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Sample records for charnley total hip

  1. [Sir John Charnley and total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Burgers, Paul T P W; van Gijn, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Sir John Charnley (1911-1982), pioneer of the total hip prosthesis, saved countless elderly people from immobility. During the Second World War he assisted Dudley Buxton, orthopaedic surgeon to the British armed forces in the Middle East, in developing new instruments and splints. After the war he first studied healing of bone fractures and the role of compression, and then completely dedicated himself to arthroplasty of the hip. Through countless experiments he found the optimal diameter for the head of the stainless steel prosthesis as well as the optimal polymer for the socket; he also advocated tight cementing of the shaft into the femur. Sir John Charnley received the Lasker Award in 1974 and was knighted in 1977.

  2. Outcomes of Charnley total hip arthroplasty using improved cementing with so-called second- and third-generation techniques.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Shiro; Otsuka, Hiromi; Morishima, Takkan; Sato, Keiji

    2012-03-01

    Techniques of cemented total hip arthroplasty have developed over time. We present the outcomes of Charnley total hip arthroplasty performed using improved second- and third-generation cementing techniques. We reviewed the radiologic results of 91 Charnley total hip arthroplasties performed using second- and third-generation cementing techniques. Second-generation techniques involved making multiple anchor holes, a double-cementing method on the acetabular side and an intramedullary plug, and retrograde filling with a cement gun on the femoral side in 57 hips. Third-generation techniques involved additional vacuum mixing and cement pressurization in 34 hips. Joint survival rates at 20 years when using second-generation techniques were 89% for the socket and 94% for the stem with aseptic loosening as the end point; the survival rates at 10 years when using third-generation techniques were 97 and 100%, respectively. According to our radiographic evaluation system for the clear zone at 5 years, there was less clear zone in the acetabular side with the third-generation techniques than with second-generation techniques. In the femoral side, there was very little development of the clear zone, but the difference between generations was not significant. Second- and third-generation cementing techniques showed excellent survivorship. The clear zone scores at 5 years indicated that third-generation techniques were effective, especially in the acetabular side, and may produce better long-term results than second-generation techniques.

  3. Results of Charnley total hip arthroplasty at a minimum of thirty years. A concise follow-up of a previous report.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, John J; Templeton, Jesse E; Liu, Steve S; Pedersen, Douglas R; Goetz, Devon D; Sullivan, Patrick M; Johnston, Richard C

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to update the results of a prospective, single-surgeon series of primary Charnley total hip arthroplasties performed with cement. This investigation is one of the first studies in which hips treated with total hip arthroplasty with cement were followed for a minimum of thirty years. Twenty-seven patients (thirty-four [10.3%] of the hips in the initial study group) were alive at a minimum of thirty years postoperatively. These patients served as the focus of the present study. Revision because of aseptic loosening of the acetabular component was performed in 7.3% (twenty-three) of the hips from the original study group (excluding those revised because of infection or dislocation) and 26% (eight) of the hips in the living cohort. Revision because of aseptic loosening of the femoral component was performed in 3.2% (ten) of the hips from the original study group (excluding those revised because of infection or dislocation) and 10% (three) of the hips in the living patients. Since the twenty-five-year review, three hips were revised (one because of acetabular loosening, one because of femoral loosening, and one because of instability). This end-result study demonstrated the remarkable durability of cemented Charnley total hip replacements over a span of three decades, with 88% of the original prostheses intact at the time of the final follow-up or at the patient's death.

  4. The John Charnley Award. Natural history of thromboembolic disease after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, V D; Clement, D; Lush-Ehmann, C; Keller, G S; Evarts, C M

    1996-12-01

    In 1079 consecutive patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty between 1984 and 1992, complications of thromboembolic disease and related anticoagulation were reviewed for 6 months after hospital discharge, including cost data. Of 347 patients having venograms, 78 (22.5%) had positive results and 269 (77.5%) had negative results for deep venous thrombosis. In patients with negative venograms, 3 (1.1%) were readmitted with 2 symptomatic deep venous thromboses and nonfatal pulmonary embolism. There were no readmissions among the 55 patients who had venographically evident deep venous thrombosis diagnosed and treated with outpatient warfarin. Overall, 3 of 324 (0.9%) patients with true positive or negative venograms were readmitted for complications of thromboembolic disease. In contrast, 12 of 732 (1.6%) patients not receiving contrast venography were readmitted, including 9 (1.2%) deep venous thromboses and 3 (0.4%) nonfatal pulmonary embolisms. Four of 23 patients (17.4%) with untreated calf deep venous thrombosis suffered 2 nonfatal pulmonary embolisms resulting in readmission and 2 fatal pulmonary embolisms outside the hospital. Untreated calf deep venous thrombosis after total hip arthroplasty represents a significant threat of extension to more proximal veins and distant embolization. Routine thromboembolic disease prophylaxis combined with screening contrast venography and selective therapeutic anticoagulation is effective in preventing late thromboembolic disease complications and, compared with a strategy of extended prophylaxis for all, is cost effective management by reducing exposure of the elderly population to outpatient anticoagulant therapy.

  5. Survivorship of a Charnley total hip arthroplasty. A concise follow-up, at a minimum of thirty-five years, of previous reports.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, John J; Bracha, Peter; Liu, Steve S; Piyaworakhun, Somyot; Goetz, Devon D; Johnston, Richard C

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to update the results, at a minimum of thirty-five years, in a single-surgeon series of primary Charnley total hip arthroplasties performed with cement. Twelve patients (fifteen hips) were alive, 249 patients (314 hips) had died, and one patient (one hip) had been lost to follow-up. Seven of the hips in the living patients had required at least one revision; 290 (88%) of the original group of total hip prostheses either continued to function or were in patients who had died. Since the time of a thirty-year study of this cohort, one hip that had previously been revised because of acetabular loosening required an additional revision because of acetabular loosening and two additional hips had evidence of radiographic loosening (of one acetabular and one femoral component). The survival rate with revision for any reason as the end point was 78%. This end result study should provide a benchmark for subsequent procedures and designs with the caveat that patient life expectancy will likely continue to increase and modern-design implants are being used in younger patients.

  6. Thirty-five-year results after Charnley total hip arthroplasty in patients less than fifty years old. A concise follow-up of previous reports.

    PubMed

    Warth, Lucian C; Callaghan, John J; Liu, Steve S; Klaassen, Alison L; Goetz, Devon D; Johnston, Richard C

    2014-11-05

    We report the updated results for a previously described cohort of patients who were less than fifty years old at the time of the index Charnley total hip arthroplasty with cement. The original cohort consisted of ninety-three consecutive hips in sixty-nine patients. The patients were followed for a minimum of thirty-five years after surgery or until death. At the latest follow-up evaluation, there were forty-one total hip replacements (44%) in thirty-two living patients. Thirty-four (37%) of the ninety-three total hip replacements in the original cohort had been revised or removed. Twenty acetabular (22%) and seven femoral (8%) components had been revised for aseptic loosening. Since the twenty-five-year follow-up, the average six-minute-walk distance decreased from 395 m to 171 m, and this decrease correlated with increasing comorbidity. This study demonstrates the durability of cemented total hip replacements in a young patient population. Although 63% (fifty-nine) of the ninety-three original hip replacements were functioning at the latest follow-up or at the time of death, a significant decrease in activity level was seen over time (p < 0.001). Of the forty-one original implants in the patients who were alive at the time of the thirty-five-year follow-up, only 46% (nineteen) were retained. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  7. Tribological measurements on a Charnley-type artificial hip joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A total hip simulator was used to determine the friction and wear properties of Charnley-type (316L stainless steel balls and sterile ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene cups) hip prostheses. Three different sets of specimens were tested to 395,000, 101,500 and 233,000 walking cycles, respectively. All tests were run unlubricated, at ambient conditions (22 to 26 C, 30 to 50 percent relative humidity), at 30 walking cycles per minute, under a dynamic load simulating walking. Polyethylene cup wear rates ranged from 1.4 to 39 ten billions cu m which corresponds to dimensional losses of 4.0 to 11 microns per year. Although these wear rates are lower than those obtained from other hip simulators and from in vivo X-ray measurements, they are comparable when taking run-in and plastic deformation into account. Maximum tangential friction forces ranged from 93 to 129 N under variable load (267 to 3090 N range) and from 93 to 143 N under a static load of 3090 N. A portion of one test 250,000 walking cycles) run under dry air ( 1 percent relative humidity) yielded a wear rate almost 6 times greater than that obtained under wet air ( 70 percent relative humidity) conditions.

  8. The John Charnley Award: Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing versus large-diameter head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Garbuz, Donald S; Tanzer, Michael; Greidanus, Nelson V; Masri, Bassam A; Duncan, Clive P

    2010-02-01

    Resurfacing arthroplasty has become an attractive option for young patients who want to maintain a high activity level. One recent study reported modestly increased activity levels for patients with resurfacing compared to standard total hip arthroplasty (THA). We conducted a prospective randomized clinical trial to compare clinical outcomes of resurfacing versus large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty. We randomized 107 patients deemed eligible for resurfacing arthroplasty to have either resurfacing or standard THA. Patients were assessed for quality-of-life outcomes using the PAT-5D index, WOMAC, SF-36, and UCLA activity score. The minimum followup was 0.8 years (mean, 1.1 years; range, 0.8-2.2 years). Of the 73 patients followed at least one year, both groups reported improvement in quality of life on all outcome measures. There was no difference in quality of life between the two arms in the study. Serum levels of cobalt and chromium were measured in a subset of 30 patients. In both groups cobalt and chromium was elevated compared to baseline. Patients receiving a large-head metal-on-metal total hip had elevated ion levels compared to the resurfacing arm of the study. At 1 year, the median serum cobalt increased 46-fold from baseline in patients in the large-head total hip group, while the median serum chromium increased 10-fold. At 1 year, serum cobalt was 10-fold higher and serum chromium 2.6-fold higher than in the resurfacing arm. Due to these excessively high metal ion levels, the authors recommend against further use of this particular large-head total hip arthroplasty. Level I, randomized clinical trial. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  9. Living history in current orthopaedic hip surgery: intrapelvic teflon granuloma after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiu, Daniel; Peter, Viju; Lynch, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The teflon hip arthroplasty design was used by Sir John Charnley in the early 60's but was taken off the market due to high complication rates. A case is reported of an intrapelvic granuloma after total hip arthroplasty following the use of a teflon socket. This appears to be the last surviving patient treated by Sir John Charnley using a Teflon hip socket design.

  10. Bone sparing surgical options for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Audrey; Pesut, Tracy; Peacock, Charity; Tucci, Michelle; Buckhalter, Ruth Ann

    2003-01-01

    Between 4/5/99 and 5/20/2002, our university performed 31 total hip arthroplasties in 27 young patients utilizing a conservative hip prosthesis developed at the Mayo Clinic. Eleven patients underwent Bipolar replacement, while the remaining twenty required an acetabular component. The patients ranged in age from 25 to 50 (mean of 39.9). The mean follow up was 12.4 months (range 4.5-27). Twenty-eight hips were treated for AVN secondary to RA, HIV, ETOH abuse, and SLE; while two underwent THA for OA secondary to trauma, and one for JRA. Three patients were lost to follow up at less than 6 months and were excluded from the study. The patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months utilizing the Harris hip score, the Charnley hip score, and radiographic evaluation including subsidence, radiolucency, and calcar resorption. Four patients (13%) had subsidence ranging from 1 to 3 mm at the most recent visit. One patients (3.2%) had radiographic evidence of radiolucency measuring 2 mm. Nine patients (29%) developed 1-3 mm of calcar resorption. No hips required revision. Thirty patients had improvement in their Harris hip score and Charnley hip score. The one patient who decreased his score had developed AVN secondary to ETOH abuse. Three hips had an intra-operative complication of lateral cortex penetration and required circlage wiring. Comparisons were made utilizing Multiple Logistic Regression to determine if preoperative BMI, Dorr score, and gender had an impact on the postoperative hip scores or degree of osteolysis, subsidence, and calcar resorption. Although the Harris hip score and Charnley hip scores significantly improved postoperatively, the preoperative BMI, Dorr score, and gender did not correlate with patient outcome. Our patients improved clinically in pain level, function and ROM. Further follow up will reveal if this component truly preserves bone stock for ease of future revision.

  11. Total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Siopack, J S; Jergesen, H E

    1995-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty, or surgical replacement of the hip joint with an artificial prosthesis, is a reconstructive procedure that has improved the management of those diseases of the hip joint that have responded poorly to conventional medical therapy. In this review we briefly summarize the evolution of total hip arthroplasty, the design and development of prosthetic hip components, and the current clinical indications for this procedure. The possible complications of total hip arthroplasty, its clinical performance over time, and future directions in hip replacement surgery are also discussed. Images PMID:7725707

  12. The John Charnley Award: Redefining the Natural History of Osteoarthritis in Patients With Hip Dysplasia and Impingement.

    PubMed

    Wyles, Cody C; Heidenreich, Mark J; Jeng, Jack; Larson, Dirk R; Trousdale, Robert T; Sierra, Rafael J

    2017-02-01

    Structural hip deformities including developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) are thought to predispose patients to degenerative joint changes. However, the natural history of these malformations is not clearly delineated. (1) Among patients undergoing unilateral THA who have a contralateral hip without any radiographic evidence of hip disease, what is the natural history and progression of osteoarthritis in the native hip based on morphological characteristics? (2) Among patients undergoing unilateral THA who have a contralateral hip without any radiographic evidence of hip disease, what are the radiographic parameters that predict differential rates of degenerative change? We identified every patient 55 years of age or younger at our institution who received unilateral primary THA from 1980 to 1989 (n = 722 patients). Preoperative radiographs were reviewed on the contralateral hip and only hips with Tönnis Grade 0 degenerative change that had minimum 10-year radiographic followup were included. A total of 172 patients met all eligibility criteria with the following structural diagnoses: 48 DDH, 74 FAI, and 40 normal morphology, and an additional 6% (10 of the 172 patients) met all eligibility criteria but were lost to followup before the 10-year minimum. Mean age at the time of study inclusion was 47 years (range, 18-55 years), and 56% (91 of 162) of the patients in this study were female. Mean followup was 20 years (range, 10-35 years). Radiographic metrics, in conjunction with the review of two experienced arthroplasty surgeons, determined the structural hip diagnosis as DDH, FAI, or normal morphology. Every available followup AP radiograph was reviewed to determine progression from Tönnis Grade 0 to 3 until the time of last followup or operative intervention with THA. Survivorship was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier methodology, hazard ratios, and multistate modeling. Thirty-five patients eventually underwent THA: 16 (33%) DDH

  13. Biodynamic total hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pipino, F; Calderale, P M

    1987-09-01

    The biodynamic total hip prosthesis which was devised in 1977-78 and implanted in 1979 was derived from a series of experimental studies and a lengthy clinical experience, both dating back to 1968. This prosthesis introduced two new and original concepts into the field of prosthetic hip surgery: 1) the biequatorial design of the cup; 2) the preservation of the femoral neck. This prosthetic system is based on maximum preservation of the bone stock as well as hip function. The biequatorial cup allows for positioning corresponding to that of the normal acetabulum. The femoral component incorporates features (collar, sagittal and frontal angulation, external surface, etc.) which facilitate proximal cortical fixation and cancellous metaphyseal biological anchoring, thus ensuring total adhesion. The average 3.5 years follow-up (maximum 7 years, minimum one year) in 280 cases confirms the effectiveness of this prosthesis and the validity of the basic principles on which it is founded.

  14. Total hip arthroplasty in the ankylosed hip.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Megan A; Huo, Michael H

    2011-12-01

    Altered biomechanics secondary to hip ankylosis often result in degeneration of the lumbar spine, ipsilateral knee, and contralateral hip and knee. Symptoms in these joints may be reduced with conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA) of the ankylosed hip. THA in the ankylosed hip is a technically challenging procedure, and the overall clinical outcome is generally less satisfactory than routine THA performed for osteoarthritis and other etiologies. Functional integrity of the hip abductor muscles is the most important predictor of walking ability following conversion THA. Many patients experience persistent limp, and it can take up to 2 years to fully assess final functional outcome. Risk factors cited for increased risk of failed THA include prior surgical ankylosis and age <50 years at the time of conversion THA.

  15. INNOPLANT Total Hip Replacement System.

    PubMed

    Harper, Tisha A M

    2017-07-01

    Total hip replacement is a salvage procedure that is done to alleviate discomfort secondary to osteoarthritis in the hip, which is most often a result of hip dysplasia. Commercially available total hip replacement implants for small animal patients are classified as cemented or cementless. The INNOPLANT Total Hip Replacement system includes modular, screw-in cementless components that were developed to improve implant stability by maintaining as much normal anatomic structure, and by extension biomechanics of the coxofemoral joint, as possible. As a newer system, there are few data and no long-term studies available in the veterinary literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rehabilitation following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Garden, F H

    1994-01-01

    Rehabilitation professionals play an important role in the comprehensive postoperative management of the patient who has undergone a total hip replacement. Understanding the general surgical considerations that eventually impact the rehabilitation process is essential. Coordination of physicians, physical and occupational therapists, social services, and family members results in better quality of care. The technology and design of hip prostheses and fixation methods impact the functional outcome of total hip arthroplasty. Professionals involved in total hip arthroplasty rehabilitation should also understand the potential complications following total hip arthroplasty that oftentimes cause delays or revisions in the rehabilitation program. When these are combined with appropriate preoperative patient selection and education, as well as postoperative physical and occupational therapy programs, most patients are able to achieve a satisfactory functional outcome, including independence in basic activities of daily living and independent ambulation with an assistive device.

  17. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Monzón, Daniel Godoy; Iserson, Kenneth V.; Jauregui, José; Musso, Carlos; Piccaluga, Francisco; Buttaro, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to determine the dislocation and reoperation rate, functional outcomes, and the survival rate of the unique subset of very old but lucid and independent patients with hip fractures following a total hip arthroplasty (THA) and geriatric team-coordinated perioperative care. Method: Between 2000 and 2006, previously independent ambulatory patients ≥80 years old presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture were given THAs under the care of an integrated orthopedic surgery–geriatric service. Their fracture-related complications, ambulation, mental status, and survival were followed for 5 to 11 years postinjury. Results: Five years postinjury, 57 (61.3%) patients of the original study group were living. In all, 3 (3.2%) patients had postoperative hip dislocations (and 2 patients had dislocation twice) and 2 reoperations were needed within the first postoperative month. There were no hip dislocations or reoperations after the first year. Radiographs obtained on 88% of the surviving patients at 5 years postoperatively showed that all remained unchanged from their immediate postoperative images. Nearly half of the patients were still able to ambulate as they did preoperatively and their mixed-model equation was statistically unchanged. Conclusion: This study of patients >80 years old with previously good functional status demonstrates that with appropriate surgical (best prosthesis, good operating technique, and regional anesthesia) and geriatric (pre- and postoperative assessments, close follow-up, medication adjustments, and fall-prevention instruction) care, they have few hip dislocations and reoperations, survive postfracture at least as long as their noninjured contemporaries, and continue to function and ambulate as they did prior to their injury. PMID:24660092

  18. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  19. The John Charnley Award Paper. The role of joint fluid in the tribology of total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mazzucco, Daniel; Spector, Myron

    2004-12-01

    The effect of joint fluid on the tribology (ie, lubrication, friction, and wear) of total hip arthroplasty has not yet been investigated adequately. In the current study, a friction assay was used to assess four hypotheses relating to the effect of human joint fluid and its principal components on the articulation of metal-on-polyethylene. First, joint fluid was found to produce a widely varying amount of friction between cobalt-chromium and polyethylene; this range exceeded the range produced when the articulation was lubricated by water or bovine serum. Second, it was shown that hyaluronic acid, phospholipid, albumin, and gamma-globulin were not acting as boundary lubricants, but that one or more other proteins (as yet unidentified) were responsible for reducing friction in this couple. Third, lower friction was found when oxidized zirconium alloy replaced cobalt-chromium as a bearing surface on polyethylene. Finally, a pilot study suggested that lubricin, which contributes to cartilage-on-cartilage lubrication, is not a protein responsible for the tribological variabiation found among joint fluid samples. The current study showed that joint fluid is a patient factor that influences the tribology of metal-on-polyethylene arthroplasty.

  20. A Historical and Economic Perspective on Sir John Charnley, Chas F. Thackray Limited, and the Early Arthroplasty Industry

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    In the 1960s, Sir John Charnley pioneered modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) and spent the next two decades refining all aspects of the procedure, working with the commercial firm of Chas F. Thackray Limited, now a subsidiary of DePuy Orthopaedics, a Johnson and Johnson Company. We review here that relationship, in light of the complex relationships today that exist among industry, researchers, surgeons, and the public. PMID:16089068

  1. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty in small-proportioned patients.

    PubMed

    Rahimtoola, Z O; Finger, S; Imrie, S; Goodman, S B

    2000-01-01

    In a prospective, consecutive series, 41 total hip arthroplasties were performed in 27 small-proportioned patients with small femoral dimensions. The 17 female and 10 male patients averaged 23.6 years (range, 14-47 years), and the mean height and weight were 157 cm (range, 132-183 cm) and 53.5 kg (range, 36-84 kg). The most common preoperative diagnosis was juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in 18 patients (28 hips). Most patients were severely disabled in their daily activity, and 68% of the patients were classified as Charnley functional class C. The femoral implants consisted primarily of the proximally porous-coated miniature Anatomic Medullary Locking femoral component (AML/CDH, Depuy, Warsaw, IN) in 33 hips in 22 patients (average stem diameter, 9.5 mm; range, 8-12.0 mm). A porous ingrowth acetabular cup fixed with screws was used in all procedures. At an average follow-up of 51 months, Harris Hip Scores improved significantly from 34 points (range, 0-65 points) preoperatively to 85 points (range, 33-100 points) after arthroplasty. There were no intraoperative complications. There was 1 revision because of femoral implant loosening. Three cementless femoral components showed evidence of nonprogressive subsidence. One patient had significant bilateral acetabular component polyethylene wear and underwent revision. All other femoral and acetabular components were radiographically stable. The relief of pain and improvement of function were dramatic. The miniature AML/CDH femoral component, combined with an uncemented acetabular cup, provides a promising, off-the-shelf alternative in small-proportioned patients.

  2. Arthroscopic treatment of unstable total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Ricardo; Aguinaga, Iñaki; Corcuera, Irene; Ponte, Juan; Usabiaga, Jaime

    2010-06-01

    Hip arthroscopy may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of apparently well-implanted but unstable total hip replacement prostheses. We present 2 cases of arthroscopically assisted capsular tightening in unstable total hip replacements. Both cases had significant capsular laxity. Case 2 had impingement of the lower part of the acetabulum with the lesser trochanter that caused hip dislocation. Early revision surgery can be avoided with the use of this technique in selected cases of unstable total hip replacements.

  3. A modified technique to extract fractured femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Akrawi, Hawar; Magra, Merzesh; Shetty, Ajit; Ng, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The removal of well-fixed broken femoral component and cement mantle can be extremely demanding, time consuming and potentially damaging to the host bone. Different methods have been described to extract broken femoral stem yet this remains one of the most challenging prospect to the revision hip surgeon. PRESENTATION OF CASE The authors present two cases underwent a modified sliding cortical window technique utilising a tungsten carbide drill, Charnley pin retractor and an orthopaedic mallet to aid extraction of a fractured cemented femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty. DISCUSSION The modified technique offers a simple and controlled method in extracting a well fixed fractured cemented femoral stem. It has the advantage of retaining the cement mantle with subsequent good seal of the femoral cortical window secured with cable ready system. Furthermore, tungsten carbide drill bit and Charnley pin retractor are relatively readily available to aid the extraction of the broken stem. Finally, it yields the option of implanting a standard femoral stem and obviates the need for bypassing the cortical window with long revision femoral component. CONCLUSION Fractured femoral stem is a rare yet a complex and very demanding prospect to both patients and hip surgeons. The sliding cortical window technique utilising tungsten carbide drill and Charnley pin retractor is technically easy and most importantly; preserves host bone stock with cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty. We believe this technique can be added to the armamentarium of revision hip surgeon when faced with the challenge of extracting a fractured cemented femoral stem. PMID:24858980

  4. Total hip replacement in dancers.

    PubMed

    Buyls, Inge R A E; Rietveld, A B M Boni; Ourila, Tiia; Emerton, Mark E; Bird, H A

    2013-04-01

    A case report of a professional contemporary dancer who successfully returned to the stage after bilateral total hip replacements (THR) for osteoarthritis is presented, together with her own commentary and a retrospective cohort study of total hip replacements in dancers. In the presented cohort, there were no post-operative dislocations or infections, the original pain had been relieved, rehabilitation was objectively normal and all resumed their dance (teaching) activities. Nevertheless, they were disappointed about the prolonged rehabilitation. Due to their high demands as professional dancers, post-operative expectations were too optimistic in view of the usual quick and favourable results of THR in the older and less physically active, general population. In all dancers with unilateral osteoarthritis, the left hip was involved, which may reflect the tendency to use the left leg as standing leg and be suggestive that strenuous physical activity may lead to osteoarthritis. Better rehabilitation guidelines are needed for dancer patients undergoing THR, especially drawing their attention to realistic post-operative expectations.

  5. Complex primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boisgard, S; Descamps, S; Bouillet, B

    2013-02-01

    Although total hip arthroplasty is now a classic procedure that is well controlled by orthopedic surgeons, some cases remain complex. Difficulties may be due to co-morbidities: obesity, skin problems, muscular problems, a history of neurological disease or associated morphological bone deformities. Obese patients must be informed of their specific risks and a surgical approach must be used that obtains maximum exposure. Healing of incisions is not a particular problem, but adhesions must be assessed. Neurological diseases may require tenotomy and the use of implants that limit instability. Specific techniques or implants are necessary to respect hip biomechanics (offset, neck-shaft angle) in case of a large lever arm or coxa vara. In case of arthrodesis, before THA can be performed, the risk of infection must be specifically evaluated if the etiology is infection, and the strength of the gluteal muscles must be determined. Congenital hip dysplasia presents three problems: the position and coverage of the cup, placement of a specific or custom made femoral stem, with an osteotomy if necessary, and finally lowering the femoral head into the cup by freeing the soft tissues or a shortening osteotomy. Acetabular dysplasia should not be underestimated in the presence of significant bone defect (BD), and reconstruction with a bone graft can be proposed. Sequelae from acetabular fractures presents a problem of associated BD. Internal fixation hardware is rarely an obstacle but the surgical approach should take this into account. Treatment of acetabular protrusio should restore a normal center of rotation, and prevent recurrent progressive protrusion. The use of bone grafts and reinforcement rings are indispensible. Femoral deformities may be congenital or secondary to trauma or osteotomy. They must be evaluated to restore hip biomechanics that are as close to normal as possible. Fixation of implants should restore anteversion, length and the lever arm. Most problems that

  6. Current attitudes to total hip replacement in the younger patient: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Tennent, T D; Goddard, N J

    2000-01-01

    A postal questionnaire was sent to all practicing consultant orthopaedic surgeons in the UK seeking information regarding their usual total hip replacement practice, the age at which they would define a patient as falling into the 'young hip group' and whether this might modify their practice. In particular, in the 'younger' age group, we were interested in the frequency of usage of uncemented implants, the choice of implant and the bearing surfaces. Of 1242 surgeons surveyed, we had a response from 935 who currently undertake total hip arthroplasty. Their responses confirm that approximately 60,645 total hip replacements are performed annually in the UK of which 9,376 are performed in the younger age group (mean age 57.5 years). As with our previous survey, the most popular prosthesis in the 'older' age group overall was the Charnley (51%) followed by the Exeter (15%). These implants also proved to be the most popular in the 'younger' age group (40% Charnley, 18% Exeter), with 75% of surgeons choosing a cemented stem, and 65% also opting to cement the socket. 23% of surgeons used hydroxy-apatite coated implants on both the femoral and acetabular sides of the joint. Stainless steel remained the most popular choice of femoral head bearing surface (42%) followed by chrome-cobalt (33%) and ceramic (25%). On the acetabular side, high density polyethylene predominated--accounting for 95%, with only 3% using chrome cobalt and 2% ceramic. There would appear to be a remarkably conservative attitude among British surgeons, the majority of whom prefer to stick with tried and tested cemented femoral implants when dealing with the younger patient. There are a small number of uncemented acetabulae and the hybrid configuration. Hydroxy-apatite coatings seem to be the most popular choice for the non-cemented prostheses. Ceramic femoral heads are used more frequently than the ceramic acetabular bearing, and equally metal/metal bearings remain infrequently used.

  7. Traumatic breakage of the ceramic head of prosthesis in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Moreschini, O; Braidotti, P

    1991-09-01

    The authors describe breakage of the 32 mm alumina AL2 O3 ceramic head in 3 cases of total hip replacement using two different models of prosthesis (Charnley-Müller and Mittelmeier). All three patients were of average height, weight, and activity (Brown et al., 1985; Callaghan et al., 1988), and the breakage had been caused by an accidental fall. The same mechanism of injury, in people the same age as our subjects, can cause femoral neck fractures. Reoperation was necessary in order to replace the component. The implants all appeared to be positioned correctly, and the patients had reported no symptoms. Before the trauma that caused breakage, there had been no other injuries worth noting. All patients were satisfied with their hip replacements.

  8. Total hip replacement in young adults with hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Dysplasia of the hip increases the risk of secondary degenerative change and subsequent total hip replacement. Here we report on age at diagnosis of dysplasia, previous treatment, and quality of life for patients born after 1967 and registered with a total hip replacement due to dysplasia in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. We also used the medical records to validate the diagnosis reported by the orthopedic surgeon to the register. Methods Subjects born after January 1, 1967 and registered with a primary total hip replacement in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register during the period 1987–2007 (n = 713) were included in the study. Data on hip symptoms and quality of life (EQ-5D) were collected through questionnaires. Elaborating information was retrieved from the medical records. Results 540 of 713 patients (76%) (corresponding to 634 hips) returned the questionnaires and consented for additional information to be retrieved from their medical records. Hip dysplasia accounted for 163 of 634 hip replacements (26%), 134 of which were in females (82%). Median age at time of diagnosis was 7.8 (0–39) years: 4.4 years for females and 22 years for males. After reviewing accessible medical records, the diagnosis of hip dysplasia was confirmed in 132 of 150 hips (88%). Interpretation One quarter of hip replacements performed in patients aged 40 or younger were due to an underlying hip dysplasia, which, in most cases, was diagnosed during late childhood. The dysplasia diagnosis reported to the register was correct for 88% of the hips. PMID:21434808

  9. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty as a salvage procedure for failed infected internal fixation of hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Shubhranshu S; Agashe, Mandar V; Sheth, Binoti A; Dash, Kumar K

    2013-01-01

    Background: Failed infected internal fixation produces significant pain and functional disability. In infected internal fixation of hip fractures with partial or complete head destruction, total hip arthroplasty (THA) can be technically challenging; however, it restores hip biomechanics. The present study is to evaluate the results and assess the complications of THA following failed infected internal fixation of these fractures. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of prospectively collected data in a tertiary healthcare center was performed of 20 consecutive patients of THA following failed infected internal fixation operated between September 2001 and November 2007. There were 11 dynamic hip screw failures for intertrochanteric fractures, 6 failed osteotomies following transcervical fractures, and 3 failed screw fixations for transcervical fractures. Results: The average age of the patients was 48.5 years (range 28-70 years) and the average followup period was 6.5 years (range 3.5-10.5 years). An indigenously designed cement spacer was used in a majority of patients (n = 15). The custom-made antibiotic impregnated cement spacer was prepared on-table, with the help of a K-nail bent at 130°, long stem Austin Moore's prosthesis (n=1), Charnley's prosthesis (n=1), or bent Rush nail (n=1). The antibiotic mixed cement was coated over the hardware in its doughy phase and appropriately shaped using an asepto syringe or an indigenously prepared spacer template. Nineteen of the 20 patients underwent two-stage revision surgeries. The average Harris hip score improved from 35.3 preoperatively to 82.85 postoperatively at the last followup. A significant difference was found (P < 0.0001). None of the patients had recurrence of infection. Conclusions: The results were comparable to primary arthroplasty in femoral neck fractures. Thus, THA is a useful salvage procedure for failed infected internal fixation of hip fractures. PMID:23533069

  10. Trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for congenital hip disease.

    PubMed

    Hartofilakidis, G; Babis, G C; Georgiades, G; Kourlaba, G

    2011-05-01

    We studied the effect of trochanteric osteotomy in 192 total hip replacements in 140 patients with congenital hip disease. There was bony union in 158 hips (82%), fibrous union in 29 (15%) and nonunion in five (3%). The rate of union had a statistically significant relationship with the position of reattachment of the trochanter, which depended greatly on the pre-operative diagnosis. The pre-operative Trendelenburg gait substantially improved in all three disease types (dysplasia, low and high dislocation) and all four categories of reattachment position. A persistent Trendelenburg gait post-operatively was noticed mostly in patients with defective union (fibrous or nonunion). Acetabular and femoral loosening had a statistically significant relationship with defective union and the position of reattachment of the trochanter. These results suggest that the complications of trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for patients with congenital hip disease are less important than the benefits of this surgical approach.

  11. [Treatment of infected total hip endoprostheses].

    PubMed

    Zilkens, K W; Forst, R; Casser, H R

    1989-07-01

    In total hip arthroplasty the most serious complication besides aseptic loosening is infection. The results observed in 42 cases of infected hip arthroplasties are presented. In contrast to early superficial infection, deep infection following total hip replacement is difficult to treat. Depending on the general condition of the patient, a well-defined, adequate treatment is required. In patients at vital risk the provocation of a permanent fistula can be recommended as an alternative method in preference to revision arthroplasty.

  12. Total hip arthroplasty after lower extremity amputation.

    PubMed

    Amanatullah, Derek F; Trousdale, Robert T; Sierra, Rafael J

    2015-05-01

    There are approximately 1.6 million lower extremity amputees in the United States. Lower extremity amputees are subject to increased physical demands proportional to their level of amputation. Lower extremity amputees have a 6-fold higher risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in the ipsilateral hip and a 2-fold risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in contralateral hip when compared with the non-amputee population. Additionally, there is a 3-fold increased risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in the ipsilateral hip after an above knee amputation when compared with a below knee amputation. The authors retrospectively reviewed 35 total hip arthroplasties after lower extremity amputation. The mean clinical follow-up was 5.3±4.0 years. The mean time from lower extremity amputation to total hip arthroplasty was 12.2±12.8 years after a contralateral amputation and 5.4±6.0 years after an ipsilateral amputation (P=.050). The mean time to total hip arthroplasty was 15.6±15.4 years after an above knee amputation and 6.4±6.1 years after a below knee amputation (P=.021). There was a statistically significant improvement in the mean Harris Hip Score from 35.9±21.8 to 76.8±12.8 with total hip arthroplasty after a contralateral amputation (P<.001). There also was a statistically significant improvement in the mean Harris Hip Score from 25.4±21.7 to 78.6±17.1 with total hip arthroplasty after an ispilateral amputation (P<.001). Three (17.7%) total hip arthroplasties after a contralateral amputation and 2 (11.1%) total hip arthroplasties after an ipsilateral amputation required revision total hip arthroplasty. Patients with an ipsilateral amputation or a below knee amputation progress to total hip arthroplasty faster than those with a contralateral amputation or an above knee amputation, respectively. Lower extremity amputees experience clinically significant improvements with total hip arthroplasty after lower extremity amputation.

  13. Total hip replacement for hip fracture: Surgical techniques and concepts.

    PubMed

    Coomber, Ross; Porteous, Matthew; Hubble, Matthew J W; Parker, Martyn J

    2016-10-01

    When treating a hip fracture with a total hip replacement (THR) the surgical technique may differ in a number of aspects in comparison to elective arthroplasty. The hip fracture patient is more likely to have poor bone stock secondary to osteoporosis, be older, have a greater number of co-morbidities, and have had limited peri-operative work-up. These factors lead to a higher risk of complications, morbidity and perioperative mortality. Consideration should be made to performing the THR in a laminar flow theatre, by a surgeon experienced in total hip arthroplasty, using an anterolateral approach, cementing the implant in place, using a large head size and with repair of the joint capsule. Combined Ortho-geriatric care is recommended with similar post-operative rehabilitation to elective THR patients but with less expectation of short length of stay and consideration for fracture prevention measures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Results of total hip arthroplasty using a bionic hip stem.

