year post-enrolment. Scoring systems were derived from this data and compared using receiver-operating characteristic curves. One hundred and four patients were enrolled. The 28-day mortality was 18% and one-year mortality 40%. For predicting one-year mortality, the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for age-weighted Charlson Comorbidity Score (0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.81) was at least as good or superior to other scoring systems analysed. The intensive care unit admission rate was 45% and the median hospital length-of-stay was eight days. We conclude that in patients who present to the emergency department with severe sepsis or sepsis with shock, age-weighted Charlson Comorbidity Score is a predictor of one-year mortality that is simple to calculate and at least as accurate as other validated scoring systems.

  3. Managing comorbidities in COPD.

    PubMed

    Hillas, Georgios; Perlikos, Fotis; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Tzanakis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Age and smoking are common risk factors for COPD and other illnesses, often leading COPD patients to demonstrate multiple coexisting comorbidities. COPD exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity in individual patients. Clinical trials investigating the treatment of COPD routinely exclude patients with multiple comorbidities or advanced age. Clinical practice guidelines for a specific disease do not usually address comorbidities in their recommendations. However, the management and the medical intervention in COPD patients with comorbidities need a holistic approach that is not clearly established worldwide. This holistic approach should include the specific burden of each comorbidity in the COPD severity classification scale. Further, the pharmacological and nonpharmacological management should also include optimal interventions and risk factor modifications simultaneously for all diseases. All health care specialists in COPD management need to work together with professionals specialized in the management of the other major chronic diseases in order to provide a multidisciplinary approach to COPD patients with multiple diseases. In this review, we focus on the major comorbidities that affect COPD patients. We present an overview of the problems faced, the reasons and risk factors for the most commonly encountered comorbidities, and the burden on health care costs. We also provide a rationale for approaching the therapeutic options of the COPD patient afflicted by comorbidity.

  4. Surgically and Conservatively Treated Obese Patients Differ in Psychological Factors, Regardless of Body Mass Index or Obesity-Related Co-Morbidities: A Comparison between Groups and an Analysis of Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Ahnis, Anne; Figura, Andrea; Hofmann, Tobias; Stengel, Andreas; Elbelt, Ulf; Klapp, Burghard F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective For the treatment of obesity, both conservative and surgical procedures are available. Psychological factors are likely to influence the choice of treatment; however, to date, systematic studies that investigate these factors are few in number. The aim of our study was to analyze whether patients who undergo a surgical treatment differ from those who require a conservative treatment in regard to psychological factors, regardless of their somatic conditions. Furthermore, predictors of treatment choice will be examined. Methods A total of 244 patients (189 women), with a mean body mass index of 45.1 kg/m2, underwent a weight reduction treatment, with 126 patients undergoing bariatric surgery and 118 patients participating in a conservative, multimodal outpatient weight reduction program. Differences in the results of the psychological questionnaires between conservatively and surgically treated patients were evaluated through the use of t-tests, χ2-tests and an ANCOVA. For the analysis of the predictors, logistic regression models were calculated. Results Surgically and conservatively treated obese patients differ in psychological, somatic, and socio-demographic factors. The psychological differences between the groups are independent of obesity-related co-morbidities, such as body mass index (BMI), type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension and coronary heart disease. The following psychological and somatic factors equally predict the choice of bariatric surgery: apathy, delegated active coping, a sense of coherence, complaints, type 2 diabetes mellitus, BMI, and age. Conclusion Longitudinal studies are required to assess the predictive value of the psychological factors in regard to the postsurgical weight course to improve the pre-surgical screening and treatment selection process. The pre-surgical identification of psychological predictors should result in a more personalized medicine course and may ensure long term outcomes. PMID:25679521

  5. Comorbidity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Turesson, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory condition, which is associated with an increased risk of comorbidity from other diseases. RA disease severity is a major predictor of development of cardiovascular disease, serious infections and malignant lymphoma. This reflects the role of chronic inflammation in the underlying pathology. Recent surveys indicate that although clinical outcomes have improved in patients with RA, mainly owing to access to more efficient pharmacotherapy, comorbidity remains a major issue in many patients. Register-based observational studies are useful sources of information on the impact of comorbidity and the efficacy and safety of antirheumatic treatment in patients with coexisting diseases. As a part of strategies to improve further the management of patients with RA, multidisciplinary collaboration for prevention and early detection of comorbidities is of major importance.

  6. Vascular comorbidities in multiple sclerosis: a nationwide study from Denmark.

    PubMed

    Thormann, Anja; Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Laursen, Bjarne; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the occurrence of vascular comorbidities before and after the clinical onset of multiple sclerosis. In this combined case-control and cohort study, all Danish born citizens with onset of multiple sclerosis 1980-2005 were identified from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry and randomly matched with controls regarding year of birth, gender, and municipality on January 1st in the year of multiple sclerosis (MS) onset (index date). Individual-level information on comorbidities was obtained from several independent nationwide registries and linked to the study population by unique personal identification numbers. To assess the presence of vascular comorbidities before and after MS onset, cases and controls were followed from January 1977 to the index date, and from the index date through December 2012. We used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and Cox regression to calculate hazard ratios (HRs). Before the index date, MS cases had a decreased probability for cerebrovascular comorbidity [OR 0.69 (95 % CI 0.48-0.99, p = 0.043)], and a numerically but not statistically significant decreased probability for cardiovascular comorbidity [OR 0.87 (95 % CI 0.71-1.07, p = 0.188)]. After the index date, MS cases had an increased risk for cerebrovascular comorbidity [HR 1.84 (95 % CI 1.69-2.00, p < 0.0005)], and for cardiovascular comorbidity [HR 1.08 (95 % CI 1.02-1.15, p = 0.013)]. The lower occurrence of cerebrovascular comorbidities in cases prior to MS onset could be due to protective immune mechanisms, while the higher occurrence of vascular comorbidities in cases after MS onset could be because of converging causal pathways of the coexisting diseases. These findings deserve to be studied closer in a broader spectrum of comorbidities in MS.

  7. Development of a 5 year life expectancy index in older adults using predictive mining of electronic health record data

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Jason Scott; Agrawal, Ankit; Feinglass, Joe; Cooper, Andrew J; Baker, David William; Choudhary, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Objective Incorporating accurate life expectancy predictions into clinical decision making could improve quality and decrease costs, but few providers do this. We sought to use predictive data mining and high dimensional analytics of electronic health record (EHR) data to develop a highly accurate and clinically actionable 5 year life expectancy index. Materials and methods We developed the index using EHR data for 7463 patients ≥50 years old with ≥1 visit(s) in 2003 to a large, academic, multispecialty group practice. We extracted 980 attributes from the EHRs of the practices and affiliated hospitals. Correlation feature selection with greedy stepwise search was used to find the attribute subset with best average merit. Rotation forest ensembling with alternating decision tree as underlying classifier was used to predict 5 year mortality. Model performance was compared with the modified Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Walter life expectancy method. Results Within 5 years of the last visit in 2003, 838 (11%) patients had died. The final model included 24 attributes: two demographic (age, sex), 10 comorbidity (eg, cardiovascular disease), one vital sign (mean diastolic blood pressure), two medications (loop diuretic use, digoxin use), six laboratory (eg, mean albumin), and three healthcare utilization (eg, the number of hospitalizations 1 year prior to the last visit in 2003). The index showed very good discrimination (c-statistic 0.86) and outperformed comparators. Conclusions The EHR based index successfully distinguished adults ≥50 years old with life expectancy >5 years from those with life expectancy ≤5 years. This information could be used clinically to optimize preventive service use (eg, cancer screening in the elderly). PMID:23538722

  8. [Heart failure and comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Boully, Clémence; Hanon, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure is a frequent disease in the elderly. Its clinical presentation is less typical and the prognosis more severe than in younger subjects because heart failure occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities. A comprehensive geriatric assessment should therefore be performed to detect the vulnerabilities and manage the comorbidities. The main diseases associated with heart failure are dementia, depression, malnutrition, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, orthostatic hypotension, renal failure, anemia and iron deficiency. Comorbidities worsen heart failure and makes its treatment more difficult. The identification and treatment of comorbidities improve the prognosis in terms of mortality but especially in terms of quality of life. Caution with drugs is necessary because of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic changes related to aging and the comorbidities. In this context, clinical and laboratory monitoring should be increased, mostly during an acute event (acute heart failure, infection, dehydration, fall, new therapy…). Therefore, the follow-up of elderly patients with heart failure requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves close cooperation between cardiologists, geriatricians, general practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists.

  9. Role of comorbidity on outcome of head and neck cancer: a population-based study in Thuringia, Germany.

    PubMed

    Göllnitz, Irene; Inhestern, Johanna; Wendt, Thomas G; Buentzel, Jens; Esser, Dirk; Böger, Daniel; Mueller, Andreas H; Piesold, Jörn-Uwe; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Eigendorff, Ekkehard; Schlattmann, Peter; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2016-11-01

    To examine the impact of comorbidity on overall survival (OS) in a population-based study of patients with head and neck cancer who were treated between 2009 and 2011. Data of 1094 patients with primary head and neck carcinomas without distant metastasis from the Thuringian cancer registries were evaluated concerning the influence of patient's characteristics and comorbidity on OS. Data on comorbidity prior to head and neck cancer diagnosis was adapted to the Charlson Comorbidity (CCI), age-adjusted CCI (ACCI), head and neck CCI (HNCCI), simplified comorbidity score (SCS), and to the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 (ACE-27). Most patients were male (80%; median age: 60 years; 50% stage IV tumors). Smoking, alcohol abuse, and anemia were registered for 38%, 33%, and 23% of the patients, respectively. Predominant therapy was surgery + radiochemotherapy (30%), surgery (29%), and surgery + radiotherapy (21%). Mean CCI, ACCI, HNCCI, SCS and ACE-27 were 1.0 ± 1.5, 2.6 ± 2.1, 0.6 ± 0.8, 4.4 ± 4.2, and 0.9 ± 0.9, respectively. Median follow-up was 25.7 months. Multivariable analyses showed that higher age, higher UICC stage, no therapy, including surgery or radiotherapy, alcohol abuse, and anemia, higher comorbidity were independent risk factors for worse OS (all P < 0.05). According to the discriminatory power analysis none of the five comorbidity scores was superior to the other scores to prognosticate OS. This population-based study showed that comorbidity is frequent in German patients with head and neck cancer and is an important risk factor for poor OS. Comorbidity should be routinely assessed and taken into account in prospective clinical trials.

  10. Comorbid anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Mark H

    2005-01-01

    Anxiety and depressive disorders often occur as comorbid illnesses and share many common symptoms. Risk factors for these disorders most likely include interactions of environmental and genetic factors. The presence of comorbid anxiety and depression adversely affects clinical and treatment outcomes. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are usually considered first-line treatment for patients with these disorders, although alternative antidepressants or additional therapies are often necessary. Studies suggest that benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, and atypical antipsychotics may be effective as augmentation therapy to optimize outcome, with buspirone and beta-blockers useful in some patients as well. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is also an effective therapeutic alternative for affected patients.

  11. [Comorbidity in psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Gerdes, S; Mrowietz, U; Boehncke, W-H

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease associated with comorbidity. Many epidemiological studies have shown that psoriasis is associated with psoriatic arthritis as well as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Furthermore, obesity and psychological diseases such as depression and anxiety disorders are linked with psoriasis and play a central role in its management. The association of psoriasis and its comorbidity can be partly explained by genetic and pathophysiological mechanisms. Approximately 40 psoriasis susceptibility loci have been described with the majority linked to the innate and adaptive immune system. In some associated diseases, such as psoriatic arthritis, an overlap of their genetic susceptibility exists. Pathophysiologically the "psoriatic march" is a model that describes the development of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases due to the presence of underlying systemic inflammation. Dermatologists are the gatekeepers to treatment for patients with psoriasis. The early detection and the management of comorbidity is part of their responsibility. Concepts for the management of psoriasis and tools to screen for psoriatic comorbidity have been developed in order to support dermatologists in daily practice.

  12. Psoriasis: new comorbidities*

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Pinto, Jackson; Diniz, Michelle dos Santos; Bavoso, Nádia Couto

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with several comorbidities. A few decades ago, it was considered an exclusive skin disease but today it is considered a multisystem disease. It is believed that 73% of psoriasis patients have at least one comorbidity. Studies have demonstrated the association of psoriasis with inflammatory bowel disease, uveitis, psychiatric disorders, metabolic syndrome and its components and cardiovascular diseases. The systemic inflammatory state seems to be the common denominator for all these comorbidities. This work aims at presenting a review of the current literature on some new comorbidities that are associated with psoriasis as osteoporosis, obstructive sleep apnea and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. While there is still controversy, many studies already point to a possible bone involvement in patients with psoriasis, especially in the male group, generally less affected by osteoporosis. Psoriasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease present some risk factors in common as obesity, smoking and physical inactivity. Besides, both diseases are associated with the metabolic syndrome. These factors could be potential confounders in the association of the two diseases. Further prospective studies with control of those potential confounders should be developed in an attempt to establish causality. Existing data in the literature suggest that there is an association between obstructive sleep apnea and psoriasis, but studies performed until now have involved few patients and had a short follow-up period. It is, therefore, premature to assert that there is indeed a correlation between these two diseases. PMID:26982772

  13. What Can ADHD without Comorbidity Teach Us about Comorbidity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeda, Toshinobu; Ambrosini, Paul J.; deBerardinis, Rachel; Elia, Josephine

    2012-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric comorbidity in ADHD is frequent, impairing and poorly understood. In this report, characteristics of comorbid and comorbid-free ADHD subjects are investigated in an attempt to identify differences that could potentially advance our understanding of risk factors. In a clinically-referred ADHD cohort of 449 youths (ages 6-18), age,…

  14. Comorbidity of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    BIÇAKCI, Şebnem

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder and can be severely disabling during attacks. The highest prevalence occurs between the ages of 25 and 55 years. Prior studies have found that migraine occurs together with other illnesses at a greater coincidental rate than is seen in the general population. These occurrences are called “comorbidities”. To delineate the comorbidities of migraine is important, because it can help improve treatment strategies and the understanding of the possible pathophysiology of migraine.

  15. How I assess comorbidities before hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.

    2013-01-01

    The hematopoietic cell transplantation-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) is a comorbidity tool suited for recipients of HCT. The index has been shown to sensitively capture the prevalence and magnitude of severity of various organ impairments before HCT and to provide valuable prognostic information after HCT. Many investigators have validated the discriminative power of the HCT-CI, but others have not. One concern is the consistency in comorbidity coding across different evaluators, particularly in view of the relatively recent addition of the HCT-CI to the transplant evaluation process. In this article, comorbidity scoring was tested across different evaluators, and only a fair interobserver agreement rate could be detected. To address these issues, a brief training program is proposed here, consisting of systematic methodology for data acquisition and consistent guidelines for comorbidity coding that were summarized in a Web-based calculator. In a validation patient cohort, this training program was shown to improve the interevaluator agreement on HCT-CI scores to an excellent rate with weighted κ values in the range of 0.89 to 0.97. This proposed training program will facilitate reliable assessment of comorbidities in the clinic and for research studies leading to standardization of the use of comorbidities in prediction of HCT outcomes. PMID:23355537

  16. Diagnosis and underdiagnosis of comorbidities in psoriasis patients - need for a multidisciplinary approach*

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Gleison Vieira; de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima S. P.; Follador, Ivonise; Silva, Thadeu Santo; de Carvalho Filho, Edgar Marcelino

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease that manifests predominantly in the skin, although systemic involvement may also occur. Although associated comorbidities have long been recognized and despite several studies indicating psoriasis as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events, little has been done in general medical practice regardind screening. In the United States, less than 50% of clinicians are aware of these recommendations. OBJECTIVE To identify the prevalence of these comorbidities in 296 patients followed up at a university dermatology clinic. METHODS Systematically investigated comorbidity frequencies were compared with general practitioners' registry frequencies. Clinical features correlated with comorbidities were also investigated. RESULTS High prevalences of systematically investigated comorbidities such as hypertension (30%) and dyslipidemia (26.5%) were documented. Conversely, data from general practitioners' records showed that 33% of dyslipidemia cases were undiagnosed and indicated possible underdiagnosis of some comorbidities. Furthermore, an association was found between: the number of comorbidities and psoriasis duration, age and high body mass index an association was found between the number of comorbidities and psoriasis duration, age, high body mass index, waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio. (p<0.05). CONCLUSION Disease duration, age and high body mass index, waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio are possible criteria for choosing which patients should be screened for comorbidities. Underdiagnosis of comorbidities by general practitioners highlights the need for a multidisciplinary approach in psoriasis management. PMID:28099594

  17. Body Mass Index Trajectories and Healthcare Utilization in Young and Middle-aged Adults.

    PubMed

    Elrashidi, Muhamad Y; Jacobson, Debra J; St Sauver, Jennifer; Fan, Chun; Lynch, Brian A; Rutten, Lila J Finney; Ebbert, Jon O

    2016-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a significant public health issue with adverse impact on health and costs. Applying a life-course perspective to obesity may advance our understanding of the influence of obesity over time on patterns of healthcare utilization in young and middle-aged United States (US) adults.We identified baseline body mass index (BMI) and BMI trajectories, and assessed their association with outpatient visits, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations in a well-defined population of young and middle-aged US adults.Using the Rochester Epidemiology Project resources, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of adults (N = 23,254) aged 18 to 44 years, with at least 3 BMI measurements, residing in Olmsted County, MN from January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2012.We observed that 27.5% of the population was obese. Four BMI trajectories were identified. Compared to under/normal weight, obese class III adults had higher risk of outpatient visits (adjusted rate ratio [RR], 1.86; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 1.67-2,08), ED visits (adjusted RR, 3.02; 95% CI, 2.74-3.34), and hospitalizations (adjusted RR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.59-1.75). BMI trajectory was positively associated with ED visits after adjustment for age, sex, race, and Charlson Comorbidity Index (P < 0.001 for trend).Among young and middle-aged US adults, baseline BMI is positively associated with outpatient visits, ED visits, and hospitalizations, while BMI trajectory is positively associated with ED visits. These findings extend our understanding of the longitudinal influence of obesity on healthcare utilization in early to mid-adulthood.

  18. Economic and Comorbidity Burden Among Moderate‐to‐Severe Psoriasis Patients with Comorbid Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Steven R.; Shi, Lizheng; Tran, Mary Helen; Lu, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the prevalence of comorbidities, health care utilization, and costs between moderate‐to‐severe psoriasis (PsO) patients with comorbid psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and matched controls. Methods Adults ages 18–64 years with concomitant diagnoses of PsO and PsA (PsO+PsA) were identified in the OptumHealth Reporting and Insights claims database between January 2007 and March 2012. Moderate‐to‐severe PsO was defined based on the use of at least one systemic or phototherapy during the 12‐month study period after the index date (randomly selected date after the first PsO diagnosis). Control patients without PsO and PsA were demographically matched 1:1 with PsO+PsA patients. Multivariate regressions were employed to examine PsO/PsA‐related comorbidities, medications, health care utilization, and costs between PsO+PsA patients and controls, adjusting for demographics, index year, insurance type, and non–PsO/PsA‐related comorbidities. Results Among 1,230 matched pairs of PsO+PsA patients and controls, PsO+PsA patients had significantly more PsO/PsA‐related comorbidities, with the top 3 most common in both groups being hypertension (35.8% versus 23.5%), hyperlipidemia (34.6% versus 28.5%), and diabetes mellitus (15.9% versus 10.0%). Compared with controls, PsO+PsA patients had a higher number of distinct prescriptions filled (incidence rate ratio 2.3, P < 0.05); were more likely to have inpatient admissions (odds ratio [OR] 1.6), emergency room visits (OR 1.3), and outpatient visits (OR 62.7) (all P < 0.05); and incurred significantly higher total, pharmacy, and medical costs (adjusted annual cost differences per patient $23,160, $17,696, and $5,077, respectively; all P < 0.01). Conclusion Compared with matched PsO‐ and PsA‐free controls, moderate‐to‐severe PsO patients with comorbid PsA had higher comorbidity and health care utilization and costs. PMID:25303478

  19. Investigating asthma comorbidities: a systematic scoping review protocol

    PubMed Central

    El Ferkh, Karim; Nwaru, Bright; Griffiths, Chris; Sheikh, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Asthma is a common long-term disorder with a number of related comorbid conditions, which may affect asthma outcomes. There is a need for greater appreciation for understanding how these comorbidities interact with asthma in order to improve asthma outcomes. Objectives To systematically identify and map out key asthma comorbidities. Methods We will systematically search the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO and Google Scholar. Additional literature will be identified by searching the reference list of identified eligible studies and by searching the repositories of international conference proceedings, including ISI Conference Proceeding Citation Index, and ZETOC (British Library). Dissemination The findings from this systematic scoping review will be reported at scientific meetings and published in a peer-reviewed journal. PMID:27558899

  20. The association between co-morbidities and physical performance in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, Lok Sze Katrina; Caughey, Gillian E; Johnston, Kylie N

    2014-02-01

    A systematic review was conducted to examine the association between co-morbidity and physical performance in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from inception to end-February 2013, using keywords 'COPD', 'exercise', 'physical activity', 'rehabilitation', 'co-morbidity' and individual co-morbid conditions. Studies reporting associations of co-morbidities in COPD with at least one objective measure of physical performance were included. Study quality was appraised using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. Nine studies met inclusion criteria. Mean (standard deviation (SD)) STROBE score was 16 (3) (maximum score = 21). Four studies examined anxiety as a co-morbid condition; three examined depression; two examined obesity and two examined a range of conditions. Reduced physical performance was associated with higher Charlson score (odds ratio (OR) = 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.54-0.98), metabolic disease (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.49-0.67), anxiety (OR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.23-0.59) and osteoporosis (OR = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.11-0.70). Depression had minimal association with physical performance but was associated with higher dropout rates from pulmonary rehabilitation programmes. Obesity was negatively associated with baseline physical performance but not with change from an exercise intervention. The presence of co-morbid conditions in people with COPD may negatively affect physical performance and should be identified and accounted for analysis of interventions.

  1. Comorbidity, systemic inflammation and outcomes in the ECLIPSE cohort.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joy; Edwards, Lisa D; Agustí, Alvar; Bakke, Per; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome; Coxson, Harvey O; Crim, Courtney; Lomas, David A; Miller, Bruce E; Rennard, Steve; Silverman, Edwin K; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wouters, Emiel; Yates, Julie C; Macnee, William

    2013-09-01

    Comorbidities, are common in COPD, have been associated with poor outcomes and are thought to relate to systemic inflammation. To investigate comorbidities in relation to systemic inflammation and outcomes we recorded comorbidities in a well characterized cohort (ECLIPSE study) for 2164 clinically stable COPD subjects, 337 smokers and 245 non-smokers with normal lung function. COPD patients had a higher prevalence of osteoporosis, anxiety/panic attacks, heart trouble, heart attack, and heart failure, than smokers or nonsmokers. Heart failure (Hazard Ratio [HR] 1.9, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.3-2.9), ischemic heart disease (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.0), heart disease (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-2.0), and diabetes (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.4) had increased odds of mortality when coexistent with COPD. Multiple comorbidities had accumulative effect on mortality. COPD and cardiovascular disease was associated with poorer quality of life, higher MRC dyspnea scores, reduced 6MWD, higher BODE index scores. Osteoporosis, hypertension and diabetes were associated with higher MRC dyspnea scores and reduced 6MWD. Higher blood concentrations of fibrinogen, IL-6 and IL-8 levels occurred in those with heart disease. Comorbidity is associated with poor clinical outcomes in COPD. The comorbidities of heart disease, hypertension and diabetes are associated with increased systemic inflammation.

  2. Psoriasis: classical and emerging comorbidities*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Duarte, Gleison Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease. Evidence shows an association of psoriasis with arthritis, depression, inflammatory bowel disease and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, several other comorbid conditions have been proposed as related to the chronic inflammatory status of psoriasis. The understanding of these conditions and their treatments will certainly lead to better management of the disease. The present article aims to synthesize the knowledge in the literature about the classical and emerging comorbidities related to psoriasis. PMID:25672294

  3. Psychiatric comorbidity in forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Palijan, Tija Zarković; Muzinić, Lana; Radeljak, Sanja

    2009-09-01

    For the past several years a numerous studies in the field of forensic psychiatry confirmed a close relationship between violent offenders and comorbid substance abuse. The comorbid substance abuse in violent offenders was usually unrecognized and misdiagnosed. Furthermore, comorbidity in forensic psychiatry describes the co-occurrence of two or more conditions or psychiatric disorder known in the literature as dual diagnosis and defined by World Health Organization (WHO). In fact, many violent offenders have multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Recent studies have confirmed causal relationship between major psychiatric disorders and concomitant substance abuse (comorbidity) in 50-80% of forensic cases. In general, there is a high level of psychiatric comorbidity in forensic patients with prevalence of personality disorders (50-90%), mood disorders (20-60%) and psychotic disorders (15-20%) coupled with substance abuse disorders. Moreover, the high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities could be found in mentally retarded individuals, as well as, in epileptic patients. Drugs and alcohol abuse can produce serious psychotoxic effects that may lead to extreme violent behavior and consequently to serious criminal offence such as physical assault, rape, armed robbery, attempted murder and homicide, all due to an altered brain function and generating psychotic-like symptoms. Studies have confirmed a significant statistical relevance in causal relationship between substance abuse and violent offences. In terms of forensic psychiatry, the comorbidity strongly contributes in the process of establishing psychiatric diagnosis of diminished mental capacity or insanity at the time of the offence in the course of clinical assessment and evaluation of violent offenders. Today, the primary focus of forensic psychiatry treatment services (in-patient or community) is management of the violent offenders with psychiatric comorbidity which requires a multilevel, evidence based approach to

  4. Usefulness of open lung biopsy in mechanically ventilated patients with undiagnosed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates: influence of comorbidities and organ dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seong Yong; Suh, Gee Young; Choi, Jae Chol; Koh, Won Jung; Lim, Si Young; Han, Joungho; Lee, Kyung Soo; Shim, Young Mog; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung

    2007-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of open lung biopsy (OLB) in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation for diffuse pulmonary infiltrates of unknown etiology. Methods This was a 10-year retrospective study in a 10-bed medical intensive care unit. The medical records of 36 ventilator-dependent patients who underwent OLB for the diagnosis of unknown pulmonary infiltrates from 1994 to 2004 were reviewed retrospectively. Data analyzed included demographic data, Charlson age–comorbidity score, number of organ dysfunctions, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, ventilation variables, and radiological patterns. Diagnostic yield, effect on subsequent treatment changes, and complications of OLB were also assessed. Results A specific clinico-pathologic diagnosis was obtained for 31 patients (86%). The most common diagnoses were interstitial pneumonia (n = 17, including 8 acute interstitial pneumonia) and viral pneumonia (n = 4). Therapeutic modifications were made in 64% of patients. Patients who received OLB less than 1 week after initiation of mechanical ventilation were more likely to survive (63% versus 11%; P = 0.018). There were no major complications associated with the procedure. Factors independently associated with survival were the Charlson age-comorbidity score, number of organ dysfunction and the PaO2/FiO2 ratio on the day of the OLB. Conclusion OLB can provide a specific diagnosis in many ventilator-dependent patients with undiagnosed pulmonary infiltrate. Early OLB seems to be useful in critically ill patients with isolated respiratory failure. PMID:17725820

  5. Comorbidity Cohort (2C) study: Cardiovascular disease severity and comorbid osteoarthritis in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Two of the commonest chronic diseases experienced by older people in the general population are cardiovascular diseases and osteoarthritis. These conditions also commonly co-occur, which is only partly explained by age. Yet, there have been few studies investigating specific a priori hypotheses in testing the comorbid interaction between two chronic diseases and related health and healthcare outcomes. It is also unknown whether the stage or severity of the chronic disease influences the comorbidity impact. The overall plan is to investigate the interaction between cardiovascular severity groups (hypertension, ischaemic heart disease and heart failure) and osteoarthritis comorbidity, and their longitudinal impact on health and healthcare outcomes relative to either condition alone. Methods From ten general practices participating in a research network, adults aged 40 years and over were sampled to construct eight exclusive cohort groups (n = 9,676). Baseline groups were defined on the basis of computer clinical diagnostic data in a 3-year time-period (between 2006 and 2009) as: (i) without cardiovascular disease or osteoarthritis (reference group), (ii) index cardiovascular disease groups (hypertension, ischaemic heart disease and heart failure) without osteoarthritis, (iii) index osteoarthritis group without cardiovascular disease, and (vi) index cardiovascular disease groups comorbid with osteoarthritis. There were three main phases to longitudinal follow-up. The first (survey population) was to invite cohorts to complete a baseline postal health questionnaire, with 10 monthly brief interval health questionnaires, and a final 12-month follow-up questionnaire. The second phase (linkage population) was to link the collected survey data to patient clinical records with consent for the 3-year time-period before baseline, during the 12-month survey period and the 12 months after final questionnaire (total 5 years). The third phase (denominator

  6. Genetic comorbidities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Saad, Mohamad; Noyce, Alastair J; Keller, Margaux F; Schrag, Anette; Bestwick, Jonathan P; Traynor, Bryan J; Gibbs, J Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G; Cookson, Mark R; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B

    2014-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a number of known genetic risk factors. Clinical and epidemiological studies have suggested the existence of intermediate factors that may be associated with additional risk of PD. We construct genetic risk profiles for additional epidemiological and clinical factors using known genome-wide association studies (GWAS) loci related to these specific phenotypes to estimate genetic comorbidity in a systematic review. We identify genetic risk profiles based on GWAS variants associated with schizophrenia and Crohn's disease as significantly associated with risk of PD. Conditional analyses adjusting for SNPs near loci associated with PD and schizophrenia or PD and Crohn's disease suggest that spatially overlapping loci associated with schizophrenia and PD account for most of the shared comorbidity, while variation outside of known proximal loci shared by PD and Crohn's disease accounts for their shared genetic comorbidity. We examine brain methylation and expression signatures proximal to schizophrenia and Crohn's disease loci to infer functional changes in the brain associated with the variants contributing to genetic comorbidity. We compare our results with a systematic review of epidemiological literature, while the findings are dissimilar to a degree; marginal genetic associations corroborate the directionality of associations across genetic and epidemiological data. We show a strong genetically defined level of comorbidity between PD and Crohn's disease as well as between PD and schizophrenia, with likely functional consequences of associated variants occurring in brain.

  7. Genetic comorbidities in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Mike A.; Saad, Mohamad; Noyce, Alastair J.; Keller, Margaux F.; Schrag, Anette; Bestwick, Jonathan P.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G.; Cookson, Mark R.; Morris, Huw R.; Williams, Nigel; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a number of known genetic risk factors. Clinical and epidemiological studies have suggested the existence of intermediate factors that may be associated with additional risk of PD. We construct genetic risk profiles for additional epidemiological and clinical factors using known genome-wide association studies (GWAS) loci related to these specific phenotypes to estimate genetic comorbidity in a systematic review. We identify genetic risk profiles based on GWAS variants associated with schizophrenia and Crohn's disease as significantly associated with risk of PD. Conditional analyses adjusting for SNPs near loci associated with PD and schizophrenia or PD and Crohn's disease suggest that spatially overlapping loci associated with schizophrenia and PD account for most of the shared comorbidity, while variation outside of known proximal loci shared by PD and Crohn's disease accounts for their shared genetic comorbidity. We examine brain methylation and expression signatures proximal to schizophrenia and Crohn's disease loci to infer functional changes in the brain associated with the variants contributing to genetic comorbidity. We compare our results with a systematic review of epidemiological literature, while the findings are dissimilar to a degree; marginal genetic associations corroborate the directionality of associations across genetic and epidemiological data. We show a strong genetically defined level of comorbidity between PD and Crohn's disease as well as between PD and schizophrenia, with likely functional consequences of associated variants occurring in brain. PMID:24057672

  8. Comorbidity in the Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Romdhane, L; Messaoud, O; Bouyacoub, Y; Kerkeni, E; Naouali, C; Cherif Ben Abdallah, L; Tiar, A; Charfeddine, C; Monastiri, K; Chabchoub, I; Hachicha, M; Tadmouri, G O; Romeo, G; Abdelhak, S

    2016-03-01

    Genetic diseases in the Tunisian population represent a real problem of public health as their spectrum encompasses more than 400 disorders. Their frequency and distribution in the country have been influenced by demographic, economic and social features especially consanguinity. In this article, we report on genetic disease association referred to as comorbidity and discuss factors influencing their expressivity. Seventy-five disease associations have been reported among Tunisian families. This comorbidity could be individual or familial. In 39 comorbid associations, consanguinity was noted. Twenty-one founder and 11 private mutations are the cause of 34 primary diseases and 13 of associated diseases. As the information dealing with this phenomenon is fragmented, we proposed to centralize it in this report in order to draw both clinicians' and researcher's attention on the occurrence of such disease associations in inbred populations as it makes genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis challenging even when mutations are known.

  9. How do COPD comorbidities affect ICU outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Ongel, Esra Akkutuk; Karakurt, Zuhal; Salturk, Cuneyt; Takir, Huriye Berk; Burunsuzoglu, Bunyamin; Kargin, Feyza; Ekinci, Gulbanu H; Mocin, Ozlem; Gungor, Gokay; Adiguzel, Nalan; Yilmaz, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) frequently require admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) for application of mechanical ventilation (MV). We aimed to determine whether comorbidities and clinical variables present at ICU admission are predictive of ICU mortality. Methods A retrospective, observational cohort study was performed in a tertiary teaching hospital’s respiratory ICU using data collected between January 2008 and December 2012. Previously diagnosed COPD patients who were admitted to the ICU with ARF were included. Patients’ demographics, comorbidities, body mass index (BMI), ICU admission data, application of noninvasive and invasive MV (NIV and IMV, respectively), cause of ARF, length of ICU and hospital stay, and mortality were recorded from their files. Patients were grouped according to mortality (survival versus non-survival), and all the variables were compared between the two groups. Results During the study period, a total of 1,013 COPD patients (749 male) with a mean age (standard deviation) of 70±10 years met the inclusion criteria. Comorbidities of the non-survival group (female/male, 40/131) were significantly higher compared with the survival group (female/male, 224/618): arrhythmia (24% vs 11%), hypertension (42% vs 34%), coronary artery disease (28% vs 11%), and depression (7% vs 3%) (P<0.001, P<0.035, P<0.001, and P<0.007, respectively). Logistic regression revealed the following mortality risk factors: need of IMV, BMI <20 kg/m2, pneumonia, coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, hypertension, chronic hypoxia, and higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores. The respective odds ratios, confidence intervals, and P-values for each of these were as follows: 27.7, 15.7–49.0, P<0.001; 6.6, 3.5–412.7, P<0.001; 5.1, 2.9–8.8, P<0.001; 2.9, 1.5–5.6, P<0.001; 2.7, 1.4–5.2, P<0.003; 2.6, 1.5–4.4, P<0.001; 2.2, 1.2–3.9, P<0

  10. The Psychiatric Comorbidity Hypothesis Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forness, Steven R.; Kavale, Kenneth A.; Bauman, Stephanie San Miguel

    1998-01-01

    The authors of an earlier article, which argued that the social skills deficits typically found in children with learning disabilities (LD) are largely due to the comorbidity of LD with psychiatric disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depressive disorder, respond to a critique that did not find this relationship…

  11. Comorbidity of Migraine with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Riise, Trond; Lund, Anders; Dilsaver, Steven C.; Hundal, Oivind; Oedegaard, Ketil J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate how often drugs used to treat migraine and ADHD are prescribed to the same patients to assess, indirectly, the comorbidity of these disorders. Method: We used data from the Norwegian prescription database for 2006, including the total Norwegian population (N = 4,640,219). Results:…

  12. Neuropsychopathological comorbidities in learning disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Learning Disorders (LD) are complex diseases that affect about 2-10% of the school-age population. We performed neuropsychological and psychopathological evaluation, in order to investigate comorbidity in children with LD. Methods Our sample consisted of 448 patients from 7 to 16 years of age with a diagnosis of LD, divided in two subgroups: Specific Learning Disorders (SLD), including reading, writing, mathematics disorders, and Learning Disorders Not Otherwise Specified (LD NOS). Results Comorbidity with neuropsychopathologies was found in 62.2% of the total sample. In the LSD subgroup, ADHD was present in 33%, Anxiety Disorder in 28.8%, Developmental Coordination Disorder in 17.8%, Language Disorder in 11% and Mood Disorder in 9.4% of patients. In LD NOS subgroup, Language Disorder was present in 28.6%, Developmental Coordination Disorder in 27.5%, ADHD in 25.4%, Anxiety Disorder in 16.4%, Mood Disorder in 2.1% of patients. A statistically significant presence was respectively found for Language and Developmental Coordination Disorder comorbidity in LD NOS and for ADHD, mood and anxiety disorder comorbidity in SLD subgroup. Conclusions The different findings emerging in this study suggested to promote further investigations to better define the difference between SLD and LD NOS, in order to improve specific interventions to reduce the long range consequences. PMID:24330722

  13. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19–75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  14. Examining the effects of comorbidities on disease-modifying therapy use in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tingting; Tremlett, Helen; Leung, Stella; Zhu, Feng; Kingwell, Elaine; Fisk, John D.; Bhan, Virender; Campbell, Trudy L.; Stadnyk, Karen; Yu, B. Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comorbidities are common in multiple sclerosis (MS) and adversely affect health outcomes. However, the effect of comorbidity on treatment decisions in MS remains unknown. We aimed to examine the effects of comorbidity on initiation of injectable disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) and on the choice of the initial DMT in MS. Methods: We conducted a retrospective observational analysis using population-based health administrative and linked clinical databases in 3 Canadian provinces. MS cases were defined as any individual with ≥3 diagnostic codes for MS. Cohort entry (index date) was the first recorded demyelinating disease-related claim. The outcomes included choice of initial first-line DMTs and time to initiating a DMT. Logistic and Cox regression models were used to examine the association between comorbidity status and study outcomes, adjusting for sex, age, year of index date, and socioeconomic status. Meta-analysis was used to estimate overall effects across the 3 provinces. Results: We identified 10,698 persons with incident MS, half of whom had ≥1 comorbidities. As the total number of comorbidities increased, the likelihood of initiating a DMT decreased. Comorbid anxiety and ischemic heart disease were associated with reduced initiation of a DMT. However, patients with depression were 13% more likely to initiate a DMT compared to those without depression at the index date (adjusted hazard ratio 1.13; 95% confidence interval 1.00–1.27). Conclusions: Comorbidities are associated with treatment decisions regarding DMTs in MS. A better understanding of the effects of comorbidity on effectiveness and safety of DMTs is needed. PMID:26944268

  15. Comorbidity of dementia: a cross-sectional study of primary care older patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidemiologic study of comorbidities of an index health problem represents a methodological challenge. This study cross-sectionally describes and analyzes the comorbidities associated with dementia in older patients and reviews the existing similarities and differences between identified comorbid diseases using the statistical methods most frequently applied in current research. Methods Cross-sectional study of 72,815 patients over 64 seen in 19 Spanish primary care centers during 2008. Chronic diseases were extracted from electronic health records and grouped into Expanded Diagnostic Clusters®. Three different statistical methods were applied (i.e., analysis of prevalence data, multiple regression and factor analysis), stratifying by sex. Results The two most frequent comorbidities both for men and women with dementia were hypertension and diabetes. Yet, logistic regression and factor analysis demonstrated that the comorbidities significantly associated with dementia were Parkinson’s disease, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, anemia, cardiac arrhythmia, chronic skin ulcers, osteoporosis, thyroid disease, retinal disorders, prostatic hypertrophy, insomnia and anxiety and neurosis. Conclusions The analysis of the comorbidities associated with an index disease (e.g., dementia) must not be exclusively based on prevalence rates, but rather on methodologies that allow the discovery of non-random associations between diseases. A deep and reliable knowledge about how different diseases are grouped and associated around an index disease such as dementia may orient future longitudinal studies aimed at unraveling causal associations. PMID:24645776

  16. Effect of Comorbidities on Outcomes of Neurorehabilitation Interventions in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fakolade, Afolasade; Bisson, Etienne J.; Pétrin, Julie; Lamarre, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interest in comorbidities has increased in the past few years, but the effect of comorbidities on outcomes of multiple sclerosis (MS) neurorehabilitation interventions is unclear. The aim of this review was to identify and summarize the existing evidence regarding the effect of comorbidities on outcomes of neurorehabilitation interventions targeting people with MS. Methods: Five databases (Embase, MEDLINE through Ovid, PubMed Central, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Web of Science) were searched using index terms and keywords relating to MS and a wide range of rehabilitation interventions. Studies screened were limited to English-language randomized controlled trials. Information related to included and excluded comorbidities and how they were reported and described was extracted from the included studies. Results: Fifty-four neurorehabilitation randomized controlled trials were included and were grouped into categories: robotics/technology-enhanced (n = 7), task-oriented training/neurorehabilitation principles (n = 7), electrical stimulation (n = 12), temperature regulation (n = 6), magnetic field therapy (n = 5), vibration (n = 9), and miscellaneous (n = 8). Although the issue of comorbidity was considered in 40 studies, it was limited to excluding individuals from participating in the trials. Only two studies reported on comorbidity, but neither examined the possible mediating or moderating effect of comorbidities on intervention outcomes. Conclusions: This review documents important knowledge gaps about the effect of comorbidity on neurorehabilitation outcomes and identifies a critical need for future studies to address this issue. Without this information, we limit our understanding of the mechanisms of comorbidity and its effects on relevant clinical and research outcomes specific to neurorehabilitation. PMID:27999522

  17. Binge Eating Disorder and Medical Comorbidities in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James E.; King, Wendy C.; Pories, Walter; Wolfe, Bruce; Flum, David R.; Spaniolas, Konstatinos; Bessler, Mark; Devlin, Michael; Marcus, Marsha D.; Kalarchian, Melissa; Engel, Scott; Khandelwal, Saurobh; Yanovski, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether binge eating disorder (BED) status is associated with medical comorbidities in obese adults scheduled for bariatric surgery. Method The study utilized Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 data obtained from 6 clinical centers around the United States. This is a well-phenotyped cohort of individuals who were evaluated within 30 days prior to their scheduled surgery using standardized protocols. In the cohort, 350 participants were classified as having BED and 1875 as not having BED (non-BED). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether BED status was independently related to medical comorbidities. As an exploratory analysis, significance was based on nominal P-values (p<.05). Holm-adjusted P-values were also reported. Results After adjusting for age, sex, education and body mass index, BED status was independently associated with 4 of 15 comorbidities (i.e., impaired glucose levels (odds ratio [OR]=1.45 (95%CI: 1.12–1.87), high triglycerides (OR=1.28 (95%CI: 1.002–1.63) and urinary incontinence (OR=1.30 (95%CI: 1.02,1.66) all being more common among the BED sample, and severe walking limitations being less common in the BED sample (OR=0.53 (95%CI: 0.29–0.96)). With further adjustment for psychiatric/emotional health indicators, BED status was independently associated with 3 comorbidities (impaired glucose levels (OR=1.36 (95%CI: 1.04–1.79), cardiovascular disease (OR=0.50 (95%CI: 0.30–0.86) and severe walking limitations (OR=0.38 (95%CI: 0.19–0.77)). However, Holm’s adjusted P-values for all variables were greater than .05. Discussion The results suggest the possibility of a contribution of BED to risk of specific medical comorbidities in severely obese adults. PMID:25778499

  18. [Compulsive buying and psychiatric comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Mueller, Astrid; Mühlhans, Barbara; Silbermann, Andrea; Müller, Ulrike; Mertens, Christian; Horbach, Thomas; Mitchell, James E; de Zwaan, Martina

    2009-08-01

    Compulsive buying is an excessive behavior that has begun to receive attention from researchers in recent years. The current study provides an overview of research on compulsive buying and examines the psychiatric co-morbidity in a German female treatment seeking compulsive buying sample in comparison with age and gender-matched normal buying control groups. Thirty women suffering from compulsive buying disorder, 30 community controls, and 30 bariatric surgery candidates were assessed with the German versions of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnoses (SCID). Women with compulsive buying disorder showed significantly higher prevalence rates of affective, anxiety, and eating disorders compared to community controls, and suffered significantly more often from affective and anxiety disorders compared to bariatric surgery candidates. The compulsive buying group presented with the highest rates of personality disorders, most commonly avoidant, depressive, obsessive-compulsive, and borderline personality disorder, and reported the highest prevalence rates of other impulse control disorders, especially for intermittent explosive disorder. The findings suggest an elevated psychiatric co-morbidity in patients with compulsive buying disorder.

  19. Comorbidities in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Amir; Zisman, Devy

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are often affected by numerous comorbidities that carry significant morbidity and mortality. Reported comorbidities include diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune eye disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, depression, and fibromyalgia. All health care providers for patients with PsA should recognize and monitor those comorbidities, as well as understand their effect on patient management to ensure an optimal clinical outcome. PMID:28178440

  20. Comorbidity of paraphilia and depression in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Haasen, Christian

    2010-01-25

    The comorbidity of paraphilia-related disorders and other psychiatric disorders is high, but the paraphilia-related disorder often remains untreated until patients seek help for the comorbid disorder. A case of a patient in Mexico with comorbid paraphilia and depressive disorder, who was effectively treated with antidepressive medication and psychotherapy, is reported. The effect of stigmatization of homosexuality on the access to care of persons with sexual disorders is discussed.

  1. Comorbidity of paraphilia and depression in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Haasen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The comorbidity of paraphilia-related disorders and other psychiatric disorders is high, but the paraphilia-related disorder often remains untreated until patients seek help for the comorbid disorder. A case of a patient in Mexico with comorbid paraphilia and depressive disorder, who was effectively treated with antidepressive medication and psychotherapy, is reported. The effect of stigmatization of homosexuality on the access to care of persons with sexual disorders is discussed. PMID:25478091

  2. Comorbid Conditions and Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mandeep; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Roger, Veronique L.; Lennon, Ryan J.; Spertus, John; Jahangir, Arshad; Holmes, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether adding comorbid conditions to a risk model can help predict in-hospital outcome and long-term mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Design Retrospective chart review Setting Academic medical center. Patients 7,659 patients who had 9,032 PCIs. Interventions PCI performed at Mayo Clinic between January 1, 1999, and June 30, 2004. Main Outcome Measures The Mayo Clinic Risk Score (MCRS) and the coronary artery disease (CAD)-specific index for determination of comorbid conditions in all patients. Results The mean MCRS score was 6.5±2.9. The CAD-specific index was 0 or 1 in 46%, 2 or 3 in 30%, and 4 or higher in 23%. The rate of in-hospital major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) increased with higher MCRS and CAD-specific index (Cochran-Armitage test, P<.001 for both models). The c-statistic for the MCRS for in-hospital MACE was 0.78; adding the CAD-specific index did not improve its discriminatory ability for in-hospital MACE (c-statistic=0.78; likelihood ratio test, P=.29). A total of 707 postdismissal deaths occurred after 7,253 successful procedures. The c-statistic for all-cause mortality was 0.69 for the MCRS model alone and 0.75 for the MCRS and CAD-specific indices together (likelihood ratio test, P<.001), indicating significant improvement in the discriminatory ability. Conclusions Addition of comorbid conditions to the MCRS adds significant prognostic information for postdismissal mortality but adds little prognostic information about in-hospital complications after PCI. Such health-status measures should be included in future risk stratification models that predict long-term mortality after PCI. PMID:17923464

  3. Comorbid insomnia and cognitive behavior therapy.

    PubMed

    Chand, Suma P

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia most commonly presents comorbidly in association with medical and psychiatric disorders. Comorbid insomnia, however, remains under treated in the majority of patients. Concerns about drug interactions, adverse events, and dependence as well as the assumption that treating the insomnia as a secondary presentation that will resolve when the primary condition improves are all factors that contribute to the under treatment of comorbid insomnia. This article presents the growing research evidence that highlights the benefits and importance of targeting the insomnia that presents comorbidly with medical and psychiatric conditions utilizing the nonpharmacological and effective treatment of cognitive behavior therapy.

  4. The Effects of Comorbidity on the Benefits and Harms of Treatment for Chronic Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Terri R.; O’Leary, John; Towle, Virginia; Goldstein, Mary K.; Trentelange, Mark; Martin, Deanna K.

    2014-01-01

    Background There are concerns about the potential for unintentional harms when clinical practice guidelines are applied to patients with multimorbidity. The objective was to summarize the evidence regarding the effect(s) of comorbidity on the outcomes of medication for an index chronic condition. Methods A systematic review was conducted of studies published in MEDLINE and Cochrane Trials before May 2012. The search strategy was constructed to identify articles indexed with “comorbidity” or a related term or by a given condition and one or more additional specified comorbid conditions. The search yielded 3252 articles, of which 37 passed the title/abstract screening process, and 22 were included after full-text review. An additional 23 articles were identified by screening the reference lists for included articles. Information was extracted on study design; population; therapy; comparison groups; outcome(s); main findings. Findings Indexing of articles was inconsistent, with no term for “multimorbidity,” and rare use of “comorbidity”. Only one article examined the effects of comorbidity per se, finding no benefit of tight control of DM among persons with high comorbidity, defined using a comorbidity index. The remainder examined pairs of conditions, the majority of which were post-hoc analyses of randomized controlled trials and which found no difference in outcomes according to whether a comorbid condition was present. Several demonstrated no difference or an increased risk of adverse outcome among persons with DM and tight control of HTN as compared to usual control. Several demonstrated lack of benefit of statins among persons with end-stage renal disease. Conclusions There is limited evidence regarding the effects of multiple comorbidities on treatment outcomes. The majority of studies demonstrated no effect of a single comorbid condition on outcomes. Additional studies examining a broad range of comorbidity are required, along with clear and

  5. The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease comorbidity spectrum in Japan differs from that in western countries.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Saeko; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-11-01

    Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) frequently suffer from various comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, depression, malnutrition, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and lung cancer. These comorbidities have a significant impact on disease severity and survival. In fact, guidelines from both the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and the Japanese Respiratory Society recommend that physicians take comorbidities into account when they evaluate COPD severity. These guidelines also emphasize the importance of managing comorbidities alongside airway obstruction in COPD. The mechanisms by which the many COPD-related comorbidities develop are still unclear. Aging and smoking are well-established as major factors. However, systemic inflammation may also contribute to the disease process. Having developed from the classical theory to differentiate COPD patients into "pink puffers" and "blue bloaters", COPD is now generally considered as a heterogeneous condition. On this point, we have noticed that the characteristics of Japanese COPD patients tend to differ from those of Westerners. Specifically, Japanese patients tend to be older, to have lower body mass index, to suffer from emphysema-dominant lung disease, and to experience exacerbations less frequently. The comorbidity spectrum of Japanese COPD patients also seems to differ from that of Westerners. For instance, in Japanese patients, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome are less prevalent, whereas osteoporosis and malnutrition are more frequent. In order to treat Japanese COPD patients optimally, we must pay particular attention to their unique demographics and comorbidity spectrum, which contrast with those of Western COPD patients.

  6. Assessing comorbidity using claims data: an overview.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, Carrie N; Warren, Joan L; Legler, Julie M

    2002-08-01

    Comorbidity, additional disease beyond the condition under study that increases a patient's total burden of illness, is one dimension of health status. For investigators working with observational data obtained from administrative databases, comorbidity assessment may be a useful and important means of accounting for differences in patients' underlying health status. There are multiple ways of measuring comorbidity. This paper provides an overview of current approaches to and issues in assessing comorbidity using claims data, with a particular focus on established indices and the SEER-Medicare database. In addition, efforts to improve measurement of comorbidity using claims data are described, including augmentation of claims data with medical record, patient self-report, or health services utilization data; incorporation of claims data from sources other than inpatient claims; and exploration of alternative conditions, indices, or ways of grouping conditions. Finally, caveats about claims data and areas for future research in claims-based comorbidity assessment are discussed. Although the use of claims databases such as SEER-Medicare for health services and outcomes research has become increasingly common, investigators must be cognizant of the limitations of comorbidity measures derived from these data sources in capturing and controlling for differences in patient health status. The assessment of comorbidity using claims data is a complex and evolving area of investigation.

  7. Treating Comorbid Anxiety and Aggression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Karyn; Hunt, Caroline; Heriot, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention that targeted both anxious and aggressive behaviors in children with anxiety disorders and comorbid aggression by parent report. Method: The effects of a cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention targeting comorbid anxiety and aggression problems were compared…

  8. Bipolar Disorder, Bipolar Depression and Comorbid Illness.

    PubMed

    Manning, J Sloan

    2015-06-01

    There is a substantial need for the early recognition and treatment of the psychiatric and medical comorbidities of bipolar disorder in primary care. If comorbid conditions are recognized and treated, serious adverse health outcomes may be averted, including substantial morbidity and mortality.

  9. [Affective disorders: endocrine and metabolic comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Cermolacce, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Links between affective and endocrine-metabolic disorders are numerous and complex. In this review, we explore most frequent endocrine-metabolic comorbidities. On the one hand, these comorbidities imply numerous iatrogenic effects from antipsychotics (metabolic side-effects) or from lithium (endocrine side-effects). On the other hand, these comorbidities are also associated with affective disorders independently from medication. We will successively examine metabolic syndrome, glycemic disturbances, obesity and thyroid disorders among patients with affective disorders. Endocrinemetabolic comorbidities can be individually encountered, but can also be associated. Therefore, they substantially impact morbidity and mortality by increasing cardiovascular risk factors. Two distinct approaches give an account of processes involved in these comorbidities: common environmental factors (iatrogenic effects, lifestyle), and/or shared physiological vulnerabilities. In conclusion, we provide a synthesis of important results and recommendations related to endocrine-metabolic comorbidities in affective disorders : heavy influence on morbidity and mortality, undertreatment of somatic diseases, importance of endocrine and metabolic side effects from main mood stabilizers, impact from sex and age on the prevalence of comorbidities, influence from previous depressive episodes in bipolar disorders, and relevance of systematic screening for subclinical (biological) disturbances.