    PubMed

    Fokter, Samo K; Sarler, Taras; Strahovnik, Andrej; Repše-Fokter, Alenka

    2015-06-01

    The trabecular-orientated bionic hip stem was designed to mimic the natural force transmission through the femur in total hip arthroplasty, resulting in supposedly longer prosthesis survivability. The aim of this study was to compare the second-generation bionic hip stem to a standard uncemented hip stem. A group of 18 patients (21 hips) who underwent total hip arthroplasty with a bionic stem (bionic group) was compared with a historic group of 12 patients (12 hips) treated with standard anatomic hip stem (control group). During the first year after the procedure, the densitometric measurements of the bone around the prosthesis were taken. Radiographic and clinical assessments were additionally performed preoperatively and at the three month, six month, one year and three year follow-ups in the bionic group. In the bionic group, one patient was revised for aseptic loosening and 16 patients (19 hips) were available to the final follow-up. A significant decrease of bone mineral density was found in Gruen zones 3, 4 and 5 in the bionic group, and in zone 7 in both groups. The bionic group had a significantly higher bone mineral density in Gruen zone 1 at the one year follow-up. At the final follow-up, all prostheses were radiologically stable in both groups. Provided that a good implant position is achieved, comparable short-term results can be obtained using a bionic stem. Still, a decrease of bone mineral density in Gruen zone 7 occurred in both groups. Further studies are required to determine survivability of the bionic stem.

  15. Is the use of antidepressants associated with patient-reported outcomes following total hip replacement surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meridith E; Rolfson, Ola; Gordon, Max; Annerbrink, Kristina; Malchau, Henrik; Garellick, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Patients with anxiety and/or depression tend to report less pain reduction and less satisfaction with surgical treatment. We hypothesized that the use of antidepressants would be correlated to patient-reported outcomes (PROs) 1 year after total hip replacement (THR), where increased dosage or discontinuation would be associated with worse outcomes. Patients and methods THR cases with pre- and postoperative patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were selected from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register (n = 9,092; women: n = 5,106). The PROMs were EQ-5D, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, Charnley class, and VAS for satisfaction after surgery. These cases were merged with a national database of prescription purchases to determine the prevalence of antidepressant purchases. Regression analyses were performed where PROs were dependent variables and sex, age, Charnley class, preoperative pain, preoperative health-related quality of life (HRQoL), patient-reported anxiety/depression, and antidepressant use were independent variables. Results Antidepressants were used by 10% of the cases (n = 943). Patients using antidepressants had poorer HRQoL and higher levels of pain before and after surgery and they experienced less satisfaction. Preoperative antidepressant use was independently associated with PROs 1 year after THR regardless of patient-reported anxiety/depression. Interpretation Antidepressant usage before surgery was associated with reduced PROs after THR. Cases at risk of poorer outcomes may be identified through review of the patient’s medical record. Clinicians are encouraged to screen for antidepressant use preoperatively, because their use may be associated with PROs after THR. PMID:27482877

  16. Primary total hip replacement versus hip resurfacing - hospital considerations.

    PubMed

    Ward, William G; Carter, Christina J; Barone, Marisa; Jinnah, Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors regarding surgical procedures and patient selection affect hospital staffing needs as well as hospital revenues. In order to better understand the potential impact on hospitals that hip arthroplasty device selection (standard total hip arthroplasty vs. resurfacing) creates, a review of all primary hip arthroplasties performed at one institution was designed to identify factors that impacted hospital staffing needs and revenue generation. All primary hip arthroplasties undertaken over three fiscal years (2008 to 2010) were reviewed, utilizing only hospital business office data and medical records data that had been previously extracted prior for billing purposes. Analysis confirmed differing demographics for two hip arthroplasty populations, with the resurfacing patients (compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty population) consisting of younger patients (mean age, 50 vs. 61 years), who were more often male (75% vs. 45%), were more likely to have osteoarthritis as their primary diagnosis (83 vs. 67%) and were more often covered by managed care or commercial insurance (83 vs. 34%). They also had shorter hospital stays (mean length of stay, 2.3 vs. 4.1 days) and consequently provided a more favorable financial revenue stream to the hospital on a per patient basis. Several trends appeared during the study periods. There was a steady increase in all procedures in all groups except for the resurfacings, which decreased 26% in males and 53% in females between 2009 and 2010. Differences were observed in the demographics of patients presenting for resurfacing, compared to those presenting for conventional total hip arthroplasty. In addition to the revenue stream considerations, institutions undertaking a resurfacing program must commit the resources and planning in order to rehabilitate these patients more expeditiously than is usually required with conventional hip arthroplasty patients.

  17. NEW BEARING SURFACES IN TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is being increasingly indicated for younger and more active patients, in addition to a naturally growing demand for the procedure because of increasing life expectancy among patients. The high costs of this surgery and the controversies regarding implant performance have made this topic the subject of constant research, seeking new materials with better resistance to wear and better biocompatibility. The present article provides a review of new surfaces in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27042614

  18. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty, but not of total knee arthroplasty, is related to the preoperative radiographic severity of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, Claire; Holtslag, Maarten J; Tordoir, Rutger L; Leichtenberg, Claudia S; Verdegaal, Suzan H M; Kroon, Herman M; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus on the impact of radiographic severity of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) on the clinical outcome of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether preoperative radiographic severity of OA is related to improvements in functioning, pain, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 1 year after THA or TKA. Patients and methods This prospective cohort study included 302 THA patients and 271 TKA patients with hip or knee OA. In the THA patients, preoperatively 26% had mild OA and 74% had severe OA; in the TKA patients, preoperatively 27% had mild OA and 73% had severe OA. Radiographic severity was determined according to the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) classification. Clinical assessments preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively included: sociodemographic characteristics and patient-reported outcomes (PROMs): Oxford hip/knee score, hip/knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS/KOOS), SF36, and EQ5D. Change scores of PROMs were compared with mild OA (KL 0–2) and severe OA (KL 3–4) using a multivariate linear regression model. Results Adjusted for sex, age, preoperative scores, BMI, and Charnley score, radiographic severity of OA in THA was associated with improvement in HOOS “Activities of daily living”, “Pain”, and “Symptoms”, and SF36 physical component summary (“PCS”) scale. In TKA, we found no such associations. Interpretation The decrease in pain and improvement in function in THA patients, but not in TKA patients, was positively associated with the preoperative radiographic severity of OA. PMID:26484651

  19. Total hip arthroplasty in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: Midterm radiologic and functional results.

    PubMed

    Saglam, Yavuz; Ozturk, Irfan; Cakmak, Mehmet Fevzi; Ozdemir, Mustafa; Yazicioglu, Onder

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). One hundred five hips of 61 AS patients (mean age: 41.3 ± 10.2 years) who underwent THA between 1997 and 2012 were included into the study. Dorr's classification of proximal femoral geometry, acetabular protrusio, bone ankylosis, acetabular protrusion, Brooker classification of heterotopic ossification (HO), Gruen and Charnley classifications of implant loosening were used in radiographic assessments. Patients were called back to return for an additional long-term follow-up for functional assessment. Cementless total hip arthroplasty was used in 83 hips (79%) and cemented TKA was used in 22 hips (21%). The overall rate of aseptic loosening was 7.6% at a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. Femoral loosening was statistically similar in cemented and cementless femoral components (14% vs. 8%, p = 0.089). Acetabular component loosening was statistically higher in patients with any degree of HO (p = 0.04). Regardless of the type of femoral implant (cemented or cementless), femoral component loosening was higher in Dorr's type C patients (p = 0.005). The average pre-operative HSS was 46.6 ± 16.3, and it improved to 80.7 ± 18.7 at last follow-up (p < 0.01). Revision incidence was similar in between ankylosed and non-ankylosed hips. While complication rates are high, significant functional improvement can be achieved after THA in patients with AS. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Surgical treatment of hip osteoarthritis: update in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Ilizaliturri Sánchez, Víctor M; Mangino Pariente, Gerardo; Camacho Galindo, Javier

    2007-10-01

    Total hip replacement is one of the most successful procedures in orthopaedic surgery. There are two different technologies for implant fixation in total hip replacement: cemented and cementless, both can be combined, which is called Hybrid arthroplasty. Long term implant stability results in long term function. The most important factor that limits longevity of well-fixed implants is the wear of the articular surfaces. Wear of the polyethylene from the acetabulum generates particles that access the implant bone or the implant-cement-bone interface. This produces an inflammatory reaction, osteolysis and implant loosening. Polyethylene of higher resistance to wear and prosthetic articulations without polyethylene (hard on hard bearings), have been introduced to improve wear particle generation. Minimally invasive surgical techniques minimize surgical trauma to sort tissue around the hip joint, facilitating a better and more rapid recovery.

  1. Total hip arthroplasty instability in Italy.

    PubMed

    Falez, Francesco; Papalia, Matteo; Favetti, Fabio; Panegrossi, Gabriele; Casella, Filippo; Mazzotta, Gianluca

    2017-03-01

    Hip dislocation is a major and common complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA), which appears with an incidence between 0.3% and 10% in primary total hip arthroplasties and up to 28% in revision THA. The hip dislocations can be classified into three groups: early, intermediate and late. Approximately two-thirds of cases can be treated successfully with a non-operative approach. The rest require further surgical intervention. The prerequisite to developing an appropriate treatment strategy is a thorough evaluation to identify the causes of the dislocation. In addition, many factors that contribute to THA dislocation are related to the surgical technique, mainly including component orientation, femoral head diameter, restoration of femoral offset and leg length, cam impingement and condition of the soft tissues. The diagnosis of a dislocated hip is relatively easy because the clinical situation is very typical. Having identified a dislocated hip, the first step is to perform a closed reduction of the implant. After reduction you must perform a computed tomography scan to evaluate the surgical options for treatment of recurrent dislocation that include: revision arthroplasty, modular components exchange, dual-mobility cups, large femoral heads, constrained cups, elimination of impingement and soft tissue procedures. The objective is to avoid further dislocation, a devastating event which is increasing the number of operations on the hip. To obtain this goal is useful to follow an algorithm of treatment, but the best treatment remains prevention.

  2. Late instability following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Luis; Restrepo, Camilo; Parvizi, Javad

    2007-06-01

    Instability is one of the most common complications after total hip arthroplasty and can present early or late after hip replacement. Late instability is considered if the event occurs five or more years after the primary arthroplasty, and in contrast to early dislocation, it appears to require operative intervention. The incidence of late instability may be greater than initially appreciated, and the cumulative rate rises with longer follow-up. The etiology of hip instability is often multifactorial with the presumed risk factors for late instability including long standing malposition of the components, trauma, deterioration in muscle mass, neurological status impairment and polyethylene wear. This article presents a synopsis of published studies on late instability and outlines our institutional experience with treatment of late dislocation following total hip arthroplasty occurring due to polyethylene wear.

  3. [Second-generation metal bearings in cementless primary total hip arthroplasty: rationale, French homologation and preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C

    2000-12-01

    Long-term outcome of Charnley low-friction arthroplasty in young active patients is impaired worldwide due to wear of the polyethylene (PE) component and osteolysis. In the late eighties, reports of possible low wear with some former metal on metal total hip arthroplasties led to the reintroduction of metallic bearings. The aims of this work were to examine the rationale for using metal on metal bearings in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) and report preliminary results obtained with cementless Metasul -Alloclassic hips. From January 1994 to March 1997, 64 cementless primary Alloclassic-THA (grit-blasted titanium SL stems and CSF treaded cups) with 28 mm Metasul bearings were performed. Mean age at surgery was 60 years (range, 36-73). Diagnoses were usual, mainly primary osteoarthrosis in 70 p. 100 of the hips. Two bearing surfaces were exchanged for late dislocation at 2.6 and 2.9 years. Thus, 62 hips in 58 active patients (4 bilateral) were reviewed after a minimum 2-year follow-up (mean 3.2 years, range 24-66 months). Clinical results according to the Merle d'Aubigne and Charnley rating system were graded excellent or good in all 62 hips. Radiologically, calcar, atrophy and spot welds were noted in 93 p. 100 and 82 p. 100 of hips respectively. Proximal reactive and lucent lines and mild proximal stress shielding were observed in 8 p. 100 and 4.8 p. 100 of hips respectively. No osteolysis granuloma has thus far been observed in the vicinity of any component. Cobalt blood level remained normal, except in 6 cases due to occupational exposure (n=1), possible impingement (n=1) or an unknown cause (n=4). All elevated cobalt levels (range 7 to 25 microg/l) were nevertheless far below the toxic limit. Dislocation may be due either to the posterolateral surgical approach and/or early impingement with the first Metasul bearing design (head sleeve). Metasul acetabular component fixation is not restricted to only cementless metal-backing, unlike alumina-ceramic cups

  4. Hip Squeaking after Ceramic-on-ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qi; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the characteristics and influencing factors of squeaking after ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to analyze the possible mechanisms of the audible noise. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were based on articles from PubMed and Web of Science. Study Selection: The articles selected for review were original articles and reviews found based on the following search terms: “total hip arthroplasty”, “ceramic-on-ceramic”, “hip squeaking”, and “hip noise.” Results: The mechanism of the squeaking remains unknown. The possible explanations included stripe wear, edge loading, a third body, fracture of the ceramic liner, and resonance of the prosthesis components. Squeaking occurrence is influenced by patient, surgical, and implant factors. Conclusions: Most studies indicated that squeaking after CoC THA was the consequence of increasing wear or impingement, caused by prosthesis design, patient characteristics, or surgical factors. However, as conflicts exist among different articles, the major reasons for the squeaking remain to be identified. PMID:27453238

  5. A randomized trial of hydroxyapatite coated prostheses in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yee, A J; Kreder, H K; Bookman, I; Davey, J R

    1999-09-01

    In a prospective randomized trial, 62 consecutive primary cementless total hip arthroplasties in 55 patients were performed by one surgeon using either hydroxyapatite coated (35 hips) or nonhydroxyapatite coated femoral prostheses (27 hips). The dual tapered femoral stem had a Ti-6AI-4V plasma sprayed circumferential proximal porous coat applied to the proximal 1/3 of the stem. The middle 1/3 had a roughened blasted textured surface, and the distal 1/3 had a smooth surface. The hydroxyapatite coated femoral stems had an additional hydroxyapatite coating applied to the proximal porous coat with use of an air plasma process. The patients in the two groups were not significantly different regarding age (48.2 +/- 9.0 years hydroxyapatite group, 50.4 +/- 8.7 years control group), gender, Charnley class, or length of followup (4.4 +/- 0.7 years hydroxyapatite group, 4.9 +/- 1.0 years control group). Forty-nine patients (54 hips) were available for clinical followup, and 45 patients (50 hips) had radiographic followup. A minimum 3-year followup was recorded. To date, there have been no femoral prostheses failures. No femoral implant has migrated or subsided. Radiographically, the hydroxyapatite coated stems showed trends toward increased distal stem related cortical hypertrophy, increased cancellous condensation and less endosteal cavitation. Two nonhydroxyapatite coated stems had distal endosteal cavitation, whereas no hydroxyapatite coated stems did. There were two cases of acetabular osteolysis (revision in one) and two cases of acetabular cup migration (nonrevised), all occurring in the control group. The overall revision rate was 4%. There was no difference in Harris hip scores at 6 months (80.6 +/- 13.0 points hydroxyapatite group, 83.8 +/- 12.4 points control group) or at last followup (85.6 +/- 15.4 points hydroxyapatite group, 89.7 +/- 13.4 control group). The Harris hip pain scores also were not significantly different at 6 months or at last followup. Multiple

  6. Preoperative planning for revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Barrack, Robert L; Burnett, R Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    Revision total hip arthroplasty is associated with more perioperative complications and unexpected findings than are encountered during primary total hip arthroplasty. Special instruments, implants, bone grafts, and other accessories may be required to treat complex problems that arise during revision surgery. Preoperative planning is important to anticipate potential complications and to ensure that all possible needed materials are readily available during surgery. Patients and their families also should be counseled on the specific additional risk factors involved in this complex surgery. An organized approach to revision total hip arthroplasty helps to reduce surgical time, minimize risks, decrease the stress level of the entire surgical team, and to increase the rate of successful outcomes for patients.

  7. A comparison of total hip resurfacing and total hip arthroplasty - patients and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fowble, Vincent A; dela Rosa, Mylene A; Schmalzried, Thomas P

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of pertinent preoperative and postoperative data relative to total hip resurfacing versus total hip arthroplasty (THA) would assist in evaluating current perceptions in outcome. We compared 50 consecutive metal-metal resurfacing replacements in 50 patients with 44 consecutive conventional total hip arthroplasties in 35 patients, who were implanted during the same time period, by the same surgeon, and followed prospectively for 2 to 4 years. The patients undergoing hip resurfacing were 62% male, 9 years younger, and 3.2 inches taller, with a lower mean body mass index and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade than patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Preoperatively, patients undergoing resurfacing had a lower Harris hip score (46 vs 52 points), more pain, higher UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) activity scores (4.2 vs 3.6), and better range of motion. Surgical time for resurfacing was 18% longer, but there was less total blood loss and fewer transfusions. Postoperatively, there was no difference in Harris hip score (97 vs 96). Patients undergoing resurfacing had higher function, Short Form-12 physical activity scores, and UCLA activity scores, but also a higher incidence of slight or mild pain. There were no differences in postoperative range of motion or dislocation (one each). The preoperative characteristics and general health status of the average patient undergoing resurfacing are more favorable than that of the average patient undergoing conventional total hip arthroplasty. Caution should be applied in attributing differences in outcomes directly to the arthroplasty technology.

  8. Bladder tear during revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Grauer, Jonathan N; Halim, Andrea; Keggi, Kristaps J

    2014-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and revision total hip arthroplasty are among the most commonly performed orthopedic procedures. There are many reported complications of THA, but intrapelvic complications are a rare subset. Bladder injuries have infrequently been described in association with this common procedure. We present an unusual case of a bladder tear occurring intraoperatively during a revision THA. It is suspected that the patient's history of multiple prior hip procedures caused adhesions of the bladder to the pelvic floor and predisposed the bladder to injury during acetabular revision. Previous reports of bladder injury relating to THA have described thermal necrosis, component migration, and occasional direct perforation. There are no prior case reports describing bladder tears related to adhesions occurring intraoperatively during revision THA. This case report highlights the importance of surgeon awareness of an unusual complication. In this case, intraoperative and postoperative recognition of a hematuria diagnosis led to the appropriate treatment, and this patient had an acceptable outcome.

  9. Iliopsoas bursitis following total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y M; Gupte, C M; Beverly, M J

    2004-12-01

    We report the imaging features of a 52-year-old man presenting with a groin mass and gross lower limb oedema secondary to venous occlusion by massive cystic enlargement of the iliopsoas bursa 4 years after uncemented primary total hip replacement. Ultrasonography of the groin mass demonstrated a large cystic lesion extending into the pelvis. CT showed displacement of the external iliac vessels with venous compression. Bursography showed the bursa's margins and no communication with the hip joint. Diagnostic aspiration excluded infection, but fluid recollection occurred subsequently. Complete resolution of symptoms, including limb swelling, followed surgical excision with no recurrence at the 5-year follow-up. We believe iliopsoas bursitis occurred as a tissue response to polyethylene wear within the prosthetic hip and occurred even in the absence of loosening or a direct communication between bursa and joint.

  10. Total hip and total knee replacement: preoperative nursing management.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Brian

    Total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgery are carried out for the relief of hip or knee pain, usually caused by osteoarthritis. This is the first of two articles on THR and TKR. It will outline the different types of replacement used in lower limb joint replacement surgery. Preparation of patients for surgery requires attention to physical, psychological and social factors and these are explored in detail. The organization of services along the patient pathway to ensure comprehensive preparation is considered and the nursing role highlighted. The second article, to be published in the next issue, will discuss recovery and rehabilitation from THR and TKR surgery.

  11. Sagittal spinopelvic alignment predicts hip function after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Hironori; Homma, Yasuhiro; Baba, Tomonori; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Matsumoto, Mikio; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between preoperative sagittal spinopelvic alignment and postoperative clinical outcomes after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This retrospective study included 92 patients with hip osteoarthritis who underwent primary THA between May 2013 and October 2015. Patients' characteristics, radiographic sagittal spinopelvic parameters and modified Harris Hip Scores, including function scores (gait scores and functional activities scores), were investigated. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to determine the associations between each preoperative sagittal spinopelvic parameter and postoperative hip function The preoperative sagittal spinopelvic parameters that were associated with postoperative gait scores were sagittal vertical axis (adjusted β-coefficient=-0.28, P=0.02), lumbar lordosis angle (adjusted β-coefficient=0.29, P=0.0089), pelvic tilt (adjusted β-coefficient=-0.25, P=0.045), sacral slope (adjusted β-coefficient=0.27, P=0.017) and pelvic incidence minus lumbar lordosis angle (adjusted β-coefficient=-0.31, P=0.01). The preoperative sagittal spinopelvic parameters that were related to the postoperative functional activities scores were sagittal vertical axis (adjusted β-coefficient=-0.38, P=0.0051) and pelvic incidence minus lumbar lordosis angle (adjusted β-coefficient=-0.39, P=0.0033). Patients with preoperative imbalanced sagittal alignment such as larger sagittal vertical axis, larger pelvic incidence minus lumbar lordosis and retroversion of pelvis had poorer clinical outcomes than others after THA. While, those preoperative imbalanced patients with anteversion of pelvis may have a compensatory ability which could correct the abnormal sagittal alignment after THA. Preoperative sagittal spinopelvic alignment affected postoperative clinical outcomes after THA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Preoperative prediction of inpatient recovery of function after total hip arthroplasty using performance-based tests: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Oosting, Ellen; Hoogeboom, Thomas J; Appelman-de Vries, Suzan A; Swets, Adam; Dronkers, Jaap J; van Meeteren, Nico L U

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of conventional factors, the Risk Assessment and Predictor Tool (RAPT) and performance-based functional tests as predictors of delayed recovery after total hip arthroplasty (THA). A prospective cohort study in a regional hospital in the Netherlands with 315 patients was attending for THA in 2012. The dependent variable recovery of function was assessed with the Modified Iowa Levels of Assistance scale. Delayed recovery was defined as taking more than 3 days to walk independently. Independent variables were age, sex, BMI, Charnley score, RAPT score and scores for four performance-based tests [2-minute walk test, timed up and go test (TUG), 10-meter walking test (10 mW) and hand grip strength]. Regression analysis with all variables identified older age (>70 years), Charnley score C, slow walking speed (10 mW >10.0 s) and poor functional mobility (TUG >10.5 s) as the best predictors of delayed recovery of function. This model (AUC 0.85, 95% CI 0.79-0.91) performed better than a model with conventional factors and RAPT scores, and significantly better (p = 0.04) than a model with only conventional factors (AUC 0.81, 95% CI 0.74-0.87). The combination of performance-based tests and conventional factors predicted inpatient functional recovery after THA. Two simple functional performance-based tests have a significant added value to a more conventional screening with age and comorbidities to predict recovery of functioning immediately after total hip surgery. Patients over 70 years old, with comorbidities, with a TUG score >10.5 s and a walking speed >1.0 m/s are at risk for delayed recovery of functioning. Those high risk patients need an accurate discharge plan and could benefit from targeted pre- and postoperative therapeutic exercise programs.

  13. Total Hip Joint Replacement Biotelemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Luntz, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a biotelemetry system that is hermetically sealed within a total hip replacement implant is reported. The telemetry system transmits six channels of stress data to reconstruct the major forces acting on the neck of the prosthesis and uses an induction power coupling technique to eliminate the need for internal batteries. The activities associated with the telemetry microminiaturization, data recovery console, hardware fabrications, power induction systems, electrical and mechanical testing and hermetic sealing test results are discussed.

  14. [Cementless total hip arthroplasty: a review].

    PubMed

    Diehl, Peter; Haenle, Maximilian; Bergschmidt, Philipp; Gollwitzer, Hans; Schauwecker, Johannes; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of total hip replacement (THR) is the restoration of a painless functioning hip joint with the main focus on the biomechanical properties. Advances in surgical techniques and biomaterial properties currently allow predictable surgical results in most patients. Despite the overwhelming success of this surgical procedure, the debate continues surrounding the optimal choice of implants and fixation. Femoral and acetabular implants with varying geometries and fixation methods are currently available. Problems inherent with acrylic bone cement, however, have encouraged surgeons to use alternative surfaces to allow biologic fixation. Optimal primary and secondary fixation of cementless hip stems is a precondition for long-term stability. Important criteria to achieve primary stability are good rotational and axial stability by press-fit fixation. The objective of the cementless secondary fixation is the biological integration of the implant by bony ingrowth. Nevertheless, current investigations show excellent results of cementless fixation even in older patients with reduced osseous quality. The main advantages of cementless fixation include biological integration, reduced duration of surgery, no tissue damage by cement polymerization and reduction of intraoperative embolisms. In comparison to cemented THR both, cementless sockets and stems provide good long-term results.

  15. Are hip hemiarthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty infections different entities? The importance of hip fractures.

    PubMed

    del Toro, M D; Nieto, I; Guerrero, F; Corzo, J; del Arco, A; Palomino, J; Nuño, E; Lomas, J M; Natera, C; Fajardo, J M; Delgado, J; Torres-Tortosa, M; Romero, A; Martín-Rico, P; Muniain, M Á; Rodríguez-Baño, J

    2014-08-01

    Hip hemiarthroplasty (HHA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) infections are usually considered as one entity; however, they may show important differences. We analyze these differences, as well as predictors of treatment failure (TF) and poor functional status among patients with prosthetic hip infections (PHIs). A multicenter cohort study of consecutive patients with PHIs was performed. The main outcome variable was TF after the first surgical treatment performed to treat the infection. Multivariate analysis was used to identify predictors of TF. A total of 127 patients with PHI were included (43 HHA, 84 THA). Patients with HHA infections were more frequently women (88% vs. 54%; p < 0.001), had comorbidities (86% vs. 67%, p = 0.02), and were older (median age 79 vs. 65 years, p < 0.001), and the reason for arthroplasty was more frequently a fracture (100% vs. 18%, p < 0.001). Failure of initial treatment and crude mortality were more frequent among HHA patients (44% vs. 23%, p = 0.01 and 28% vs. 7%, p = 0.001, respectively). However, HHA was not associated with TF in the multivariate analysis when hip fracture was considered; thus, variables independently associated with TF were hip fracture, inadequate surgical management, prosthesis retention, and higher C-reactive protein level. Failure of the first surgical treatment was associated with poorer functional status. HHA and THA infections showed significant differences in epidemiology, clinical features, and outcome. Although patients with HHA infections had a higher risk of TF, this was related to the reason for hip implant: a hip fracture. Success of the initial management of infection is a predictor of better clinical and functional outcome.

  16. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: in opposition.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2004-06-01

    At the Knee Society Winter Meeting in 2003, Seth Greenwald and I debated about whether there should be new standards (ie, regulations) applied to the release of information to the public on "new developments." I argued for the public's "right to know" prior to the publication of peer-reviewed literature. He argued for regulatory constraint or "proving by peer-reviewed publication" before alerting the public. It is not a contradiction for me to currently argue against the public advertising of minimally invasive (MIS) total hip arthroplasty as not yet being in the best interest of the public. It is hard to remember a concept that has so captured both the public's and the surgical community's fancy as MIS. Patients are "demanding" MIS without knowing why. Surgeons are offering it as the next best, greatest thing without having developed the skill and experience to avoid the surgery's risks. If you put "minimally invasive hip replacement" into the Google search engine (http://www.google.com), you get 5,170 matches. If you put the same words in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi), referencing the National Library of Medicine database, you get SEVENTEEN; none is really a peer-reviewed article. Most are 1 page papers in orthopedics from medical education meetings. On the other hand, there are over 6,000 peer-reviewed articles on total hip arthroplasty. Dr. Thomas Sculco, my couterpart in this debate, wrote an insightful editorial in the American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery in which he stated: "Although these procedures have generated incredible interest and enthusiasm, I am concerned that they may be performed to the detriment of our patients." I couldn't agree with him more. Smaller is not necessarily better and, when it is worse, it will be the "smaller" that is held accountable.

  17. Antibiotic prophylaxis in total hip replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, J P; Hughes, S P; Scott, J E; Evans, M J; Benson, M K

    1979-01-01

    A controlled prospective trial to compare the efficacy of the antibiotics cephaloridine and flucloxacillin in preventing infection after total hip replacement was conducted at three hospitals. The antibiotic regimens began before surgery, cephaloridine being continued for 12 hours and flucloxacillin for 14 days afterwards. Over an 18-month period 297 patients undergoing a total of 310 hip replacements were entered into the trial and randomly allocated to one of the regimens. The follow-up period ranged from one to two and a half years. All operations were performed in conventional operating theatres; at two of the hospitals these were also used by various other surgical disciplines. Four patients developed deep infection, two having received the cephaloridine and two the flucloxacillin regimen. The overall rate of deep infection was therefore 1.3%. Thus three doses of cephaloridine proved to be as effective as a two-week regimen of flucloxacillin. Giving a prophylactic systemic antibiotic reduced the incidence of infection to a level comparable with that obtained in ultra-clean-air operating enclosures. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:373841

  18. Dual mobility cups in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    De Martino, Ivan; Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios Konstantinos; Sculco, Peter Keyes; Sculco, Thomas Peter

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is considered one of the most successful surgical procedures in orthopaedics. With the increase in the number of THAs performed in the world in the next decades, reducing or preventing medical and mechanical complications such as post-operative THA instability will be of paramount importance, particularly in an emerging health care environment based on quality control and patient outcome. Dual mobility acetabular component (also known as unconstrained tripolar implant) was introduced in France at the end of the 1970s as an alternative to standard sockets, to reduce the risk of THA dislocation in patients undergoing primary THA in France. Dual mobility cups have recently gained wider attention in the United States as an alternative option in the prevention and treatment of instability in both primary and revision THA and offer the benefit of increased stability without compromising clinical outcomes and implant longevity. In this article, we review the use of dual mobility cup in total hip arthroplasty in terms of its history, biomechanics, outcomes and complications based on more than 20 years of medical literature. PMID:25035820

  19. Epidemiology of dislocation after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Meek, R M D; Allan, D B; McPhillips, G; Kerr, L; Howie, C R

    2006-06-01

    Instability after total hip arthroplasty is an important complication. It usually occurs in the immediate postoperative period, but the risk also increases with time. There are numerous surgical treatment options, but they have relatively unpredictable outcomes. Numerous factors are associated with dislocation, but research has mainly focused on surgical factors. Epidemiological factors remain the subject of much debate. We aimed to establish the most significant epidemiological factors in Scotland and in particular the dislocation rate in neuromuscular conditions. The Scottish National arthroplasty nonvoluntary registry is based on SMR01 records (Scottish Morbidity Record) data. We analyzed the Scottish National Arthroplasty Project to find patients' dislocation rates up to 1 year postoperatively for surgeon volume, age, gender, previous surgery, diagnosis, and followup duration. There were 14,314 total hip arthroplasties performed from April 1996 to March 2004 with an annual incidence of dislocation of 1.9%. We found an association between rate of dislocation with age, surgical volume, and previous fracture. However, there was no increase in the rate of dislocation associated with gender or with diagnoses of stroke or Parkinson's disease. Our prognostic assessment of dislocation risk allows assessment for methods of reducing dislocation in high risk patients.

  20. Pain management for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Young, Adam C; Buvanendran, Asokumar

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been shown to improve long-term quality of life, although the immediate postoperative period can be associated with intense postoperative pain that hampers rehabilitation. Effective postoperative analgesia is paramount in the recovery period. The understanding and collaboration of the orthopaedic surgeon and the pain-management physicians will improve the perioperative outcome of THA. Appropriate pain management can reduce the associated total direct medical costs for lower extremity joint replacement surgeries by reducing hospital stays and the services needed during hospitalization. Factors contributing to the shorter lengths of stay include homogenous entities such as regular staff and continuity of nursing care, the use of timely and up-to-date information including expectations on a short stay, functional discharge criteria, early mobilization, and the use of a multimodal analgesia approach centered on opioid sparing.

  1. Staged total hip arthroplasty in a patient with hip dysplasia and a large pertrochanteric bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Langston, Joseph R; DeHaan, Alexander M; Huff, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Hip arthroplasty in young patients requires thoughtful preoperative planning. Patients with proximal femoral bone loss complicate this planning and may require a staged procedure to optimize implant insertion. We report on a case of a 26-year-old woman with secondary hip arthritis from developmental dysplasia of the hip and a large pertrochanteric bone cyst that was treated with staged total hip arthroplasty. The cyst was decompressed and filled with an osteoconductive and osteoinductive bone graft substitute called EquivaBone. One year later, the patient underwent a successful primary total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen-month follow-up after her hip replacement revealed resolution of postoperative pain and significant functional improvement.

  2. Robot-assisted total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffery J; Elmallah, Randa K; Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Precise and accurate biomechanical reconstruction during total hip arthroplasty (THA) is essential for durable long-term survivorship. Accurate fit of cementless hip implants is also crucial to reduce micromotion between the bone-implant interfaces to allow for stable osseointegration. Robotic technology aims to minimize potential human errors and improve implant alignment and fit, and address persisting concerns with modern-day cementless THA. Although robotic THA dates back to the early 1990s, concerns with increased operating times, costs, and complications led to its withdrawal. However, semi-active systems have renewed interest in robot-assisted joint arthroplasty. We reviewed the current technology, its potential benefits, and the reported clinical and radiographic outcomes. Early evidence suggests that robotic use may lead to more accurate reconstruction of radiographic parameters, such as implant positioning, fit, center-of-rotation, and leg-length discrepancy. Further research is needed to determine if these will translate into better outcomes and improved implant longevity to justify increased costs.

  3. Revision total hip arthroplasty due to pain from hypersensitivity to cobalt-chromium in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kosukegawa, Ima; Nagoya, Satoshi; Kaya, Mitsunori; Sasaki, Koichi; Sasaki, Mikito; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2011-09-01

    We report a case with hypersensitivity to CoCr in total hip arthroplasty coupled with conventional polyethylene and CoCr femoral head. The patient complained of left hip pain and systemic fever, and computed tomography imaging revealed a periprosthetic cystic lesion, so we performed revision total hip arthroplasty using a titanium stem and ceramic head and highly crosslinked polyethylene. Hip pain and cystic lesion disappeared 3 years after revision surgery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of ceramics in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Lang, Jason E; Whiddon, David R; Smith, Eric L; Salyapongse, Aaron K

    2008-01-01

    Ceramics have been used as a bearing surface in total hip arthroplasty (THA) for more than 30 years. Properties of this material which make it particularly attractive for this application include its hardness, high compression strength, and excellent wettability. The low incidence of biologically significant particle generation and clinically significant osteolysis with the use of ceramics in THA reflects these properties. However, low fracture toughness and linear elastic behavior demonstrated by ceramic make it prone to breakage under stress. Improvements in the processing of ceramic as well as advances in engineering of head-neck articulations and liner design have led to an overall decrease in the incidence of ceramic fracture and dislocation. This article reviews the science behind the use of ceramics in THA, the clinical results of ceramics in THA, including complications unique to this bearing surface, and future directions for the application of ceramics in THA.

  5. Radiological evaluation of painful total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Jamshid, T.; Schneider, R.; Freiberger, R.H.

    1981-11-01

    Ninety-four cases of clinically failed, cemented, total hip prostheses requiring surgery were reviewed to determine the accuracy of preoperative plain radiography, culture of aspirated fluid, arthrography, and bone scanning. When radiopaque cement had been used to embed the prosthesis, plain radiography was highly accurate in detecting a loose femoral component, less so in detecting a loose acetabular component. Culture of aspirated fluid was accurate in diagnosing infection. A positive arthrogram identified loosening with good accuracy; however, a negative arthrogram did not reliably exclude loosening. /sup 99/mTc bone scans frequently differentiated loosening from loosening with infection. The suggested sequence of diagnostic tests is plain radiography followed by bone scanning. If the bone scan shows diffuse augmented uptake, culture of aspirated fluid followed by arthrography is indicated.

  6. Radiological evaluation of painful total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Schneider, R.; Freiberger, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Ninety-four cases of clinically failed, cemented, total hip prostheses requiring surgery were reviewed to determine the accuracy of preoperative plain radiography, culture of aspirated fluid, arthrography, and bone scanning. When radiopaque cement had been used to embed the prosthesis, plain radiography was highly accurate in detecting a loose femoral component, less so in detecting a loose acetabular component. Culture of aspirated fluid was accurate in diagnosing infection. A positive arthrogram identified loosening with good accuracy; however, a negative arthrogram did not reliably exclude loosening. /sup 99/mTc bone scans frequently differentiated loosening from loosening with infection. The suggested sequence of diagnostic tests is plain radiography followed by bone scanning. If the bone scan shows diffuse augmented uptake, culture of aspirated fluid followed by arthrography is indicated.

  7. Tribology of total hip arthroplasty prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Rieker, Claude B.

    2016-01-01

    Articulating components should minimise the generation of wear particles in order to optimize long-term survival of the prosthesis. A good understanding of tribological properties helps the orthopaedic surgeon to choose the most suitable bearing for each individual patient. Conventional and highly cross-linked polyethylene articulating either with metal or ceramic, ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal are the most commonly used bearing combinations. All combinations of bearing surface have their advantages and disadvantages. An appraisal of the individual patient’s objectives should be part of the assessment of the best bearing surface. Cite this article: Rieker CB. Tribology of total hip arthroplasty prostheses: what an orthopaedic surgeon should know. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:52-57. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000004. PMID:28461928

  8. Reproduction of Hip Offset and Leg Length in Navigated Total Hip Arthroplasty: How Accurate Are We?

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Mahajan, Vivek; Deakin, Angela H; Deep, Kamal

    2015-06-01

    This study assesses how accurately we can restore hip offset and leg length in navigated total hip arthroplasty (THA). 152 consecutive patients with navigated THA formed the study group. The contra-lateral hip formed control for measuring hip offset and leg length. All radiological measurements were made using Orthoview digital software. In the normal hip offset group, the mean is 75.73 (SD- 8.61). In the reconstructed hip offset group, the mean is 75.35 (SD - 7.48). 95.39% had hip offset within 6 mm of opposite side while 96.04% had leg length restored within 6 mm of contra-lateral side. Equivalence test revealed that the two groups of hip offsets were essentially the same. We conclude that computer navigation can successfully reproduce hip offset and leg length accurately.

  9. CLINICAL OUTCOME AFTER INFECTED TOTAL KNEE AND TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Falk; Leichtle, Carmen Ina; Schlumberger, Michael; Leichtle, Ulf Gunther; Wünschel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Infection after total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a serious complication which typically leads to a long lasting and intensive surgical and medicamentous treatment. The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence outcome after revision surgery caused by prosthetic infection. We retrospectively analyzed 64 patients who had revision surgery between 1989 and 2009 due to periprosthetic infection. We examined a total of 69 joints (TKA: 36%, THA: 64%), follow-up 5.1 years (0.5-21 years) after the initial surgical intervention. The mean patient age at time of surgery was 67 years old (43-79 years old). Clinical data and scores including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC)-Index, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS) were surveyed. There was no difference in clinical scores regarding treatment between a single and a multiple stage treatment regime. Infections with multiple microorganisms and Enterococcus spp. lead to a significantly higher number of interventions. Using a modified Tsukayama system we classified 24% as type I, 34% type II and 42% type III- infections, with no differences in clinical outcome. Overweight patients had a significantly lower HHS and WOMAC-score. Immunosuppression leads to a worse WOMAC and HSS-Score. An increased number of procedures was associated to a limping gait. Thorough surgical technique leads to good clinical results independent of infection-type and treatment philosophy. Level of Evidence III, Case Control Study.

  10. [Therapeutic effect of artificial total hip arthroplasty on flexion regidity of hip joint in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Song, Liming; Yu, Jianhua; Zhang, Tieliang

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the operative methods, clinical outcomes and complications of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in the treatment of patient with hip joint flexion rigidity due to ankylosing spondylitis (AS). From May 1992 to July 2004, 56 patients (32 left hips and 39 right hips) with AS received THA through a modified anterolateral approach, including 52 males (67 hips) and 4 females (4 hips) aged 17-48 years with an average of 35.5 years. All the hips were ankylosed in (43.1 +/- 7.2) degrees of flexion and 15 patients had bilaterally ankylosed hips. Preoperatively, Harris hip score was (42.6 +/- 5.3) points and all the hips were classified as stage IV according to the standard of American College of Rheumatology (ACR). And the course of disease was 3-11 years. Intraoperatively, 1 patient suffering from proximal femur fracture due to severe osteoporosis was treated with titanium wire fixation, and the fracture was healed 6 weeks later. All the patients were followed up for 3-15 years (average 5.3 years). Postoperatively, 1 patient (1 hip) got subcutaneous soft tissue infection at 8 days, 1 patient (1 hip) got wound disunion at 11 days, 2 patients (2 hips) got infection at 11 months and 3 years, respectively. All the infections were healed after symptomatic treatment. The wounds of the rest 52 patients were healed by first intention without joint infections. The postoperative X-rays demonstrated that 4 hips (5.6%) had loose acetabulum prosthesis, 3 hips (4.2%) had loose femoral prosthesis and 5 hips had loose acetabulum and femoral prosthesis (7.0%), and the total loosening rate was 16.8%. Among which, 8 hips received revision resulting in satisfactory therapeutic effects, and the rest 4 hips had no further treatment. Fifteen hips (21.1%) had heterotopic ossification, which was relieved after taking nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory drugs. Harris hip score at final follow-up was (82.7 +/- 4.1) points, indicating there was a significant difference between before and after

  11. Cemented total hip arthroplasty following acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Scott, C E H; MacDonald, D; Moran, M; White, T O; Patton, J T; Keating, J F

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of cemented total hip arthroplasty (THA) following a fracture of the acetabulum, with evaluation of risk factors and comparison with a patient group with no history of fracture. Between 1992 and 2016, 49 patients (33 male) with mean age of 57 years (25 to 87) underwent cemented THA at a mean of 6.5 years (0.1 to 25) following acetabular fracture. A total of 38 had undergone surgical fixation and 11 had been treated non-operatively; 13 patients died at a mean of 10.2 years after THA (0.6 to 19). Patients were assessed pre-operatively, at one year and at final follow-up (mean 9.1 years, 0.5 to 23) using the Oxford Hip Score (OHS). Implant survivorship was assessed. An age and gender-matched cohort of THAs performed for non-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA) or avascular necrosis (AVN) (n = 98) were used to compare complications and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). The mean time from fracture to THA was significantly shorter for patients with AVN (2.2 years) or protrusio (2.2 years) than those with post-traumatic OA (9.4 years) or infection (8.0 years) (p = 0.03). Nine contained and four uncontained defects were managed with autograft (n = 11), bulk allograft (n = 1), or trabecular metal augment (n = 1). Initial fracture management (open reduction and internal fixation or non-operative), timing of THA (>/< one year), and age (>/< 55 years) had no significant effect on OHS or ten-year survival. Six THAs were revised at mean of 12 years (5 to 23) with ten-year all-cause survival of 92% (95% confidence interval 80.8 to 100). THA complication rates (all complications, heterotopic ossification, leg length discrepancy > 10 mm) were significantly higher following acetabular fracture compared with atraumatic OA/AVN and OHSs were inferior: one-year OHS (35.7 versus 40.2, p = 0.026); and final follow-up OHS (33.6 versus 40.9, p = 0.008). Cemented THA is a reasonable option for the sequelae of acetabular fracture. Higher complication rates and

  12. CLINICAL OUTCOME AFTER INFECTED TOTAL KNEE AND TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, Falk; Leichtle, Carmen Ina; Schlumberger, Michael; Leichtle, Ulf Gunther; Wünschel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Infection after total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a serious complication which typically leads to a long lasting and intensive surgical and medicamentous treatment. The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence outcome after revision surgery caused by prosthetic infection. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 64 patients who had revision surgery between 1989 and 2009 due to periprosthetic infection. We examined a total of 69 joints (TKA: 36%, THA: 64%), follow-up 5.1 years (0.5-21 years) after the initial surgical intervention. The mean patient age at time of surgery was 67 years old (43-79 years old). Clinical data and scores including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC)-Index, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS) were surveyed. Results: There was no difference in clinical scores regarding treatment between a single and a multiple stage treatment regime. Infections with multiple microorganisms and Enterococcus spp. lead to a significantly higher number of interventions. Using a modified Tsukayama system we classified 24% as type I, 34% type II and 42% type III- infections, with no differences in clinical outcome. Overweight patients had a significantly lower HHS and WOMAC-score. Immunosuppression leads to a worse WOMAC and HSS-Score. An increased number of procedures was associated to a limping gait. Conclusion: Thorough surgical technique leads to good clinical results independent of infection-type and treatment philosophy. Level of Evidence III, Case Control Study. PMID:26997914

  13. Dynamic hip joint stiffness in individuals with total hip arthroplasty: relationships between hip impairments and dynamics of the other joints.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Tsukagoshi, Rui; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Oda, Shingo; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2011-07-01

    Little is known about hip joint stiffness during walking (dynamic joint stiffness) and the effect of hip impairments on biomechanical alterations of other joints in patients with total hip arthroplasty. Twenty-four patients (mean age 61.7 years) who underwent unilateral (n=12) or bilateral total hip arthroplasty (n=12) and healthy subjects (n=12) were recruited. In addition to kinematic and kinetic variables, dynamic hip joint stiffness which was calculated as an angular coefficient of linear regression of the plot of the hip flexion moment vs. hip extension angle during the late stance of gait, was measured. Group differences were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test, and relationships between primary hip impairments and secondary gait impairments were found using partial correlation coefficients adjusted for gait speed and stride length. Dynamic hip joint stiffness was 47% higher on the side with the more pronounced limp in patients with bilateral arthroplasty than in healthy controls. In the same patients, increased dynamic hip joint stiffness was significantly associated especially with increased ankle plantarflexion moment on the ipsilateral side. In patients with unilateral arthroplasty, decreased hip power was significantly related to increased ankle plantarflexor power, only on the non-operated side. We found that dynamic hip joint stiffness was an important factor in assessing relationships between hip impairments and dynamics in other joints, especially in patients with bilateral total hip arthroplasty. The effects of altering hip joint stiffness on gait biomechanics need to be explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Process optimized minimally invasive total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gebel, Philipp; Oszwald, Markus; Ishaque, Bernd; Ahmed, Gaffar; Blessing, Recha; Thorey, Fritz; Ottersbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse a new concept of using the the minimally invasive direct anterior approach (DAA) in total hip replacement (THR) in combination with the leg positioner (Rotex- Table) and a modified retractor system (Condor). We evaluated retrospectively the first 100 primary THR operated with the new concept between 2009 and 2010, regarding operation data, radiological and clinical outcome (HOOS). All surgeries were perfomed in a standardized operation technique including navigation. The average age of the patients was 68 years (37 to 92 years), with a mean BMI of 26.5 (17 to 43). The mean time of surgery was 80 min. (55 to 130 min). The blood loss showed an average of 511.5 mL (200 to 1000 mL). No intra-operative complications occurred. The postoperative complication rate was 6%. The HOOS increased from 43 points pre-operatively to 90 (max 100 points) 3 months after surgery. The radiological analysis showed an average cup inclination of 43° and a leg length discrepancy in a range of +/− 5 mm in 99%. The presented technique led to excellent clinic results, showed low complication rates and allowed correct implant positions although manpower was saved. PMID:22577504

  15. Pneumatic compression hemodynamics in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Westrich, G H; Specht, L M; Sharrock, N E; Sculco, T P; Salvati, E A; Pellicci, P M; Trombley, J F; Peterson, M

    2000-03-01

    A crossover study was performed to evaluate the effect of several pneumatic compression devices and active dorsoplantar flexion in 10 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Using the Acuson 128XP/10 duplex ultrasound unit with a 5-MHz linear array probe, peak venous velocity and venous volume were assessed above and below the greater saphenous vein and common femoral vein junction. A computer generated randomization table was used to determine the order of the test conditions. The pneumatic compression devices evaluated included two foot pumps, one foot and calf pump, one calf pump, and three calf and thigh pumps. Statistical analyses included analysis of variance and analysis of variance with covariance between devices and patients. The covariates tested were the baseline measurements and the order in which the devices were tested. Differences between devices relate in part to the frequency and rate of inflation and the location and type of compression. Pulsatile calf and foot and calf pneumatic compression with a rapid inflation time produced the greatest increase in peak venous velocity, whereas compression of the calf and thigh showed the greatest increase in venous volume. Because patient and nursing compliance is essential to the success of mechanical prophylaxis for thromboembolic disease, the more simple, yet efficacious, devices that are easier to apply and less cumbersome appear to have a greater likelihood of success. In the active and alert patient, active dorsoplantar flexion should be encouraged.

  16. Acetabular blood flow during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    ElMaraghy, Amr W.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Waddell, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the immediate effect of reaming and insertion of the acetabular component with and without cement on periacetabular blood flow during primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Design A clinical experimental study. Setting A tertiary referral and teaching hospital in Toronto. Patients Sixteen patients (9 men, 7 women) ranging in age from 30 to 78 years and suffering from arthritis. Intervention Elective primary THA with a cemented (8 patients) and noncemented (8 patients) acetabular component. All procedures were done by a single surgeon who used a posterior approach. Main outcome measure Acetabular bone blood-flow measurements made with a laser Doppler flowmeter before reaming, after reaming and after insertion of the acetabular prosthesis. Results Acetabular blood flow after prosthesis insertion was decreased by 52% in the noncemented group (p < 0.001) and 59% in the cemented group (p < 0.001) compared with baseline (prereaming) values. Conclusion The significance of these changes in periacetabular bone blood flow during THA may relate to the extent of bony ingrowth, periprosthetic remodelling and ultimately the incidence of implant failure because of aseptic loosening. PMID:10851413

  17. Conversion of fused hip to total hip arthroplasty with presurgical and postsurgical gait studies.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Stephanie J; Eltoukhy, Moataz A; Hodge, W Andrew; Asfour, Shihab S

    2012-03-01

    This case study presents a subject with a fused hip converted to total hip arthroplasty. Kinematic gait analysis was conducted on 3 occasions, presurgery, 4 months postsurgery, and 2.5 years postsurgery. Presurgery data showed decreased cadence and shorter step length; sound limb possessed increased hip, knee range of motion (ROM), and increased knee flexion during stance; the affected limb had minimal hip motion and normal knee ROM with abnormal pattern. At 4 months postsurgery, the sound limb showed decreased step length, whereas the affected limb showed increased knee extension during stance and increased hip ROM. Data obtained at 2.5 years postsurgery indicated decreased cadence and speed and increased ROM in both limbs. The total hip arthroplasty had provided relief of chronic back and affected hip pain and improved mobility. Gait-specific training is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Total hip arthroplasty and bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Cherubino, Paolo; Ratti, Chiara; Fagetti, Alessandro; Binda, Tommaso

    2011-04-01

    The number of elderly people is steadily increasing: in the United States it will increase from 12.9% to 20% in 2030 with respect to the total population. Italy, with UK, Denmark and Sweden are the countries with the largest number of octogenarians (about 4% of the population) and it is estimated that this rate will increase by 300% over the next 50 years. The number of people affected by osteoarthritis will increase significantly and therefore the number of total hip arthroplasties will progressively increase. The success of an implant depends firstly by a flawless surgical technique, a correct and stable implant fixation and an optimal preoperative planning that should consider the bone quality of the patient, in order to choose a proper implant design. Different approaches could be followed to achieve adequate fixation: northern Europe surgeons prefer the cemented implant, instead American orthopedics generally use systems that allow a direct biological osteointegration. Elderly patients often present with multiple local and general problems that could affect significantly the normal course of a prosthetic surgery procedure and its results: they have bone tissue changes that lead to increased bone fragility and, consequently, difficulties to obtain primary stability. Osteoporotic bone is characterized by reduction of bone mass, decrease of cancellous bone trabeculae and by increased porosity of cortical bone. The bone fragility implies a greater risk of iatrogenic intraoperative fractures. Furthermore, difficulties linked to bone stock deficiencies become even more significant in revision surgery, where cortical bone thinning is associated with enlargement of the isthmus thus making more difficult to obtain distal fixation of prosthetic stems. At the moment, the role played by the drugs used for the treatment of osteoporosis during implant osteointegration is still not clearly understood and is still under investigation.

  19. Dual mobility total hip replacement in a high risk population

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Jatinder Singh; Al Riyami, Amur; Allami, Mohamad Kasim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate results of dual mobility total replacement in a high risk population who take hip into hyperflexed position while sitting and praying on the floor. Method: The study included 65 (35 primary total replacement and 30 complex total hip replacement) cases of total hip replacement using avantage privilege dual mobility cup system from biomet. A cemented acetabular component and on femoral side a bimetric stem, either cemented or uncemented used depending on the canal type. Ten cases were examined fluoroscopically in follow up. Result: There was dislocation in one patient undergoing complex hip replacement. Fluoroscopy study showed no impingement between the neck of prosthesis and acetabular shell at extremes of all movements. Conclusion: The prevalence of dislocation is low in our high risk population and we consider it preferred concept for patients undergoing complex total hip replacement. PMID:27924742

  20. Gait patterns after total hip arthroplasty and surface replacement arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nantel, Julie; Termoz, Nicolas; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Lavigne, Martin; Prince, François

    2009-03-01

    To compare gait patterns in patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA) and surface hip arthroplasty. Observational study. Outpatient biomechanical laboratory. Two groups of 10 surface hip arthroplasty and THA patients and 10 control subjects participated in the study (N=30). The patients were volunteers recruited from a larger randomized study. Not applicable. Gait patterns, hip abductor muscle strength, clinical outcomes, and radiographic analyses were compared between groups. In the sagittal plane, the THA group showed a larger flexor moment and larger mechanical work in H2S and K3S power bursts compared with surface hip arthroplasty and control subjects. In the frontal plane, both THA and surface hip arthroplasty patients had smaller hip abductor muscles energy generation (H3F) than the control group. No difference was found for the hip abductor muscles strength. In the THA group, the larger energy absorption in H2S and K3S would be a cost-effective mechanical adaptation to increase stability. The surface hip arthroplasty characteristics could allow the return to a more normative gait pattern compared with THA. The modification in the frontal plane in surface hip arthroplasty and THA would be related to the hip abductor muscles strength.

  1. Future Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  2. Future bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun-Dong

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  3. Countrywise results of total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose An earlier Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) report on 280,201 total hip replacements (THRs) based on data from 1995–2006, from Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, was published in 2009. The present study assessed THR survival according to country, based on the NARA database with the Finnish data included. Material and methods 438,733 THRs performed during the period 1995–2011 in Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland were included. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to calculate survival probabilities with 95% confidence interval (CI). Cox multiple regression, with adjustment for age, sex, and diagnosis, was used to analyze implant survival with revision for any reason as endpoint. Results The 15-year survival, with any revision as an endpoint, for all THRs was 86% (CI: 85.7–86.9) in Denmark, 88% (CI: 87.6–88.3) in Sweden, 87% (CI: 86.4–87.4) in Norway, and 84% (CI: 82.9–84.1) in Finland. Revision risk for all THRs was less in Sweden than in the 3 other countries during the first 5 years. However, revision risk for uncemented THR was less in Denmark than in Sweden during the sixth (HR = 0.53, CI: 0.34–0.82), seventh (HR = 0.60, CI: 0.37–0.97), and ninth (HR = 0.59, CI: 0.36–0.98) year of follow-up. Interpretation The differences in THR survival rates were considerable, with inferior results in Finland. Brand-level comparison of THRs in Nordic countries will be required. PMID:24650019

  4. Bilaterally Primary Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty for Severe Hip Ankylosis with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dong-Xu; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yu-Min; Nian, Yue-Wen; Zhang, Jun; Kang, Xiao-Min; Wu, Shu-Fang; Zhu, Yang-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is a reliable therapeutic intervention in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, in whom the aims of surgery are to reduce pain, restore hip function and improve quality of life. The current study is a retrospective analysis of the clinical and radiographic findings in a consecutive series of patients with hip ankylosis associated with severe ankylosing spondylitis who underwent bilateral primary total hip arthroplasty using non-cemented components. From June 2008 to May 2012, total hip arthroplasty was performed on 34 hips in 17 patients with bilateral ankylosis caused by ankylosing spondylitis. The study patients included 13 men and 4 women with a mean age of 24.2 years. The mean duration of disease was 8.3 years and the average duration of hip involvement was 7.6 years. All patients had severe hip pain and dysfunction with bilateral bony ankylosis and no range of motion preoperatively and all underwent bilateral cementless total hip arthroplasty performed by a single surgeon. Joint pain, range of motion (ROM), and Harris hip scores were assessed to evaluate the postoperative results. At a mean follow-up of 31.7 months, all patients had experienced significant clinical improvement in function, ROM, posture and ambulation. At the final follow-up, the mean postoperative flexion ROM was 134.4° compared with 0° preoperatively. Similar improvements were seen in hip abduction, adduction, internal rotation and external rotation. Postoperatively, 23 hips were completely pain-free, six had only occasional discomfort, three mild to moderate pain and two severe pain. The average Harris Hip Score improved from 23.7 preoperatively to 65.8 postoperatively. No stems had loosened at the final follow-up in any patient, nor had any revision surgery been required. Bilateral severe hip ankylosis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis can be treated with cementless bilateral synchronous total hip arthroplasty, which can greatly improve hip joint function and

  5. Case report: Salmonella infection following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chong, Paul Y; Sporer, Scott M

    2005-01-01

    A case of a total hip arthroplasty infection with Staphylococcus aureus, co-infected with Salmonella choleraesuis was treated with two-stage exchange and administration of vancomycin and ciprofloxacin. No signs of re-infection have appeared fourteen months after surgery. Cases of salmonella infection of hip prostheses are quite rare, with only a handful of reports in the literature.

  6. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior ipsilateral hip fusion.

    PubMed

    Romness, D W; Morrey, B F

    1992-03-01

    Sixteen total knee arthroplasties performed between 1977 and 1985 in 13 patients with prior ipsilateral hip arthrodesis or ankylosis were studied to determine the preferred sequence and long-term follow-up of procedures in this clinical setting. Twelve of 16 underwent fusion takedown and total hip arthroplasty prior to knee replacement. The average age at total knee arthroplasty was 52.7 years and the average time from hip fusion to total knee arthroplasty was 36.3 years. Mean follow-up after total knee arthroplasty was 5.5 years (range, 2.3 to 10 years). The Hospital for Special Surgery knee score increased from a mean of 31.8 preoperatively to 72.2 after surgery. In patients who had conversion of the hip fusion prior to knee replacement, knee scores were 28 before and 72.5 after both procedures. Patients who retained their hip fusion had mean scores of 43.5 and 72.1, respectively. None of the knees has been removed and 14 of 16 had no pain at last follow-up. One had mild pain and one had moderate pain attributed to pes anserine bursitis. Although the numbers are small, this experience reveals that takedown of the fusion with total hip arthroplasty is an effective technique before performing the knee replacement. Though successful in some instances, the experience is too small to show that if hip fusion is in good position, knee replacement without fusion takedown is acceptable.

  7. Reconstruction of the Acetabulum in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Christodoulou, Michael; Sasalos, Gregory; Babis, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) or congenital hip dysplasia (CDH) is the most prevalent developmental childhood hip disorder. It includes a wide spectrum of hip abnormalities ranging from dysplasia to subluxation and complete dislocation of the hip joint. The natural history of neglected DDH in adults is highly variable. The mean age of onset of symptoms is 34.5 years for dysplastic DDH, 32.5 years for low dislocation, 31.2 years for high dislocation with a false acetabulum, and 46.4 years for high dislocation without a false acetabulum. Thorough understanding of the bony and soft tissue deformities induced by dysplasia is crucial for the success of total hip arthroplasty. It is important to evaluate the existing acetabular deformity three-dimensionally, and customize the correction in accordance with the quantity and location of ace tabular deficiencies. Acetabular reconstruction in patients with DDH is challenging. Interpretation of published data is difficult and should be done with caution because most series include patients with different types of hip disease. In general, the complication rate associated with THA is higher in patients with hip dysplasia than it is in patients with osteoarthritis. Overall, clinical and functional outcomes following THA in patients hip dysplasia (DDH) differ from those treated for primary hip osteoarthritis, possibly due to the lower age and level of activity. Although function scores decline with age, the scores for pain and range of motion presented with a statistically significant improvement in the long-term. PMID:25386570

  8. Algorithm of physical therapy exercises following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stryła, Wanda; Pogorzała, Adam M; Rogala, Piotr; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-09

    Authors present a set of exercises for patients after total hip replacement (THR) treated due to idiopathic hip joint osteoarthritis. Outcome of surgical treatment depends largely on physical therapy conducted after the procedure. Physical therapy following total hip arthroplasty involves restoration of proper physical function. Exercises increase the strength of hip girdle muscles and stabilize the involved hip joint. Total postoperative rehabilitation improves the gait esthetics. Restoring patient's full independence in everyday and professional life after total hip arthroplasty is the best test for properly conducted rehabilitation. A rehabilitation algorithm following hip arthroplasty was established based on the data acquired from literature and authors' own studies. Methods of rehabilitation following total arthroplasty was unified with regard to the type of endoprosthesis (cemented and non-cemented). Rehabilitation after revision and cancer arthroplasties were not taken into consideration. Exercises were divided into those performed in supine and standing positions as well as resistance training (using an elastic TheraBand® tape). At a later stage of rehabilitation, marching and walking as well as cycloergometer training were included. Patient's position during the day and in the sleep for two months following THR was taken into account, including some types of exercises that are contraindicated and pose a threat of endoprosthesis luxation.

  9. Evaluation of the hip center in total hip arthroplasty for old developmental dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Flecher, Xavier; Parratte, Sebastien; Brassart, Nicolas; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel; Argenson, Jean-Noël

    2008-12-01

    We describe the problems with positioning the hip center according to the severity of dislocation in 97 cementless total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip. The mean location of the hip center from the interteardrop was 30.4 +/- 8.7 mm horizontally and 23.4 +/- 5.4 mm vertically. The presence of a limp correlated with a superior placement of the cup. Four cups were revised, 2 of which with a significant high hip center. The survival rate of the acetabular component was 95% at 12 years. Craniopodal repositioning was easy in class 1. In class 2, the cup was the largest. In class 3, the greatest variations of the hip center were found. In class 4, the smallest implants were necessary for positioning in the true acetabulum.

  10. Trochanteric osteotomy and fixation during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Archibeck, Michael J; Rosenberg, Aaron G; Berger, Richard A; Silverton, Craig D

    2003-01-01

    Once used routinely, trochanteric osteotomy in total hip arthroplasty now is usually limited to difficult primary and revision cases. There are three types: the standard trochanteric osteotomy and its variations, the trochanteric slide, and the extended trochanteric osteotomy. Each has unique indications, fixation techniques, and complications. Primary total hip arthroplasty procedures requiring the enhanced exposure provided by trochanteric osteotomy may be needed in patients with hip ankylosis or fusion, protrusio acetabuli, proximal femoral deformities, developmental dysplasia, or abductor muscle laxity. Trochanteric osteotomies in revision arthroplasties, primarily the extended trochanteric osteotomy, facilitate the removal of well-fixed femoral components, provide direct access to the diaphysis for distal fixation, and enhance acetabular exposure.

  11. Achieving stability and lower limb length in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berend, Keith R; Sporer, Scott M; Sierra, Rafael J; Glassman, Andrew H; Morris, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is an exceptionally cost-effective and successful surgical procedure. Dislocation, infection, osteolysis, and limb-length inequality are among the most common complications affecting the long-term success of total hip arthroplasty. Instability is a challenging complication to treat. The surgeon frequently must try to achieve a stable hip at the cost of increasing the length of the operated extremity. It is important to understand the factors associated with stability and limb length; the surgical options available; the effect and role of the various surgical approaches; and methods to manage instability, with and without limb-length inequality.

  12. Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Girdlestone Hip following a Failed Hemiarthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, VJ; Ranganath, BT

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Girdlestone hip arthroplasty, though described as a salvage procedure for infected hip joints, can also be considered for failed Hemiarthroplasty procedures. The functional results of such Girdlestone hip may not be satisfactory. They may require total hip replacement to improve the quality of life, which are technically challenging. Here we are reporting such a case ina 60 year old male patient, with review of literature. Case Report: A 60 year old male patient underwent cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty for fracture neck of femur which failed, owing to improper implantation. Subsequently he underwent Girdlestone arthroplasty which resulted in persistent painful hip. He presented to us in this situation, where we successfully converted the Girdlestone arthroplasty to a Total Hip arthroplasty. Conclusion: Improper implantation in Hemiarthroplasty fails subsequently. In such cases Girdlestone arthroplasty may be an option to consider, though it may not give requisite relief to patient in some cases. In such situations total hip arthroplasty procedure, though technically challenging will give stable painless hip to the patient. PMID:27299043

  13. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using S-ROM Prosthesis for Dysplastic Hip

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Ryuh Sup; Park, Seung Rim; Lee, Jung Sun; Shin, Sang Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of total hip arthroplasty using a proximal modular femoral stem in patients who had secondary coxarthrosis associated with a dysplastic hip. Materials and Methods Forty-two patients (45 hips) with secondary coxarthrosis were evaluated after undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty using an S-ROM proximal modular femoral stem. The average follow-up was 80 months (range: 60 to 96 months). Clinical and radiological assessments were performed based on the Harris hip score and the radiological changes around the prosthesis. Results The average Harris hip score improved from 52.2 points to 88.5 points. All femoral stems showed stable fixation; there were 37 cases by bony ingrowth and 8 cases by stable fibrous ingrowth. Neither osteolysis nor progressive radiolucent lines around the femoral stem were found at the last follow-up. Forty-one hips (91.9%) revealed excellent or good clinical results at the most recent follow-up. Conclusion For advanced secondary coxarthrosis, total hip arthroplasty with the use of the proximal modular femoral stem yielded good mid-term results with respect to the clinical and radiological criteria. PMID:21623609

  14. Primary cementless total hip arthroplasty with an alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearing: results after a minimum of twenty years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Petsatodis, George E; Papadopoulos, Pericles P; Papavasiliou, Kyriakos A; Hatzokos, Ippokratis G; Agathangelidis, Filon G; Christodoulou, Anastasios G

    2010-03-01

    The biological problems related to wear debris after total hip arthroplasty have stimulated renewed interest in alternatives to metal-on-polyethylene bearing surfaces. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of 100 patients who had undergone a total of 109 primary total hip arthroplasties with a cementless alumina ceramic-on-ceramic prosthesis between January 1985 and December 1989. The mean age of the patients at the time of the index arthroplasty was forty-six years. Clinical evaluation was performed with use of the Charnley modification of the Merle d'Aubigné-Postel scale. Seventy-eight patients who had had a total of eighty-five arthroplasties were available for follow-up evaluation at an average of 20.8 years. The patients' average age at the time of the latest follow-up was 66.8 years. Six hips (six acetabular cups and one femoral stem) in six patients underwent revision. Aseptic loosening of the cup combined with focal osteolysis was the cause of all six revisions. In one patient, the stem was also revised because of aseptic loosening. At the time of final follow-up, the result was excellent (according to the Merle d'Aubigné-Postel scale) in 68% of the hips, good in 19%, fair in 9%, and poor in 4%. The mean Merle d'Aubigné-Postel score improved from 7.9 points preoperatively to 16.9 points postoperatively (p < 0.001). The cumulative rate of survival of the prostheses was 84.4% at 20.8 years. The results of these cementless ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasties continued to be satisfactory at a minimum of twenty years postoperatively. The improved design of contemporary prostheses and the new generation of ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surfaces may lead to even better long-term results.

  15. Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty Involving Trochanteric Osteotomy without Subtrochanteric Shortening for High Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soong Joon; Kim, Hee Joong

    2017-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty with subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy is widely performed for high hip dislocation. However, suboptimal leg length discrepancy correction and nonunion of the osteotomy site remain concerns. Although total hip arthroplasty using trochanteric osteotomy without subtrochanteric osteotomy was introduced, cemented implants have been more commonly used than contemporary cementless implants in this procedure. We evaluated the long-term results of cementless total hip arthroplasty with trochanteric osteotomy without subtrochanteric osteotomy for high hip dislocation. Methods From 1990 to 2002, 27 cementless total hip arthroplasties using trochanteric osteotomy without subtrochanteric osteotomy were performed in 26 patients with Crowe III or IV high hip dislocation and a mean age of 36.4 ± 12.9 years. Seven ceramic-on-ceramic, 8 ceramic-on-polyethylene, 10 metal-on-polyethylene, and 2 metal-on-metal bearings were inserted. Mean follow-up was 15.1 ± 3.7 years. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and radiographic data and evaluated the clinical and radiological results including the Harris hip score, implant survival, correction of leg length discrepancy, and occurrence of complications. Results The mean Harris hip score and leg length discrepancy improved significantly from 73.3 to 94.9 points and from 4.3 cm to 1.0 cm, respectively. With revision for loosening set as the end point, implant survival rates at 10 and 15 years postoperatively were 96.0% and 90.9% for stems and 74.1% and 52.3% for cups. In 8 of 10 hips with the metal-on-polyethylene bearing and 4 of 8 hips with the ceramic-on-polyethylene bearing, revision surgery was performed for aseptic loosening. However, no revision was performed in hips with the ceramic-on-ceramic bearing or the metal-on-metal bearing. Implant survival was significantly different by the type of bearing surface. Two permanent neurologic complications occurred in patients with a limb lengthening

  16. Salmon calcitonin nasal spray treatment for postmenopausal women after hip fracture with total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peichl, Peter; Marteau, Robert; Griesmacher, Andrea; Kumpan, Wofgang; Schedl, Rudolf; Prosquil, Eugen; Fasol, Paul; Bröll, Hans

    2005-01-01

    The increasing rate of hip fractures is giving rise to a number of socioeconomic problems for the aging community. In addition to being unable to resume their previous living habits, many patients fail to achieve full functional recovery after the fractures. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a successful operation for the majority of patients with all forms of hip fractures. Dislocation and aseptic loosening are the major reasons for revisions. An additional problem post-THA is the rate of heterotopic soft tissue calcification after total hip arthroplasty, resulting in severely impaired function, pain, and a reduced range of hip motion. In an open study, 37 women who had undergone cementless total hip arthroplasty after accidental hip fractures were treated twice daily with 200 IU salmon calcitonin nasal spray for 12 months. Simultaneously, the patients received one bag of 1000 mg calcium plus 880 IU vitamin D daily throughout the treatment period of 1 year. A parallel group of 38 women with a similar clinical status in terms of hip fractures and cementless total hip arthroplasty were treated with only one bag of 1000 mg calcium plus 880 IU vitamin D daily through the treatment period. The results of this 12-month clinical trial show that 200 IU salmon calcitonin nasal spray per day promotes general independence from foreign assistance, mobility, and fear of further falls in postmenopausal elderly women following THA. Treatment with a salmon calcitonin nasal spray reduces bone turnover serum markers, loss of further bone density, and pain. Additionally, calcitonin promoted the repair of hip fractures and, as a coincidence finding, was associated with a significantly reduced rate of refractures as well as periprosthetic ossifications.

  17. [Metal on metal bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty: a survey of material incidents].