  10. Co-Morbid Disorders in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mol Debes, Nanette M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is often accompanied by other symptoms and syndromes. The two best-known co-morbidities are Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), but also other conditions like rage-attacks, depression, and sleeping disturbances are frequent in persons with TS. Both in clinical cohorts and in population-based cohorts the prevalence of co-morbidities is high. The presence of co-morbid ADHD and/or OCD has an impact on psychosocial, educational, and neuropsychological consequences of TS and it is associated with higher rates of other co-morbid disorders, like rage, anxiety, and conduct disorders. The symptoms of a co-morbid disorder might appear prior to the time that tics reach clinical attention. The TS phenotype probably changes during the course of the disease. The exact aetiology of the co-occurrence of co-morbid disorders and TS is not known, but they probably all are neurotransmitter disorders. European guidelines recommend first-choice pharmacological treatment, but randomised double-blinded trials are needed. Professionals need to be aware of the close relationship between TS and co-morbidities in order to give the patients the right treatment and support. PMID:23187139

  11. Impact of patient comorbidities on head and neck microvascular reconstruction. A report on 423 cases.

    PubMed

    Vandersteen, Clair; Dassonville, Olivier; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Poissonnet, Gilles; Nao, Eric Edi Martial; Pierre, Cédric Sandy; Leyssale, Axel; Peyrade, Frédéric; Falewee, Marie Noelle; Sudaka, Anne; Haudebourg, Juliette; Demard, François; Santini, José; Bozec, Alexandre

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the different subtypes of patient comorbidities on the outcomes of head and neck microvascular reconstruction. A total of 423 patients who underwent head and neck free flap reconstruction in our institution between 2000 and 2010 were included in this retrospective study. The impact of the different subtypes of patient comorbidities (as defined by the Kaplan-Feinstein Index) and other global health status-related factors on free flap success, local and general complications, postoperative mortality and length of stay was assessed in univariate and multivariate analysis. We found no correlation between patient comorbidities and free flap failure. In multivariate analysis, we demonstrated a significant correlation between tobacco consumption (p = 0.04) and local complications. Gastro-intestinal comorbidity (p = 0.005) and malnutrition (p = 0.02) were associated with a higher risk of fistula formation. Diabetes mellitus (p = 0.003), gastro-intestinal (p = 0.02), systemic (p = 0.02) and cardiac comorbidities (p = 0.03) were significant predictors of medical complications. We concluded that the different subtypes of patient comorbidities were relevant predictors of complications in head and neck microvascular reconstruction.

  12. The incorporation of comorbidities in the prognostication of patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Falantes, Jose F; Márquez-Malaver, Francisco J; Knight, Teresa; Calderón-Cabrera, Cristina; Martino, María L; González, Jose; Montero, Isabel; Espigado, Ildefonso; Pérez-Simón, Jose A

    2017-08-01

    Chronic medical diseases, evaluated by several comorbidities indexes have been reported to influence on overall survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, these studies included patients with lower and higher-risk disease by IPSS. This study retrospectively evaluates the role of comorbidities (evaluated by the MDS comorbidity index; MDS-CI) together with clinical parameters in a series of 232 patients with LR-MDS (defined as either an IPSS score of low/intermediate-1 and favorable cytogenetic categories by IPSS-R). In multivariate analysis, together with age >75 years, diabetes requiring therapy and hemoglobin <10 g/dL; the incorporation of comorbidities by the MDS-CI (HR = 2.5; p< 0.0001) were independently associated to the probability of nonleukemic death (NLD). The combination of these variables allowed development of a model, which categorizes patients in three different groups with significantly different probability of NLD overtime (p< 0.001). This integrated score confirms the importance of comorbidities at diagnosis of patients with LR-MDS.

  13. Impact of Comorbid Anxiety and Depressive Disorders on Treatment Response to Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Lynda; Harvey, Allison G.; Fortier-Brochu, Émilie; Beaulieu-Bonneau, Simon; Eidelman, Polina; Talbot, Lisa; Ivers, Hans; Hein, Kerrie; Lamy, Manon; Soehner, Adriane M.; Mérette, Chantal; Morin, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of comorbid anxiety or depressive disorders on treatment response to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for insomnia, behavior therapy (BT), or cognitive therapy (CT). Method Participants were 188 adults (117 women; M age = 47.4 years) with chronic insomnia, including 45 also presenting a comorbid anxiety or mild to moderate depressive disorder. They were randomized to BT (n = 63), CT (n = 65), or CBT (n = 60). Outcome measures were the proportion of treatment responders (decrease of ≥ 8 points on the Insomnia Severity Index; ISI) and remissions (ISI score < 8) and depression and anxiety symptoms. Results Proportion of treatment responders and remitters in the CBT condition was not significantly different between the subgroups with and without comorbidity. However, the proportion of responders was lower in the comorbidity subgroup compared to those without comorbidity in both the BT (34.4% vs 81.6%; p=0.007) and CT (23.6% vs 57.6%; p=0.02) alone conditions, although remission rates and pre-post ISI change scores were not. Pre to post change scores on the depression (−10.6 vs −3.9; p<0.001) and anxiety measures (−9.2 vs −2.5; p=.01) were significantly greater in the comorbidity subgroup relative to the subgroup without comorbidity but only for those treated with the full CBT; no difference was found for those treated with either BT or CT alone. Conclusions The presence of a comorbid anxiety or mild to moderate depressive disorder did not reduce the efficacy of CBT for insomnia, but it did for its single BT and CT components when used alone. PMID:26963600

  14. Binge‐eating disorder in the Swedish national registers: Somatic comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Laura M.; Watson, Hunna J.; Jangmo, Andreas; Welch, Elisabeth; Wiklund, Camilla; von Hausswolff‐Juhlin, Yvonne; Norring, Claes; Herman, Barry K.; Larsson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate associations between binge‐eating disorder (BED) and somatic illnesses and determine whether medical comorbidities are more common in individuals who present with BED and comorbid obesity. Method Cases (n = 850) were individuals with a BED diagnosis in the Swedish eating disorders quality registers. Ten community controls were matched to each case on sex, and year, month, and county of birth. Associations of BED status with neurologic, immune, respiratory, gastrointestinal, skin, musculoskeletal, genitourinary, circulatory, and endocrine system diseases were evaluated using conditional logistic regression models. We further examined these associations by adjusting for lifetime psychiatric comorbidity. Amongst individuals with BED, we explored whether comorbid obesity was associated with risk of somatic disorders. Results BED was associated with most classes of diseases evaluated; strongest associations were with diabetes [odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 5.7 (3.8; 8.7)] and circulatory systems [1.9 (1.3; 2.7)], likely indexing components of metabolic syndrome. Amongst individuals with BED, those with comorbid obesity were more likely to have a lifetime history of respiratory [1.5 (1.1; 2.1)] and gastrointestinal [2.6 (1.7; 4.1)] diseases than those without comorbid obesity. Increased risk of some somatic disease classes in individuals with BED was not simply due to obesity or other lifetime psychiatric comorbidity. Discussion The association of BED with many somatic illnesses highlights the morbidity experienced by individuals with BED. Clinicians treating patients with BED should be vigilant for medical comorbidities. Nonpsychiatric providers may be the first clinical contact for those with BED underscoring the importance of screening in primary care. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Eating Disorders Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:58–65) PMID:27642179

  15. Implications of Psychiatric Comorbidity Among Combat Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    187-97. 30. Feinstein AR: The pre-therapeutic classification of co-morbidity in chronic disease . J Chron Dis 1970; 23: 455-68. 31. Maj M: ’Psychiatric...their medical records included an International Classification of Diseases , Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnostic code between 290.00 and...during the clinical course of . . . disease " (p. 456).^° In recent years, it has been argued that the reported rates of psychiatric comorbidity have

  16. Psychiatric comorbidities of episodic and chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Buse, Dawn C; Silberstein, Stephen D; Manack, Aubrey N; Papapetropoulos, Spyros; Lipton, Richard B

    2013-08-01

    Migraine is a prevalent disabling neurological disorder associated with a wide range of medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Population- and clinic-based studies suggest that psychiatric comorbidities, particularly mood and anxiety disorders, are more common among persons with chronic migraine than among those with episodic migraine. Additional studies suggest that psychiatric comorbidities may be a risk factor for migraine chronification (i.e., progression from episodic to chronic migraine). It is important to identify and appropriately treat comorbid psychiatric conditions in persons with migraine, as these conditions may contribute to increased migraine-related disability and impact, diminished health-related quality of life, and poor treatment outcomes. Here, we review the current literature on the rates of several psychiatric comorbidities, including depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder, among persons with migraine in clinic- and population-based studies. We also review the link between physical, emotional, and substance abuse, psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Finally, we review the data on psychiatric risk factors for migraine chronification and explore theories and evidence underlying the comorbidity between migraine and these psychiatric disorders.

  17. Clinical Phenotypes and Comorbidity in European Sleep Apnoea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saaresranta, Tarja; Hedner, Jan; Bonsignore, Maria R.; Riha, Renata L.; McNicholas, Walter T.; Penzel, Thomas; Anttalainen, Ulla; Kvamme, John Arthur; Pretl, Martin; Sliwinski, Pawel; Verbraecken, Johan; Grote, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical presentation phenotypes of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and their association with comorbidity as well as impact on adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment have not been established. Methods A prospective follow-up cohort of adult patients with OSA (apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of ≥5/h) from 17 European countries and Israel (n = 6,555) was divided into four clinical presentation phenotypes based on daytime symptoms labelled as excessive daytime sleepiness (“EDS”) and nocturnal sleep problems other than OSA (labelled as “insomnia”): 1) EDS (daytime+/nighttime-), 2) EDS/insomnia (daytime+/nighttime+), 3) non-EDS/non-insomnia (daytime-/nighttime-), 4) and insomnia (daytime-/nighttime+) phenotype. Results The EDS phenotype comprised 20.7%, the non-EDS/non-insomnia type 25.8%, the EDS/insomnia type 23.7%, and the insomnia phenotype 29.8% of the entire cohort. Thus, clinical presentation phenotypes with insomnia symptoms were dominant with 53.5%, but only 5.6% had physician diagnosed insomnia. Cardiovascular comorbidity was less prevalent in the EDS and most common in the insomnia phenotype (48.9% vs. 56.8%, p<0.001) despite more severe OSA in the EDS group (AHI 35.0±25.5/h vs. 27.9±22.5/h, p<0.001, respectively). Psychiatric comorbidity was associated with insomnia like OSA phenotypes independent of age, gender and body mass index (HR 1.5 (1.188–1.905), p<0.001). The EDS phenotype tended to associate with higher CPAP usage (22.7 min/d, p = 0.069) when controlled for age, gender, BMI and sleep apnoea severity. Conclusions Phenotypes with insomnia symptoms comprised more than half of OSA patients and were more frequently linked with comorbidity than those with EDS, despite less severe OSA. CPAP usage was slightly higher in phenotypes with EDS. PMID:27701416

  18. Neuroinflammation and Comorbidity of Pain and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Kavelaars, A.; Heijnen, C. J.; Dantzer, R.

    2014-01-01

    Comorbid depression and chronic pain are highly prevalent in individuals suffering from physical illness. Here, we critically examine the possibility that inflammation is the common mediator of this comorbidity, and we explore the implications of this hypothesis. Inflammation signals the brain to induce sickness responses that include increased pain and negative affect. This is a typical and adaptive response to acute inflammation. However, chronic inflammation induces a transition from these typical sickness behaviors into depression and chronic pain. Several mechanisms can account for the high comorbidity of pain and depression that stem from the precipitating inflammation in physically ill patients. These mechanisms include direct effects of cytokines on the neuronal environment or indirect effects via downregulation of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2, activation of the tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase that generates neurotropic kynurenine metabolites, increased brain extracellular glutamate, and the switch of GABAergic neurotransmission from inhibition to excitation. Despite the existence of many neuroimmune candidate mechanisms for the co-occurrence of depression and chronic pain, little work has been devoted so far to critically assess their mediating role in these comorbid symptoms. Understanding neuroimmune mechanisms that underlie depression and pain comorbidity may yield effective pharmaceutical targets that can treat both conditions simultaneously beyond traditional antidepressants and analgesics. PMID:24335193

  19. Pharmacotherapy treatment of PTSD and comorbid disorders.

    PubMed

    Kozarić-Kovacić, Dragica

    2009-09-01

    Comorbity is very high in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients. PTSD is very often complicated with depressive disorder, substance abuse, other anxiety disorders, personality disorders, psychotic features, etc. There have been few pharmacotherapy studies in this complicated field. In the past few years the literature on pharmacotherapy treatment for PTSD and comorbidity has arisen. From empirical evidence (level A) exist three sertraline studies in PTSD comorbid with: 1) anxiety, 2) depression, and 3) anxiety and depression, and one risperidone study in PTSD comorbid with psychotic symptoms. From empirical evidence (level B) exist two disulfiram, naltrexone, and their combination studies in patients with PTSD comorbid with alcohol dependence and one paroxetine or bupropion versus cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) versus community mental health referral study in PTSD women outpatients with major depressive disorder. The results from our label trials in the Croatian war veterans with chronic PTSD comorbid with psychotic features treated with novel antipsychotics (olanzapine, risperidone, or quetiapine) are promising. In the future more rigorously designed, comparative studies are needed to determine the usefulness, efficacy, tolerability, and safety of particular psychopharmaceutical drugs in the treatment of this therapeutically and functionally challenging disorder, especially the trials from level A.

  20. Comorbidity profile of poliomyelitis survivors in a Chinese population: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2011-06-01

    Previous reports of comorbid conditions in poliomyelitis survivors mainly focused on some disease categories, such as respiratory diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, psychiatric diseases, neurological diseases and cancer. Data regarding a wide spectrum of medical comorbidities in patients with poliomyelitis is still sparse. This study aimed to investigate and profile the wide range of comorbidities among the survivors of paralytic poliomyelitis in a Chinese population. In total, 2,032 paralytic poliomyelitis patients were selected as the study group and the comparison group consisted of 10,160 randomly selected enrollees. The comorbidities for analysis were based on a modified version of the Elixhauser Comorbidity Index. Conditional logistic regression analyses were computed to investigate the risk of comorbidities for these two groups. As compared to controls, patients with paralytic poliomyelitis had significantly higher prevalence of hypertension, ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, peripheral vascular disorder, stroke, paralysis, migraines, Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, pulmonary circulation disorders, chronic pulmonary disease, liver disease, peptic ulcers, hepatitis B or C, deficiency anemias, depression, and lymphoma. Most of the differences are of clinical interest, ORs often being between 2 and 3. No significant difference between poliomyelitis patients and controls was observed in the prevalence of SLE, tuberculosis, alcohol abuse and drug abuse. Our findings demonstrate that survivors of paralytic poliomyelitis in Taiwan are at higher risk of having multiple medical comorbidities although some potential confounding factors including educational level, marital status, obesity and physical activity are not available in our database. The pattern is generally consistent with previous observations from Western populations. Nevertheless, we found several novel associations

  1. Pain and depression comorbidity: a preclinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Pain and depression are two highly prevalent and deleterious disorders with significant socioeconomic impact to society. Clinical observations have long recognized the co-existence and interactions of pain and depression. However, the underlying mechanisms of pain-depression comorbidity and their dynamic interactions remain largely unknown. Preclinical animal studies may provide critical information for the understanding of this important comorbidity. This review analyzed the current preclinical evidence of interactions between pain and depression, which generally supports the causative relationship of the two conditions. In addition, the analysis proposed to apply domain interplay concept in future model development of pain-depression comorbidity and mechanism studies. The application of spectrum-centered animal models will better the understanding of pain-depression dyad and foster the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:24797835

  2. Asperger's syndrome: diagnosis, comorbidity and therapy.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, F I; Sahli, Z T; Pleskow, J; Mousa, S A

    2015-03-01

    Asperger's syndrome (AS), a behavioral disorder that is related to autism, is associated with abnormal social functioning and repetitive behaviors but not with a decrease in intelligence or linguistic functionality. This article reviews the clinical diagnosis of AS and discusses the comorbid disorders that may be present with AS, as well as the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pharmacotherapies given to AS patients, as reported in preclinical and clinical studies. AS may be present with several comorbid disorders including: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and Tourette's syndrome. The difficulty in distinguishing AS from autism results in treating the comorbid disorder symptoms, rather than treating the symptoms of AS. Accordingly, there is a great need to further understand the psychobiology of AS and its association with other disorders, which should expand the pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic options and improve the quality of life for AS patients.

  3. Fatigue and Comorbidities in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fiest, Kirsten M.; Fisk, John D.; Patten, Scott B.; Tremlett, Helen; Wolfson, Christina; Warren, Sharon; McKay, Kyla A.; Berrigan, Lindsay I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Fatigue is commonly reported by people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Comorbidity is also common in MS, but its association with the presence of fatigue or fatigue changes over time is poorly understood. Methods: Nine hundred forty-nine people with definite MS were recruited from four Canadian centers. The Fatigue Impact Scale for Daily Use and a validated comorbidity questionnaire were completed at three visits over 2 years. Participants were classified into groups with no fatigue versus any fatigue. Logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between fatigue and each comorbidity at baseline, year 1, year 2, and overall. Results: The incidence of fatigue during the study was 38.8%. The prevalence of fatigue was greater in those who were older (P = .0004), had a longer time since symptom onset (P = .005), and had greater disability (P < .0001). After adjustment, depression (odds ratio [OR], 2.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.03–3.27), irritable bowel syndrome (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.18–2.48), migraine (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.27–2.27), and anxiety (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.15–2.16) were independently associated with fatigue that persisted during the study. There was also an individual-level effect of depression on worsening fatigue (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.08–2.07). Conclusions: Comorbidity is associated with fatigue in MS. Depression is associated with fatigue and with increased risk of worsening fatigue over 2 years. However, other comorbid conditions commonly associated with MS are also associated with persistent fatigue, even after accounting for depression. Further investigation is required to understand the mechanisms by which comorbidities influence fatigue. PMID:27134583

  4. Comorbidities impacting on prognosis after lung transplant.

    PubMed

    Vaquero Barrios, José Manuel; Redel Montero, Javier; Santos Luna, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of the clinical circumstances presenting before lung transplant that may have negative repercussions on the long and short-term prognosis of the transplant. Methods for screening and diagnosis of common comorbidities with negative impact on the prognosis of the transplant are proposed, both for pulmonary and extrapulmonary diseases, and measures aimed at correcting these factors are discussed. Coordination and information exchange between referral centers and transplant centers would allow these comorbidities to be detected and corrected, with the aim of minimizing the risks and improving the life expectancy of transplant receivers.

  5. Parkinson disease and comorbid cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nanhoe-Mahabier, Wandana; de Laat, Karlijn F; Visser, Jasper E; Zijlmans, Jan; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2009-10-01

    Optimal management of chronic diseases not only requires tackling of the primary disease processes, but also necessitates timely recognition and treatment of comorbid conditions. In this article, we illustrate this two-pronged approach for two common age-related disorders: Parkinson disease (PD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD). We first discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms that could provide a link between PD and CVD. Patients with PD have a series of risk factors that could promote development of CVD, but also have several protective factors. We then review the available clinical, radiological and neuropathological evidence to support an association between these two conditions. We conclude by discussing the potential implications for clinical practice, highlighting how comorbid CVD could alter the clinical presentation of PD and reviewing the possibilities for prevention and secondary prophylaxis. Additional research will be needed to fully evaluate the prevalence and clinical relevance of comorbid CVD in PD. Pending further evidence, we recommend that cerebral neuroimaging should be considered if patients with initially uncomplicated PD develop-either acutely or chronically-prominent and/or treatment-resistant gait impairment, postural instability, depression, cognitive decline, or urinary incontinence. Finding comorbid CVD in such patients could have prognostic implications, and could necessitate treatment to arrest further progression of CVD.

  6. Co-Morbidity of Conditions among Prisoners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinkfield, Alison J.; Graffam, J.; Meneilly, Sharn

    2009-01-01

    Eighty seven adult prisoners (58 males, 29 females) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and a questionnaire on current health in order to examine both the prevalence of co-morbid conditions and the relation of depression and anxiety to ill-health and prior substance use. High prevalence rates of…

  7. The psychiatric comorbidities of cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S

    2013-02-01

    Although the comorbidity of migraine has been extensively studied, the relationships between cluster headache and psychiatric disease have not been well-addressed. In this review the available literature concerning cluster headache and depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, aggression, suicide, and their implications are discussed. Potential mechanisms, confounding variables, and unanswered questions are also addressed.

  8. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Gender Dysphoric Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Annelou L. C.; Doreleijers, Theo A. H.; Steensma, Thomas D.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examined psychiatric comorbidity in adolescents with a gender identity disorder (GID). We focused on its relation to gender, type of GID diagnosis and eligibility for medical interventions (puberty suppression and cross-sex hormones). Methods: To ascertain DSM-IV diagnoses, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children…

  9. [Diabetic co-morbidities: prevalences in Germany].

    PubMed

    Heller, T; Blum, M; Spraul, M; Wolf, G; Müller, U A

    2014-04-01

    In some patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) chronic hyperglycemia leads to microvascular complications in retina, kidney and nerves. Concerning missing data from Germany cited prevalence in German educational books and guidelines arise from other countries. This review demonstrates the prevalence of diabetic comorbidities in Germany. The largest investigation in Germany is the Disease-Management-Programm Nordrhein with more than 450.000 surveyed DM  patients. These researches show good comparability with most analyses respective to the prevalence of diabetic comorbidities in Germany. Patients with DM2 have a mean Hba1c of 7 % and patients with DM1 of 7.9 %. In patients with DM2 the prevalence of retinopathy is 11 %, nephropathy 10 % and neuropathy 20 %. Co-morbidities are more commonin patients with long diabetes duration and high HbA1c. In patients with DM1 the prevalence of retinopathy is 25 %, of nephropathy 15 % and neuropathy 27 %. The prevalence of diabetic co-morbidities in primary care in Germany is considerably lower as mentioned in educational books or guidelines. This positive development is reasonable through a better quality of care, nationwide early detection examinations and training programmes.

  10. Psychiatric Disorders, Comorbidity, and Suicidality in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Guilherme; Nock, Matthew K.; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior studies have reported that psychiatric disorders are among the strongest predictors of suicidal behavior (i.e., suicide ideation, plans, and attempts). However, surprisingly little is known about the independent associations between each disorder and each suicidal behavior due to a failure to account for comorbidity. Methods This study used data from a representative sample of 5,782 respondents participating in the Mexican National Comorbidity Survey (2001–2002) to examine the unique associations between psychiatric disorders and suicidality. Results A prior psychiatric disorder was present in 48.8% of those with a suicide ideation and in 65.2% of those with an attempt. Discrete-time survival models adjusting for comorbidity revealed that conduct disorder and alcohol abuse/dependence were the strongest predictors of a subsequent suicide attempt. Most disorders predicted suicidal ideation but few predicted the transition from ideation to a suicide plan or attempt. Limitations M-NCS is a household survey that excluded homeless and institutionalized people, andthe diagnostic instrument used did not include an assessment of all DSM-IV disorders which would increase the comorbidity discussed here. Conclusions These results reveal a complex pattern of associations in which diverse psychiatric disorders impact different parts of the pathway to suicide attempts. These findings will help inform clinical and public health efforts aimed at suicide prevention in Mexico and other developing countries. PMID:19926141

  11. Autism Parenting Stress Index: Initial Psychometric Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Louisa M. T.; Schalock, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Data validating the Autism Parenting Stress Index (APSI) is presented for 274 children under age six. Cronbach's alpha was 0.827. As a measure of parenting stress specific to core and co-morbid symptoms of autism, the APSI is unique. It is intended for use by clinicians to identify areas where parents need support with parenting skills, and to…

  12. Trajectory in obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities.

    PubMed

    de Mathis, Maria Alice; Diniz, Juliana B; Hounie, Ana G; Shavitt, Roseli G; Fossaluza, Victor; Ferrão, Ygor; Leckman, James F; de Bragança Pereira, Carlos; do Rosario, Maria Conceição; Miguel, Eurípedes C

    2013-07-01

    The main goal of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the trajectory of comorbid disorders associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) according to the first manifested psychiatric disorder and its impact in the clinical course of OCD and subsequent psychiatric comorbidities. One thousand and one OCD patients were evaluated at a single time point. Standardized instruments were used to determine the current and lifetime psychiatric diagnoses (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I and for impulse-control disorders) as well as to establish current obsessive-compulsive, depressive and anxiety symptom severity (Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale; Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories and the OCD Natural History Questionnaire). To analyze the distribution of comorbidities according to age at onset Bayesian approach was used. Five hundred eight patients had the first OC symptom onset till the age of 10 years old. The first comorbidity to appear in the majority of the sample was separation anxiety disorder (17.5%, n=175), followed by ADHD (5.0%, n=50) and tic disorders (4.4%, n=44). OCD patients that presented with separation anxiety disorder as first diagnosis had higher lifetime frequency of post-traumatic stress disorder (p=0.003), higher scores in the Sexual/Religious dimension (p=0.04), Beck Anxiety (p<0.001) and Depression (p=0.005) Inventories. OCD patients that initially presented with ADHD had higher lifetime frequencies of substance abuse and dependence (p<0.001) and worsening OCD course (p=0.03). OCD patients that presented with tic disorders as first diagnosis had higher lifetime frequencies of OC spectrum disorders (p=0.03). OCD is a heterogeneous disorder and that the presence of specific comorbid diagnoses that predate the onset of OCD may influence its clinical presentation and course over the lifetime.

  13. Psychiatric Comorbidities among Female Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Lenz, Klaus; Simmendinger, Nicole; Klinkowski, Nora; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Pfeiffer, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated current comorbid Axis I diagnoses associated with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) in adolescents. The sample included 101 female adolescents treated at a psychiatric unit for primary DSM-IV diagnoses of AN. 73.3% of the AN patients were diagnosed as having a current comorbidity of at least one comorbid Axis I diagnosis, with no…

  14. Comorbidity in youth with specific phobias: Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome and the impact of treatment on comorbid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ollendick, Thomas H.; Öst, Lars-Göran; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Costa, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. In an analysis of data from an existing randomized control trial of brief cognitive behavioral treatment on specific phobias (One-Session Treatment, OST; Ollendick et al., 2009), we examined 1) the effect of comorbid specific phobias and other anxiety disorders on treatment outcomes, and 2) the effect of treatment of the specific phobia on these co-occurring disorders. These relations were explored in 100 youth presenting with animal, natural environment, situational, and “other” types of phobia. Youth were reliably diagnosed with the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV: Child and Parent versions (Silverman & Albano, 1996). Clinician Severity Ratings at post-treatment and 6-month follow-up were examined as were parent and child treatment outcome satisfaction measures. Results indicated that the presence of comorbid phobias or anxiety disorders did not affect treatment outcomes; moreover, treatment of the targeted specific phobias led to significant reductions in the clinical severity of other co-occurring specific phobias and related anxiety disorders. These findings speak to the generalization of the effects of this time-limited treatment approach. Implications for treatment of principal and comorbid disorders are discussed, and possible mechanisms for these effects are commented upon. PMID:20573338

  15. Comorbidity in youth with specific phobias: Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome and the impact of treatment on comorbid disorders.

    PubMed

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Ost, Lars-Göran; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Costa, Natalie

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. In an analysis of data from an existing randomized control trial of brief cognitive behavioral treatment on specific phobias (One-Session Treatment, OST; Ollendick et al., 2009), we examined 1) the effect of comorbid specific phobias and other anxiety disorders on treatment outcomes, and 2) the effect of treatment of the specific phobia on these co-occurring disorders. These relations were explored in 100 youth presenting with animal, natural environment, situational, and "other" types of phobia. Youth were reliably diagnosed with the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV: Child and Parent versions (Silverman & Albano, 1996). Clinician severity ratings at post-treatment and 6-month follow-up were examined as were parent and child treatment outcome satisfaction measures. Results indicated that the presence of comorbid phobias or anxiety disorders did not affect treatment outcomes; moreover, treatment of the targeted specific phobias led to significant reductions in the clinical severity of other co-occurring specific phobias and related anxiety disorders. These findings speak to the generalization of the effects of this time-limited treatment approach. Implications for treatment of principal and comorbid disorders are discussed, and possible mechanisms for these effects are commented upon.

  16. High Loading of Polygenic Risk for ADHD in Children With Comorbid Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Hamshere, Marian L.; Langley, Kate; Martin, Joanna; Agha, Sharifah Shameem; Stergiakouli, Evangelia; Anney, Richard J.L.; Buitelaar, Jan; Faraone, Stephen V.; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Neale, Benjamin M.; Franke, Barbara; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Asherson, Philip; Merwood, Andrew; Kuntsi, Jonna; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Roeyers, Herbert; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa E.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; McGough, James J.; Kent, Lindsey; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael J.; Holmans, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is highly heritable, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yet identified any common genetic variants that contribute to risk. There is evidence that aggression or conduct disorder in children with ADHD indexes higher genetic loading and clinical severity. The authors examine whether common genetic variants considered en masse as polygenic scores for ADHD are especially enriched in children with comorbid conduct disorder. Method Polygenic scores derived from an ADHD GWAS meta-analysis were calculated in an independent ADHD sample (452 case subjects, 5,081 comparison subjects). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were employed to compare polygenic scores in the ADHD and comparison groups and test for higher scores in ADHD case subjects with comorbid conduct disorder relative to comparison subjects and relative to those without comorbid conduct disorder. Association with symptom scores was tested using linear regression. Results Polygenic risk for ADHD, derived from the meta-analysis, was higher in the independent ADHD group than in the comparison group. Polygenic score was significantly higher in ADHD case subjects with conduct disorder relative to ADHD case subjects without conduct disorder. ADHD polygenic score showed significant association with comorbid conduct disorder symptoms. This relationship was explained by the aggression items. Conclusions Common genetic variation is relevant to ADHD, especially in individuals with comorbid aggression. The findings suggest that the previously published ADHD GWAS meta-analysis contains weak but true associations with common variants, support for which falls below genome-wide significance levels. The findings also highlight the fact that aggression in ADHD indexes genetic as well as clinical severity. PMID:23599091

  17. Does Comorbid Obesity Impact Quality of Life Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Endoscopic Sinus Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Toby O.; Mace, Jess C.; Deconde, Adam S.; Xiao, Christopher C.; Storck, Kristina A.; Gudis, David A.; Schlosser, Rodney J.; Soler, Zachary M.; Smith, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Both obesity and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) are characterized by inflammation. Furthermore, both disease processes are independently associated with decreases in quality-of-life (QOL). We sought to investigate the role of comorbid obesity in QOL outcomes in CRS patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Methods Adult patients with medically refractory CRS (n=241) were prospectively enrolled into a multi-institutional treatment outcomes investigation. Body mass index (BMI) calculations were used to differentiate patient weight groups (normal weight: 18.5–24.9, overweight: 25.0–29.9; and obese: ≥30.0). Preoperative and postoperative QOL (Rhinosinusitis Disability Index (RSDI) and the 22-item Sinonasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22)) were evaluated compared across BMI groups and obesity subclasses. Results The prevalence of comorbid obesity was 41% (n=99). Higher prevalence of comorbid disease was found across increasing BMI groups including diabetes mellitus, asthma, and depression. No significant differences were found in mean preoperative QOL measures between any BMI groups. Significant improvement between preoperative and postoperative QOL mean scores (p≤0.050) was found for all BMI groups. Despite no significant difference in mean QOL improvement between BMI groups (p≥0.142), overweight and obese patients reported reduced relative mean percentage (%) improvement compared to normal weight participants on the RSDI total score (33% and 37% vs. 55%, respectively) and SNOT-22 total score (29% and 40% vs. 48%, respectively). Conclusions Patients with comorbid obesity experience significant improvement in average QOL gains following ESS though the percentage of relative improvement in QOL may be decreased in patients with comorbid obesity and CRS as compared to those without. PMID:26201473

  18. The Comorbidity of Diabetes Mellitus and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Katon, Wayne J.

    2009-01-01

    Several factors, including sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and an aging population, contribute to epidemic rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Depression frequently occurs comorbidly with diabetes although it is unrecognized and untreated in approximately two thirds of patients with both conditions. The course of depression in patients with both diabetes and depression is chronic and severe. Up to 80% of patients with diabetes and depression will experience a relapse of depressive symptoms over a 5-year period. Depression is associated with nonadherence to diabetes self-care—including following dietary restrictions, medication compliance, and blood glucose monitoring—resulting in worse overall clinical outcomes. Due to potential negative health consequences associated with comorbid diabetes and depression, both conditions should be optimally treated to maximize patient outcomes. PMID:18954592

  19. Kidney Disease and Psoriasis. A New Comorbidity?

    PubMed

    González-Parra, E; Daudén, E; Carrascosa, J M; Olveira, A; Botella, R; Bonanad, C; Rivera, R

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease that has been associated with cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities, particularly in young patients and patients with more severe forms of the disease. Recent studies have also linked psoriasis to kidney disease, and this would seem only logical, as the kidney is both a target of classic cardiovascular risk factors and susceptible to the toxic effects of some of the traditional drugs used to control psoriasis. In this article, we would like to draw readers' attention to this recently described comorbidity and stress the importance of early detection, as once chronic kidney disease develops, it cannot be reversed. When evaluating patients with psoriasis, particularly when they are candidates for systemic therapy, we believe it is important to order laboratory tests including glomerular filtration rate and a simple urine test to screen for albuminuria (albumin/creatinine ratio).

  20. Cardiac Imaging in Heart Failure with Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chiew; Chen, Sylvia; Iyngkaran, Pupalan

    2017-01-01

    Imaging modalities stand at the frontiers for progress in congestive heart failure (CHF) screening, risk stratification and monitoring. Advancements in echocardiography (ECHO) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have allowed for improved tissue characterizations, cardiac motion analysis, and cardiac performance analysis under stress. Common cardiac comorbidities such as hypertension, metabolic syndromes and chronic renal failure contribute to cardiac remodeling, sharing similar pathophysiological mechanisms starting with interstitial changes, structural changes and finally clinical CHF. These imaging techniques can potentially detect changes earlier. Such information could have clinical benefits for screening, planning preventive therapies and risk stratifying patients. Imaging reports have often focused on traditional measures without factoring these novel parameters. This review is aimed at providing a synopsis on how we can use this information to assess and monitor improvements for CHF with comorbidities.

  1. Self Report Co-Morbidity and Health Related Quality of Life -- A Comparison with Record Based Co-Morbidity Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voaklander, Donald C.; Kelly, Karen D.; Jones, C. Allyson; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare three hospital-based measures of co-morbidity to patient self-report co-morbidity and to determine the relative proportion of outcome predicted by each of the co-morbidity measures in a population of individuals receiving major joint arthroplasty. Baseline measures using the SF-36 general health…

  2. Seventy-Five Years of Comorbidity Research

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Matt G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: As part of the 75th anniversary edition of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, this article reviews research on the relationship between mental disorders and substance use disorders (“comorbidity”) from 1940—the journal’s inception—to the present. Method: First, a survey of the titles and abstracts of all articles published in the journal was used to identify those articles pertaining to comorbidity. Seminal and representative works from this set of articles and a limited selection of articles from other journals were included in the review. Results: The early psychosocial research emphasized psychoanalytic formulations of alcohol use as a defensive symptom, which informed the early experimental research on the tension-reducing properties of alcohol. The “cognitive revolution,” occurring in the 1970s, enabled an expansion of the tension-reduction theory to include a central role for mental processes (e.g., alcohol expectancies) in promoting drinking to cope with negative affectivity. The early clinical research characterized mental conditions commonly co-occurring with alcohol disorders and considered their etiological relationship to alcohol disorders. The “neo-Kraepelinian revolution” in psychiatry, which also occurred in the 1970s, infused the clinical comorbidity research with a more rigorous diagnostic technology and a range of biomedical research methodologies to study the mechanistic linkages of co-occurring disorders. Conclusions: Although a substantial quantity of scientific information on comorbidity has accumulated over the past 75 years, a standard model(s) of comorbidity has yet to congeal. Barriers and opportunities related to achieving this important goal are discussed. PMID:24565311

  3. Headache and comorbidity in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common neurological symptom reported in childhood and adolescence, leading to high levels of school absences and being associated with several comorbid conditions, particularly in neurological, psychiatric and cardiovascular systems. Neurological and psychiatric disorders, that are associated with migraine, are mainly depression, anxiety disorders, epilepsy and sleep disorders, ADHD and Tourette syndrome. It also has been shown an association with atopic disease and cardiovascular disease, especially ischemic stroke and patent foramen ovale (PFO). PMID:24063537

  4. Models of comorbidity for multifactorial disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, M C; Kendler, K S

    1995-01-01

    We develop several formal models for comorbidity between multifactorial disorders. Based on the work of D. N. Klein and L. P. Riso, the models include (i) alternate forms, where the two disorders have the same underlying continuum of liability; (ii) random multiformity, in which affection status on one disorder abruptly increases risk for the second; (iii) extreme multiformity, where only extreme cases have an abruptly increased risk for the second disorder; (iv) three independent disorders, in which excess comorbid cases are due to a separate, third disorder; (v) correlated liabilities, where the risk factors for the two disorders correlate; and (vi) direct causal models, where the liability for one disorder is a cause of the other disorder. These models are used to make quantitative predictions about the relative proportions of pairs of relatives who are classified according to whether each relative has neither disorder, disorder A but not B, disorder B but not A, or both A and B. For illustration, we analyze data on major depression (MD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) assessed in adult female MZ and DZ twins, which enable estimation of the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors. Several models are rejected--that comorbid cases are due to chance; multiformity of GAD; a third independent disorder; and GAD being a cause of MD. Of the models that fit the data, correlated liabilities, MD causes GAD, and reciprocal causation seem best. MD appears to be a source of liability for GAD. Possible extensions to the models are discussed. PMID:7573055

  5. Author Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diodato, Virgil P.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the effectiveness of using author-supplied indexing to increase subject control in information retrieval, and describes a study which compared author indexing for articles published in "American Mathematical Society" journals to indexing of the same articles by an editor of "Mathematical Reviews." Nine references are…

  6. Autism Parenting Stress Index: initial psychometric evidence.

    PubMed

    Silva, Louisa M T; Schalock, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Data validating the Autism Parenting Stress Index (APSI) is presented for 274 children under age six. Cronbach's alpha was .827. As a measure of parenting stress specific to core and co-morbid symptoms of autism, the APSI is unique. It is intended for use by clinicians to identify areas where parents need support with parenting skills, and to assess the effect of intervention on parenting stress. Mean parenting stress in the autism group was four times that of the typical group and double that of the other developmental delay group [F(2,272) = 153; p < 001]. An exploratory factor analysis suggested three factors impacting parenting stress: one relating to core deficits, one to co-morbid behavioral symptoms, and one to co-morbid physical symptoms.

  7. Comorbidity Patterns in Patients with Chronic Diseases in General Practice

    PubMed Central

    García-Olmos, Luis; Salvador, Carlos H.; Alberquilla, Ángel; Lora, David; Carmona, Montserrat; García-Sagredo, Pilar; Pascual, Mario; Muñoz, Adolfo; Monteagudo, José Luis; García-López, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Healthcare management is oriented toward single diseases, yet multimorbidity is nevertheless the rule and there is a tendency for certain diseases to occur in clusters. This study sought to identify comorbidity patterns in patients with chronic diseases, by reference to number of comorbidities, age and sex, in a population receiving medical care from 129 general practitioners in Spain, in 2007. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a health-area setting of the Madrid Autonomous Region (Comunidad Autónoma), covering a population of 198,670 individuals aged over 14 years. Multiple correspondences were analyzed to identify the clustering patterns of the conditions targeted. Results Forty-two percent (95% confidence interval [CI]: 41.8–42.2) of the registered population had at least one chronic condition. In all, 24.5% (95% CI: 24.3–24.6) of the population presented with multimorbidity. In the correspondence analysis, 98.3% of the total information was accounted for by three dimensions. The following four, age- and sex-related comorbidity patterns were identified: pattern B, showing a high comorbidity rate; pattern C, showing a low comorbidity rate; and two patterns, A and D, showing intermediate comorbidity rates. Conclusions Four comorbidity patterns could be identified which grouped diseases as follows: one showing diseases with a high comorbidity burden; one showing diseases with a low comorbidity burden; and two showing diseases with an intermediate comorbidity burden. PMID:22359665

  8. Cognitive behavioral therapy in persons with comorbid insomnia: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Geiger-Brown, Jeanne M; Rogers, Valerie E; Liu, Wen; Ludeman, Emilie M; Downton, Katherine D; Diaz-Abad, Montserrat

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is effective for treatment of primary insomnia. There has been no synthesis of studies quantifying this effect on insomnia comorbid with medical and psychiatric disorders using rigorous selection criteria. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of CBT-I in studies including patients with medical or psychiatric disorders. Studies were identified from 1985 through February 2014 using multiple databases and bibliography searches. Inclusion was limited to randomized controlled trials of CBT-I in adult patients with insomnia diagnosed using standardized criteria, who additionally had a comorbid medical or psychiatric condition. Twenty-three studies including 1379 patients met inclusion criteria. Based on weighted mean differences, CBT-I improved subjective sleep quality post-treatment, with large treatment effects for the insomnia severity index and Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Sleep diaries showed a 20 min reduction in sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset, 17 min improvement in total sleep time, and 9% improvement in sleep efficiency post-treatment, similar to findings of meta-analyses of CBT-I in older adults. Treatment effects were durable up to 18 mo. Results of actigraphy were similar to but of smaller magnitude than subjective measures. CBT-I is an effective, durable treatment for comorbid insomnia.

  9. [Comorbidity between cocaine addiction and personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montalvo, J; Lorea, I

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the current knowledge about the comorbidity between cocaine dependence and personality disorders. Results concerning a specific profile of cocaine patients are not conclusive. The prevalence rate of personality disorders in cocaine dependents is very heterogeneous (with a mean of 66% of cases), and a great variability is observed between all the studies carried out. There is a tendency for a higher proportion of cocaine dependents to be found within the cluster B category (mainly antisocial and borderline). Lastly, implications of this kind of study for future research and clinical practice are commented upon.

  10. The Multimorbidity Index: A Tool for Assessing the Prognosis of Patients from Their History of Illness

    PubMed Central

    Alemi, Farrokh; Levy, Cari R.; Kheirbek, Raya E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Multimorbidity (MM) Index predicts the prognosis of patients from their diagnostic history. In contrast to existing approaches with broad diagnostic categories, it treats each diagnosis as a separate independent variable using individual International Classification of Disease, Revision 9 (ICD-9) codes. Objective: This paper describes the MM Index, reviews the published data on its accuracy, and provides procedures for implementing the Index within electronic health record (EHR) systems. Methods: The MM Index was tested on various patient populations by using data from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs data warehouse and claims data within the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project of the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality. Results: In cross-validated studies, the MM Index outperformed prognostic indices based on physiological markers, such as CD4 cell counts in HIV/AIDS, HbAlc levels in diabetes, ejection fractions in heart failure, or the 13 physiological markers commonly used for patients in intensive care units. When predicting the prognosis of nursing home patients by using the cross-validated area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the MM Index was 15 percent outperformed the Quan variant of the Charlson Index, 27 percent more accurate than the Deyo variant of the Charlson Index, and 22 percent more accurate than the von Walraven variant of the Elixhauser Index. For patients in intensive care units, the MM Index was 13 percent outperformed the cross-validated area under ROC associated with Elixhauser’s categories. The MM Index also demonstrated greater accuracy than a number of commercially available measures of illness severity; including a fivefold greater accuracy than the All Patient Refined Diagnosis-Related Groups and a threefold greater accuracy than All Payer Severity-Adjusted Diagnosis-Related Groups. Conclusion: The MM Index is statistically more accurate than many existing measures of

  11. Hair cortisol concentrations and cortisol stress reactivity in generalized anxiety disorder, major depression and their comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Steudte-Schmiedgen, Susann; Wichmann, Susann; Stalder, Tobias; Hilbert, Kevin; Muehlhan, Markus; Lueken, Ulrike; Beesdo-Baum, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Studies investigating cortisol secretion in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have reported heterogeneous findings. Further, current knowledge on the specificity of endocrine changes for GAD and/or comorbid major depression (MD) is limited. Hence, the current study investigated long-term integrated cortisol secretion, as indexed by hair cortisol concentrations (HCC), and experimentally-induced cortisol stress reactivity in relation to GAD, MD and their comorbidity. Carefully characterized groups of 17 GAD patients including 8 with comorbid MD (GAD-MD), 12 MD patients and 21 healthy controls were recruited. Alongside psychometric data, HCC (N = 43) and salivary cortisol stress reactivity in response to the Trier Social Stress Test (N = 45) were determined. Findings revealed that MD patients exhibited lower HCC compared to controls and GAD patients, with no differences between the latter two groups. Interestingly, when the GAD group was separated into two groups based on MD comorbidity, lower HCC in MD patients were found compared to controls and GAD-noMD patients, but did not show differences when compared to GAD-MD patients. No HCC differences were seen between GAD-MD or GAD-noMD patients and healthy controls. No TSST group differences emerged. Our findings suggest MD to be related to long-term attenuation in cortisol secretion. While no group differences emerged between patients with GAD, neither with nor without MD, and controls, the current results provide tentative evidence that MD determines long-term endocrine changes, with pure GAD showing a distinct pattern. Future studies are needed to confirm our findings in larger samples of pure and comorbid groups.

  12. Bacterial flora in the sputum and comorbidity in patients with acute exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Boixeda, Ramon; Almagro, Pere; Díez-Manglano, Jesús; Cabrera, Francisco Javier; Recio, Jesús; Martin-Garrido, Isabel; Soriano, Joan B

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine in patients admitted with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE-COPD) the association between the isolation of potential pathogens in a conventional sputum culture and comorbidities. Patients and methods The ESMI study is a multicenter observational study. Patients with AE-COPD admitted to the Internal Medicine departments of 70 hospitals were included. The clinical characteristics, treatments, and comorbidities were gathered. The results of conventional sputum cultures were recorded. Results A total of 536 patients were included, of which 161 produced valid sputum and a potentially pathogenic microorganism was isolated from 88 subjects (16.4%). The isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.7%) was associated with a greater severity of the lung disease (previous admissions [P= 0.026], dyspnea scale [P=0.047], post-broncodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) [P=0.005], and the BODEx index [P=0.009]); also with higher prevalence of cor pulmonale (P=0.017), heart failure (P=0.048), and cerebrovascular disease (P=0.026). Streptococcus pneumoniae (26.1%) was associated with more comorbidity according to number of diseases (P=0.018); notably, peripheral artery disease (P=0.033), hypertension (P=0.029), dyslipidemia (P=0.039), osteoporosis (P=0.0001), and depression (P=0.005). Conclusion Patients with AE-COPD and P. aeruginosa present higher severity of COPD, while those with S. pneumoniae present greater comorbidity. The potentially pathogenic microorganism obtained in the sputum culture depends on the associated comorbidities. PMID:26664106

  13. Influence of culture on pain comorbidity in women with and without temporomandibular disorder-pain.

    PubMed

    Al-Harthy, M; Michelotti, A; List, T; Ohrbach, R

    2017-02-28

    Evidence on cultural differences in prevalence and impact of common chronic pain conditions, comparing individuals with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) versus individuals without TMD, is limited. The aim was to assess cross-cultural comorbid pain conditions in women with chronic TMD pain. Consecutive women patients (n = 122) with the index condition of chronic TMD pain diagnosed per the research diagnostic criteria for TMD and TMD-free controls (n = 121) matched for age were recruited in Saudi Arabia, Italy and Sweden. Self-report questionnaires assessed back, chest, stomach and head pain for prevalence, pain intensity and interference with daily activities. Logistic regression was used for binary variables, and ancova was used for parametric data analysis, adjusting for age and education. Back pain was the only comorbid condition with a different prevalence across cultures; Swedes reported a lower prevalence compared to Saudis (P < 0·01). Saudis reported higher prevalence of work reduced >50% due to back pain compared to Italians or Swedes (P < 0·01). Headache was the most common comorbid condition in all three cultures. The total number of comorbid conditions did not differ cross-culturally but were reported more by TMD-pain cases than TMD-free controls (P < 0·01). For both back and head pain, higher average pain intensities (P < 0·01) and interference with daily activities (P < 0·01) were reported by TMD-pain cases, compared to TMD-free controls. Among TMD-pain cases, Italians reported the highest pain-related disability (P < 0·01). Culture influences the associated comorbidity of common pain conditions. The cultural influence on pain expression is reflected in different patterns of physical representation.

  14. The Effects of Comorbidity and Age on RTOG Study Enrollment in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Who Are Eligible for RTOG Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Firat, Selim; Byhardt, Roger W.; Gore, Elizabeth

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of measured comorbidity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) combined modality therapy (CMT) study enrollment in Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: One hundred and seventy-one patients with a Karnofsky Performance Score {>=}70 and clinical Stage III NSCLC were analyzed retrospectively for comorbidity, RTOG study eligibility, and enrollment at initial consultation. Effect of comorbidity scores (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale) were tested on patient selection for CMT, RTOG enrollment, and overall survival. Results: Comorbidity (Grade 4; p < 0.005) and use of radiation only (p {<=} 0.001) were associated with inferior survival independent of other factors. Patient selection for CMT was affected by age ({>=}70, p < 0.001), comorbidity (severity index [SI]> 2, p = 0.001), and weight loss (>5%, p = 0.001). Thirty-three patients (19%) were enrolled in a CMT RTOG study (Group 1). Forty-nine patients (29%) were eligible but not enrolled (Group 2), and 57 (33%) were ineligible (Group 3). The most common ineligibility reasons were weight loss (67%) and comorbidity in the exclusion criteria of the RTOG studies (63%). Group 1 patients were the youngest (p = 0.02), with the lowest comorbidity scores (p < 0.001) and SI (p < 0.001) compared with Groups 2 and 3. Group 3 patients were the oldest with the most unfavorable comorbidity profile. Comorbidity scores (SI >2; p = 0.006) and age ({>=}70; p = 0.05) were independent factors influencing RTOG study enrollment in patients meeting study eligibility requirements (Groups 1 and 2). Conclusions: Comorbidity scales could be useful in stratification of patients in advanced lung cancer trials and interpretation of results particularly regarding the elderly population.

  15. Comorbid internet addiction in male clients of inpatient addiction rehabilitation centers: psychiatric symptoms and mental comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Wölfling, Klaus; Beutel, Manfred E; Koch, Andreas; Dickenhorst, Ulrike; Müller, Kai W

    2013-11-01

    Addictive Internet use has recently been proposed to be included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Still, little is known about its nosological features, including comorbidity with other mental disorders and disorder-specific psychopathological symptoms. To investigate whether Internet addiction (IA) is an issue in patients in addiction treatment, 1826 clients were surveyed in 15 inpatient rehabilitation centers. Male patients meeting criteria for comorbid IA (n = 71) were compared with a matched control group of male patients treated for alcohol addiction without addictive Internet use (n = 58). The SCL-90-R, the Patient Health Questionnaire, and the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder were used to assess associated psychiatric symptoms and further comorbid disorders. Comorbid IA was associated with higher levels of psychosocial symptoms, especially depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and interpersonal sensitivity. Moreover, the patients with IA more frequently met criteria for additional mental disorders. They display higher rates of psychiatric symptoms, especially depression, and might be in need of additional therapeutic treatment. In rehabilitation centers, a regular screening for IA is recommended to identify patients with this (non-substance-related) addiction and supply them with additional disorder-specific treatment.

  16. Handling clinical comorbidity in randomized clinical trials in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Ruth; Beaudreau, Sherry A; Gould, Christine E; Froehlich, Wendy; Kraemer, Helena C

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to a) outline the importance of including patients with clinical comorbidities in Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) of psychiatric treatments; and b) to propose a specific approach for best handling, analyzing and interpreting the data on clinical comorbidities in terms of their impact on treatment outcomes. To do this we first define and describe clinical comorbidity and differentiate it from other forms of comorbidity. We then describe the methodological and analytical problems associated with excluding patients with clinically comorbid conditions from RCTs, including the impact on the outcomes of RCTs in psychiatry and the impact on evidence-based clinical decision-making. We then address the challenges inherent to including patients with clinical comorbidities in RCTs. Finally, we propose a methodological and analytic approach to deal with these issues in RCTs which aims to significantly improve the information yielded from RCTs in psychiatry, and thus improve clinical decision-making.

  17. Identification of disease comorbidity through hidden molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Younhee; Cho, Minah; Lee, Jin-Sung; Kim, Jaebum

    2016-01-01

    Despite multiple diseases co-occur, their underlying common molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Identification of comorbid diseases by considering the interactions between molecular components is a key to understand the underlying disease mechanisms. Here, we developed a novel approach utilizing both common disease-causing genes and underlying molecular pathways to identify comorbid diseases. Our approach enables the analysis of common pathologies shared by comorbid diseases through molecular interaction networks. We found that the integration of direct genetic sharing and indirect high-level molecular associations revealed significantly strong consistency with known comorbid diseases. In addition, neoplasm-related diseases showed high comorbidity patterns within themselves as well as with other diseases, indicating severe complications. This study demonstrated that molecular pathway information could be used to discover disease comorbidity and hidden biological mechanism to understand pathogenesis and provide new insight on disease pathology. PMID:27991583

  18. Current and new thinking in the management of comorbid insomnia.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, David N

    2009-02-01

    Insomnia occurs predominantly in conjunction with a medical or psychiatric illness. New thinking regarding the treatment of comorbid insomnia has moved the field away from practices that called for treating the comorbid condition to resolve the coexisting insomnia to one in which the insomnia is treated as a separate condition. Although 10 medications currently are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of insomnia, only 2, eszopiclone and zolpidem, have been evaluated for efficacy in patients with chronic comorbid insomnia. Studies suggest clear benefits in comorbid insomnia. Nonpharmacologic treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, and relaxation training, have also been investigated for comorbid insomnia, with studies suggesting these approaches may be effective either alone or in conjunction with medications. While behavioral issues should be optimized, clinicians need to customize treatments for patients with comorbid insomnia based on coexisting medical and psychiatric morbidities, age, medical history, current medications, and lifestyle issues.