    PubMed

    Passuti, N; Terver, S

    2007-05-01

    This study is dedicated to the problems met with metal-metal bearing prostheses. We have analysed the results of the reports sent to the AFSSAPS relating incidents described with this interface. Only 11 incidents were reported during the last 4 years by surgeons from different centers in France. At a mean follow-up of 7 years, we collected 2614 total hip arthroplasties with metal-metal bearings and among them only 5 cases of unusual osteolysis and 10 cases of impingement. The bibliographic analysis did not show any severe specific complication due to the release of Cobalt or Chromium ions. The increased levels of Co an Cr in the patients' blood is now a well established notion (with more than 10 years follow up) and no special carcinogenetic effect has been correlated with the metal-metal bearings. Small diameter cemented cups can provide complications with high rates of acetabular loosening and metallosis; the same is true for some cementless cups also with loosening and a high revision rate. Among 143 hip prosthesis with a cemented polyethylene cup, at a mean follow-up of 42 months there were 22% of evolutive radiolucencies around the cups concerning all three De Lee and Charnley zones. Furthermore there was a statistically significant difference between small and large diameter cups (loosening of cups less than 46 mm in diameter). The same problem has been described for some cementless cups with loosening at the metal-bone interface due to a failure of osteointegration at the implant surface. However no failures were observed with an hydroxyapatite coating on the same cup. An other matter of concern is the skirted metal head: this design is responsible for a high rate of impingement and of prosthetic revision (2.3% among 642 THA). In these cases the increase of Cobalt serum levels was well correlated with the failure of the metal-metal interface. Large diameter heads decrease significantly the risks of dislocation. This is correlated with the increase in size

  18. Bilateral total hip arthroplasty in siblings with Stickler Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, D; Anderson, J A; Taveras, N A; González Della Valle, A

    2007-01-01

    Stickler Syndrome is an infrequent autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder. The most prevalent mutation affects type II collagen gene and results in abnormalities in cartilage, vitreous and nucleus pulposus. Orthopaedic manifestations include joint hyper- mobility and pain with early development of secondary osteoarthritis. The condition has a predilection for the femoral head and patients usually present in their third to fourth decade with secondary hip arthritis. We report on two siblings with Stickler Syndrome who presented with hip osteoarthritis in their third decade of life and underwent staged bilateral total hip arthroplasties (THA). The patients experienced pain relief and improved quality of life after surgery.

  19. Two-Stage Cementless Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty for Infected Primary Hip Arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Camurcu, Yalkin; Sofu, Hakan; Buyuk, Abdul Fettah; Gursu, Sarper; Kaygusuz, Mehmet Akif; Sahin, Vedat

    2015-09-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to analyze the clinical features, the most common infective agents, and the results of two-stage total hip revision using a teicoplanin-impregnated spacer. Between January 2005 and July 2011, 41 patients were included. At the clinical status analysis, physical examination was performed, Harris hip score was noted, isolated microorganisms were recorded, and the radiographic evaluation was performed. The mean Harris hip score was improved from 38.9 ± 9.6 points to 81.8 ± 5.8 points (P<0.05). Infection was eradicated in 39 hips. Radiographic evidence of stability was noted in 37 acetabular revision components, and all femoral stems. Two-stage revision of the infected primary hip arthroplasty is a time-consuming but a reliable procedure with high rates of success. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of preoperative physiotherapy in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Czyżewska, Anna; Glinkowski, Wojciech M; Walesiak, Katarzyna; Krawczak, Karolina; Cabaj, Dominika; Górecki, Andrzej

    2014-10-27

    The World Health Organization (WHO) claimed osteoarthritis as a civilization-related disease. The effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy among patients suffering hip osteoarthritis (OA) at the end of their conservative treatment is rarely described in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life and musculoskeletal health status of patients who received preoperative physiotherapy before total hip replacement (THR) surgery within a year prior to admission for a scheduled THR and those who did not. Forty-five patients, admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Locomotor System for elective total hip replacement surgery, were recruited for this study. The assessment consisted of a detailed interview using various questionnaires: the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), as well as physical examination. Patients were assigned to groups based on their attendance of preoperative physiotherapy within a year prior to surgery. Among patients who received preoperative physiotherapy a significant improvement was found for pain, daily functioning, vitality, psychological health, social life, and (active and passive) internal rotation (p < 0.05). Patients are not routinely referred to physiotherapy within a year before total hip replacement surgery. This study confirmed that pre-operative physiotherapy may have a positive influence on selected musculoskeletal system status indicators and quality of life in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting surgery.

  1. Effects of preoperative physiotherapy in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Czyżewska, Anna; Walesiak, Katarzyna; Krawczak, Karolina; Cabaj, Dominika; Górecki, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) claimed osteoarthritis as a civilization-related disease. The effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy among patients suffering hip osteoarthritis (OA) at the end of their conservative treatment is rarely described in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life and musculoskeletal health status of patients who received preoperative physiotherapy before total hip replacement (THR) surgery within a year prior to admission for a scheduled THR and those who did not. Material and methods Forty-five patients, admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Locomotor System for elective total hip replacement surgery, were recruited for this study. The assessment consisted of a detailed interview using various questionnaires: the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), as well as physical examination. Patients were assigned to groups based on their attendance of preoperative physiotherapy within a year prior to surgery. Results Among patients who received preoperative physiotherapy a significant improvement was found for pain, daily functioning, vitality, psychological health, social life, and (active and passive) internal rotation (p < 0.05). Conclusions Patients are not routinely referred to physiotherapy within a year before total hip replacement surgery. This study confirmed that pre-operative physiotherapy may have a positive influence on selected musculoskeletal system status indicators and quality of life in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting surgery. PMID:25395951

  2. [Particle disease--aseptic loosening of the total hip endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Kolundzić, Robert; Orlić, Dubravko

    2008-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) improves the ability and quality of life in patients with hip dysfunction due to different causes. Aseptic loosening is the major cause of the late hip endoprosthesis failure. It results from aseptic inflammatory reaction induced by the implant wear debris accumulating at the prosthesis interface, and is mediated by numerous cellular and humoral factors. Due to presence of wear debris we call aseptic loosening of the total hip endoprosthesis as "particle disease". In the most important of factors affecting the risk of aseptic instability include patient's age, sex, body mass index, underlying morbidity (reason for THA), endoprosthetic material and surgeon's skill. However, taken together, all these factors explain only a minor part of variability of this phenomenon. Factors that are decisive for the occurrence of aseptic instability are still largely unknown. The existence of "individual disposition" for development of aseptic instability that is not determined by demographic or biomechanical factors is well recognized.

  3. Optimization of Scan Time in MRI for Total Hip Prostheses: SEMAC Tailoring for Prosthetic Implants Containing Different Types of Metals.

    PubMed

    Deligianni, X; Bieri, O; Elke, R; Wischer, T; Egelhof, T

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of soft tissues after total hip arthroplasty is of clinical interest for the diagnosis of various pathologies that are usually invisible with other imaging modalities. As a result, considerable effort has been put into the development of metal artifact reduction MRI strategies, such as slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC). Generally, the degree of metal artifact reduction with SEMAC directly relates to the overall time spent for acquisition, but there is no specific consensus about the most efficient sequence setup depending on the implant material. The aim of this article is to suggest material-tailored SEMAC protocol settings. Five of the most common total hip prostheses (1. Revision prosthesis (S-Rom), 2. Titanium alloy, 3. Müller type (CoNiCRMo alloy), 4. Old Charnley prosthesis (Exeter/Stryker), 5. MS-30 stem (stainless-steel)) were scanned on a 1.5 T MRI clinical scanner with a SEMAC sequence with a range of artifact-resolving slice encoding steps (SES: 2-23) along the slice direction (yielding a total variable scan time ranging from 1 to 10 min). The reduction of the artifact volume in comparison with maximal artifact suppression was evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively in order to establish a recommended number of steps for each case. The number of SES that reduced the artifact volume below approximately 300 mm(3) ranged from 3 to 13, depending on the material. Our results showed that although 3 SES steps can be sufficient for artifact reduction for titanium prostheses, at least 11 SES should be used for prostheses made of materials such as certain alloys of stainless steel. Tailoring SES to the implant material and to the desired degree of metal artifact reduction represents a simple tool for workflow optimization of SEMAC imaging near total hip arthroplasty in a clinical setting. Five of the most common total hip prostheses have been investigated in vitro. Tailored SEMAC protocols - in terms of

  4. Prevalence of osteoporosis in patients awaiting total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Vitor Rodrigues; de Campos, Gustavo Constantino; Plapler, Pérola Grimberg; de Rezende, Márcia Uchôa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of osteoporosis in patients awaiting total hip arthroplasty. Method: Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with hip osteoarthritis awaiting primary total arthroplasty of the hip answered WOMAC questionnaire, VAS and questions about habits, osteoporosis and related diseases. Bone mineral densitometry of the lumbar spine and hips and laboratory tests (complete blood count and examination of calcium metabolism) were performed. Weight and height were measured to calculate body mass index (BMI). The evaluated quantitative characteristics were compared between patients with and without osteoporosis using the Mann-Whitney tests. Results: Thirteen men and 16 women with a mean age of 61.5 years old, WOMAC 51.4; EVA 6.4 and BMI 27.6 were evaluated. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 20.7%, and 37.9% had osteopenia. Patients with osteoporosis were older than patients without osteoporosis (p=0.006). The mean bone mineral density of the femoral neck without hip osteoarthritis was lower than the affected side (p=0.007). Thirty-five percent of patients did not know what osteoporosis is. Of these, 30% had osteopenia or osteoporosis. Conclusion: osteoarthritis and osteoporosis may coexist and the population waiting for total hip arthroplasty should be considered at risk for the presence of osteoporosis. Level of Evidence III, Observational Study. PMID:26327793

  5. Preventing Leg Length Discrepancy and Instability After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sculco, Peter K; Austin, Matthew S; Lavernia, Carlos J; Rosenberg, Aaron G; Sierra, Rafael J

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of equal leg lengths and dynamic hip stability are essential elements of a successful total hip arthroplasty. A careful clinical examination, a preoperative plan, and appropriate intraoperative techniques are necessary to achieve these goals. Preoperative identification of patients at risk for residual leg length discrepancy allows surgeons to adjust the surgical approach and/or the type of implant and provide better preoperative patient education. The use of larger femoral heads, high-offset stem options, and enhanced soft-tissue repairs have improved impingement-free range of motion as well as dynamic hip stability and have contributed to an overall reduction in dislocation. Methods for accurate leg length restoration and component positioning include anatomic landmarks, intraoperative radiographs, intraoperative calipers, stability testing, and computer-assisted surgery. If recurrent instability occurs after total hip arthroplasty, the underlying cause for dislocation should be identified and treated; this may include the use of semiconstrained dual-mobility or fully constrained liners, depending on abductor function. Surgeons should be aware of the clinical and surgical techniques for achieving leg length equalization and dynamic hip stability in total hip arthroplasty.

  6. Implant survival of the most common cemented total hip devices from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association database

    PubMed Central

    Junnila, Mika; Laaksonen, Inari; Eskelinen, Antti; Pulkkinen, Pekka; Ivar Havelin, Leif; Furnes, Ove; Marie Fenstad, Anne; Pedersen, Alma B; Overgaard, Søren; Kärrholm, Johan; Garellick, Göran; Malchau, Henrik; Mäkelä, Keijo T

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose According to previous Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) data, the 10-year implant survival of cemented total hip arthroplasties (THAs) is 94% in patients aged 65–74 and 96% in patients aged 75 or more. Here we report a brand-level comparison of cemented THA based on the NARA database, which has not been done previously. Patients and methods We determined the rate of implant survival of the 9 most common cemented THAs in the NARA database. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis with 95% CI to study implant survival at 10 and 15 years, and Cox multiple regression to assess survival and hazard ratios (HRs), with revision for any reason as endpoint and with adjustment for age, sex, diagnosis, and femoral head material. Results Spectron EF THA (89.9% (CI: 89.3–90.5)) and Elite THA (89.8% (CI: 89.0–90.6)) had the lowest 10-year survivorship. Lubinus (95.7% survival, CI: 95.5–95.9), MS 30 (96.6%, CI: 95.8–97.4), and C-stem THA (95.8%, CI: 94.8–96.8) had a 10-year survivorship of at least 95%. Lubinus (revision risk (RR) = 0.77, CI: 0.73–0.81), Müller (RR =0.83, CI: 0.70–0.99), MS-30 (RR =0.73, CI: 0.63–0.86), C-stem (RR =0.70, CI: 0.55–0.90), and Exeter Duration THA (RR =0.84, CI: 0.77–0.90) had a lower risk of revision than Charnley THA, the reference implant. Interpretation The Spectron EF THA and the Elite THA had a lower implant survival than the Charnley, Exeter, and Lubinus THAs. Implant survival of the Müller, MS 30, CPT, and C-stem THAs was above the acceptable limit for 10-year survival. PMID:27550058

  7. The History of Biomechanics in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Houcke, Jan Van; Khanduja, Vikas; Pattyn, Christophe; Audenaert, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Biomechanics of the hip joint describes how the complex combination of osseous, ligamentous, and muscular structures transfers the weight of the body from the axial skeleton into the appendicular skeleton of the lower limbs. Throughout history, several biomechanical studies based on theoretical mathematics, in vitro, in vivo as well as in silico models have been successfully performed. The insights gained from these studies have improved our understanding of the development of mechanical hip pathologies such as osteoarthritis, hip fractures, and developmental dysplasia of the hip. The main treatment of end-stage degeneration of the hip is total hip arthroplasty (THA). The increasing number of patients undergoing this surgical procedure, as well as their demand for more than just pain relief and leading an active lifestyle, has challenged surgeons and implant manufacturers to deliver higher function as well as longevity with the prosthesis. The science of biomechanics has played and will continue to play a crucial and integral role in achieving these goals. The aim of this article, therefore, is to present to the readers the key concepts in biomechanics of the hip and their application to THA.

  8. Composite technology for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Skinner, H B

    1988-10-01

    Composite materials, which can be very strong while having a low modulus of elasticity, are being studied because such materials have potential to be made into isoelastic hip prostheses. Composites intended for medical applications incorporate carbon or polyamide as a fiber component, while polysulfone, polyetheretherketone, or polyethylene is used as a matrix component. Mechanical properties (especially the modulus of elasticity) are emphasized because of the desire to match those properties of the proximal femur. Many of the variables that affect the mechanical properties of these materials are explained. The application of stress to different fiber orientations demonstrates the mechanical properties of the composite, and this is proved mathematically. It is shown that in composites with fibers oriented in the same direction, the modulus of elasticity in the direction of the fibers generally approaches that of the fibers as the amount of matrix decreases. Perpendicular to the fibers, the modulus of elasticity of the composite is only slightly greater than that of the matrix material. For isotropic chopped-fiber composites, the modulus of elasticity approaches that of the matrix as the fiber content decreases; at high-fiber content, the modulus is significantly less than that of oriented long-fiber composites. In general, the modulus of elasticity and fiber content have a linear relationship. Composites have fatigue properties that vary with direction and approach ultimate strength in tension but are lower in compression. The fatigue properties of proposed composites are discussed. Abrasion as a cause of stress concentration sites and wear particles is considered.

  9. [Value of preoperative planning in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    De Thomasson, E; Mazel, C; Guingand, O; Terracher, R

    2002-05-01

    Preoperative planning enables an assessment of the size of the implants needed before total hip replacement. Eggli and Müller demonstrated the reproduciblity of preoperative planning but did not evaluate its contribution to reducing limb length discrepancy. As femur lateralization and the position of the prosthetic center of rotation affect joint mechanics, it would be useful to assess their contribution to the efficacy of preoperative planning. We reviewed the files of 57 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty for primary joint degeneration or necrosis limited to one hip. The healthy hip served as a control. The surgical plan was elaborated from the preoperative pelvis x-rays (AP and lateral views) and anatomic measurements on films obtained three months postoperatively. In 49 cases, preoperative planning predicted a restoration of the normal anatomy of the operated hip (center of rotation, femur lateralization, length of the operated limb). This objective was achieved in only 22.5% of the cases. Femur lateralization was the most difficult objective to achieve (59.2%). Equal limb length and good position of the center of rotation was achieved in 70% of the cases. For eight patients (14%) preoperative planning was not satisfactory, the implant offset not being adapted to the patient's anatomy. There are limits to preoperative planning, particularly for restitution of adequate femur lateralization. This difficulty appears to be related to three factors: inadequate adaptation of the implant to hip anatomy (14% of the cases in our experience), stiff rotation in degenerative hips inhibiting proper assessment of the length of the femoral neck, and relative imprecision of operative evaluation of femoral anteversion affecting femur lateralization and the level of the femoral cut. Although imperfect, preoperative planning is, in our opinion, essential before total hip arthroplasty in order to avoid major positioning errors and operative difficulties.

  10. Psoas abscess associated with infected total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Buttaro, M; González Della Valle, A; Piccaluga, F

    2002-02-01

    A 65-year-old man with a left uncemented total hip arthroplasty performed 11 years previously was admitted with a history of progressive low back pain, left hip pain, and sepsis that had begun 6 months earlier. On physical examination, a gross, fluctuant mass was palpated in the left thigh. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a 6.5 x 3 cm left retrofascial psoas abscess communicating with the hip joint. The patient underwent irrigation and débridement of the hip with removal of the components. The psoas abscess was drained through the iliopsoas bursa. A residual psoas abscess was drained percutaneously under CT guidance. Cultures isolated Escherichia coli, and the patient responded to 6 months of ciprofloxacin therapy. After 1 year, the patient had no evidence of infection. Pathways of infection spread, diagnosis, and treatment of a patient with this rare association are discussed with a review of the literature.

  11. MAASH Technique for Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Capsular Work.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Felipe G; Broch, Albert; Reina, Francisco; Ximeno, Lluís; Torras, David; García, Francesc; Salvador, Antoni

    2013-07-01

    Dislocation and leg length discrepancy are major complications following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Many surgical approaches for THA have been described, but none suggest a capsular incision that assures good exposure while maintaining adequate capsule integrity in closure. Modified anterolateral approach for stable hip (MAASH) is a modification of the classical Hardinge approach, but specifically preserves the anterior iliofemoral lateral ligament and pubofemoral ligament excising the "weak area" of the capsule, in the so called "internervous safe zone" and introducing the "box concept" for the anterior approach to the hip. This is the main difference of the MAASH approach. This technique can be used as a standard for all THA standard models, but we introduce new devices to make it easier. From November 2007 to May 2012, data were collected for this observational retrospective consecutive case study. We report the results of 100 THA cases corresponding to the development curve of this new concept in THA technique. MAASH technique offers to hip surgeons, a reliable and reproducible THA anterolateral technique assuring accurate reconstruction of leg length and a low rate of dislocation. Only one dislocation and six major complications are reported, but most of them occurred at the early stages of technique development. MAASH technique proposes a novel concept on working with the anterior capsule of the hip for the anterolateral approach in total hip arthroplasty, as well as for hemiarthroplasty in the elderly population with high dislocation risk factors. MAASH offers maximal stability and the ability to restore leg length accurately.

  12. Predictors of quality of life outcomes after revision total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Biring, G S; Masri, B A; Greidanus, N V; Duncan, C P; Garbuz, D S

    2007-11-01

    A prospective cohort of 222 patients who underwent revision hip replacement between April 2001 and March 2004 was evaluated to determine predictors of function, pain and activity level between one and two years post-operatively, and to define quality of life outcomes using validated patient reported outcome tools. Predictive models were developed and proportional odds regression analyses were performed to identify factors that predict quality of life outcomes at one and two years post-operatively. The dependent outcome variables were the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) function and pain scores, and University of California Los Angeles activity scores. The independent variables included patient demographics, operative factors, and objective quality of life parameters, including pre-operative WOMAC, and the Short Form-12 mental component score. There was a significant improvement (t-test, p < 0.001) in all patient quality of life scores. In the predictive model, factors predictive of improved function (original regression analyses, p < 0.05) included a higher pre-operative WOMAC function score (p < 0.001), age between 60 and 70 years (p < 0.037), male gender (p = 0.017), lower Charnley class (p < 0.001) and aseptic loosening being the indication for revision (p < 0.003). Using the WOMAC pain score as an outcome variable, factors predictive of improvement included the pre-operative WOMAC function score (p = 0.001), age between 60 and 70 years (p = 0.004), male gender (p = 0.005), lower Charnley class (p = 0.001) and no previous revision procedure (p = 0.023). The pre-operative WOMAC function score (p = 0.001), the indication for the operation (p = 0.007), and the operating surgeon (p = 0.008) were significant predictors of the activity assessment at follow-up. Predictors of quality of life outcomes after revision hip replacement were established. Although some patient-specific and surgery-specific variables were important, age, gender

  13. Femoral neck preservation in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Pipino, F; Molfetta, L

    1993-01-01

    Preservation of the femoral neck in hip arthroplasty creates a particular biomechanical situation which is clearly different from what is found even after partial neck removal. The femoral neck consists in fact of a "cylinder of cortical bone" that can be used as the "base" for anchoring the stem to the femur, in contrast to the press-fit procedure or other solutions. The mechanical and biological advantages are as follows: 1) Primary triplanar stem stability, in particular rotational stability. Rotational movements of the stem are blocked by the tough lateral cortical cylinder of the neck. Resistance to varus-valgus stress and collapse is also increased vertically and frontally. 2) Proximal cortical fixation. Primary fixation of the stem is provided by the neck cortex, whereas its mid-distal part is merely held by the metaphyseal cancellous bone and the tip is undersized with respect to the medullary canal. 3) Stress loads distributed along physiological lines of stress. Retention of the neck permits preservation of the trabecular systems, along which the stress is distributed towards the diaphysis and the greater trochanter. 4) Elasticity of the bone-prosthesis system. Most of the stem is contained within the metaphyseal cancellous bone that lies between the prosthesis and the cortical bone, creating a bone-prosthesis module with variable and integrated elasticity. 5) Preservation of the bone-stock. The amount of residual bone following implant of the prosthesis increases, not only because of the presence of the femoral neck, but also as a result of the preservation of most of the metaphyseal cancellous bone. There is therefore greater bone-ingrowth, which is also favoured by the fewer changes in the endosteal blood supply. 6) Prosthesis revision is simpler, since the stem can easily be removed and a second neck resection performed. Our clinical and experimental studies, together with those of Freeman et al., confirm that the femoral neck is present for a long

  14. Lower limb length and offset in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Flecher, X; Ollivier, M; Argenson, J N

    2016-02-01

    Restoration of normal hip biomechanics is a key goal of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and favorably affects functional recovery. Furthermore, a major concern for both the surgeon and the patient is preservation or restoration of limb length equality, which must be achieved without compromising the stability of the prosthesis. Here, definitions are given for anatomic and functional limb length discrepancies and for femoral and hip offset, determined taking anteversion into account. Data on the influence of operated-limb length and offset on patient satisfaction, hip function, and prosthesis survival after THA are reviewed. Errors may adversely impact function, quality of life, and prosthetic survival and may also generate conflicts between the surgeon and patient. Surgeons rely on two- or three-dimensional preoperative templating and on intraoperative landmarks to manage offset and length. Accuracy can be improved by using computer-assisted planning or surgery and the more recently introduced EOS imaging system. The prosthetic's armamentarium now includes varus-aligned and lateralized implants, as well as implants with modular or custom-made necks, which allow restoration of the normal hip geometry, most notably in patients with coxa vara or coxa valga. Femoral anteversion must also receive careful attention. The most common errors are limb lengthening and a decrease in hip offset. When symptoms are caused by an error in length and/or offset, revision arthroplasty may deserve consideration.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and management of hip pain after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H John; Ranawat, Amar S; Potter, Hollis G; Foo, Li Foong; Jawetz, Shari T; Ranawat, Chitranjan S

    2009-08-01

    Evaluation of pain following total hip arthroplasty (THA) can be challenging in the absence of radiographic pathology. This study aimed to examine the diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of enigmatic hip pain following THA. We reviewed a series of patients who were evaluated with MRI after presenting with enigmatic hip pain following THA. MRI was able to demonstrate pathology in the periprosthetic tissues in all hips with minimal artifact. Patients underwent a range of conservative and operative interventions depending on the underlying pathology. If used discriminately in situations where pathology cannot be detected by conventional methods, MRI is a highly effective modality that can aid in the diagnosis of a wide range of disorders thereby allowing the clinician to determine the most appropriate intervention.

  16. The tribology of metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A

    2006-02-01

    Total hip surgery is an effective way of alleviating the pain and discomfort caused by diseased or damaged joints. However, in the majority of cases, these joints have a finite life. The main reason for failure is osteolysis (bone resorption). It is well documented that an important cause of osteolysis, and therefore the subsequent loosening and failure of conventional metal- or ceramic-on-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene joints, is the body's immunological response to the polyethylene wear particles. To avoid this, interest has been renewed in metal-on-metal joints. The intention of this paper is to review the studies that have taken place within different laboratories to determine the tribological performance of new-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements. These types of joint offer a potential solution to enhance the longevity of prosthetic hip systems; however, problems may arise owing to the effects of metal ion release, which are, as yet, not fully understood.

  17. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27536639

  18. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Min, Byung-Woo; Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty.

  19. Alcohol use in elective total hip arthroplasty: risk or benefit?

    PubMed

    Lavernia, Carlos J; Villa, Jesus M; Contreras, Juan S

    2013-02-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption has been associated with adverse health measures after elective surgery. The effects of low or moderate consumption remain unclear. We determined differences among patients with different consumption levels in (1) preoperative and postoperative patient-perceived outcomes and hip scores, (2) changes in those scores from preoperatively to postoperatively, (3) demographics and comorbidities, and (4) length of stay (LOS) and hospitalization charges. We retrospectively reviewed 191 patients (218 primary hips). Based on a self-administered consumption questionnaire, patients were stratified into three groups: (1) nondrinkers (n = 52), (2) occasional drinkers (n = 56), and (3) moderate drinkers (n = 17). Demographics, BMI, Charlson Comorbidity Index, and American Society of Anesthesiologists grade; preoperative and postoperative Quality of Well-being Scale, SF-36, WOMAC, Harris hip, and Merle d'Aubigné-Postel hip scores; and LOS and hospital charges were obtained and compared among groups adjusting for patient characteristics. Minimum followup was 1 year (mean, 3.5 years; range, 1-6 years). Most abstainers were older, female, and Hispanic. Preoperatively, moderate drinkers had better WOMAC function and total scores and Harris hip scores. There were no differences postoperatively among groups. However, nondrinkers had greater improvement (preoperative to postoperative) in the WOMAC function, pain, and total scores. Compared to nondrinkers, moderate drinkers had a higher contribution margin and net income. Alcohol consumption is more common among men and non-Hispanics. Moderate consumption was associated with better WOMAC and Harris hip scores. After surgery, abstainers achieved greater improvements in the WOMAC function, pain, and total scores. Level III, prognostic study. See the Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  20. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. Material/Methods A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. Results A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). Conclusions 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  1. Infection in total hip replacement: meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Senthi, Surendra; Munro, Jacob T.

    2010-01-01

    While total hip arthroplasty has progressed to become one of the most successful surgical procedures ever developed, infection remains a serious complication. We have conducted a review of the literature pertaining to management of deep infection in total hip arthroplasty, specifically focusing on clinically relevant articles published in the last five years. A search was conducted using MEDLINE and PubMed, as well as a review of the Cochrane database, using the terms “total hip arthroplasty”, “total hip replacement” and “infection”. References for all selected articles were cross-checked. While the so-called two-stage revision is generally considered to be the gold standard for management, numerous studies now report outcomes for implant retention and reassessing one-stage revision strategies. There are encouraging reports for complex reconstruction options in patients with associated severe bone stock loss. The duration of antibiotic therapy remains controversial. There is concern about increasing bacterial resistance especially with the widespread use of vancomycin and ertapenem (carbapenem). PMID:21085957

  2. Effects of Neuromuscular Reeducation on Hip Mechanics and Functional Performance in Patients after Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Dana L.; Winters, Joshua D.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.; Christiansen, Cory L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following total hip arthroplasty, patients demonstrate compensatory movement strategies during activities of daily living such as walking and stair climbing. Movement compensations are important markers of functional decline in older adults and are related to poor functional capacity. Despite increased utilization of hip arthroplasty, persistent movement compensation, and functional performance deficits, no consensus on postoperative rehabilitation exists. Neuromuscular reeducation techniques offer a strategy to improve movement quality by emphasizing hip abductor performance and pelvic stability. This case series illustrates changes in movement strategy around the hip in response to targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques after hip arthroplasty. Methods Five participants received an 8-week exercise program following total hip arthroplasty, emphasizing targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques hallmarked by specific, weight-bearing exercise to improve hip abductor performance and pelvic stability. Five additional participants were supervised and followed for comparison. Findings Participants in the neuromuscular reeducation program improved their internal hip abductor moments and vertical ground reaction forces during walking and stair climbing. They also improved their functional performance and hip abductor strength outcomes. Interpretation Targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques after total hip arthroplasty provided a positive effect on biomechanical outcomes, functional performance, and muscle strength. Through focused use of the hip abductor muscles, increased internal hip abductor moments were observed. This intervention potentially promotes pelvic stability, and may contribute to improved performance on tasks such as stair climbing, fast walking, and balance. The results suggest that neuromuscular reeducation offers a unique effect on movement strategy and function for patients following total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26802531

  3. Treatment of symptomatic greater trochanteric fracture after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Jeffrey I; Chuang, Michael J; Cerynik, Douglas L; Johanson, Norman A

    2009-08-01

    Isolated greater trochanter fractures after total hip arthroplasty are associated with major comorbidities such as debilitating weakness, pain, and dislocation. No definitive standard of care has been established for these fracture. However, it is well known that reestablishing osseous union in these patients is strongly associated with return of functional status. We report a case of an elderly patient with multiple hip revision surgeries now presenting with unilateral greater trochanter fracture. Treatment incorporated the use of a trochanteric claw plate, cerclage wiring, and adjuvant demineralized bone matrix allograft to achieve successful osseous union. This is the first reported use of adjuvant demineralized bone matrix for fixing these fractures.

  4. Bilateral total hip replacement in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Dalton, David Michael; Magill, Paul; Mulhall, Kevin James

    2015-11-25

    The authors present a case of bilateral total hip replacements (THRs) in a 56-year-old patient with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). The considerations for the perioperative period and the outcome are discussed. Preoperative planning included an anaesthetic review and availability of fiberoptic intubation due to poor mouth opening. Perioperatively, contractures can make positioning and exposure difficult but in this case a standard posterior approach was taken. Particular attention was given to soft tissue balancing given the theoretical risk of dislocation. There were no perioperative complications. Postoperatively there has been improvement in pain and hip scores but the patient has failed to return to work. Objective improvements in range of motion (ROM) have not been made. This experience suggests THR is a safe and effective treatment for osteoarthritic hip pain in patients with AMC but patients should be informed that ROM is unlikely to improve. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Iliopsoas cyst causing persistent pain after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wuenschel, Markus; Kunze, Beate

    2011-05-18

    Persistent pain after total hip arthroplasty (THA) has many potential causes. The most common are aseptic loosening, infection, and heterotopic ossification. Irritation of the iliopsoas tendon due to the acetabular component is an underestimated cause of persistent groin pain and functional disability after THA with rare incidence. Pain specific to iliopsoas tendonitis includes activities such as hyperextension of the hip, forced flexion, and activities of daily living (eg, ascending stairs). This article presents a case of a 50-year old man with clinical and radiological signs of osteoarthritis of the right hip joint. A THA was performed. After a symptom-free interval of several weeks postoperatively, the patient reported pain projecting from the right groin and radiating ventromedially along the leg. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hip showed a fluid-filled cyst in anatomical proximity to the femoral nerve causing an iliopsoas tendonitis. The patient underwent surgical resection of the cyst was performed by an anterior approach; a conjunction to the hip joint was not present. The implanted components of the prosthesis showed good osseointegration with no signs of loosening. The cyst was removed and the iliopsoas tendon was released. A few weeks after the operation, the patient was pain free. At 17-month follow-up, no problems were reported. In cases such as this, finding the correct diagnosis may be difficult and misleading. Conservative and operative therapeutic options are discussed and compared with divergent findings in the literature. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Fracture of the Modular Neck in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, A.; Gargallo-Margarit, A.; Barro, V.; Gallardo-Calero, I.; Sallent, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity of the components in total hip arthroplasty has had an increase in popularity in the last decades. We present the case of a 53-year-old man with a history of avascular necrosis of the femoral head due to a hypophyseal adenoma. A total hip modular arthroplasty was implanted. Three and a half years after the surgery the patient attended the emergency room due to acute left hip pain with no prior traumatism. Radiological examination confirmed a fracture of the modular neck. A revision surgery was performed finding an important pseudotumoral well-organized periprosthetic tissue reaction. Through an extended trochanteric osteotomy the femoral component was removed, and a straight-stem revision prosthesis implanted. There are several potential advantages when using modularity in total hip arthroplasty that surgeons may benefit from, but complications have arisen and must be addressed. Various circumstances such as large femoral head with a long varus neck, corrosion, patient's BMI, and activity level may participate in creating the necessary environment for fatigue failure of the implant. PMID:26266069

  7. [Rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty of hip and knee].

    PubMed

    Jansen, E; Brienza, S; Gierasimowicz-Fontana, A; Matos, C; Reynders-Frederix-Dobre, C; HateM, S M

    2015-09-01

    Numbers of total hip and knee arthroplasties are increasing on a regular basis. Clinical pathways tend to shorten the duration of hospitalization in acute care after surgery. Therefore, the preoperative preparation of the patient and his abilities for postoperative rehabilitation should be carefully addressed. Before the surgical intervention, it is recommended that the patient receives an educational program and a physical preparation. After the surgical intervention, the patient can benefit from a home-based rehabilitation program supervised by a physiotherapist, if there were no preoperative reasons for prolonging the hospital stay and if the surgery took place without complications. Some patients may benefit from postsurgical rehabilitation in a specialized locomotor rehabilitation long-stay care unit. The indications for inpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation are : two simultaneous arthroplasties, revision of a previous hip or knee arthroplasty, postsurgical complications, advanced age, comorbidities influencing the rehabilitation process, social difficulties, necessity for adaptation of the environment, insufficient or unadapted out-patient (para)medical care. The goals of the rehabilitation treatment depend on the patient's characteristics and environment, on the properties of the prosthesis and on the postsurgical complications. The functional prognosis of a total joint arthroplasty of the knee or hip is excellent, provided that there are no post-surgical complications and that the patient benefits from adequate rehabilitation therapy. The present paper describes the different phases of rehabilitation treatment and the general and specific complications of total hip and knee arthroplasties that may influence the rehabilitation outcome.

  8. Is tantalum protective against infection in revision total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Tokarski, A T; Novack, T A; Parvizi, J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesised that the use of tantalum (Ta) acetabular components in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) was protective against subsequent failure due to infection. We identified 966 patients (421 men, 545 women and 990 hips) who had undergone revision THA between 2000 and 2013. The mean follow up was 40.2 months (3 months to 13.1 years). The mean age of the men and women was 62.3 years (31 to 90) and 65.1 years (25 to 92), respectively. Titanium (Ti) acetabular components were used in 536 hips while Ta components were used in 454 hips. In total, 73 (7.3%) hips experienced subsequent acetabular failure. The incidence of failure was lower in the Ta group at 4.4% (20/454) compared with 9.9% (53/536) in the Ti group (p < 0.001, odds ratio 2.38; 95% CI 1.37 to 4.27). Among the 144 hips (64 Ta, 80 Ti) for which revision had been performed because of infection, failure due to a subsequent infection was lower in the Ta group at 3.1% (2/64) compared with 17.5% (14/80) for the Ti group (p = 0.006). Thus, the use of Ta acetabular components during revision THA was associated with a lower incidence of failure from all causes and Ta components were associated with a lower incidence of subsequent infection when used in patients with periprosthetic joint infection. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  9. MINIMALLY INVASIVE ANTEROLATERAL ACCESS ROUTE FOR TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Sawaia, Rogério Naim; Galvão, Antonio Felipe Martensen; Oliveira, Fernando Machado; Secunho, Guilherme Rondinelli; Filho, Geraldo Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to present a minimally invasive anterolateral access route and to ascertain whether this enables total hip replacement without compromising the quality of the implant positioning, while maintaining the integrity of the gluteus muscles. Method: A retrospective study was conducted on 260 patients (186 females and 74 males) with an average age of 62 years. There were 18 bilateral cases, totaling 278 hips. All the patients had osteoarthritis and had undergone non-cemented total hip arthroplasty (metal-metal or metal-polyethylene) between October 2004 and December 2007. A minimally invasive anterolateral access route was used, measuring 7 to 10 cm in length, according to body weight and the size of the femoral head. The patients were assessed clinically regarding age, sex and presence of the Trendelenburg sign, and radiologically regarding acetabular and femoral positioning. Results: The acetabular inclination was between 30° and 40° in 78 patients, between 41° and 50° in 189 patients, and 51° or over in 11 patients. On anteroposterior radiographs to study femoral positioning, the positioning was central in 209 cases, 41 presented valgus deviation and 28 presented varus deviation. On lateral views, 173 were central, 67 anterior and 38 posterior. The mean duration of the procedure was 63 minutes. Regarding complications, there were five cases of infection, three of deep vein thrombosis, two of hip dislocation, 80 of lengthening of the lower limbs and five of shortening of the operated limb. The Trendelenburg sign was present in four cases, of which one showed superior gluteal nerve injury. Conclusion: The minimally invasive anterolateral access route made it possible to perform total hip arthroplasty without compromising the positioning of the implants, thereby maintaining the integrity of the gluteus muscles. PMID:27027008

  10. Plasma, bone, hip capsule, synovial and drain fluid concentrations of lincomycin during total hip replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, R L; Beavis, J P; Hossack, G A; Paddock, G M

    1977-01-01

    1 Lincomycin (600 mg) was given 6 h preoperatively by intramuscular injection, as an intravenous infusion over 30 min and for 72 h postoperatively in twelve patients having total hip replacement. 2 The plasma, bone, hip capsule, synovial and drain fluid concentrations of lincomycin were almost always above the M.I.C. of lincomycin against penicillinase producing Staphylococcus aureus. 3 There was a good correlation between the estimated concentrations of lincomycin in bone by the grinding and agitation methods of analysis. 4 Two patients developed pseudomembranous colitis after parenteral lincomycin. PMID:901734

  11. Piroxicam and naproxen in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip waiting for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Alho, A; Jaer, O; Slungaard, U; Holme, I

    1988-06-01

    Two-hundred and fifty-two patients waiting for a total hip replacement for degenerative hip disease were randomized to two groups of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication using piroxicam, 20 mg per day, and naproxen, 750 mg per day, after exclusion for severe dyspepsia or peptic ulcer, asthma, idiosyncracy, dissent, age below 50 years, Harris hip score above 50, or significant contralateral disease. A significant improvement in the pain and daily activity parameters was obtained in both groups. The effect was better in the piroxicam group one month after the commencement of the treatment, and equal in the groups later during the observation period of 2-5 months. We conclude that continuous medication is beneficial in patients with severe osteoarthritis scheduled for operation. However, the side effects of the medication have to be carefully considered and followed up.

  12. The Influence of Hip Rotation on Femoral Offset Following Short Stem Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boese, Christoph K; Bredow, Jan; Ettinger, Max; Eysel, Peer; Thorey, Fritz; Lechler, Philipp; Budde, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Short stem total hip arthroplasty (THA) is thought to be an advantageous surgical option for young patients. Femoral offset has been identified as an important factor for clinical outcome of THA. However, little is known on functional implications of femoral offset after short stem THA. Importantly, hip rotation influences the projected femoral offset and may lead to significant underestimation. Therefore, a novel method to identify and account for hip rotation was applied to a prospectively enrolled series of 37 patients (48 radiographs) undergoing short stem THA. Repeated measurements were performed and intraobserver and interobserver reliability was assessed and femoral offset was corrected for rotation. Based on this study, rotation-correction of femoral offset is of highest relevance for the correct interpretation in future studies.

  13. A Useful Anatomical Reference Guide for Stem Anteversion during Total Hip Arthroplasty in the Dysplastic Hip.

    PubMed

    Tsukeoka, Tadashi; Tsuneizumi, Yoshikazu; Lee, Tae Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography scans of 50 dysplastic hips were obtained and reconstructed using preoperative planning software for total hip arthroplasty. The anteversion of the stem implanted parallel to the line connecting the trochanteric fossa and the middle of the medial cortex of the femoral neck (T line) was measured. The cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm above the lesser trochanter were simulated. The mean difference of the anteversion of the stem using the T line and the native femoral anteversion was 2.7° (95% CI: 1.0°-4.5°) and 3.5° (95% CI: 1.5°-5.5°) at cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm respectively. An anteversion using a T line is compatible with native femoral anteversion even in developmental dysplasia of the hip.

  14. Charnley low-frictional torque arthroplasty in patients under the age of 51 years. Follow-up to 33 years.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, B M; Siney, P D; Fleming, P A

    2002-05-01

    Between November 1962 and December 1990 a group of 1092 patients, 668 women and 424 men, under the age of 51 years at the time of surgery, underwent 1434 primary Charnley low-frictional torque arthroplasties and are being followed up indefinitely. Their mean age at operation was 41 years (12 to 51). At the latest review in June 2001 the mean follow-up had been for 15 years 1 month. Of the 1092 patients 54 (66 hips) could not be traced, 124 (169 hips) were known to have died and 220 (248 hips) had had a revision procedure. At a mean follow-up of 17 years and 5 months, 759 patients (951 hips) are still attending. In this group satisfaction with the outcome is 96.2%. The incidence of deep infection for the whole group was 1.67%. It was more common in patients who had had previous surgery (hemi- and total hip arthroplasties excluded), 2.2% compared with 1.5% in those who had not had previous surgery, but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.4). There were fewer cases of deep infection if gentamicin-containing cement was used, 0.9% compared with 1.9% in those with plain acrylic cement, but this was not also statistically significant (p = 0.4). There was a significantly higher rate of revision in patients who had had previous hip surgery, 24.8% compared with 14.1% in those who had not had previous surgery (p < 0.001). At the latest review, 1.95% are known to have had at least one dislocation and 0.4% have had a revision for dislocation. The indication for revision was aseptic loosening of the cup (11.7%), aseptic loosening of the stem (4.9%), a fractured stem (1.7%), deep infection (1.5%) and dislocation (0.4%). With revision for any indication as the endpoint the survivorship was 93.7% (92.3 to 95.0) at ten years, 84.7% (82.4 to 87.1) at 15 years, 74.3% (70.5 to 78.0) at 20 years and 55.3% (45.5 to 65.0) at 27 years, when 55 hips remained 'at risk'.

  15. Psychological factors as risk factors for poor hip function after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Benditz, Achim; Jansen, Petra; Schaible, Jan; Roll, Christina; Grifka, Joachim; Götz, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is influenced by several psychological aspects, such as depression, anxiety, resilience, and personality traits. We hypothesized that preoperative depression impedes early functional outcome after THA (primary outcome measure). Additional objectives were perioperative changes in the psychological status and their influence on perioperative outcome. This observational study analyzed depression, anxiety, resilience, and personality traits in 50 patients after primary unilateral THA. Hip functionality was measured by means of the Harris Hip Score. Depression, state anxiety, and resilience were evaluated preoperatively as well as 1 and 5 weeks postoperatively. Trait anxiety and personality traits were measured once preoperatively. Patients with low depression and anxiety levels had significantly better outcomes with respect to early hip functionality. Resilience and personality traits did not relate to hip functionality. Depression and state anxiety levels significantly decreased within the 5-week stay in the acute and rehabilitation clinic, whereas resilience remained at the same level. Our study suggests that low depression and anxiety levels are positively related to early functionality after THA. Therefore, perioperative measurements of these factors seem to be useful to provide the best support for patients with risk factors. PMID:28260910

  16. [Comparison of clinical efficacy between minimally invasive total hip artliroplasty and traditional total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Li, Xiu-xia; Gao, Ming-xuan; Wang, Ze-hao; Yu, Li-ming; Li, Xu-sheng

    2016-02-01

    To systematically review the effectiveness of minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty (MIS-THA) versus traditional total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with hip diseases. Through a method of combining Free words and keywords,we searched databases including PubMed,The Cochrane Library, EMbase,Web of Science, CBM , CNKI and Wanfang Data for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the comparison between MIS-THA and THA for hip disease from inception to June, 2014. Two reviewers independently screened literatures according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed the quality of the included studies according to the "bias risk assessment" tool recommended by Cochrane Handbook 5.0 for Systematic Reviews. Then, meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3 software. Thirteen RCTs involving 1 213 cases of surgeries and total 1 284 hips (MIS-THA: n = 631; THA: n = 653) were identified. The results of meta-analysis showed that statistically significant differences were found in Harris hip score on the 3rd month after operation [MD = 8.37, 95% CI (6.02,10.72)], Hematocrit [MD = 0.02, 95% CI (0.01, 0.03)] and Hemoglobin [MD = 0.50, 95% CI (0.16, 0.85)] at the 48th hour after operation, changed value of femoral offset [MD = 0.30, 95% CI (0.04, 0.56)] between two groups. In the change value of femoral offset, THA was better than MIS-THA; There were no statistically significant differences between two groups in Harris hip score at 1st year after operation [MD = 3.26, 95% CI (-3.25, 9.76)], WOMAC score [MD = -0.53, 95% CI (-3.67, 2.60)] and Oxford score [MD = 1.34, 95% CI (-3.46, 6.13)] at the 6th week after operation, Hematocrit at the 8th hour after operation [MD = -0.01, 95% CI (-0.02, 0.00)], the incidence of hip varus [RR = 0.82, 95% CI (0.45,1.52)] and dislocation [RR = 1.40, 95% CI (0.48, 4.12)]. THA brings less trauma, less hemorrhage and better early clinical outcome compared with MIS-THA, but the difference of the complication rates

  17. The provision of total hip replacement for displaced intracapsular hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) currently recommends the use of total hip replacement (THR) for displaced intracapsular hip fractures in patients who meet certain mobility, cognitive and health criteria. Methods A multicentre prospective audit was conducted within a defined geographic region to assess current practice and variation in provision of THR for displaced intracapsular hip fractures. Results A total of 879 patients with hip fractures, admitted to 8 acute trauma units, were included in this study. Of 462 patients with displaced intracapsular hip fractures, 169 fulfilled the NICE criteria for THR. THR was performed for only 49 of (29%) the eligible patients. There was significant variation in THR provision between the eight units (0% to 50% THR usage, p<0.001). There were statistically significant differences in age, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade, abbreviated mental test score and walking ability prior to the injury between patients who underwent fixation, THR or hemiarthroplasty (all p≤0.05). There was a significantly increased chance of not undergoing THR if a patient was older than 77 years (median age for the THR eligible cohort; relative risk [RR]: 7.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.8–22.0, p<0.001). There was also a trend for this with patients who were ASA grade 3 compared with ASA grade 1 or 2 (RR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.0–7.3, p=0.06). The surgeons gave multifactorial reasons for not performing THR in eligible patients. Conclusions There is significant variation in the provision of THR for eligible hip fracture patients, which is influenced by both patient demographics and the unit to which a patient is admitted. PMID:26741658

  18. [Revision total hip arthroplasty using a cementless prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qing; Xu, Zhi-hong; Chen, Dong-yang; Shi, Dong-quan; Qin, Jiang-hui; Dai, Jin; Weng, Wen-jie; Yuan, Tao

    2012-05-01

    To assess the operative technique and results with the usage of cementless prosthesis in hip revision. Retrospective study was done on revision of total hip arthroplasty with cementless prosthesis in 72 patients (41 males and 31 females) with an average age of 65.7 years (28-82 years) from January 2004 to December 2009. The reason for revision was 2 infection, 54 aseptic loosening, 4 periprosthetic fractures, 5 fracture of femoral stems and 7 cases of acetabular abrasion after hemi-arthroplasty. The operation time, bleeding loss, complications of infection, dislocation, periprosthetic fractures and loosening were evaluated. The Harris score were used for hip function evaluation. The average operation time was (146±47) minutes (70-280 minutes) and bleeding loss during the operation was (970±540) ml (200-2500 ml). Bacterium cultivation during operation demonstrated infection in 2 patients. Bone windows at the lateral femoral were opened in 4 patients and extend trochanteric osteotomy was done in 7 patients. Fracture of the proximal femur occurred in 8 cases. Twenty-nine patients were treated with bone graft including 18 autografts and 11 allografts. Sixty-seven patients were followed up for an average time of 66 months (20-92 months). Additional revisions were performed in 3 cases including 2 dislocations and 1 infection. There were no death, no damage of major blood vessels and nerves. The bone graft healed during 3-5 months. The survival rates of the femoral prosthesis and the acetabulum prostheses were 95.5% and 98.4%. The mean Harris score was 86±8 (55-95 points). Osteolysis were seen in 13 hips but migration was seen in only 1 patient. The cementless prosthesis is useful in revision total hip arthroplasty and the perfect clinical results are related to the reliable primary fixation.

  19. Risk assessment tools used to predict outcomes of total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Joseph F; Hansen, Viktor J; Rubash, Harry E; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews recently proposed clinical tools for predicting risks and outcomes in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty patients. Additionally, we share the Massachusetts General Hospital experience with using the Risk Assessment and Prediction Tool to predict the need for an extended care facility after total joint arthroplasty.

  20. Conventional Versus Cross-Linked Polyethylene for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Monestier, Luca; Vulcano, Ettore; Harwin, Steven F; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The clinical and radiographic outcomes of 88 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with either conventional polyethylene or cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) from the same manufacturer were compared. There were no significant differences between the 2 subpopulations regarding average age, gender, side affected, or prosthetic stem and cup size. The average follow-up was 104 months (range, 55 to 131 months). To the authors' knowledge, this is the longest follow-up for this particular insert. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results showed that XLPE has a significantly greater wear reduction than that of standard polyethylene in primary total hip arthroplasty. At the longest available follow-up for these specific inserts, XLPE proved to be effective in reducing wear.

  1. Modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty. Experimental study in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This prospective experimental study evaluated the surgical procedure and results of modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty in dogs. Methods Ten skeletally mature healthy mongrel dogs with weights varying between 19 and 27 kg were used. Cemented modular femoral stems and uncemented porous-coated acetabular cups were employed. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed before surgery and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 360 days post-operation. Results Excellent weight bearing was noticed in the operated limb in seven dogs. Dislocation followed by loosening of the prosthesis was noticed in two dogs, which were therefore properly treated with a femoral head osteotomy. Femoral fracture occurred in one dog, which was promptly treated with full implant removal and femoral osteosynthesis. Conclusions The canine modular hybrid total hip arthroplasty provided excellent functionality of the operated limb. PMID:21736758

  2. [Modern tribology in total hip arthroplasty: pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Gómez-García, F

    2014-01-01

    The wear products and adverse reactions that occur on bearing surfaces represent one of the greatest challenges in prosthetic replacements, as the latter experience increasing demands due to the large number of young and older adult patients that have a long life expectancy and remarkable activity. The purpose of this review is to analyze the pros and cons of the new advances in the bearing components of the articular surfaces of current total hip arthroplasties. We also discuss the strategies used historically, their problems, results and the surgeon's role in prescribing the tribologic couple that best fits each patient's needs. We conclude with practical recommendations for the prescription and management of the latest articular couples for total hip arthroplasty.

  3. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Paget's Disease A Review.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Vineet; Lajam, Claudette; Deshmukh, Ajit J

    2016-11-01

    Paget's disease of the bone is a chronic osteopathy that leads to structural weakness, hypervascularity, and bone deformities. Rapid bone turnover in patients with Paget's disease may affect outcomes following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Most literature on THA in the setting of Paget's disease is limited to isolated case reports or case series documenting a single institution experience. By completing a comprehensive analysis of the available cases, this study aims to investigate the outcomes and complications of THA in patients with Paget's disease.

  4. The importance of acetabular component position in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Daines, Brian K; Dennis, Douglas A

    2012-11-01

    Correct acetabular cup position is critical to successful total hip replacement. Unfortunately, malposition of acetabular cups is common and leads to increased rates of dislocation, wear, and ion toxicity. Despite the popularity of Lewinnek's safe zone, the exact target of acetabular abduction and version remains elusive. Differences in functional pelvic position, surgical approach, and femoral anteversion affect the optimal cup position for individual patients. Surgeons need to be aware of pelvic position changes from the supine to lateral decubitus position.

  5. Clinical biomechanics of wear in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, John J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Johnston, Richard C; Brown, Thomas D

    2003-01-01

    Complementary clinical and laboratory studies were performed to identify variables associated with polyethylene wear following total hip replacement, and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for accelerated wear in the total hip arthroplasty construct. Observational cohort studies were performed using a prospective clinical database of more than 4000 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties performed by a single surgeon, to identify wear-related variables. These variables included head size, acetabular/femoral component impingement, and third body debris. Novel digital edge detection techniques were developed and employed to accurately measure wear, and to determine the relationships of head size and third body debris to acceleration of wear. A novel sliding-distance-coupled finite element model was formulated and employed to examine the mechanisms responsible for wear. The long-term cohort studies demonstrated smaller head sizes to be associated with less wear. Third body debris generated from cable fretting was associated with an increase in wear, osteolysis, and acetabular loosening, especially with larger head sizes. The sliding-distance-coupled finite element model replicated the wear rates occurring in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the importance of sliding distance on polyethylene wear following total hip arthroplasty. It also demonstrated substantial increases in wear associated with femoral head scratching from third body debris. Further extension of the finite element formulation demonstrated the potential for acetabular component rim damage from impingement wear, and the enhanced potential for third body ingress to the bearing surface with larger head sizes. Edge detection wear measurement techniques demonstrated that early wear rates were predictive of long-term wear rates. These complementary clinical and laboratory investigations have provided insight into 1) the significance of sliding distance and physiologic loci of motion as contributing

  6. Clinical Biomechanics of Wear in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, John J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Johnston, Richard C; Brown, Thomas D

    2003-01-01

    Complementary clinical and laboratory studies were performed to identify variables associated with polyethylene wear following total hip replacement, and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for accelerated wear in the total hip arthroplasty construct. Observational cohort studies were performed using a prospective clinical database of more than 4000 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties performed by a single surgeon, to identify wear-related variables. These variables included head size, acetabular/femoral component impingement, and third body debris. Novel digital edge detection techniques were developed and employed to accurately measure wear, and to determine the relationships of head size and third body debris to acceleration of wear. A novel slidingdistance-coupled finite element model was formulated and employed to examine the mechanisms responsible for wear. The long-term cohort studies demonstrated smaller head sizes to be associated with less wear. Third body debris generated from cable fretting was associated with an increase in wear, osteolysis, and acetabular loosening, especially with larger head sizes. The sliding-distance-coupled finite element model replicated the wear rates occurring in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the importance of sliding distance on polyethylene wear following total hip arthroplasty. It also demonstrated substantial increases in wear associated with femoral head scratching from third body debris. Further extension of the finite element formulation demonstrated the potential for acetabular component rim damage from impingement wear, and the enhanced potential for third body ingress to the bearing surface with larger head sizes. Edge detection wear measurement techniques demonstrated that early wear rates were predictive of long-term wear rates. These complementary clinical and laboratory investigations have provided insight into 1) the significance of sliding distance and physiologic loci of motion as contributing

  7. [Investigate progress of intraoperative periprosthetic fracture of total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Cong, Yu; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2011-02-01

    One of the complications of total hip arthroplasty is intraoperative periprosthetic fracture. Periprosthetic fracture is divided into acetabular fracture and femoral fracture. Risk factors for intraoperative periprosthetic fracture include use of minimally invasive techniques, press-fit cementless stems, revision operations and osteoporosis. It has been recognized that treatment of intraoperative periprosthetic fractures should be based on the classification of the Vancouver system for intraoperative fractures.

  8. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this review was to assess the safety and effectiveness of metal on metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty for young patients compared with that of total hip replacement (THR) in the same population. Clinical Need Total hip replacement has proved to be very effective for late middle-aged and elderly patients with severe degenerative diseases of the hips. As indications for THR began to include younger patients and those with a more active life style, the longevity of the implant became a concern. Evidence suggests that these patients experience relatively higher rates of early implant failure and the need for revision. The Swedish hip registry, for example, has demonstrated a survival rate in excess of 80% at 20 years for those aged over 65 years, whereas this figure was 33% by 16 years in those aged under 55 years. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to THR that restores normal joint biomechanics and load transfer. The technique has been used around the world for more than 10 years, specifically in the United Kingdom and other European countries. The Technology Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative procedure to conventional THR in younger patients. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is less invasive than THR and addresses the problem of preserving femoral bone stock at the initial operation. This means that future hip revisions are possible with THR if the initial MOM arthroplasty becomes less effective with time in these younger patients. The procedure involves the removal and replacement of the surface of the femoral head with a hollow metal hemisphere, which fits into a metal acetabular cup. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a technically more demanding procedure than is conventional THR. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is retained, which makes it much more difficult to access the acetabular cup. However, hip resurfacing arthroplasty has several advantages over a

  9. Femoral nerve lesion in total hip replacement: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Heller, K D; Prescher, A; Birnbaum, K; Forst, R

    1998-01-01

    A total of 20 hip joints of 10 non-fixed corpses were examined within 48 h of death to measure the pressure below the inguinal ligament simulating the surgical conditions during total hip arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of various leg positions and insertion techniques of retractors during the surgical procedure for total hip replacement in order to detect supposed causes for indirect pressure injuries of the femoral nerve. The obtained results verified no increase of pressure in the inguinal canal which could explain an indirect injury of the femoral nerve. If the retractor is inserted correctly at the anterior acetabular rim, the pressure in the lacuna musculorum can even be reduced, and furthermore, the femoral nerve is protected by the iliopsoas muscle. Femoral nerve lesions which have been published so far can only be explained by an incorrect use of instruments or implants (e.g., screws, cement, acetabular cup) or an extreme postoperative leg length discrepancy.

  10. Saving Implants BMP-2 Application in Revision Total Hip Surgery.

    PubMed

    Jäger, M; Emami, R; Thorey, F; Krauspe, R

    2006-06-01

    Besides others, there are two major problems in total hip replacement surgery which result in implant failure. First there is aseptic loosening due to a lack of implant biocompatibility or micromovements and second periimplant wear debris induced osteolysis which limits the survival rate of an implant. Regarding to recent data there are only limited therapeutic strategies to heal these bony defects without arthroplasty revision surgery. Since the investigation and characterization of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow, a cell and tissue engineering based therapy might be a promising solution to heal endoprosthesis associated bony defects. Moreover the application of growth factors in bone reconstructive surgery is another treatment concept to promote local bone regeneration. We report about a 73-year old patient with a painful weight bearing and a large, wear debris induced pelvic osteolysis after total hip arthroplasty. To prevent from salvage surgical procedures and preserve bone, a healing attempted was performed by filling the critical bony defect zone with a BMP-2/MSC composit. Clinical and radiological follow-ups showed a progressive bony healing of the critical size defect area without any complications. Fifteen months after application the patient is still pain free, has no limitations in daily life or sport activities. The case embarks on a strategy of non-embryonic stem cell and growth factor application to heal bony defects at patients with total hip endoprosthesis.

  11. Orthopaedic surgeons' cardiovascular response during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bergovec, Marko; Orlic, Dubravko

    2008-02-01

    The literature contains limited and contradictory information regarding the amount of physical effort and/or emotional stress needed to perform surgery. We therefore investigated cardiovascular response to psychophysical stress in orthopaedic surgeons while they were performing surgery. We monitored 29 male orthopaedic surgeons from four university centers while they performed total hip arthroplasties. Changes in their cardiovascular parameters were recorded by ambulatory monitoring methods. Exercise stress testing of each participant was used as a control state. We compared the cardiovascular response during surgery to energy requirements of everyday activities. Preoperative and postoperative testing showed lower values of cardiovascular parameters than during physically less difficult parts of the operation; physically more difficult phases of the operation additionally increased the values of parameters. We concluded performing total hip arthroplasty increases surgeons' cardiovascular parameters because of psychologic stress and physical effort. Excitement of the cardiovascular system during total hip arthroplasty appears similar to the excitement during moderate-intensity daily activities, such as walking the dog, leisurely bicycling, or climbing stairs.

  12. Orthopaedic Surgeons’ Cardiovascular Response During Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Orlic, Dubravko

    2008-01-01

    The literature contains limited and contradictory information regarding the amount of physical effort and/or emotional stress needed to perform surgery. We therefore investigated cardiovascular response to psychophysical stress in orthopaedic surgeons while they were performing surgery. We monitored 29 male orthopaedic surgeons from four university centers while they performed total hip arthroplasties. Changes in their cardiovascular parameters were recorded by ambulatory monitoring methods. Exercise stress testing of each participant was used as a control state. We compared the cardiovascular response during surgery to energy requirements of everyday activities. Preoperative and postoperative testing showed lower values of cardiovascular parameters than during physically less difficult parts of the operation; physically more difficult phases of the operation additionally increased the values of parameters. We concluded performing total hip arthroplasty increases surgeons’ cardiovascular parameters because of psychologic stress and physical effort. Excitement of the cardiovascular system during total hip arthroplasty appears similar to the excitement during moderate-intensity daily activities, such as walking the dog, leisurely bicycling, or climbing stairs. PMID:18196425

  13. Basic Science Considerations in Primary Total Hip Replacement Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Saqeb B; Dunlop, Douglas G; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Naqvi, Syed G; Gangoo, Shafat; Salih, Saif

    2010-01-01

    Total Hip Replacement is one of the most common operations performed in the developed world today. An increasingly ageing population means that the numbers of people undergoing this operation is set to rise. There are a numerous number of prosthesis on the market and it is often difficult to choose between them. It is therefore necessary to have a good understanding of the basic scientific principles in Total Hip Replacement and the evidence base underpinning them. This paper reviews the relevant anatomical and biomechanical principles in THA. It goes on to elaborate on the structural properties of materials used in modern implants and looks at the evidence base for different types of fixation including cemented and uncemented components. Modern bearing surfaces are discussed in addition to the scientific basis of various surface engineering modifications in THA prostheses. The basic science considerations in component alignment and abductor tension are also discussed. A brief discussion on modular and custom designs of THR is also included. This article reviews basic science concepts and the rationale underpinning the use of the femoral and acetabular component in total hip replacement. PMID:20582240

  14. General Compared with Spinal Anesthesia for Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basques, Bryce A.; Toy, Jason O.; Bohl, Daniel D.; Golinvaux, Nicholas S.; Grauer, Jonathan N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty may be performed under general or spinal anesthesia. The purpose of the current study was to compare perioperative outcomes between anesthetic types for patients undergoing primary elective total hip arthroplasty. Methods: Patients who had undergone primary elective total hip arthroplasty from 2010 to 2012 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Operating room times, length of stay, thirty-day adverse events, and readmission were compared between patients who had received general anesthesia and those who had received spinal anesthesia. Propensity-adjusted multivariate analysis was used to control for selection bias and baseline patient characteristics. Results: A total of 20,936 patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty met inclusion criteria for this study. Of these, 12,752 patients (60.9%) had received general anesthesia and 8184 patients (39.1%) had received spinal anesthesia. On propensity-adjusted multivariate analyses, general anesthesia for total hip arthroplasty was associated with increased operative time (+12 minutes [95% confidence interval, +11 to +13 minutes]; p < 0.001) and postoperative room time (+5 minutes [95% confidence interval, +4 to +6 minutes]; p < 0.001). General anesthesia was also associated with the occurrence of any adverse event (odds ratio, 1.31 [95% confidence interval, 1.23 to 1.41]; p < 0.001), prolonged postoperative ventilator use (odds ratio, 5.81 [95% confidence interval, 1.35 to 25.06]; p = 0.018), unplanned intubation (odds ratio, 2.17 [95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 4.29]; p = 0.024), stroke (odds ratio, 2.51 [95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 6.20]; p = 0.046), cardiac arrest (odds ratio, 5.04 [95% confidence interval, 1.15 to 22.07]; p = 0.032), any minor adverse event (odds ratio, 1.35 [95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 1.45]; p = 0.001), and blood transfusion (odds ratio, 1.34 [95% confidence interval, 1.25 to

  15. Impingement and Dislocation in Total HIP Arthroplasty: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D; Elkins, Jacob M; Pedersen, Douglas R; Callaghan, John J

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary total hip arthroplasty, instability has been a complication in approximately 2% to 5% of primary surgeries and 5% to 10% of revisions. Due to the reduction in the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis that has been achieved over the last decade, instability now stands as the single most common reason for revision surgery. Moreover, even without frank dislocation, impingement and subluxation are implicated in a set of new concerns arising with advanced bearings, associated with the relatively unforgiving nature of many of those designs. Against that backdrop, the biomechanical factors responsible for impingement, subluxation, and dislocation remain under-investigated relative to their burden of morbidity. This manuscript outlines a 15-year program of laboratory and clinical research undertaken to improve the scientific basis for understanding total hip impingement and dislocation. The broad theme has been to systematically evaluate the role of surgical factors, implant design factors, and patient factors in predisposing total hip constructs to impinge, sublux, and/or dislocate. Because this class of adverse biomechanical events had not lent itself well to study with existing approaches, it was necessary to develop (and validate) a series of new research methodologies, relying heavily on advanced finite element formulations. Specific areas of focus have included identifying the biomechanical challenges posed by dislocation-prone patient activities, quantifying design parameter effects and component surgical positioning effects for conventional metal-on-polyethylene implant constructs, and the impingement/dislocation behavior of non-conventional constructs, quantifying the stabilizing role of the hip capsule (and of surgical repairs of capsule defects), and systematically studying impingement and edge loading of hard-on-hard bearings, fracture of ceramic liners, confounding effects of patient obesity, and subluxation-mediated worsening of third body

  16. Digital versus analogue preoperative planning of total hip arthroplasties: a randomized clinical trial of 210 total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    The, Bertram; Verdonschot, Nico; van Horn, Jim R; van Ooijen, Peter M A; Diercks, Ron L

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this randomized clinical trial was to compare the clinical and technical results of digital preoperative planning for primary total hip arthroplasties with analogue planning. Two hundred and ten total hip arthroplasties were randomized. All plans were constructed on standardized radiographs by the surgeon who performed the arthroplasty the next day. The main outcome was accuracy of the preoperative plan. Secondary outcomes were operation time and a radiographic assessment of the arthroplasty. Digital preoperative plans were more accurate in planning the cup (P < .05) and scored higher on the postoperative radiologic assessment of cemented cup (P = .03) and stem (P < .01) components. None of the other comparisons reached statistical significance. We conclude that digital plans slightly outperform analogue plans.

  17. Intrapelvic protrusion of the acetabular component following total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Salvati, E A; Bullough, P; Wilson, P D

    1975-09-01

    Protrusion of the acetabular component into the true pelvis following total hip replacement has occurred in 5 patients, 4 with severe rheumatoid arthritis and 1 with a destructive type of degenerative hip disease. Preoperatively all hips had severe protrusio acetabuli, a markedly thin acetabular medial wall and advanced osteoporosis. Four had a McKee-Farrar prosthesis, a metal-to-metal device with high frictional torque, particularly when the contact is equatorial, and no damping capacity against marginal impingement in the extreme range of motion. In order to reduce the incidence of intrapelvic protrusion, extreme care should be given to preserve the medial bone stock of the acetabulum, more so when it is already damaged or defective. If anchoring holes are used they should be restricted to the superior ilium, pubis and ischium and should not perforate the medial wall. Once loosening is present, reoperation is indicated to avoid progressive bone reabsorption by the abrasive motion of the loosened prosthesis, that might lead to irreparable bone loss. To reduce the stress transmitted to an already weakened acetabulum, select a total prosthetic device with low friction; fix it with acrylic cement in order to distribute the stress over a large surface; carefully orient both components to avoid marginal impingement; be certain to preserve the medial wall as much as possible and if it is already defective reinforce it by bone grafting and/or wire mesh.

  18. Polyethylene Oxidation in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Evolution and New Advances

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Medel, Francisco; Puértolas, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains the gold standard acetabular bearing material for hip arthroplasty. Its successful performance has shown consistent results and survivorship in total hip replacement (THR) above 85% after 15 years, with different patients, surgeons, or designs. As THR results have been challenged by wear, oxidation, and liner fracture, relevant research on the material properties in the past decade has led to the development and clinical introduction of highly crosslinked polyethylenes (HXLPE). More stress on the bearing (more active, overweighted, younger patients), and more variability in the implantation technique in different small and large Hospitals may further compromise the clinical performance for many patients. The long-term in vivo performance of these materials remains to be proven. Clinical and retrieval studies after more than 5 years of in vivo use with HXLPE in THR are reviewed and consistently show a substantial decrease in wear rate. Moreover, a second generation of improved polyethylenes is backed by in vitro data and awaits more clinical experience to confirm the experimental improvements. Also, new antioxidant, free radical scavengers, candidates and the reinforcement of polyethylene through composites are currently under basic research. Oxidation of polyethylene is today significantly reduced by present formulations, and this forgiving, affordable, and wellknown material is still reliable to meet today’s higher requirements in total hip replacement. PMID:20111694

  19. Intraoperative Proximal Femoral Fracture in Primary Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Shahi, Alisina; Park, Andrew G; Purtill, James J

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative proximal femoral fracture is a complication of primary cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) at rates of 2.95-27.8%. A retrospective review of 2423 consecutive primary cementless THA cases identified 102 hips (96 patients) with fracture. Multivariate analysis compared fracture incidences between implants, Accolade (Stryker Orthopaedics) and Tri-Lock (DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc.), and evaluated potential risk factors using a randomized control group of 1150 cases without fracture. The fracture incidence was 4.4% (102/2423), 3.7% (36/1019) using Accolade and 4.9% using Tri-Lock (66/1404) (P=0.18). Female gender (OR=1.96; 95% CI 1.19-3.23; P=0.008) and smaller stem size (OR=1.64; 95% CI 1.04-2.63; P=0.03) predicted increased odds of fracture. No revisions of the femoral component were required in the fracture cohort.