  19. [Health economic aspects of physical-mental comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Lehnert, T; Konnopka, A; Riedel-Heller, S; König, H-H

    2011-01-01

    Physical-mental comorbidity is often associated with worse clinical and psychosocial outcomes, reduced health-related quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization. The following article is dedicated to the health economic aspects of physical-mental comorbidity. It presents basic theoretical and methodological aspects of cost-of-illness studies and economic evaluations related to physical-mental comorbidity, which are explained and discussed for the practical example of comorbid depression in diabetes mellitus. The results show that mental comorbidity in diabetes is associated with increased healthcare costs, which can in part be attributed to an increased somatic health service use. Appropriate interventions can lower these excess costs. Economic evaluations assessing the effectiveness of interventions for depressive diabetics have shown that overall health can be improved and costs saved. However, especially in health economics, mental comorbidity in somatic diseases has not been comprehensively investigated and further research is warranted.

  20. [Psychiatric comorbidities with tobacco-related disorders].

    PubMed

    Mühlig, S; Andreas, S; Batra, A; Petersen, K U; Hoch, E; Rüther, T

    2016-01-01

    The coincidence of tobacco smoking and psychiatric disorders is of great epidemiological and therapeutic importance. Tobacco smoking by people with mental disorders leads to disproportionately high somatic health risks, an adverse clinical course, poorer clinical outcomes and reduced quality of life (QoL). The etiological causes of the high comorbidity between smoking and mental disorders are still unclear: currently, tobacco smoking is discussed as being either the consequence or contributory cause of psychological disorders or both disorders share common antecedents and interactions. Psychiatric patients are motivated to quit and smoking cessation is not generally less effective with smokers with mental disorders than with mentally healthy individuals. Specific smoking cessation programs in the inpatient and outpatient settings are time-consuming and complex but effective. Within the framework of the current S3 guidelines the international evidence has been updated and transformed into treatment guidelines following an elaborate consensus process. Basically the same interventional measures should be used as with mentally healthy individuals; however, smokers with a psychological comorbidity often need more intensive adjuvant psychotherapeutic interventions and often need pharmaceutical support, (bupropion, varenicline and nicotine replacement therapy). Due to the overall unsatisfactory findings the treatment guidelines are partially based on clinical consensus decisions. In this field, a considerable need for research has been determined.

  1. Tuberculosis Comorbidity with Communicable and Noncommunicable Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew; Marais, Ben J; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-02-06

    The 18th WHO Global Tuberculosis Annual Report indicates that there were an estimated 8.6 million incident cases of tuberculosis (TB) in 2012, which included 2.9 million women and 530,000 children. TB caused 1.3 million deaths including 320,000 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people; three-quarters of deaths occurred in Africa and Southeast Asia. With one-third of the world's population latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), active TB disease is primarily associated with a break down in immune surveillance. This explains the strong link between active TB disease and other communicable diseases (CDs) or noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) that exert a toll on the immune system. Comorbid NCD risk factors include diabetes, smoking, malnutrition, and chronic lung disease, all of which have increased relentlessly over the past decade in developing countries. The huge overlap between killer infections such as TB, HIV, malaria, and severe viral infections with NCDs, results in a "double burden of disease" in developing countries. The current focus on vertical disease programs fails to recognize comorbidities or to encourage joint management approaches. This review highlights major disease overlaps and discusses the rationale for better integration of tuberculosis care with services for NCDs and other infectious diseases to enhance the overall efficiency of the public health responses.

  2. Comorbidity between neurological illness and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Hesdorffer, Dale C

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in many neurological disorders, including epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and stroke. These comorbidities increase disease burden and may complicate the treatment of the combined disorders. Initial studies of the comorbidity of psychiatric and neurological disorders were cross-sectional, and time order of the associations was impossible to elucidate. More recent work has clarified time associations between psychiatric disorders and neurological disorders, particularly in epilepsy and stroke where epidemiological evidence suggests that there is a bidirectional relationship. This article takes an epidemiological approach to understanding these relationships and focuses mostly on epilepsy. Although, these relationships are understood in many neurological disorders, routine screening for psychiatric disorders in neurological disorders is infrequent, mostly due to the lack of partnerships between psychiatrists and neurologists and the paucity of neuropsychiatrists. Much more needs to be done to improve the detection and treatment of patients affected by neurological and psychiatric disorders. Understanding the scope of this overlap may inspire collaborations to improve the lives of people affected by both disorders.

  3. Adherence to Antihypertensives in Patients With Comorbid Condition

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Zahra; Nikdoust, Farahnaz; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Bahremand, Mostafa; Shobeiri, Elham; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharramzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity has been noted as a potential barrier to proper adherence to antihypertensive medications. Objectives: We decided to investigate whether comorbidity could significantly affect adherence of Iranian patients with hypertension to their medication regimen. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and eighty consecutive hypertensive patients were interviewed in 4 cities of Iran. The 8-item Morisky medication adherence scale (MMAS-8) (validated in Persian) was used to assess medication adherence. This scale determines adherence by scores as lower than 6 (low adherence), 6 or 7 (moderate adherence), and 8 (high adherence). Comorbidity was considered as any concomitant medical condition, which necessitates the patient to take medicine for a minimum of 6 months prior to the interviews. Results: The most common comorbid conditions were ischemic heart disease (65 patients, 23.2%), diabetes mellitus (55 patients, 19.6%), and dyslipidemia (51 patients, 18.2%). Mean (± SD) MMAS-8 score in comorbid group was 5.68 (± 1.85) and in non-comorbid hypertensive patients, it was 5.83 (± 1.91) (P = 0.631). Mean (± SD) number of comorbidities was 1.53 (± 0.75) in low adherence group compared to 1.54 (± 0.77) in moderate/high adherers (P = 0.98). With increasing the number of comorbid diseases, the proportion of patients with high adherence decreased successively from 20% in those with no comorbid disease to 14.1% in those with one or two comorbid conditions, and finally 11.1% in those with 3 to 5 comorbid conditions. Conclusions: With increasing the number of comorbid conditions, the proportion of patients with high adherence decreases. In our opinion, this finding is a useful clinical note for healthcare providers when managing patients with hypertension who have other medical problems at the same time. PMID:26539419

  4. [Comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients treated with disease modifying drugs].

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Z A; Sizyakina, L P; Belovolova, R A; Megeryan, V A

    2016-01-01

    Because of intensive growth of the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases (AID) during the last years, the comorbidity of MS and AID is not a rarity. In this literature review, the development of comorbid AID in patients with MS is considered to be the probable complication of disease modifying therapy with drugs of different groups. The authors present the own data on the prevalence of comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients with MS treated with disease modifying drugs.

  5. Comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    PENG, Daihui; JIANG, Kaida

    2015-01-01

    Summary Obsessive-compulsive symptoms are common in patients with bipolar disorders. This comorbid condition complicates the clinical treatment of the two disorders, so identifying these individuals is important. We discuss the comorbid occurrence of obsessive-compulsive disorder and bipolar disorder, introduce possible etiological mechanisms that could result in this common comorbid condition, discuss recent research advances in the area, and propose some clinical principles for managing such patients. PMID:26549961

  6. Comorbidities predict worse prognosis in patients with primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Kate J.; Naqvi, Kiran; Nguyen, Khanh T.; Cardenas-Turanzas, Marylou; Tanaka, Maria Florencia; Pierce, Sherry; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    Background Comorbidities have been shown to play an important role in prognostic assessment of several hematologic conditions; however, the role of comorbidities in primary myelofibrosis has not been studied. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and impact of comorbidities in patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF) using the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 (ACE-27). Methods In this retrospective observational cohort study, we evaluated 349 consecutive patients with a confirmed diagnosis of PMF who presented to our institution from 2000 to 2008. We evaluated the frequency and severity of comorbidities in these patients and assessed their impact on survival in a bivariable model that included the ACE-27 and Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System (DIPSS) scores as covariates. Results Sixty-four percent of patients had at least one comorbid condition, and diseases of the cardiovascular system (63%) were most common. Comorbidities had a significant negative impact on survival (P < 0.001). Patients with severe comorbidities had twice the risk of death as those with no comorbidities. When stratified by demographic and clinical characteristics, comorbidities were significantly associated with worse survival in patients younger than 65 years (P < 0.001) and those with performance status < 1 (P < 0.001). In a multivariable model that included the ACE-27 and Dynamic-International Prognostic Scoring System scores, comorbidities retained a significant association with shorter survival (P ≤ 0.001). Conclusions Assessment of comorbid conditions in patients with PMF, particularly those who are younger and with good performance status, has important implications for overall prognosis and treatment planning. PMID:24917509

  7. Comorbidities of Psoriasis - Exploring the Links by Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sundarrajan, Sudharsana; Arumugam, Mohanapriya

    2016-01-01

    Increasing epidemiological studies in patients with psoriasis report the frequent occurrence of one or more associated disorders. Psoriasis is associated with multiple comorbidities including autoimmune disease, neurological disorders, cardiometabolic diseases and inflammatory-bowel disease. An integrated system biology approach is utilized to decipher the molecular alliance of psoriasis with its comorbidities. An unbiased integrative network medicine methodology is adopted for the investigation of diseasome, biological process and pathways of five most common psoriasis associated comorbidities. A significant overlap was observed between genes acting in similar direction in psoriasis and its comorbidities proving the mandatory occurrence of either one of its comorbidities. The biological processes involved in inflammatory response and cell signaling formed a common basis between psoriasis and its associated comorbidities. The pathway analysis revealed the presence of few common pathways such as angiogenesis and few uncommon pathways which includes CCKR signaling map and gonadotrophin-realising hormone receptor pathway overlapping in all the comorbidities. The work shed light on few common genes and pathways that were previously overlooked. These fruitful targets may serve as a starting point for diagnosis and/or treatment of psoriasis comorbidities. The current research provides an evidence for the existence of shared component hypothesis between psoriasis and its comorbidities. PMID:26966903

  8. The challenge of comorbidity in clinical trials for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron; Sormani, Maria Pia; Thompson, Alan; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Trojano, Maria; O'Connor, Paul; Reingold, Stephen; Cohen, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to provide recommendations for addressing comorbidity in clinical trial design and conduct in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We held an international workshop, informed by a systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of comorbidity in MS and an international survey about research priorities for studying comorbidity including their relation to clinical trials in MS. Results: We recommend establishing age- and sex-specific incidence estimates for comorbidities in the MS population, including those that commonly raise concern in clinical trials of immunomodulatory agents; shifting phase III clinical trials of new therapies from explanatory to more pragmatic trials; describing comorbidity status of the enrolled population in publications reporting clinical trials; evaluating treatment response, tolerability, and safety in clinical trials according to comorbidity status; and considering comorbidity status in the design of pharmacovigilance strategies. Conclusion: Our recommendations will help address knowledge gaps regarding comorbidity that interfere with the ability to interpret safety in monitored trials and will enhance the generalizability of findings from clinical trials to “real world” settings where the MS population commonly has comorbid conditions. PMID:26888986

  9. Predicting Comorbid Conditions and Trajectories using Social Health Records.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiang; Ae Chun, Soon; Geller, James

    2016-05-05

    Many patients suffer from comorbidity conditions, for example, obese patients often develop type-2 diabetes and hypertension. In the US, 80% of Medicare spending is for managing patients with these multiple coexisting conditions. Predicting potential comorbidity conditions for an individual patient can promote preventive care and reduce costs. Predicting possible comorbidity progression paths can provide important insights into population heath and aid with decisions in public health policies. Discovering the comorbidity relationships is complex and difficult, due to limited access to Electronic Health Records by privacy laws. In this paper, we present a collaborative comorbidity prediction method to predict likely comorbid conditions for individual patients, and a trajectory prediction graph model to reveal progression paths of comorbid conditions. Our prediction approaches utilize patient generated health reports on online social media, called Social Health Records (SHR). The experimental results based on one SHR source show that our method is able to predict future comorbid conditions for a patient with coverage values of 48% and 75% for a top-20 and a top-100 ranked list, respectively. For risk trajectory prediction, our approach is able to reveal each potential progression trajectory between any two conditions and infer the confidence of the future trajectory, given any observed condition. The predicted trajectories are validated with existing comorbidity relations from the medical literature.

  10. Validated Questionnaires heighten detection of Difficult Asthma Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishna, Naghmeh; Tay, Tunn Ren; Hore-Lacy, Fiona; Stirling, Robert; Hoy, R; Dabscheck, Eli; Hew, Mark

    2016-10-07

    Objective Multiple extra-pulmonary comorbidities contribute to difficult asthma, but their diagnosis can be challenging and time consuming. Previous data on comorbidity detection have focused on clinical assessment, which may miss certain conditions. We aimed to locate relevant validated screening questionnaires to identify extra-pulmonary comorbidities that contribute to difficult asthma, and evaluate their performance during a difficult asthma evaluation. Methods MEDLINE was searched to identify key extra-pulmonary comorbidities that contribute to difficult asthma. Screening questionnaires were chosen based on ease of use, presence of a cut off score, and adequate validation to help systematically identify comorbidities. In a consecutive series of 86 patients referred for systematic evaluation of difficult asthma, questionnaires were administered prior to clinical consultation. Results Six difficult asthma comorbidities and corresponding screening questionnaires were found: sinonasal disease (allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis), vocal cord dysfunction, dysfunctional breathing, obstructive sleep apnea, anxiety and depression, and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. When the questionnaires were added to the referring clinician's impression, the detection of all six comorbidities was significantly enhanced. The average time for questionnaire administration was approximately 40 minutes. Conclusions The use of validated screening questionnaires heightens detection of comorbidities in difficult asthma. The availability of data from a battery of questionnaires prior to consultation can save time and allow clinicians to systematically assess difficult asthma patients and to focus on areas of particular concern. Such an approach would ensure that all contributing comorbidities have been addressed before significant treatment escalation is considered.

  11. Comorbidities of Psoriasis - Exploring the Links by Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Sundarrajan, Sudharsana; Arumugam, Mohanapriya

    2016-01-01

    Increasing epidemiological studies in patients with psoriasis report the frequent occurrence of one or more associated disorders. Psoriasis is associated with multiple comorbidities including autoimmune disease, neurological disorders, cardiometabolic diseases and inflammatory-bowel disease. An integrated system biology approach is utilized to decipher the molecular alliance of psoriasis with its comorbidities. An unbiased integrative network medicine methodology is adopted for the investigation of diseasome, biological process and pathways of five most common psoriasis associated comorbidities. A significant overlap was observed between genes acting in similar direction in psoriasis and its comorbidities proving the mandatory occurrence of either one of its comorbidities. The biological processes involved in inflammatory response and cell signaling formed a common basis between psoriasis and its associated comorbidities. The pathway analysis revealed the presence of few common pathways such as angiogenesis and few uncommon pathways which includes CCKR signaling map and gonadotrophin-realising hormone receptor pathway overlapping in all the comorbidities. The work shed light on few common genes and pathways that were previously overlooked. These fruitful targets may serve as a starting point for diagnosis and/or treatment of psoriasis comorbidities. The current research provides an evidence for the existence of shared component hypothesis between psoriasis and its comorbidities.

  12. Major depression in panic disorder patients with comorbid social phobia.

    PubMed

    Reiter, S R; Otto, M W; Pollack, M H; Rosenbaum, J F

    1991-07-01

    Rates of depression among panic disorder patients are particularly elevated in patients with comorbid social phobia. However, it is unclear whether this association is specific to social phobia, or whether any comorbid anxiety disorder increases the risk of depression. We assessed 100 panic disorder patients and found a significantly higher incidence of lifetime major depression for panic patients with comorbid social phobia or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Panic patients with comorbid social phobia had significantly higher scores on measures of dysfunctional attitudes and lower scores on measures of assertiveness; these variables may mediate the link between social phobia and depression in this population.

  13. Severe Obesity and Comorbid Condition Impact on the Weight-Related Quality of Life of the Adolescent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Meg H.; Inge, Thomas H.; Modi, Avani C.; Jenkins, Todd M.; Michalsky, Marc P.; Helmrath, Michael; Courcoulas, Anita; Harmon, Carroll M.; Rofey, Dana; Baughcum, Amy; Austin, Heather; Price, Karin; Xanthakos, Stavra A.; Brandt, Mary L.; Horlick, Mary; Buncher, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess links between comorbid health status, severe excess weight, and weight-related quality of life (WRQOL) in adolescents with severe obesity and undergoing weight loss surgery (WLS) to inform clinical care. Study design Baseline (pre-operative) data from Teen-LABS, a prospective multicenter observational study of 242 adolescents with severe obesity (MdnBMI = 50.5 kg/m2; Mage=17.1; 75.6% female; 71.9% White) undergoing WLS, were utilized to examine the impact of demographics, body mass index (BMI), presence/absence of 16 comorbid conditions, and a cumulative comorbidity load (CLoad) index on WRQOL scores (Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Kids; IWQOL-Kids). Results WRQOL was significantly lower than reference samples of healthy weight, overweight, and obese samples. Of 16 comorbid conditions, the most prevalent were dyslipidemia (74.4%), chronic pain (58.3%), and obstructive sleep apnea (56.6%). Males had a higher CLoad (p=.01) and BMI (p=.01), yet less impairment in total WRQOL (p<.01) than females. CLoad was a significant predictor of male WRQOL. For females, psychosocial (versus physical) comorbidities, BMI, and White race were significant predictors of WRQOL impairment. Less prevalent conditions (e.g., stress urinary incontinence) also emerged as contributors to lower WRQOL. Conclusions WRQOL impairment is substantial for adolescents with severe obesity undergoing WLS, with predictors varying by sex. These patient-data highlight targets for education, support, and adjunctive care referrals prior to WLS. Further, they provide a comprehensive empirical base for understanding heterogeneity in adolescent WRQOL outcomes following WLS, as weight and comorbidity profiles change over time. PMID:25556022

  14. Obesity, insulin resistance and comorbidities – Mechanisms of association

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Kolka, Cathryn M.; Kim, Stella P.; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Overall excess of fat, usually defined by the body mass index, is associated with metabolic (e.g. glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), dyslipidemia) and non-metabolic disorders (e.g. neoplasias, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fat liver disease, glomerulopathy, bone fragility etc.). However, more than its total amount, the distribution of adipose tissue throughout the body is a better predictor of the risk to the development of those disorders. Fat accumulation in the abdominal area and in non-adipose tissue (ectopic fat), for example, is associated with increased risk to develop metabolic and non-metabolic derangements. On the other hand, observations suggest that individuals who present peripheral adiposity, characterized by large hip and thigh circumferences, have better glucose tolerance, reduced incidence of T2DM and of metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the main culprits in the association between obesity, particularly visceral, and metabolic as well as non-metabolic diseases. In this review we will highlight the current pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms possibly involved in the link between increased VAT, ectopic fat, IR and comorbidities. We will also provide some insights in the identification of these abnormalities. PMID:25211442

  15. Comorbidities and Crash Involvement among Younger and Older Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michela; Boccardi, Virginia; Prestano, Raffaele; Angellotti, Edith; Desiderio, Manuela; Marano, Luigi; Rizzo, Maria Rosaria; Paolisso, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies identified comorbidities as predictors of older driver performance and driving pattern, while the direct impact of comorbidities on road crash risk in elderly drivers is still unknown. The present study is a cross-sectional aimed at investigating the association between levels of comorbidity and crash involvement in adult and elderly drivers. 327 drivers were stratified according to age range in two groups: elderly drivers (age ≥70 years old, referred as older) and adult drivers (age <70 years old, referred as younger). Driving information was obtained through a driving questionnaire. Distance traveled was categorized into low, medium and high on the basis of kilometers driven in a year. CIRS-illness severity (IS) and CIRS-comorbidity indices (CI) in all populations were calculated. Older drivers had a significantly higher crash involvements rate (p = .045) compared with the younger group based on the number of licensed drivers. Dividing comorbidity indices into tertiles among all licensed subjects, the number of current drivers significantly decreased (p<.0001) with increasing level of comorbidity. The number of current drivers among older subjects significantly decreased with increasing comorbidity level (p = .026) while no difference among younger group was found (p = .462). Among younger drivers with increasing comorbidity level, the number of road accidents significantly increased (p = .048) and the logistic regression analysis showed that comorbidity level significantly associated with crash involvement independent of gender and driving exposure. Older subjects with high level of comorbidity are able to self-regulate driving while comorbidity burden represents a significant risk factor for crash involvements among younger drivers. PMID:24722619

  16. Childhood maltreatment, emotional dysregulation, and psychiatric comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Yael; Ford, Julian D; Hill, Michael; Frazier, Jean A

    2014-01-01

    Affect dysregulation, defined as the impaired ability to regulate or tolerate negative emotional states, has been associated with interpersonal trauma and posttraumatic stress. Affect-regulation difficulties play a role in many psychiatric conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders, and especially major depression in youth and bipolar disorder throughout the life span. Exposure to traumatic events and interpersonal trauma in childhood is associated with wide-ranging psychosocial, developmental, and medical impairments in children, adolescents, and adults, with emotional dysregulation being a core feature that may help to account for this heightened risk. In order to understand how the developmental effects of childhood maltreatment contribute to emotional dysregulation and psychiatric sequelae, we review emotional regulation and its developmental neurobiology, and examine the research evidence of associations between childhood trauma, emotional dysregulation, and psychiatric comorbidities in children, adolescents, and adults.

  17. Senescence in COPD and Its Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2017-02-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is regarded as a disease of accelerated lung aging. This affliction shows all of the hallmarks of aging, including telomere shortening, cellular senescence, activation of PI3 kinase-mTOR signaling, impaired autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction, stem cell exhaustion, epigenetic changes, abnormal microRNA profiles, immunosenescence, and a low-grade chronic inflammation (inflammaging). Many of these pathways are driven by chronic exogenous and endogenous oxidative stress. There is also a reduction in antiaging molecules, such as sirtuins and Klotho, which further accelerate the aging process. COPD is associated with several comorbidities (multimorbidity), such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, that share the same pathways of accelerated aging. Understanding these mechanisms has helped identify several novel therapeutic targets, and several drugs and dietary interventions are now in development to treat multimorbidity.

  18. Migraine and Stroke: “Vascular” Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Guidetti, Donata; Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola; Immovilli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several comorbidities are associated to migraine. Recent meta-analyses have consistently demonstrated a relationship between migraine and stroke, which is well-defined for ischemic stroke and migraine with aura (MA), even stronger in females on oral contraceptives or smokers. However, there seems to be no clear-cut association between stroke in migraineurs and the common vascular risk factors, at least in the young adult population. Migraineurs also run an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, while the association between migraine and cardiovascular disease remains poorly defined. Another aspect is the relationship between migraine and the presence of silent brain lesions. It has been demonstrated that there is an increased frequency of ischemic lesions in the white matter of migraineurs, especially silent infarcts in the posterior circulation territory in patients with at least 10 attacks per month. Although there is a higher prevalence of patent foramen ovale (PFO) in migraineurs, the relationship between migraine and PFO remains controversial and PFO closure is not a recommended procedure to prevent migraine. As an increased frequency of cervical artery dissections has been observed in migrainous patients, it has been hypothesized that migraine may represent a predisposing factor for cervical artery dissection. There still remains the question as to whether migraine should be considered a true “vascular disease” or if the comorbidity between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may have underlying shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms. Although further studies are required to clarify this issue, current evidence supports a clinical management where MA patients should be screened for other concomitant vascular risk factors and treated accordingly. PMID:25339937

  19. Book Review: ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews "ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management" by Steven R. Pliszka, Caryn L. Carlson, and James M. Swanson, a book that provides information on children displaying both attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and other comorbid psychiatric conditions, complex psychopharmacological interventions that may…

  20. Comorbidities in Preschool Children at Family Risk of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooch, Debbie; Hulme, Charles; Nash, Hannah M.; Snowling, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity among developmental disorders such as dyslexia, language impairment, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and developmental coordination disorder is common. This study explores comorbid weaknesses in preschool children at family risk of dyslexia with and without language impairment and considers the role that…

  1. Recommendations for observational studies of comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron; Sormani, Maria Pia; Thompson, Alan; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Trojano, Maria; O'Connor, Paul; Fiest, Kirsten; Reider, Nadia; Reingold, Stephen; Cohen, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To reach consensus about the most relevant comorbidities to study in multiple sclerosis (MS) with respect to incidence, prevalence, and effect on outcomes; review datasets that may support studies of comorbidity in MS; and identify MS outcomes that should be prioritized in such studies. Methods: We held an international workshop to meet these objectives, informed by a systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of comorbidity in MS, and an international survey regarding research priorities for comorbidity. Results: We recommend establishing age- and sex-specific incidence and prevalence estimates for 5 comorbidities (depression, anxiety, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes); evaluating the effect of 7 comorbidities (depression, anxiety, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, chronic lung disease, and autoimmune diseases) on disability, quality of life, brain atrophy and other imaging parameters, health care utilization, employment, and mortality, including age, sex, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and disease duration as potential confounders; harmonizing study designs across jurisdictions; and conducting such studies worldwide. Ultimately, clinical trials of treating comorbidity in MS are needed. Conclusion: Our recommendations will help address knowledge gaps regarding the incidence, prevalence, and effect of comorbidity on outcomes in MS. PMID:26865523

  2. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Heterotypic Comorbidity in Externalizing Male Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauder, Colin L.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa M.; Shannon, Katherine E.; Aylward, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Children and adolescents with externalizing behavior disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD) often present with symptoms of comorbid internalizing psychopathology. However, few studies have examined central nervous system correlates of such comorbidity. We evaluated interactions between…

  3. ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pliszka, Steven R.; Carlson, Caryn L.; Swanson, James M.

    This book is designed to help clinicians assess and treat children or adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder who also present other disabilities. Major comorbidities are described in depth and empirically grounded guidelines are presented for evaluation and treatment. Part 1 provides an overview of issues in comorbidity,…

  4. Comorbidity among Older American Indians: The Native Elder Care Study

    PubMed Central

    Pilkerton, Courtney S.

    2011-01-01

    Comorbidity is a growing challenge and the older adult population is most at risk of developing comorbid conditions. Comorbidity is associated with increased risk of mortality, increased hospitalizations, increased doctor visits, increased prescription medications, nursing home placement, poorer mental health, and physical disability. American Indians experience some of the highest rates of chronic conditions, but to date there have been only two published studies on the subject of comorbidity in this population. With a community-based sample of 505 American Indians aged 55 years or older, this study identified the most prevalent chronic conditions, described comorbidity, and identified socio-demographic, functional limitations, and psychosocial correlates of comorbidity. Results indicated that older American Indians experience higher rates of hypertension, diabetes, back pain, and vision loss compared to national statistics of older adults. Two-thirds of the sample experienced some degree of comorbidity according to the scale used. Older age, poorer physical functioning, more depressive symptomatology, and lower personal mastery were all correlates of higher comorbidity scores. Despite medical advances increasing life expectancy, morbidity and mortality statistics suggest that the health of older American Indians lags behind the majority population. These findings highlight the importance of supporting chronic care and management services for the older American Indian population. PMID:20532973

  5. ADHD with Comorbid Anxiety: A Review of the Current Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, David Beck; Rostain, Anthony L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective/Method: ADHD is often comorbid with anxiety disorders, with rates approaching 25% in many samples. This current review's goal is to examine the literature on ADHD with comorbid anxiety from 1998 to the present. Results: Recent studies indicate that anxiety in ADHD may a) partially inhibit the impulsivity and response inhibition deficits,…

  6. Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Arab Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amr, Mostafa; Raddad, Dahoud; El-Mehesh, Fatima; Bakr, Ashraf; Sallam, Khalid; Amin, Tarek

    2012-01-01

    The objective of our study is to estimate the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders in a sample of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) recruited from three Arab countries. We also examine the relationship between comorbidity and children's cognitive functioning and gender. Children who received a diagnosis of ASD (n = 60) from a…

  7. Does Comorbidity Matter in Body Focused Repetitive Behavior Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jon E.; Leppink, Eric W.; Chamberlain, Samuel; Redden, Sarah A.; Curley, Erin; Odlaug, Brian L.; Keuthen, Nancy J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Trichotillomania (TTM) and skin picking disorder (SPD) have been characterized as Body Focused Repetitive Behavior Disorders (BFRBs). Because BFRBs frequently co-occur, we sought to discover the similarities and differences between having both TTM and SPD as opposed to just one. Methods 421 participants with primary TTM were evaluated regarding the comorbidity of SPD and 124 were participants with primary SPD were evaluated regarding the comorbidity of TTM. The effects of comorbid overlap on demographic and clinical measures were evaluated. Results Of the 421 participants with primary TTM, 61 (14.5%) had co-occurring SPD. Of 124 adults with primary SPD, 21 (16.9%) had comorbid TTM. Those with primary TTM and comorbid SPD had significantly more severe trichotillomania symptoms and were more likely to have major depressive disorder than those with TTM alone. Those with primary of SPD and comorbid TTM reported significantly more severe skin picking symptoms than those who only had SPD. Conclusions Individuals with co-occurring TTM and SPD may have more problematic hair pulling or skin picking symptoms. Hair pullers with comorbid SPD were more likely to have comorbid depression. Evaluating people for multiple BFRBs may be important to assess severity of symptoms and may have treatment implications. PMID:27490833

  8. The comorbidity of ADHD and autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Antshel, Kevin M; Zhang-James, Yanli; Faraone, Stephen V

    2013-10-01

    ADHD and autism spectrum disorder are common psychiatric comorbidities to each another. In addition, there is behavioral, biological and neuropsychological overlap between the two disorders. There are also several important differences between autism spectrum disorder and ADHD. Treatment strategies for the comorbid condition will also be reviewed. Future areas of research and clinical need will be discussed.

  9. The impact of comorbid migraine on quality of life outcomes after endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    DeConde, Adam S.; Mace, Jess C.; Smith, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and migraine are common entities with overlapping symptomatology yet little research exists which investigates the intersection of the two. This study seeks to investigate whether patients with CRS with and without a migraine history experience comparable quality-of-life (QOL) improvement after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Study Design Retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort Methods An adult population (n=229) with medically refractory CRS was prospectively evaluated following ESS using disease-specific QOL surveys: the Rhinosinusitis Disability Index (RSDI), the Chronic Sinusitis Survey (CSS), and the Sinonasal Outcome Test-22 (SNOT-22). History of comorbid migraine was identified (n=46) and pre- and postoperative QOL was compared to patients without migraine (n=183). Results Patients migraine and CRS were more likely to be female (p=0.023), experience allergies (p=0.024), fibromyalgia (p=0.009), depression (p=0.010), and be less likely to have nasal polyposis (p=0.003). Objective measures of disease (endoscopy and computed tomography scores) were significantly lower in patients with migraine (p=0.027 and p=0.002, respectively), yet these patients scored lower on baseline RSDI and SNOT-22 scores (p=0.025 and p=0.019, respectively). QOL in both patients with and without migraine improved significantly after ESS (p<0.003) and by comparable magnitudes (p>0.062). Conclusion Patients with comorbid migraine and CRS are more likely to have less severe evidence of disease and worse preoperative baseline QOL scores. This may imply that comorbid migraine disorder, in the setting of CRS, compels these patients to seek surgical management earlier in the disease process. Regardless, ESS provides comparable improvement for both patients with and without comorbid migraine. PMID:24431279

  10. Specific Learning Disabilities and Psychiatric Comorbidities in School Children in South India

    PubMed Central

    Bandla, Shailaja; Mandadi, Gowri Devi; Bhogaraju, Anand

    2017-01-01

    Background: Specific learning disabilities (SLDs) are an important cause of academic underachievement in children and are also associated with comorbidities like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) which further have an impact on the child's education. Aims: To estimate the prevalence and psychosocial profile and psychiatric comorbidities in children with SLD in two settings, i.e., on special (remedial) education and schools and to compare the findings with normal children. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in schools situated in urban and semi-urban areas and special education schools. A total of 96 children were chosen for the study. After taking informed consent from the parents, the details about socioeconomic status, family, developmental history, and school history of the children were collected on a semi-structured pro forma and then the children were screened for SLD. They were administered colored/standard progressive matrices and Malin's intelligence scale for assessing their intelligence quotient and NIMHANS SLD index and developmental psychopathology checklist to study psychopathology. Chi-square test and ANOVA were done. Results: The prevalence of SLD in schools is found out to be 6.6%. There was a significant association with prematurity, cesarean section, delayed speech, and family history of SLD. Among comorbidities of SLD, association with ADHD alone has been found to be significant. Conclusion: The most common type of SLD is combined type comorbid with ADHD. There is a need for early identification of learning disabilities in schools so that with early recognition and remedial intervention children can be helped with to cope with studies. PMID:28250563

  11. INDEXING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Kock, L.J.

    1959-09-22

    A device is presented for loading and unloading fuel elements containing material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy. The device comprises a combination of mechanical features Including a base, a lever pivotally attached to the base, an Indexing plate on the base parallel to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed In rows, each aperture having a keyway, an Index pin movably disposed to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed in rows, each aperture having a keyway, an index pin movably disposed on the lever normal to the plane rotation, a key on the pin, a sleeve on the lever spaced from and parallel to the index pin, a pair of pulleys and a cable disposed between them, an open collar rotatably attached to the sleeve and linked to one of the pulleys, a pin extending from the collar, and a bearing movably mounted in the sleeve and having at least two longitudinal grooves in the outside surface.

  12. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is adenosine the common link?

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-10-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the 'adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities' implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic 'comorbidity model', in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain co-morbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions.

  13. Sub-Diagnostic Psychiatric Comorbidity in Alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Fein, George; Di Sclafani, Victoria; Finn, Peter; Scheiner, Diane L.

    2007-01-01

    Background Psychiatric comorbidity in alcohol use disorders is clearly established, however most studies ignore data on psychiatric symptom counts that do not meet criteria for a diagnosis. We examined psychiatric symptom counts and psychological measures in the domains of anxiety, mood and externalizing pathology in 48 long-term abstinent alcoholics (LTAA) compared to 48 age/gender comparable light/non-drinking controls(NC). Methods Continuous measures of pathology (i.e., symptoms counts and psychological assessments) in each domain were compared between groups for: 1) all study participants, 2) excluding individuals with a lifetime psychiatric diagnosis in the domain, and 3) excluding individuals with a current psychiatric diagnosis in the domain. Results Psychiatric symptom counts and psychological pathology were greater in LTAA than NC. The differences between groups on these measures were not reduced by removal of individuals with lifetime or current diagnoses. Conclusions The bulk of the difference between LTAA and NC in psychiatric illness was carried by sub-diagnostic psychopathology. In comparison to the limited view provided by using only symptomatology that meets criteria for a diagnosis, the use of continuous measures of psychiatric symptomatology and psychological abnormality yields a much more accurate picture of psychiatric illness co-occurring with alcoholism. PMID:16965876

  14. Comorbidity of personality disorders with alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Mellos, Eleftherios; Liappas, Ioannis; Paparrigopoulos, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    There is high comorbidity of alcohol dependence with mood, anxiety, substance abuse and personality disorders. Personality disorders, in particular, are considered to be an important contributing and/or predisposing factor in the pathogenesis, clinical course and treatment outcome of alcohol dependence. According to clinical and epidemiological studies, the prevalence of personality disorders in alcoholism ranges from as low as 22-40% to as high as 58-78%. The literature has focused primarily on antisocial and borderline personality disorders; however, almost the whole spectrum of personality disorders can be encountered in alcohol dependence, such as the dependent, avoidant, paranoid and others. A number of factors, such as sampling methods, diagnostic criteria used or assessment procedures applied, may explain this wide variation. The quest of a distinct 'alcoholic personality' dates from the first half of the 20th century but failed to reveal consistent and strong substantiation. However, renewed efforts provided evidence for the importance of impulsivity/ disinhibition and neuroticism/negative affectivity in the development of alcohol dependence; the role of other personality traits such as extraversion/sociability is still unclear. These findings led to a number of typologies, some of the most popular and influential being those of Cloninger, Babor, and Lesch.

  15. Comorbid medical illness in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Forty, Liz; Ulanova, Anna; Jones, Lisa; Jones, Ian; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Fraser, Christine; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Hosang, Georgina M.; Rivera, Margarita; Craddock, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with a mental health disorder appear to be at increased risk of medical illness. Aims To examine rates of medical illnesses in patients with bipolar disorder (n = 1720) and to examine the clinical course of the bipolar illness according to lifetime medical illness burden. Method Participants recruited within the UK were asked about the lifetime occurrence of 20 medical illnesses, interviewed using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) and diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. Results We found significantly increased rates of several medical illnesses in our bipolar sample. A high medical illness burden was associated with a history of anxiety disorder, rapid cycling mood episodes, suicide attempts and mood episodes with a typically acute onset. Conclusions Bipolar disorder is associated with high rates of medical illness. This comorbidity needs to be taken into account by services in order to improve outcomes for patients with bipolar disorder and also in research investigating the aetiology of affective disorder where shared biological pathways may play a role. PMID:25359927

  16. Prevalence of Comorbidities, Overweight and Obesity in an International Sample of People with Multiple Sclerosis and Associations with Modifiable Lifestyle Factors.

    PubMed

    Marck, Claudia Helena; Neate, Sandra Leanne; Taylor, Keryn Louise; Weiland, Tracey Joy; Jelinek, George Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disorder, often affecting young people. Comorbid disorders such as depression, anxiety and hypertension are common and can affect disease course, treatment, and quality of life (QOL) of people with MS (PwMS). The associations between comorbidities, body mass index (BMI) and health outcomes are not well studied in MS, although research shows most PwMS are overweight. Most data on the prevalence of comorbidities and obesity in PwMS comes from North American populations. This study describes the prevalence of comorbidities, overweight and obesity and associations with modifiable factors in an international sample of PwMS recruited online through social media, MS societies and websites. The online survey consisted of validated and researcher-devised instruments to assess self-reported health outcomes and lifestyle behaviors. Of the 2399 respondents, 22.5% were overweight, 19.4% were obese and 67.2% reported at least one comorbidity, with back pain (36.2%), depression (31.7%), anxiety (29.1%) and arthritis (13.7%) most prevalent and most limiting in daily activities. Obesity and most comorbid disorders were significantly more prevalent in North America. Obese participants were more likely to have comorbidities, especially diabetes (OR 4.8) and high blood pressure (OR 4.5) but also depression (OR 2.2). Being overweight, obese, or a former, or current smoker was associated with an increase in the number of comorbidities; while healthy diet, physical activity (borderline significant) and moderate alcohol consumption were associated with decreased number of comorbidities. Increasing number of comorbidities was related to worse QOL, increased odds of disability and prior relapse. Obese PwMS had higher odds of disability and lower QOL. The associations between BMI, comorbidities and health outcomes are likely to be bi-directional and associated with lifestyle behaviors. Preventing and treating comorbid disorders and obesity in

  17. Association of Comorbid Psychopathology with the Duration of Cannabis Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Richard F.; Kosty, Derek B.; Seeley, John R.; Gau, Jeff M.; Duncan, Susan C.; Walker, Denise D.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Risk factors for the development of cannabis use disorders (CUDs) have been well–researched. Comparatively little is known, however, about factors associated with the persistence of CUDs over time. This research explored whether the temporal sequencing of comorbid psychiatric disorders in relation to the onset of the index CUD episode were associated with the length of this episode. Four comprehensive diagnostic assessments were conducted between ages 16 and 30 with a large and regionally representative community sample (n = 816), among which 173 persons were diagnosed with a lifetime CUD. In separate unadjusted analyses, any internalizing disorder and any mood disorder with onset prior to that of the index CUD episode were each significantly and negatively associated with CUD duration. These effects, however, were reduced to trend-level in adjusted analyses that controlled for putative confounders. Following the onset of the index CUD episode, the subsequent occurrence of any axis I disorder, internalizing disorder, externalizing disorder, or other substance use disorder during the index CUD episode was significantly and positively associated with the duration of that episode in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. These findings collectively suggest that the presence of internalizing-spectrum disorders prior to the onset of the index CUD episode affords some modest protection against protracted episodes, whereas the emergence of broad-spectrum psychopathology within the index CUD episode, most notably non-cannabis substance use disorders, is associated with greater disorder persistence. The relevance of these findings for various motivational models of cannabis addiction is discussed. PMID:26766543

  18. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Comorbidities of Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Miller, Iben Marie; McAndrew, Rachel J; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to estimate a true prevalence of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) because it is underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed. Prevalences have been reported from 0.00033% to 4.1%. The incidence seems to be rising. In addition to dermatologic symptoms, HS is associated with metabolic syndrome, and increased cardiovascular risk. The majority of HS patients are smokers. Additional somatic comorbidities complicating HS include autoimmune conditions, follicular syndromes, rheumatologic conditions, and malignancies. HS patients are troubled by psychological comorbidities. When treating HS patients it is imperative not only to treat the skin symptoms, but also address the screening and treatment of possible comorbidities.

  19. Comorbidities and cognitive functioning: implications for nursing research and practice.

    PubMed

    Vance, David; Larsen, Kirsten I; Eagerton, Gregory; Wright, Mary A

    2011-08-01

    Optimal cognitive functioning is necessary to successfully negotiate one's environment, yet medical conditions can interfere with brain health, thus negatively impacting cognitive functioning. Such comorbidities include hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, depression, and HIV, as well as others. The physiological properties of these comorbidities can reduce one's cognitive reserve and limit one's cognitive efficiency. This article provides an overview of a few common comorbidities known to affect cognitive functioning and addresses ways in which cognitive functioning may be ameliorated and protected or mitigated in lieu of cognitive declines in such clinical populations. Implications for nursing practice and research are posited.

  20. COMORBIDITIES IN PATIENTS WITH CRYSTAL DISEASES AND HYPERURICEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Sattui, Sebastian E; Singh, Jasvinder A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Crystal arthropathies are among the most common causes of painful inflammatory arthritis. Gout, the most common example, has been associated with cardiovascular and renal disease. In the last years, evidence on these associations and those involving other comorbidities, such as the metabolic syndrome, have emerged and established the importance of asymptomatic hyperuricemia. This review article presents an update on evidence, both experimental and clinical, describing associations between hyperuricemia, gout, and several comorbidities. Causality on calcium pyrophosphate arthropathy and associated comorbidities is also briefly reviewed. PMID:24703346

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Insomnia Comorbid with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Lack, Leon; Sweetman, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Insomnia is often comorbid with obstructive sleep apnea. It reduces positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy acceptance and adherence. Comorbid patients show greater daytime impairments and poorer health outcomes. The insomnia often goes undiagnosed, undertreated, or untreated. Pharmacotherapy is not recommended for long-term treatment. Although care should be taken administering behavioral therapies to patients with elevated sleepiness, cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBTi) is an effective and durable nondrug therapy that reduces symptoms and may increase the effectiveness of PAP therapy. Sleep clinics should be alert to comorbid insomnia and provide adequate diagnostic tools and clinicians with CBTi expertise.

  2. Late-life comorbid insomnia: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    McCrae, Christina S

    2009-02-01

    Changing sleep architecture in the elderly may increase their vulnerability to comorbid insomnia. Common comorbid conditions include chronic pain, depression, nocturia, and neurologic conditions such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Diagnosing and treating comorbid insomnia in an older population poses special challenges for clinicians given the variety of coexisting medical and psychological conditions, polypharmacy, and the potential adverse effects of the most commonly used medications for insomnia in this population. Thus, the use of nonpharmacologic treatments, such as cognitive behavior therapy and relaxation techniques, is recommended before any medical approaches.

  3. Frequency of obesity and comorbidities in medical students

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Yasir; Al-Swailmi, Farhan Khashim; Al-Enazi, Shehab Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of obesity disorders and their co-morbidities in medical students. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Faculty of Medicine, Northern Border University, Ar’ar, Saudi Arabia. All medical students who consented to participate were included in the study. Their relevant information was recorded on a structured proforma. Weight and height of the participants were measured using calibrated manual weighing scale and Body mass index (BMI) was calculated. The obtained results were interpreted according to classification of body weight disorders. The participants who turned out to be over-weight and obese were further assessed for hypertension, diabetes mellitus and gallstones. The collected data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 20. Results: A total of 405 students participated in study, age range was 19-25 years. Male were 169 (41.7%) and female students were 236(58.3%). Family history of obesity was present in 34.3%. Out of 405 students, 126 were having BMI between 25 and 45.6, among them 34(8.4%) students were obese and 88 (21.7%) were overweight. Sixty two (15.3%) among them were male and 64 (15.8%) female. Fourteen (11.1%) were hypertensive and 9(7.1%) were having gall stones. Conclusion: The frequency of obesity among medical students was 8.4%. Increasing frequency of obesity associated with unhealthy life style needs to be controlled at national level to raise a healthy generation and to reduce burden on health economy. PMID:28083058

  4. Genomic Study of Cardiovascular Continuum Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Makeeva, O. A.; Sleptsov, A. A.; Kulish, E. V.; Barbarash, O. L.; Mazur, A. M.; Prokhorchuk, E. B.; Chekanov, N. N.; Stepanov, V. A.; Puzyrev, V. P.

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidity or a combination of several diseases in the same individual is a common and widely investigated phenomenon. However, the genetic background for non–random disease combinations is not fully understood. Modern technologies and approaches to genomic data analysis enable the investigation of the genetic profile of patients burdened with several diseases (polypathia, disease conglomerates) and its comparison with the profiles of patients with single diseases. An association study featuring three groups of patients with various combinations of cardiovascular disorders and a control group of relatively healthy individuals was conducted. Patients were selected as follows: presence of only one disease, ischemic heart disease (IHD); a combination of two diseases, IHD and arterial hypertension (AH); and a combination of several diseases, including IHD, AH, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypercholesterolemia (HC). Genotyping was performed using the “My Gene” genomic service (www.i–gene.ru). An analysis of 1,400 polymorphic genetic variants and their associations with the studied phenotypes are presented. A total of 14 polymorphic variants were associated with the phenotype “IHD only,” including those in the APOB, CD226, NKX2–5, TLR2, DPP6, KLRB1, VDR, SCARB1, NEDD4L, and SREBF2 genes, and intragenic variants rs12487066, rs7807268, rs10896449, and rs944289. A total of 13 genetic markers were associated with the “IHD and AH” phenotype, including variants in the BTNL2, EGFR, CNTNAP2, SCARB1, and HNF1A genes, and intragenic polymorphisms rs801114, rs10499194, rs13207033, rs2398162, rs6501455, and rs1160312. A total of 14 genetic variants were associated with a combination of several diseases of cardiovascular continuum (CVC), including those in the TAS2R38, SEZ6L, APOA2, KLF7, CETP, ITGA4, RAD54B, LDLR, and MTAP genes, along with intragenic variants rs1333048, rs1333049, and rs6501455. One common genetic marker was identified for the

  5. The Joint Effects of Lifestyle Factors and Comorbidities on the Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Large Chinese Retrospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai; Zhou, Yangyang; Ren, Shujuan; Wu, Jiajin; Zhu, Meiying; Chen, Donghui; Yang, Haiyan; Wang, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. In previous epidemiologic studies, the respective correlation between lifestyle factors and comorbidity and CRC has been extensively studied. However, little is known about their joint effects on CRC. Methods We conducted a retrospective case-control study of 1,144 diagnosed CRC patients and 60,549 community controls. A structured questionnaire was administered to the participants about their socio-demographic factors, anthropometric measures, comorbidity history and lifestyle factors. Logistic regression model was used to calculate the odds ratio (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for each factor. According to the results from logistic regression model, we further developed healthy lifestyle index (HLI) and comorbidity history index (CHI) to investigate their independent and joint effects on CRC risk. Results Four lifestyle factors (including physical activities, sleep, red meat and vegetable consumption) and four types of comorbidity (including diabetes, hyperlipidemia, history of inflammatory bowel disease and polyps) were found to be independently associated with the risk of CRC in multivariant logistic regression model. Intriguingly, their combined pattern- HLI and CHI demonstrated significant correlation with CRC risk independently (ORHLI: 3.91, 95%CI: 3.13–4.88; ORCHI: 2.49, 95%CI: 2.11–2.93) and jointly (OR: 10.33, 95%CI: 6.59–16.18). Conclusions There are synergistic effects of lifestyle factors and comorbidity on the risk of colorectal cancer in the Chinese population. PMID:26710070

  6. Common comorbidities in women and men with epilepsy and the relationship between number of comorbidities and health plan paid costs in 2010.

    PubMed

    Wilner, A N; Sharma, B K; Soucy, A; Thompson, A; Krueger, A

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this observational study were to determine the prevalence of the most common comorbidities in women and men with epilepsy and to demonstrate the relationship of these comorbidities to health plan paid costs. Data for 6621 members with epilepsy (52% women, 48% men) from eight commercial health plans were analyzed. The presence of comorbidities in people with epilepsy was identified by searching health insurance claims for 29 prespecified comorbidity-specific diagnosis codes. More women (50%) than men (43%) with epilepsy had one or more of the 29 comorbidities (p<0.05). The top 10 comorbidities for women and their relative prevalences were psychiatric diagnosis (16%), hypertension (12%), asthma (11%), hyperlipidemia (11%), headache (7%), diabetes (6%), urinary tract infection (5%), hypothyroidism (5%), anemia (5%), and migraine (4%). For men, the top 10 comorbidities and their relative prevalences were psychiatric diagnosis (15%), hyperlipidemia (12%), hypertension (12%), asthma (8%), diabetes (5%), headache (4%), cancer (4%), coronary artery disease (3%), anemia (3%), and gastroesophageal reflux disease (3%). Seven of the top 10 comorbidities were common to both women and men. Psychiatric diagnosis was the only comorbidity among the top five comorbidities for all age groups. The presence of one comorbidity approximately tripled the health-care cost for that member compared with the cost for members who had no comorbidities. Additional comorbidities generally further increased costs. The increase in health-care cost per member per month ($) with increase in number of comorbidities was greater for men than for women (p<0.05).

  7. Axis II comorbidity and developmental adversity in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Steiger, H; Jabalpurwala, S; Champagne, J

    1996-09-01

    Using data from 61 bulimic patients, we evaluated associations among axis II disturbances, psychopathological traits, eating symptoms, and adverse developmental experiences (e.g., childhood sexual and physical abuse). Findings showed likelihood of childhood abuse to increase markedly in function of comorbid personality pathology. In addition, comorbid borderline personality disorder was found to be a better predictor of object-relations disturbances, primitive defenses, and hostility than developmental adversity was. Although marked trait disturbances were strongly associated with borderline personality disorder (more than with severity of childhood adversity), the converse seemed true of severity of bulimic symptoms (i.e., comorbid personality disorder had no predictive effects, whereas developmental variables had inconsistent effects). Bulimic and general psychopathological symptoms, thus, seemed to have intriguingly independent determinants. We interpret these findings as showing that the observed association between developmental adversity and bulimic syndromes may, in large part, be attributable to comorbid personality pathology.

  8. Study Parses Comorbidity of Cannabis Use and Social Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Use and Social Anxiety Study Parses Comorbidity of Cannabis Use and Social Anxiety Email Facebook Twitter October ... difficulties and other cannabis-related problems. SAD and Cannabis Use Severity Further analysis suggested that people with ...

  9. Metacognitive Therapy for Comorbid Anxiety Disorders: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sverre U.; Hoffart, Asle

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to systematically evaluate a generic model of metacognitive therapy (MCT) with a highly comorbid anxiety disorder patient, that had been treated with diagnosis-specific cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) without significant effect. Traditionally, CBT has progressed within a disorder-specific approach, however, it has been suggested that this could be less optimal with highly comorbid patients. To address comorbidity, transdiagnostic treatment models have been emerging. This case study used an AB-design with repeated assessments during each therapy session and a 1-year follow-up assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of MCT. Following 8 sessions of MCT, significant decrease in anxiety and depression symptoms, as well as loss of diagnostic status was observed. Outcomes were preserved at 12 months follow up. The generic model of MCT seems promising as an approach to highly comorbid mixed anxiety depression patients. Further testing using more powered methodologies are needed. PMID:27746757

  10. Heart failure in primary care: co-morbidity and utilization of health care resources

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Montserrat; García-Olmos, Luis M; García-Sagredo, Pilar; Alberquilla, Ángel; López-Rodríguez, Fernando; Pascual, Mario; Muñoz, Adolfo; Salvador, Carlos H; Monteagudo, José L; Otero-Puime, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Background. In order to ensure proper management of primary care (PC) services, the efficiency of the health professionals tasked with such services must be known. Patients with heart failure (HF) are characterized by advanced age, high co-morbidity and high resource utilization. Objective. To ascertain PC resource utilization by HF patients and variability in the management of such patients by GPs. Methods. Descriptive, cross-sectional study targeting a population attended by 129 GPs over the course of 1 year. All patients with diagnosis of HF in their clinical histories were included, classified using the Adjusted Clinical Group system and then grouped into six resource utilization bands (RUBs). Resource utilization and Efficiency Index were both calculated. Results. One hundred per cent of patients with HF were ranked in RUBs 3, 4 and 5. The highest GP visit rate was 20 and the lowest in excess of 10 visits per year. Prescription drug costs for these patients ranged from €885 to €1422 per patient per year. Health professional efficiency varied notably, even after adjustment for co-morbidity (Efficiency Index Variation Ratio of 28.27 for visits and 404.29 for prescription drug cost). Conclusions. Patients with HF register a high utilization of resources, and there is great variability in the management of such patients by health professionals, which cannot be accounted for by the degree of case complexity. PMID:23776041

  11. Psychological and Personality Predictors of Weight Loss and Comorbid Metabolic Changes After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Agüera, Zaida; García-Ruiz-de-Gordejuela, Amador; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Sanchez, Isabel; Baño, Marta; Camacho, Lucía; Granero, Roser; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Virgili, Nuria; Lopez-Urdiales, Rafael; de Bernabe, Mónica Montserrat-Gil; Garrido, Pilar; Monasterio, Carmen; Steward, Trevor; Pujol-Gebelli, Jordi; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Menchón, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Bariatric surgery (BS) has proven to be the most effective treatment for weight loss and for improving comorbidities in severe obesity. A comprehensive psychological assessment prior to surgery is proposed to prepare patients for a successful post-surgical outcome. Therefore, the main aim of the present study was to assess psychological and personality predictors of BS outcome. The sample comprised 139 severely obese patients who underwent BS. Assessment measures included the Eating Disorders Inventory-2, the Symptom Checklist-Revised and the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised. Our results show that favourable BS outcome, after 2 years follow up, was associated with younger age, less depression, moderate anxiety symptoms and high cooperativeness levels. Likewise, metabolic improvements were found to be linked to younger age and certain psychopathological factors. In conclusion, our findings suggest that age, baseline body mass index, psychopathological indexes and personality traits predict successful BS outcome.

  12. Enhanced Cognitive Rehabilitation to Treat Comorbid TBI and PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0641 TITLE: Enhanced Cognitive Rehabilitation to Treat Comorbid TBI and PTSD PRINCIPAL...DATES COVERED 15 Sep 2013 – 14 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhanced Cognitive Rehabilitation to Treat Comorbid TBI and PTSD 5a. CONTRACT...therapy (CPT), an empirically supported treatment for PTSD, in which CPT is enhanced with compensatory cognitive rehabilitation principles. The

  13. Incorporating comorbidities into latent treatment pattern mining for clinical pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhengxing; Dong, Wei; Ji, Lei; He, Chunhua; Duan, Huilong

    2016-02-01

    In healthcare organizational settings, the design of a clinical pathway (CP) is challenging since patients following a particular pathway may have not only one single first-diagnosis but also several typical comorbidities, and thus it requires different disciplines involved to put together their partial knowledge about the overall pathway. Although many data mining techniques have been proposed to discover latent treatment information for CP analysis and reconstruction from a large volume of clinical data, they are specific to extract nontrivial information about the therapy and treatment of the first-diagnosis. The influence of comorbidities on adopting essential treatments is crucial for a pathway but has seldom been explored. This study proposes to extract latent treatment patterns that characterize essential treatments for both first-diagnosis and typical comorbidities from the execution data of a pathway. In particular, we propose a generative statistical model to extract underlying treatment patterns, unveil the latent associations between diagnosis labels (including both first-diagnosis and comorbidities) and treatments, and compute the contribution of comorbidities in these patterns. The proposed model extends latent Dirichlet allocation with an additional layer for diagnosis modeling. It first generates a set of latent treatment patterns from diagnosis labels, followed by sampling treatments from each pattern. We verify the effectiveness of the proposed model on a real clinical dataset containing 12,120 patient traces, which pertain to the unstable angina CP. Three treatment patterns are discovered from data, indicating latent correlations between comorbidities and treatments in the pathway. In addition, a possible medical application in terms of treatment recommendation is provided to illustrate the potential of the proposed model. Experimental results indicate that our approach can discover not only meaningful latent treatment patterns exhibiting

  14. Prazosin for Treatment With PTSD And Comorbid Alcohol Dependence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    There is a high rate of comorbidity with alcohol dependence (AD) and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The rates of PTSD among individuals with...AD are at least twice as high as those in the general population. In addition, alcohol dependence is the most common comorbid condition in men with...sleep disturbance in combat veterans with PTSD and alcohol dependence . The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of prazosis (16mg

  15. Efficacy and safety evaluation of citalopram and doxepin on sleep quality in comorbid insomnia and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junfeng; Chang, Fei; Zu, Hengbing

    2015-10-01

    Anxiety disorders are frequently comorbid with insomnia, and sleep disturbance in patients with anxiety disorders is the most common complaint. Antidepressants can affect sleep quality; however, their effect in patients with comorbid insomnia and anxiety disorders is unclear. The aim of the present study was to comprehensively evaluate the dose, treatment duration, treatment efficacy and safety of clinical citalopram and doxepin application in patients with comorbid insomnia and anxiety disorders. It was found that both citalopram (20 mg/day) and low-dose doxepin (12.5 mg/day) significantly improved sleep latency, duration and disturbances, as well as daytime dysfunction and the global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index during the 12-week treatment period. Notably, low-dose doxepin significantly improved sleep latency in patients after treatment for 8 and 12 weeks as compared with citalopram. It was further observed that both citalopram and low-dose doxepin improved anxiety. A significant and positive correlation was found between the improvement in the sleep quality and anxiety in the two treatment groups. Citalopram and low-dose doxepin both showed good efficacy and a low adverse reaction rate in the treated patients. These data support a potential application of citalopram and low-dose doxepin in the treatment of patients with comorbid insomnia and anxiety disorders.

  16. Efficacy and safety evaluation of citalopram and doxepin on sleep quality in comorbid insomnia and anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    WU, JUNFENG; CHANG, FEI; ZU, HENGBING

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are frequently comorbid with insomnia, and sleep disturbance in patients with anxiety disorders is the most common complaint. Antidepressants can affect sleep quality; however, their effect in patients with comorbid insomnia and anxiety disorders is unclear. The aim of the present study was to comprehensively evaluate the dose, treatment duration, treatment efficacy and safety of clinical citalopram and doxepin application in patients with comorbid insomnia and anxiety disorders. It was found that both citalopram (20 mg/day) and low-dose doxepin (12.5 mg/day) significantly improved sleep latency, duration and disturbances, as well as daytime dysfunction and the global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index during the 12-week treatment period. Notably, low-dose doxepin significantly improved sleep latency in patients after treatment for 8 and 12 weeks as compared with citalopram. It was further observed that both citalopram and low-dose doxepin improved anxiety. A significant and positive correlation was found between the improvement in the sleep quality and anxiety in the two treatment groups. Citalopram and low-dose doxepin both showed good efficacy and a low adverse reaction rate in the treated patients. These data support a potential application of citalopram and low-dose doxepin in the treatment of patients with comorbid insomnia and anxiety disorders. PMID:26622482

  17. Management of obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbid with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kazhungil, Firoz; Mohandas, E.

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is one of the most common comorbidities in bipolar disorder (BD). Clinicians often get perplexed in making treatment decisions when encountering comorbid OCD and BD as treatment of OCD by pharmacotherapy may induce or exacerbate mood instability and psychotherapeutic approaches for OCD may not be feasible in acute manic or depressive state of BD. In this study, we reviewed literature, whether existing guideline-based treatments of BD may be effective in OCD and whether newer agents will be of use for treating this comorbidity. We could find that treatment of such comorbid disorder is largely understudied. Adjuvant topiramate or olanzapine- selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor/clomipramine combination along with mood stabilizer is found to be effective for treating OCD in BD. Use of other conventional pharmacological agents and psychotherapy for treating comorbid OCD in BD lacks evidence and is limited to case reports. Our review also highlights the need for further studies regarding the treatment strategies in this highly prevalent comorbid disorder. PMID:28066002

  18. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is Adenosine the Common Link?

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the ‘adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities’ implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic ‘comorbidity model’, in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain comorbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  19. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Acculturation Stress Among Puerto Rican Substance Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Kevin P.; Swendsen, Joel D.; Dierker, Lisa; Canino, Glorisa; Merikangas, Kathleen R.

    2007-01-01

    Background Although acculturation to the United States has been associated with an increase in substance, mood, and anxiety disorders in Latino populations, few studies have examined this concept relative to comorbidity among these syndromes. Methods This study: (1) compares the prevalence and patterns of psychiatric comorbidity among Puerto Ricans with substance use disorders living in San Juan (Puerto Rico) to those who have migrated to New Haven (Connecticut); and (2) examines the association between acculturation-related stress and the prevalence and patterns of psychiatric comorbidity among those who have migrated to New Haven. Results Lifetime levels of nearly all comorbid psychiatric disorders among respondents with substance use disorders (SUD) was generally similar across sites. However, the risk of any co-occurring psychiatric disorder was higher among SUD cases in New Haven who reported high levels of total acculturation stress and family-specific acculturation stress. These findings were generally accounted for by associations between affective disorders and high scores on these indicators of acculturation stress. Conclusions The overall prevalence and patterns of psychiatric comorbidity are remarkably similar among Puerto Rican substance abusers whether they live in San Juan or have migrated to New Haven, thereby demonstrating robustness to differences in geographic location. Nevertheless, the degree of acculturation-related family stress is positively associated with co-occurring substance and psychiatric disorders, particularly affective disorders. Intervention in family strain related to the acculturation process may diminish the development of comorbid mental disorders and assist in implementing successful treatment of substance abuse. PMID:17543714

  20. Management of obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbid with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Kazhungil, Firoz; Mohandas, E

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is one of the most common comorbidities in bipolar disorder (BD). Clinicians often get perplexed in making treatment decisions when encountering comorbid OCD and BD as treatment of OCD by pharmacotherapy may induce or exacerbate mood instability and psychotherapeutic approaches for OCD may not be feasible in acute manic or depressive state of BD. In this study, we reviewed literature, whether existing guideline-based treatments of BD may be effective in OCD and whether newer agents will be of use for treating this comorbidity. We could find that treatment of such comorbid disorder is largely understudied. Adjuvant topiramate or olanzapine- selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor/clomipramine combination along with mood stabilizer is found to be effective for treating OCD in BD. Use of other conventional pharmacological agents and psychotherapy for treating comorbid OCD in BD lacks evidence and is limited to case reports. Our review also highlights the need for further studies regarding the treatment strategies in this highly prevalent comorbid disorder.

  1. Treating comorbid anxiety and depression: Psychosocial and pharmacological approaches

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D; Aaronson, Cindy J; Panthangi, Venkatesh; Kim, Younsuk

    2015-01-01

    Comorbid anxiety with depression predicts poor outcomes with a higher percentage of treatment resistance than either disorder occurring alone. Overlap of anxiety and depression complicates diagnosis and renders treatment challenging. A vital step in treatment of such comorbidity is careful and comprehensive diagnostic assessment. We attempt to explain various psychosocial and pharmacological approaches for treatment of comorbid anxiety and depression. For the psychosocial component, we focus only on generalized anxiety disorder based on the following theoretical models: (1) “the avoidance model”; (2) “the intolerance of uncertainty model”; (3) “the meta-cognitive model”; (4) “the emotion dysregulation model”; and (5) “the acceptance based model”. For depression, the following theoretical models are explicated: (1) “the cognitive model”; (2) “the behavioral activation model”; and (3) “the interpersonal model”. Integration of these approaches is suggested. The treatment of comorbid anxiety and depression necessitates specific psychopharmacological adjustments as compared to treating either condition alone. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are considered first-line treatment in uncomplicated depression comorbid with a spectrum of anxiety disorders. Short-acting benzodiazepines (BZDs) are an important “bridging strategy” to address an acute anxiety component. In patients with comorbid substance abuse, avoidance of BZDs is recommended and we advise using an atypical antipsychotic in lieu of BZDs. For mixed anxiety and depression comorbid with bipolar disorder, we recommend augmentation of an antidepressant with either lamotrigine or an atypical agent. Combination and augmentation therapies in the treatment of comorbid conditions vis-à-vis monotherapy may be necessary for positive outcomes. Combination therapy with tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin and selective serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (e.g., duloxetine) are

  2. Comorbid generalized anxiety disorder and its association with quality of life in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yongjie; Cao, Zhongqiang; Yang, Mei; Xi, Xiaoyan; Guo, Yiyang; Fang, Maosheng; Cheng, Lijuan; Du, Yukai

    2017-01-01

    The comorbidity of major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common and often predicts poorer outcomes than either disorder alone. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of comorbid GAD and its association with quality of life (QOL) among MDD patients. A total of 1225 psychiatric outpatients were screened using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Those who scored ≥8 on the HADS were interviewed using DSM-IV criteria by two senior psychiatrists. Patients diagnosed with MDD were further assessed using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, Social Support Rating Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and World Health Organization QOL Scale, brief version (WHOQOL-BREF). Ultimately, 667 patients were diagnosed with MDD, of 71.7% of whom had GAD. Compared to those with MDD alone, comorbid patients had lower scores on the physical (38.64 ± 10.35 vs.36.54 ± 12.32, P = 0.026) and psychological (35.54 ± 12.98 vs. 30.61 ± 14.66, P < 0.001) domains of the WHOQOL-BREF. The association between comorbid GAD and poor QOL on the two domains remained statistically significant in the multiple linear regression (unstandardized coefficients: −1.97 and −4.65, P < 0.001). In conclusion, the prevalence of comorbid GAD in MDD patients is high, and co-occurring GAD may exacerbate impaired physical and psychological QOL in Chinese MDD patients. PMID:28098176

  3. Emerging Comorbidities in Adult Asthma: Risks, Clinical Associations, and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kankaanranta, Hannu; Kauppi, Paula; Tuomisto, Leena E.; Ilmarinen, Pinja

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Most studies with asthma have been performed in patients being otherwise healthy. However, in real life, comorbid diseases are very common in adult patients. We review here the emerging comorbid conditions to asthma such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2), and cardiac and psychiatric diseases. Their role as risk factors for incident asthma and whether they affect clinical asthma are evaluated. Obesity, independently or as a part of metabolic syndrome, DM2, and depression are risk factors for incident asthma. In contrast, the effects of comorbidities on clinical asthma are less well-known and mostly studies are lacking. Cross-sectional studies in obese asthmatics suggest that they may have less well controlled asthma and worse lung function. However, no long-term clinical follow-up studies with these comorbidities and asthma were identified. These emerging comorbidities often occur in the same multimorbid adult patient and may have in common metabolic pathways and inflammatory or other alterations such as early life exposures, systemic inflammation, inflammasome, adipokines, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, lung mechanics, mitochondrial dysfunction, disturbed nitric oxide metabolism, and leukotrienes. PMID:27212806

  4. Comorbidities, Social Impact, and Quality of Life in Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Valsamma; Cavanna, Andrea E; Robertson, Mary M

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is more than having motor and vocal tics, and this review will examine the varied comorbidities as well as the social impact and quality of life (QoL) in individuals with TS. The relationship between any individual and his/her environment is complex, and this is further exaggerated in the case of a person with TS. For example, tics may play a significant role in shaping the person's experiences, perceptions, and interactions with the environment. Furthermore, associated clinical features, comorbidities, and coexisting psychopathologies may compound or alter this relationship. In this regard, the common comorbidities include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and disruptive behaviors, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorder, and coexistent problems include anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, which can all lead to poorer psychosocial functioning and QoL. Thus, the symptoms of TS and the associated comorbid conditions may interact to result in a vicious cycle or a downward spiraling of negative experiences and poor QoL. The stigma and social maladjustment in TS and the social exclusion, bullying, and discrimination are considered to be caused in large part by misperceptions of the disorder by teachers, peers, and the wider community. Improved community and professional awareness about TS and related comorbidities and other psychopathologies as well as the provision of multidisciplinary services to meet the complex needs of this clinical population are critical. Future research to inform the risk and resilience factors for successful long-term outcomes is also warranted.

  5. Psoriasis comorbidities: complications and benefits of immunobiological treatment*

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, André Vicente Esteves; Romiti, Ricardo; Souza, Cacilda da Silva; Paschoal, Renato Soriani; Milman, Laura de Mattos; Meneghello, Luana Pizarro

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, different studies have converged to evidence the high prevalence of comorbidities in subjects with psoriasis. Although a causal relation has not been fully elucidated, genetic relation, inflammatory pathways and/or common environmental factors appear to be underlying the development of psoriasis and the metabolic comorbidities. The concept of psoriasis as a systemic disease directed the attention of the scientific community in order to investigate the extent to which therapeutic interventions influence the onset and evolution of the most prevalent comorbidities in patients with psoriasis. This study presents scientific evidence of the influence of immunobiological treatments for psoriasis available in Brazil (infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept and ustekinumab) on the main comorbidities related to psoriasis. It highlights the importance of the inflammatory burden on the clinical outcome of patients, not only on disease activity, but also on the comorbidities. In this sense, systemic treatments, whether immunobiologicals or classic, can play a critical role to effectively control the inflammatory burden in psoriatic patients. PMID:28099601

  6. Comorbid anxiety and neurocognitive dysfunctions in children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Bloemsma, J Monique; Boer, Frits; Arnold, Renée; Banaschewski, Tobias; Faraone, Stephen V; Buitelaar, Jan K; Sergeant, Joseph A; Rommelse, Nanda; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2013-04-01

    Previous research established that children with ADHD and comorbid anxiety have a later age of ADHD onset, show less off-task and hyperactive behavior, and have more school problems than children with ADHD alone. Comorbid anxiety appears to ameliorate behavioral inhibition deficits, worsen working memory problems, and lengthen reaction times in ADHD. This study investigated the effect of comorbid anxiety on a broad range of neurocognitive functions and includes child-, parent- and teacher reports of anxiety. The sample consisted of 509 children in the age range 5-19 years, including 238 children with a diagnosis of ADHD combined subtype and 271 normal control children. Children were tested on a broad battery of neurocognitive tasks that proved highly sensitive to ADHD in previous work. Linear Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to estimate the effect of comorbid anxiety on the neurocognitive functions. Child reported anxiety was associated with slower motor speed and response speed and better behavioral inhibition. Teacher reported anxiety was related to worse time production. Parent reported anxiety was not significantly associated with any of the neurocognitive functions. Compared to parent and teacher reports of anxiety, child reported comorbid anxiety shows foremost the largest associations with the neurocognitive dysfunctions observed in children with ADHD. This stresses the importance of including child self-reported anxiety assessments in clinical and research practice.

  7. Occurrence of Comorbidities before and after Soft Tissue Sarcoma Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    van Herk-Sukel, Myrthe P. P.; Shantakumar, Sumitra; Overbeek, Lucy I. H.; van Boven, Hester; Penning-van Beest, Fernie J. A.; Herings, Ron M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Data is limited on the burden of common comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), respiratory disease and diabetes, or comorbidities related to cancer and its treatment, such as anemia and depression, in patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Patients and Methods. From the Dutch Pathology Registry linked to the PHARMO database (including data on drug use and hospitalizations), 533 patients with STS were selected during 2000–2007 and matched 1 : 10 to cancer-free controls. The occurrences of comorbidities were assessed in the 12 months before and after STS diagnosis. Results. STS patients were 2–4 times more likely to have comorbidities at diagnosis compared with cancer-free controls. The incidence of CVD, anemia, and depression after STS diagnosis differed significantly from cancer-free controls and decreased during followup from 40–124 per 1,000 person-years (py) during the first six months to 11–38 per 1,000 py more than 12 months after diagnosis. The incidence of respiratory disease and diabetes among STS patients remained stable during followup (5–21 per 1,000 py) and did not differ significantly from cancer-free controls. Conclusions. STS patients were more likely to have comorbidities before cancer diagnosis and to develop CVD, anemia, and depression after diagnosis compared to cancer-free controls. PMID:22690132

  8. Impact of age and comorbidity on survival in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Eeghen, Elmer E.; Bakker, Sandra D.; van Bochove, Aart

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer are often excluded from clinical trials based on age or a poor performance score. However, 70% of colorectal cancer is diagnosed in patients over 65. Evaluation on the influence of age and comorbidity on survival and cause of death in a non-selected population. Methods Included were 621 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer. An extensive chart review was performed for 392 patients with colon cancer and 143 patients with rectal cancer. Analyses were performed separately for both groups. Results Median survival of colon cancer patients was 5.13 years, 131 patients (34.3%) died from tumour progression. Age and comorbidity were significant predictors for overall survival (P<0.001). Age was also a significant predictor of cause of death (P=0.001). In rectal cancer patients median survival was 4.67 years, 51 (35.7%) of patients died from tumour progression. Neither age nor comorbidity was significant predictors of survival. Age was a significant predictor of cause of death (P<0.001). Conclusions In colon cancer patient age and comorbidity predict survival. This represents possible bias or a reduced survival benefit of treatment, and is an indication that colon cancer is not the prognosis defining illness in the majority of patients. In rectal cancer patients neither age or comorbidity significantly impacted survival. PMID:26697191

  9. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus; Linton, Steven J; Flink, Ida K; Granberg, Sarah; Danermark, Berth; Norell-Clarke, Annika

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-I) for insomnia on patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment. A randomized controlled design was used with a 3-month follow-up. Thirty-two patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment were randomized to either CBT-I or a waitlist condition (WLC). The primary outcome was insomnia severity. Secondary outcomes were sleep diary parameters, dysfunction, anxiety, and depression. Compared to WLC, CBT-I resulted in lower insomnia severity at post-treatment and at follow-up (d = 1.18-1.56). Relative to WLC, CBT-I also led, at both assessment points, to reduced total wake time (d = 1.39) and increased sleep restoration (d = 1.03-1.07) and sleep quality (d = 0.91-1.16). Both groups increased their total sleep time, but no significant group difference emerged. Compared to WLC, CBT-I resulted in higher function (d = 0.81-0.96) and lower anxiety (d = 1.29-1.30) at both assessment points. Neither CBT-I nor WLC led to improvement on depression. Based on the Insomnia Severity Index, more CBT-I (53-77%) than WLC participants (0-7%) were treatment responders. Also, more CBT-I (24%) than WLC participants (0%) remitted. In patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment, CBT-I was effective in decreasing insomnia severity, subjective sleep parameters, dysfunction, and anxiety. These findings are in line with previous results on the effects of CBT-I in other medical conditions.

  10. Implicit and Explicit Self-Esteem in Current, Remitted, Recovered, and Comorbid Depression and Anxiety Disorders: The NESDA Study

    PubMed Central

    van Tuijl, Lonneke A.; Glashouwer, Klaske A.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Tendeiro, Jorge N.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; de Jong, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dual processing models of psychopathology emphasize the relevance of differentiating between deliberative self-evaluative processes (explicit self-esteem; ESE) and automatically-elicited affective self-associations (implicit self-esteem; ISE). It has been proposed that both low ESE and ISE would be involved in major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders (AD). Further, it has been hypothesized that MDD and AD may result in a low ISE “scar” that may contribute to recurrence after remission. However, the available evidence provides no straightforward support for the relevance of low ISE in MDD/AD, and studies testing the relevance of discrepant SE even showed that especially high ISE combined with low ESE is predictive of the development of internalizing symptoms. However, these earlier findings have been limited by small sample sizes, poorly defined groups in terms of comorbidity and phase of the disorders, and by using inadequate indices of discrepant SE. Therefore, this study tested further the proposed role of ISE and discrepant SE in a large-scale study allowing for stricter differentiation between groups and phase of disorder. Method In the context of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA), we selected participants with current MDD (n = 60), AD (n = 111), and comorbid MDD/AD (n = 71), remitted MDD (n = 41), AD (n = 29), and comorbid MDD/AD (n = 14), recovered MDD (n = 136) and AD (n = 98), and never MDD or AD controls (n = 382). The Implicit Association Test was used to index ISE and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale indexed ESE. Results Controls reported higher ESE than all other groups, and current comorbid MDD/AD had lower ESE than all other clinical groups. ISE was only lower than controls in current comorbid AD/MDD. Discrepant self-esteem (difference between ISE and ESE) was not associated with disorder status once controlling for ESE. Limitations Cross-sectional design limits causal inferences. Conclusion Findings

  11. WANTED: Fully Automated Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Royal

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of indexing focuses on the possibilities of fully automated indexing. Topics discussed include controlled indexing languages such as subject heading lists and thesauri, free indexing languages, natural indexing languages, computer-aided indexing, expert systems, and the need for greater creativity to further advance automated indexing.…

  12. Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bøje, Charlotte Rotbøl

    2014-01-01

    The significant association with tobacco and alcohol combined with advanced age at time of diagnosis predispose head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients to increased risk of comorbidities. The presence of comorbidity affects treatment, treatment selection and subsequent outcome. Multiple studies have demonstrated comorbidity to be a strong prognostic factor for survival, and therefore comorbidity can be a major confounder in clinical trials. This review provides a summary of the current literature on comorbidity in head and neck cancer, measurements of comorbidity, the impact of comorbidity on treatment, treatment selection, and survival. A systematic search was performed in six electronic databases. In all, 31 papers were selected for this review. A meta-analysis on the prognostic impact of comorbidity was performed including 10 studies. Furthermore, 21 studies concerning comorbidity were reviewed. Several valid indices to classify comorbidity were described in the literature, none proven to be superior over the other. The prevalence of comorbidity increased with age and the presence of comorbidity influenced treatment and treatment selection. Furthermore, comorbidity was associated with lower socio economic status and increased the risk of early retirement after treatment. The meta-analysis on comorbidity as a prognostic factor, including 22,932 patients, showed that overall survival was significantly worsened among patients with comorbidity (HR=1.38 (1.32-1.43)). Increasing comorbidity-score was associated with increased risk of death. Comorbidity is important in HNSCC and significantly impacts on overall survival. Trials concerning HNSCC should always include information on comorbidity and randomized trials should stratify patients according to comorbidity in order to avoid bias in the study.

  13. Comprehensive therapeutic approach for patients with heart failure and comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Laiglesia, F J; Garcés-Horna, V; Formiga, F

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure increases with age and is accompanied by other diseases, which are encompassed within a «cardiometabolic phenotype». Their interrelation changes the evolution and treatment that each disease would have in isolation. Patients with heart failure and comorbidity are frail and complex. They require a comprehensive assessment (not just biomedical), which includes functional, cognitive, affective and psychosocial aspects. The overall treatment, which is not covered in the clinical practice guidelines, should adapt to each and every one of the comorbidities. Polypharmacy should be avoided as much as possible, due to its interactions and reduced adherence. Treatment needs to be optimised and adapted to the evolutionary phase of the disease and the specific needs of each patient. The complexity of the care process for patients with heart failure and comorbidities requires the coordination of healthcare providers and support from family and others involved in the patient's care.

  14. Compulsive Buying Behavior: Characteristics of Comorbidity with Gambling Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Granero, Roser; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Steward, Trevor; Mestre-Bach, Gemma; Baño, Marta; del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Moragas, Laura; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Mallorquí-Bagué, Núria; Tárrega, Salomé; Menchón, José M.; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Compulsive buying behavior (CBB) has begun to be recognized as a condition worthy of attention by clinicians and researchers. Studies on the commonalities between CBB and other behavioral addictions such as gambling disorder (GD) exist in the literature, but additional research is needed to assess the frequency and clinical relevance of the comorbidity of CBB and GD. The aim of the study was to estimate the point-prevalence of CBB+GD in a clinical setting. Data corresponded to n = 3221 treatment-seeking patients who met criteria for CBB or GD at a public hospital unit specialized in treating behavioral addictions. Three groups were compared: only-CBB (n = 127), only-GD (n = 3118) and comorbid CBB+GD (n = 24). Prevalence for the co-occurrence of CBB+GD was 0.75%. In the stratum of patients with GD, GD+CBB comorbidity obtained relatively low point prevalence (0.77%), while in the subsample of CBB patients the estimated prevalence of comorbid GD was relatively high (18.9%). CBB+GD comorbidity was characterized by lower prevalence of single patients, higher risk of other behavioral addictions (sex, gaming or internet), older age and age of onset. CBB+GD registered a higher proportion of women compared to only-GD (37.5 vs. 10.0%) but a higher proportion of men compared to only-CBB (62.5 vs. 24.4%). Compared to only-GD patients, the simultaneous presence of CBB+GD was associated with increased psychopathology and dysfunctional levels of harm avoidance. This study provides empirical evidence to better understand CBB, GD and their co-occurrence. Future research should help delineate the processes through which people acquire and develop this comorbidity. PMID:27199853

  15. Compulsive Buying Behavior: Characteristics of Comorbidity with Gambling Disorder.

    PubMed

    Granero, Roser; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Steward, Trevor; Mestre-Bach, Gemma; Baño, Marta; Del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Moragas, Laura; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Mallorquí-Bagué, Núria; Tárrega, Salomé; Menchón, José M; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Compulsive buying behavior (CBB) has begun to be recognized as a condition worthy of attention by clinicians and researchers. Studies on the commonalities between CBB and other behavioral addictions such as gambling disorder (GD) exist in the literature, but additional research is needed to assess the frequency and clinical relevance of the comorbidity of CBB and GD. The aim of the study was to estimate the point-prevalence of CBB+GD in a clinical setting. Data corresponded to n = 3221 treatment-seeking patients who met criteria for CBB or GD at a public hospital unit specialized in treating behavioral addictions. Three groups were compared: only-CBB (n = 127), only-GD (n = 3118) and comorbid CBB+GD (n = 24). Prevalence for the co-occurrence of CBB+GD was 0.75%. In the stratum of patients with GD, GD+CBB comorbidity obtained relatively low point prevalence (0.77%), while in the subsample of CBB patients the estimated prevalence of comorbid GD was relatively high (18.9%). CBB+GD comorbidity was characterized by lower prevalence of single patients, higher risk of other behavioral addictions (sex, gaming or internet), older age and age of onset. CBB+GD registered a higher proportion of women compared to only-GD (37.5 vs. 10.0%) but a higher proportion of men compared to only-CBB (62.5 vs. 24.4%). Compared to only-GD patients, the simultaneous presence of CBB+GD was associated with increased psychopathology and dysfunctional levels of harm avoidance. This study provides empirical evidence to better understand CBB, GD and their co-occurrence. Future research should help delineate the processes through which people acquire and develop this comorbidity.

  16. Affective comorbidity in panic disorder: is there a bipolar connection?

    PubMed

    Savino, M; Perugi, G; Simonini, E; Soriani, A; Cassano, G B; Akiskal, H S

    1993-07-01

    Although theoretical explanations for comorbidity in panic disorder (PD) abound in the literature, the complex clinical challenges of these patients have been neglected, especially where panic, obsessive-compulsive and 'soft' bipolar (e.g., hypomanic, cyclothymic and hyperthymic) conditions might co-exist. The aim of the present study has been to systematically explore the spectrum of intra-episodic and longitudinal comorbidity of 140 DSM-III-R PD patients--67.1% of whom concomitantly met the criteria for Agoraphobia--and who were consecutively admitted to the ambulatory service of the Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Pisa over a 2-year period. Comorbidity with strictly defined anxiety disorders--i.e., not explained as mere symptomatic extensions of PD--was relatively uncommon, and included Simple Phobia (10.7%), Social Phobia (6.4%), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (3.6%), and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (4.2%). Comorbidity with Major Depression--strictly limited to the melancholic subtype--occurred in 22.9%. Comorbidity with Bipolar Disorders included 2.1% with mania, 5% with hypomania, as well as 6.4% with cyclothymia, for a total of 13.5%; an additional 34.3% of PD patients met the criteria for hyperthymic temperament. We submit that such comorbid patterns are at the root of unwieldy clinical constructs like 'atypical depression' and 'borderline personality'. The relationship of panic disorder to other anxious-phobic and depressive states has been known for some time. Our data extend this relationship to soft bipolar disorders. Studies from other centers are needed to verify that the proposed new link is not merely due to referral bias to a tertiary university setting.

  17. Influence of Using Different Databases and ‘Look Back’ Intervals to Define Comorbidity Profiles for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Hypertension: Implications for Health Services Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanmin; Lix, Lisa; Tu, Karen; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Campbell, Norm R. C.; McAlister, Finlay A.; Quan, Hude

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the data sources and ‘look back’ intervals to define comorbidities. Data Sources Hospital discharge abstracts database (DAD), physician claims, population registry and death registry from April 1, 1994 to March 31, 2010 in Alberta, Canada. Study Design Newly-diagnosed hypertension cases from 1997 to 2008 fiscal years were identified and followed up to 12 years. We defined comorbidities using data sources and duration of retrospective observation (6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and 3 years). The C-statistics for logistic regression and concordance index (CI) for Cox model of mortality and cardiovascular disease hospitalization were used to evaluate discrimination performance for each approach of defining comorbidities. Principal Findings The comorbidities prevalence became higher with a longer duration. Using DAD alone underestimated the prevalence by about 75%, compared to using both DAD and physician claims. The C-statistic and CI were highest when both DAD and physician claims were used, and model performance improved when observation duration increased from 6 months to one year or longer. Conclusion The comorbidities prevalence is greatly impacted by the data source and duration of retrospective observation. A combination of DAD and physicians claims with at least one year observation duration improves predictions for cardiovascular disease and one-year mortality outcome model performance. PMID:27583532

  18. Managing medical comorbidities in patients with depression to improve prognosis.

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E

    2016-02-01

    Medical comorbidities contribute to poor antidepressant response, treatment resistance, and poor outcomes in many patients with depression. Depression can co-occur with thyroid conditions, chronic pain conditions, central nervous system disorders, and more. Inflammatory conditions such as diabetes and obesity are also associated with depression, and the connection between inflammation and depression may lead to testing that could better match patients to specific antidepressant treatment. Interventions for patients with depression and a comorbid medical condition include careful selection of antidepressant therapy as well as psychotherapy and adjunctive agents.

  19. Lithium therapy in comorbid temporal lobe epilepsy and cycloid psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Paul; Kashiviswanath, Sridhar; Huynh, Alison; Allha, Naveen; Piaggio, Ken; Sahoo, Saddichha; Gupta, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of post-ictal psychosis has foundered on uncertainty in diagnosis of psychotic phenotypes, and equivocal efficacy of first and second generation antipsychotics. This article presents a case history of comorbid temporal lobe epilepsy and psychosis, suggests the applicability of the continental, cycloid psychosis diagnostic conceptualization to post-ictal psychoses, and demonstrates the efficacy of lithium in their treatment. Clinical studies of comorbidity of epilepsy and psychosis offer great potential as a basis for modelling brain–mind relationships, and neuropsychiatric nosology, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:28031853

  20. Co-morbid anxiety and depression among pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Aamir, Siddiqua; Aisha

    2010-10-01

    The need to recognize and manage psychiatric co-morbidity in tuberculosis (TB) patients in primary care settings in order to improve adherence to the treatment is now well documented. Pulmonary TB patients at the District TB Control Office and TB Centre in Haripur from December 2007 to March 2008 were evalute in order to assess the frequency of anxiety and depression and continuation of treatment. Forty seven out of 65 (72%) TB patients had severe/moderate level of anxiety and depression according to Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Fourteen (22%) TB patients with co-morbid anxiety and depression showed multi drug-resistance (MDR-TB).

  1. Impact of Comorbidities on Mortality in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kreuter, Michael; Ehlers-Tenenbaum, Svenja; Palmowski, Karin; Bruhwyler, Jacques; Oltmanns, Ute; Muley, Thomas; Heussel, Claus Peter; Warth, Arne; Kolb, Martin; Herth, Felix J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Comorbidities significantly influence the clinical course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, their prognostic impact is not fully understood. We therefore aimed to determine the impact of comorbidities, as individual and as whole, on survival in IPF. Methods The database of a tertiary referral centre for interstitial lung diseases was reviewed for comorbidities, their treatments, their frequency and survival in IPF patients. Results 272 patients were identified of which 12% had no, 58% 1–3 and 30% 4–7 comorbidities, mainly cardiovascular, pulmonary and oncologic comorbidities. Median survival according to the frequency of comorbidities differed significantly with 66 months for patients without comorbidities, 48 months when 1–3 comorbidities were reported and 35 months when 4–7 comorbidities were prevalent (p = 0.004). A multivariate Cox proportional hazard analyses identified other cardiac diseases and lung cancer as significant predictors of death, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and diastolic dysfunction had a significant positive impact on survival. A significant impact of comorbidities associated therapies on survival was not discovered. This included the use of proton pump inhibitors at baseline, which was not associated with a survival benefit (p = 0.718). We also established a predictive tool for highly prevalent comorbidities, termed IPF comorbidome which demonstrates a new relationship of IPF and comorbidities. Conclusion Comorbidities are frequent in IPF patients. Some comorbidities, especially lung cancer, mainly influence survival in IPF, while others such as GERD may inherit a more favourable effect. Moreover, their cumulative incidence impacts survival. PMID:27023440

  2. [Body composition and comorbidity in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Bonnefoy, Marc; Gilbert, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Obesity and excess in fat versus lean mass is well known to enhance the risk of mortality and morbidity. Several recent works have pointed the importance of analysing more precisely body composition for the assessment of prognosis of patients in terms of cardiovascular outcomes and mortality. The body mass index (BMI), commonly used for defining obese patients, does not give sufficient indication on the body composition and distribution of fat mass. In the elderly population, relative excess in fat mass associated with a decrease in lean mass is frequently observed. In such situations of sarcopenic obesity, the relative weight stability can be misleading. Sarcopenic obesity is an emerging public health problem in the geriatric population. It appears to be the situation with the worst prognosis for cardiovascular risk. In addition, recent works have highlighted the major impact of visceral fat, clearly linked with cardiovascular events. Body composition has also an impact on other pathologic conditions such as dementia, sleep apnoea or cancer. The links between body composition and morbidity in the elderly population are presented in this review, with emphasis on adipokines and their interactions with other organs such as the heart, liver, skeletal muscle or bones. More precise measurements of body composition, rather than BMI alone, should be developed in the elderly population.

  3. The NLM Indexing Initiative's Medical Text Indexer.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Alan R; Mork, James G; Gay, Clifford W; Humphrey, Susanne M; Rogers, Willie J

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Text Indexer (MTI) is a program for producing MeSH indexing recommendations. It is the major product of NLM's Indexing Initiative and has been used in both semi-automated and fully automated indexing environments at the Library since mid 2002. We report here on an experiment conducted with MEDLINE indexers to evaluate MTI's performance and to generate ideas for its improvement as a tool for user-assisted indexing. We also discuss some filtering techniques developed to improve MTI's accuracy for use primarily in automatically producing the indexing for several abstracts collections.

  4. Cognitive Deficits in Adults with ADHD Go beyond Comorbidity Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Katiane L.; Guimaraes-da-Silva, Paula O.; Grevet, Eugenio H.; Victor, Marcelo M.; Salgado, Carlos A. I.; Vitola, Eduardo S.; Mota, Nina R.; Fischer, Aline G.; Contini, Veronica; Picon, Felipe A.; Karam, Rafael G.; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo; Rohde, Luis A.; Bau, Claiton H. D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study addresses if deficits in cognitive, attention, and inhibitory control performance in adults with ADHD are better explained by the disorder itself or by comorbid conditions. Method Adult patients with ADHD ("n" = 352) and controls ("n" = 94) were evaluated in the ADHD program of a tertiary hospital. The…

  5. Comorbidity of Schizophrenia and Substance Abuse: Implications for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueser, Kim T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews substance abuse disorders in schizophrenia patients, including prevalence of comorbid disorders, assessment, hypothesized mechanisms underlying abuse, and clinical effects of abuse on course of illness and cognitive functioning. Outlines principles of treatment for dual-diagnosis schizophrenia patients, noting limitations of existing…

  6. Comorbidity of Learning Disorders: Prevalence and Familial Transmission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerl, Karin; Moll, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Background: In order to fully specify the profiles of risk and protective factors of developmental disorders, a better understanding of the conditions under which they co-occur is required. So far, empirical evidence on comorbidities of specific learning disorders in arithmetic, reading and spelling is scarce. Methods: Prevalence and gender ratios…

  7. Literacy Difficulties and Psychiatric Disorders: Evidence for Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Julia M.; Maughan, Barbara; Goodman, Robert; Meltzer, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Background: Literacy difficulties show high levels of comorbidity with both disruptive and emotional disorders, but questions remain over the nature and specificity of these links. Method: Relationships between specific literacy difficulties and psychiatric disorder were investigated in a large-scale national sample of children aged 9 to 15 years.…

  8. Frequency, Comorbidity, and Psychosocial Impairment of Depressive Disorders in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Conradt, Judith; Petermann, Franz

    2000-01-01

    Estimated the frequency, comorbidity, and psychosocial impairment of depressive disorders from survey of 1,035 German 12- to 17-year-olds. Found that 17.9 percent met the lifetime criteria for depressive disorders, according to DSM-IV criteria; criteria were higher in females than in males. Rates for all disorders increased with age, with…

  9. Treating Obesity: Clinical Implications of Comorbid Borderline Personality Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sansone, Randy A.; Wiederman, Michael W.; Sansone, Lori A.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews possible links between obesity and borderline-personality disorder and discusses treatment approaches for those individuals demonstrating such comorbidity. Approaches include modification of current techniques for obesity treatment and incorporation of psychodynamic counseling specific to borderline-personality disorder. (Author/GCP)

  10. Comorbidity of Auditory Processing, Language, and Reading Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Mridula; Purdy, Suzanne C.; Kelly, Andrea S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The authors assessed comorbidity of auditory processing disorder (APD), language impairment (LI), and reading disorder (RD) in school-age children. Method: Children (N = 68) with suspected APD and nonverbal IQ standard scores of 80 or more were assessed using auditory, language, reading, attention, and memory measures. Auditory processing…

  11. Comorbidities in preschool children at family risk of dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Gooch, Debbie; Hulme, Charles; Nash, Hannah M; Snowling, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Background Comorbidity among developmental disorders such as dyslexia, language impairment, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and developmental coordination disorder is common. This study explores comorbid weaknesses in preschool children at family risk of dyslexia with and without language impairment and considers the role that comorbidity plays in determining children’s outcomes. Method The preschool attention, executive function and motor skills of 112 children at family risk for dyslexia, 29 of whom also met criteria for language impairment, were assessed at ages 3 ½ and 4 ½. The performance of these children was compared to the performance of children with language impairment and typically developing controls. Results Weaknesses in attention, executive function and motor skills were associated with language impairment rather than family risk status. Individual differences in language and executive function are strongly related in the preschool period and preschool motor skills predicted unique variance (4%) in early reading skills over and above children’s language ability. Conclusion Comorbidity between developmental disorders can be observed in the preschool years: children with language impairment have significant and persistent weaknesses in motor skills and executive function compared to those without language impairment. Children’s early language and motor skills are predictors of children’s later reading skills. PMID:24117483

  12. Autism in Angelman Syndrome: An Exploration of Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trillingsgaard, Anegen; Ostergaard, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The aim was to explore the comorbidity between Angelman syndrome and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Identification of autism in children with Angelman syndrome presents a diagnostic challenge. In the present study, 16 children with Angelman syndrome, all with a 15q11-13 deletion, were examined for ASDs. Thirteen children with Angelman syndrome…

  13. Comorbidity in the context of neural network properties.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Juliana; Kolev, Vasil; Kirov, Roumen; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2010-06-01

    Cramer et al.'s network approach reconceptualizes mental comorbidity on the basis of symptom space originating from psychometric signatures. We argue that the advantages of this approach need to be regarded in the context of the multi-level functional organization of the neural substrate, ranging from neurogenetic to psychometric. Neuroelectric oscillations are proposed as a level-integrating principle.

  14. Psychiatric Comorbidity among Children with Gender Identity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallien, Madeleine S.C.; Swaab, Hanna; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence and type of comorbidity in children with gender identity disorder (GID). Method: The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children--Parent Version was used to assess psychopathology according to the DSM in two groups of children. The first group consisted of 120 Dutch children (age range 4-11 years) who were…

  15. Comorbidity and Phenomenology of Bipolar Disorder in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Eduardo; Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the comorbidity of bipolar disorder (BPD) in children with ADHD and to study the psychopathological profile of ADHD children with and without mania. Method: A total of 100 children with ADHD were assessed with a semistructured diagnostic interview and questionnaires of mania, ADHD, and general psychopathology. Results: 8% of…

  16. The Temporal Sequencing of Problem Gambling and Comorbid Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, Louise; Haw, John; Hing, Nerilee

    2012-01-01

    Two qualitative studies were undertaken to identify the prevalent comorbid mental disorders in treatment seeking problem gamblers and to also identify the temporal sequencing of the disorders. A forum with problem gambling counsellors and interviews with 24 mental health experts were undertaken. There was general agreement that the most commonly…

  17. Spreading of diseases through comorbidity networks across life and gender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmiel, Anna; Klimek, Peter; Thurner, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    The state of health of patients is typically not characterized by a single disease alone but by multiple (comorbid) medical conditions. These comorbidities may depend strongly on age and gender. We propose a specific phenomenological comorbidity network of human diseases that is based on medical claims data of the entire population of Austria. The network is constructed from a two-layer multiplex network, where in one layer the links represent the conditional probability for a comorbidity, and in the other the links contain the respective statistical significance. We show that the network undergoes dramatic structural changes across the lifetime of patients. Disease networks for children consist of a single, strongly interconnected cluster. During adolescence and adulthood further disease clusters emerge that are related to specific classes of diseases, such as circulatory, mental, or genitourinary disorders. For people over 65 these clusters start to merge, and highly connected hubs dominate the network. These hubs are related to hypertension, chronic ischemic heart diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. We introduce a simple diffusion model to understand the spreading of diseases on the disease network at the population level. For the first time we are able to show that patients predominantly develop diseases that are in close network proximity to disorders that they already suffer. The model explains more than 85% of the variance of all disease incidents in the population. The presented methodology could be of importance for anticipating age-dependent disease profiles for entire populations, and for design and validation of prevention strategies.

  18. Comorbidity in "DSM" Childhood Mental Disorders: A Functional Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipani, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I address the issue of comorbidity and its prevalence in the prior "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" ("DSM") classification systems. The focus on the topography or form of presenting problems as the venue for determining mental disorders is scrutinized as the possible cause. Addressing the…

  19. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Children with New Onset Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jana E.; Watson, Ryann; Sheth, Raj; Caplan, Rochelle; Koehn, Monica; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution, timing, and risk factors for psychiatric comorbidity in children with recent onset epilepsy. Children aged 8 to 18 years with recent onset epilepsy (less than 1 year in duration) of idiopathic etiology (n=53) and a healthy comparison group (n=50) underwent a structured psychiatric…

  20. [Comorbidities in COPD: a new challenge in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Couillard, A; Veale, D; Muir, J-F

    2011-06-01

    Today it is a recognised fact that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a real systemic disease that is respiratory-based. Recently, the focus has been on the importance of the comorbidities that are associated with COPD, such as all the cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, peripheral muscular dysfunction, depression, anxiety, osteoporosis and anaemia, etc. These comorbidities constitute a new medical and therapeutic challenge with regard to COPD; their high frequency and considerable impact on the quality of life and the prognosis for survival of the patients make them a key element. The aims of this focus are to present the spectrum and prevalence of comorbidities in COPD, to obtain an objective view as to why and how these comorbidities should be systematically assessed and treated in patients, and subsequently to discuss the impact of this new data in clinical practice and in research. This recent data is another positive step in understanding the disease, optimising the diagnosis, and assessing and caring for COPD patients.

  1. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, David S.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Brereton, Avril V.; Einfeld, Stewart L.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study investigating rates and types of comorbid mental disorder evident in adolescents and young adults with autism. A sample of 84 young people (M = 19.5 years, SD = 4.6) with "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders," 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric…

  2. Clinical features, comorbidity, and cognitive impairment in elderly bipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Rise, Ida Vikan; Haro, Josep Maria; Gjervan, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Data specific to late-life bipolar disorder (BD) are limited. Current research is sparse and present guidelines are not adapted to this group of patients. Objectives We present a literature review on clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and cognitive impairment in patients with late-life BD. This review discusses common comorbidities that affect BD elders and how aging might affect cognition and treatment. Methods Eligible studies were identified in MedLine by the Medical Subject Headings terms “bipolar disorder” and “aged”. We only included original research reports published in English between 2012 and 2015. Results From 414 articles extracted, 16 studies were included in the review. Cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, type II diabetes, and endocrinological abnormalities were observed as highly prevalent. BD is associated with a high suicide risk. Bipolar elderly had an increased risk of dementia and performed worse on cognitive screening tests compared to age-matched controls across different levels of cognition. Despite high rates of medical comorbidity among bipolar elderly, a systematic under-recognition and undertreatment of cardiovascular disease have been suggested. Conclusion There was a high burden of physical comorbidities and cognitive impairment in late-life BD. Bipolar elderly might be under-recorded and undertreated in primary medical care, indicating that this group needs an adapted clinical assessment and specific clinical guidelines need to be established. PMID:27274256

  3. Temporal Sequence of Comorbid Alcohol Use Disorder and Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jessica H.; Thornton, Laura M.; Strober, Michael; Brandt, Harry; Crawford, Steve; Fichter, Manfred M.; Halmi, Katherine A.; Johnson, Craig; Jones, Ian; Kaplan, Allan S.; Klump, Kelly L.; Mitchell, James E.; Treasure, Janet; Woodside, D. Blake; Berrettini, Wade H.; Kaye, Walter H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2013-01-01

    Women with eating disorders have a significantly higher prevalence of substance use disorders than the general population. The goal of the current study was to assess the temporal pattern of comorbid anorexia nervosa (AN) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) and the impact this ordering has on symptomatology and associated features. Women were placed into one of three groups based on the presence or absence of comorbid AUD and the order of AN and AUD onset in those with both disorders: (1) AN Only, (2) AN First, and (3) AUD First. The groups were compared on psychological symptoms and personality characteristics often associated with AN, AUD, or both using general linear models. Twenty-one percent of women (n = 161) with AN reported a history of AUD with 115 reporting AN onset first and 35 reporting AUD onset first. Women with binge-eating and/or purging type AN were significantly more likely to have AUD. In general, differences were found only between women with AN Only and women with AN and AUD regardless of order of emergence. Women with AN and AUD had higher impulsivity scores and higher prevalence of depression and borderline personality disorder than women with AN Only. Women with AN First scored higher on traits commonly associated with AN, whereas women with comorbid AN and AUD displayed elevations in traits more commonly associated with AUD. Results do not indicate a distinct pattern of symptomatology in comorbid AN and AUD based on the temporal sequence of the disorders. PMID:23254222

  4. Comorbidity and Continuity of Psychiatric Disorders in Youth After Detention

    PubMed Central

    Abram, Karen M.; Zwecker, Naomi A.; Welty, Leah J.; Hershfield, Jennifer A.; Dulcan, Mina K.; Teplin, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Psychiatric disorders and comorbidity are prevalent among incarcerated juveniles. To date, no large-scale study has examined the comorbidity and continuity of psychiatric disorders after youth leave detention. OBJECTIVE To determine the comorbidity and continuity of psychiatric disorders among youth 5 years after detention. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective longitudinal study of a stratified random sample of 1829 youth (1172 male and 657 female; 1005 African American, 296 non-Hispanic white, 524 Hispanic, and 4 other race/ethnicity) recruited from the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center, Chicago, Illinois, between November 20, 1995, and June 14, 1998, and who received their time 2 follow-up interview between May 22, 2000, and April 3, 2004. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES At baseline, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version 2.3. At follow-ups, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version IV (child and young adult versions) and the Diagnostic Interview Schedule Version IV (substance use disorders and antisocial personality disorder). RESULTS Five years after detention, when participants were 14 to 24 years old, almost 27% of males and 14% of females had comorbid psychiatric disorders. Although females had significantly higher rates of comorbidity when in detention (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.7), males had significantly higher rates than females at follow-up (odds ratio, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.6-3.3). Substance use plus behavioral disorders was the most common comorbid profile among males, affecting 1 in 6. Participants with more disorders at baseline were more likely to have a disorder approximately 5 years after detention, even after adjusting for demographic characteristics. We found substantial continuity of disorder. However, some baseline disorders predicted alcohol and drug use disorders at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Although prevalence rates of comorbidity decreased in youth after detention, rates

  5. Poor mental health in severely obese patients is not explained by the presence of comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Somerville, R; McKenzie, K; Eslami, S; Breen, C; O'Shea, D; Wall, P

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of obesity, especially severe obesity where body mass index (BMI) exceeds 40 kg m(-2) and where the physical risks are greatest, is increasing. However, little is known about the impact of severe obesity on psychological well-being and self-rated health (SRH). We aimed to investigate this relationship in patients attending an Irish weight management clinic. SRH was measured with a single-item inventory (excellent = 1, poor = 5). Well-being was measured with the validated World Health Organization-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5), in which scores <13 indicate poor well-being. Previous studies of the Irish population have reported mean SRH = 2.56 (males) and 2.53 (females) and mean well-being = 16.96. One hundred eighty-two (46.8%) completed questionnaires were returned. The sample was representative of the clinic population with a mean age of 47.1, mean baseline BMI of 51.9 kg m(-2) and 64.3% females. Mean SRH was 3.73 in males and 3.30 in females; mean well-being was 10.27 in males and 10.52 in females. In the final multivariable models, number of medications, depression and obstructive sleep apnoea, WHO-5 and current BMI were significant predictors of SRH, and secondary level education, social support and mindfulness scores were significant predictors of psychological well-being. Number of medications was not significant. The results suggest that the poor psychological well-being seen is not explained by the presence of comorbidities and that social support and mindfulness may be important targets for improving psychological well-being. Improving psychological well-being in addition to weight loss and effective management of comorbidities may be important for improving SRH.