  20. Acetabular augmentation for the treatment of unstable total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholl, J. E.; Koka, S. R.; Bintcliffe, I. W.; Addison, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-eight unstable total hip arthroplasties were treated with an acetabular augmentation wedge. Of the hips, 23 have had no further dislocations at a mean follow-up of 26 months. Five patients continued to dislocate and have needed further surgery. To our knowledge this is the largest reported series of acetabular augmentation with as good results as those of the most successful reported series of this technique, and a success rate comparable to other methods of treating recurrent dislocation. Careful patient selection, and using a thin augmentation wedge to avoid impingement, are important to the success of a technique which is a useful option in the management of recurrent dislocation. Images Figure 1 PMID:10364973

  1. Total hip arthroplasty: areview of advances, advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-Wei; Zi, Ying; Xiang, Liang-Bi; Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic outcomes of Osteoarthritis (OA) has been unsatisfactory and often surgeries such as total hip arthroplasty (THA) is required. THA is an effective treatment for patients with end-stage arthritic hip conditions. Cemented THA has been the treatment of choice for elderly patients with OA. An improvement in Timed “Up and Go” (TUG) before surgery might contribute to a decrease in the occurrence of DVT after THA, though post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), a chronic condition in the lower extremity does not appear to be a major complication after DVT in patients undergoing THA. For OA, four domains to be evaluated: pain, physical function, joint imaging, and patient global assessment. Thus, THA can be cost saving or, at least cost- effective in improving quality-adjusted life expectancy. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances as well as advantages and limitations of THA. PMID:25784971

  2. When is total hip arthroplasty a failure? The patients' perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Hellman, E. J.; Feinberg, J. R.; Capello, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients (186 primary, 92 revision) were surveyed regarding their satisfaction, their expectations regarding longevity, of the hip implant, and their perspective on the potential or actual need for revision surgery. The vast majority of patients were glad they had the original THA, would do it again if faced with a similar choice, and would recommend it to others. One-third of patients believed their current implants would last the rest of their life. The most common responses to either potential or actual failure were happiness it lasted as long as it did, accepting it as "one of those things," and disappointment. No primary THA patients and only 7% of revision of THA patients indicated that they would consider the primary THA a failure when revision surgery was indicated. PMID:9129281

  3. Revision hip arthroplasty in patients with a previous total hip replacement for osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Soo; Moon, Young-Wan; Lee, Keun-Ho; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2014-12-01

    Patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head are typically relatively young and active and often require high rates of revision after primary total hip arthroplasty. However, outcomes of revision hip arthroplasty in this patient population have rarely been reported in the literature. The authors conducted a retrospective review of 72 patients (75 hips) who underwent revision hip arthroplasty with a primary diagnosis of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Mean age at index revision was 53.3 years (range, 34-76). Components of acetabular revision included a cementless porous-coated cup in 58 hips and an acetabular cage in 3 hips. Components of femoral revision included a fully grit-blasted tapered stem in 30 hips and a proximally porous-coated modular stem in 9 hips. Mean duration of follow-up was 7 years (range, 3-17). Mean Harris Hip Score improved from 49 points preoperatively to 90 points postoperatively. At final follow-up, 11 hips (14.7%) required reoperation because of aseptic loosening (6 hips), infection (2 hips), recurrent dislocation (1 hip), periprosthetic fracture (1 hip), and ceramic fracture (1 hip). Kaplan-Meier survivor-ship with an endpoint of re-revision for any reason was 81% and for mechanical failure was 87.5% for the cup and 100% for the stem at 10 years. Unlike the previous report, the authors' study showed a lower failure rate of the femoral stem after revision hip arthroplasty using modern cementless femoral components in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Aseptic cup loosening or osteolysis is the most common mechanism of failure at medium-term follow-up. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Low revision rate after total hip arthroplasty in patients with pediatric hip diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The results of primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) after pediatric hip diseases such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), or Perthes’ disease have been reported to be inferior to the results after primary osteoarthritis of the hip (OA). Materials and methods We compared the survival of primary THAs performed during the period 1995–2009 due to previous DDH, SCFE, Perthes’ disease, or primary OA, using merged individual-based data from the Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish arthroplasty registers, called the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA). Cox multiple regression, with adjustment for age, sex, and type of fixation of the prosthesis was used to calculate the survival of the prostheses and the relative revision risks. Results 370,630 primary THAs were reported to these national registers for 1995–2009. Of these, 14,403 THAs (3.9%) were operated due to pediatric hip diseases (3.1% for Denmark, 8.8% for Norway, and 1.9% for Sweden) and 288,435 THAs (77.8%) were operated due to OA. Unadjusted 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival of THAs after pediatric hip diseases (94.7% survival) was inferior to that after OA (96.6% survival). Consequently, an increased risk of revision for hips with a previous pediatric hip disease was seen (risk ratio (RR) 1.4, 95% CI: 1.3–1.5). However, after adjustment for differences in sex and age of the patients, and in fixation of the prostheses, no difference in survival was found (93.6% after pediatric hip diseases and 93.8% after OA) (RR 1.0, CI: 1.0–1.1). Nevertheless, during the first 6 postoperative months more revisions were reported for THAs secondary to pediatric hip diseases (RR 1.2, CI: 1.0–1.5), mainly due to there being more revisions for dislocations (RR 1.8, CI: 1.4–2.3). Comparison between the different diagnosis groups showed that the overall risk of revision after DDH was higher than after OA (RR 1.1, CI: 1.0–1.2), whereas the combined

  5. Primary vs Conversion Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Cost Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Garwin; Wright, David J; Snir, Nimrod; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-02-01

    Increasing hip fracture incidence in the United States is leading to higher occurrences of conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA) for failed surgical treatment of the hip. In spite of studies showing higher complication rates in conversion THA, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services currently bundles conversion and primary THA under the same diagnosis-related group. We examined the cost of treatment of conversion THA compared with primary THA. Our hypothesis is that conversion THA will have higher cost and resource use than primary THA. Fifty-one consecutive conversion THA patients (Current Procedure Terminology code 27132) and 105 matched primary THA patients (Current Procedure Terminology code 27130) were included in this study. The natural log-transformed costs for conversion and primary THA were compared using regression analysis. Age, gender, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologist, Charlson comorbidity score, and smoker status were controlled in the analysis. Conversion THA subgroups formed based on etiology were compared using analysis of variance analysis. Conversion and primary THAs were determined to be significantly different (P<.05) and greater in the following costs: hospital operating direct cost (29.2% greater), hospital operating total cost (28.8% greater), direct hospital cost (24.7% greater), and total hospital cost (26.4% greater). Based on greater hospital operating direct cost, hospital operating total cost, direct hospital cost, and total hospital cost, conversion THA has significantly greater cost and resource use than primary THA. In order to prevent disincentives for treating these complex surgical patients, reclassification of conversion THA is needed, as they do not fit together with primary THA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Digital templating in total hip arthroplasty: Additional anteroposterior hip view increases the accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Stigler, Sophia K; Müller, Franz J; Pfaud, Sebastian; Zellner, Michael; Füchtmeier, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    AIM To analyze planning total hip arthroplasty (THA) with an additional anteroposterior hip view may increases the accuracy of preoperative planning in THA. METHODS We conducted prospective digital planning in 100 consecutive patients: 50 of these procedures were planned using pelvic overview only (first group), and the other 50 procedures were planned using pelvic overview plus antero-posterior (a.p.) hip view (second group). The planning and the procedure of each patient were performed exclusively by the senior surgeon. Fifty procedures with retrospective analogues planning were used as the control group (group zero). After the procedure, the planning was compared with the eventually implanted components (cup and stem). For statistic analysis the χ2 test was used for nominal variables and the t test was used for a comparison of continuous variables. RESULTS Preoperative planning with an additional a.p. hip view (second group) significantly increased the exact component correlation when compared to pelvic overview only (first group) for both the acetabular cup and the femoral stem (76% cup and 66% stem vs 54% cup and 32% stem). When considering planning ± 1 size, the accuracy in the second group was 96% (48 of 50 patients) for the cup and 94% for the stem (47 of 50 patients). In the analogue control group (group zero), an exact correlation was observed in only 1/3 of the cases. CONCLUSION Digital THA planning performed by the operating surgeon and based on additional a.p. hip view significantly increases the correlation between preoperative planning and eventual implant sizes. PMID:28144576

  7. Clinical Outcomes and 90-Day Costs Following Hemiarthroplasty or Total Hip Arthroplasty for Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Christine I; Vose, Joshua G; Nunley, Ryan M

    2017-09-01

    In the era of bundled payments, many hospitals are responsible for costs from admission through 90 days postdischarge. Although bundled episodes for hip fracture will have a separate target price for the bundle, little is known about the 90-day resource use burden for this patient population. Using Medicare 100% Standard Analytic Files (2010-2014), we identified patients undergoing hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty (THA). Patients were aged 65 and older with admitting diagnosis of closed hip fracture, no concurrent fractures of the lower limb, and no history of hip surgery in the prior 12 months baseline. Continuous Medicare-only enrollment was required. Complications, resource use, and mortality from admission through 90 days following discharge (follow-up) were summarized. Four cohorts met selection criteria for analysis: (1) hemiarthroplasty diagnosis-related group (DRG) 469 (N = 19,634), (2) hemiarthroplasty DRG 470 (N = 77,744), (3) THA DRG 469 (N = 1686), and (4) THA DRG 470 (N = 9314). All-cause mortality during the study period was 51.6%, 29.5%, 48.1%, and 24.9% with mean 90-day costs of $28,952, $19,243, $29,763, and $18,561, respectively. Most of the patients waited 1 day from admission to surgery (41%-51%). Incidence of an all-cause complication was approximately 70% in each DRG 469 cohort and 14%-16% in each DRG 470 cohort. This study confirms patients with hip fracture are a costly subpopulation. Tailored care pathways to minimize post-acute care resource use are warranted for these patients. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Revision of Failed Hip Resurfacing and Large Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Dual-Mobility Components.

    PubMed

    Snir, Nimrod; Park, Brian K; Garofolo, Garret; Marwin, Scott E

    2015-06-01

    Revision of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) or hip resurfacing is associated with high complication rates. The authors propose dual-mobility components as a surgical option and present short- to mid-term results of MoM hips revised with dual-mobility components. Eighteen consecutive hips that underwent revision of MoM THA or hip resurfacing using dual-mobility components were identified. At final follow-up (mean, 17.5 months), the visual analog scale, modified Harris Hip Score, and SF-12 scores had all improved (P<.05, P<.01, and P<.05, respectively). There were no dislocations or other complications. Revision of failed MoM THA or hip resurfacing using a dual-mobility device is an effective strategy. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Development of a Risk Stratification Model for Delayed Inpatient Recovery of Physical Activities in Patients Undergoing Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Elings, Jordi; van der Sluis, Geert; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Galindo Garre, Francisca; de Gast, Arthur; Hoogeboom, Thomas; van Meeteren, Nico L U

    2016-03-01

    Prospective cohort design using data derived from usual care. It is important that patients are able to function independently as soon as possible after total hip replacement. However, the speed of regaining activities differs significantly. To develop a risk stratification model (RSM) to predict delayed inpatient recovery of physical activities in people who underwent total hip replacement surgery. This study was performed in 2 routine orthopaedic settings: Diakonessenhuis Hospital (setting A) and Nij Smellinghe Hospital (setting B). Preoperative screening was performed for all consecutive patients. In-hospital recovery of activities was assessed with the Modified Iowa Level of Assistance Scale. Delayed inpatient recovery of activities was defined as greater than 5 days. The RSM, developed using logistic regression analysis and bootstrapping, was based on data from setting A (n = 154). External validation was performed on the data set from setting B (n = 271). Twenty-one percent of the patients in setting A had a delayed recovery of activities during their hospital stay. Multivariable logistic regression modeling yielded a preliminary RSM that included the following factors: male sex (odds ratio [OR] = 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.2, 2.6), 70 or more years of age (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.4, 3.4), body mass index of 25 kg/m(2) or greater (OR = 2.2; 95% CI: 0.7, 7.4), an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 (OR = 1.2; 95% CI: 0.3, 4.4), a Charnley score of B or C (OR = 6.1; 95% CI: 2.2, 17.4), and a timed up-and-go score of 12.5 seconds or greater (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 9.0). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.90) and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test score was 3.57 (P>.05). External validation yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.71 (95% CI: 0.61, 0.81). We demonstrated that the risk for delayed recovery of activities during the hospital stay can be predicted by using preoperative data. Level of

  10. Does total hip replacement affect sexual quality of life?

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Rita Th E; Haanstra, Tsjitske M; Sierevelt, Inger N; Jansma, Elise P; Nolte, Peter A; Nicolai, Melianthe P J; Wall, Peter D H; Van Royen, Barend J

    2016-05-04

    Total Hip Replacement (THR) is an effective treatment for end-stage hip osteoarthritis. Since the introduction of total joint replacement, the effect on the Sexual Quality of Life (SQoL) following THR has been addressed in scant studies. The aim of our study was to systematically review the literature, to summarise effects of THR on patients' SQoL. We searched PubMed, EMBASE and PsycINFO between January 1970 and February 9th, 2015 with search terms including Total Hip, Osteoarthritis, SQoL, and THR. Eligible studies were identified and two independent authors extracted data including details of SQoL, study quality and risk of bias. There were 12 eligible studies, which included a total of 2099 patients with an age range of 20-85 years. The methodological quality of ten studies was rated as low, and of two as moderate. Amongst the majority of patients, SQoL improved after surgery, both in terms of physical-functional and psychosocial well-being. However, changes between pre-operative and postoperative SQoL ranged extensively: for example, Sexual Dysfunction Δ 8-51% and Sexual Activity (SA) Δ 0-77%. Three studies reported that some patients never resumed SA again after surgery. In over 40 years of THR treatment, scant studies have examined the effect of THR on patients' SQoL. This review suggests that SQol improves after THR, although the magnitude of effects varies highly. However, the quality of the supporting evidence was rated as low to moderate. This suggests a need for more high quality evidence about the effects of THR on SQoL.

  11. Post-operative neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Su, E P

    2017-01-01

    Nerve palsy is a well-described complication following total hip arthroplasty, but is highly distressing and disabling. A nerve palsy may cause difficulty with the post-operative rehabilitation, and overall mobility of the patient. Nerve palsy may result from compression and tension to the affected nerve(s) during the course of the operation via surgical manipulation and retractor placement, tension from limb lengthening or compression from post-operative hematoma. In the literature, hip dysplasia, lengthening of the leg, the use of an uncemented femoral component, and female gender are associated with a greater risk of nerve palsy. We examined our experience at a high-volume, tertiary care referral centre, and found an overall incidence of 0.3% out of 39 056 primary hip arthroplasties. Risk factors found to be associated with the incidence of nerve palsy at our institution included the presence of spinal stenosis or lumbar disc disease, age younger than 50, and smoking. If a nerve palsy is diagnosed, imaging is mandatory and surgical evacuation or compressive haematomas may be beneficial. As palsies are slow to recover, supportive care such as bracing, therapy, and reassurance are the mainstays of treatment. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B(1 Supple A):46-9. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. Pseudotumor associated with metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Scully, William F; Teeny, Steven M

    2013-05-01

    This case report details the presentation, imaging results, and operative findings of a pseudotumor associated with a press-fit metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty (THA). An 80-year-old man presented approximately 7 years after undergoing THA with worsening right groin and lateral hip pain with an associated proximal thigh mass. Physical examination demonstrated a tender, large anterolateral thigh mass that was also evident on metal artifact reduction sequence magnetic resonance imaging.An exploratory operative procedure revealed extensive tissue necrosis involving nearly the entire hip capsule, short external rotators, and tendinous portion of the gluteus medius muscle. In addition, marked surface corrosion was discovered about the taper at the head-neck junction of the prosthetic femoral component and the trunnion within the femoral head. The press-fit THA components were solidly fixed. The metallic head was replaced with a ceramic component, and the polyethylene liner was exchanged. The patient had complete resolution of his preoperative symptoms but had persistent problems with dislocations.Although reports of pseudotumor and local soft tissue reactions associated with metal-on-metal THAs have become increasingly ubiquitous in the literature, similar reports involving metal-on-polyethylene THA implants are less common. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Short-Term Results of Novel Constrained Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Thomas; Finley, Stephen; Snider, Rebecca; Looper, Jayme; Tanner, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Constrained acetabular components have only been recommended as a salvage option for the persistently unstable total hip arthroplasty (THA), due to limited range of motion and less than satisfactory component failure rates. This is a retrospective review of 137 patients with 154 consecutive primary constrained THAs performed between November 2003 and August 2007. We reviewed serial radiographs, postoperative complications, groin/thigh pain, and compared preoperative and postoperative Harris Hip Scores. With a mean follow-up of 6 years, there was 1.9% dislocation rate, 0% component failure rate, and 2.6% infection rate. Seven patients reported continued groin pain, and three had continued thigh pain. One patient showed radiographic evidence of 1 mm polyethylene wear. Radiographic review showed no evidence of osteolysis or stem subsidence. Harris Hip Scores improved from a mean of 68.8 (range 58-87) preoperatively to 98.9 (range 65-100) at final clinical assessment. This constrained acetabular prosthesis had a dislocation rate of less than 2%, with 0% component failure rate at a minimum of 2 years of follow-up suggesting this prosthesis may be a viable alternative for patients at risk for instability or those known to have recurrent instability. PMID:26330992

  14. A new anterolateral surgical approach for total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    GRANO, GIOVANNI F.; PAVLIDOU, MARIA; TODESCO, ALBERTO; PALERMO, AUGUSTO; MOLFETTA, LUIGI

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of the present paper is to present the short-term results of a “detachment-free” (DF) anterolateral approach for primary total hip replacement (THR) performed in a large series of patients. Methods two hundred patients submitted to primary THR were retrospectively reviewed for the present study. In all cases, the surgery was performed using a minimally invasive DF anterolateral approach, which entails no disconnection of tendons and no muscle damage. The study population consisted of 96 men (48%) and 104 women (52%), with an average age of 69.4 years (range 38–75). Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed after 12 months. Results the clinical results, evaluated using the Harris Hip Score, were excellent in 95% of the cases and good in 5%; no cases had fair or poor results. X-rays taken at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery did not show heterotopic ossification, mobilization of the prosthetic components, or hip dislocation. No infections, deep vein thrombosis, or failure of the gluteal muscles were reported. Conclusions the DF anterolateral approach for THR proved safe and provided effective results at short-term follow-up. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:27900306

  15. Subsequent Total Joint Arthroplasty After Primary Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty: A 40-Year Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Thomas L; Maradit Kremers, Hilal; Schleck, Cathy D; Larson, Dirk R; Berry, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    Despite the large increase in total hip arthroplasties and total knee arthroplasties, the incidence and prevalence of additional contralateral or ipsilateral joint arthroplasty are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of additional joint arthroplasty after a primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty. This historical cohort study identified population-based cohorts of patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty (n = 1,933) or total knee arthroplasty (n = 2,139) between 1969 and 2008. Patients underwent passive follow-up through their medical records beginning with the primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty. We assessed the likelihood of undergoing a subsequent total joint arthroplasty, including simultaneous and staged bilateral procedures. Age, sex, and calendar year were evaluated as potential predictors of subsequent arthroplasty. During a mean follow-up of 12 years after an initial total hip arthroplasty, we observed 422 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (29% at 20 years), 76 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (6% at 10 years), and 32 ipsilateral total knee arthroplasties (2% at 20 years). Younger age was a significant predictor of contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.0001), but not a predictor of the subsequent risk of total knee arthroplasty. During a mean follow-up of 11 years after an initial total knee arthroplasty, we observed 809 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (45% at 20 years), 31 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (3% at 20 years), and 29 ipsilateral total hip arthroplasties (2% at 20 years). Older age was a significant predictor of ipsilateral or contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.001). Patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty can be informed of a 30% to 45% chance of a surgical procedure in a contralateral cognate joint and about a 5% chance of a surgical procedure in noncognate joints within 20 years of

  16. Meralgia paresthetica of the contralateral leg after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Weier, Chris A; Jones, Lynne C; Hungerford, Marc W

    2010-04-01

    In the United States, total hip arthroplasty (THA) is typically performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position. Positioning of the morbidly obese patient can be technically challenging and may require special positioning equipment. Although the increased incidence of complications after THA in obese patients has been well documented, neurologic complications in the contralateral limb are rare. This article describes a case of a patient with impairment of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve in the contralateral leg after THA.A 55-year-old woman with a body mass index of 34.24 kg/m(2) underwent THA in the right lateral decubitus position. Because of her body habitus, a bean-bag positioner was used. Total hip arthroplasty was performed using a direct lateral approach. Intraoperative surgical time was 2.5 hours, and total anesthesia time was 3.5 hours. A few days postoperatively, the patient began to experience "burning and shooting" pain in the contralateral hip, but she did not report this pain until 6 weeks postoperatively. She was treated initially with a single lidocaine injection. When this was ineffective, she was treated with topiramate (100 mg daily) and vitamin B6 (100 mg orally twice daily). The symptoms lessened markedly at 5 months and resolved completely at 9 months postoperatively.Meralgia paresthetica is an uncommon, but known, complication of THA. To our knowledge, it has been reported only in the operative limb. This report reinforces the need for careful positioning to avoid pressure over the anterior superior iliac spine intraoperatively. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Effects of perioperative factors and hip geometry on hip abductor muscle strength during the first 6 months after anterolateral total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Takashi; Jinno, Tetsuya; Aizawa, Junya; Masuda, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kazuo; Ninomiya, Kazunari; Suzuki, Kouji; Morita, Sadao

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The importance and effect of hip joint geometry on hip abductor muscle strength are well known. In addition, other perioperative factors are also known to affect hip abductor muscle strength. This study examined the relative importance of factors affecting hip abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 97 females with osteoarthritis scheduled for primary unilateral THA. The following variables were assessed preoperatively and 2 and 6 months after surgery: isometric hip abductor strength, radiographic analysis (Crowe class, postoperative femoral offset (FO)), Frenchay Activities Index, compliance rate with home exercise, Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip-Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ), and demographic data. Factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength 2 and 6 months after surgery were examined. [Results] Significant factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength at 2 and 6 months after surgery were, in extraction order: 1. isometric hip abductor muscle strength in the preoperative period; 2. BMI; and 3. the JHEQ mental score at 2 and 6 months after surgery. [Conclusion] Preoperative factors and postoperative mental status were related to postoperative isometric hip abductor strength. FO was not extracted as a significant factor related to postoperative isomeric hip abductor strength. PMID:28265161

  18. Effects of perioperative factors and hip geometry on hip abductor muscle strength during the first 6 months after anterolateral total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takashi; Jinno, Tetsuya; Aizawa, Junya; Masuda, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kazuo; Ninomiya, Kazunari; Suzuki, Kouji; Morita, Sadao

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The importance and effect of hip joint geometry on hip abductor muscle strength are well known. In addition, other perioperative factors are also known to affect hip abductor muscle strength. This study examined the relative importance of factors affecting hip abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 97 females with osteoarthritis scheduled for primary unilateral THA. The following variables were assessed preoperatively and 2 and 6 months after surgery: isometric hip abductor strength, radiographic analysis (Crowe class, postoperative femoral offset (FO)), Frenchay Activities Index, compliance rate with home exercise, Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip-Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ), and demographic data. Factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength 2 and 6 months after surgery were examined. [Results] Significant factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength at 2 and 6 months after surgery were, in extraction order: 1. isometric hip abductor muscle strength in the preoperative period; 2. BMI; and 3. the JHEQ mental score at 2 and 6 months after surgery. [Conclusion] Preoperative factors and postoperative mental status were related to postoperative isometric hip abductor strength. FO was not extracted as a significant factor related to postoperative isomeric hip abductor strength.

  19. Utility of modular implants in primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berry, Daniel J

    2014-04-01

    Most surgeons believe that some level of modularity has a valuable role to play in primary total hip arthroplasty. However, all modular junctions carry some risk and recent problems with taper tribocorrosion have elevated concerns. These problems suggest that more rigorous preclinical testing should be undertaken before new types of modularity are widely used. Efforts to further optimize these junctions where they are needed, avoidance of gratuitous use of modular junctions where they provide only modest benefits, and a judicious approach to adopting new modularity are reasonable approaches to current concerns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cost Analysis of Ceramic Heads in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Keith J; Odum, Susan M; Troyer, Jennifer L; Fehring, Thomas K

    2016-11-02

    The advent of adverse local tissue reactions seen in metal-on-metal bearings, and the recent recognition of trunnionosis, have led many surgeons to recommend ceramic-on-polyethylene articulations for primary total hip arthroplasty. However, to our knowledge, there has been little research that has considered whether the increased cost of ceramic provides enough benefit over cobalt-chromium to justify its use. The primary purpose of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of ceramic-on-polyethylene implants and metal-on-polyethylene implants in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Markov decision modeling was used to determine the ceramic-on-polyethylene implant revision rate necessary to be cost-effective compared with the revision rate of metal-on-polyethylene implants across a range of patient ages and implant costs. A different set of Markov models was used to estimate the national cost burden of choosing ceramic-on-polyethylene implants over metal-on-polyethylene implants for primary total hip arthroplasties. The Premier Research Database was used to identify 20,398 patients who in 2012 were ≥45 years of age and underwent a total hip arthroplasty with either a ceramic-on-polyethylene implant or a metal-on-polyethylene implant. The cost-effectiveness of ceramic heads is highly dependent on the cost differential between ceramic and metal femoral heads and the age of the patient. At a cost differential of $325, ceramic-on-polyethylene bearings are cost-effective for patients <85 years of age. At a cost differential of $600, it is cost-effective to utilize ceramic-on-polyethylene bearings in patients <65 years of age, and, at a differential of $1,003, ceramic-on-polyethylene bearings are not cost-effective at any age. The ability to recoup the initial increased expenditure of ceramic heads through a diminished lifetime revision cost is dependent on the price premium for ceramic and the age of the patient. A wholesale switch to ceramic bearings

  1. Tribological characteristics of a composite total-surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous fiber, woven E glass composite femoral shells having the same elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle wear tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these continuous fiber particulate composite femoral shells articulating with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups were comparable to those of a vitallium ball articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cup.

  2. Complications of total hip arthroplasty: periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Chitre, Amol; Wynn Jones, Henry; Shah, Nikhil; Clayson, Anthony

    2013-12-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are a rare but potentially disastrous complication of total hip arthroplasty. Such fractures occur either as early perioperative complications or late complications when they are associated with either significant trauma or as a result of the loss of the structural integrity of the bone supporting the prosthesis, such as aseptic osteolysis. The incidence of such fractures appears to be increasing with the increased use of uncemented acetabular components. This article explores the current literature on the epidemiology, etiology, and classification of periprosthetic acetabular fractures as well as offering potential treatment strategies.

  3. Acute periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Potty, Anish G; Corona, Jacqueline; Manning, Blaine T; Le, Amanda; Saleh, Khaled J

    2014-01-01

    Although periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are relatively uncommon after total hip arthroplasty, a variety of patient-, surgeon-, and implant-related risk factors can contribute to the occurrence of this serious complication. These risk factors, combined with the increased use of cementless acetabular cups, will likely result in an increased prevalence of these fractures in the future. By better understanding the risk factors, classification schemes, and treatment options for periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum, orthopaedic surgeons can achieve better outcomes for their patients.

  4. Christiansen's artificial hip joints--what went wrong?

    PubMed

    Sudmann, Einar; Ramstad, Knut Rasmus; Engesæter, Lars Birger

    2013-12-10

    Modern arthroplasty is undoubtedly the greatest contribution that orthopaedic surgery has ever made to medical science. The honour for the good results achieved with total hip replacement surgery goes chiefly to the Briton John Charnley (1911-1982). However, the Norwegian Tor Aas Christiansen (1917-1981) has also earned a place in this history. He wanted to improve the operative treatment of dislocated, medial fractures of the femoral neck, and in the 1960s he constructed a hemiprosthesis. Later, he also made a total prosthesis for the hip joint. Over time, the prostheses proved to be less than successful. Nevertheless, approximately 6,500 Christiansen prostheses were fitted in Norway before a prospective Charnley vs. Christiansen study at the Coastal Hospital in Hagavik finally put an end to his prostheses in 1983. Indirectly, the study led to the establishment of a national register of hip prostheses, now the National Arthroplasty Register, at Haukeland University Hospital. Based on our personal cooperation with Christiansen, as well as original drawings and correspondence from the Polaris factory in Sandnes, we will tell the story of Christiansen's hemi- and total prostheses. These are a key element in the history of hip arthroplasty in Norway.

  5. Hip joint contact forces in normal subjects and subjects with total hip prostheses: walking and stair and ramp negotiation.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, B W; Nicol, A C

    2002-02-01

    To calculate the hip joint contact force in normal subjects and subjects with total hip replacements. An observational study of age matched normal subjects and subjects with hip joint replacements. Hip joint contact forces have been calculated using musculo-skeletal models and measured in vivo using instrumented hip prostheses. There are few examples of studies performed on subjects in the 40-60 year age range. This study characterises the forces in both normal subjects and subjects with hip joint replacements for these 'young' subjects. Motion analysis and force plate data were used as input to a three-dimensional model of the leg. Five male and six female normal subjects and five male subjects with hip prostheses were studied. Each subject was observed walking and negotiating stairs and a ramp. Hip joint contact forces in both thigh and pelvic-based co-ordinate systems are presented. Subjects cadence, speed and stride length are given. In general subjects with hip replacements exhibited lower hip joint contact forces than age matched normal subjects. It is suggested that this was the results of the lower speeds, stride lengths and cadences adopted by the subjects with hip replacements. The characterisation of hip joint contact forces provides essential information for prosthetic joint design and testing. The comparison of hip joint contact forces in normal subjects with those in subjects with prosthetic joints provides evidence of, not only actual use of joints, but also of possible levels of force that might be applied to hip prostheses if subjects returned to normal use.

  6. Cementless total hip arthroplasty in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Zeng, Min; Xie, Jie; Wen, Ting; Hu, Yihe

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Controversies on the surgical protocols and efficacies of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) still exist. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the perioperative managements and their outcomes related to performing THA on patients with AS. Data of 54 AS patients who underwent 81 THAs between 2008 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and imaging data were collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and during the follow-up period for surgical efficacy. Using posterolateral approach, cementless prostheses were selected in all cases. Mean follow-up period was 3.6 years (range, 2–8 years). Inclinations and anteversions of acetabular cups were 36.3°±4.5° (range, 30°–50°) and 12.3°±4.9° (range, 0°–25°) respectively. Mean visual analog scale (VAS) score decreased from 6.7 ± 2.1 (range, 4–10) preoperatively to 1.5 ± 1.0 (range, 0–4) at final follow-up, and mean Harris hip score (HHS) improved from 31.2 ± 11.6 (range, 15–45) to 86.1 ± 4.3 (range, 80–95) (P < 0.05). Postoperative range of motion (ROM) in flexion was improved from 6.7°±13.5° (range, 0°–50°) preoperatively to 82.5°±6.4° (range, 70°–100°) at final follow-up, and ROM in extension was improved from 1.8°±5.7°(range, 0°–15°) to 15.4°±2.6° (range, 10°–20°) (P < 0.05). Heterotopic ossification (HO) was documented in 9 hips (11.1%). Signs of stable fibrous ingrowth and bone ingrowth were detected in 52 and 29 hips, respectively. Sciatic never injury was occurred in 3 cases, and treated conservatively. There were no signs of periprosthetic fractures, dislocation, or prosthesis loosening. Surgical efficacies of THA for AS patients with severe hip involvement are satisfactory. PMID:28121928

  7. [Total knee and hip prosthesis: variables associated with costs].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Espiñeira, Carmen; Escobar, Antonio; Navarro-Espigares, José Luis; Castillo, Juan de Dios Lunadel; García-Pérez, Lidia; Godoy-Montijano, Amparo

    2013-01-01

    The elevated prevalence of osteoarthritis in Western countries, the high costs of hip and knee arthroplasty, and the wide variations in the clinical practice have generated considerable interest in comparing the associated costs before and after surgery. To determine the influence of a number of variables on the costs of total knee and hip arthroplasty surgery during the hospital stay and during the one-year post-discharge. A prospective multi-center study was performed in 15 hospitals from three Spanish regions. Relationships between the independent variables and the costs of hospital stay and postdischarge follow-up were analyzed by using multilevel models in which the "hospital" variable was used to group cases. Independent variables were: age, sex, body mass index, preoperative quality of life (SF-12, EQ-5 and Womac questionnaires), surgery (hip/knee), Charlson Index, general and local complications, number of beds and economic-institutional dependency of the hospital, the autonomous region to which it belongs, and the presence of a caregiver. The cost of hospital stay, excluding the cost of the prosthesis, was 4,734 Euros, and the post-discharge cost was 554 Euros. With regard to hospital stay costs, the variance among hospitals explained 44-46% of the total variance among the patients. With regard to the post-discharge costs, the variability among hospitals explained 7-9% of the variance among the patients. There is considerable potential for reducing the hospital stay costs of these patients, given that more than 44% of the observed variability was not determined by the clinical conditions of the patients but rather by the behavior of the hospitals.

  8. Digital templating in primary total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Levine, Brett; Fabi, David; Deirmengian, Carl

    2010-11-02

    The use of digital radiography is becoming more prevalent in orthopedics. This transition impacts the ability to preoperatively plan for implants in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This article reports on the clinical success of digital templating using the Advanced Case Plan (Stryker Imaging, Flower Mound, Texas) system in primary THA and TKA. Digital radiographs of 269 consecutive patients undergoing primary THA (93 cases) or TKA (176 cases) were templated using the Advanced Case Plan digital software package. A 25.4-mm metallic sphere was used as a calibrating marker. Anteroposterior hip and lateral knee radiographs were digitally templated preoperatively and compared to the actual size of the implants at the time of surgery. The accuracy of calibrating images using the metallic sphere was validated by measuring the diameter of femoral heads on 25 postoperative hip radiographs. Digital templating was accurate in predicting the correct implant size in 58.5% of THAs and 66% of TKAs. In 93% of THAs and 98.5% of TKAs, preoperative templating was within 1 size of the final implant. There were no cases in which the predicted implant size varied from the final components by >2 sizes. Calibrating the image using the metallic sphere marker was found to be highly accurate, predicting the correct femoral head size within 1.5 mm in all 25 cases (7 hemiarthroplasties and 18 THAs). Digital templating is an effective means for predicting the size of THA and TKA components, thus remaining a viable option as we transition into the modern era of digital radiography. Future studies will evaluate interobserver reliability and the impact of level of training on templating accuracy. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Physical functioning four years after total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vissers, M M; Bussmann, J B; de Groot, I B; Verhaar, J A N; Reijman, M

    2013-06-01

    Our previous study showed that 6 months after total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA), patients reported having less difficulty with daily activities, showed better functional capacity, and performed activities in their natural environment faster compared to preoperatively. However, their actual daily activity level was not significantly improved. Six months is a rather short follow-up period and the discrepancy in recovery among different aspects of functioning might be explained by this limited duration of follow-up. The objective of the present study was to examine the recovery of different aspects of physical functioning at a follow-up nearly 4 years after THA/TKA. Special attention was given to the actual daily activity level, and whether it had increased 4 years after THA/TKA compared to 6 months postoperatively. Seventy-seven (35 hip, 42 knee) patients who were measured preoperatively and postoperatively (6 months after surgery) in a previous study were invited to participate; 44 patients (23 hip, 21 knee) agreed to participate. The 4-year follow-up data were compared with the preoperative and 6-month postoperative data. The daily activity level after 4 years was found to be actually lower than at 6 months post-surgery (128 min vs. 138 min activity per 24h; p-value 0.48). However, the patients continued to improve in other aspects of physical functioning. In conclusion, 4-year post-surgery patients continued to improve on perceived physical functioning, capacity, and performance of activities in daily life. However, even in this relatively healthy study population, patients did not adopt a more active lifestyle 4 years after surgery.

  10. Alternative bearing surface options for revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Patel, Deepan; Parvizi, Javad; Sharkey, Peter F

    2011-01-01

    Despite the overall success of total hip arthroplasty (THA), there has been an increase in the rate of revision hip surgeries performed each year in the United States. These revision surgeries result in several billion dollars in health care costs. Bearing surface wear can result in the need for revision surgery through a variety of mechanisms. Many implant failures necessitating the need for revision surgeries occur secondary to dislocations, which are often related to prothesis wear and eventual loosening of the components. Wear also can lead to osteolysis and may play a role in aseptic loosening. Specific concerns regarding the wear rates of metal-on-polyethylene (the most common bearing surface) have encouraged the manufacture of newer polyethylene implants with improved wear properties, as well as alternative bearing surfaces. The goal is to improve the durability of revision implants and/or reduce the incidence of revision THAs. Revision arthroplasty involves using alternative surfaces, such as replacing the metal femoral head with a ceramic component or changing the entire prosthesis to a metal-on-metal or ceramic-on-ceramic articulation. It is important to review the characteristics of these alternative bearing surface options and their contributions to improved THA tribology and prolonged prosthesis longevity. The choice of a bearing surface for a revision THA should consider factors such as the patient's age and activity level, the cost of the implant, and both the surgeons' and patients' preferences. Although laboratory studies and small clinical trials have generated optimistic results for these alternative implants in vitro and in vivo, much still needs to be learned about the long-term performance of these materials in patients after total hip revision surgery.

  11. The Role of Metal-on-Metal Bearings in Total Hip Arthroplasty and Hip Resurfacing: Review Article.

    PubMed

    Sands, David; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2017-02-01

    The current role of metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings in hip arthroplasty remains controversial. The low wear offered by MoM bearings compared to metal-on-polyethylene and the possibility of a lower risk of dislocation with larger head sizes, encouraged a trend towards the re-introduction of the MoM bearing couple. However, recent evidence has shown that not all designs of the MoM bearing have been successful. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on the use of MoM bearings and address the following issues: (1) the reintroduction of metal-on-metal bearings in total hip arthroplasty, (2) the failure of metal-on-metal bearings in stemmed total hip arthroplasty, (3) the role of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing in modern orthopaedics and (4) metal-on-metal hip resurfacing versus total hip arthroplasty. A literature search strategy was conducted using various search terms in MEDLINE and Embase. The highest quality articles that met the inclusion criteria and best answered the topics of focus of this review were selected. Key search terms included 'metal-on-metal', 'total hip arthroplasty' and 'hip resurfacing'. The initial search retrieved 1240 articles. Twenty-two articles were selected and used in the review. Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing is still a suitable treatment option in specific patient populations with the appropriate implant design and surgical skill, while stemmed metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty should be avoided in all patient populations. Continued follow-up of patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing is critical in order to further understand the long-term outcomes of these patients and why certain complications tend to occur with this procedure.