  6. Health-related Quality of Life in Accordance with Fracture History and Comorbidities in Korean Patients with Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hye-Young; Ha, Yong-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among Korean patients with osteoporosis and to measure the impact of fractures and comorbidity on their quality of life (QOL) using the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data with a nationwide representativeness. Methods This study was based on 4-year-data obtained from the KNHANES 2008 to 2011. Osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2,078 survey participants according to their bone mineral density measurements using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. According to the World Health Organization study group, T-scores at or above -1.0 are considered normal, those between -1.0 and -2.5 as osteopenia, and those at or below -2.5 as osteoporosis The EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D) index score was used to assess the QOL. Results Of 2,078 patients diagnosed with osteoporosis, fractures were found to occur at 11.02%. Wrist fracture was the most frequent, affecting 4.52% of the patients, with a significantly different prevalence among men and women (P<0.001). The overall EQ-5D index score was 0.84±0.01 among patients with osteoporosis. With the exception of cancer, the EQ-5D index score were significantly lower for those having osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular events compared to those without the related diseases. Conclusions We found that low health utility was associated with previous spine fracture and comorbidities in patients with osteoporosis. In particular, the number of fracture experiences greatly deteriorated the HRQOL in patients with osteoporosis. Thus, prevention of secondary fractures and chronic care model for comorbidities should be a priority for osteoporosis management in order to improve HRQOL. PMID:27965941

  7. Comorbidities, Social Impact, and Quality of Life in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Valsamma; Cavanna, Andrea E.; Robertson, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is more than having motor and vocal tics, and this review will examine the varied comorbidities as well as the social impact and quality of life (QoL) in individuals with TS. The relationship between any individual and his/her environment is complex, and this is further exaggerated in the case of a person with TS. For example, tics may play a significant role in shaping the person’s experiences, perceptions, and interactions with the environment. Furthermore, associated clinical features, comorbidities, and coexisting psychopathologies may compound or alter this relationship. In this regard, the common comorbidities include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and disruptive behaviors, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorder, and coexistent problems include anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, which can all lead to poorer psychosocial functioning and QoL. Thus, the symptoms of TS and the associated comorbid conditions may interact to result in a vicious cycle or a downward spiraling of negative experiences and poor QoL. The stigma and social maladjustment in TS and the social exclusion, bullying, and discrimination are considered to be caused in large part by misperceptions of the disorder by teachers, peers, and the wider community. Improved community and professional awareness about TS and related comorbidities and other psychopathologies as well as the provision of multidisciplinary services to meet the complex needs of this clinical population are critical. Future research to inform the risk and resilience factors for successful long-term outcomes is also warranted. PMID:27375503

  8. Sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and plasma biomarkers for cocaine addiction in abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects in outpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Pedraz, María; Araos, Pedro; García-Marchena, Nuria; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Pastor, Antoni; Barrios, Vicente; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are sex differences in the progression of drug addiction, relapse, and response to therapies. Because biological factors participate in these differences, they should be considered when using biomarkers for addiction. In the current study, we evaluated the sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and the concentrations of plasma mediators that have been reported to be affected by cocaine. Fifty-five abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects diagnosed with lifetime cocaine use disorders (40 men and 15 women) and 73 healthy controls (48 men and 25 women) were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview "Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders." Plasma concentrations of chemokines, cytokines, N-acyl-ethanolamines, and 2-acyl-glycerols were analyzed according to history of cocaine addiction and sex, controlling for covariates age and body mass index (BMI). Relationships between these concentrations and variables related to cocaine addiction were also analyzed in addicted subjects. The results showed that the concentrations of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2/MCP-1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12/SDF-1) were only affected by history of cocaine addiction. The plasma concentrations of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were affected by history of cocaine addiction and sex. In fact, whereas cytokine concentrations were higher in control women relative to men, these concentrations were reduced in cocaine-addicted women without changes in addicted men. Regarding fatty acid derivatives, history of cocaine addiction had a main effect on the concentration of each acyl derivative, whereas N-acyl-ethanolamines were increased overall in the cocaine group, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased. Interestingly, N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA) was only increased in cocaine-addicted women. The covariate BMI had a significant

  9. Sex Differences in Psychiatric Comorbidity and Plasma Biomarkers for Cocaine Addiction in Abstinent Cocaine-Addicted Subjects in Outpatient Settings

    PubMed Central

    Pedraz, María; Araos, Pedro; García-Marchena, Nuria; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Pastor, Antoni; Barrios, Vicente; Chowen, Julie A.; Argente, Jesús; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are sex differences in the progression of drug addiction, relapse, and response to therapies. Because biological factors participate in these differences, they should be considered when using biomarkers for addiction. In the current study, we evaluated the sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and the concentrations of plasma mediators that have been reported to be affected by cocaine. Fifty-five abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects diagnosed with lifetime cocaine use disorders (40 men and 15 women) and 73 healthy controls (48 men and 25 women) were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview “Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders.” Plasma concentrations of chemokines, cytokines, N-acyl-ethanolamines, and 2-acyl-glycerols were analyzed according to history of cocaine addiction and sex, controlling for covariates age and body mass index (BMI). Relationships between these concentrations and variables related to cocaine addiction were also analyzed in addicted subjects. The results showed that the concentrations of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2/MCP-1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12/SDF-1) were only affected by history of cocaine addiction. The plasma concentrations of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were affected by history of cocaine addiction and sex. In fact, whereas cytokine concentrations were higher in control women relative to men, these concentrations were reduced in cocaine-addicted women without changes in addicted men. Regarding fatty acid derivatives, history of cocaine addiction had a main effect on the concentration of each acyl derivative, whereas N-acyl-ethanolamines were increased overall in the cocaine group, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased. Interestingly, N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA) was only increased in cocaine-addicted women. The covariate BMI had a significant

  10. Comorbidity and health care visit burden in working-age commercially insured patients with diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Szilárd; Chandwani, Hitesh S; Cole, Ashley L; Patel, Vaishali D; Lunacsek, Orsolya E; Dugel, Pravin U

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the comorbidity profile and update estimates of health care resource utilization for commercially insured, working-age adults with diabetic macular edema (DME) relative to a matched comparison group of diabetic adults without DME. Additional comparisons were made in the subgroup of pseudophakic patients. Patients and methods A retrospective matched-cohort study of commercially insured diabetic adults aged 18–63 years was conducted using medical and outpatient pharmacy claims (July 1, 2008–June 30, 2013). Outcomes included diabetes-related and ocular comorbidities and health care resource utilization (any health care visit days, outpatient visit days, inpatient visit days, emergency room visits, eye care-related visit days, unique medications) in the 12-month post-index period. Results All diabetes-related and ocular comorbidities were significantly more prevalent in DME cases versus non-DME controls (P<0.05). A significantly greater proportion of DME cases utilized eye care-related visits compared with non-DME controls (P<0.001). DME cases had almost twice the mean number of total health care visit days compared to non-DME controls (28.6 vs 16.9 days, P<0.001), with a minority of visit days being eye care-related (mean 5.1 vs 1.5 days, P<0.001). Similar trends were observed in pseudophakic cohorts. Conclusion This working-age DME population experienced a mean of 29 health care visit days per year. Eye care-related visit days were a minority of the overall visit burden (mean 5 days) emphasizing the trade-offs DME patients face between managing DME and their overall diabetic disease. Insights into the complex comorbidity profile and health care needs of diabetic patients with DME will better inform treatment decisions and help optimize disease management. PMID:27994438

  11. Functional Impairments in Children with ADHD: Unique Effects of Age and Comorbid Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booster, Genery D.; DuPaul, George J.; Eiraldi, Ricardo; Power, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Children with ADHD and comorbid disorders display poorer overall functioning compared with children with ADHD alone, though little research has examined the differential impact of externalizing versus internalizing comorbidities. Method: This study examined the impact of internalizing and externalizing comorbidities on the academic and…

  12. Indexing Consistency and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.

    A measure of indexing consistency is developed based on the concept of 'fuzzy sets'. It assigns a higher consistency value if indexers agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an indexer's work and exhaustivity of indexing are also proposed. Experimental data on indexing consistency…

  13. Culture and comorbidity in East and West berliners.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Mary J

    2010-03-01

    Following the collapse of socialism, fluctuations in cardiac mortality rates in East Germany and a West-to-East cardiac health gradient became topics of interest. Researchers suggested possible causes for these phenomena, including stress from postsocialism. I proposed that a cultural investigation of heart disease comorbid with depression could inform our understanding of the potential health effects of the postsocialist transition. I conducted ethnographic and survey research. In the study described here, I administered a depression scale (CES-D) and an ethnographically derived measure of cultural stress (Good Life Survey) to over 200 East and West Berliners with cardiovascular disease. Comparison of the groups' depression means revealed no difference. However, correlation of the Good Life Survey and the CES-D revealed unique profiles of cultural variables associated with depression in the two groups, suggesting that culture shapes depression and cardiac risk. I discuss the value of cultural studies to comorbidity research.

  14. Kleine–Levin syndrome with comorbid iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajendra Singh; Kumar, Sunil; Srivastava, Trilochan; Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki

    2015-01-01

    Kleine–Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare chronic sleep disorder of unknown etiopathology, which typically occurs in adolescent males. Although the severity of symptoms and disease course varies between the KLS patients, it usually resolves spontaneously, but sometime comorbid conditions may worsen the symptoms. Herein, we report a case of KLS who presented with severe episodic hypersomnia. During episodes, the patient used to sleep as long as 20 h in a day, affecting his daily living activities. All the relevant investigations including electroencephalography, magnetic resonance imaging of brain and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were normal except for severe iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In our patient, the severity of symptoms worsened due to coexistent IDA. The treatment of IDA along with modafinil decreased the severity of symptoms and shortened the hospital stay during episodes. This might be the first case report of KLS with comorbid IDA. PMID:26634130

  15. An Adolescent Boy with Comorbid Anorexia Nervosa and Hashimoto Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Pehlivantürk Kızılkan, Melis; Kanbur, Nuray; Akgül, Sinem; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer

    2016-01-01

    Low triiodothyronine syndrome is a physiological adaptation encountered in anorexia nervosa (AN) and generally improves with sufficient weight gain. However, when a primary thyroid pathology accompanies AN, both the evaluation of thyroid hormone levels and the management of the co-morbid disease become more challenging. Hashimoto thyroiditis could complicate the management of AN by causing hyper- or hypothyroidism. AN could also negatively affect the treatment of Hashimoto thyroiditis by altering body weight and metabolic rate, as well as by causing drug non-compliance. We present the case of a 15-year-old boy with comorbid AN restrictive sub-type and Hashimoto thyroiditis. In this case report, we aimed to draw attention to the challenges that could be encountered in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with AN when accompanied by Hashimoto thyroiditis. PMID:26757948

  16. [The problem of comorbidity of phobic disorders in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Golovina, A G

    2007-01-01

    Age peculiarities of the comorbidity of the phobic syndrome with other psychopathological formations have been studied on the basis of clinical and follow-up examination of 314 patients, 257 male, 57 female, aged 15-17 years old, with phobic disorders diagnosed according to ICD-10 criteria. Simple phobias found in 21% of patients existed as an isolated phenomenon displaying no comorbidity. Asthenic syndrome was most frequently concomitant with phobias (293 patients); personality anomalies were found in 167 patients including 31 with personality disorders; affective syndrome was observed in 61 patients and other ones were noticeably rare. Within the structure of the acute states, phobias appear as a schizophrenic attack or reactive symptoms correlating with the basic syndrome by the time of onset, intensity and content. Age differences of the phobic and related psychopathological syndromes are revealed.

  17. Epilepsy and art: Windows into complexity and comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Steven C

    2016-04-01

    The views of artists with epilepsy as expressed through their art provide unique opportunities to gain understanding of the experiences of living with epilepsy and related comorbidities. This paper provides a glimpse into art collected from an international group of artists with epilepsy, focusing on ictal and postictal experiences, psychiatric comorbidities, and social aspects of epilepsy. The art serves to enhance understanding among clinicians and neuroscientists of what it means to have epilepsy as well as to reduce misunderstanding and stigma among the public. It may also inspire neuroscientists to further explore the underlying neurological basis to the rich tapestries of ictal, postictal, and interictal experiences of persons with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  18. The Role of Co-morbidities in Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Michael; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Cardioprotective strategies such as pre and postconditioning result in a robust reduction in infarct size in young, healthy male animals. However there are data suggesting that the protection is diminished in animals with co-morbidities such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes. It is important to understand at a mechanistic level the reasons for these differences. The effects of sex and diseases need to be considered in design of cardioprotective interventions in animal studies and clinical trials. PMID:21821527

  19. Psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent electronic and conventional cigarette use.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Strong, David R; Sussman, Steve; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Unger, Jennifer B; Barrington-Trimis, Jessica L; Audrain-McGovern, Janet

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of electronic (e-) cigarettes has greatly increased recently, particularly in adolescents. However, the extent of psychiatric comorbidity with adolescent e-cigarette use and dual use of conventional (combustible) and e-cigarettes is unknown. This study characterized psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent conventional and e-cigarette use. Ninth grade students attending high schools in Los Angeles, CA (M age = 14) completed self-report measures of conventional/e-cigarette use, emotional disorders, substance use/problems, and transdiagnostic psychiatric phenotypes consistent with the NIMH-Research Domain Criteria Initiative. Outcomes were compared by lifetime use of: (1) neither conventional nor e-cigarettes (non-use; N = 2557, 77.3%); (2) e-cigarettes only (N = 412, 12.4%); (3) conventional cigarettes only (N = 152, 4.6%); and (4) conventional and e-cigarettes (dual use; N = 189, 5.6%). In comparison to adolescents who used conventional cigarettes only, e-cigarette only users reported lower levels of internalizing syndromes (depression, generalized anxiety, panic, social phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder) and transdiagnostic phenotypes (i.e., distress intolerance, anxiety sensitivity, rash action during negative affect). Depression, panic disorder, and anhedonia were higher in e-cigarette only vs. non-users. For several externalizing outcomes (mania, rash action during positive affect, alcohol drug use/abuse) and anhedonia, an ordered pattern was observed, whereby comorbidity was lowest in non-users, moderate in single product users (conventional or e-cigarette), and highest in dual users. These findings: (1) raise question of whether emotionally-healthier ('lower-risk') adolescents who are not interested in conventional cigarettes are being attracted to e-cigarettes; (2) indicate that research, intervention, and policy dedicated to adolescent tobacco-psychiatric comorbidity should distinguish conventional cigarette, e-cigarette, and dual use.

  20. Comorbidity in Dementia: Update of An Ongoing Autopsy Study

    PubMed Central

    Magaki, Shino; Yong, William H.; Khanlou, Negar; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine systemic and central nervous system (CNS) comorbidities of patients with dementia evaluated during general autopsy. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING A large tertiary academic medical center in Los Angeles, California. PARTICIPANTS A cohort of 86 participants with clinically and neuropathologically diagnosed dementia who received complete autopsies and 132 participants with dementia who received partial (brain only) autopsies. MEASUREMENTS The causes of death as well as systemic and CNS comorbidities were obtained from autopsy reports and clinical information as available from the medical records. Findings were tabulated with respect to type of dementia, semiquantitative assessment of the severity of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, semiquantitative assessment of the severity of cerebrovascular disease, and evidence of ischemic damage in the brain. RESULTS Out of a total of 218 subjects with dementia, 175 (80.3%) had Alzheimer’s disease (AD) either in isolation or in combination with other lesions that might contribute to cognitive impairment, such as cerebrovascular disease and diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD), 14 (6.4%) had frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and 7 (3.2%) had isolated DLBD. The most common cause of death among demented patients was pneumonia (57 cases, 66.3%) followed by cardiovascular disease (14 cases, 16.3%). Eighteen subjects (20.9%) had lung disease and 16 (18.6%) had evidence of old or recent myocardial infarct. Clinically undiagnosed neoplasms included colonic adenocarcinoma, metastatic pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinoma, meningioma, and Schwannoma. CONCLUSION Significant comorbidities were discovered at autopsy in patients with dementia. Understanding the causes of death and associated comorbidities in patients with various subtypes of dementia is important in the assessment of end of life care in these subjects. PMID:25039832

  1. Comorbidity between psychiatric and general medical disorders in homeless veterans.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Gerald; Luther, James F; Haas, Gretchen L; Gordon, Adam J; Appelt, Cathleen

    2009-12-01

    Homeless veterans have numerous co-occurring medical and behavioral health problems. Identification of common patterns of comorbid conditions may help providers to determine severity of medical conditions and triage health care more effectively. In this study we identify such patterns of comorbid medical and psychiatric disorders using cluster analysis and we evaluate relationships between these patterns and sociodemographic factors. We used data from a survey of 3,595 veterans in a regional VA network who were presently or recently homeless assessing nine major medical disorder and six psychiatric disorder categories. Diagnostic ratings of presence or absence of these disorders were placed into the same cluster analysis to determine whether separable clusters emerged reflecting differing diagnostic profiles. There are recognizable patterns of comorbidity involving several psychiatric and general medical disorders, as well as disorders of both types that exist independently. Cluster membership was associated with various sociodemographic indices. Mental and general medical health problems in homeless veterans often occur in association with each other and form identifiable patterns that vary on sociodemographic factors.

  2. Psychological Co-morbidity in Children with Specific Learning Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Manoj K.; Biswas, Haritha; Padhy, Susanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Children under 19 years of age constitute over 40% of India's population and information about their mental health needs is a national imperative. Children with specific learning disorders (SLDs) exhibit academic difficulties disproportionate to their intellectual capacities. Prevalence of SLD ranges from 2% to 10%. Dyslexia (developmental reading disorder) is the most common type, affecting 80% of all SLD. About 30% of learning disabled children have behavioral and emotional problems, which range from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (most common) to depression, anxiety, suicide etc., to substance abuse (least common). Co-occurrence of such problems with SLD further adds to the academic difficulty. In such instances, diagnosis is difficult and tricky; improvement in academics demands comprehensive holistic treatment approach. SLD remains a large public health problem because of under-recognition, inadequate treatment and therefore merits greater effort to understand the co-morbidities, especially in the Indian population. As the literature is scarce regarding co-morbid conditions in learning disability in Indian scenario, the present study has tried to focus on Indian population. The educational concessions (recent most) given to such children by Central Board of Secondary Education, New Delhi are referred to. The issues to be addressed by the family physicians are: Low level of awareness among families and teachers, improper dissemination of accurate information about psychological problems, available help seeking avenues, need to develop service delivery models in rural and urban areas and focus on the integration of mental health and primary care keeping such co-morbidity in mind. PMID:25810984

  3. Prevalence and burden of comorbidities in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Corlateanu, Alexandru; Covantev, Serghei; Mathioudakis, Alexander G; Botnaru, Victor; Siafakas, Nikolaos

    2016-11-01

    The classical definition of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) as a lung condition characterized by irreversible airway obstruction is outdated. The systemic involvement in patients with COPD, as well as the interactions between COPD and its comorbidities, justify the description of chronic systemic inflammatory syndrome. The pathogenesis of COPD is closely linked with aging, as well as with cardiovascular, endocrine, musculoskeletal, renal, and gastrointestinal pathologies, decreasing the quality of life of patients with COPD and, furthermore, complicating the management of the disease. The most frequently described comorbidities include skeletal muscle wasting, cachexia (loss of fat-free mass), lung cancer (small cell or non-small cell), pulmonary hypertension, ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, normocytic anemia, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, obstructive sleep apnea, depression, and arthritis. These complex interactions are based on chronic low-grade systemic inflammation, chronic hypoxia, and multiple common predisposing factors, and are currently under intense research. This review article is an overview of the comorbidities of COPD, as well as their interaction and influence on mutual disease progression, prognosis, and quality of life.

  4. Temperament dimensions explain the comorbidity of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, M; Przybeck, T R; Bellodi, L; Cloninger, C R

    1996-01-01

    The comorbidity of DSM-III-R axis I and axis II disorders presents conceptual and nosological challenges to psychiatry. In a consecutive series of 164 psychiatric outpatients and 36 healthy controls in Milan, Italy, psychopathology was measured by structured interviews for DSM-III-R disorders and temperament was measured by the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ). Low reward dependence (RD) distinguished cluster A personality disorders and no axis I disorders. High novelty seeking (NS) characterized cluster B personality disorders and patients with eating disorders, alcohol abuse, or substance abuse. High harm avoidance (HA) characterized all cluster C personality disorders and patients with mood or anxiety disorders. The temperament dimensions were nearly independent of one another, but patients often had multiple DSM-III-R diagnoses. The joint relations of these disorders to multiple temperament dimensions accounted for their characteristic patterns of comorbidity. These findings support the hypothesis that interactions among temperament dimensions during development influence comorbidity between axis I and axis II disorders.

  5. Comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis*

    PubMed Central

    Baeta, Isabela Guimarães Ribeiro; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques; Gontijo, Bernardo; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease and its pathogenesis involves an interaction between genetic, environmental, and immunological factors. Recent studies have suggested that the chronic inflammatory nature of psoriasis may predispose to an association with other inflammatory diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. OBJECTIVES To describe the demographic, clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory characteristics of a sample of psoriasis patients; to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities in this group of patients; and to identify the cardiovascular risk profile using the Framingham risk score. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study involving the assessment of 190 patients. Participants underwent history and physical examination. They also completed a specific questionnaire about epidemiological data, past medical history, and comorbidities. The cardiovascular risk profile was calculated using the Framingham risk score. RESULTS Patients' mean age was 51.5 ± 14 years, and the predominant clinical presentation was plaque psoriasis (78.4%). We found an increased prevalence of systemic hypertension, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. Increased waist circumference was also found in addition to a considerable prevalence of depression, smoking, and regular alcohol intake. Patients' cardiovascular risk was high according to the Framingham risk score, and 47.2% of patients had moderate or high risk of fatal and non-fatal coronary events in 10 years. CONCLUSIONS Patients had high prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities, and high cardiovascular risk according to the Framingham risk score. Further epidemiological studies are needed in Brazil for validation of our results. PMID:25184912

  6. Hyperphosphorylated tau is implicated in acquired epilepsy and neuropsychiatric comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ping; Shultz, Sandy R; Hovens, Chris M; Velakoulis, Dennis; Jones, Nigel C; O'Brien, Terence J

    2014-06-01

    Epilepsy is a common group of neurological diseases. Acquired epilepsy can be caused by brain insults, such as trauma, infection or tumour, and followed by a latent period from several months to years before the emergence of recurrent spontaneous seizures. More than 50% of epilepsy cases will develop chronic neurodegenerative, neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric comorbidities. It is important to understand the mechanisms by which a brain insult results in acquired epilepsy and comorbidities in order to identify targets for novel therapeutic interventions that may mitigate these outcomes. Recent studies have implicated the hyperphosphorylated tubulin-associated protein (tau) in rodent models of epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease, and in experimental and clinical studies of traumatic brain injury. This potentially represents a novel target to mitigate epilepsy and associated neurocognitive and psychiatric disorders post-brain injury. This article reviews the potential role of tau-based mechanisms in the pathophysiology of acquired epilepsy and its neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric comorbidities, and the potential to target these for novel disease-modifying treatments.

  7. Improving cardiovascular health and metabolic comorbidities in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ogdie, Alexis; Eder, Lihi

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested a link between psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and comorbidities, in particular cardiovascular disease and metabolic comorbidities such as diabetes. The co-existence of these comorbidities is likely the result of systemic inflammation. In order to improve the health of patients with PsA and provide optimal care, these comorbidities must be addressed. However, little is known about how to improve metabolic and cardiovascular health in patients with PsA. In this perspective, we describe the research needs in the area of improving cardiovascular disease and metabolic comorbidities among patients with PsA. PMID:27134682

  8. How Can the Comorbidity with ADHD Aid Understanding of Language and Speech Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Tomblin, J. Bruce; Mueller, Kathyrn L

    2014-01-01

    This paper serves to provide a background for the topic of comorbidity than extends through this issue. Comorbidity is common within developmental disorders. It is shown that there are many possible reasons for comorbidity. Some of these can be viewed as artifacts as simple as chance occurrence or because of the way that the research participants were sampled. If these artifacts are eliminated, then comorbidity can be informative with respect to possible causes of the disorders that are comorbid. Several possible etiologic models are presented along with a general framework for considering levels of causality in developmental disorders. PMID:24817779

  9. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes.

  10. Theory of mind in social anxiety disorder, depression, and comorbid conditions.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Dustin; Wilson, Gillian; Roes, Meighen; Rnic, Katerina; Harkness, Kate Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder is characterized by marked interpersonal impairment, particularly when presenting with comorbid major depression. However, the foundational social-cognitive skills that underlie interpersonal impairment in comorbid and non-comorbid manifestations of SAD has to date received very little empirical investigation. In a sample of 119 young adults, the current study examined differences in theory of mind (ToM), defined as the ability to decode and reason about others' mental states, across four groups: (a) non-comorbid SAD; (b) non-comorbid Lifetime MDD; (c) comorbid SAD and Lifetime MDD; and (d) healthy control. The non-comorbid SAD group was significantly less accurate at decoding mental states than the non-comorbid MDD and control groups. Further, both the comorbid and non-comorbid SAD groups made significantly more 'excessive' ToM reasoning errors than the non-comorbid MDD group, suggesting a pattern of over-mentalizing. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for understanding the social cognitive foundations of social anxiety.

  11. Associations between Pathological Gambling and Psychiatric Comorbidity among Help-Seeking Populations in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Chan, Elda M. L.; Wong, Ryan H. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Problem gambling is complex and often comorbid with other mental health problems. Unfortunately, gambling studies on comorbid psychiatric disorders among Chinese communities are extremely limited. The objectives of this study were to (a) determine the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders among treatment-seeking pathological gamblers; (b) compare the demographic profiles and clinical features of pathological gamblers with and without comorbid psychiatric disorders; (c) explore the associations between pathological gambling and psychiatric disorders and their temporal relationship. Participants (N = 201) who sought gambling counseling were examined by making Axis-I diagnoses including mood disorders, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, substance use disorders, anxiety disorders, and adjustment disorder. Results showed that 63.7% of participants had lifetime comorbid psychiatric disorder. The most common comorbid psychiatric mental disorders were mood disorders, adjustment disorder, and substance use disorders. Pathological gamblers with psychiatric comorbidities were significantly more severe in psychopathology, psychosocial functioning impairment, and gambling problems than those without the disorders. PMID:22778700

  12. Comparing the predictive accuracy of frailty, comorbidity, and disability for mortality: a 1-year follow-up in patients hospitalized in geriatric wards

    PubMed Central

    Ritt, Martin; Ritt, Julia Isabel; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies evaluating and comparing the power of frailty, comorbidity, and disability instruments, together and in parallel, for predicting mortality are limited. Objective This study aimed to evaluate and compare the measures of frailty, comorbidity, and disability in predicting 1-year mortality in geriatric inpatients. Design Prospective cohort study. Patients and setting A total of 307 inpatients aged ≥65 years in geriatric wards of a general hospital participated in the study. Measurements The patients were evaluated in relation to different frailty, comorbidity, and disability instruments during their hospital stays. These included three frailty (the seven-category Clinical Frailty Scale [CFS-7], a 41-item frailty index [FI], and the FRAIL scale), two comorbidity (the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics [CIRS-G] and the comorbidity domain of the FI [Comorbidity-D-FI]), and two disability instruments (disability in basic activities of daily living [ADL-Katz] and the instrumental and basic activities of daily living domains of the FI [IADL/ADL-D-FI]). The patients were followed-up over 1 year. Results Using FI, CIRS-G, Comorbidity-D-FI, and ADL-Katz, this study identified a patient group with a high (≥50%) 1-year mortality rate in all of the patients and the two patient subgroups (ie, patients aged 65–82 years and ≥83 years). The CFS-7, FI, FRAIL scale, CIRS-G, Comorbidity-D-FI, and IADL/ADL-D-FI (analyzed as full scales) revealed useful discriminative accuracy for 1-year mortality (ie, an area under the curve >0.7) in all the patients and the two patient subgroups (all P<0.001). Thereby, CFS-7 (in all patients and the two patient subgroups) and FI (in the subgroup of patients aged ≥83 years) showed greater discriminative accuracy for 1-year mortality compared to other instruments (all P<0.05). Conclusion All the different instruments emerged as suitable tools for risk stratification in geriatric inpatients. Among them, CFS-7, and in

  13. Increased risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia and in fibromyalgia patients with concomitant comorbidities: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chen-Chia; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Lan, Joung-Liang; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Tsay, Gregory J; Hsu, Chung-Yi

    2016-11-01

    An increased risk of suicide ideation and death has been reported in patients with fibromyalgia. This study aimed to evaluate the risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia and in fibromyalgia patients with comorbidities. We used the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database, a subset of the national insurance claim dataset, which enrolled 1 million Taiwanese people from 2000 to 2005, to identify 95,150 patients with incident fibromyalgia (ICD-9-CM 729.0-729.1) and 190,299 reference subjects matched by sex, age, and index date of diagnosis, with a mean of 8.46 ± 2.37 years of follow-up until 2011. The risk of a suicide event (ICD-9-CM, External-Cause Codes 950-959) was analyzed with a Cox proportional hazards model. Stratification analysis was performed by separating fibromyalgia patients and reference subjects with respect to each comorbidity to determine the risk of suicide in fibromyalgia patients with or without comorbidity relative to subjects who had neither fibromyalgia nor comorbidity. In this Taiwanese dataset, there were 347 suicide events in patients with fibromyalgia (4.16 per 10 person-years) and 424 in matched reference subjects (2.63 per 10 person-years) with a significant crude hazard ratio (HR) of 1.58 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38-1.83) and an adjusted HR of 1.38 (95% CI 1.17-1.71) for fibromyalgia patients relative to the matched reference subjects. According to the 2 × 2 stratification analysis, we found that fibromyalgia patients without comorbidity had an independent but mild risk of a suicide event with adjusted HRs ranging from 1.33 to 1.69 relative to subjects with neither fibromyalgia nor comorbidity. Meanwhile, fibromyalgia patients with comorbidity led to a markedly enhanced risk of a suicide event relative to the matched reference subjects, with adjusted HRs ranging from 1.51 to 8.23. Our analysis confirmed a mild-to-moderate risk of a suicide event in patients with primary fibromyalgia. Attention should

  14. Effect of a family history of psoriasis and age on comorbidities and quality of life in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: Results from the ARIZONA study.

    PubMed

    López-Estebaranz, Jose Luis; Sánchez-Carazo, Jose Luis; Sulleiro, Sara

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease whose clinical characteristics vary from patient to patient. We aimed to analyze how comorbidities and quality of life (QoL, as per the Dermatology Life Quality Index [DLQI]) may be affected by a family history of psoriasis and by age. The ARIZONA study was a multicenter, cross-sectional study in 1022 adult patients diagnosed with moderate to severe psoriasis at least 6 months prior to inclusion. The severity of psoriasis and the proportion of patients with comorbidities were not affected by the presence of a family history. The regression analysis revealed that the presence of a family history of psoriasis was associated with the effect on the patient's QoL (P = 0.002), regardless of disease severity. The mean DLQI total score varied significantly across age groups (5.1 ± 5.3 for the 18-30-year group, 5.7 ± 6.5 for the 31-60-year group and 3.8 ± 5.1 for the >60-year group; P = 0.001). In conclusion, the presence of a family history of psoriasis appears to disrupt QoL in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis, but it hardly affected the prevalence of comorbid conditions. The effect of age on QoL was particularly noticeable in younger patients, highlighting its negative impact. As expected, older patients appeared to be burdened with a higher number of comorbidities than their younger counterparts.

  15. Development and Validation of New Disease-Specific Measures of Somatization and Comorbidity in IBS

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Elizabeth W.; Palsson, Olafur S.; Turner, Marsha J.; Whitehead, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To create and validate empirically derived questionnaires that measure non-gastrointestinal symptoms and disorders that co-exist with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods A systematic review of the world literature identified all non-GI symptoms and diagnoses known to have excess frequency in IBS patients. This data was used to create the Recent Physical Symptoms Questionnaire (RPSQ), which measures somatization (the psychological tendency to report multiple physical symptoms), and the Comorbid Medical Conditions Questionnaire (CMCQ). The psychometric properties of these questionnaires were assessed in two studies: 109 IBS patients in Study I; 286 IBS patients and 67 healthy controls in Study II. Results In Study I, the RPSQ and CMCQ showed high test-retest reliability (r=.88 and .95) and good internal consistency (Cronbach alphas: .86 and .70, respectively). In Study II, principal components analysis demonstrated that the RPSQ is a homogeneous somatization scale, but the CMCQ could be divided into 4 subscales: one for psychiatric disorders and 3 for different types of somatic disorders. Concurrent validity was shown by strong correlations of both the RPSQ and the CMCQ with the Cornell Medical Index (CMI) and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) somatization scales. Discriminant validity was modest: the BSI-18 anxiety and depression scales were less strongly correlated with the RPSQ than the BSI-18 somatization scale. The RPSQ and CMCQ scores of IBS patients were significantly higher than the scores of healthy controls (P<.001). Conclusions The RPSQ and CMCQ are highly reliable and valid measures of somatization and medical comorbidities in IBS. PMID:23062808

  16. Hyperuricemia, Cardiovascular Profile, and Comorbidity in Older Men and Women: The Pro.V.A. Study.

    PubMed

    Musacchio, Estella; Perissinotto, Egle; Sartori, Leonardo; Veronese, Nicola; Punzi, Leonardo; Zambon, Sabina; Manzato, Enzo; Baggio, Giovannella; Corti, Maria-Chiara; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Ramonda, Roberta

    2017-02-01

    Hyperuricemia (HU) is growing worldwide and associates with several medical conditions in the elderly. However, data about older people and possible gender differences are sparse. The aim of this study was to compare HU prevalence rates and association with relevant medical disorders in elderly subjects of both sexes. Pro.V.A. is a survey of 3099 individuals aged 65+, focusing on chronic diseases and disability. Uric acid (UA) levels were dichotomized using 6.0 mg/dL (females) and 7.0 mg/dL (males), and multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) between HU and single comorbidity. HU prevalence was 21.5% in females and 15.8% in males. HU was associated with most anthropometric and laboratory variables in women, but not in men. After adjustment for age, body mass index, and renal function, HU was independently associated with the presence of cardiovascular diseases in both sexes. In women, HU was associated with hand osteoarthritis (OR = 1.52; 95%CI: 1.12-2.08) and edentulism (OR = 1.31; 95%CI: 1.01-1.71), while resulted protective for osteoporosis (OR = 0.69; 95%CI: 0.53-0.91). In men, HU was significantly related with knee osteoarthritis (OR = 1.72; 95%CI: 1.06-2.79) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR = 1.60; 95%CI: 1.04-2.45). The presence of ≥4 comorbidities was a stronger determinant of HU in men (OR = 2.54; 95%CI: 1.21-5.37) than in women (ns). Patterns of age-dependent UA increase are markedly different in men and women. HU prevalence is substantial and its association with other diseases is gender specific, connoting a peculiar clinical profile.

  17. Sleep Quality and Body Mass Index in College Students: The Role of Sleep Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Perla A.; Flores, Melissa; Robles, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Obesity and its comorbidities have emerged as a leading public health concern. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and sleep patterns, including duration and disturbances. Methods: A convenience sample of 515 college students completed an online survey consisting of the Pittsburgh Sleep…

  18. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    1999-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  19. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    2001-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  20. An Investigation of Comorbid Psychological Disorders, Sleep Problems, Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Epilepsy in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannion, Arlene; Leader, Geraldine; Healy, Olive

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated comorbidity in eighty-nine children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Ireland. Comorbidity is the presence of one or more disorders in addition to a primary disorder. The prevalence of comorbid psychological disorders, behaviours associated with comorbid psychopathology, epilepsy, gastrointestinal…

  1. Automating Index Preparation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-23

    Automating Index Preparation* Pehong Chent Michael A. Harrison Computer Science Division University of CaliforniaI Berkeley, CA 94720 March 23, 1987...Abstract Index preparation is a tedious and time-consuming task. In this paper we indicate * how the indexing process can be automated in a way which...identified and analyzed. Specifically, we describe a framework for placing index commands in the document and a general purpose index processor which

  2. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Depressed HIV-infected Individuals: Common and Clinically Consequential

    PubMed Central

    Gaynes, Bradley N.; O'Donnell, Julie; Nelson, Elise; Heine, Amy; Zinski, Anne; Edwards, Malaika; McGuinness, Teena; Riddhi, Modi A.; Montgomery, Charita; Pence, Brian W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report on the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity and its association with illness severity in depressed HIV patients. Methods As part of a multi-site randomized controlled trial of depression treatment for HIV patients, 304 participants meeting criteria for current Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) were assessed for other mood, anxiety and substance use disorders with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, a structured psychiatric diagnostic interview. We also assessed baseline adherence, risk, and health measures. Results Complicated depressive illness was common. Only 18% of participants experienced MDD with no comorbid psychiatric diagnoses; 49% had comorbid dysthymia, 62% had ≥1 comorbid anxiety disorder, and 28% had a comorbid substance use disorder. Self-reported antiretroviral adherence did not differ by the presence of psychiatric comorbidity. However, psychiatric comorbidity was associated with worse physical health and functioning: compared to those with MDD alone, individuals with ≥1 comorbidity reported more HIV symptoms (5.1 vs. 4.1, p-value=0.01), and worse mental health-related quality of life on the SF-12 (29 vs. 35, p<0.01). Conclusion For HIV patients with MDD, chronic depression and psychiatric comorbidity are strikingly common, and this complexity is associated with greater HIV disease severity and worse quality of life. Appreciating this comorbidity can help clinicians better target those at risk of harder-to-treat HIV disease, and underscores the challenge of treating depression in this population. PMID:25892152

  3. External validation and comparison of two variants of the Elixhauser comorbidity measures for all-cause mortality

    PubMed Central

    Crispo, James A. G.; Cohen, Deborah; McNair, Douglas S.; Mattison, Donald R.; Krewski, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Assessing prevalent comorbidities is a common approach in health research for identifying clinical differences between individuals. The objective of this study was to validate and compare the predictive performance of two variants of the Elixhauser comorbidity measures (ECM) for inhospital mortality at index and at 1-year in the Cerner Health Facts® (HF) U.S. database. We estimated the prevalence of select comorbidities for individuals 18 to 89 years of age who received care at Cerner contributing health facilities between 2002 and 2011 using the AHRQ (version 3.7) and the Quan Enhanced ICD-9-CM ECMs. External validation of the ECMs was assessed with measures of discrimination [c-statistics], calibration [Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, Brier Score, calibration curves], added predictive ability [Net Reclassification Improvement], and overall model performance [R2]. Of 3,273,298 patients with a mean age of 43.9 years and a female composition of 53.8%, 1.0% died during their index encounter and 1.5% were deceased at 1-year. Calibration measures were equivalent between the two ECMs. Calibration performance was acceptable when predicting inhospital mortality at index, although recalibration is recommended for predicting inhospital mortality at 1 year. Discrimination was marginally better with the Quan ECM compared the AHRQ ECM when predicting inhospital mortality at index (cQuan = 0.887, 95% CI: 0.885–0.889 vs. cAHRQ = 0.880, 95% CI: 0.878–0.882; p < .0001) and at 1-year (cQuan = 0.884, 95% CI: 0.883–0.886 vs. cAHRQ = 0.880, 95% CI: 0.878–0.881, p < .0001). Both the Quan and the AHRQ ECMs demonstrated excellent discrimination for inhospital mortality of all-causes in Cerner Health Facts®, a HIPAA compliant observational research and privacy-protected data warehouse. While differences in discrimination performance between the ECMs were statistically significant, they are not likely clinically meaningful. PMID:28350807

  4. Comorbidity of Psychiatric and Personality Disorders in First Suicide Attempters

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. Nagaraja; Kulkarni, Ranganath R.; Begum, Shamshad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Attempted suicide is a common clinical problem in a general hospital setting. It has a serious clinical and socio-economical impact too. Aims: To study the psychosocial, psychiatric, and personality profile of the first suicide attempters in a general hospital. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional, hospital-based, descriptive study. Materials and Methods: All the consecutive cases of first suicide attempt (n=100) treated in a general hospital were studied to know the clinical profile. Variables related to socio-demographic characteristics, family background, suicide characteristics, psychiatric morbidity, and comorbidity were analyzed. Risk-Rescue rating was applied to know the medical seriousness of the suicide attempt. Presumptive stressful life event scale was utilized to calculate life events score. Structured clinical interview (MINI Plus) and semi-structured clinical interview (IPDE) were used for axis-I and axis-II (personality) diagnoses. The results were analyzed using appropriate statistical measures. Results: Family history of psychiatric illnesses (31%) and suicide (11%) were noted. Insecticides and pesticides were the most common agents (71%) employed to attempt suicide. Interpersonal difficulties (46%) were the most frequent stressor. Overall medical seriousness of the suicide attempt was of moderate lethality. 93% of the suicide attempters had at least one axis-I and/or axis-II psychiatric disorder. Most common diagnostic categories were mood disorders, adjustment disorders, and substance-related disorders, with axis-I disorders (89%), personality disorders (52%), and comorbidity of psychiatric disorders (51.6%). Conclusion: Individuals who made first suicide attempt were young adults, had lower educational achievement; overall seriousness of the suicide attempt was of moderate lethality, high prevalence of psychiatric morbidity, personality disorders, and comorbidity, and had sought medical help from general practitioners. PMID:23833346

  5. Impact of cardiovascular comorbidity on ovarian cancer mortality

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Eileen H.; Lenihan, Daniel J.; Urbauer, Diana L.; Basen-Engquist, Karen M.; Valentine, Alan; Palmero, Laura; Woods, Myrshia L.; Patel, Pooja; Nick, Alpa M.; Shahzad, Mian M. K.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Golden, Antoinette; Atkinson, Emma; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Sood, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND A retrospective cohort study utilizing prospectively collected data was conducted from August 2003 until March 2008 at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. It is unknown whether cardiovascular comorbidity and chronic stress impact ovarian cancer outcome, which remains poor despite advances in therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cardiovascular disease and markers that may be associated with stress are also associated with survival in ovarian cancer patients. METHODS Participants with newly diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer were followed until time of death or truncation of study period (median follow-up = 4.2 years; n=271). Tumor characteristics (stage, tumor grade, histology, debulking status), demographic variables, and cardiovascular comorbidity were documented and compared to overall survival. RESULTS Of the 9 cardiovascular events tracked during follow-up, venous thrombo embolism (VTE; Hazard Ratio= 3.2; 95%CI =1.8–5.5) and pulmonary hypertension (Hazard Ratio=8.5; 95%CI=3.9– 18.7) were associated with shorter survival in multivariate analysis. In addition, high tumor grade, suboptimal cytoreduction, and baseline heart rate (Hazard Ratio=1.02; 95%CI= 1.01– 1.04) were related to decreased survival. CONCLUSION Careful management of certain cardiovascular comorbidities may extend survival in patients with ovarian cancer. Our findings suggest that increased baseline heart rate and the development of VTE and pulmonary hypertension after cancer diagnosis may be significant predictors of survival in women with ovarian cancer. IMPACT Our study emphasizes the importance of identifying and optimally treating tachycardia, VTE and pulmonary hypertension in conjunction with cancer therapy. PMID:24045927

  6. Visual height intolerance and acrophobia: clinical characteristics and comorbidity patterns.

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Huppert, Doreen; Grill, Eva; Fitz, Werner; Brandt, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the general population lifetime and point prevalence of visual height intolerance and acrophobia, to define their clinical characteristics, and to determine their anxious and depressive comorbidities. A case-control study was conducted within a German population-based cross-sectional telephone survey. A representative sample of 2,012 individuals aged 14 and above was selected. Defined neurological conditions (migraine, Menière's disease, motion sickness), symptom pattern, age of first manifestation, precipitating height stimuli, course of illness, psychosocial impairment, and comorbidity patterns (anxiety conditions, depressive disorders according to DSM-IV-TR) for vHI and acrophobia were assessed. The lifetime prevalence of vHI was 28.5% (women 32.4%, men 24.5%). Initial attacks occurred predominantly (36%) in the second decade. A rapid generalization to other height stimuli and a chronic course of illness with at least moderate impairment were observed. A total of 22.5% of individuals with vHI experienced the intensity of panic attacks. The lifetime prevalence of acrophobia was 6.4% (women 8.6%, men 4.1%), and point prevalence was 2.0% (women 2.8%; men 1.1%). VHI and even more acrophobia were associated with high rates of comorbid anxious and depressive conditions. Migraine was both a significant predictor of later acrophobia and a significant consequence of previous acrophobia. VHI affects nearly a third of the general population; in more than 20% of these persons, vHI occasionally develops into panic attacks and in 6.4%, it escalates to acrophobia. Symptoms and degree of social impairment form a continuum of mild to seriously distressing conditions in susceptible subjects.

  7. [Leukotrien antagonists in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Sacre Hazouri, José Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Leukotrienes comprise a family of products of the 5-lipoxigenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism. The cysteinil leukotrienes C4, D4 and E4 account for the biologic activity that was previously termed "slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis". The proinflammatory effects of cysteinil leukotrienes (cys LTs) have been well described in asthma and rhinitis. The cys LTs induce broncospasm (1,000 times more potent than histamine), edema, mucus, hypersecretion, attract inflammatory cells like eosinophils, increase airway hyperreactivity, vascular leakage, and stimulate takikinins. The leukotriene synthesis can be inhibited in two different places; through inhibition of 5 lipooxigenase activating protein (FLAP) in the 5 lipooxigenase pathway, with the drug Zyleuton, or blocking the cysLT1 receptor with the drugs Montelukast, Pranlukast, Zafirlukast. The cysLTs play an important role in pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis and comorbid diseases like rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. Antileukotrienes are prescribed in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis is a complex IgE inflammatory disease of the upper airways. It is the most common allergic disease ocurring in 10 to 20% of adults and up to 30% of children. It may be seasonal or perennial, intermittent or persistent. Sneezing, itching, watery rhinorrea and nasal obstruction are classic symptoms. Ocular itching, lacrimation and redness also occur frequently as almost 50% of the patients also have allergic conjunctivitis. Allergic rhinitis may be mild, moderate or severe disease. It may impair cognition, school and work performance. It affects productivity, behavior and mood changes, causes sleep disturbance and diminish the patient's quality of life. Allergic rhinitis is a common comorbid condition with asthma, sinusitis, otitis media, nasal polyposis and recurrent respiratory infections. The purpose of this rewiew article is to know the importante of leukotrienes, its receptors and the clinical

  8. Evaluation of the risk factors of depressive disorders comorbid with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Liqiang; Xu, Luoyi; Wei, Lili; Sun, Yi; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Objective Overlap of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) complicates diagnosis of depressive disorder and renders antidepressant treatment challenging. Previous studies have reported that the incidence of OSA is higher in patients with depression than in the general population. The purpose of this article was to investigate clinical risk factors to predict OSA in depression disorders. Methods A total of 115 patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (in a major depressive episode), who underwent overnight polysomnography, were studied retrospectively. They were divided into two groups: non-OSA and OSA. The patients who had apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) <5 were defined as the non-OSA group, whereas the OSA group was defined as those with an AHI ≥5. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association among AHI and clinical factors, including sex, age, body mass index (BMI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and diagnosis (MDD or bipolar disorder [in a major depressive episode]). Results In 115 patients, 51.3% had OSA. Logistic regression analysis showed significant associations between AHI and diagnosis (MDD or bipolar disorder [in a major depressive episode]), BMI, HAMD, and PSQI (P<0.05). Conclusion The findings of our study suggested that the rate of depression being comorbid with OSA is remarkably high and revealed that there is a high rate of undetected OSA among depressive disorder patients and untreated OSA among mood disorder patients. The clinical risk factors (diagnosis [MDD or bipolar disorder {in a major depressive episode}], BMI, HAMD, and PSQI) could predict AHI or OSA diagnosis and contribute to OSA screening in depressive disorder patients. PMID:28144146

  9. Gastrointestinal comorbidities which complicate the treatment of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mascolo, Margherita; Geer, Bashir; Feuerstein, Joshua; Mehler, Philip S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa often voice a multitude of symptoms in regards to their gastrointestinal tract. These complaints can complicate the treatment of their eating disorder as they distract attention from the important goal of weight restoration. Moreover, the restricting of certain food groups also makes the task of weight restoration substantially more difficult, or may result in binging. Therefore a working knowledge of common gastrointestinal comorbidities, such as celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and gastroparesis, is useful when treating a patient who has anorexia nervosa.

  10. Personality pathology comorbidity in adult females with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    De Bolle, Marleen; De Clercq, Barbara; Pham-Scottez, Alexandra; Mels, Saskia; Rolland, Jean-Pierre; Guelfi, Julien Daniel; Braet, Caroline; De Fruyt, Filip

    2011-03-01

    Personality pathology is examined in 100 female in-patients diagnosed with eating disorders. The Eating Disorder Inventory-II and the NEO-PI-R were self-administered and personality pathology was assessed using a structured interview. Clinicians additionally evaluated patients' global functioning. The results indicated sizeable personality disorder comorbidity, and two dimensions of personality pathology, for example, an internalizing and an externalizing factor, could be identified. Patients' global functioning was primarily associated with dimensions of personality pathology, but not with eating disorder symptoms. Assessment and therapeutic interventions should focus on this co-occurring pathology in order to improve patients' functioning.

  11. Circadian Clocks as Modulators of Metabolic Comorbidity in Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Barandas, Rita; Landgraf, Dominic; McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder are often accompanied by metabolic dysfunction symptoms, including obesity and diabetes. Since the circadian system controls important brain systems that regulate affective, cognitive, and metabolic functions, and neuropsychiatric and metabolic diseases are often correlated with disturbances of circadian rhythms, we hypothesize that dysregulation of circadian clocks plays a central role in metabolic comorbidity in psychiatric disorders. In this review paper, we highlight the role of circadian clocks in glucocorticoid, dopamine, and orexin/melanin-concentrating hormone systems and describe how a dysfunction of these clocks may contribute to the simultaneous development of psychiatric and metabolic symptoms.

  12. Neuroplasticity Underlying the Comorbidity of Pain and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Lisa; Manders, Toby; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Acute pain induces depressed mood, and chronic pain is known to cause depression. Depression, meanwhile, can also adversely affect pain behaviors ranging from symptomology to treatment response. Pain and depression independently induce long-term plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS). Comorbid conditions, however, have distinct patterns of neural activation. We performed a review of the changes in neural circuitry and molecular signaling pathways that may underlie this complex relationship between pain and depression. We also discussed some of the current and future therapies that are based on this understanding of the CNS plasticity that occurs with pain and depression. PMID:25810926

  13. Risk of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in relation to maternal co-morbid mood and migraine disorders during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Swee May; Frederick, Ihunnaya O; Qiu, Chunfang; Williams, Michelle A

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the risks of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among pregnant women with mood and migraine disorders, using a cohort study of 3432 pregnant women. Maternal pre-pregnancy or early pregnancy (<20 weeks gestation) mood disorder and pre-pregnancy migraine diagnoses were ascertained from interview and medical record review. We fitted generalised linear models to derive risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy for women with isolated mood, isolated migraine and co-morbid mood-migraine disorders, respectively. Reported RR were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, marital status, parity, smoking status, chronic hypertension or pre-existing diabetes mellitus, and pre-pregnancy body mass index. Women without mood or migraine disorders were defined as the reference group. The risks for preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were more consistently elevated among women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders than among women with isolated mood or migraine disorder. Women with co-morbid disorders were almost twice as likely to deliver preterm (adjusted RR=1.87, 95% CI 1.05, 3.34) compared with the reference group. There was no clear evidence of increased risks of preterm delivery and its subtypes with isolated migraine disorder. Women with mood disorder had elevated risks of pre-eclampsia (adjusted RR=3.57, 95% CI 1.83, 6.99). Our results suggest an association between isolated migraine disorder and pregnancy-induced hypertension (adjusted RR=1.42, 95% CI 1.00, 2.01). This is the first study examining perinatal outcomes in women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders. Pregnant women with a history of migraine may benefit from screening for depression during prenatal care and vigilant monitoring, especially for women with co-morbid mood and migraine disorders.

  14. CENDI Indexing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The CENDI Indexing Workshop held at NASA Headquarters, Two Independence Square, 300 E Street, Washington, DC, on September 21-22, 1994 focused on the following topics: machine aided indexing, indexing quality, an indexing pilot project, the MedIndEx Prototype, Department of Energy/Office of Scientific and Technical Information indexing activities, high-tech coding structures, category indexing schemes, and the Government Information Locator Service. This publication consists mostly of viewgraphs related to the above noted topics. In an appendix is a description of the Government Information Locator Service.

  15. Differentiating Aging Among Adults With Down Syndrome and Comorbid Dementia or Psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Esbensen, Anna J; Johnson, Emily Boshkoff; Amaral, Joseph L; Tan, Christine M; Macks, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Differences were examined between three groups of adults with Down syndrome in their behavioral presentation, social life/activities, health, and support needs. We compared those with comorbid dementia, with comorbid psychopathology, and with no comorbid conditions. Adults with comorbid dementia were more likely to be older, have lower functional abilities, have worse health and more health conditions, and need more support in self-care. Adults with comorbid psychopathology were more likely to exhibit more behavior problems and to be living at home with their families. Adults with no comorbidities were most likely to be involved in community employment. Differences in behavioral presentation can help facilitate clinical diagnoses in aging in Down syndrome, and implications for differential diagnosis and service supports are discussed.

  16. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with autism and other developmental disabilities: associations with ethnicity, child comorbid symptoms, and parental stress.

    PubMed

    Valicenti-McDermott, Maria; Burrows, Bethany; Bernstein, Leora; Hottinger, Kathryn; Lawson, Katharine; Seijo, Rosa; Schechtman, Merryl; Shulman, Lisa; Shinnar, Shlomo

    2014-03-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine by children with autism and the association of its use with child comorbid symptoms and parental stress was studied in an ethnically diverse population, in a cross-sectional study with structured interviews. The sample included 50 families of children with autism and 50 families of children with other developmental disabilities, matched by age/gender. Interview included the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire, Gastrointestinal Questionnaire, Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, Aberrant Behavior Checklist, and Parenting Stress Index. In this ethnically diverse sample, the use of complementary and alternative medicine was significantly higher for the autism group. In the autism group, use was significantly related to child's irritability, hyperactivity, food allergies, and parental stress; in the developmental disabilities group, there was no association with child comorbid symptoms or parental stress. The results contribute information to health care providers about families of children with autism who are more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine.

  17. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers Contributing to Comorbidities in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Inga Jácome, Martha Cecilia; Morales Chacòn, Lilia Maria; Vera Cuesta, Hector; Maragoto Rizo, Carlos; Whilby Santiesteban, Mabel; Ramos Hernandez, Lesyanis; Noris García, Elena; González Fraguela, Maria Elena; Fernandez Verdecia, Caridad Ivette; Vegas Hurtado, Yamilé; Siniscalco, Dario; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto; Robinson-Agramonte, Maria de los Angeles

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the contribution of peripheral biomarkers to comorbidities and clinical findings in autism. Seventeen autistic children and age-matched typically developing (AMTD), between three to nine years old were evaluated. The diagnostic followed the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition (DMS-IV) and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) was applied to classify the severity. Cytokine profile was evaluated in plasma using a sandwich type ELISA. Paraclinical events included electroencephalography (EEG) record. Statistical analysis was done to explore significant differences in cytokine profile between autism and AMTD groups and respect clinical and paraclinical parameters. Significant differences were found to IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-12p40, and IL-12p70 cytokines in individuals with autism compared with AMTD (p < 0.05). All autistic patients showed interictalepileptiform activity at EEG, however, only 37.5% suffered epilepsy. There was not a regional focalization of the abnormalities that were detectable with EEG in autistic patients with history of epilepsy. A higher IL-6 level was observed in patients without history of epilepsy with interictalepileptiform activity in the frontal brain region, p < 0.05. In conclusion, peripheral inflammatory markers might be useful as potential biomarkers to predict comorbidities in autism as well as reinforce and aid informed decision-making related to EEG findings in children with Autism spectrum disorders (ASD). PMID:27983615

  18. Anxiety and depression—Important psychological comorbidities of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Curt R.; Walsh, James R.; Yang, Ian A.; Rolls, Tricia A.; Ward, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are common and important comorbidities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The pathophysiology of these psychological comorbidities in COPD is complex and possibly explained by common risk factors, response to symptomatology and biochemical alterations. The presence of anxiety and/or depression in COPD patients is associated with increased mortality, exacerbation rates, length of hospital stay, and decreased quality of life and functional status. There is currently no consensus on the most appropriate approach to screening for anxiety and depression in COPD. Treatment options include psychological [relaxation, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), self-management] and pharmacological interventions. Although there is some evidence to support these treatments in COPD, the data are limited and mainly comprised by small studies. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves anxiety and depression, and conversely these conditions impact rehabilitation completion rates. Additional high quality studies are urgently required to optimise screening and effective treatment of anxiety and depression in patients with COPD, to enhance complex chronic disease management for these patients. PMID:25478202

  19. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: diagnosis, lifespan, comorbidities, and neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Thomas J; Biederman, Joseph; Mick, Eric

    2007-01-01

    In this report, we provide an evidence-based overview of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), including diagnosis, prevalence, developmental expression of symptoms, persistence, the heterogeneity of functional outcome, impairment in afflicted adults, psychiatric comorbidity, pathophysiology, genetics, psychosocial and biologic risk factors, and neurobiology. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is an early-onset, highly prevalent neurobehavioral disorder, with genetic, environmental, and biologic etiologies, that persists into adolescence and adulthood in a sizable majority of afflicted children of both sexes. It is characterized by behavioral symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity across the life cycle and is associated with considerable morbidity and disability. Comorbidity is a distinct clinical feature of both childhood and adult ADHD. Although its etiology remains unclear, emerging evidence documents its strong neurobiologic and genetic underpinnings. Despite the high diagnostic reliability and the robust evidence of the validity of ADHD, there are many underlying issues that remain to be resolved. These include establishing developmentally appropriate diagnostic criteria at older ages, further elaborating the impact of gender on symptom expression, and examining risk and protective factors in relationship to prevention or amelioration of ADHD as well as related functional impairments.

  20. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers Contributing to Comorbidities in Autism.

    PubMed

    Inga Jácome, Martha Cecilia; Morales Chacòn, Lilia Maria; Vera Cuesta, Hector; Maragoto Rizo, Carlos; Whilby Santiesteban, Mabel; Ramos Hernandez, Lesyanis; Noris García, Elena; González Fraguela, Maria Elena; Fernandez Verdecia, Caridad Ivette; Vegas Hurtado, Yamilé; Siniscalco, Dario; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto; Robinson-Agramonte, Maria de Los Angeles

    2016-12-14

    This study evaluates the contribution of peripheral biomarkers to comorbidities and clinical findings in autism. Seventeen autistic children and age-matched typically developing (AMTD), between three to nine years old were evaluated. The diagnostic followed the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition (DMS-IV) and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) was applied to classify the severity. Cytokine profile was evaluated in plasma using a sandwich type ELISA. Paraclinical events included electroencephalography (EEG) record. Statistical analysis was done to explore significant differences in cytokine profile between autism and AMTD groups and respect clinical and paraclinical parameters. Significant differences were found to IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-12p40, and IL-12p70 cytokines in individuals with autism compared with AMTD (p < 0.05). All autistic patients showed interictalepileptiform activity at EEG, however, only 37.5% suffered epilepsy. There was not a regional focalization of the abnormalities that were detectable with EEG in autistic patients with history of epilepsy. A higher IL-6 level was observed in patients without history of epilepsy with interictalepileptiform activity in the frontal brain region, p < 0.05. In conclusion, peripheral inflammatory markers might be useful as potential biomarkers to predict comorbidities in autism as well as reinforce and aid informed decision-making related to EEG findings in children with Autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

  1. Comorbidities of obsessive and compulsive symptoms in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen E.; Gehl, Carissa R.; Marder, Karen S.; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    Although current reports document a high rate of obsessive and compulsive symptoms (O/Cs) in Huntington disease (HD), there have been no studies published that have made an attempt to identify comorbidities of O/Cs in HD. We examined O/Cs in 1,642 individuals with a diagnosis of HD. Of those endorsing significant O/Cs (27.2%), nearly one-quarter reported obtaining treatment for OCD. Individuals with HD and O/Cs were older, had poorer functioning, and a longer duration of illness than those without O/Cs. Individuals with HD and O/Cs endorsed significantly higher psychiatric comorbidities of depression, suicidal ideation, aggression, delusions and hallucinations. Participants with the most severe O/Cs had greater bradykinesia and worse performance on the Stroop task, a measure of executive function. Clinicians should be aware that patients with HD and O/Cs might have a somewhat different clinical picture from those without, and may require a specialized treatment plan. PMID:20458194

  2. Gender differences in cardiovascular disease and comorbid depression.

    PubMed Central

    Möller-Leimkühler, Anne Maria

    2007-01-01

    Although gender is increasingly perceived as a key determinant in health and illness, systematic gender studies in medicine are still lacking. For a long time, cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been seen as a “male” disease, due to men's higher absolute risk compared with women, but the relative risk in women of CVD morbidity and mortality is actually higher: Current knowledge points to important gender differences in age of onset, symptom presentation, management, and outcome, as well as traditional and psychosocial risk factors. Compared with men, CVD risk in women is increased to a greater extent by some traditional factors (eg, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity,) and socioeconomic and psychosocial factors also seem to have a higher impact on CVD in women. With respect la differences in CVD management, a gender bias in favor of men has to be taken into account, in spite of greater age and higher comorbidity in women, possibly contributing to a poorer outcome. Depression has been shown to be an independent risk factor and consequence of CVD; however, concerning gender differences, The results have been inconsistent. Current evidence suggests that depression causes a greater increase in CVD incidence in women, and that female CVD patients experience higher levels of depression than men. Gensier aspects should be more intensively considered, both in further research on gender differences in comorbid depresion, and in cardiac treatment and rehabilitation, with the goal of making secondary prevention more effective. PMID:17506227

  3. Heterogeneity of executive functions among comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Dajani, Dina R; Llabre, Maria M; Nebel, Mary Beth; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Uddin, Lucina Q

    2016-11-09

    Executive functions (EFs) are used to set goals, plan for the future, inhibit maladaptive responses, and change behavior flexibly. Although some studies point to specific EF profiles in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) - prevalent and often highly comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders - others have not differentiated them. The objective of the current study was to identify distinct profiles of EF across typically developing (TD) children and children with ASD and ADHD. We employed a latent profile analysis using indicators of EF (e.g., working memory, inhibition, and flexibility) in a mixed group of 8-13 year-olds including TD children (n = 128), children with ASD without ADHD (n = 30), children with ADHD (n = 93), and children with comorbid ASD and ADHD (n = 66). Three EF classes emerged: "above average," "average," and "impaired." EF classes did not reproduce diagnostic categories, suggesting that differences in EF abilities are present within the ASD and ADHD groups. Further, greater EF dysfunction predicted more severe socioemotional problems, such as anxiety/depression. These results highlight the heterogeneity of current diagnostic groups and identify an "impaired" EF group, consisting of children with both ASD and ADHD, which could specifically be targeted for EF intervention.

  4. Heterogeneity of executive functions among comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dajani, Dina R.; Llabre, Maria M.; Nebel, Mary Beth; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Uddin, Lucina Q.

    2016-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) are used to set goals, plan for the future, inhibit maladaptive responses, and change behavior flexibly. Although some studies point to specific EF profiles in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) — prevalent and often highly comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders — others have not differentiated them. The objective of the current study was to identify distinct profiles of EF across typically developing (TD) children and children with ASD and ADHD. We employed a latent profile analysis using indicators of EF (e.g., working memory, inhibition, and flexibility) in a mixed group of 8–13 year-olds including TD children (n = 128), children with ASD without ADHD (n = 30), children with ADHD (n = 93), and children with comorbid ASD and ADHD (n = 66). Three EF classes emerged: “above average,” “average,” and “impaired.” EF classes did not reproduce diagnostic categories, suggesting that differences in EF abilities are present within the ASD and ADHD groups. Further, greater EF dysfunction predicted more severe socioemotional problems, such as anxiety/depression. These results highlight the heterogeneity of current diagnostic groups and identify an “impaired” EF group, consisting of children with both ASD and ADHD, which could specifically be targeted for EF intervention. PMID:27827406

  5. Genomic structural variations for cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Nazarenko, Maria S.; Sleptcov, Aleksei A.; Lebedev, Igor N.; Skryabin, Nikolay A.; Markov, Anton V.; Golubenko, Maria V.; Koroleva, Iuliia A.; Kazancev, Anton N.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Puzyrev, Valery P.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify genes targeted by both copy number and copy-neutral changes in the right coronary arteries in the area of advanced atherosclerotic plaques and intact internal mammary arteries derived from the same individuals with comorbid coronary artery disease and metabolic syndrome. The artery samples from 10 patients were screened for genomic imbalances using array comparative genomic hybridization. Ninety high-confidence, identical copy number variations (CNVs) were detected. We also identified eight copy-neutral changes (cn-LOHs) > 1.5 Mb in paired arterial samples in 4 of 10 individuals. The frequencies of the two gains located in the 10q24.31 (ERLIN1) and 12q24.11 (UNG, ACACB) genomic regions were evaluated in 33 paired arteries and blood samples. Two patients contained the gain in 10q24.31 (ERLIN1) and one patient contained the gain in 12q24.11 (UNG, ACACB) that affected only the blood DNA. An additional two patients harboured these CNVs in both the arteries and blood. In conclusion, we discovered and confirmed a gain of the 10q24.31 (ERLIN1) and 12q24.11 (UNG, ACACB) genomic regions in patients with coronary artery disease and metabolic comorbidity. Analysis of DNA extracted from blood indicated a possible somatic origin for these CNVs. PMID:28120895

  6. Prazosin for Treatment of Patients with PTSD and Comorbid Alcohol Dependence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Prazosin for Treatment of Patients with PTSD and Comorbid Alcohol Dependence PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...of Patients with PTSD and Comorbid Alcohol Dependence 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-2-0075 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...comorbidity with alcohol dependence (AD) and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The rates of TSD among individuals with AD are at least twice

  7. Independent effect of type 2 diabetes beyond characteristic comorbidities and medications on immediate but not continued knee extensor exercise hyperemia

    PubMed Central

    Poitras, Veronica J.; Bentley, Robert F.; Hopkins-Rosseel, Diana H.; LaHaye, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that type 2 diabetes (T2D), when present in the characteristic constellation of comorbidities (obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia) and medications, slows the dynamic adjustment of exercising muscle perfusion and blunts the steady state relative to that of controls matched for age, body mass index, fitness, comorbidities, and non-T2D medications. Thirteen persons with T2D and 11 who served as controls performed rhythmic single-leg isometric quadriceps exercise (rest-to-6 kg and 6-to-12 kg transitions, 5 min at each intensity). Measurements included leg blood flow (LBF, femoral artery ultrasound), mean arterial pressure (MAP, finger photoplethysmography), and leg vascular conductance (LVK, calculated). Dynamics were quantified using mean response time (MRT). Measures of amplitude were also used to compare response adjustment: the change from baseline to 1) the peak initial response (greatest 1-s average in the first 10 s; ΔLBFPIR, ΔLVKPIR) and 2) the on-transient (average from curve fit at 15, 45, and 75 s; ΔLBFON, ΔLVKON). ΔLBFPIR was significantly blunted in T2D vs. control individuals (P = 0.037); this was due to a tendency for reduced ΔLVKPIR (P = 0.063). In contrast, the overall response speed was not different between groups (MRT P = 0.856, ΔLBFON P = 0.150) nor was the change from baseline to steady state (P = 0.204). ΔLBFPIR, ΔLBFON, and LBF MRT did not differ between rest-to-6 kg and 6-to-12 kg workload transitions (all P > 0.05). Despite a transient amplitude impairment at the onset of exercise, there is no robust or consistent effect of T2D on top of the comorbidities and medications typical of this population on the overall dynamic adjustment of LBF, or the steady-state levels achieved during low- or moderate-intensity exercise. PMID:26048976

  8. Comorbidity of Adult Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder in Bipolar Patients: Prevalence, Sociodemographic and Clinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    BERKOL, Tonguç Demir; YARGIÇ, İlhan; ÖZYILDIRIM, İlker; YAZICI, Olcay

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of adult attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) comorbidity in bipolar patients and to investigate the influence of this comorbidity on the clinical characteristics of bipolar disorder (BD). Method A total of 135 patients with BD type I and II and BD not otherwise specified were included in this study. First, the Adult ADD/ADHD DSM-IV-Based Diagnostic Screening and Rating Scale (ADHD scale) was administered to all patients, and all of the patients were also interviewed for the diagnosis. Patients who were diagnosed as having ADHD comorbidity (n=23) on the basis of DSM-IV and those who were not diagnosed to have ADHD comorbidity (n=32) were compared in terms of sociodemographic and clinical correlates. Results Twenty-three of 135 patients (17%) were found to have ADHD comorbidity. In the ADHD comorbidity group, the level of education and the number of suicide attempts were higher (p=.011 and .043, respectively). Although not significant, subthreshold depressive symptoms in interepisodic periods, the lifetime history of antidepressant use and the total number of lifetime depressive episodes tended to be more frequent in bipolar disorder with ADHD comorbidity group than in the control group. Conclusion Bipolar disorder has a frequent comorbidity with ADHD, and contrary to expectations, it might be related to the depressive aspect, rather than the manic aspect, of bipolar disorder. Early diagnosis of ADHD comorbidity in bipolar patients might help to prevent serious risk factors.

  9. Rapid cycling as a feature of bipolar disorder and comorbid migraine

    PubMed Central

    Gordon-Smith, K.; Forty, L.; Chan, C.; Knott, S.; Jones, I.; Craddock, N.; Jones, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested the clinical profile of individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) differs according to the presence or absence of comorbid migraine. We aimed to determine the clinical characteristics that differentiate individuals with BD with and without comorbid migraine in a large, representative, clinically well-characterised UK sample. Methods The lifetime clinical characteristics of 1488 individuals with BD (BPI n=1120, BPII n=368) with and without comorbid migraine were compared (n=375 vs. n=1113 respectively). Results Individuals with BD and comorbid migraine had a distinctive set of lifetime clinical characteristics. A multivariate model showed that consistent with previous studies those with comorbid migraine were significantly more likely to be female (OR=2.099, p=0.005) and have comorbid panic attacks (OR=1.842, p=0.004). A novel finding was that even after controlling for other differences, the individuals with BD and comorbid migraine were more likely to have a rapid cycling illness course (OR=1.888, p=0.002). Limitations Presence of migraine was assessed using self report measures. Cross-sectional study design limits investigations of bidirectional associations between migraine and bipolar disorder. Conclusions Comorbid migraine in BD may represent a more homogenous subtype of BD with an unstable rapid cycling course. Identifying individuals with BD and comorbid migraine may be of use in a clinical setting and this subgroup could be the focus of future aetiological studies. PMID:25661398

  10. Major comorbid disease processes associated with increased incidence of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Salwa; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2016-03-06

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly seen amongst critically ill and hospitalized patients. Individuals with certain co-morbid diseases have an increased risk of developing AKI. Thus, recognizing the co-morbidities that predispose patients to AKI is important in AKI prevention and treatment. Some of the most common co-morbid disease processes that increase the risk of AKI are diabetes, cancer, cardiac surgery and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). This review article identifies the increased risk of acquiring AKI with given co-morbid diseases. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AKI in relation to co-morbid diseases are discussed to understand how the risk of acquiring AKI is increased. This paper reviews the effects of various co-morbid diseases including: Diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and HIV AIDS, which all exhibit a significant increased risk of developing AKI. Amongst these co-morbid diseases, inflammation, the use of nephrotoxic agents, and hypoperfusion to the kidneys have been shown to be major pathological processes that predisposes individuals to AKI. The pathogenesis of kidney injury is complex, however, effective treatment of the co-morbid disease processes may reduce its risk. Therefore, improved management of co-morbid diseases may prevent some of the underlying pathology that contributes to the increased risk of developing AKI.

  11. A bivariate mann-whitney approach for unraveling genetic variants and interactions contributing to comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yalu; Schaid, Daniel J; Lu, Qing

    2013-04-01

    Although comorbidity among complex diseases (e.g., drug dependence syndromes) is well documented, genetic variants contributing to the comorbidity are still largely unknown. The discovery of genetic variants and their interactions contributing to comorbidity will likely shed light on underlying pathophysiological and etiological processes, and promote effective treatments for comorbid conditions. For this reason, studies to discover genetic variants that foster the development of comorbidity represent high-priority research projects, as manifested in the behavioral genetics studies now underway. The yield from these studies can be enhanced by adopting novel statistical approaches, with the capacity of considering multiple genetic variants and possible interactions. For this purpose, we propose a bivariate Mann-Whitney (BMW) approach to unravel genetic variants and interactions contributing to comorbidity, as well as those unique to each comorbid condition. Through simulations, we found BMW outperformed two commonly adopted approaches in a variety of underlying disease and comorbidity models. We further applied BMW to datasets from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment, investigating the contribution of 184 known nicotine dependence (ND) and alcohol dependence (AD) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to the comorbidity of ND and AD. The analysis revealed a candidate SNP from CHRNA5, rs16969968, associated with both ND and AD, and replicated the findings in an independent dataset with a P-value of 1.06 × 10(-03) .

  12. Major comorbid disease processes associated with increased incidence of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Salwa; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly seen amongst critically ill and hospitalized patients. Individuals with certain co-morbid diseases have an increased risk of developing AKI. Thus, recognizing the co-morbidities that predispose patients to AKI is important in AKI prevention and treatment. Some of the most common co-morbid disease processes that increase the risk of AKI are diabetes, cancer, cardiac surgery and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). This review article identifies the increased risk of acquiring AKI with given co-morbid diseases. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AKI in relation to co-morbid diseases are discussed to understand how the risk of acquiring AKI is increased. This paper reviews the effects of various co-morbid diseases including: Diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and HIV AIDS, which all exhibit a significant increased risk of developing AKI. Amongst these co-morbid diseases, inflammation, the use of nephrotoxic agents, and hypoperfusion to the kidneys have been shown to be major pathological processes that predisposes individuals to AKI. The pathogenesis of kidney injury is complex, however, effective treatment of the co-morbid disease processes may reduce its risk. Therefore, improved management of co-morbid diseases may prevent some of the underlying pathology that contributes to the increased risk of developing AKI. PMID:26981437

  13. Managing Comorbid Illness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: What Can We Learn from Other Diseases?

    PubMed

    Conwell, Walter D; Tsai, Sheila C

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with numerous comorbid medical conditions. Symptoms of OSA may mimic those of comorbid conditions. The presence of OSA may worsen outcomes from the primary condition. Conversely, OSA treatment may benefit both sleep symptomatology and comorbid illness. Because of potential significant benefit, it is important to screen for sleep apnea symptoms, to have a low threshold to perform diagnostic testing, to treat OSA if present, and to closely monitor symptoms. OSA management does not necessarily replace, but rather, should be performed in conjunction with primary therapy for comorbid conditions.

  14. The NLM Indexing Initiative.

    PubMed

    Aronson, A R; Bodenreider, O; Chang, H F; Humphrey, S M; Mork, J G; Nelson, S J; Rindflesch, T C; Wilbur, W J

    2000-01-01

    The objective of NLM's Indexing Initiative (IND) is to investigate methods whereby automated indexing methods partially or completely substitute for current indexing practices. The project will be considered a success if methods can be designed and implemented that result in retrieval performance that is equal to or better than the retrieval performance of systems based principally on humanly assigned index terms. We describe the current state of the project and discuss our plans for the future.

  15. Gradient Index Lens Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-19

    Finally, an assessment of the current technologies in gradient index has been made. This includes a series of recommendations w’iich will be...17 III. Ray Tracing in Anamorphic Gradient Index Media ......... 20 IV. Fabrication of Six Gradient Index Samples ............. 27 V. Technology ...for a basic understanding of what can and cannot be done with gradient index lenses, aside from any lack of technology for making a paricular gradient

  16. Kaiser's Systematic Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a system of subject indexing developed by Julius Kaiser (1868-1927) which is based on "concretes" and "processes" to govern the form of subject headings and subdivisions. Elements of amplification, guides for the subject index, and criticism of Kaiser's systematic indexing are noted. Five sources are given. (EJS)

  17. Automatic Versus Manual Indexing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Meulen, W. A.; Janssen, P. J. F. C.

    1977-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of results in terms of recall and precision from queries submitted to systems with automatic and manual subject indexing. Differences were attributed to query formulation. The effectiveness of automatic indexing was found equivalent to manual indexing. (Author/KP)

  18. The Europe 2020 Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasimeni, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new index to quantify, measure and monitor the progress towards the objectives of the Europe 2020 strategy. This index is based on a set of relevant, accepted, credible, easy to monitor and robust indicators presented by the European Commission at the time the strategy was launched. The internal analysis of the index shows…

  19. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Mortality among Veterans Hospitalized for Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Banta, Jim E.; Andersen, Ronald M.; Young, Alexander S.; Kominski, Gerald; Cunningham, William E.

    2011-01-01

    A Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization approach was used to examine the impact of comorbid mental illness on mortality of veterans admitted to Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in fiscal year 2001 with a primary diagnosis of congestive heart failure (n= 15,497). Thirty percent had a psychiatric diagnosis, 4.7% died during the index hospitalization and 11.5% died during the year following discharge. Among those with mental illness, 23.6% had multiple psychiatric disorders. Multivariable logistic regression models found dementia to be positively associated with inpatient mortality. Depression alone (excluding other psychiatric disorders) was positively associated with one-year mortality. Primary care visits were associated with a reduced likelihood of both inpatient and one-year mortality. Excepting dementia, VA patients with a mental illness had comparable or higher levels of primary care visits than those having no mental illness. Patients with multiple psychiatric disorders had more outpatient care than those with one psychiatric disorder. PMID:20968262

  20. The Efficacy of Mirtazapine in the Treatment of Cocaine Dependence with Comorbid Depression

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Maryam; Knapp, Clifford M.; Sarid-Segal, Ofra; Devine, Eric; Colaneri, Laurie Sickles; Tozier, Lisa; Waters, Megan E.; Putnam, Megan A.; Ciraulo, Domenic A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Prior findings concerning the use of mirtazapine in the treatment of a variety of substance use disorders and its antagonistic actions at the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor suggest that this drug may have efficacy in the treatment of cocaine dependence in the presence of a depressive disorder. Methods Depressed cocaine-dependent subjects received either mirtazapine (target dose 45 mg daily) or placebo for 12 weeks. Urine concentrations of benzoylecgonine and self-report were used to assess cocaine consumption. Depression and sleep quality were evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, respectively. Results Cocaine consumption during the treatment period did not differ significantly between the mirtazapine (n = 11) and placebo (n = 13) groups in this study. In week 4 sleep latency was significantly lower in the active medication than in the placebo group. Positive effects of mirtazapine treatment on early insomnia were suggested by an item analysis of the HAM-D. Conclusions and Scientific Significance The results of this study suggest that mirtazapine is superior to placebo in improving sleep in patients with comorbid depression and cocaine dependence, but is not more effective than placebo in reducing cocaine use. PMID:22221171

  1. Key Comorbid Conditions that Are Predictive of Survival among Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Tentori, Francesca; Pisoni, Ronald L.; Tighiouart, Hocine; Levey, Andrew S.; Port, Friedrich K.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Abstracting information about comorbid illnesses from the medical record can be time-consuming, particularly when a large number of conditions are under consideration. We sought to determine which conditions are most prognostic and whether comorbidity continues to contribute to a survival model once laboratory and clinical parameters have been accounted for. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Comorbidity data were abstracted from the medical records of Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Pattern Study (DOPPS) I, II, and III participants using a standardized questionnaire. Models that were composed of different combinations of comorbid conditions and case-mix factors were compared for explained variance (R2) and discrimination (c statistic). Results: Seventeen comorbid conditions account for 96% of the total explained variance that would result if 45 comorbidities that were expected to be predictive of survival were added to a demographics-adjusted survival model. These conditions together had more discriminatory power (c statistic 0.67) than age alone (0.63) or serum albumin (0.60) and were equivalent to a combination of routine laboratory and clinical parameters (0.67). The strength of association of the individual comorbidities lessened when laboratory/clinical parameters were added, but all remained significant. The total R2 of a model adjusted for demographics and laboratory/clinical parameters increased from 0.13 to 0.17 upon addition of comorbidity. Conclusions: A relatively small list of comorbid conditions provides equivalent discrimination and explained variance for survival as a more extensive characterization of comorbidity. Comorbidity adds to the survival model a modest amount of independent prognostic information that cannot be substituted by clinical/laboratory parameters. PMID:19808231

  2. Self-Reported Food Hypersensitivity: Prevalence, Characteristics, and Comorbidities in the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Braaten, Tonje; Obstfelder, Aud; Abelsen, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate the prevalence of self-reported food hypersensitivity, (SFH), the characteristics of women with SFH, and whether SFH is associated with multiple health complaints among the participants of the Norwegian Women and Cancer study (NOWAC). Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study among 64,316 women aged 41–76 years. The women were randomly selected from the Norwegian Central Person Register. Information on SFH and all covariates except age and place of residence was collected by questionnaires in 2002–2005. Results The prevalence of SFH in our study sample was 6.8% (95% confidence interval: 6.7–7.0). Logistic regression analysis showed a negative association between SFH and age (odds ratio [OR] 0.97). The odds of SFH increased among women living in or near urban centers, women with more than 9 years of education, women who did not have full-time work, women who had experienced poor economic conditions in childhood, those living without a partner, and those who did not consume alcohol or smoke (OR varied from 1.10 to 1.70). Women with a low body mass index had higher odds of SFH (OR 1.37) than those with a moderate body mass index. SFH was positively associated with poor self-perceived health (OR 2.56). The odds of SFH increased with the number of concurrent health complaints, with an OR for 5–6 comorbidities of 4.93. Conclusion We found an association between SFH, poor health, and different socio demographic and lifestyle characteristics. Women with SFH had increased odds of reporting multiple health complaints. PMID:27992542

  3. Family history and psychiatric comorbidity in persons with kleptomania.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E

    2003-01-01

    The current study was constructed to examine the family history and psychiatric comorbidity of a group of persons with kleptomania. Thirty-one subjects with DSM-IV kleptomania were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Minnesota Impulse Disorders Inventory (MIDI). The Family History Research Diagnostic Criteria (FH-RDC) were used to collect information about psychiatric disorders in first-degree relatives. Subjects with kleptomania were more likely than comparison subjects to have any lifetime impulse-control disorder (chi2=12.569; df=1; P<.001) and to have a first-degree relative with an alcohol use disorder (chi2=6.994; df=1; P=.008) or any psychiatric disorder (chi2=12.056; df=1; P=.001). Persons with kleptomania appear to have a higher lifetime prevalence of impulse-control disorders and are more likely to have first-degree relatives with alcohol problems than are comparison subjects.

  4. A Taxonomy of medical comorbidity for veterans who are homeless.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Gerald; Luther, James F; Jacoby, Aaron M; Haas, Gretchen L; Gordon, Adam J

    2008-08-01

    Homeless veterans have numerous medical and behavioral health problems. Grouping homeless people based on comorbidity patterns may assist in determining severity of illness and triaging health care more effectively. We sought to determine if a finite number of profiles could be identified related to demographic characteristics, living situation, length of homelessness, and referral areas using interview data from 2,733 veterans who were presently or recently homeless. We considered 12 disorders: eye problems, hypertension, cardiovascular problems, COPD/emphysema, tuberculosis, gastrointestinal problems, hepatic disease, neurologic disorders, orthopedic problems, skin problems, and trauma. Ratings were evaluated using cluster analysis. Comparison statistics were used to compare intercluster differences in demographics, homeless situation, and referral recommendations. A four-cluster solution is proposed: generalized illness, hepatic disease, lung disease, and neurologic disorder. Medical health problems are common and heterogeneous in homeless individuals. Classifications of these problems may be useful in planning treatment and predicting outcome.

  5. The effect of obesity surgery on obesity comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, Marshall J; Ross, Leigh Ann; Sumrall, Caryl D; Loustalot, Fleetwood V; Low, Annette K; Land, Kelly K

    2006-04-01

    Obesity is epidemic in the modern world. It is becoming increasingly clear that obesity is a major cause of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and renal disease, as well as a host of other comorbidities. There are at present no generally effective long-term medical therapies for obesity. Surgical therapy for morbid obesity is not only effective in producing long-term weight loss but is also effective in ameliorating or resolving several of the most significant complications of obesity, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sleep apnea, gastroesophageal reflux disease, degenerative joint disease, venous stasis, pseudotumor cerebri, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, urinary incontinence, fertility problems, and others. The degree of benefit and the rates of morbidity and mortality of the various surgical procedures vary according to the procedure.

  6. COMORBID MOOD, PSYCHOSIS, AND MARIJUANA ABUSE DISORDERS: A THEORECTICAL REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Natascha; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2009-01-01

    There is a need to bridge the gap between the fields of addiction psychiatry and general psychiatry in order to effectively treat co-morbid substance abuse and psychiatric disorders. This alarming epidemic transcends communities and severely impacts healthcare worldwide yielding poor treatment outcomes and prognoses for afflicted patients. Because substance abuse can acerbate and/or trigger psychosis and mood disorders, it is important to keep these issues in the forefront when evaluating patients. In order to address some of the complications stemming from not enough interactions between various groups of practitioners, this review addresses the neurobehavioral effects of cannabis use and their impact on patients who suffer from psychotic or affective disorders. The hope is that this paper will serve as a spring board for further discussions among practitioners who treat these patients. Greater interactions between caretakers are bound to impact the care of our patients in a very positive way. PMID:20155601

  7. Infinite Continuous Feature Model for Psychiatric Comorbidity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Valera, Isabel; Ruiz, Francisco J R; Olmos, Pablo M; Blanco, Carlos; Perez-Cruz, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    We aim at finding the comorbidity patterns of substance abuse, mood and personality disorders using the diagnoses from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions database. To this end, we propose a novel Bayesian nonparametric latent feature model for categorical observations, based on the Indian buffet process, in which the latent variables can take values between 0 and 1. The proposed model has several interesting features for modeling psychiatric disorders. First, the latent features might be off, which allows distinguishing between the subjects who suffer a condition and those who do not. Second, the active latent features take positive values, which allows modeling the extent to which the patient has that condition. We also develop a new Markov chain Monte Carlo inference algorithm for our model that makes use of a nested expectation propagation procedure.

  8. [Depression and addiction comorbidity: towards a common molecular target?].

    PubMed

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    The comorbidity of depression and cocaine addiction suggests shared mechanisms and anatomical pathways. Specifically, the limbic structures, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc), play a crucial role in both disorders. P11 (S100A10) is a promising target for manipulating depression and addiction in mice. We summarized the recent genetic and viral strategies used to determine how the titration of p11 levels within the NAc affects hedonic behavior and cocaine reward learning in mice. In particular, p11 in the ChAT+ cells or DRD1+ MSN of the NAc, controls depressive-like behavior or cocaine reward, respectively. Treatments to counter maladaptation of p11 levels in the NAc could provide novel therapeutic opportunities for depression and cocaine addiction in humans.

  9. RD, ADHD, and their comorbidity from a dual route perspective.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Christien G W; Licht, Robert; Sergeant, Joseph A; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    In order to achieve further insight into the comorbidity of reading disorder (RD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), lexical processing and rapid naming were studied in RD and ADHD. The Dual Route Cascaded model postulates that lexical processing contains two parallel processes: lexical route processing and sublexical route processing. An orthographic decision task and a phonological decision task were used to measure lexical and sublexical route processing, respectively. In addition, a rapid naming task was used to compare 27 children with RD, 18 children with ADHD, 20 children with ADHD+RD, and 29 controls. RD and ADHD shared impairments in accuracy of orthographic and phonological decision making as well as in rapid naming, which suggest that RD and ADHD may be overlapping disorders that share deficits in both lexical route and sublexical route processing. RD was dissociated from ADHD by being slower in both orthographical and phonological decision making that indicates unique deficits in RD on lexical and sublexical speed.

  10. [Evidence-based psychotherapy: addiction and personality disorders as comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Kienast, T; Roediger, E; Kensche, M; Foerster, J; Daig, I; Heinz, A

    2009-09-01

    A large number of studies have shown that various psychotherapeutic methods have a positive effect on the course of addiction and personality disorders when they are treated separately. Co-morbid occurrence of both disorders is common but a chronologically separated treatment often leads to renewed occurrence of the symptoms of the initially treated disorder. Failures of abstinence motivation, severe drug craving and the activation of dysfunctional behavior patterns frequently lead to renewed consumption of addictive substances and thus endanger the further course of treatment. So far, evidence of effectiveness exists only for dialectic behavior therapy and dual focus schema therapy. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge and introduces both methods by highlighting the core therapeutic strategies.

  11. Substance Use Disorders, Comorbidity, and Arrest among Indigenous Adolescents*

    PubMed Central

    Hartshorn, Kelley J. Sittner; Whitbeck, Les B.; Prentice, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Indigenous adolescents are overrepresented at multiple stages of the justice system, but we know very little about the role that mental health, particularly substance use disorder, plays in Indigenous pathways to arrest. This study examined the association between substance use disorder, its comorbidity with other disorders, and arrest using a longitudinal sample of Indigenous youth from the Northern Midwest and Canada. Of the 16% of youth who reported at least one arrest at Wave 5, half met criteria for substance abuse/dependence, and slightly more for conduct disorder. Substance abuse/dependence and conduct disorder were each associated with an increased risk of arrest, although co-occurring disorders were not. The reciprocal effects of arrest and mental disorder are discussed. PMID:26759503

  12. [Psycho-organic comorbidity of climacteric: acknowledgement of denial].

    PubMed

    Souza y Machorro, Mario

    2002-03-01

    Considering psychiatric co-morbidity of menopause within the context of a new historical and psychosocial view of woman and femininity, the recommendations of current scientific literature focused to its attention, treatment and prevention, become different from the traditional sociomedical observations. In order to reach a new more effective assistance, prevailing prejudices must be overcame to achieve an adequate updating before being really effective. That is, to be suitable to the psychosocial needs of those who suffer a physiological condition. The change in the social role of women (which requires a genuine community acceptance) is not consolidated to new favorable attitudes which is required in the general thinking in our country, in order to offer better therapeutic alternatives to women's problems and its complications. Such situation is reflected even the medical and psychological handling of cases, where women are the main protagonists. This paper offers a brief discussion of this issue and some recommendations for diffusion purposes.

  13. Clinical Decision Support Systems for Comorbidity: Architecture, Algorithms, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Aihua; Tang, Yu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design of a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for monitoring comorbid conditions. Specifically, we address the architecture of a CDSS by characterizing it from three layers and discuss the algorithms in each layer. Also we address the applications of CDSSs in a few real scenarios and analyze the accuracy of a CDSS in consideration of the potential conflicts when using multiple clinical practice guidelines concurrently. Finally, we compare the system performance in our design with that in the other design schemes. Our study shows that our proposed design can achieve a clinical decision in a shorter time than the other designs, while ensuring a high level of system accuracy. PMID:28373881

  14. Alternative comorbidity adjustors for the Medicare inpatient psychiatric facility PPS.

    PubMed

    Drozd, Edward M; Maier, Jan; Hales, Jan F; Thomas, Frederick G

    2008-01-01

    The inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system (IPF-PPS), provides per diem payments for psychiatric hospitals and units, including 17 comorbid condition payment adjustors that cover 11 percent of patients. This study identifies an alternative set of 16 adjustors identifying three times as many high-cost patients and evaluates the improved predictive power in log per diem cost regression models. A model using the IPF-PPS adjustors achieved 8.8 percent of the feasible improvement from a no-adjustor baseline, while the alternative adjustors achieved 22.1 percent of the feasible improvement. The current adjustors may therefore be too restrictive, resulting in systematic over- or underpayment for many patients.

  15. Medical comorbidity in bipolar disorder: relationship between illnesses of the endocrine/metabolic system and treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, David E; Gao, Keming; Chan, Philip; Ganocy, Stephen J; Findling, Robert L; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2010-01-01

    Objective The present study examined the relationship between medical burden in bipolar disorder and several indicators of illness severity and outcome. It was hypothesized that illnesses of the endocrine/metabolic system would be associated with greater psychiatric symptom burden and would impact the response to treatment with lithium and valproate. Method Data were analyzed from two studies evaluating lithium and valproate for rapid-cycling presentations of bipolar I and II disorder. General medical comorbidity was assessed by the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore the relationships between medical burden, body mass index (BMI), substance use disorder status, and depressive symptom severity. Results Of 225 patients enrolled, 41.8% had a recent substance use disorder, 50.7% were male, and 69.8% had bipolar I disorder. The mean age of the sample was 36.8 (SD = 10.8) years old. The mean number of comorbid medical disorders per patient was 2.5 (SD = 2.5), and the mean CIRS total score was 4.3 (SD = 3.1). A significant positive correlation was observed between baseline depression severity and the number of organ systems affected by medical illness (p = 0.04). Illnesses of the endocrine/metabolic system were inversely correlated with remission from depressive symptoms (p = 0.02), and obesity was specifically associated with poorer treatment outcome. For every 1-unit increase in BMI, the likelihood of response decreased by 7.5% [odds ratio (OR) = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.87–0.99; p = 0.02] and the likelihood of remission decreased by 7.3% (OR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.87–0.99; p = 0.03). The effect of comorbid substance use on the likelihood of response differed significantly according to baseline BMI. The presence of a comorbid substance use disorder resulted in a lower odds of response, but only among patients with a BMI ≥ 23 (p = 0.02). Conclusion Among patients with

  16. Personality traits and psychiatric comorbidities in alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Donadon, M.F.; Osório, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Non-adaptive personality traits may constitute risk factors for development of psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. We aim to evaluate associations and the predictive value of personality traits among alcohol-dependent individuals, with or without psychiatric comorbidities. The convenience sample comprised two groups of males over 18 years of age: one with subjects who had an alcohol dependence diagnosis (AG, n=110), and a control group without abuse and/or alcohol dependence diagnosis (CG, n=110). The groups were assessed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview DSM-IV (SCID-IV). AG participants were recruited among outpatients from the university hospital, whereas CG participants were recruited from a primary healthcare program. Data collection was done individually with self-assessment instruments. Parametric statistics were performed, and a significance level of P=0.05 was adopted. A positive correlation was observed between openness and the length of time that alcohol has been consumed, as were significant and negative correlations between conscientiousness and both the length of time alcohol has been consumed and the number of doses. For alcoholics, extraversion emerged as a protective factor against depression development (P=0.008) and tobacco abuse (P=0.007), whereas openness worked as a protective factor against anxiety (P=0.02). The findings point to specific deficits presented by alcoholics in relation to personality traits with or without psychiatric comorbidities and to the understanding that therapeutic approaches should favor procedures and/or preventive measures that allow more refined awareness about the disorder. PMID:26628399

  17. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Long-Term Abstinent Alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Di Sclafani, Victoria; Finn, Peter; Fein, George

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND A high prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders has been demonstrated in individuals with an alcohol use disorder in both community and treatment samples, with higher comorbidity in treatment samples. In this study, we examined lifetime and current psychiatric diagnoses in long-term abstinent alcoholics (LTAA; mean abstinence = 6.3 years; n = 52) compared to age and gender-comparable non-alcoholic controls (NC; n = 48). We asked the following questions: 1) to achieve long-term abstinence, must an individual be relatively psychiatrically healthy (i.e., comparable to NC) and 2) can ongoing abstinence be maintained in the face of a current psychiatric disorder? METHODS Lifetime and current (prior 12-months) psychiatric diagnoses were assessed in the mood, anxiety, and externalizing disorder domains using the computerized Diagnostic Interview Schedule (c-DIS). RESULTS Over 85% of LTAA had a lifetime psychiatric diagnosis, compared to 50% of NC. LTAA had a higher prevalence than NC of lifetime mood, anxiety, and externalizing disorder diagnoses. LTAA also had a greater prevalence than NC of current mood and anxiety diagnoses. Although LTAA had a greater lifetime prevalence of an antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) than NC, no LTAA or NC had a current ASPD diagnosis. Finally, there was no association of duration of abstinence with lifetime or current psychiatric diagnoses, consistent with psychiatric diagnoses having little effect on relapse. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that: 1) the presence of a lifetime psychiatric diagnosis does not militate against achieving long-term abstinence, 2) abstinence can be maintained in the presence of a current mood or anxiety disorder, and 3) a current diagnosis of ASPD may not be compatible with long-term abstinence. The relatively low levels of antisocial behavior compared to pre-abstinence (as indicated by no LTAA meeting current criteria for ASPD) raises the question of whether the neurobiology underlying

  18. Tics and psychiatric comorbidity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gadow, Kenneth D; Nolan, Edith E; Sprafkin, Joyce; Schwartz, Joseph

    2002-05-01

    This study examined comorbid psychiatric symptoms in a large, community-based sample of children and adolescents. The study sample comprised a total of 3006 school children: 413 preschool (3 to 5 years; 237 males, 176 females; mean age 4 years 2 months, SD 8 months), 1520 elementary school (5 to 12 years; 787 males, 733 females; mean age 8 years 2 months, SD 1 year 11 months), and 1073 secondary school children (12 to 18 years; 573 males, 500 females; mean age 14 years 4 months, SD 1 year 10 months), all of whom were attending regular education programs. Children were evaluated with a teacher-completed DSM-IV-referenced rating scale. The sample was divided into four groups: attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder with tics (ADHD+tics), ADHD without tics (ADHD), tics without ADHD (T), and a comparison group i.e. neither ADHD nor tics (Non). The percentage of children with tic behaviors varied with age: preschool children (22.3%), elementary school children (7.8%), and adolescents (3.4%). Tic behaviors were more common in males than females, regardless of comorbid ADHD symptoms. For many psychiatric symptoms, screening prevalence rates were highest for the ADHD groups (ADHD+tics>ADHD>T>Non). However, obsessive-compulsive and simple and social phobia symptoms were more common in the groups with tic behavior. Findings for a community-based sample show many similarities with studies of clinically referred samples suggesting that teacher-completed ratings of DSM-IV symptoms may be a useful methodology for investigating the phenomenology of tic disorders.

  19. Profiling leucocyte subsets in tuberculosis-diabetes co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; Dhakshinraj, Sharmila D; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2015-10-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis-type 2 diabetes mellitus (PTB-DM) co-morbidity. However, the phenotypic profile of leucocyte subsets at homeostasis in individuals with active or latent tuberculosis (LTB) with coincident diabetes is not known. To characterize the influence of diabetes on leucocyte phenotypes in PTB or LTB, we examined the frequency (Fo ) of leucocyte subsets in individuals with TB with (PTB-DM) or without (PTB) diabetes; individuals with latent TB with (LTB-DM) or without (LTB) diabetes and non-TB-infected individuals with (NTB-DM) or without (NTB) diabetes. Coincident DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD4(+) T cells in LTB individuals. In contrast, DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD8(+) T cells and significantly higher Fo of central memory CD8(+) T cells in PTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly higher Fo of classical memory B cells in PTB and significantly higher Fo of activated memory and atypical B cells in LTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of classical and intermediate monocytes in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Finally, DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Our data reveal that coincident diabetes alters the cellular subset distribution of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and monocytes in both individuals with active TB and those with latent TB, thus potentially impacting the pathogenesis of this co-morbid condition.

  20. Comorbidity and Pattern of Substance Use in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sepehrmanesh, Zahra; Ahmadvand, Afshin; Moraveji, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Substance use in patients with psychiatric disorder is an every-day seen. Detection of this comorbidity can significantly affect the treatment of these disorders, as well as substance use. Objectives: This study has been conducted to determine the prevalence and pattern of substance use in hospitalized psychiatric patients. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 210 hospitalized psychiatric patients were selected by simple randomization from all records of hospitalized patients. The instrument of gathering data was a demographic checklist including age, gender, marital status, education, type of disorder and substance abuse and duration of psychiatric disorder. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16 using Fisher exact and Chi square tests. Results: The mean age of patients was 37.9 years. Most of the patients were male, married and unemployed. The Prevalence of substance use was 36.7%. The most prevalent pattern of substance use was opium, opioid, methamphetamines and other substances (poly substance). The prevalence of substance use in patients with mood disorders was more than the other disorders and the most prevalent substance use in these patients was opium and opioid. Poly substance use was the most prevalent pattern of use (80 %) in psychotic and mood disorders due to substance. Significant difference was seen between genders, marital status, occupation, duration of illness and frequency of substance use (P < 0.05 ), however no significant difference was seen between educational levels, age and substance use. Conclusions: The patients with mood disorders had the highest comorbidity with substance use and concurrent use of poly substance was the most prevalent pattern of use in these patients. Therefore, successful treatment of psychiatric disorders and substance use needs multimodal and more serious interventions. Regarding to the pattern of poly substance use in these patients, careful screening should be performed at admission

  1. The 'co-morbidity roundabout': a framework to guide assessment and intervention strategies and engineer change among people with co-morbid problems.

    PubMed

    Kay-Lambkin, Frances J; Baker, Amanda L; Lewin, Terry J

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the nature and consequences of co-morbidity, as applied to co-occurring mental health and alcohol/other drug (AOD) use problems. The 'co-morbidity roundabout' is introduced as a useful metaphor for conceptualizing the current experiences of people with co-occurring mental health and AOD use problems. In order to successfully negotiate the 'roundabout', the 'drivers' (people with co-morbid mental health and AOD use problems) must consider a range of internal and external conditions (knowledge about services, support from family, friends, health providers, motivation to change, etc.), account for their vehicle's characteristics (other conditions and demands, including social/legal/financial issues), keep their travel itinerary in mind (plans for change including treatment) and navigate through the many detours and dead-ends that they may confront (eligibility for services, accessibility of treatments, etc.). Co-morbidity is a major contributing factor in 'drivers' failing to successfully negotiate, or even becoming 'stuck' on, the 'roundabout'. A summary of relevant treatment research is also presented, including descriptions of brief interventions and more intensive treatment approaches. Finally, the 'co-morbidity roundabout' metaphor is expanded to assist clinicians to translate the findings from this treatment research into clinical practice. Further suggestions are made for improved navigation through and exit from the 'roundabout', including recommendations for the use of a stepped-care approach to the assessment and treatment of clients with co-morbid mental health and AOD use problems.

  2. Comorbid Depressive Disorders in Anxiety-Disordered Youth: Demographic, Clinical, and Family Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Kelly A.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates that depression and anxiety are highly comorbid in youth. Little is known, however, about the clinical and family characteristics of youth with principal anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive diagnoses. The present study examined the demographic, clinical, and family characteristics of 200 anxiety-disordered children and…

  3. Atomoxetine Treatment for Pediatric Patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder with Comorbid Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Daniel; Donnelly, Craig; Lopez, Frank; Rubin, Richard; Newcorn, Jeffrey; Sutton, Virginia; Bakken, Rosalie; Paczkowski, Martin; Kelsey, Douglas; Sumner, Calvin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Research suggests 25% to 35% of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have comorbid anxiety disorders. This double-blind study compared atomoxetine with placebo for treating pediatric ADHD with comorbid anxiety, as measured by the ADHD Rating Scale-IV-Parent Version: Investigator Administered and Scored…

  4. Health Co-Morbidities in Ageing Persons with Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, M.; Gill, M.; McCallion, P.; Begley, C.

    2005-01-01

    Consideration of the relationship between physical and mental health co-morbidities in ageing persons with Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's dementia (AD) is of clinical importance both from a care and resource perspective. To investigate and measure health co-morbidities in ageing persons with Down syndrome with and without AD. Recorded physical…

  5. How Can Comorbidity with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Aid Understanding of Language and Speech Disorders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomblin, J. Bruce; Mueller, Kathyrn L.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a background for the topic of comorbidity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and spoken and written language and speech disorders that extends through this issue of "Topics in Language Disorders." Comorbidity is common within developmental disorders and may be explained by many possible reasons. Some of these can be…

  6. Test of Alternative Hypotheses Explaining the Comorbidity between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhee, Soo Hyun; Willcutt, Erik G.; Hartman, Christie A.; Pennington, Bruce F.; DeFries, John C.

    2008-01-01

    There is significant comorbidity between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD). The conclusions of studies that examined the causes of comorbidity between ADHD and CD conflict, with some researchers finding support for the three independent disorders model and others finding support for the correlated risk…

  7. [How I treat....psoriasis comorbidities by adalimumab (Humira) anti-TNFalpha].

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Henry, F; Szepetiuk, G; Piérard, G E

    2010-10-01

    Psoriasis is primarily a chronic inflammatory skin disease burdened by some comorbidities including psoriatic alopecia, arthropathies, Crohn's disease, the metabolic syndrome and some cardiovascular involvement. During the past years, several biologicals corresponding to monoclonal antibodies were offered to treat psoriasis refractory to other potent conventional treatments. We review the effects of biologicals, in particular adalimumab (Humira), on psoriatic comorbidities.

  8. Alcohol and Tobacco Use Disorder Comorbidity in Young Adults and the Influence of Romantic Partner Environments

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, Meredith C.; Bailey, Jennifer A.; Hill, Karl G.; Epstein, Marina; Hawkins, J. David

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there is considerable evidence that the development of tobacco dependence (TD) and that of alcohol use disorder (AUD) are intertwined, less is known about the comorbid development of these disorders. The present study examines tobacco dependence and alcohol use disorder comorbidity in young adulthood within the context of romantic partner relationships. Methods Data were drawn from the Seattle Social Development Project, a contemporary, ethnically diverse, and gender balanced longitudinal panel including 808 participants. A typological person-centered approach was used to assign participants to four outcome groups: no disorder, tobacco dependence (TD) only, alcohol use disorder (AUD) only, and comorbid (both). Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the association between partner general and substance-specific environments and single or dual alcohol and tobacco use disorder diagnosis in young adulthood (ages 24–33, n = 628). Previous heavy alcohol and tobacco use were controlled for, as were dispositional characteristics, gender, ethnicity, adult SES, and adult depression. Results Greater partner conflict increased the likelihood of being comorbid compared to having TD only or AUD only. Having a smoking partner increased the likelihood of being comorbid compared to having AUD only, but having a drinking partner did not significantly distinguish being comorbid from having TD only. Conclusions Findings demonstrated the utility of a comorbidity-based, person-centered approach and the influence of general and tobacco-specific, but not alcohol-specific, partner environments on comorbid alcohol and tobacco use disorders in young adulthood. PMID:23428316

  9. Differentiating Interpersonal Correlates of Depressive Symptoms and Social Anxiety in Adolescence: Implications for Models of Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Lisa R.; Davila, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Research on psychosocial correlates of depression and social anxiety often has not accounted for their comorbidity. Differentiating correlates of depression and social anxiety may inform the development of comorbidity models. Building on research linking both disorders to interpersonal dysfunction, this study examined interpersonal correlates of…

  10. Untangling Psychiatric Comorbidity in Young Children Who Experienced Single, Repeated, or Hurricane Katrina Traumatic Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheeringa, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 70-90 % have at least one comorbid non-PTSD disorder. Objective: This study tested several hypotheses to untangle comorbidity issues. Following McMillen et al. ("Compr Psychiatry" 43(6):478-485, 2002), we hypothesized that few non-PTSD disorders would arise following…

  11. Family Correlates of Comorbid Anxiety Disorders in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfiffner, Linda J.; McBurnett, Keith

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated parental anxiety and parenting practices associated with comorbid Anxiety Disorders among children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Clinic-referred families (n = 143) were diagnosed using DSM criteria. Parents and children completed measures of parenting practices. Comorbid anxiety in children was significantly…

  12. Impact of Comorbidity on Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Merlo, Lisa J.; Larson, Michael J.; Geffken, Gary R.; Lehmkuh, Heather D.; Jacob, Marni L.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2008-01-01

    A chronic psychiatric condition among children and adolescents of concern is obsessive-compulsive disorder, which involves comorbid conditions. The impact of a range of comorbid illnesses on cognitive-behavioral therapy response and remission rates was conducted, with results revealing a negative impact on treatment response.

  13. Developmental Course(s) of Lifetime Cigarette Use and Panic Attack Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Amit; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Schmidt, Norman B.; Sachs-Ericcson, Natalie

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation examined the developmental course(s) of lifetime cigarette use and panic attack comorbidity. Participants included 4,409 adults, ages 15 to 54 years of age (M[Age] = 33.1, SD = 10.7, N (females) = 2,221) from the National Comorbidity Survey (NCS). The primary objective of the present investigation was to better understand…

  14. Patterns and Impact of Comorbidity and Multimorbidity among Community-Resident American Indian Elders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Robert; Kerby, Dave S.; Hennessy, Catherine Hagan

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to suggest a new approach to identifying patterns of comorbidity and multimorbidity. Design and Methods: A random sample of 1,039 rural community-resident American Indian elders aged 60 years and older was surveyed. Comorbidity was investigated with four standard approaches, and with cluster analysis. Results:…

  15. Comorbidity of ADHD and Substance Use Disorder (SUD): A Neuroimaging Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frodl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: ADHD has a high comorbidity with substance use disorders (SUD). Both diseases have profound social, psychological, and economic consequences and are therefore highly relevant for health systems. The high comorbidity indicates some shared underlying neurobiological substrates. Knowing these substrates may increase the understanding of…

  16. Does Comorbid Social Anxiety Disorder Impact the Clinical Presentation of Principal Major Depressive Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Dalrymple, Kristy L.; Zimmerman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background Although previous research has examined comorbidity in principal Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD), few studies have examined the disorders for which those with comorbid SAD seek treatment. Further, studies have shown that depressive disorders often are associated with SAD, but few have examined the clinical characteristics of patients with this particular comorbidity. Method The current study examined the prevalence of various principal Axis I disorders in 577 individuals diagnosed with comorbid SAD. Results Consistent with previous research, Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) was the most frequent principal diagnosis in patients with comorbid SAD. Those with principal MDD and comorbid SAD (MDD-SAD) were compared to those with MDD without SAD (MDD) on demographic and clinical characteristics. Patients with MDD-SAD versus those with MDD were more severe in terms of social functioning, duration of depressive episode, suicidal ideation, time out of work, presence of current alcohol abuse/dependence, and age of onset of MDD. Social functioning, duration of episode, suicidal ideation, and age of onset of MDD remained significant even after controlling for additional comorbid disorders. Conclusions Findings suggest the need for future research to determine how treatments could be adapted for this commonly occurring comorbidity. PMID:17188365

  17. Validity of the Autism Spectrum Disorder-Comorbid for Children (ASD-CC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; LoVullo, Santino V.; Rivet, Tessa T.; Boisjoli, Jessica A.