  12. Effect of pneumatic compression on fibrinolysis after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, William; Westrich, Geoffrey; Sharrock, Nigel; Sculco, Thomas P; Jhon, Peter H; Peterson, Margaret G E; Salvati, Eduardo A

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this prospective randomized clinical study was to investigate the enhanced systemic fibrinolysis mechanism of venous thrombosis prevention by pneumatic compression after total hip arthroplasty. Fifty patients were randomized into one of two groups (one with pneumatic compression [n=25] and one without [n=25]). Blood was drawn from a radial arterial line immediately preoperatively (baseline), at skin closure, and 8 hours and 22 hours after the baseline sample. Serum determinations of antigen of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 were done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. These data do not support the enhancement of systemic fibrinolysis mechanism for lowering thromboembolic risk after total hip arthroplasty by pneumatic compression devices. The results of this study showed no differences that were statistically significant between the two groups. The greatest difference was observed 8 hours after surgery for the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 marker, (28.12 with compression versus 22.07 ng/mL without); however, this result was not statistically significant. The beneficial effect of mechanical compression is more likely achieved through increased flow, local fibrinolytic effects, or both.

  13. The appropriateness of blood transfusion following primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Joy, PJ; Bennet, SJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A significant proportion of all red cell transfusions are given to patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery. Concern over transfusion safety and cost, coupled with evidence showing that restrictive transfusion policies benefit patients, prompted us to audit our blood prescribing practice at Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in order to assess the appropriateness of every transfusion episode following elective primary total hip replacement. METHODS All patients undergoing a primary total hip replacement in our department over a six-month period were included in the study. Data were collected retrospectively using case note examination and transfusion service data. Standards were dictated by the British Orthopaedic Association guidelines on blood conservation in elective orthopaedic surgery. RESULTS Twenty-seven per cent of patients (39/143) were transfused. Forty-six per cent of these (18/39) were transfused inappropriately and twenty-three per cent (9/39) appropriately. Thirteen per cent (5/39) had a valid indication for transfusion but were over-transfused and in eighteen per cent (7/39) the quality of documentation did not allow an assessment to be made. Fifty-two per cent of patients who had surgical drains (29/56) were transfused. Reaudit following staff education and amendments to the local transfusion policy did not demonstrate a reduction in transfusion rates. CONCLUSIONS This audit showed that significant potential exists for reducing transfusion rates based on optimising prescribing practice alone. It also demonstrated that changing local practice based on audit data can be challenging. PMID:22507728

  14. Polyethylene sterilization and production affects wear in total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Faris, Philip M; Ritter, Merrill A; Pierce, Andrew L; Davis, Kenneth E; Faris, Gregory W

    2006-12-01

    Production and package sterilization techniques for the polyethylene used in acetabular components for total hip arthroplasties are known to affect wear. We considered three combinations of techniques: sterilization by radiation in inert gas with isostatically molded polyethylene, in inert gas and ram-extruded polyethylene, and in air with extruded polyethylene. The intent of this study was to confirm that molded polyethylene and polyethylene radiated in inert environments reduce wear rates in vivo, to determine the combination of methods with the least wear, and to determine how much variance in wear is attributable to these methods. We reviewed 150 consecutive total hip arthroplasties done in 133 patients using 28-mm cobalt-chrome femoral heads and polyethylene-lined, titanium, ring-locked acetabular components. The least wear occurred in gamma inert-molded polyethylene components. The mean volumetric wear rates were 52.12 mm3/year for gamma inert-molded, 62.32 mm3/year for gamma inert-extruded, and 66.09 mm3/year for gamma air-extruded polyethylene components. Relative risk assessment found gamma air-extruded and gamma inert-extruded polyethylene components to wear 16% and 11% more than gamma inert-molded polyethylene components, respectively. Gender, body mass index, and age accounted for the greatest amount of the explained variance in volumetric wear (57.5%, 21.6%, and 14.4, respectively), followed by angle of wear (3.4%), and sterilization and production technique (3.2%).

  15. A modified S-ROM stem in primary total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Tamegai, Hideaki; Otani, Takuya; Fujii, Hideki; Kawaguchi, Yasuhiko; Hayama, Tetsuo; Marumo, Keishi

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the clinical outcome of 220 hips in 196 Asian patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) for treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) using a modified S-ROM modular (S-ROM-A) stem designed for Asians, after 2-5 years (mean, 3.3 years) of follow-up. The stem was placed so that the anteversion angle of the neck was decreased against the sleeve in 56% of the hips and increased in 18% of the hips. Bone ingrown fixation was achieved in 99.5% of the hips on X-ray at final follow-up. There were 2 (0.9%) dislocations postoperatively. In primary THA for treatment of DDH accompanied by femoral rotational deformity, the freely-rotatable modular stem provided favorable short-term outcomes by affording both morphological and functional advantages.

  16. Femoral head diameter considerations for primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Girard, J

    2015-02-01

    The configuration of total hip arthroplasty (THA) implants has constantly evolved since they were first introduced. One of the key components of THA design is the diameter of the prosthetic femoral head. It has been well established that the risk of dislocation is lower as the head diameter increases. But head diameter impacts other variables beyond joint stability: wear, cam-type impingement, range of motion, restoration of biomechanics, proprioception and groin pain. The introduction of highly cross-linked polyethylene and hard-on-hard bearings has allowed surgeons to implant large-diameter heads that almost completely eliminate the risk of dislocation. But as a result, cup liners have become thinner. With femoral head diameters up to 36 mm, the improvement in joint range of motion, delay in cam-type impingement and reduction in dislocation risk have been clearly demonstrated. Conversely, large-diameter heads do not provide any additional improvements. If an "ecologically sound" approach to hip replacement is embraced (e.g. keeping the native femoral head diameter), hip resurfacing with a metal-on-metal bearing must be carried out. The reliability of large-diameter femoral heads in the longer term is questionable. Large-diameter ceramic-on-ceramic bearings may be plagued by the same problems as metal-on-metal bearings: groin pain, squeaking, increased stiffness, irregular lubrication, acetabular loosening and notable friction at the Morse taper. These possibilities require us to be extra careful when using femoral heads with a diameter greater than 36 mm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Preoperative Hip Injections Increase the Rate of Periprosthetic Infection After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Schairer, William W; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Mayman, David J; Lyman, Stephen; Jerabek, Seth A

    2016-09-01

    Intraarticular injections are both diagnostic and therapeutic for patients with osteoarthritis. A potential risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) may occur from direct inoculation and/or immune suppression by corticosteroids. Large population-level databases were used to evaluate hip injection on the 1-year rate of PJI in patients undergoing primary THA. State-level ambulatory surgery and inpatient databases for Florida and California (2005-2012) were used to identify primary THA patients with 1-year preoperative and postoperative windows to evaluate possible injections or PJI, respectively. Patients were grouped as no injection or as THA performed 6-12 months, 3-6 months, or 0-3 months after injection. Risk adjustment was performed with multivariable regression. A total of 173,958 patients were included; 5421 (3.1%) underwent THA after an injection: 1395 (1.1%) of patients after 6-12 months, 1863 patients after 3-6 months, and 2163 (1.2%) after 0-3 months. In the 0-3 month group, PJI was significantly increased at 3 months (1.58%, P = .015), 6 months (1.76%, P = .022), and 1 year (2.04%, P = .031) compared with the noninjection control group (1.04%, 1.21%, and 1.47%, respectively). There were no differences in the 3- to 6-month and 6- to 12-month injection groups. There is an increased risk of PJI when THA is performed within 3 months of hip injection. We recommend that patients and their surgeons consider delaying elective THA until 3 months after an injection to avoid this elevated risk of infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The impact of surgeon handedness in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, A; Stewart, T; Stone, M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Total hip replacement (THR) is successful and performed commonly. Component placement is a determinant of outcome. Influence of surgeon handedness on component placement has not been considered previously. This study was a radiographic assessment of component positioning with respect to handedness. Early data from 160 patients are reported. Methods Overall, 160 primary THRs for osteoarthritis were included. Equal numbers of left and right THRs were performed by four surgeons, two right-handed and two left-handed. Postoperative radiography was assessed for THR component position by measurement of leg length inequality, acetabular inclination and centre of rotation. Surgeons’ handedness was assessed using the Edinburgh inventory. Results For leg length inequality, no significant interaction was seen between hip side and surgeon handedness. Acetabular inclination angles showed a statistically significant difference, however, depending on hand dominance, with higher inclination angles recorded when operating on the dominant side. There was a trend towards greater medialisation of the centre of rotation on the non-dominant side although this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Surgeon handedness appears to influence acetabular component position during THR but it is one factor of many that interact to achieve a successful outcome. PMID:25198975

  19. Constrained components for the unstable hip following total hip arthroplasty: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Williams, J T; Ragland, P S; Clarke, S

    2007-06-01

    Patients with chronic instability or late dislocation following total hip arthroplasty often require operative management. Unfortunately, there is an increased risk of recurrent dislocation following revision in these patients. Over the past decade the use of constrained devices for patients with chronic instability has gained increased interest; however, there is a paucity of studies available in the literature regarding the use of these devices. The purpose of this study was to analyze the available literature over the past 15 years, focusing on larger, long-term studies, to obtain recommendations from the respective articles for indications and contraindications for the use of constrained devices. Our review of eight reports included 1,199 hips in 1,148 patients with a total mean follow-up of 51 months (range, 24 to 124 months). The mean rate of dislocation following revision with a constrained liner was 10% and the mean re-operation rate for reasons other than dislocation was 4%. We concluded that constrained liners are an option for patients who have failed management of instability with other implants, those with instability of unclear etiology, those with cognitive problems who are unable to follow dislocation precautions, those with deficient abductors, and elderly or low-demand individuals with well-positioned implants requiring revision.

  20. [Total hip arthroplasty for non-functional bony ankylosed hip in young and middle-aged patients].

    PubMed

    Fu, Yingxu; Yu, Boyong; Asihaerjiang-Maimaitiyiming; Cao, Li; Aili-Rehei

    2014-09-01

    To explore the effectiveness of total hip arthroplasty (THA) for non-functional bony ankylosed hip in young and middle-aged patients. Between January 2010 and March 2013, 14 cases (19 hips) of non-functional bony ankylosed hip were treated by THA. There were 9 males and 5 females, aged 37.5 years on average (range, 23- 58 years). The left hip was involved in 6 cases, the right hip in 3 cases, and bilateral hips in 5 cases. The causes were tuberculosis in 2 patients, ankylosing spondylitis in 5 patients, traumatic arthritis in 5 patients, osteoarthritis in 1 patient, and suppurative infection in 1 patient. The disease duration was 7-18 years with an average of 8.9 years. Flexion stiffness was observed in 10 hips, flexion abduction stiffness in 6 hips, and flexion adduction shortening stiffness in 3 hips. Only 5 patients could walk with a crutch before operation. Harris hip score was 24.368 ± 7.625. The average operation time was 63.4 minutes (range, 50-90 minutes). The average intraoperative blood loss was 196.8 mL (range, 100-400 mL). Patients obtained primary healing of incision; no complication of neurovascular injury, fracture, joint dislocation, or infection occurred. All patients were followed up 2.2 years on average (range, 1 year to 4 years and 3 months). The Harris score was 86.837 ± 7.742 at last follow- up, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative score (t = -41.956, P = 0.000). The results were excellent in 5 hips, good in 11 hips, fair in 2 hips, and poor in 1 hip, with an excellent and good rate of 84.2%. All patients could basically take care of themselves; 2 patients could walk with crutch, and the other patients could walk without crutch. X-ray films showed that prosthesis was in good position; no shifting, loosening, or sinking was found. Heterotopic ossification occurred in 2 hips. THA is an effective surgical approach to treat non-functional bony ankylosed hip in young and middle- aged patients.

  1. Severity of Diabetes Mellitus and Total Hip or Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Nielen, Johannes T.H.; Emans, Pieter J.; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Boonen, Annelies; Lalmohamed, Arief; de Boer, Anthonius; van den Bemt, Bart J.F.; de Vries, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is generally thought that people with diabetes mellitus (DM) are more likely to suffer from osteoarthritis (OA) due to an increased body mass index (BMI), resulting in mechanical destruction of cartilage. However, previous studies have suggested a coexisting metabolic causality. To evaluate the risk of hip or knee replacement, as a proxy for severe OA, in patients with DM. We additionally evaluated the risk of total joint replacement (TJR) with various proxies for increased DM severity. A population-based case–control study was performed, using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Cases (n = 94,609) were defined as patients >18 years who had undergone TJR between 2000 and 2012. Controls were matched by age, gender, and general practice. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of total knee (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) surgery associated with use of antidiabetic drugs (ADs). We additionally stratified current AD users by proxies for DM severity. Current AD use was significantly associated with a lower risk of TKR (OR = 0.86 (95% CI = 0.78–0.94)) and THR (OR = 0.90 (95% CI = 0.82–0.99)) compared to patients not using ADs. Moreover, risk of TKR and THR was decreased with increasing HbA1c. This study does not support the theory that DM patients are more likely to suffer from severe OA as compared to patients without diabetes. Moreover, risk of severe OA necessitating TJR decreases with increasing DM severity. This is possibly due to dissimilarities in methodology, a decrease in eligibility for surgery, or variability of OA phenotypes. PMID:27196498

  2. Comparison of Patient and Surgeon Expectations of Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, Claire; Poiraudeau, Serge; Descamps, Stéphane; Nizard, Rémy; Hamadouche, Moussa; Anract, Philippe; Boisgard, Stéphane; Galvin, Myriam; Ravaud, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Analysis of discrepancies between patient and surgeon expectations before total hip arthroplasty (THA) should enable a better understanding of motives of dissatisfaction about surgery, but this question has been seldom studied. Our objectives were to compare surgeons' and patients' expectations before THA, and to study factors which affected surgeon-patient agreement. Methods 132 adults (mean age 62.8+/−13.7 years, 52% men) on waiting list for THA in three tertiary care centres and their 16 surgeons were interviewed to assess their expectations using the Hospital for Special Surgery Total Hip Replacement Expectations Survey (range 0–100). Patients' and surgeons' answers were compared, for the total score and for the score of each item. Univariate analyses tested the effect of patients' characteristics on surgeons' and patients' expectations separately, and on surgeon-patient differences. Results Surgeon and patient expectations' mean scores were high (respectively 90.9+/−11.1 and 90.0+/−11.6 over 100). Surgeons' and patients' expectations showed no systematic difference, but there was little agreement on Bland and Altman graph and correlation coefficient was low. Patients had higher expectations than surgeons for sports. Patients rated their expectations according to trust in physician and mental quality of life, surgeons considered disability. More disabled patients and patients from a low-income professional category were often “more optimistic” than their surgeons. Conclusion Surgeons and patients often do not agree on what to expect from THA. More disabled patients expect better outcomes than their surgeons. PMID:22272303

  3. Regulation of UHMWPE biomaterials in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kasser, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    This manuscript provides a brief history of the development of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHWMPE) biomaterials and how the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates medical devices. The flowchart used to decide whether a device is medium or high risk, known as the 510(k) flowchart, is illustrated by taking several examples through the flowchart. In order to demonstrate how changes to UHWMPE material used in the acetabular liners of total hips have been regulated, two major modifications to UHMWPE, highly crosslinked polyethylene and Vitamin E polyethylene, are taken through the flowchart. This manuscript describes the testing that has been provided to demonstrate safety and effectiveness of these modifications, as well as an explanation why the testing was supplied to the FDA.

  4. Impingement in Total Hip Replacement: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D.; Callaghan, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of total hip impingement, whether or not accompanied by frank dislocation, holds substantial untoward clinical consequences, especially as less-forgiving advanced bearing implant designs come into ever more widespread use. Biomechanical aspects of impingement and dislocation have historically received relatively little scientific attention, although that situation is now rapidly changing. The present article reviews contemporary laboratory and clinical research on the impingement/dislocation phenomena, focusing particularly on how implant design variables, surgical implantation factors and patient activity each act individually and in concert to pose impingement and dislocation challenges. In recent years, several powerful new research methodologies have emerged that have greatly expanded the scope for clinical translation of systematic laboratory study. Transferring the findings from such research into yet better implant designs, and even better surgical procedures, offers encouragement that the clinical impact of this troublesome complication can be further reduced. PMID:19956356

  5. Gross trunnion failure after primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Bono, James V; Kurtz, Steven M; Geesink, Rudolph; Meneghini, R Michael; Delanois, Ronald E; Mont, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Unfavorable outcomes from trunnion fretting and corrosion damage have been reported in the literature, gross failures of tapers in primary total hip arthroplasties have been less frequently reported. We report on 5 patients, who presented with gross trunnion failures of modular metal-on-polyethylene or ceramic-on-polyethylene bearings from 5 implant manufacturers, all necessitating revision surgery. None of these patients had an antecedent history of trauma, and the majority presented with pain or instability. No common factor was identified that may be predictive of these type of failures. Since there were 5 different stem designs, this suggests that it may be a rare generic phenomenon occurring with multiple designs. Currently, further investigations are necessary, including retrieval analysis, to identify risk factors that may predispose to such failures.

  6. Celecoxib does not affect osteointegration of cementless total hip stems.

    PubMed

    Lionberger, David R; Noble, Philip C

    2005-10-01

    Celecoxib's effect on prosthetic osteointegration in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty was studied. In a prospective, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of 49 patients, 24 were randomized to celecoxib (200 mg/d) and 25 to placebo over 6 weeks. Bone markers, N-teleopeptide, and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase were obtained postoperatively, and at 6 and 12 weeks. No radiographic prosthetic subsidence occurred. There were no significant differences from baseline in periprosthetic bone mineral density between the celecoxib and placebo groups at 3 and 6 months. There were no significant differences in baseline BSAlkP values between the 2 groups. At 6 and 12 weeks, average BSAlkP values increased. Urinary NTx concentrations followed a skewed distribution. Normalized NTx concentrations were statistically significantly greater in the celecoxib group than the placebo group at 6 weeks but not at 12 weeks.

  7. Profunda Femoris Pseudoaneurysm following Total Hip Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Katharine; Iorio, Justin; Balasubramanian, Easwaran

    2015-01-01

    Vascular injuries following total hip arthroplasty (THA) are very rare, with pseudoaneurysm being a small subset. We report a case of profunda femoris artery (PFA) pseudoaneurysm in a 61-year-old male following a posterior approach revision left THA. Presentation involved continued blood transfusion requirements several weeks postoperatively. Diagnosis of the pseduoaneurysm was made by contrast CT of the lower extremity, with confirmation via IR angiography. Successful embolization was achieved with selective coiling and Gelfoam. Presenting complaints of such complications are often vague and therefore lead to delayed diagnosis. Causes of such complications are not completely understood, particularly with PFA injuries in THA. Possible mechanisms are discussed in this paper. Vascular complications following THA can be difficult to diagnose. High suspicion in the setting of continued postoperative pain or bleeding may allow prompt diagnosis and avoidance of serious limb-threatening complications. PMID:26347839

  8. Patient sensitivity to polyethylene particles with cemented total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ise, Kentaro; Kawanabe, Keiichi; Matsusaki, Takashi; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Onishi, Eijiro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2007-10-01

    To determine whether sensitivity to polyethylene particles varies among patients, we studied 25 patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. We used pelvic radiographs to measure annual polyethylene wear and the area of osteolysis. The ratio of the area of osteolysis to the volumetric polyethylene wear was defined as sensitivity index. Adherent cells from peripheral blood were cocultured with polyethylene particles, and the amount of bone-resorptive cytokines was measured. The amount of interleukin-6, but not of interleukin-1beta or tumor necrosis factor-alpha, released from adherent cells in the in vitro experiment correlated with the in vivo sensitivity indices. This technique appears capable of predicting the development of polyethylene-induced osteolysis, allowing surgeons to avoid using polyethylene as the bearing surface in patients at risk for osteolysis.

  9. Cementless revision for infection following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Philip A; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Greidanus, Nelson V; Duncan, Clive P

    2003-01-01

    Eradication of chronic infection complicating total hip arthroplasty requires removal of all infected, devitalized and foreign tissue, including the arthroplasty components. Reimplantation into a sterile bed is the goal of treatment in most patients and successful reimplantation yields better functional results than excision arthroplasty. Reimplantation may be performed at the same stage as débridement as part of a single-stage procedure, using cemented components with antibiotic-loaded cement. Alternatively, a two-stage procedure may be performed so that the débridement and reimplantation are separated by a period of antibiotic delivery, both locally and systemically. The results of these treatment regimens and the rationale for cementless reconstruction at the second stage of a two-stage treatment protocol are important considerations in the treatment of periprosthetic infection.

  10. Highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Alexander C; D'Lima, Darryl D; Colwell, Clifford W

    2006-09-01

    Although total hip arthroplasty is a common and highly successful procedure, its long-term durability has been undermined by the cellular response to polyethylene wear debris and the subsequent effects on periprosthetic bone. Research elucidating the effects of sterilization on polyethylene wear has facilitated the development of a more wear-resistant material-highly cross-linked polyethylene. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that highly cross-linked polyethylene has markedly improved wear resistance compared with conventional polyethylene under a variety of conditions. Early clinical data have supported these results. To make informed decisions about this already widely available and frequently used product, the practicing orthopaedic surgeon should have a basic understanding of the production process as well as knowledge of the most current laboratory and clinical data.

  11. Cemented total hip prosthesis: Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Aliabadi, P.; Tumeh, S.S.; Weissman, B.N.; McNeil, B.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Conventional radiographs, technetium-99m bone scans, and gallium-67 scans were reviewed in 44 patients who had undergone cemented total hip joint replacement and were imaged because of suspicion of prosthesis loosening or infection. A complete radiolucent line of 2 mm or wider along the bone-cement interface or metal-cement lucency on conventional radiographs was used as the criterion for prosthetic loosening with or without infection and proved to be 54% sensitive and 96% specific. Scintigraphic criteria for prosthetic loosening were increased focal uptake of the radiopharmaceutical for the femoral component and increased focal or diffuse uptake for the acetabular component. For bone scintigraphy, sensitivity was 73% and specificity was 96%. Combining the results of conventional radiographs and bone scans increased sensitivity to 84% and decreased specificity to 92% for the diagnosis of loosening, infection, or both. The study also showed that Ga-67 scintigraphy has a low sensitivity for the detection of infection.

  12. Hydrotherapy after total hip arthroplasty: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, S; Ciotola, E; Dall'armi, V; Margutti, F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the subjective functional outcome of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients who underwent hydrotherapy (HT) 6 months after discharge. A prospective randomized study was performed on 70 elderly inpatients with recent THA, who completed a rehabilitation program. After randomization, 33 of them were treated in conventional gyms (no-hydrotherapy group=NHTG) and 31 received HT (hydrotherapy group=HTG). Interviews with the Western-Ontario MacMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were performed at admission, at discharge and 6 months later. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were applied for statistical analysis. Both groups improved. Pain, stiffness and function were all positively affected. Statistical analysis indicated that WOMAC sub-scales were significantly lower for all patients treated with HT. The benefits at discharge still remained after 6 months. We conclude that HT is recommended after THA in a geriatric population.

  13. Early postoperative acetabular discontinuity after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Desai, Gaurav; Ries, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    Periprosthetic acetabular fracture is a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, we have treated 2 patients with acute postoperative acetabular discontinuity that occurred 2 and 3 weeks after primary THA. Both fractures were in elderly osteoporotic female patients with minimal trauma and may have developed from unrecognized intraoperative fractures. Pelvic stability was restored with acetabular revision using medial morselized bone grafting and a cemented reconstruction cage. This report demonstrates that early postoperative periprosthetic acetabular discontinuity after THA is a risk in elderly patients with severe osteoporosis and that salvage of acetabular fixation can be achieved with cemented cage reconstruction and medial morselized bone grafting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ceramic materials as bearing surfaces for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, James A; Sutton, Kate

    2009-02-01

    During the past decade, advances in total hip arthroplasty component design have produced implants with reliable clinical results in regard to fixation. The foremost unresolved challenge has been the development of bearing surfaces that can withstand the higher demands of younger and more active patients. New alternative bearings with superior wear characteristics that minimize debris include ceramic-on-ceramic, metal-on-metal, and highly cross-linked polyethylenes in combination with ceramic or metal. Alumina-on-alumina ceramic bearings are extremely hard and scratch resistant and provide superior lubrication and wear resistance compared with other bearing surfaces in clinical use. Survivorship revision for any reason for the alumina ceramic bearings at 10 years was significantly higher compared with metal-on-polyethylene. Bearings currently being studied because of their encouraging wear performance in the laboratory are an alumina matrix (82% alumina, 17% zirconia, 0.3% chromium oxide), zirconium oxide, and ceramic-on-cobalt-chromium.

  15. Explosive and maximal strength before and 6 months after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Casartelli, Nicola C; Wellauer, Vanessa; Item-Glatthorn, Julia F; Ferguson, Stephen J; Leunig, Michael; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2017-06-02

    Patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis experience impairments in lower limb muscle function due to pain and disuse of the affected limb. The influence of hip osteoarthritis and subsequent total hip arthroplasty (THA) has mostly been evaluated by maximal strength tests, yet the functionally important explosive strength capabilities of hip and knee muscles are largely unknown. We aimed to evaluate hip and knee explosive and maximal strength in hip osteoarthritis patients before and after THA. Twenty-one patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis were evaluated before and 6 months after THA. They performed rapid maximal contractions of hip (flexor, extensor, abductor, adductor) and knee (flexor, extensor) muscles, from which explosive and maximal strength asymmetries were evaluated (involved versus uninvolved limb). Before THA, the involved limb showed significantly lower hip flexor, extensor, adductor, and knee extensor explosive and maximal strength compared to the uninvolved limb. Six months after THA surgery, hip flexor, extensor and adductor maximal and explosive strength asymmetries persisted, except for knee extensors. Explosive, but not maximal strength of hip abductors and knee extensors was lower in the involved limb before surgery and the reduced explosive strength capabilities may compromise daily living activities in hip osteoarthritis patients. After hip replacement, explosive strength asymmetries of knee extensors resolved, yet lingering asymmetries in hip flexor muscles should receive focused attention during postoperative rehabilitation. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Clinical experience with ceramics in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Oonishi, H; Wakitani, S; Murata, N; Saito, M; Imoto, K; Kim, S; Matsuura, M

    2000-10-01

    As part of a search for better articulation in total hip prostheses, the decrease in the thickness of the socket in different total hip prostheses was measured in vivo. The wear rates of (1) RCH 1000 (molecular weight, 10(6)) socket gamma-irradiated with 100 Mrad articulating with a crude COP (stainless steel containing 20% cobalt and 0.01% phosphorous) metal femoral head; (2) RCH 1000 socket nonirradiated articulating with a crude COP femoral head; (3) RCH 1000 socket irradiated with 100 Mrad articulating with an alumina femoral head; (4) ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (molecular weight, 5-6 x 10(6)) socket articulating with an alumina femoral head; and (5) ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene socket articulating with a stainless steel femoral head (T-28) were 0.06, 0.30, 0.06, 0.1 and 0.25 mm/year, respectively, in the authors' clinical cases. Alumina femoral heads were effective in decreasing wear of the polyethylene socket. However, the wear rates of gamma-irradiated sockets articulating with alumina and with metal femoral heads wear very low and were not different from each other. Regarding the relationship between wear rate and the thickness of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene socket articulating with a 28 mm alumina femoral head, on radiographs, average wear rates of socket thicknesses of 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 mm were 0.14, 0.15, 0.12, 0.06, and 0.08 mm/year, respectively. On measuring retrieved prostheses, average wear rates of 7, 8, 9 and 11 mm thickness sockets were 0.2, 0.19, 0.14, and 0.1 mm/year, respectively. The wear of sockets has been proven to be minimal in alumina femoral heads articulating with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene sockets thicker than 10 mm.

  17. Primary total hip replacement: a comparison of a nationally agreed guide to best practice and current surgical technique as determined by the North West Regional Arthroplasty Register.

    PubMed Central

    Malik, M. H. A.; Gambhir, A. K.; Bale, L.; Pradhan, N.; Porter, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 1999, a statement of best practice in primary total hip replacement was approved by the Council of the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) and by the British Hip Society (BHS) to provide a basis for regional and national auditable standards. We have compared practice in the North West Region of England to this document to ascertain adherence to this guide to best practice. METHODS: A total of 86 surgeons from 26 hospitals were included in a questionnaire study. RESULTS: A mean of 93.3% of operations were performed in the surgeon's usual theatre. All of these theatres had vertical laminar air flow systems. Of respondents, 42.2% routinely used exhaust suits, 68.1% routinely used impermeable disposable gowns, and 26.1% used impermeable re-usable gowns. The Charnley femoral and acetabular prostheses were the most commonly used prostheses. All surgeons used some form of anti-thromboembolic prophylaxis: 66.2% use a combination of both mechanical and chemical means. All surgeons used antibiotic prophylaxis. The most popular choice of antibiotic was a cephalosporin--70.7% used a 3-dose regimen over 24 h, 2.6% of surgeons continued antibiotic prophylaxis for 48 h after surgery, and 93.7% of surgeons routinely use antibiotic-loaded cement. All surgeons routinely cleaned, irrigated and dried the acetabulum and femur before cement insertion. Only one surgeon did not use any form of femoral canal occlusion. 69.4% used an intramedullary bone block. Retrograde filling of the femoral shaft by means of a cement gun was practised by 65.1%. CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated considerable variation of practice in total hip arthroplasty across the North West Region and significant divergence from the statement of best practice approved by the BOA and BHS. The introduction of a properly funded national hip register will surely help to clarify the effect of such diverse practice on patient outcome. We would recommend that all trusts locally audit their practices

  18. Physiotherapy Rehabilitation After Total Knee or Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy analysis was to determine, where, how, and when physiotherapy services are best delivered to optimize functional outcomes for patients after they undergo primary (first-time) total hip replacement or total knee replacement, and to determine the Ontario-specific economic impact of the best delivery strategy. The objectives of the systematic review were as follows: To determine the effectiveness of inpatient physiotherapy after discharge from an acute care hospital compared with outpatient physiotherapy delivered in either a clinic-based or home-based setting for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of outpatient physiotherapy delivered by a physiotherapist in either a clinic-based or home-based setting in addition to a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of preoperative exercise for people who are scheduled to receive primary total knee or hip replacement surgery Clinical Need Total hip replacements and total knee replacements are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in Ontario. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after first-time total hip or knee replacement surgery is accepted as the standard and essential treatment. The aim is to maximize a person’s functionality and independence and minimize complications such as hip dislocation (for hip replacements), wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. The Therapy The physiotherapy rehabilitation routine has 4 components: therapeutic exercise, transfer training, gait training, and instruction in the activities of daily living. Physiotherapy rehabilitation for people who have had total joint replacement surgery varies in where, how, and when it is delivered. In Ontario, after discharge from an acute care hospital, people who have had a primary total knee or hip replacement may

  19. Short-stem prostheses in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Shao-Chuan; Wang, Fan; Dong, Lu-Jue; Wei, Wei; Zeng, Jing-Qi; Huang, Hong-Xing; Han, Qing-Min; Duan, Rui-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Short-stem (SS) prostheses require less resection of the femoral neck, produce a more physiological load pattern in the proximal femur, reduce stress shielding, and aid bone conservation and are, therefore, beneficial for young patients. Conventional cementless implants in total hip arthroplasty (THA) have shown excellent clinical results; however, it is unclear whether SS prostheses can obtain the same clinical and radiological outcomes. We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate whether SS prostheses are superior to conventional implants after primary THA. Methods: We reviewed the literature published up to June 2016 from PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library to find relevant RCTs comparing SSs and conventional stems in primary THA. Quality assessment was performed by 2 independent reviewers. The RevMan 5.3 software program of the Cochrane Collaboration was used to analyze the data. Random- or fixed-effect models were used to calculate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each comparison. Results: Six RCTs involving 552 patients with 572 hips were identified. Strong evidence indicated that SS prostheses were more effective for reducing thigh pain than conventional implants (I 2 = 46%, P = 0.002; risk ratio [RR], 95% CI 0.15, 0.04–0.49). However, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups in Harris Hip Scores (I 2 = 0%, P = 0.84; SMD, 95% CI 0.02, −0.15–0.18), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index Scores (I 2 = 0%, P = 0.35; SMD, 95% CI 0.09, −0.10–0.27), femoral offset of stem (I 2 = 0%, P = 0.57; SMD, 95% CI 0.06, −0.16–0.29), and leg-length discrepancy (I 2 = 79%, P = 0.88; SMD, 95% CI 0.04, −0.44–0.51). Conclusion: SS prostheses achieve the same clinical and radiological outcomes as conventional implants, and were superior in terms of reducing thigh pain. But whether the postoperative thigh pain

  20. Peri-acetabular bone mineral density in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, L.; Dinh, L.; Beaulé, P. E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To quantify and compare peri-acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) between a monoblock acetabular component using a metal-on-metal (MoM) bearing and a modular titanium shell with a polyethylene (PE) insert. The secondary outcome was to measure patient-reported clinical function. Methods A total of 50 patients (25 per group) were randomised to MoM or metal-on-polyethlene (MoP). There were 27 women (11 MoM) and 23 men (14 MoM) with a mean age of 61.6 years (47.7 to 73.2). Measurements of peri-prosthetic acetabular and contralateral hip (covariate) BMD were performed at baseline and at one and two years’ follow-up. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC), University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score, Harris hip score, and RAND-36 were also completed at these intervals. Results At two years, only zone 1 showed a loss in BMD (-2.5%) in MoM group compared with a gain in the MoP group (+2.2%). Zone 2 showed loss in both groups (-2.2% for MoM; -3.9% for MoP) and zones 3 and 4 a gain in both groups (+0.1% for MoM; +3.3% for MoP). No other between-group differences were detected. When adjusting for BMD of the contralateral hip, no differences in BMD were observed. The only significant differences in functional scores at two years were higher UCLA activity (7.3 (sd 1.2) vs 6.1 (sd 1.5); p = 0.01) and RAND-36 physical function (82.1 (sd 13.0) vs 64.5 (sd 26.4); p = 0.02) for MoM bearings versus MoP. One revision was performed in the MoM group, for aseptic acetabular loosening at 11 months. Conclusions When controlling for systemic BMD, there were no significant differences between MoM and MoP groups in peri-acetabular BMD. However, increasing reports of adverse tissue reactions with large head MoM THR have restricted the use of the monoblock acetabular component to resurfacing only. PMID:23913361

  1. Revision total hip arthroplasty in a centenarian: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Grey, Monique A; Keggi, Kristaps J

    2006-12-01

    The clinical success of primary total hip arthroplasty in elderly patients is well established. Because of the rapid growth rate of the population aged 85 years and older and the increasing life expectancy of this group of patients, the number of patients in their 8th, 9th, and even 10th decades of life requiring revision total hip arthroplasty will increase. We present the only documented case of revision total hip arthroplasty in a centenarian and a review of the relevant literature.