    2009-01-01

    A limited number of studies currently exist focusing on comorbid psychopathology of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Due to the heterogeneity of ASD symptoms, communication deficits, and impairments in intellectual functioning, assessing symptoms of psychopathology is complicated. The "Autism Spectrum Disorders-Comorbidity for…

  18. A Clinical Study of Phenomenology and Comorbidity of Paediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Pavan Kumar; T., Sivakumar; Agarwal, Vivek; Sitholey, Prabhat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Considerable controversy exists regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis, and comorbidities especially with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), in paediatric Bipolar Disorder (BPD). Aims and objectives: To describe phenomenology and comorbidities of paediatric BPD. Method: 78 Subjects (6-16 years) attending child and…

  19. Comorbidity of Anxiety-Depression among Australian University Students: Implications for Student Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence, factor structure and scale item differences in anxiety-depression comorbidity were investigated in a sample of Australian university students defined according to the presence of anxiety and/or depression. The incidence of anxiety-depression comorbidity was over 32%, about four times that for anxiety or depression alone.…

  20. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Young Adults with a Clinical Diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugnegard, Tove; Hallerback, Maria Unenge; Gillberg, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    In children with autism spectrum disorders, previous studies have shown high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. To date, studies on adults have been scarce. The aim of the present study was to investigate psychiatric comorbidity in young adults with Asperger syndrome. Participants were 26 men and 28 women (mean age 27 years) with a clinical…

  1. Common comorbidities seen in adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Young, Joel

    2008-08-01

    This article provides an overview of key research on significant comorbidities that occur among adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, including disruptive behaviors. Such comorbidities include oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder, as well as depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, suicidality, eating disorders, sleep disorders, learning disabilities, Internet "addiction," tic disorders, new-onset pediatric epilepsy, and celiac disease.

  2. Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training: Anxiety Outcomes and Impact of Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jami F.; Makover, Heather B.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Mufson, Laura; Gallop, Robert J.; Benas, Jessica S.

    2012-01-01

    Given the frequent comorbidity of anxiety and depression, it is important to study the effects of depression interventions on anxiety and the impact of comorbid anxiety on depression outcomes. This article reports on pooled anxiety and depression data from two randomized trials of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a…

  3. Transdiagnostic Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and Comorbid Anxiety with the Unified Protocol: A Clinical Replication Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellard, Kristen K.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder with recurrent manic and depressive episodes. More than 75% of bipolar patients have a current or lifetime diagnosis of a comorbid anxiety disorder. Comorbid anxiety in BD is associated with greater illness severity, greater functional impairment, and poorer illness-related outcomes.…

  4. Calibrating for Comorbidity: Clinical Decision-Making in Youth Depression and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Brian C.; Merson, Rachel A.; Zandberg, Laurie J.; Areizaga, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Comorbidity in clinical youth populations is more the rule than the exception, yet few established guidelines exist to help practicing clinicians manage complex diagnostic profiles. The current paper reviews efforts within the treatment development literature to handle comorbidity in depressed and anxious children and adolescents, including…

  5. Families of Individuals with Intellectual Disability and Comorbid Mental Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, Anna J.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the families of individuals dually diagnosed with intellectual disability (ID) and comorbid mental health problems. The review examines the impact of caring for individuals with ID and comorbid mental health problems on family well-being, the impact of the family on these individuals, and intervention and support needs of…

  6. Cardiac Reactivity and Stimulant Use in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders with Comorbid ADHD Versus ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bink, M.; Popma, A.; Bongers, I. L.; van Boxtel, G. J. M.; Denissen, A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of youngsters with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) display comorbid attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. However, previous studies are not conclusive whether psychophysiological correlates, like cardiac reactivity, are different for ASD with comorbid ADHD (ASD+) compared to ADHD. Therefore, the current study…

  7. Adolescent BMI at Northern Israel: From Trends, to Associated Variables and Comorbidities, and to Medical Signatures.

    PubMed

    Machluf, Yossy; Fink, Daniel; Farkash, Rivka; Rotkopf, Ron; Pirogovsky, Avinoam; Tal, Orna; Shohat, Tamar; Weisz, Giora; Ringler, Erez; Dagan, David; Chaiter, Yoram

    2016-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of abnormal body mass index (BMI), mainly obesity, is becoming a significant public health problem. This cross-sectional study aimed to provide a comprehensive view of secular trends of BMI, and the associated socio-demographic variables and comorbidities among adolescents with abnormal BMI. Individuals of the study population were born mainly between 1970 and 1993, and were examined at 16 to 19 years of age during the years 1987 to 2010, at 1 conscription center in the northern district of Israel.The study population included 113,694 adolescents. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between BMI categories, socio-demographic variables, and medical conditions.A downward trend in the prevalence of normal BMI among both male and female adolescents was obtained, while trends of overweight and obesity (in both genders) and underweight (only among females) rose. Socio-demographic variables such as religion, education, family-related parameters, residential environment, country of birth, and origin were all associated with different risks for abnormal BMI. Obesity was associated with higher risk for hyperlipidemia, endocrine disorders (only in males), knee disorders, and hypertension type I + II (in both genders). Overweight was associated with knee disorders (only in females). Underweight, exclusively in males, was associated with increased risk for endocrine disorders, proteinuria, and cardiac disorders. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed the intricate relations between gender, BMI, and medical signatures. It brought to light novel clusters of diseases that were abundant among populations having above-normal BMI or underweight males. Furthermore, above-normal BMI was associated with a lower rate of cardiac anomalies and scoliosis/kyphosis, whereas being underweight was associated with a lower risk for hypertension and flat foot.This study provides a reliable and in-depth view

  8. Adolescent BMI at Northern Israel: From Trends, to Associated Variables and Comorbidities, and to Medical Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Machluf, Yossy; Fink, Daniel; Farkash, Rivka; Rotkopf, Ron; Pirogovsky, Avinoam; Tal, Orna; Shohat, Tamar; Weisz, Giora; Ringler, Erez; Dagan, David; Chaiter, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The increasing prevalence of abnormal body mass index (BMI), mainly obesity, is becoming a significant public health problem. This cross-sectional study aimed to provide a comprehensive view of secular trends of BMI, and the associated socio-demographic variables and comorbidities among adolescents with abnormal BMI. Individuals of the study population were born mainly between 1970 and 1993, and were examined at 16 to 19 years of age during the years 1987 to 2010, at 1 conscription center in the northern district of Israel. The study population included 113,694 adolescents. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between BMI categories, socio-demographic variables, and medical conditions. A downward trend in the prevalence of normal BMI among both male and female adolescents was obtained, while trends of overweight and obesity (in both genders) and underweight (only among females) rose. Socio-demographic variables such as religion, education, family-related parameters, residential environment, country of birth, and origin were all associated with different risks for abnormal BMI. Obesity was associated with higher risk for hyperlipidemia, endocrine disorders (only in males), knee disorders, and hypertension type I + II (in both genders). Overweight was associated with knee disorders (only in females). Underweight, exclusively in males, was associated with increased risk for endocrine disorders, proteinuria, and cardiac disorders. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed the intricate relations between gender, BMI, and medical signatures. It brought to light novel clusters of diseases that were abundant among populations having above-normal BMI or underweight males. Furthermore, above-normal BMI was associated with a lower rate of cardiac anomalies and scoliosis/kyphosis, whereas being underweight was associated with a lower risk for hypertension and flat foot. This study provides a reliable and in

  9. Comorbidities in Chronic Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Report of the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Alicia M.; Sander, Anja; Borzych-Dużałka, Dagmara; Watson, Alan R.; Vallés, Patricia G.; Ha, Il Soo; Patel, Hiren; Askenazi, David; Balasz-Chmielewska, Irena; Lauronen, Jouni; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Feber, Janusz; Schaefer, Franz; Warady, Bradley A.

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background, Objectives, and Methods: Hospitalization and mortality rates in pediatric dialysis patients remain unacceptably high. Although studies have associated the presence of comorbidities with an increased risk for death in a relatively small number of pediatric dialysis patients, no large-scale study had set out to describe the comorbidities seen in pediatric dialysis patients or to evaluate the impact of those comorbidities on outcomes beyond the newborn period. In the present study, we evaluated the prevalence of comorbidities in a large international cohort of pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) patients from the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network registry and began to assess potential associations between those comorbidities and hospitalization rates and mortality. ♦ Results: Information on comorbidities was available for 1830 patients 0 - 19 years of age at dialysis initiation. Median age at dialysis initiation was 9.1 years [interquartile range (IQR): 10.9], median follow-up for calculation of hospitalization rates was 15.2 months (range: 0.2 - 80.9 months), and total follow-up time in the registry was 2095 patient-years. At least 1 comorbidity had been reported for 602 of the patients (32.9%), with 283 (15.5%) having cognitive impairment; 230 (12.6%), motor impairment; 167 (9.1%), cardiac abnormality; 76 (4.2%), pulmonary abnormality; 212 (11.6%), ocular abnormality; and 101 (5.5%), hearing impairment. Of the 150 patients (8.2%) that had a defined syndrome, 85% had at least 1 nonrenal comorbidity, and 64% had multiple comorbidities. The presence of at least 1 comorbidity was associated with a higher hospitalization rate [hospital days per 100 observation days: 1.7 (IQR: 5.8) vs 1.2 (IQR: 3.9), p = 0.001] and decreased patient survival (4-year survival rate: 73% vs 90%, p < 0.0001). ♦ Conclusions: Nearly one third of pediatric CPD patients in a large international cohort had at least 1 comorbidity, and multiple

  10. Comorbidity Analysis According to Sex and Age in Hypertension Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaqi; Ma, James; Wang, Jiaojiao; Zeng, Daniel Dajun; Song, Hongbin; Wang, Ligui; Cao, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertension, an important risk factor for the health of human being, is often accompanied by various comorbidities. However, the incidence patterns of those comorbidities have not been widely studied. Aim: Applying big-data techniques on a large collection of electronic medical records, we investigated sex-specific and age-specific detection rates of some important comorbidities of hypertension, and sketched their relationships to reveal the risk for hypertension patients. Methods: We collected a total of 6,371,963 hypertension-related medical records from 106 hospitals in 72 cities throughout China. Those records were reported to a National Center for Disease Control in China between 2011 and 2013. Based on the comprehensive and geographically distributed data set, we identified the top 20 comorbidities of hypertension, and disclosed the sex-specific and age-specific patterns of those comorbidities. A comorbidities network was constructed based on the frequency of co-occurrence relationships among those comorbidities. Results: The top four comorbidities of hypertension were coronary heart disease, diabetes, hyperlipemia, and arteriosclerosis, whose detection rates were 21.71% (21.49% for men vs 21.95% for women), 16.00% (16.24% vs 15.74%), 13.81% (13.86% vs 13.76%), and 12.66% (12.25% vs 13.08%), respectively. The age-specific detection rates of comorbidities showed five unique patterns and also indicated that nephropathy, uremia, and anemia were significant risks for patients under 39 years of age. On the other hand, coronary heart disease, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, hyperlipemia, and cerebral infarction were more likely to occur in older patients. The comorbidity network that we constructed indicated that the top 20 comorbidities of hypertension had strong co-occurrence correlations. Conclusions: Hypertension patients can be aware of their risks of comorbidities based on our sex-specific results, age-specific patterns, and the comorbidity network

  11. Adolescent Substance Use and Comorbid Psychopathology: Emotion Regulation Deficits as a Transdiagnostic Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lejuez, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Rates of substance use and comorbid psychopathology peak during adolescence, highlighting the need to identify transdiagnostic risk processes that cut across conditions and elucidate early embedded risk factors for comorbidity across development. The current review highlights emotion regulation deficits as a core transdiagnostic risk factor underlying the development of substance use, addiction, and comorbid psychopathology in adolescence. We present the dual systems model of neurological development to highlight adolescence as a critical period of increased risk for emotion regulation difficulties, corresponding risk behaviors, and psychopathology. We describe malfunction in the neurobiological regulation system underlying the relationship between emotion regulation and risk for addiction and comorbidity. We pull from two established developmental theories including both the externalizing pathway and the internalizing pathway to substance use disorders, which together highlight how early embedded risk in the form of emotion regulation deficits can explain mechanisms underlying the development of addiction and comorbid psychiatric disorders. PMID:26889402

  12. Fourth revolution in psychiatry – Addressing comorbidity with chronic physical disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Shiv

    2010-01-01

    The moral treatment of mental patients, Electro Convulsive therapy (ECT), and Psychotropic medications constitute the first, second, and third revolution in psychiatry, respectively. Addressing comorbidities of mental illnesses with chronic physical illnesses will be the fourth revolution in psychiatry. Mind and body are inseparable; there is a bidirectional relationship between psyche and soma, each influencing the other. Plausible biochemical explanations are appearing at an astonishing rate. Psychiatric comorbidity with many chronic physical disorders has remained neglected. Such comorbidity with cardiac, respiratory, Gastrointestinal, endocrinal, and neurological disorders, trauma, and other conditions like HIV and so on, needs to be addressed too. Evidence base of prevalence and causal relationship of psychiatric comorbidities in these disorders has been highlighted and strategies to meet the challenge of comorbidity have been indicated. PMID:21180405

  13. Comorbidities of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Pregnancy Risk Factors and Parent Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Silva, Desiree; Houghton, Stephen; Hagemann, Erika; Bower, Carol

    2015-08-01

    Our study examined the risk of maternal smoking and alcohol consumption in pregnancy associated with child comorbidity in a community sample of children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We used a cross sectional community retrospective questionnaire of 321 children diagnosed with ADHD. Our results suggest that maternal smoking increased the risk of oppositional defiant behavior (ODB) in children with ADHD twofold (OR 2.27; CI 1.29-4.11). Maternal alcohol consumption increased the risk although not significantly for ADHD child comorbid ODB, anxiety disorder and depression. Parent mental health significantly impacted on child comorbidity. Our study suggests that smoking in pregnancy is associated with comorbid ODB, independent of parent mental health, family history of ADHD and socioeconomic factors. Parent mental health is independently associated with comorbid ODB, anxiety disorder and depression.

  14. Comorbidity of LD and ADHD: implications of DSM-5 for assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    DuPaul, George J; Gormley, Matthew J; Laracy, Seth D

    2013-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disability (LD) can co-occur for a significant minority of children with each disorder. A total of 17 studies (2001-2011) examining ADHD-LD comorbidity were reviewed, revealing a higher mean comorbidity rate (45.1%) than has been obtained previously. Higher comorbidity may be the result of including students with writing disorders, not just reading and/or math disabilities. Proposed DSM-5 criteria for both disorders will likely affect comorbidity rates; however, it is unclear whether such rates will increase or decrease. Regardless of the specific impact of DSM revisions, academic skill and/or performance deficits should be assessed for students with ADHD as part of screening, comprehensive evaluation, and treatment monitoring. Comprehensive intervention services for students with comorbid ADHD and LD will require empirically supported treatment strategies that address both disorders and that are implemented across school and home settings.

  15. Bipolar disorder comorbid with alcohol use disorder: focus on neurocognitive correlates

    PubMed Central

    Balanzá-Martínez, Vicent; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; González-Pinto, Ana; Vieta, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are usually comorbid, and both have been associated with significant neurocognitive impairment. Patients with the BD-AUD comorbidity (dual diagnosis) may have more severe neurocognitive deficits than those with a single diagnosis, but there is paucity of research in this area. To explore this hypothesis more thoroughly, we carried out a systematic literature review through January 2015. Eight studies have examined the effect of AUDs on the neurocognitive functioning of BD patients. Most studies found that BD patients with current or past history of comorbid AUDs show more severe impairments, especially in verbal memory and executive cognition, than their non-dual counterparts. Greater neurocognitive dysfunction is another facet of this severe comorbid presentation. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed. Specifically, the application of holistic approaches, such as clinical staging and systems biology, may open new avenues of discoveries related to the BD-AUD comorbidity. PMID:25904869

  16. A Developmental Psychopathology Perspective on ADHD and Comorbid Conditions: The Role of Emotion Regulation.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Elizabeth A; Drabick, Deborah A G

    2015-12-01

    Research investigating attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and co-occurring disorders such as oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, anxiety, and depression has surged in popularity; however, the developmental relations between ADHD and these comorbid conditions remain poorly understood. The current paper uses a developmental psychopathology perspective to examine conditions commonly comorbid with ADHD during late childhood through adolescence. First, we present evidence for ADHD and comorbid disorders. Next, we discuss emotion regulation and its associations with ADHD. The role of parenting behaviors in the development and maintenance of emotion regulation difficulties and comorbid disorders among children with ADHD is explored. An illustrative example of emotion regulation and parenting over the course of development is provided to demonstrate bidirectional relations among these constructs. We then present an integrated conceptual model of emotion regulation as a shared risk process that may lead to different comorbid conditions among children with ADHD. Implications and directions for future research are presented.

  17. External Validation of Comorbid Patterns of Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Ximena; Saavedra, Lissette; Silverman, Wendy K

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the external validity of comorbid patterns of anxiety disorders among youth who presented to an anxiety disorders clinic, comorbid cases were compared to “pure” anxiety disorder cases. Children and adolescents (N = 329; mean age = 10.04 years) and parents were administered structured interviews and four groups were formed, Pure Anxiety, Anxiety + Anxiety, Anxiety + Externalizing, and Anxiety + Depressive, and compared along 4 external validation criteria: sociodemographics, clinical phenomenology, psychosocial, and family factors. All comorbid groups were more severe than the pure anxiety group on clinical phenomenology and psychosocial factors. The Anxiety + Depressive Disorders group was most severe on all criteria except sociodemographics. Results provide evidence for the external validity of comorbid diagnostic presentations among anxiety disorders, as there was differential meaningfulness in the diagnostic presentation of a pure anxiety disorder versus anxiety disorder comorbid with other disorders. Assessment and future research implications are discussed. PMID:17095184

  18. Cost Index Flying

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    continually alter applicable cost indexes . Computed KC-10 Cost Index Equation Using the dollar figures given above, our CI equation reads : CI = CT / C...COST INDEX FLYING GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER John M. Mirtich, Major, USAF AFIT/IMO/ENS/11-11 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY...AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED

  19. The dimensions of indexing.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, W John; Kim, Won

    2003-01-01

    Indexing of documents is an important strategy intended to make the literature more readily available to the user. Here we describe several dimensions of indexing that are important if indexing is to be optimal. These dimensions are coverage, predictability, and transparency. MeSH terms and text words are compared in MEDLINE in regard to these dimensions. Part of our analysis consists in applying AdaBoost with decisions trees as the weak learners to estimate how reliably index terms are being assigned and how complex the criteria are by which they are being assigned. Our conclusions are that MeSH terms are more predictable and more transparent than text words.

  20. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Cognitive Profile in Children with Narcolepsy with or without Association to the H1N1 Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Szakács, Attila; Hallböök, Tove; Tideman, Pontus; Darin, Niklas; Wentz, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    psychiatric comorbidity had a significantly lower full-scale IQ compared to those without. Conclusion: Our study indicates increased psychiatric comorbidity in children and adolescents with narcolepsy. The identified cognitive profile with significantly lower verbal comprehension and working memory compared with the normal mean index could have important implications for social relations and schooling. The small numbers of patients with nPHV narcolepsy make it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the possible differences between the two groups of patients. Citation: Szakács A, Hallböök T, Tideman P, Darin N, Wentz E. Psychiatric comorbidity and cognitive profile in children with narcolepsy with or without association to the h1n1 influenza vaccination. SLEEP 2015;38(4):615–621. PMID:25325473

  1. [Symptom variations in ADHD: importance of context, development and comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Purper-Ouakil, D; Wohl, M; Michel, G; Mouren, M C; Gorwood, P

    2004-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity (ADHD) is a common disorder in school-aged children and is associated with significant impairment in social and academic functioning. Its recognition is based on congruent information from different sources, because most ADHD children and adolescents are not completely aware of impairments caused by inattention and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity. Fluctuations in symptom expression may complicate the diagnosis: during clinical examination or tests sessions, ADHD symptoms may be less severe than usual or completely absent. This review examines variations in ADHD symptoms due to environmental context, internal state, circadian factors, development, psychiatric comorbidity and discusses their clinical relevance. Generally, ADHD symptoms are pervasive and identified in different areas of functioning. Despite their chronicity, they show a relative context-dependency. An unfamiliar environment or situation may lessen symptoms. The same happens in dual relations or in calm settings, when the child receives attention and positive reinforcement from the adult. On the contrary, the classroom situation with its high stimulation level (noise, visual distractors, large class size) is likely to reveal or accentuate instability, impulsivity and inattention. Independently from objective symptom fluctuations, the impact of ADHD symptoms, and their consequences on self-esteem may also vary with the degree of environmental mismatch. Recent research in experimental psychology also draws attention to the motivational state of ADHD children: preference for immediate gratification and delay aversion may explain why most of them show satisfactory attentional capacities in certain activities (for instance video games or TV), while showing impairment in school work or in other effortful tasks. The diagnosis of the full ADHD syndrome requires significant impact on functioning in at least two areas. Some children with "situational" ADHD are impaired either in

  2. [Analgesic abuse and psychiatric comorbidity in headache patients].

    PubMed

    Radat, F; Irachabal, S; Swendsen, J; Henry, P

    2002-01-01

    Headache patients frequently overuse analgesic medications: 20% of the patients from headache centers is concerned by this problem, which has been estimated to occur in four percent of the community migrainers. Frequent use of various types of headache medication may paradoxically cause an increase in headache attack frequency as well as their chronicisation due to potentially complex mechanisms of sensitization. Patients will enter into a self- perpetuating cycle of daily headaches and use of symptomatic medications which can lead to addiction and to social and occupational impairement. Indeed, many patients will experience pharmacological tolerance and dependence but also by some kind of craving. International Headache Society qualify these patients as abusers referring mostly to the amount of substance ingested. Hence patients are labelled analgesic abusers . However, as many of these analgesic medications contained psychotropic substances (i.e. caffeine, codeine.), these patients may fulfill DSM IV criteria of dependance. Nevertheless, the dependance criteria should be adapted to chronic pain patients. Indeed, if pharmacological dependence and tolerance criteria are easy to apply in such patients, it is not the case for the criteria a great deal of time spent to obtain substances, to use substances or to recover from substances effects . As analgesic medications are legally obtained from medical practitioners, drug seeking behaviours are mostly: obtaining medications from multiple providers, repeating episodes of prescription loss and multiplying requests for early refills. Moreover the detrimental effects of analgesic abuse on psychosocial functioning is likely to be related to pain rather than to medication overuse. Finally the best indicator of addictive behaviors in such patients, is the loss of control over the use of analgesic medication despite the adverse consequences over pain. Comorbidity with addiction to other substances has never been specifically

  3. Influence of comorbidities in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus — research and clinical care. A report of the ISHCSF task force on comorbidities in INPH

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) is a syndrome of ventriculomegaly, gait impairment, cognitive decline and incontinence that occurs in an elderly population prone to many types of comorbidities. Identification of the comorbidities is thus an important part of the clinical management of INPH patients. In 2011, a task force was appointed by the International Society for Hydrocephalus and Cerebrospinal Fluid Disorders (ISHCSF) with the objective to compile an evidence-based expert analysis of what we know and what we need to know regarding comorbidities in INPH. This article is the final report of the task force. The expert panel conducted a comprehensive review of the literature. After weighing the evidence, the various proposals were discussed and the final document was approved by all the task force members and represents a consensus of expert opinions. Recommendations regarding the following topics are given: I. Musculoskeletal conditions; II. Urinary problems; III. Vascular disease including risk factors, Binswanger disease, and white matter hyperintensities; IV. Mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease including biopsies; V. Other dementias (frontotemporal dementia, Lewy body, Parkinson); VI. Psychiatric and behavioral disorders; VII. Brain imaging; VIII. How to investigate and quantify. The task force concluded that comorbidity can be an important predictor of prognosis and post-operative outcome in INPH. Reported differences in outcomes among various INPH cohorts may be partly explained by variation in the rate and types of comorbidities at different hydrocephalus centers. Identification of comorbidities should thus be a central part of the clinical management of INPH where a detailed history, physical examination, and targeted investigations are the basis for diagnosis and grading. Future INPH research should focus on the contribution of comorbidity to overall morbidity, mortality and long-term outcomes. PMID:23758953

  4. Indexing for Invention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breton, Ernest J.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the development of a functional indexing system that is tailored to the thinking involved in the process of invention. Classification by function is discussed; matrix representation is explained; a controlled vocabulary of verbs, objects, and modifiers is described; and the relation to other indexing systems is examined. (13 references)…

  5. Indexing Editorial Cartoons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapple-Sokol, Angie

    1996-01-01

    Discusses access to editorial cartoons, including the importance and worth of editorial cartoons; sources, including newspapers, museums, and special cartoon collections; indexing and classification; subject access; indexing by illustrator and subject; technology and access, including digital data; access to special collections; and access to…

  6. Linked Phrase Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craven, Timothy C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a computer-assisted system for the production of printed indexes based on networks of concept relations expressed in natural-language-like form. The LIPHIS is designed to handle more complex networks of concept relations, and so produce better indexing of highly detailed subjects. (Author/CWM)

  7. EMMSE Media Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Clifford A., Comp.; McKinstry, Herbert A., Comp.

    This index provides a topical taxonomy of media which have been selected for their relevance in the teaching of materials science and engineering. The index is keyed to a matrix which matches topical and/or class material with six classifications of media: print, 16mm film, super 8 film, slide/tape, videotape, and other (including interactive…

  8. A Computer Calculated Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Francis J.

    The Gunning Fog Index of readability indicates both the average length of words and the difficult words (three or more syllables) in written material. This document describes a business communication course at Wayne State University in which students calculate the Gunning Fog Index of two of their writing assignments with the aid of the…

  9. Transfer Index: One Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinselman, James L.

    A transfer index of the proportion of students in California's community colleges transferring to the University of California (UC) and the California State University (CSU) system for fall 1982, 1983, and 1984 is presented in this report. Introductory material provides one definition of an appropriate index of transfer rates, i.e., the ratio of…

  10. Universal Index System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Steve; Roussopoulos, Nick; Sellis, Timos; Wallace, Sarah

    1993-01-01

    The Universal Index System (UIS) is an index management system that uses a uniform interface to solve the heterogeneity problem among database management systems. UIS provides an easy-to-use common interface to access all underlying data, but also allows different underlying database management systems, storage representations, and access methods.

  11. Children's Stress Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Dianne, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This double issue of the "ZPG Reporter" focuses on the theme of ZPG's Children's Stress Index", the first national survey of children's well-being based on population- related pressures. Using an extensive list of social, economic, and environmental factors that affect the lives of children, the index ranks 828 cities, counties, and…

  12. A Factor Simplicity Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2003-01-01

    Proposes an index for assessing the degree of factor simplicity in the context of principal components and exploratory factor analysis. The index does not depend on the scale of the factors, and its maximum and minimum are related only to the degree of simplicity in the loading matrix. (SLD)

  13. Gradient index retroreflector

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Clyde B.

    1988-01-01

    A retroreflector is formed of a graded index lens with a reflective coating at one end. The lens has a length of an odd multiple of a quarter period thereof. Hexagonally shaped graded index lenses may be closely packed in an array to form a retroreflecting surface.

  14. The Effect of Comorbid AD/HD and Learning Disabilities on Parent-Reported Behavioral and Academic Outcomes of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Thomas J.; Adams, Gail

    2006-01-01

    Data from the 2001 National Household Education Survey were examined to estimate the prevalence of comorbid AD/HD and LD among school-aged children in the United States and assess how this comorbidity was associated with selected parent-reported behavioral and academic outcomes. The observed prevalence of comorbidity coincided with estimates in…

  15. Chronic Comorbidities Contribute to the Burden and Costs of Persistent Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Linna, Miika; Jantunen, Juha; Martikainen, Jaana E.; Haahtela, Tari; Pelkonen, Anna; Mäkelä, Mika

    2015-01-01

    Background. We aimed to study the prevalence of chronic comorbidities in asthma patients and the costs of health care use associated with asthma with comorbidities. Material and Methods. We analysed the prevalence of the four most common chronic diseases in asthma patients in 2008–2014 in Finland. Prevalence of coronary artery disease, diabetes and dyslipidaemia, hypertension, epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatic diseases, and severe psychiatric disease was studied by register of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland. The costs of health care services were collected from the registries maintained by the National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL). Results. Prevalence of asthma was 4.6% in 2014. Diabetes was among the four most common comorbidities in all the age groups. The other common comorbidities were hypertension (≥46 years; 12.9–37.6%), severe psychiatric disorders (age groups of 16–59 years; 1.4–3.5%), and ischaemic heart disease (≥60 years; 10–25%). In patients with both asthma and diabetes, the costs of hospitalization were approximately 169% compared with patients with asthma alone. Conclusions. Prevalence of asthma increases by tenfold when aging. The comorbidity diversity and rate are age-dependent. Prevalence of diabetes as comorbidity in asthma has increased. Costs of hospitalizations in asthma approximately double with chronic comorbidities. PMID:26783384

  16. Familial Comorbidity of Bipolar Disorder and Multiple Sclerosis: Genetic Susceptibility, Coexistence or Causal Relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidis, Mary H.; Bozikas, Vasilis P.; Giannouli, Vaitsa; Karavatos, Athanasios; Fokas, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose in undertaking the present study was to examine the hypotheses proposed for explaining the frequent comorbidity of bipolar disorder and multiple sclerosis. One hypothesis posits that, when there is comorbidity, MS plays a causal role in psychiatric manifestations. Another suggests that both disorders have a common underlying physiological process that increases the likelihood of their co-occurrence. We examined two adult siblings with comorbidity and their relatives, including three generations of family members with psychiatric morbidity. We found an extensive multigenerational history of bipolar disorder in this family. This history would seem to support the hypothesis of a common underlying brain process (potentially genetically-based) to explain the comorbidity of BD and MS, but cannot clarify whether this comorbidity implies a relationship between the two disorders or merely reflects parallel processes of brain deterioration. We cannot, however, rule out the possibility of a subclinical MS-related process leading to the early manifestation of BD, with MS appearing much later in time, or even a third, undetermined factor, leading to familial comorbidity. Although we have insufficient information to support either hypothesis definitively, we present the familial cases as a springboard for a discussion of dilemmas related to teasing apart MS and BD comorbidity. Further observation of the clinical course of the younger family members, who have not yet shown any neurological signs, over the next few years may elucidate the current picture further. PMID:22713400

  17. Comorbid Personality Disorders in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Its Symptom Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Bulli, Francesco; Melli, Gabriele; Cavalletti, Veronica; Stopani, Eleonora; Carraresi, Claudia

    2016-06-01

    The current paper was aimed at: (1) investigating the comorbidity between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and personality disorders (PDs) using an OCD sample and clinician-administered structured interviews; (2) exploring the associations of different cluster comorbid PDs with the specific symptom dimensions of OCD; (3) analyzing the variables which could play a significant role in the probability of having at least one comorbid PD, controlling for confounding variables. The SCID-II and Y-BOCS, together with a series of self-report measures of OCD, depression and anxiety symptoms were administered to a clinical sample of 159 patients with a primary diagnosis of OCD. 20.8 % of the participants suffered from at least one comorbid PD; the most common was obsessive-compulsive PD (9.4 %), followed by narcissistic PD (6.3 %). In OCD patients with comorbid cluster C PDs, the percentage of responsibility for harm, injury, or bad luck symptoms was significantly greater than other OCD symptom dimensions (p < .005). Logistic regression found some evidence supporting the association between severity of OCD symptoms and comorbid PDs. PDs are prevalent among Italian people with OCD and should be routinely assessed, as comorbidity may affect help-seeking behaviour and response to treatment.

  18. A meta-analysis of the influence of comorbidity on treatment outcome in the anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Cisler, Josh M; Tolin, David F

    2010-08-01

    Although psychiatric comorbidity is common among patients with anxiety disorders, its impact on treatment outcome remains unclear. The present study used meta-analytic techniques to examine the relationship between diagnostic comorbidity and treatment outcome for patients with anxiety disorders. One hundred forty-eight anxiety-disordered treatment samples (combined N=3534) were examined for post-treatment effects from the PsychINFO database. Samples consisted of those exposed to both active (CBT, dynamic therapy, drug treatment, CBT+drug treatment, mindfulness) and inactive treatments (placebo/attention control, wait-list). All treatments were associated with significant improvement at post-treatment, and active treatments were associated with greater effects than were inactive treatments. However, overall comorbidity was generally unrelated to effect size at post-treatment or at follow-up. A significant negative relationship between overall comorbidity and treatment outcome was found for mixed or "neurotic" anxiety samples when examining associations between comorbidity and specific diagnoses. Conversely, there was a significant positive relationship between overall comorbidity and treatment outcome for panic disorder and/or agoraphobia and PTSD or sexual abuse survivors. These findings suggest that while diagnostic comorbidity may not impact the effects of specific anxiety disorder treatments, it appears to differentially impact outcome for specific anxiety disorder diagnoses.

  19. Neuroinflammation and comorbidities are frequently ignored factors in CNS pathology

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, Raluca Elena; Buga, Ana Maria; Uzoni, Adriana; Petcu, Eugen Bogdan; Popa-Wagner, Aurel

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all drug interventions that have been successful pre-clinically in experimental stroke have failed to prove their efficacy in a clinical setting. This could be partly explained by the complexity and heterogeneity of human diseases as well as the associated co-morbidities which may render neuroprotective drugs less efficacious in clinical practice. One aspect of crucial importance in the physiopathology of stroke which is not completely understood is neuroinflammation. At the present time, it is becoming evident that subtle, but continuous neuroinflammation can provide the ground for disorders such as cerebral small vessel disease. Moreover, advanced aging and a number of highly prevalent risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis could act as “silent contributors” promoting a chronic proinflammatory state. This could aggravate the outcome of various pathological entities and can contribute to a number of subsequent post-stroke complications such as dementia, depression and neurodegeneration creating a pathological vicious cycle. Moreover, recent data suggests that the inflammatory process might be closely linked with multiple neurodegenerative pathways related to depression. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines could play a central role in the pathophysiology of both depression and dementia. PMID:26604877

  20. [Comorbid antisocial and borderline personality disorders: mentalization-based treatment].

    PubMed

    Bateman, Anthony; Fonagy, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Mentalization is the process by which we implicitly and explicitly interpret the actions of ourselves and others as meaningful based on intentional mental states (e.g., desires, needs, feelings, beliefs, and reasons). This process is disrupted in individuals with comorbid antisocial (ASPD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD), who tend to misinterpret others' motives. Antisocial characteristics stabilize mentalizing by rigidifying relationships within prementalistic ways of functioning. However, loss of flexibility makes the person vulnerable to sudden collapse when the schematic representation is challenged. This exposes feelings of humiliation, which can only be avoided by violence and control of the other person. The common path to violence is via a momentary inhibition of the capacity for mentalization. In this article, the authors outline their current understanding of mentalizing and its relation to antisocial characteristics and violence. This is illustrated by a clinical account of mentalization-based treatment adapted for antisocial personality disorder. Treatment combines group and individual therapy. The focus is on helping patients maintain mentalizing about their own mental states when their personal integrity is challenged. A patient with ASPD does not have mental pain associated with another's state of mind; thus, to generate conflict in ASPD by thinking about the victim will typically be ineffective in inducing behavior change.

  1. Nosology and epidemiology of addictive disorders and their comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Bucholz, K K

    1999-06-01

    Diagnostic classification systems have developed to the point at which the DSM-IV and ICD-10 are nearly identical, so that researchers and clinicians in different parts of the world have a common language for substance-dependence diagnoses. Despite the differences in nosology, the demographic correlates of alcohol and drug dependence are strikingly similar. Lifetime and 12-month prevalences are generally higher in men than in women, whites compared with nonwhites, younger compared with older cohorts, those with lower income levels and lower educational attainment, and those who have not been stably married (including those who have cohabited). NCS data indicated differences in risk factors for stages of drug use, arguing for separation of these in future analyses. Alcoholics are more likely to have another psychiatric disorder compared with their nonalcoholic counterparts, and ASPD, mania, and other drug dependence rank among those disorders most strongly associated with alcohol and drug dependence. Analyses from the NCS examining temporal ordering of diagnoses have focused attention on anxiety disorders in the cause of alcohol dependence. Depression, although not so strongly associated with substance dependence as clinical studies had led researchers to believe, nonetheless seems to be of etiologic interest as well, according to the NCS analyses. The cross-sectional results of the NLAES data on comorbidity between depression and alcohol and drug dependence have uncovered important new associations between gender, age, and depression and may yield further etiologic insights when age-of-onset data are taken into account.

  2. [Autism spectrum disorders - epidemiology, symptoms, comorbidity and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Rybakowski, Filip; Bialek, Anna; Chojnicka, Izabela; Dziechciarz, Piotr; Horvath, Andrea; Janas-Kozik, Malgorzata; Jeziorek, Anetta; Pisula, Ewa; Piwowarczyk, Anna; Slopien, Agnieszka; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Szajewska, Hanna; Szczaluba, Krzysztof; Szymanska, Krystyna; Urbanek, Ksymena; Waligórska, Anna; Wojciechowska, Aneta; Wroniszewski, Michal; Dunajska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In the new classification of American Psychiatric Association - DSM-5 - a category of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) was introduced, which replaced autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. ASD are defined by two basic psychopathological dimensions: communication disturbances and stereotyped behaviors, and the diagnosis is complemented with the assessment of language development and intellectual level. In successive epidemiological studies conducted in 21 century the prevalence of ASD has been rising, and currently is estimated at 1% in general population. The lifetime psychiatric comorbidity is observed in majority of patients. The most common coexisting diagnoses comprise disorders ofanxiety-affective spectrum, and in about 1/3 of patients attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorders could be diagnosed. Prodromal symptoms of ASD may emerge before 12 months of life, however reliability of diagnosis at such an early age is poor. Several screening instruments, based on the parental and/or healthcare professional assessments may be helpful in ASD detection. However, structured interviews and observation schedules remain the gold standard of diagnosis.

  3. Suicidal ideation in Huntington disease: The role of comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Heather H.; Gehl, Carissa R.; Dellefave, Lisa; Schiffman, Judith F.; Shannon, Kathleen M.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by cognitive impairments, motor abnormalities, and psychiatric disturbance. An increased risk for suicide has been documented. The majority of HD research has focused on cognitive and motor features of HD; the implications of psychiatric manifestations have received less consideration. Recent studies have sought to identify the stages of HD in which patients are at increased risk to experience suicidal ideation, though no study has examined possible risk factors for suicidality. The current study examines the presence of psychiatric comorbidity and its involvement in suicidal ideation. Suicidal ideation was examined in 1,941 HD patients enrolled in the Huntington Study Group. Of those, 19% (N = 369) reported suicidal ideation. Logistic regression analyses indicated that depression/anxiety and aggression/irritability are significant predictors of suicidal ideation (p < 0.01). In a subsample with the greatest suicidal ideation, alcohol and drug abuse were also predictive. Findings suggest that suicide in HD may be more distinct as compared to suicide in the general population. It is recommended that all individuals with HD (specifically those with features of depression, aggression, substance abuse) have routine suicide assessment; further research is needed to understand the high rate of suicide in HD. PMID:21605914

  4. Association of Lifestyle-Related Comorbidities With Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hong; Lee, Jung-Seok; Park, Jin-Young; Choi, Jung-Kyu; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Young-Taek; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the association of periodontitis with lifestyle-related comorbidities (LCs) using data in the Korean National Health Insurance Cohort Database from 2002 to 2013. This was a retrospective study involving a large national cohort with patient samples (representing 2% of the total Korean population) stratified on the basis of sociodemographic information. Using this precisely extracted database, the correlations between LCs (cerebral infarction, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction, osteoporosis, and obesity) and periodontitis were investigated while adjusting for confounding bias. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate differences in variable factors. Among a total of 1,025,340 samples, 321,103 (31.3%) cases were diagnosed with periodontitis. Statistically significant associations were found between all LCs except myocardial infarction and periodontitis (P < 0.005). Periodontitis is significantly and positively correlated with LCs (except for myocardial infarction) after adjusting for confounding bias. In particular, lifestyle-related diseases, erectile dysfunction, and osteoporosis seem to be intimately related to periodontitis. PMID:26376407

  5. Factitious disorder comorbid with bipolar I disorder. A case report.

    PubMed

    Del Casale, Antonio; Ferracuti, Stefano; Rapinesi, Chiara; Serata, Daniele; Simonetti, Alessio; Caloro, Matteo; Roma, Paolo; Savoja, Valeria; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Sani, Gabriele; Tatarelli, Roberto; Girardi, Paolo

    2012-06-10

    We describe a case of factitious disorder with physical and psychological symptoms comorbid with bipolar I disorder in a 37-year-old woman. Since the onset of bipolar disorder, which occurred at the age of 31, she increasingly complained of physical symptoms, compulsively seeking medical and surgical interventions. She has been hospitalised several times and her Munchausen-type factitious disorder recently appeared to be developing into Munchausen by proxy, involving her 11-year-old daughter. The patient adhered poorly to stabilising and antipsychotic drug treatment and did not improve through the years. We here analyse her mood phases, which were always associated with changes in the quality of factitious symptoms, according to whether the disorder was in its depressive phase (somatic complaints and suicidal ideation prevail), or in its manic or mixed phase (medical intervention-seeking and manipulation of clinicians to obtain surgical interventions). We also briefly discuss some important forensic issues to consider in similar cases, mainly stemming from the psychotic aspects of these two co-occurring disorders. Clinicians should be aware of some patients' ability to produce signs and symptoms of physical and/or psychological illness and consult psychiatrists before giving consent to invasive diagnostic procedures or surgery.

  6. [Glucose-lowering therapy in patients with cardiac comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Meier, Juris J

    2015-04-01

    The risk for cardiovascular events, congestive heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia is significantly increased in patients with diabetes. Although poor glycaemic control has been associated with an increased cardiovascular event rate, aggressive glucose-lowering strategies have failed to improve cardiovascular endpoints or mortality. Therefore, treatment-associated adverse effects, especially hypoglycaemia and weight gain, must be carefully outbalanced against the potential benefits of better glycaemic control. Furthermore, certain drug-specific aspects must be considered: Pioglitazone is contraindicated in patients with heart failure, and DPP-4 inhibitors have recently been associated with an increased heart failure rate. Heart rate may increase during treatment with GLP-1 analogues. Only with metformin a reduction in cardiovascular endpoint has been demonstrated in patients with diabetes. Insulin and sulphonylureas have yielded neutral results in the available endpoint trials. Endpoint studies with GLP-1 analogues or SGLT-2 inhibitors have not yet been completed. These various drug-specific actions in the cardiovascular system need to be born in mind for the choice of the optimal glucose-lowering strategy in patients with cardiac comorbidities.

  7. Pregnancy-Onset Panic Disorder: Incidence, Comorbidity and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    GÜLER, Özkan; KAYA, Veli; GEZGİNÇ, Kazım; KAYHAN, Fatih; ÇİÇEK, Erdinç; SÖNMEZ, Önder; UĞUZ, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The present study aimed to investigate the incidence rate of pregnancy-onset panic disorder (POPD) among Turkish pregnant women using a diagnostic interview. Additionally, we examined whether the independent socio-demographic or clinical risk factors were associated with the risk of panic disorder in these women. Methods The study sample comprised 1475 consecutive pregnant women who presented to the obstetric outpatient clinics of two research centers. The rate of POPD in these participants was 1.3% (Group 1, n=20). The 20 women with POPD were compared with 250 pregnant women without pregnancy-onset depression or anxiety (Group 2; controls). Panic disorder and other anxiety or mood disorders were determined by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Comorbid Axis II disorders were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Personality Disorders. Results The incidence rate of panic disorder was 1.3% (n=20). In group 1, 55% (n=11) of the women with POPD had an additional mood or anxiety disorder. In addition, the prevalence rate of any cluster C personality disorder, including avoidant, passive-aggressive and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders, were significantly greater in the group 1 women with POPD than the control pregnant women without a panic disorder (group 2). Conclusion The women with POPD were more likely than the controls to have a cluster C Axis II disorder and a history of a pre-existing anxiety or mood disorder.

  8. A Neurobiological Basis for Substance Abuse Comorbidity in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, R. Andrew; Krystal, John H.; Self, David W.

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly held that substance use comorbidity in schizophrenia represents self-medication, an attempt by patients to alleviate adverse positive and negative symptoms, cognitive impairment, or medication side effects. However, recent advances suggest that increased vulnerability to addictive behavior may reflect the impact of the neuropathology of schizophrenia on the neural circuitry mediating drug reward and reinforcement. We hypothesize that abnormalities in the hippocampal formation and frontal cortex facilitate the positive reinforcing effects of drug reward and reduce inhibitory control over drug-seeking behavior. In this model, disturbances in drug reward are mediated, in part, by dysregulated neural integration of dopamine and glutamate signaling in the nucleus accumbens resulting form frontal cortical and hippocampal dysfunction. Altered integration of these signals would produce neural and motivational changes similar to long-term substance abuse but without the necessity of prior drug exposure. Thus, schizophrenic patients may have a predilection for addictive behavior as a primary disease symptom in parallel to, and in many cases independent from, their other symptoms. PMID:11526998

  9. Identifying comorbid depression and disruptive behavior disorders: comparison of two approaches used in adolescent studies.

    PubMed

    Vander Stoep, Ann; Adrian, Molly C; Rhew, Isaac C; McCauley, Elizabeth; Herting, Jerald R; Kraemer, Helena C

    2012-07-01

    Interest in commonly co-occurring depression and disruptive behavior disorders in children has yielded a small body of research that estimates the prevalence of this comorbid condition and compares children with the comorbid condition and children with depression or disruptive behavior disorders alone with respect to antecedents and outcomes. Prior studies have used one of two different approaches to measure comorbid disorders: (1) meeting criteria for two DSM or ICD diagnoses or (2) scoring .5 SD above the mean or higher on two dimensional scales. This study compares two snapshots of comorbidity taken simultaneously in the same sample with each of the measurement approaches. The Developmental Pathways Project administered structured diagnostic interviews as well as dimensional scales to a community-based sample of 521 11-12 year olds to assess depression and disruptive behavior disorders. Clinical caseness indicators of children identified as "comorbid" by each method were examined concurrently and 3-years later. Cross-classification of adolescents via the two approaches revealed low agreement. When other indicators of caseness, including functional impairment, need for services, and clinical elevations on other symptom scales were examined, adolescents identified as comorbid via dimensional scales only were similar to those who were identified as comorbid via DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Findings suggest that when relying solely on DSM diagnostic criteria for comorbid depression and disruptive behavior disorders, many adolescents with significant impairment will be overlooked. Findings also suggest that lower dimensional scale thresholds can be set when comorbid conditions, rather than single forms of psychopathology, are being identified.

  10. Comorbidity between post-traumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder: alternative explanations and treatment considerations

    PubMed Central

    Flory, Janine D.; Yehuda, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Approximately half of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) also suffer from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The current paper examines evidence for two explanations of this comorbidity. First, that the comorbidity reflects overlapping symptoms in the two disorders. Second, that the co-occurrence of PTSD and MDD is not an artifact, but represents a trauma-related phenotype, possibly a subtype of PTSD. Support for the latter explanation is inferred from literature that examines risk and biological correlates of PTSD and MDD, including molecular processes. Treatment implications of the comorbidity are considered. PMID:26246789

  11. Increasing Comorbidities Suggest that Atopic Dermatitis Is a Systemic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Patrick M; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Paller, Amy S; Kabashima, Kenji; Amagai, Masayuki; Luger, Thomas A; Deleuran, Mette; Werfel, Thomas; Eyerich, Kilian; Stingl, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis comorbidities extend well beyond the march to allergic conditions (food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis), suggesting both cutaneous and systemic immune activation. In reviewing atopic dermatitis comorbidities, Councilors of the International Eczema Council found a strong pattern of immune activation in peripheral blood and the propensity to both skin and systemic infections. Associations with cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, and malignant diseases were increasingly reported, but confirmation of their link with atopic dermatitis requires longitudinal studies. Given the possibility of atopic dermatitis-related systemic immune activation, future investigations of new interventions should concurrently examine the impact on these comorbidities.

  12. Comorbidity between post-traumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder: alternative explanations and treatment considerations.

    PubMed

    Flory, Janine D; Yehuda, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    Approximately half of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) also suffer from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The current paper examines evidence for two explanations of this comorbidity. First, that the comorbidity reflects overlapping symptoms in the two disorders. Second, that the co-occurrence of PTSD and MDD is not an artifact, but represents a trauma-related phenotype, possibly a subtype of PTSD. Support for the latter explanation is inferred from literature that examines risk and biological correlates of PTSD and MDD, including molecular processes. Treatment implications of the comorbidity are considered.

  13. Comorbid Diabetes and Depression in African Americans: Implications for the Health Care Provider.

    PubMed

    Chlebowy, Diane Orr; Coty, Mary-Beth; Fu, Liyan; Hines-Martin, Vicki

    2017-03-09

    Health care providers (HCPs) face many obstacles as they undertake efforts to meet the challenges of caring for African American patients with comorbid diabetes and depression. This review article discusses the incidence of comorbid diabetes and depression in African Americans, cultural factors affecting diabetes self-management, and clinical practice implications for the HCP. The role of patient-centered care, engagement, and best-practice strategies are discussed to provide the HCP with guidelines regarding the minimal standards that support improved health care outcomes for African Americans with comorbid diabetes and depression.

  14. Potential vorticity index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcilon, Albert; Weng, Hengyi

    1990-01-01

    Using standard data analysis techniques, researchers explore the links between disturbance growth and quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity (PV) gradients; appearance and disappearance of cutoff lows and blocking highs and their relation to a zonal index (properly defined in terms of PV); and teleconnections between different flow patterns and their relation to the zonal index. It was found that the PV index and the eddy index correlate better than a zonal index (defined by zonal wind) and the eddy index. In the frequency domain there are three frequencies (.03, .07 and .17 cpd (cycle per day) corresponding to periods of 33, 14 and 6 days) at which PV index and the eddy index exhibit local maxima. The high correlation found at periods of 33 days is mainly due to eddy activity at high latitudes while the local correlation maxima found at the shorter periods are mainly due mid-latitude eddy activity. The correlation between the PV index and the geopotential height anomaly at 500 mb, at each grid point in the Northern Hemisphere, shows the existence of most of the teleconnection patterns summarized by Wallace and Gutzler (1981): the North Atlantic Oscillation, the North Pacific Oscillation, and the Pacific/North American patterns. Results show that the Isentropic Potential Vorticity (IPV) analysis can be a very useful and powerful tool when used to understand the dynamics of several large scale atmospheric systems. Although the data are limited to only one winter, and it is difficult to assess the statistical significance of the correlation coefficients presented here, the results are encouraging from physical viewpoint.

  15. Index Construction, A Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    Application in Science, S5G37 Technology , and Humanities, N.Y., N.Y: John Wiley & Sons, C 1969. Z695.9 Harrod, Leonard Montague, ed. Indexers on... Indexing Terminology, Posting Terms and KWOC, DESK Alexandria, VA: DDC, May, 1979. Z1035.1 Library of Congress. Main Reading Room, Reference Collection...A1544 750 INDEX CONSTRUCTON AR BI OGRAPHYU ARMY FIEL ARTILERY SHOOL FORT SIL OR MILE R SEP 84 USA FASM -DSB- A0 VNtASIIEFG 5/2 NI MONSOONSfl 0841

  16. Glycemic index and disease.

    PubMed

    Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier

    2002-07-01

    It has been suggested that foods with a high glycemic index are detrimental to health and that healthy people should be told to avoid these foods. This paper takes the position that not enough valid scientific data are available to launch a public health campaign to disseminate such a recommendation. This paper explores the glycemic index and its validity and discusses the effect of postprandial glucose and insulin responses on food intake, obesity, type 1 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Presented herein are the reasons why it is premature to recommend that the general population avoid foods with a high glycemic index.

  17. Viral Retinitis Following Intravitreal Triamcinolone Injection in Patients with Predisposing Medical Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ankur M.; Oster, Stephen F.; Freeman, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To review the cases of viral retinitis following intravitreal steroid administration at a single center, to estimate the incidence, and to propose risk factors for its occurrence. Design Retrospective, observational case series Methods 736 intravitreal triamcinolone (IVTA) injections were given in the clinic and operating room by three retina specialists at a single academic medical center, between September 2002 to November 2008. Inclusion criteria were simply a history of one or more IVTA injections during the period. The overall incidence of viral retinitis following IVTA was calculated. Subsequently, a chart audit was performed to estimate the number of patients with immune-altering conditions who had received IVTA during the time period, and the incidence within this subgroup was calculated. Results Viral retinitis developed following IVTA injection in three patients, yielding an overall incidence of 3/736 or 0.41%. An estimated 334 injections were given to patients with an immune-altering condition, including diabetes. All three of the patients who developed viral retinitis following IVTA possessed abnormal immune systems, yielding an incidence rate of 3/334 or 0.90% within this subgroup. Conclusions Our high reported incidence for this potentially devastating complication can be attributed to multiple factors, including coexisting medical immunocompromising comorbidities, a higher dose with a longer duration of local immunosuppression in the vitreous, multiple injections, as well as previous viral retinitis. Caution with a high index of clinical suspicion and frequent follow-up is advised in patients receiving IVTA with potentially immune-altering conditions, even after apparent immune recovery. PMID:20172069

  18. Refractory Hypertension: Determination of Prevalence, Risk Factors and Comorbidities in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, David A.; Booth, John N.; Oparil, Suzanne; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Shimbo, Daichi; Lackland, Daniel T.; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M.; Muntner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Refractory hypertension is an extreme phenotype of antihypertensive treatment failure. Participants in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study, a large (n=30,239), population-based cohort were evaluated to determine the prevalence of refractory hypertension and associated cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Refractory hypertension was defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (systolic/diastolic ≥ 140/90 mm Hg) on ≥ 5 antihypertensive drug classes. Participants with resistant hypertension (systolic/diastolic ≥140/90 mm Hg on ≥ 3 or<140/90 mm Hg on ≥ 4 antihypertensive classes) and all treated hypertensive participants served as comparator groups. Of 14,809 REGARDS participants receiving antihypertensive treatment, 78 (0.5%) had refractory hypertension. The prevalence of refractory hypertension was 3.6% among participants with resistant hypertension(n=2,144) and 41.7% among participants on 5 or more antihypertensive drug classes. Among all hypertensive participants, African American race, male gender, living in the stroke belt or buckle, higher body mass index, lower heart rate, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, diabetes and history of stroke and coronary heart disease were associated with refractory hypertension. Compared to resistant hypertension, prevalence ratios for refractory hypertension were increased for African Americans (3.00, 95% CI 1.68 – 5.37) and those with albuminuria (2.22, 95% CI 1.40 – 3.52) and diabetes (2.09, 95% CI 1.32 – 3.31). The median 10-year Framingham risk for coronary heart disease and stroke was higher among participants with refractory hypertension compared to either comparator group. These data indicate that while resistant hypertension is relatively common among treated hypertensive patients, true antihypertensive treatment failure is rare. PMID:24324035

  19. Refractory hypertension: determination of prevalence, risk factors, and comorbidities in a large, population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, David A; Booth, John N; Oparil, Suzanne; Irvin, Marguerite R; Shimbo, Daichi; Lackland, Daniel T; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M; Muntner, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Refractory hypertension is an extreme phenotype of antihypertensive treatment failure. Participants in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study, a large (n=30 239), population-based cohort were evaluated to determine the prevalence of refractory hypertension and associated cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Refractory hypertension was defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (systolic/diastolic, ≥140/90 mm Hg) on ≥5 antihypertensive drug classes. Participants with resistant hypertension (systolic/diastolic, ≥140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 or <140/90 mm Hg on ≥4 antihypertensive classes) and all participants treated for hypertension served as comparator groups. Of 14 809 REGARDS participants receiving antihypertensive treatment, 78 (0.5%) had refractory hypertension. The prevalence of refractory hypertension was 3.6% among participants with resistant hypertension (n=2144) and 41.7% among participants on ≥5 antihypertensive drug classes. Among all participants with hypertension, black race, male sex, living in the stroke belt or buckle, higher body mass index, lower heart rate, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, diabetes mellitus, and history of stroke and coronary heart disease were associated with refractory hypertension. Compared with resistant hypertension, prevalence ratios for refractory hypertension were increased for blacks (3.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.68-5.37) and those with albuminuria (2.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-3.52) and diabetes mellitus (2.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-3.31). The median 10-year Framingham risk for coronary heart disease and stroke was higher among participants with refractory hypertension when compared with those with either comparator group. These data indicate that although resistant hypertension is relatively common among treated patients with hypertension, true antihypertensive treatment failure is rare.

  20. Internight sleep variability: its clinical significance and responsiveness to treatment in primary and comorbid insomnia.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ortuño, María M; Edinger, Jack D

    2012-10-01

    Although sleep diary and actigraphy data are usually collected daily for 1 or 2 weeks, traditional analytical approaches aggregate these data into mean values. Internight variability of sleep often accompanies insomnia. However, few studies have explored the relevance of this 'construct' in the context of diagnosis, clinical impact, treatment effects and/or whether having 'variable sleep' carries any prognostic significance. We explored these questions by conducting secondary analyses of data from a randomized clinical trial. The sample included primary (PI: n = 40) and comorbid insomnia (CMI: n = 41) sufferers receiving four biweekly sessions of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) or sleep hygiene education. Using the within-subject standard deviations of diary- and actigraphy-derived measures collected for 2-week periods [sleep onset latency (SOL), wake after sleep onset (WASO), total sleep time (TST) and sleep efficiency (SE)], we found that CMI sufferers displayed more variable self-reported SOLs and SEs than PI sufferers. However, higher variability in diary and actigraphy-derived measures was related to poorer sleep quality only within the PI group, as measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Within both groups, the variability of diary-derived measures was reduced after CBT, but the variability of actigraphy-derived measures remained unchanged. Interestingly, the variability of actigraphy measures at baseline was correlated with PSQI scores at 6-month follow-up. Higher SOL variability was associated with worse treatment outcomes within the PI group, whereas higher WASO variability was correlated with better treatment outcomes within the CMI group. Sleep variability differences across insomnia diagnoses, along with their distinctive correlates, suggest that mechanisms underlying the sleep disruption/complaint and treatment response in both patient groups are distinct. Further studies are warranted to support variability as a useful metric in

  1. Distinct Subtypes of Apathy Revealed by the Apathy Motivation Index.

    PubMed

    Ang, Yuen-Siang; Lockwood, Patricia; Apps, Matthew A J; Muhammed, Kinan; Husain, Masud

    2017-01-01

    Apathy is a debilitating but poorly understood disorder characterized by a reduction in motivation. As well as being associated with several brain disorders, apathy is also prevalent in varying degrees in healthy people. Whilst many tools have been developed to assess levels of apathy in clinical disorders, surprisingly there are no measures of apathy suitable for healthy people. Moreover, although apathy is commonly comorbid with symptoms of depression, anhedonia and fatigue, how and why these symptoms are associated is unclear. Here we developed the Apathy-Motivation Index (AMI), a brief self-report index of apathy and motivation. Using exploratory factor analysis (in a sample of 505 people), and then confirmatory analysis (in a different set of 479 individuals), we identified subtypes of apathy in behavioural, social and emotional domains. Latent profile analyses showed four different profiles of apathy that were associated with varying levels of depression, anhedonia and fatigue. The AMI is a novel and reliable measure of individual differences in apathy and might provide a useful means of probing different mechanisms underlying sub-clinical lack of motivation in otherwise healthy individuals. Moreover, associations between apathy and comorbid states may be reflective of problems in different emotional, social and behavioural domains.

  2. Increasing Body Mass Index Is Inversely Related to Groin Hernias.

    PubMed

    Ravanbakhsh, Samine; Batech, Michael; Tejirian, Talar

    2015-10-01

    Few studies describe the relationship between obesity and groin hernias. Our objective was to investigate the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and groin hernias in a large population. Patients with the diagnosis of inguinal or femoral hernia with and without incarceration or strangulation were identified using the Kaiser Permanente Southern California regional database including 14 hospitals over a 7-year period. Patients were stratified by BMI. There were 47,950 patients with a diagnosis of a groin hernia--a prevalence of 2.28 per cent. Relative to normal BMI (20-24.9 kg/m(2)), lower BMI was associated with an increased risk for hernia diagnosis. With increasing BMI, the risk of incarceration or strangulation increased. Additionally, increasing age, male gender, white race, history of hernia, tobacco use history, alcohol use, and higher comorbidity index increased the chance of a groin hernia diagnosis. Complications were higher for women, patients with comorbidities, black race, and alcohol users. Our study is the largest to date correlating obesity and groin hernias in a diverse United States population. Obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) is associated with a lower risk of groin hernia diagnosis, but an increased risk of complications. This inverse relationship may be due to limitations of physical exam in obese patients.

  3. Distinct Subtypes of Apathy Revealed by the Apathy Motivation Index

    PubMed Central

    Apps, Matthew A. J.; Muhammed, Kinan; Husain, Masud

    2017-01-01

    Apathy is a debilitating but poorly understood disorder characterized by a reduction in motivation. As well as being associated with several brain disorders, apathy is also prevalent in varying degrees in healthy people. Whilst many tools have been developed to assess levels of apathy in clinical disorders, surprisingly there are no measures of apathy suitable for healthy people. Moreover, although apathy is commonly comorbid with symptoms of depression, anhedonia and fatigue, how and why these symptoms are associated is unclear. Here we developed the Apathy-Motivation Index (AMI), a brief self-report index of apathy and motivation. Using exploratory factor analysis (in a sample of 505 people), and then confirmatory analysis (in a different set of 479 individuals), we identified subtypes of apathy in behavioural, social and emotional domains. Latent profile analyses showed four different profiles of apathy that were associated with varying levels of depression, anhedonia and fatigue. The AMI is a novel and reliable measure of individual differences in apathy and might provide a useful means of probing different mechanisms underlying sub-clinical lack of motivation in otherwise healthy individuals. Moreover, associations between apathy and comorbid states may be reflective of problems in different emotional, social and behavioural domains. PMID:28076387

  4. Asperger syndrome in India: findings from a case-series with respect to clinical profile and comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Sreedaran, Priya; Ashok, M V

    2015-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is an autism spectrum disorder with a high rate of psychiatric comorbidity. We describe the clinical profile and psychiatric comorbidity in a series of affected individuals referred to an Indian general hospital psychiatry setting. Gilliam Asperger's disorder scale was used to evaluate the clinical characteristics while Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI)-KID and MINI-PLUS were used to assess psychiatric comorbidity. The profile of subjects with AS in our case-series appears similar to that published elsewhere with high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. Mental health professionals should evaluate for psychiatric comorbidity in individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

  5. Asperger Syndrome in India: Findings from a Case-Series with Respect to Clinical Profile and Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Sreedaran, Priya; Ashok, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is an autism spectrum disorder with a high rate of psychiatric comorbidity. We describe the clinical profile and psychiatric comorbidity in a series of affected individuals referred to an Indian general hospital psychiatry setting. Gilliam Asperger's disorder scale was used to evaluate the clinical characteristics while Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI)-KID and MINI-PLUS were used to assess psychiatric comorbidity. The profile of subjects with AS in our case-series appears similar to that published elsewhere with high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. Mental health professionals should evaluate for psychiatric comorbidity in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. PMID:25969609

  6. NASA 1981 photography index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    An index of representative photographs is presented. Color transparencies and black and white glossies of major launches, Mariner spacecraft, Pioneer spacecraft, planets and other space phenomena, Skylab, space shuttle, Viking spacecraft, and Voyager spacecraft are included.

  7. Pesticide Use Site Index

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Use Site Index will help a company (or other applicant) identify which data requirements are needed to register a pesticide product. It provides information on pesticide use sites and pesticide major use patterns.

  8. Gradient Index Lens Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-25

    over six to nine readings at two to three input polarizations each. The first set of index values is calculated assuming ei = 450 These values are...TECHNICAL REPORT RG-CR-84-2 Sli GRADIENT INDEX LENS RESEARCH Prepared by: Duncan T. Moore The Institute of Optics University of Rochester Rochester...CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (Miten Data Fntered) READ INSTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 1. REPORT NU14MU R GOVT ACCESSION No. 3

  9. JSC document index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) document index is intended to provide a single source listing of all published JSC-numbered documents their authors, and the designated offices of prime responsibility (OPR's) by mail code at the time of publication. The index contains documents which have been received and processed by the JSC Technical Library as of January 13, 1988. Other JSC-numbered documents which are controlled but not available through the JSC Library are also listed.

  10. New generic indexing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeston, Michael

    1996-01-01

    There has been no fundamental change in the dynamic indexing methods supporting database systems since the invention of the B-tree twenty-five years ago. And yet the whole classical approach to dynamic database indexing has long since become inappropriate and increasingly inadequate. We are moving rapidly from the conventional one-dimensional world of fixed-structure text and numbers to a multi-dimensional world of variable structures, objects and images, in space and time. But, even before leaving the confines of conventional database indexing, the situation is highly unsatisfactory. In fact, our research has led us to question the basic assumptions of conventional database indexing. We have spent the past ten years studying the properties of multi-dimensional indexing methods, and in this paper we draw the strands of a number of developments together - some quite old, some very new, to show how we now have the basis for a new generic indexing technology for the next generation of database systems.

  11. Norepinephrine Regulates Condylar Bone Loss via Comorbid Factors.

    PubMed

    Jiao, K; Niu, L; Xu, X; Liu, Y; Li, X; Tay, F R; Wang, M

    2015-06-01

    Degenerative changes of condylar subchondral bone occur frequently in temporomandibular disorders. Although psychologic stresses and occlusal abnormalities have been implicated in temporomandibular disorder, it is not known if these risks represent synergistic comorbid factors that are involved in condylar subchondral bone degradation that is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system. In the present study, chronic immobilization stress (CIS), chemical sympathectomy, and unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) were sequentially applied in a murine model. Norepinephrine contents in the subjects' serum and condylar subchondral bone were detected by ELISA; bone and cartilage remodeling parameters and related gene expression in the subchondral bone were examined. Subchondral bone loss and increased subchondral bone norepinephrine level were observed in the CIS and UAC groups. These groups exhibited decreased bone mineral density, volume fraction, and bone formation rate; decreased expressions of osterix, collagen I, and osteocalcin; but increased trabecular separation, osteoclast number and surface, and RANKL expression. Combined CIS + UAC produced more severe subchondral bone loss, higher bone norepinephrine level, and decreased chondrocyte density and cartilage thickness when compared to CIS or UAC alone. Sympathectomy simultaneously prevented subchondral bone loss and decreased bone norepinephrine level in all experimental subgroups when compared to the vehicle-treated counterparts. Norepinephrine also decreased mRNA expression of osterix, collagen I, and osteocalcin by mesenchymal stem cells at 7 and 14 d of stimulation and increased the expression of RANKL and RANKL/OPG ratio by mesenchymal stem cells at 2 h. In conclusion, CIS and UAC synergistically promote condylar subchondral bone loss and cartilage degradation; such processes are partially regulated by norepinephrine within subchondral bone.

  12. Psychological consequences of childhood obesity: psychiatric comorbidity and prevention.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Jean; Matthews, Lynsay; Cobley, Stephen; Han, Ahreum; Sanders, Ross; Wiltshire, Huw D; Baker, Julien S

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century with far-reaching and enduring adverse consequences for health outcomes. Over 42 million children <5 years worldwide are estimated to be overweight (OW) or obese (OB), and if current trends continue, then an estimated 70 million children will be OW or OB by 2025. The purpose of this review was to focus on psychiatric, psychological, and psychosocial consequences of childhood obesity (OBy) to include a broad range of international studies. The aim was to establish what has recently changed in relation to the common psychological consequences associated with childhood OBy. A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for articles presenting information on the identification or prevention of psychiatric morbidity in childhood obesity. Relevant data were extracted and narratively reviewed. Findings established childhood OW/OBy was negatively associated with psychological comorbidities, such as depression, poorer perceived lower scores on health-related quality of life, emotional and behavioral disorders, and self-esteem during childhood. Evidence related to the association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and OBy remains unconvincing because of various findings from studies. OW children were more likely to experience multiple associated psychosocial problems than their healthy-weight peers, which may be adversely influenced by OBy stigma, teasing, and bullying. OBy stigma, teasing, and bullying are pervasive and can have serious consequences for emotional and physical health and performance. It remains unclear as to whether psychiatric disorders and psychological problems are a cause or a consequence of childhood obesity or whether common factors promote both obesity and psychiatric disturbances in susceptible children and adolescents. A cohesive and strategic approach to tackle this current obesity epidemic is

  13. The Family of Sensorimotor Gating Disorders: Comorbidities or Diagnostic Overlaps?

    PubMed Central

    GEYER, MARK A.

    2009-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle is an operational measure of the pre-attentive filtering process known as sensorimotor gating. Originally identified in patients with schizophrenia, PPI deficits have been observed in multiple but not all psychiatric disorders. Thus, as with most signs and symptoms of psychiatric disorders, deficits in PPI cut across diagnostic categories. It remains unclear whether the diversity of disorders exhibiting deficient PPI bespeaks diagnostic overlaps or comorbidities. Given the recent focus on treatments for cognitive deficits of schizophrenia independently of treating psychosis, the relationship of PPI deficits to cognitive deficits becomes of interest. Although PPI cannot be considered to be a cognitive process per se, abnormalities in pre-attentive information processing may be predictive of or lead to complex cognitive deficits. Animal models of PPI deficits produced by dopamine agonists reliably predict existing antipsychotics. Nevertheless, since neither PPI nor cognitive deficits in schizophrenia are ameliorated by standard antipsychotics, current research is exploring the predictive value of non-dopaminergic PPI models in identifying treatments for gating disturbances independently of their relevance to specific disorders. Both PPI and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia patients are not reversed by first generation antipsychotics but may be attenuated by clozapine. Similarly, effects of glutamate antagonists on symptoms in patients and PPI in animals appear to be reduced by clozapine. Hence, treatment-induced reversals of deficits in PPI produced by glutamate antagonists may provide animal, and human, models to aid in the discovery of treatments of cognitive deficits in patients already treated with existing antipsychotics. PMID:17197371

  14. Psychological consequences of childhood obesity: psychiatric comorbidity and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Jean; Matthews, Lynsay; Cobley, Stephen; Han, Ahreum; Sanders, Ross; Wiltshire, Huw D; Baker, Julien S

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century with far-reaching and enduring adverse consequences for health outcomes. Over 42 million children <5 years worldwide are estimated to be overweight (OW) or obese (OB), and if current trends continue, then an estimated 70 million children will be OW or OB by 2025. The purpose of this review was to focus on psychiatric, psychological, and psychosocial consequences of childhood obesity (OBy) to include a broad range of international studies. The aim was to establish what has recently changed in relation to the common psychological consequences associated with childhood OBy. A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for articles presenting information on the identification or prevention of psychiatric morbidity in childhood obesity. Relevant data were extracted and narratively reviewed. Findings established childhood OW/OBy was negatively associated with psychological comorbidities, such as depression, poorer perceived lower scores on health-related quality of life, emotional and behavioral disorders, and self-esteem during childhood. Evidence related to the association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and OBy remains unconvincing because of various findings from studies. OW children were more likely to experience multiple associated psychosocial problems than their healthy-weight peers, which may be adversely influenced by OBy stigma, teasing, and bullying. OBy stigma, teasing, and bullying are pervasive and can have serious consequences for emotional and physical health and performance. It remains unclear as to whether psychiatric disorders and psychological problems are a cause or a consequence of childhood obesity or whether common factors promote both obesity and psychiatric disturbances in susceptible children and adolescents. A cohesive and strategic approach to tackle this current obesity epidemic is

  15. [Neuro-psychiatric comorbidity among children and adolescents who suffer from epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Doron, Yariv; Epstein, Orna; Heyman, Eli; Lahat, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is quite a common disorder in the child and adolescent population, and it has been studied for many years. Recently, a better understanding has been achieved regarding the comorbidities in epilepsy, including: major depression, anxiety, learning disabilities, etc.. The comorbidities are extensive and affect many aspects in the life of the patient, and his family members, including: psychological development, learning abilities, independence, etc.. Several mechanisms take part in these comorbidities, starting in the cell and ending with a broadened psychological effect. A better understanding of these mechanisms may assist the physicians in diagnosing their patients and tailoring a wide-approach treatment plan, thereby improving the patient's clinical status and his quality of life (and that of his family). The objective of this article is to describe some of the common comorbidities that are present in epilepsy, and outline the multi-disciplinary approach in treating the epileptic child and his/her family.

  16. A Prospective Study of Psychiatric Comorbidity and Recidivism Among Repeat DUI Offenders.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Sarah E; Belkin, Katerina; LaPlante, Debi A; Bosworth, Leslie; Shaffer, Howard J

    2015-04-13

    Psychiatric comorbidity has emerged as a key element distinguishing DUI offenders from others, and, in some cases, distinguishing repeat offenders from first-time offenders. This paper utilizes a prospective design to determine whether the comorbid disorders identified among repeat DUI offenders can predict recidivism. Seven hundred forty-three repeat DUI offenders were recruited from a two-week inpatient treatment program at which they received a standardized mental health assessment and followed across five years post-treatment to track DUI offense, motor vehicle-related offenses, and general criminal offenses. Psychiatric comorbidity, though it did not predict DUI recidivism specifically, predicted criminal re-offense more generally. In addition, there was a specific relationship between lifetime attention deficit disorder and repeated motor vehicle-related offenses. These findings suggest that for many repeat offenders, DUI is one outlet in a constellation of criminal behavior, and that psychiatric comorbidity increases vulnerability for criminal re-offense.

  17. Lifetime Prevalence, Age of Risk, and Etiology of Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hirschtritt, Matthew E.; Lee, Paul C.; Pauls, David L.; Dion, Yves; Grados, Marco A.; Illmann, Cornelia; King, Robert A.; Sandor, Paul; McMahon, William M.; Lyon, Gholson J.; Cath, Danielle C.; Kurlan, Roger; Robertson, Mary M.; Osiecki, Lisa; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Mathews, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by high rates of psychiatric comorbidity; however, few studies have fully characterized these comorbidities. Furthermore, most studies have included relatively few participants (<200), and none has examined the ages of highest risk for each TS-associated comorbidity or their etiologic relationship to TS. Objective To characterize the lifetime prevalence, clinical associations, ages of highest risk, and etiology of psychiatric comorbidity among individuals with TS. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional structured diagnostic interviews conducted between April 1, 1992, and December 31, 2008, of participants with TS (n = 1374) and TS-unaffected family members (n = 1142). Main Outcomes and Measures Lifetime prevalence of comorbid DSM-IV-TR disorders, their heritabilities, ages of maximal risk, and associations with symptom severity, age at onset, and parental psychiatric history. Results The lifetime prevalence of any psychiatric comorbidity among individuals with TS was 85.7%; 57.7% of the population had 2 or more psychiatric disorders. The mean (SD) number of lifetime comorbid diagnoses was 2.1 (1.6); the mean number was 0.9 (1.3) when obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were excluded, and 72.1% of the individuals met the criteria for OCD or ADHD. Other disorders, including mood, anxiety, and disruptive behavior, each occurred in approximately 30% of the participants. The age of greatest risk for the onset of most comorbid psychiatric disorders was between 4 and 10 years, with the exception of eating and substance use disorders, which began in adolescence (interquartile range, 15–19 years for both). Tourette syndrome was associated with increased risk of anxiety (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0–1.9; P = .04) and decreased risk of substance use disorders (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.3–0.9; P = .02) independent from comorbid OCD and ADHD; however, high rates

  18. Transdiagnostic Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and Comorbid Anxiety with the Unified Protocol: A Clinical Replication Series

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, Kristen K.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder with recurrent manic and depressive episodes. Over 75% of bipolar patients have a current or lifetime diagnosis of a comorbid anxiety disorder. Comorbid anxiety in BD is associated with greater illness severity, greater functional impairment, and poorer illness-related outcomes. Effectively treating comorbid anxiety in individuals with BD has been recognized as one of the biggest unmet needs in the field of bipolar disorder. Recently, the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP) was developed to be applicable to the full range of anxiety and mood disorders, based upon converging evidence from genetics, cognitive and affective neuroscience, and behavioral research suggesting common, core emotion-related pathology. Here, we present a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of the UP for the treatment of BD with comorbid anxiety, in a clinical replication series consisting of three cases. PMID:22822175

  19. [Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders: diagnosis and pharmacological treatment].

    PubMed

    Paslakis, G; Schredl, M; Alm, B; Sobanski, E

    2013-08-01

    Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterised by inattention and/or hyperactivity and impulsivity and is a frequent psychiatric disorder with childhood onset. In addition to core symptoms, patients often experience associated symptoms like emotional dysregulation or low self-esteem and suffer from comorbid disorders, particularly depressive episodes, substance abuse, anxiety or sleep disorders. It is recommended to include associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders in the diagnostic set-up and in the treatment plan. Comorbid psychiatric disorders should be addressed with disorder-specific therapies while associated symptoms also often improve with treatment of the ADHD core symptoms. The most impairing psychiatric disorder should be treated first. This review presents recommendations for differential diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD with associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders with respect to internationally published guidelines, clinical trials and expert opinions.

  20. A Prospective Study of Psychiatric Comorbidity and Recidivism Among Repeat DUI Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Sarah E.; Belkin, Katerina; LaPlante, Debi A.; Bosworth, Leslie; Shaffer, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity has emerged as a key element distinguishing DUI offenders from others, and, in some cases, distinguishing repeat offenders from first-time offenders. This paper utilizes a prospective design to determine whether the comorbid disorders identified among repeat DUI offenders can predict recidivism. Seven hundred forty-three repeat DUI offenders were recruited from a two-week inpatient treatment program at which they received a standardized mental health assessment and followed across five years post-treatment to track DUI offense, motor vehicle-related offenses, and general criminal offenses. Psychiatric comorbidity, though it did not predict DUI recidivism specifically, predicted criminal re-offense more generally. In addition, there was a specific relationship between lifetime attention deficit disorder and repeated motor vehicle-related offenses. These findings suggest that for many repeat offenders, DUI is one outlet in a constellation of criminal behavior, and that psychiatric comorbidity increases vulnerability for criminal re-offense. PMID:26539339

  1. Genetic similarity between cancers and comorbid Mendelian diseases identifies candidate driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, Rachel D.; Emmett, Kevin J.; Madubata, Chioma; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Rabadan, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Despite large-scale cancer genomics studies, key somatic mutations driving cancer, and their functional roles, remain elusive. Here we propose that analysis of comorbidities of Mendelian diseases with cancers provides a novel, systematic way to discover new cancer genes. If germline genetic variation in Mendelian loci predisposes bearers to common cancers, the same loci may harbor cancer-associated somatic variation. Compilations of clinical records spanning over 100 million patients provide an unprecedented opportunity to assess clinical associations between Mendelian diseases and cancers. We systematically compare these comorbidities against recurrent somatic mutations from more than five thousand patients across many cancers. Using multiple measures of genetic similarity, we show that a Mendelian disease and comorbid cancer indeed have genetic alterations of significant functional similarity. This result provides a basis to identify candidate drivers in cancers including melanoma and glioblastoma. Some Mendelian diseases demonstrate “pan-cancer” comorbidity and shared genetics across cancers. PMID:25926297

  2. Difficulties in the diagnosis of heart failure in patients with comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Trullàs, J C; Casado, J; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients present frequently comorbidities and the diagnosis of HF in this setting is a challenge. The symptoms and signs of HF may be atypical and can be simulated or disguised by co-morbidities such as respiratory disease and/or obesity. For this reasons, confirmation of the diagnosis always requires further tests. Natriuretic peptides accurately exclude cardiac dysfunction as a cause of symptoms, but the optimal cut-off levels for ruling out and ruling in HF diagnosis are influenced by different co-morbidities. Echocardiography should be performed in all patients to confirm the diagnosis of HF, except in those cases with low clinical probability and a concentration of brain natriuretic peptides below the exclusion cut-off. This review aims to provide a practical clinical approach for the diagnosis of HF in patients with comorbidity, focusing in older patients and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and/or obesity.

  3. Health-related quality of life in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease depends on disease activity and psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, G; Erhard, D; Petersen, M; Parzer, P; Schlarb, A A; Resch, F; Brunner, R; Hoffmann, G F; Lenhartz, H; Richterich, A

    2015-04-01

    Adolescent patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) show an increased risk for behavioral and emotional dysfunction. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is influenced by medical illnesses, as well as by psychiatric disorders, but for adolescents with IBD, the extent to which HRQoL is influenced by these two factors is unclear. For 47 adolescent IBD patients, we analyzed disease activity, HRQoL and whether or not a psychiatric disorder was present. Disease activity was estimated using pediatric Ulcerative Colitis Activity Index and pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index. The IMPACT-III and the EQ-5D were used to measure HRQoL and QoL, respectively. In addition, patient and parent diagnostic interviews were performed. 55.3 % patients fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for one or more psychiatric disorders. In all patients, psychiatric comorbidity together with disease activity contributed to a reduction in quality of life. Adolescents with IBD are at a high risk for clinically relevant emotional or behavioral problems resulting in significantly lower HRQoL. We conclude that accessible, optimally structured psychotherapeutic and/or psychiatric help is needed in adolescent patients with IBD.

  4. Co-morbid pain conditions and feelings of invalidation and isolation among women with vulvodynia.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ruby H N; Ecklund, Ali M; Maclehose, Richard F; Veasley, Christin; Harlow, Bernard L

    2012-01-01

    Many women with vulvodynia also suffer from other chronic co-morbid pain conditions. Alone, these pain conditions are associated with feeling invalidated by others and feeling socially isolated. It is unclear, however, how the presence of additional pain co-morbidities are associated with the psychosocial wellbeing of women with vulvodynia. We used data from a survey administered by the National Vulvodynia Association. Women reported clinician-diagnosed vulvodynia, presence of co-morbid pain, and how often they felt that they felt no one believed their pain existed (invalidated) and isolated. Analyses determined prevalence of feeling invalidated or isolated, and the difference in prevalence when co-morbidities existed. Forty-five percent of these 1847 women with vulvodynia reported having at least one of the following five chronic pain conditions, chronic fatigue syndrome, endometriosis, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, or irritable bowel syndrome. Adjusted baseline prevalence among all women of feeling invalidated was 9% and of feeling isolated was 14%. Having a co-morbid condition with vulvodynia, as well as having an increasing number of co-morbid conditions with vulvodynia, was significantly associated with the presence of feeling both invalidated and isolated. Chronic fatigue syndrome was the co-morbidity most strongly associated with feelings invalidation and isolation. One or more co-morbid pain conditions in addition to vulvodynia were significantly associated with psychosocial wellbeing. However, the temporality of the association could not be elucidated and therefore we cannot conclude that these pain conditions cause poor psychosocial wellbeing. Despite this, future studies should explore the utility of promoting validation of women's pain conditions and reducing social isolation for women with chronic pain.

  5. Comorbid Analysis of Genes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders Reveals Differential Evolutionary Constraints

    PubMed Central

    David, Maude M.; Enard, David; Ozturk, Alp; Daniels, Jena; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Diaz-Beltran, Leticia; Wall, Dennis. P.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is substantial. The symptoms of autism overlap with many other human conditions, reflecting common molecular pathologies suggesting that cross-disorder analysis will help prioritize autism gene candidates. Genes in the intersection between autism and related conditions may represent nonspecific indicators of dysregulation while genes unique to autism may play a more causal role. Thorough literature review allowed us to extract 125 ICD-9 codes comorbid to ASD that we mapped to 30 specific human disorders. In the present work, we performed an automated extraction of genes associated with ASD and its comorbid disorders, and found 1031 genes involved in ASD, among which 262 are involved in ASD only, with the remaining 779 involved in ASD and at least one comorbid disorder. A pathway analysis revealed 13 pathways not involved in any other comorbid disorders and therefore unique to ASD, all associated with basal cellular functions. These pathways differ from the pathways associated with both ASD and its comorbid conditions, with the latter being more specific to neural function. To determine whether the sequence of these genes have been subjected to differential evolutionary constraints, we studied long term constraints by looking into Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling, and showed that genes involved in several comorbid disorders seem to have undergone more purifying selection than the genes involved in ASD only. This result was corroborated by a higher dN/dS ratio for genes unique to ASD as compare to those that are shared between ASD and its comorbid disorders. Short-term evolutionary constraints showed the same trend as the pN/pS ratio indicates that genes unique to ASD were under significantly less evolutionary constraint than the genes associated with all other disorders. PMID:27414027

  6. Distinguishing General and Specific Personality Disorder Features and Implications for Substance Dependence Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Jahng, Seungmin; Trull, Timothy J.; Wood, Phillip K.; Tragesser, Sarah L.; Tomko, Rachel; Grant, Julia D.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and population-based samples show high comorbidity between Substance Use Disorders (SUDs) and Axis II Personality Disorders (PDs). However, Axis II disorders are frequently comorbid with each other, and existing research has generally failed to distinguish the extent to which SUD/PD comorbidity is general or specific with respect to both specific types of PDs and specific types of SUDs. We sought to determine whether ostensibly specific comorbid substance dependence-Axis II diagnoses (e.g., alcohol use dependence and borderline personality disorder) are reflective of more pervasive or general personality pathology or whether the comorbidity is specific to individual PDs. Face-to-face interview data from Wave 1 and Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions were analyzed. Participants included 34,653 adults living in households in the United States. We used hierarchical factor models to statistically partition general and specific personality disorder dimensions while simultaneously testing for specific PD-substance dependence relations. Results indicated that substance dependence-Axis II comorbidity is characterized by general (pervasive) pathology and by Cluster B PD pathology over and above the relationship to the general PD factor. Further, these relations between PD factors and substance dependence diagnoses appeared to largely account for the comorbidity among substance dependence diagnoses in the younger but not older participants. Our findings suggest that a failure to consider the general PD factor, which we interpret as reflecting interpersonal dysfunction, can lead to potential mischaracterizations of the nature of certain PD and SUD comorbidities. PMID:21604829

  7. Identifying comorbid depression and disruptive behavior disorders: Comparison of two approaches used in adolescent studies

    PubMed Central

    Stoep, Ann Vander; Adrian, Molly C.; Rhew, Isaac C.; McCauley, Elizabeth; Herting, Jerald R.; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in commonly co-occurring depression and disruptive behavior disorders in children has yielded a small body of research that estimates the prevalence of this comorbid condition and compares children with the comorbid condition and children with depression or disruptive behavior disorders alone with respect to antecedents and outcomes. Prior studies have used one of two different approaches to measure comorbid disorders: 1) meeting criteria for two DSM or ICD diagnoses or 2) scoring .5 SD above the mean or higher on two dimensional scales. This study compares two snapshots of comorbidity taken simultaneously in the same sample with each of the measurement approaches. The Developmental Pathways Project administered structured diagnostic interviews as well as dimensional scales to a community-based sample of 521 11-12 year olds to assess depression and disruptive behavior disorders. Clinical caseness indicators of children identified as “comorbid” by each method were examined concurrently and 3-years later. Cross-classification of adolescents via the two approaches revealed low agreement. When other indicators of caseness, including functional impairment, need for services, and clinical elevations on other symptom scales were examined, adolescents identified as comorbid via dimensional scales only were similar to those who were identified as comorbid via DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Findings suggest that when relying solely on DSM diagnostic criteria for comorbid depression and disruptive behavior disorders, many adolescents with significant impairment will be overlooked. Findings also suggest that lower dimensional scale thresholds can be set when comorbid conditions, rather than single forms of psychopathology, are being identified. PMID:22575333

  8. [Possible side effects of drugs in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, F T; Baturin, V A

    2016-01-01

    the papers gives data on the positive effects and adverse reactions of drugs used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its comorbidity, first of all cardiovascular disease. The authors present alternative points of views based on both the data available in the literature and their findings. they propose to modify pharmacotherapy for COPD in the presence of comorbidity in patients of old age groups.

  9. Prazosin for Treatment of Patients with PTSD and Comorbid Alcohol Dependence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    08-2-0075 TITLE: Prazosin for Treatment of Patients With PTSD and Comorbid Alcohol Dependence PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ismene...page. Subject terms on next page. 6 Prazosin for Treatment of Patients With PTSD and Comorbid Alcohol Dependence Ismene Petrakis Yale University New...PTSD. There is evidence of common neurobiological mechanisms that underlie both AD and PTSD. Prazosin is an alpha-! adrenergic •ceptor antagonist

  10. Simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following a simple fall in an elderly patient without predilecting comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    van der Zeeuw, Frederique T.; Weeda, Víola B.; Vrouenraets, Bart C.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral hip fractures are rare, mostly being caused by violent forces or in patients with bone metabolism disorders. We present the case of an elderly patient who sustained simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following a simple fall without having any known predilecting comorbidities other than advanced age. Only four cases have been described of elderly patients without comorbidity with simultaneous bilateral hip fractures following low-energy traumas. This rareness potentially leads to misses of this diagnosis. PMID:27161143

  11. Clinical significance of psychiatric comorbidity in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder: subtyping a complex disorder.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A E; Morer, A; Moreno, E; Plana, M T; Cordovilla, C; Lázaro, L

    2016-04-01

    A promising approach in relation to reducing phenotypic heterogeneity involves the identification of homogeneous subtypes of OCD based on age of onset, gender, clinical course and comorbidity. This study aims to assess the sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features of OCD patients in relation to gender and the presence or absence of another comorbid disorder. The sample comprised 112 children and adolescents of both sexes and aged 8-18 years, all of whom had a diagnosis of OCD. Overall, 67 % of OCD patients had one comorbid diagnosis, 20.5 % had two such diagnoses and 2.6 % had three comorbid diagnoses. The group of OCD patients with a comorbid neurodevelopmental disorder had significantly more family history of OCD in parents (p = .049), as compared with the no comorbidity group and the group with a comorbid internalizing disorder, and they also showed a greater predominance of males (p = .013) than did the group with a comorbid internalizing disorder. The group of OCD patients with internalizing comorbidity had a later age of onset of OCD (p = .001) compared with both the other groups. Although the initial severity was similar in all three groups, the need for pharmacological treatment and for hospitalization due to OCD symptomatology was greater in the groups with a comorbid neurodevelopmental disorder (p = .038 and p = .009, respectively) and a comorbid internalizing disorder (p = .008 and p = .004, respectively) than in the group without comorbidity. Our findings suggest that two subtypes of OCD can be defined on the basis of the comorbid pathology presented. The identification of different subtypes according to comorbidity is potentially useful in terms of understanding clinical variations, as well as in relation to treatment management and the use of therapeutic resources.

  12. Needs for Research in Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milstead, Jessica L.

    1994-01-01

    Uncovers issues in indexing that need scientific research, including the cognitive processes of indexers and users; vocabulary control; how best to supplement human indexers' intellectual effort with computer capabilities; structure and layout of indexes on the printed page and on the computer screen; and evaluation of indexes. (Contains 21…

  13. Do young people with comorbid mental and alcohol disorders experience worse behavioural problems?

    PubMed

    Salom, Caroline L; Betts, Kim S; Williams, Gail M; Najman, Jackob M; Scott, James G; Alati, Rosa

    2014-10-30

    This article examines whether young individuals in the general population with comorbid alcohol use and mental health disorders experience worse internalizing and externalizing behaviour problems than those with single disorders. A large cohort of women at the Mater Misericordiae Hospital in Brisbane, Australia, was enroled during pregnancy in a longitudinal study. Mother/offspring dyads were followed over 21 years. At age 21, offspring behaviour problems were examined using the Young Adult Self Report, alcohol and mental health disorders with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Associations between comorbidity and behaviour problems were assessed using multinomial logistic regression, accounting for life-course factors. Twelve per cent of young adults had alcohol/mental health DSM-IV disorders with significant temporal overlap. A further 16% had alcohol disorders only and 23% mental health disorders only. The comorbid group scored significantly higher on total and externalizing behaviour problems but not internalizing behaviour problems. Stronger associations of aggression/delinquency with comorbidity were not fully accounted for by factors known to influence separate development of mental health and alcohol disorders. Young adults with comorbid alcohol/mental health disorders experience more, and more severe, behavioural problems than those with single disorder types, indicating an increased burden from comorbidity, with implications for treatment and public order.

  14. Neurobiology of comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol-use disorder.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, N W; Weiner, J L

    2017-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol-use disorder (AUD) are highly comorbid in humans. Although we have some understanding of the structural and functional brain changes that define each of these disorders, and how those changes contribute to the behavioral symptoms that define them, little is known about the neurobiology of comorbid PTSD and AUD, which may be due in part to a scarcity of adequate animal models for examining this research question. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state-of-the-science on comorbid PTSD and AUD. We summarize epidemiological data documenting the prevalence of this comorbidity, review what is known about the potential neurobiological basis for the frequent co-occurrence of PTSD and AUD and discuss successes and failures of past and current treatment strategies. We also review animal models that aim to examine comorbid PTSD and AUD, highlighting where the models parallel the human condition, and we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each model. We conclude by discussing key gaps in our knowledge and strategies for addressing them: in particular, we (1) highlight the need for better animal models of the comorbid condition and better clinical trial design, (2) emphasize the need for examination of subpopulation effects and individual differences and (3) urge cross-talk between basic and clinical researchers that is reflected in collaborative work with forward and reverse translational impact.

  15. Association between co-morbidities and labour force participation amongst persons with back problems.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Deborah J; Callander, Emily J; Shrestha, Rupendra N; Passey, Megan E; Percival, Richard; Kelly, Simon J

    2012-10-01

    There are few studies that have looked at the occurrence of co-morbid conditions amongst patients with back problems. This study assesses the association between of a range of co-morbidities and the labour force participation rates of 45- to 64-year-old Australians with back problems. Logistic regression models were applied to the 2003 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC) data to look at the relationship between chronic back problems, labour force participation and comorbidities. For some conditions, there is a significant increase in the chance of an individual being out of the labour force, relative to those with back problems alone. For example, an individual with back problems and heart disease is more than 10 times more likely to be out of the labour force than those with back problems alone (OR=10.90, 95% CI=2.91-40.79, P=.0004). Amongst conditions that have a significant impact on labour force participation rates, back problems and multiple co-morbidities are significantly more likely to cause persons with these conditions to be out of the labour force than those with back problems alone or those with no chronic health condition. It is important to consider which co-morbidities an individual has when assessing the impact of back problems on labour force participation, as co-morbid conditions vary in their association with labour force participation.

  16. Risk of interactions between complementary and alternative medicine and medication for comorbidities in patients with melanoma.

    PubMed

    Loquai, Carmen; Dechent, Dagmar; Garzarolli, Marlene; Kaatz, Martin; Kaehler, Katharina C; Kurschat, Peter; Meiss, Frank; Stein, Annette; Nashan, Dorothee; Micke, Oliver; Muecke, Ralph; Muenstedt, Karsten; Stoll, Christoph; Schmidtmann, Irene; Huebner, Jutta

    2016-05-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used widely among cancer patients. Beside the risk of interaction with cancer therapies, interactions with treatment for comorbidities are an underestimated problem. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of interactions between CAM and drugs for comorbidities from a large CAM usage survey on melanoma patients and to classify herb-drug interactions with regard to their potential to harm. Consecutive melanoma outpatients of seven skin cancer centers were asked to complete a standardized CAM questionnaire including questions to their CAM use and their taken medication for comorbidities and cancer. Each combination of conventional drugs and complementary substances was evaluated for their potential of interaction. 1089 questionnaires were eligible for evaluation. From these, 61.6% of patients reported taking drugs regularly from which 34.4% used biological-based CAM methods. Risk evaluation for interaction was possible for 180 CAM users who listed the names or substances they took for comorbidities. From those patients, we found 37.2% at risk of interaction of their co-consumption of conventional and complementary drugs. Almost all patients using Chinese herbs were at risk (88.6%). With a high rate of CAM usage at risk of interactions between CAM drugs and drugs taken for comorbidities, implementation of a regular assessment of CAM usage and drugs for comorbidities is mandatory in cancer care.

  17. PTSD, comorbid depression, and the cortisol waking response in victims of intimate partner violence: preliminary evidence.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Keri L M; Johnson, Dawn M; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2014-05-01

    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) are two highly comorbid and debilitating disorders experienced by more than half of intimate partner violence victims (IPV). Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) abnormalities are common in both disorders, though the direction of abnormalities often differs. The present study examined the relationship between comorbid PTSD and MDD, and the (salivary) cortisol waking response in 104 recently abused IPV victims. Waking cortisol levels, area under the waking curve with respect to ground (AUCg), and AUC with respect to increase (AUCi) were examined to determine the relation of HPA dynamics to comorbidity for basal versus more dynamic measures. Prior to accounting for comorbidity, women with PTSD or MDD showed significantly greater AUCi than women without the respective disorder. Accounting for comorbidity, PTSD only did not differ from other groups, while MDD only and PTSD + MDD showed greater AUCi than women with neither disorder. Results were nonsignificant for waking cortisol levels or AUCg. Results suggest that MDD drives elevated waking cortisol response, but not basal cortisol activity in recently abused IPV victims. Results demonstrate the importance of examining comorbid diagnoses and HPA activity from a dynamic perspective. Therapeutic implications are discussed.

  18. Comorbid depressive disorders in anxiety-disordered youth: demographic, clinical, and family characteristics.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Kelly A; Podell, Jennifer L; Benjamin, Courtney L; Kendall, Philip C

    2010-06-01

    Research indicates that depression and anxiety are highly comorbid in youth. Little is known, however, about the clinical and family characteristics of youth with principal anxiety disorders and comorbid depressive diagnoses. The present study examined the demographic, clinical, and family characteristics of 200 anxiety-disordered children and adolescents (aged 7-17) with and without comorbid depressive disorders (major depressive disorder or dysthymic disorder), seeking treatment at a university-based anxiety clinic. All participants met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for a principal anxiety disorder (generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, or social phobia). Of these, twelve percent (n = 24) also met criteria for a comorbid depressive disorder. Results suggest that anxiety-disordered youth with comorbid depressive disorders (AD-DD) were older at intake, had more severe anxious and depressive symptomatology, and were more impaired than anxiety-disordered youth without comorbid depressive disorders (AD-NDD). AD-DD youth also reported significantly more family dysfunction than AD-NDD youth. Future research should examine how this diagnostic and family profile may impact treatment for AD-DD youth.

  19. Axis II comorbidity in borderline personality disorder is influenced by sex, age, and clinical severity.

    PubMed

    Barrachina, Judith; Pascual, Juan C; Ferrer, Marc; Soler, Joaquim; Rufat, M Jesús; Andión, Oscar; Tiana, Thais; Martín-Blanco, Ana; Casas, Miquel; Pérez, Víctor

    2011-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe psychiatric disorder that has a high clinical heterogeneity and frequent co-occurrence with other personality disorders (PDs). Although several studies have been performed to assess axis II comorbidity in BPD, more research is needed to clarify associated factors. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of co-occurrent axis II disorders in a large sample of patients with BPD and to investigate the influence of sex, age, and severity on this comorbidity. Data were collected from 484 patients with BPD through 2 semistructured interviews. We analyzed the frequency of axis II comorbidity and assessed differences regarding sex, age, and severity of BPD. About 74% of patients with BPD had at least 1 co-occurrent axis II disorder. The most common were paranoid, passive-aggressive, avoidant, and dependent PDs. Significant sex differences were found. Women presented more comorbidity with dependent PD, whereas men showed higher rates of comorbidity with antisocial PD. We also observed a significant positive correlation between age and the number of co-occurrent axis II disorders in women with BPD. Another finding was the positive correlation between BPD severity and the number of co-occurrent axis II disorders. These findings suggest that comorbidity with other axis II disorders and sex, age, and severity should be taken into account when developing treatment strategies and determining the prognosis of BPD.

  20. The indirect economic impacts of co-morbidities on people with depression.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Deborah J; Callander, Emily J; Shrestha, Rupendra N; Passey, Megan E; Percival, Richard; Kelly, Simon J

    2013-06-01

    It is known that people with depression often have other co-morbid conditions; however this is rarely acknowledged in studies that access the economic impacts of depression. This paper aims to quantify the association between co-morbid health conditions and labour force status and economic circumstances of people with depression. This study undertakes cross-sectional analysis using a dataset that is representative of the 45-64 year old Australian population with depression. The probability of being out of the labour force increases with increasing number of co-morbidities, and the amount of weekly income received by people with depression decreased with increasing numbers of co-morbidities. Those with depression and three or more co-morbidities were 4.31 times more likely to be out of the labour force (95% CI: 1.74-10.68), and received a weekly private income 88% lower (95% CI: -94%, -75%) than people with depression alone. It is important to consider the co-morbid conditions an individual has when assessing the impact of depression on labour force participation and economic circumstances.

  1. ADHD severity as it relates to comorbid psychiatric symptomatology in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

    PubMed

    Mansour, Rosleen; Dovi, Allison T; Lane, David M; Loveland, Katherine A; Pearson, Deborah A

    2017-01-01

    Comorbid diagnoses identified in pediatric samples have been correlated with a range of outcomes, including greater levels of emotional, behavioral, and educational impairment and the need for more intensive treatment. Given that previous research has documented high levels of comorbid Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), this study closely examines the relationship between parent-reported ADHD symptoms (i.e., Conners' Parent Rating Scale, Revised [CPRS-R]) and the prevalence of additional comorbid psychiatric diagnoses in a pediatric ASD sample (n=99). Regression analyses revealed that greater severity of ADHD symptomatology was significantly related to a greater number of comorbid psychiatric diagnoses, as identified using the Diagnostic Interview for Children and adolescents, 4th Edition (DICA-IV). Additionally, more severe ADHD symptoms were also associated with higher levels of symptom severity on Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) syndrome subscales. Interestingly, increasing severity of ASD symptomatology, as measured by the Autism Diagnostic Interview, Revised (ADI-R), was not associated with a higher prevalence of comorbid psychiatric diagnoses or CBCL syndrome severity. Our study concluded that higher levels of ADHD severity-not ASD severity-were associated with a higher prevalence of comorbid psychiatric symptomatology in school-age children with ASD. These findings may encourage clinicians to thoroughly assess ADHD symptomatology in ASD children to better inform treatment planning.

  2. Quarantine document system indexing procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Quarantine Document System (QDS) is described including the indexing procedures and thesaurus of indexing terms. The QDS consists of these functional elements: acquisition, cataloging, indexing, storage, and retrieval. A complete listing of the collection, and the thesaurus are included.

  3. Beyond the Kubler index

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Velde, B.

    1989-01-01

    The value of peak width at half-height for the illite 001 XRD reflection is known as the Kubler index or the illite "crystallinity' index. This measurement, which has been related to the degree of metamorphism of very low-grade, pelitic rocks, is a function of at least two crystal-chemical factors: 1) illite X-ray scattering domain size; and 2) illite structural distortions (especially swelling). Reynolds' NEWMOD computer program is used to construct a grid with which these two contributions to illite peak width can be determined independently from measurements of the 001 peak width at half-height and the Srodon intensity ratio. This method yields more information about changes undergone by illite during metamorphism than application of the Kubler index method alone. -Authors

  4. Indexes of severity: conceptual development.

    PubMed Central

    Krischer, J P

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of severity index development is presented in relation to conceptual issues in index definition, analytic issues in index formulation and validation issues in index application. The CHOP index is discussed along with six severity indexes described in an earlier paper dealing with underlying concepts to illustrate the material presented. Replies are provided to specific questions raised in an accompanying paper discussing the Injury Severity Score. This conceptual material is presented to provide a foundation for severity index development, to suggest criteria to be used in their formulation and testing, and to identify analyses that can lead to the successful selection and application of an index for a defined purpose. PMID:468553

  5. Comorbidity, knowledge and attitude towards sex among patients with Dhat syndrome: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sandeep; Gupta, Sunil; Mehra, Aseem; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the knowledge about sex, attitude towards sex, prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity and relationship of the comorbidity with onset of symptoms of Dhat syndrome. Treatment records of 264 patients diagnosed with Dhat syndrome were reviewed for clinical profile including psychiatric comorbidity and sexual dysfunction and information on sexual knowledge and attitude using Sex Knowledge and Attitude Questionnaire (SKAQ-II). None of the patients gave all the correct responses on the SKAQ-II. Poor knowledge about sexual matters was not limited to the semen formation only, but also involved other aspects of sexuality, like masturbation, relationship of pregnancy with orgasm in women, breast feeding and pregnancy, relationship of sexual desire with addictive drugs and sexually transmitted diseases can be cured by having sex with a virgin girl. Higher level of education showed significant association with better sexual knowledge and liberal attitude. There was significant positive correlation between sexual knowledge and attitude. About half (51.9%) of patients had at least one comorbid psychiatric disorder and/or sexual dysfunction. Among the psychiatric disorders, depressive disorders were the most common and premature ejaculation was the most common comorbid sexual dysfunction. Among those with comorbidity, symptoms of Dhat syndrome preceded the onset of other disorders. Patients with Dhat syndrome have high rates of comorbidity and poor sexual knowledge and less liberal attitude, which was not only limited to loss of semen but also involves other spheres of sexuality. Accordingly psychoeducation in patients of Dhat syndrome should not be limited to addressing the myths and lack of knowledge about semen formation, but also should address poor sexual knowledge on all the aspects related to sexuality and the negative attitude towards sex.

  6. The prevalence of comorbidities among people living with HIV in Brent: a diverse London Borough

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Ava; Lorigan, James; Jowata, Mohamade; Brook, Gary; Banarsee, Ricky

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV has changed from a rapidly deteriorating illness to a complex chronic disease, with increasing incidences of comorbidity, including cancer, and liver, lung and cardiovascular diseases. North West London has 6719 individuals living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 873 of whom reside in the London Borough of Brent. Traditionally, commissioning services have focused on HIV therapy alone without considering how comorbidity affects treatment outcome and total service costs. Setting The setting for the study was NHS Brent Primary Care Trust, London UK. Question What associated comorbidities are present in people in Brent (London, UK) living with HIV, and how common are they? Methods A point-prevalence audit of retrospective data was conducted on all HIV-positive patients in Brent (financial year 2011/12). Data were collected from genito-urinary medicine (GUM) services, community services and general practitioners (GPs) on HIV diagnosis, patient demographics and past/current comorbidities: hepatitis B and C, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and mental health disorders. Results This study identified that 29% of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Brent have at least one comorbidity. The most common was hepatitis, followed by mental health disorders and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Comorbidity was more likely in older male patients (in particular CVD and diabetes) and White patients (except for diabetes which was more common in Asian groups). Discussion/Conclusion Many PLWHA in Brent suffer from a number of other conditions, which appear largely independent of HIV. Findings confirm the need to treat HIV as a long-term condition, including patient education, empowerment and encouraging self-management. The multi-morbidity of many PLWHA suggests a role for both primary care and collaborative, holistic, patient-centred and individualised healthcare. Service providers and commissioners need to consider comorbidities in their treatment of and

  7. Comorbid autoimmune diseases in patients with sarcoidosis: A nationwide case-control study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Hung; Chung, Pei-I; Wu, Chen-Yi; Chen, Yen-Ta; Chiu, Yun-Wen; Chang, Yun-Ting; Liu, Han-Nan

    2017-04-01

    The association between sarcoidosis and autoimmune comorbidities has been reported, however, it has seldom been confirmed by a large nationwide study. Our study aimed to clarify the association between sarcoidosis and autoimmune comorbidities in the Taiwanese. A total of 1237 patients with sarcoidosis and 4948 age- and sex-matched control subjects were selected from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan from 1997 to 2010. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to calculate the odds of comorbidities between the two groups. The prevalence of sarcoidosis was 2.17/100 000 individuals in Taiwan. Sarcoidosis patients tended to run a higher risk of autoimmune comorbidities than the control group (17.6% vs 9.4%, P < 0.05). Autoimmune thyroid disease (adjusted odd ratio [aOR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.64), Sjögren's syndrome (aOR, 11.6; 95% CI, 4.36-31.0) and ankylosing spondylitis (aOR, 3.80; 95% CI, 2.42-5.97) were significantly associated with sarcoidosis. The sex-stratified analyses were carried out to demonstrate a significant association of sarcoidosis with ankylosing spondylitis in both sexes, but with autoimmune thyroid disease in male patients and with Sjögren's syndrome female patients, respectively. Besides, the diagnosis of the autoimmune comorbidities strongly associated with sarcoidosis tended to be established after that of sarcoidosis. This study demonstrated that patients with sarcoidosis tended to have autoimmune thyroid disease, Sjögren's syndrome and ankylosing spondylitis, and the diagnosis of sarcoidosis usually preceded that of associated comorbidities. Clinicians should be alert to autoimmune comorbidities in patients with sarcoidosis.

  8. <