  2. Analysis of Femoral Components of Cemented Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shantanu; Harsha, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    There have been continuous on-going revisions in design of prosthesis in Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) to improve the endurance of hip replacement. In the present work, Finite Element Analysis was performed on cemented THA with CoCrMo trapezoidal, CoCrMo circular, Ti6Al4V trapezoidal and Ti6Al4V circular stem. It was observed that cross section and material of femoral stem proved to be critical parameters for stress distribution in femoral components, distribution of interfacial stress and micro movements. In the first part of analysis, designs were investigated for micro movements and stress developed, for different stem materials. Later part of the analysis focused on investigations with respect to different stem cross sections. Femoral stem made of Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) resulted in larger debonding of stem at cement-stem interface and increased stress within the cement mantle in contrast to chromium alloy (CoCrMo) stem. Thus, CoCrMo proved to be a better choice for cemented THA. Comparison between CoCrMo femoral stem of trapezium and circular cross section showed that trapezoidal stem experiences lesser sliding and debonding at interfaces than circular cross section stem. Also, trapezium cross section generated lower peak stress in femoral stem and cortical femur. In present study, femur head with diameter of 36 mm was considered for the analysis in order to avoid dislocation of the stem. Also, metallic femur head was coupled with cross linked polyethylene liner as it experiences negligible wear compared to conventional polyethylene liner and unlike metallic liner it is non carcinogenic.

  3. Cementless total hip replacement: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Harumoto; Yoshihara, Yasuo; Henmi, Osamu; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Shiromoto, Yuichiro; Kawano, Tomoki; Kanaji, Arihiko; Ando, Kennichi; Nakagawa, Masato; Kosaki, Naoto; Fukaya, Eiichi

    2009-03-01

    Cementless total hip replacement (THR) is rapidly being accepted as the surgery for arthritic diseases of the hip joint. The bone-ingrowth rate in porous-type cementless implants was about 90% over 10 years after surgery, showing that biological fixation of cementless THR was well maintained on both the stem and cup sides. As for the stress shielding of the femur operated using a distal fixation-type stem, severe bone resorption was observed. The severe bone resorption group showed continuous progression for more than 10 years after surgery. Stem loosening directly caused by stress shielding has been considered less likely; however, close attention should be paid to bone resorption-associated disorders including femoral fracture. Cementless cups have several specific problems. It is difficult to decide whether a cup should be placed in the physiological position for the case of acetabular dysplasia by bone grafting or at a relatively higher position without bone grafting. The bone-ingrowth rate was lower in the group with en bloc bone grafting, and the reactive line was frequently noted in the bone-grafted region. Although no data indicated that en bloc bone grafting directly led to poor outcomes, such as loosening, cup placement at a higher site without bone grafting is now selected by most operators. The polyethylene liner in a cementless cup is thinned due to the metal cup thickness; however, it has been suggested that the apparent relation between the cup size and the wear rate was absent as long as a cementless cup is used. Comparative study indicated cementless THR was inferior with regard to the yearly polyethylene wear rate and incidence of osteolysis on both the stem and cup sides. Meta-analysis study on the survival rate between cement and cementless THR reported that cemented THR was slightly superior. It should be considered that specific problems for cementless THR, especially with regard to polyethylene wear, do occur.

  4. Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Randa K; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Jauregui, Julio J; Padden, David A; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Complications following total hip arthroplasty (THA), such as dislocation, component loosening and wear, continue to be common indications for revision surgery. Multiple studies have attributed some of these problems to poor acetabular cup alignment and placement outside of the purported radiographic safe zone. In addition, it has been shown that conventional manually performed acetabular cup placement may not lead to optimal alignment, regardless of surgical experience. Additionally, incorrect leg length and offset can lead to dissatisfaction and instability. Therefore, robotic-arm assisted surgery has been introduced to improve accuracy of cup placement and leg length, and to offset with the aim of reducing the risk of hip instability and improving satisfaction after primary THA. Our aim was to prospectively review the use of robotic-arm assisted surgery in 224 patients and to assess whether the pre-operatively determined radiographic targets were achieved post-operatively and the proportion of acetabular cups outside of the safe zone. Pre-determined anteversion and inclination were 15 and 40 degrees, respectively. Our results have shown that the use of robotic-arm assisted surgery resulted in a post-operative mean inclination of 40 degrees (range, 34 to 51 degrees) and a mean anteversion of 16 degrees (range, 9 to 25 degrees). Ninety-nine percent of the patients remained within the pre-designated safe zone. Evidence has shown that robotic-arm assisted surgery may have improved accuracy in cup placement when compared to conventional surgery and possibly to computer-assisted surgery. When compared to the literature on robotic-arm assisted surgery, our results were comparable. We believe that this surgical technique may aid in reducing post-operative THA complications, such as aseptic loosening and dislocations, but further prospective studies are needed to evaluate clinical outcomes and long-term results.

  5. Intraoperative measurement of limb lengthening during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios Vasileiou; Koulouvaris, Panagiotis; Aggelidakis, Georgios Charalambos; Tsantes, Andreas Georgios; Lykissas, Marios Georgios; Mavrodontidis, Alexandros

    2017-01-01

    Background: Limb length discrepancy (LLD) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a common problem which cannot be completely resolved. Many techniques have been described in order to minimize postoperative LLD, but most of these techniques are difficult to apply. Ideal technique must be simple and accurate. The most simple technique using a suture tied on the skin has well-known limitations, but its accuracy has not been evaluated before. Materials and Methods: Sixty THAs in sixty patients (mean age 71 years, 1:1 male to female ratio) with hip osteoarthritis (37 cases in the right, and 23 cases in the left side) were studied in this prospective study. In all surgeries, the intraoperataive measurement of limb lengthening was performed using a suture tied on the skin of the lateral pelvis. The accuracy of this technique and correlation between intraoperative and postoperative radiological measurements of lengthening were evaluated. Results: The mean preoperative LLD was –7.5 mm while the mean postoperative LLD was 1.58 mm. The accuracy of this technique, defined as the mean difference between the intraoperative and postoperative measurements was 1.8 mm. A strong correlation between these two measurements was noticed (r = 0.86). Conclusion: The accuracy and correlation index of this simple technique were similar to those of other techniques. The studied technique is quite accurate when attention is given to certain details, such as the amount of tension applied on the suture, the position of the tied point on the skin, and the position of the leg during measurements.

  6. Femoral head fractures: hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Ullmark, Gösta

    2014-10-02

    Most femoral neck fractures are osteoporotic fractures in the elderly. The one-year mortality after neck fracture in this group is 24%.For hemiarthroplasty (HA) the bipolar heads have a risk reduction for reoperation due to acetabular erosion compared with monoblock heads. Surprisingly, the bipolar head had an increased reoperation risk for dislocation, infection and for periprosthetic fracture.Total hip arthroplasty (THA) after fracture has a four-fold raised risk for dislocation compared with THA after osteoarthritis. A larger head on the same neck (head to neck ratio) results in a theoretically larger range of movement and hence less risk for dislocation. The dual mobility bearing has, theoretically, the largest range of movement and good clinical results.Functional results are better for THA compared with HA. Arthroplasty for fracture has much better results compared with arthroplasty after a failed internal fixation; the risk for reoperation is more than doubled for the latter.A Swedish hip arthroplasty register study found a 20-fold higher risk for periprosthetic fracture when comparing uncemented HA with matt cemented HA. Also a polished cemented stem had 13½-fold higher risks compared with a matt.The mortality during the first day after surgery is higher for cemented compared with uncemented arthroplasties, but lower after one week, one month and one year. Analysing the time points together resulted in no difference.A matt cemented THA with a maximum head size, maybe dual mobility, has the best results, and is also for the low-demanding elderly.

  7. Total hip arthroplasty using imageless computer-assisted hip navigation: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Lass, Richard; Kubista, Bernd; Olischar, Boris; Frantal, Sophie; Windhager, Reinhard; Giurea, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    In a prospective randomized study of two groups of 65 patients each, we compared the acetabular component position when using the imageless navigation system compared to the freehand conventional technique for cementless total hip arthroplasty. The position of the component was determined postoperatively on computed tomographic scans of the pelvis. There was no significant difference for postoperative mean inclination (P = 0.29), but a significant difference for mean postoperative acetabular component anteversion (P = 0.007), for mean deviation of the postoperative anteversion from the target position of 15° (P = 0.02) and for the outliers regarding inclination (P = 0.02) and anteversion (P < 0.05) between the computer-assisted and the freehand-placement group. Our results demonstrate the importance of imageless navigation for the accurate positioning of the acetabular component.

  8. Uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis of hip secondary to low and high dislocated hips: A mid-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; O’Dwyer, Sinead; Masterson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Performing successful total hip replacement (THR) in dysplastic, subluxed, and dislocated hip is a challenging task. Here, we assessed midterm clinical and radiological outcomes of uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis (OA) of hip secondary to Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocated hips with a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of prospectively collected data was designed involving all consecutive patients who underwent uncemented THR for OA of hip secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip and Grade II or Grade III Hartofilakidis classification. Results: Thirty-two patients underwent 45 THR, with 23 Grade II (low dislocation) and 22 Grade III (high-dislocation) of Hartofilakidis classification. Thirteen patients had bilateral hip replacements, 19 patients had unilateral THR. There was highly statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative HHS and SF-36v2™ at each follow-up. Survivorship of original implant was 98.88% at a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. The mean improvement in leg length in this series was 3.6 cm (1.8-4.5, 95% confidence interval). No sciatic nerve or femoral nerve palsies were observed. Conclusions: Uncemented THR provides better function and quality of life. However, longer follow-up studies are needed to assess survivorship of uncemented THR in Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocations. PMID:27433063

  9. Durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dion, Neil T; Bragdon, Charles; Muratoglu, Orhun; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the history of the development of highly cross-linked polyethylene and provides an in-depth review of the clinical results regarding the durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The use of polyethylene as a bearing surface has contributed to the success of THA and TKA; however, polyethylene wear and osteolysis can lead to failure. Ongoing clinical and retrieval studies are required to analyze outcomes at longer-term follow-up.

  10. [Medium-term effectiveness of total hip arthroplasty with straight tapered rectangular femoral prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongwei; Gu, Weidong; Sun, Junying

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the medium-term effectiveness of straight tapered rectangular femoral prosthesis in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Between May 2004 and June 2006, 58 cases (61 hips) of hip joint disease underwent THA with straight tapered rectangular femoral prosthesis and the clinical data of 43 cases (45 hips) followed up more than 6 years were retrospectively analyzed. There were 21 males (23 hips) and 22 females (22 hips) with an average age of 51.6 years (range, 25-75 years), including 12 cases (12 hips) of congenital developmental dysplasia of the hip, 1 case (1 hip) of osteoarthritis secondary to acetabular dysplasia, 1 case (1 hip) of hip deformity after poliomyelitis, 9 cases (9 hips) of femoral neck fractures, 8 cases (8 hips) of avascular necrosis of the femoral head, 8 cases (8 hips) of osteoarthritis of the hip joint, 2 cases (3 hips) of rheumatoid arthritis, and 2 cases (3 hips) of ankylosing spondylitis. Unilateral replacement was performed in 41 cases and bilateral replacement in 2 cases. The Harris score was 41.7 +/-10.4 before operation. X-ray examination was performed to analyze the location of femoral prostheses and evaluate the stability of the prosthesis-bone interface, and Harris score was used to evaluate the hip function. Periprosthetic fracture occurred in 3 hips, and thigh pain in 4 hips after operation. Forty-three cases (45 hips) were followed up 74-99 months (mean, 85 months). Harris score was 87.6 +/- 8.3 at last follow-up, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative score (t=23.14, P=0.00). The X-ray examination showed that 9 hips had heterotopic ossification; bone resorption caused by stress shielding was observed at the proximal femur in 42 hips. But the stability of the prosthesis-bone interface was good; no infection or dislocation occurred; and no revision for aseptic loosening was performed in all cases. The survival rate of the femoral prosthesis was 100% during medium-term follow-up. THA with straight tapered

  11. The influence of spine-hip relations on total hip replacement: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rivière, C; Lazennec, J-Y; Van Der Straeten, C; Auvinet, E; Cobb, J; Muirhead-Allwood, S

    2017-06-01

    Sagittal pelvic kinematics along with spino-pelvic angular parameters have recently been studied by numerous investigators for their effect on total hip replacement (THR) clinical outcomes, but many issue of spine-hip relations (SHR) are currently unexplored. Therefore, our review aims at clarifying the following questions: is there any evidence of a relationship between articular impingement/dislocation risk in primary THR and (1) certain sagittal pelvic kinematics patterns, (2) pelvic incidence, and (3) types of SHRs? A systematic review of the existing literature utilising PubMed and Google search engines was performed in January 2017. Only clinical or computational studies published in peer-reviewed journals over the last five years in either English or French were reviewed. We identified 769 reports, of which 12 met our eligibility criteria. A review of literature shows that sagittal pelvic kinematics, but not the pelvic incidence, influences the risk of prosthetic impingement/dislocation. We found no study having assessed the relationship between this risk and the types of SHRs. Sagittal pelvic kinematics is highly variable among individuals and certain kinematic patterns substantially influences the risk of prosthetic impingement/dislocation. Recommendations for cup positioning are therefore switching from a systematic to a patient-specific approach, with the standing cup orientation Lewinneck safe zone progressively giving way to a new parameter of interest: the functional orientation of the cup. Based on a recently published classification for SHRs, We propose a new concept of "kinematically aligned THR" for the purposes of THR planning. Further studies are needed to investigate the relevance of such a classification towards the assumptions and hypothesis we have made. Level of evidence,- Level IV, systematic review of level III and IV studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Validity and responsiveness of the Oxford hip score in a prospective study with Japanese total hip arthroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Yuko; Makimoto, Kiyoko; Fujita, Kimie; Nishii, Takashi; Sakai, Takashi; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing need for disease-specific health outcome measurements, the Oxford hip score was developed to measure health-related quality of life of total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients in the United Kingdom. The Oxford hip score comprises 12 items pertaining to pain and physical function, which are increasingly used to measure health outcomes of patients who have undergone THA. The purpose of this study was to establish the validity and responsiveness of the Oxford hip score in a prospective study of Japanese patients. The study was conducted at two hospitals. The eligibility criterion for the study was consenting adult patients who underwent primary unilateral THA between April 2005 and October 2007. Three scales were self-administered at the preoperative stage and 6 months after THA. These scales were the Oxford hip score, the Short Form-36 (SF-36) version 2, and three activities requiring deep flexion of the hip (i.e., clipping one's toenails; use of a Japanese squat toilet; "seiza"--sitting on one's legs on the floor, a common posture while eating in Japan. A total of 224 consenting adult patients were recruited. Among them, 125 (61.9%) participated in pre- and postoperative surveys. Altogether, 108 (22 men, 86 women; mean age, 58.4 +/- 12.5 years) of the 125 patients answered all the items. A significant improvement in the mean scores was observed in all scales. Correlation coefficients between the Oxford hip score and the SF-36 version 2 (physical functioning, role physical, bodily pain) ranged from 0.60 to 0.76 preoperatively and postoperatively. Effect size was 1.7 for pain and 1.3 for physical function. The effect size for seiza was small (0.3). This study demonstrated the validity and responsiveness of the Oxford hip score in a prospective study. However, it does not measure activities requiring deep flexion of the hip joint, and the use of additional items is suggested.

  13. Intraoperative Hypothermia in Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Pepper, Andrew M; Rooney, Edward; Silverton, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are common and successful orthopedic procedures, and as their frequency continues to increase substantially, the focus on limiting perioperative complications heightens. Intraoperative normothermia is recommended to minimize additional complications, but limited evidence exists regarding the effect of hypothermia on orthopedic patients. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of perioperative hypothermia in the setting of TKA and THA, and to evaluate its impact on complications and outcomes. The clinical records of 2580 consecutive patients who underwent TKA or THA at a single institution between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013 were reviewed. After excluding patients with complex or revision procedures, a total of 2397 patients comprised the study population. Patient demographic data, surgery-specific data, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and 30-day readmission were recorded. Patients with a mean intraoperative temperature less than 36°C were identified as hypothermic. Statistical analysis evaluated associations with hypothermia and the effect on complications and outcomes. The incidence of mean intraoperative hypothermia was 37%, 43.9%, and 32.6% for arthroplasty, THA, and TKA, respectively. General anesthesia was significantly associated with hypothermia (P<.001). Women and THA patients were at higher risk for hypothermia. In the arthroplasty and THA cohorts, longer operating room time and re-warmer use were associated with hypothermia (P=.010). Overall, hypothermia was associated with increased estimated blood loss, but no increase in associated transfusion was demonstrated (P=.006). Hypothermia was not associated with postoperative complications. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):56-63.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Correlation of body mass index and blood loss during total knee and total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hrnack, Scott A; Skeen, Nick; Xu, Tom; Rosenstein, Alexander D

    2012-10-01

    Almost one-third of Americans older than 20 years are considered obese. Excessive weight has been linked to faster destruction of weight-bearing joints, which may then need to be replaced. Joint replacement surgeons disagree about an association between obesity and increased blood loss during hip or knee joint replacement. In this retrospective study, we examined the effect of body mass index (BMI), operative time (length of procedure), and anesthesia time on total blood loss during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Intraoperative data from 94 primary TKAs and 78 primary THAs were reviewed, and divided into obese and nonobese groups on the basis of calculated BMI. Regression analysis was used to compare intraoperative blood loss amounts to patient characteristics. TKA and THA groups were analyzed separately. Obesity did not correlate with increased intraoperative blood loss in the TKA or THA group. However, operative time correlated with increased intraoperative blood loss. A 1-minute increase in anesthesia time resulted in total blood loss increases of 3.167 mL during TKA and 1.552 mL during THA.

  15. Revision total hip arthroplasty: the femoral side using cemented implants.

    PubMed

    Holt, Graeme; Hook, Samantha; Hubble, Matthew

    2011-02-01

    Advances in surgical technique and implant technology have improved the ten-year survival after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Despite this, the number of revision procedures has been increasing in recent years, a trend which is predicted to continue into the future. Revision THA is a technically demanding procedure often complicated by a loss of host bone stock which may be compounded by the need to remove primary implants. Both cemented and uncemented implant designs are commonly used in the United Kingdom for primary and revision THA and much controversy still exists as to the ideal method of stem fixation. In this article we discuss revision of the femur using cemented components during revision THA. We focus on three clinical scenarios including femoral cement-in-cement revision where the primary femoral cement-bone interface remains well fixed, femoral cement-in-cement revision for peri-prosthetic femoral fractures, and femoral impaction grafting. We discuss the clinical indications, surgical techniques and clinical outcomes for each of these procedures.

  16. Multimodal analgesia without routine parenteral narcotics for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Aditya Vikram; Boutary, Myriam; Yun, Andrew G; Sirianni, Leigh Ellen; Dorr, Lawrence D

    2006-12-01

    Methods for managing pain after a total hip replacement have changed substantially in the past 5 years. We documented the outcome of patients treated with a multimodal pain program designed to avoid parenteral narcotics. Avoidance of parenteral narcotics can essentially eliminate the complications of respiratory depression, ileus, and narcotic-induced hypotension. It can minimize nausea and vomiting which cause dissatisfaction with an operation. Twenty-one of 140 patients (15%) needed parenteral narcotics postoperatively with only nine patients (6.4%) using parenteral narcotics after the day of surgery. Mean pain scores were below 3 of 10 on all postoperative days. There were no patients with respiratory depression or ileus, and four (2.9%) with urinary retention. Nausea occurred with 35 patients (25%) in the recovery room and in 28 patients (20%) thereafter. Emesis occurred in five patients (3.6%) with two incidences in the recovery room. One hundred and thirty-eight patients (98.6%) were discharged home at a mean of 2.7 seven days postoperatively with 98 (70%) on a single assistive device. The multimodal pain management program, which avoided parenteral narcotics, was effective in providing pain relief, nearly eliminating emesis, and eliminating the severe complications of respiratory depression, urinary tract infection and ileus, as well as accelerating function.

  17. Revision total hip arthroplasty: the femoral side using cemented implants

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Samantha; Hubble, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Advances in surgical technique and implant technology have improved the ten-year survival after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Despite this, the number of revision procedures has been increasing in recent years, a trend which is predicted to continue into the future. Revision THA is a technically demanding procedure often complicated by a loss of host bone stock which may be compounded by the need to remove primary implants. Both cemented and uncemented implant designs are commonly used in the United Kingdom for primary and revision THA and much controversy still exists as to the ideal method of stem fixation. In this article we discuss revision of the femur using cemented components during revision THA. We focus on three clinical scenarios including femoral cement-in-cement revision where the primary femoral cement-bone interface remains well fixed, femoral cement-in-cement revision for peri-prosthetic femoral fractures, and femoral impaction grafting. We discuss the clinical indications, surgical techniques and clinical outcomes for each of these procedures. PMID:21165618

  18. Medial cortex strain distribution during noncemented total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elias, J J; Nagao, M; Chu, Y H; Carbone, J J; Lennox, D W; Chao, E Y

    2000-01-01

    Intraoperative proximal femur fractures are a significant concern during noncemented total hip arthroplasty. The current study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that broaching the femur and inserting the stem without using mallet applied impact loads will reduce the risk of intraoperative fracture. Rosette strain gauges were applied to the medial and anteromedial cortex of six human anatomic specimen femurs to compare the strain distribution for broaching and stem insertion. Eight additional femurs were used to compare the strain distribution for stem insertion using impact loading and constant rate stem insertion. For the impact loading stem insertions, the soft tissues surrounding the femur were modeled. Constant rate stem insertions were performed using a mechanical testing machine. The largest strains measured at the medial and anteromedial sites primarily were aligned with the femur hoop axis. The largest strain magnitude, orientation, and sign (tensile or compressive) varied widely among femurs. The stem insertion strains were significantly larger than the broaching strains (two-way analysis of variance with replication). The impact stem insertion strains were not significantly different from the constant rate stem insertion strains. The results indicate that the femur geometry and material properties have a greater influence on the strain distribution than does the implantation technique.

  19. [Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty via direct anterior approach].

    PubMed

    Rachbauer, Franz; Krismer, Martin

    2008-09-01

    Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty via direct anterior approach aims at reducing soft-tissue damage, diminishing blood loss and postoperative pain, shortening stay in hospital, accelerating rehabilitation, and keeping scars small. The technique is suitable for primary and secondary osteoarthritis as well as fractures of the femoral neck. Complex distortions of the proximal femur should be exempted. Complex malalignment of the proximal femur. The femoral neck is exposed in the interval between tensor fasciae latae, glutei medius and minimus muscles laterally, and sartorius and rectus femoris muscles medially. After osteotomy of the neck and extraction of the head the acetabulum is reamed to prepare for cup prosthesis. Following peritrochanteric capsulotomy the externally rotated, adducted and elevated femor is broached. Cemented and cementless implants may be used. The patients are allowed to walk full weight bearing beginning on the 1st postoperative day. As soon as they are able to safely master the transfers and stairs, they are discharged. The method is a safe procedure that allows correct placement of acetabular and femoral components. It may be performed in a reasonable time, the blood loss is little. The procedure preserves the muscles and leads to small, cosmetically pleasing scars. Patients usually do not suffer from pronounced pain, rehabilitation is accelerated. They therefore agree in an short postoperative stay in hospital.

  20. Patient factors Predict Periprosthetic Fractures Following Revision Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Jensen, Matthew; Lewallen, David

    2011-01-01

    We assessed important patient risk factors for postoperative periprosthetic fractures after revision total hip replacement (THR) using prospectively collected Institutional Joint Registry data. We used univariate and multivariable-adjusted Cox regression analyses. There were 330 postoperative periprosthetic fractures after 6,281 revision THRs. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, hazard [95% confidence interval] of periprosthetic fracture was higher for: women, 1.66 [1.32, 2.08], p<0.001; higher Deyo-Charlson comorbidity index of 2, 1.46 (1.03, 2.07) and index of 3+, 2.01 (1.48, 2.73), overall p<0.001; and operative diagnosis, especially previous non-union, 5.76 (2.55, 13.02), overall p<0.001. Hazard was lower in 61–70 year old, 0.64 (0.49, 0.84) and 71–80 year old 0.57 (0.43, 0.76), compared to <60 years (overall p<0.0001). Our study identified important modifiable and unmodifiable risk factors for fractures after revision THR. PMID:22342128

  1. Intravenous versus topical tranexamic acid in primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Liang, Yuan; Chen, Pengtao; Fang, Yongchao; He, Jinshan; Wang, Jingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: As the prevalence of total hip arthroplasty (THA) is increasing, it is usually associated with considerable blood loss. Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been reported to reduce perioperative blood loss in hip joint arthroplasty. But the best route of TXA administration continues to be controversial. So, we conducted a meta-analysis that integrated all data from the 7 included trials to compare the effectiveness and safety of topical and intravenous TXA administration in primary THA. The endpoints assessed in this meta-analysis include the comparisons of total blood loss, postoperative hemoglobin decline, transfusion rates, the incidence rate of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolisms (PE), and wound infection. Methods: Literature searches of PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese Biomedical Literature database, the CNKI database, and Wan Fang Data were performed up to August 30, 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in our meta-analysis if they compared the efficiency and safety of intravenous versus topical administration of TXA in patients who underwent primary THA. The endpoints included the comparisons of total blood loss, postoperative hemoglobin decline, transfusion rates, the incidence rate of DVT, PE, and wound infection. A meta-analysis was performed following the guidelines of the Cochrane Reviewer's Handbook and the PRISMA statement. The pooling of data was carried out by using RevMan 5.3, Denmark. Results: Seven RCTs involving 964 patients met the inclusion criteria. Our meta-analysis indicated that there were no significant differences in the 2 groups in terms of total blood loss ([mean difference (MD) = −14.74, 95% confidence interval (CI): −89.21 to 59.74, P = 0.7], transfusion rates [RD = −0.02, 95% CI: −0.05 to 0.02, P = 0.39]; no significant differences were found regarding the incidence of adverse effects such as deep venous thrombosis [DVT] [RD = 0.00, 95% CI: −0

  2. Outcome in design-specific comparisons between highly crosslinked and conventional polyethylene in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Per-Erik; Furnes, Ove; Ivar Havelin, Leif; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Pedersen, Alma B; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Mäkelä, Keijo; Kärrholm, Johan

    2017-04-04

    Background and purpose - Most registry studies regarding highly crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) have focused on the overall revision risk. We compared the risk of cup and/or liner revision for specific cup and liner designs made of either XLPE or conventional polyethylene (CPE), regarding revision for any reason and revision due to aseptic loosening and/or osteolysis. Patients and methods - Using the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) database, we identified cup and liner designs where either XLPE or CPE had been used in more than 500 THAs performed for primary hip osteoarthritis. We assessed risk of revision for any reason and for aseptic loosening using Cox regression adjusted for age, sex, femoral head material and size, surgical approach, stem fixation, and presence of hydroxyapatite coating (uncemented cups). Results - The CPE version of the ZCA cup had a risk of revision for any reason similar to that of the XLPE version (p = 0.09), but showed a 6-fold higher risk of revision for aseptic loosening (p < 0.001). The CPE version of the Reflection All Poly cup had an 8-fold elevated risk of revision for any reason (p < 0.001) and a 5-fold increased risk of revision for aseptic loosening (p < 0.001). The Charnley Elite Ogee/Marathon cup and the Trilogy cup did not show such differences. Interpretation - Whether XLPE has any advantage over CPE regarding revision risk may depend on the properties of the polyethylene materials being compared, as well as the respective cup designs, fixation type, and follow-up times. Further research is needed to elucidate how cup design factors interact with polyethylene type to affect the risk of revision.

  3. Functional activity in patients after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Pogorzała, Adam M; Stryła, Wanda; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2012-11-08

    Osteoarthritis of hip joints is one of the most common diseases limiting social functioning of patients. Pain and mobility disorders are major problems associated with the disease. The goal of the study was to compare the efficacy of surgical treatment in a selected group of patients using a modified Harris Hip Score questionnaire including questions regarding the pain, the type of gait disorders and the functional activity. Surgical treatment helped to reduce the pain and improve the gait quality and parameters as well as functional activities associated with putting on socks and shoes, climbing stairs, sitting and using public transportation. Following conclusions were drawn after the study: Surgical treatment leads to significant reduction in hip pain. Mobility improvement was observed in most analyzed patients in early post-operative period as a consequence of hip contracture and pain being eliminated. The walking speed and distance improved significantly during the first 3 months after the surgery. All patients were satisfied with the treatment.

  4. Midterm Outcome of Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty in Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type III Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wenbo; Yang, Desheng; Xu, Boyong; Mamtimin, Askar; Guo, Wentao; Cao, Li

    2016-03-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is widespread in developing countries, and treating Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type III DDH in adults requires the use of a highly demanding technique. We sought to determine the outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty using Zweymüller components to treat Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type III DDH. Fifty-eight patients (71 hips) with a mean age of 35.8 years at time of index operation were included in our study. The average duration of follow-up was 70.5 months. The acetabular component was placed in the true acetabulum in all cases, and subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy was performed in 61 hips. With any component revision for any reason as the end point, Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis at 98 months revealed a cumulative survival rate for implanted components of 91.40%. The mean Harris Hip Score improved from 35.6 preoperatively to 82.9 postoperatively. There were 20 cases of intraoperative fracture, 1 case of complete nerve palsy, and 7 cases of transient nerve palsy. Revision surgery was performed in 7 patients because of cup loosening in 1, severe polyethylene wear in 4, cup breakage in 1, and dislocation in 1. Midterm results for cementless total hip arthroplasty in patients with Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type III DDH was satisfactory; however, intraoperative fracture and polyethylene wear were major complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    PubMed

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Total hip arthroplasty in paralytic dislocation from poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Laguna, Rafael; Barrientos, Jesús

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a case of a patient with degenerative hip disease in paralytic dislocation by poliomyelitis. Poliomyelitis is an acute infection disease caused by a group of neurotrophic viruses, which has a special affinity by the anterior horns cells of the spinal cord and for certain motor nuclei of the brain stem. Paralysis is a flaccid type and characteristically paralysis is asymmetrical. It is said that the joints of the affected limb by poliomyelitis are protected from the development of osteoarthritis. Hip dislocation in poliomyelitis is an acquired deformity caused by flaccid paralysis and the resulting muscular imbalance. In young children, when the gluteus maximus and medius muscles are paralyzed and the hip flexors and adductors are of normal strength, eventual luxation of the hip is almost inevitable. Hip osteoarthritis in a limb with poliomyelitis is an unusual entity because these limbs do not support excessive loads. In patients who present with the residual effects of poliomyelitis including degenerative disease and hip dysplastic, surgery is one of the most difficult challenges faced by reconstructive surgeons. In such cases, surgeons should attempt to optimize the component position and choice, surgical approach, and soft tissue tensioning because stability of the prosthesis can be problematic.

  7. The Exeter Contemporary flanged cemented acetabular component in primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Maggs, J L; Smeatham, A; Whitehouse, S L; Charity, J; Timperley, A J; Gie, G A

    2016-03-01

    We report on the outcome of the Exeter Contemporary flanged cemented all-polyethylene acetabular component with a mean follow-up of 12 years (10 to 13.9). This study reviewed 203 hips in 194 patients. 129 hips in 122 patients are still in situ; 66 hips in 64 patients were in patients who died before ten years, and eight hips (eight patients) were revised. Clinical outcome scores were available for 108 hips (104 patients) and radiographs for 103 hips (100 patients). A retrospective review was undertaken of a consecutive series of 203 routine primary cemented total hip arthroplasties (THA) in 194 patients. There were no acetabular component revisions for aseptic loosening. Acetabular revision was undertaken in eight hips. In four hips revision was necessitated by periprosthetic femoral fractures, in two hips by recurrent dislocation, in one hip for infection and in one hip for unexplained ongoing pain. Oxford and Harris hip scores demonstrated significant clinical improvement (all p < 0.001). Radiolucent lines were present in 37 (36%) of the 103 acetabular components available for radiological evaluation. In 27 of these, the line was confined to zone 1. No component had migrated. Kaplan-Meier survivorship, with revision for aseptic loosening as the endpoint, was 100% at 12.5 years and for all causes was 97.8% (95% confidence interval 95.6 to 100) when 40 components remained at risk. The Exeter Contemporary flanged cemented acetabular component demonstrates excellent survivorship at 12.5 years. The Exeter Contemporary flanged cemented acetabular component has excellent clinical outcomes and survivorship when used with the Exeter stem in total hip arthroplasty. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  8. Patient perspective survey of total hip vs total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Justin; Petruccelli, Danielle; Adili, Anthony; Piccirillo, Liz; Wismer, David; Winemaker, Mitch

    2012-06-01

    A 42-item survey was developed and administered to determine patient perception of and satisfaction with total hip arthroplasty (THA) vs total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 153 patients who had both primary THA and TKA for osteoarthritis with 1-year follow-up were identified. Survey response rate was 72%. Patients were more satisfied with THA meeting expectations for improvement in function and quality of life (P < .05), whereas pain relief expectations were equivalent. Most patients (70.9%) reported that TKA required more physiotherapy. One-year Oxford score and improvement in Oxford score from preoperative to 1 year were superior for THAs (P = .000). Despite equivalent pain relief, THAs trend toward higher satisfaction compared with TKAs. THA is more likely to "feel normal" with greater improvement in Oxford score. Recovery from TKA requires more physiotherapy and a longer time to achieve a satisfactory recovery status. Patients should be counseled accordingly.

  9. Mountain sports and total hip arthroplasty: a case report and review of mountaineering with total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peters, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Participation in certain sports after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is common. Some high-risk sports such as extreme endurance sports with risks of falls and fractures are often cautioned against, except when the sport was participated in preoperatively and an excellent physical condition is present postoperatively. In this article, current concepts pertaining to this issue in general and in relation to mountain sports are discussed after a description of the activities of a 69-year-old patient who received cementless bilateral THAs in 1987 and 1995 and who resumed, after each rehabilitation, his preoperative sports practice (eg, walking and high-altitude mountaineering [6000+ m]). The patient, who was experienced in alpine and high-altitude mountaineering, was able, after his first operation, to climb classic alpine peaks (4000+ m) as well as participate in difficult and strenuous climbs outside Europe (Kilimanjaro, Elbrus, and Rolwaling trekking). After the second operation and an intensive rehabilitation program, he was able to climb 2 mountains in the range of 6000+ m. With excellent physical training, a long preoperative practice of the sport, and an intensive and careful rehabilitation, patients with a THA are, under specific circumstances, able to perform mountaineering at a very high, even professional level without signs of prosthesis loosening or higher than normal wear of the bearing materials.

  10. Total arthroplasty in displaced dysplastic hips with acetabular reconstruction and femoral shortening - technical note.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paulo; de Oliveira, Leandro Alves; Coelho, Danilo Lopes; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Rebello, Percival Rosa; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    To describe a new procedure of total hip replacement in patient with severe developmental dysplasia of the left hip, using technique of acetabular reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts and subtrochanteric shortening femoral osteotomy. Total hip replacement done in January of 2003. The Eftekhar's classification was used and included type D, neglected dislocations. Bone graft incorporated in acetabular shelf and femoral osteotomy. Our contribution is the use of an Allis plate to better fix acetabular grafts, avoiding loosening, and cerclage around bone graft in femoral osteotomy site, which diminish pseudoarthrosis risk. This technique shows efficiency, allowing immediately resolution for this case with pain and range of motion of hip improvement. It also allows the acetabular dysplasia reconstruction, equalization of the limb length (without elevated risk of neurovascular lesion) and repairs the normal hip biomechanics due to the correction of the hip's center of rotation.

  11. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I–III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I–III). PMID:27512242

  12. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I-III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I-III).

  13. Perioperative Periprosthetic Fractures Associated With Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwan J; Menendez, Mariano E; Barnes, C Lowry

    2017-03-01

    Periprosthetic fracture (PPF) is a rare but devastating complication of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). While PPF is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, early revision rate, and poor patient outcome, there is a paucity of data on patient and hospital-dependent risk factors. Using a large administrative database, we investigated epidemiology and the risk factors associated with perioperative PPF after primary THA. We performed a retrospective review of the National Inpatient Sample records from 2006 to 2011 and identified 1062 PPFs of 1,187,969 patients using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code for PPF (996.44). We then analyzed sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, and hospital characteristics of our study population. The overall incidence of PPF in National Inpatient Sample database was 0.089% (8.9 per 10,000 THAs). Patient-dependent risk factors were: female (odds ratio [OR] 1.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.67-2.22), low household income (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.18-1.65), Medicaid (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.39-2.57), and uninsured (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.63-4.61). Patients with malnutrition and hemiparesis/hemiplegia were associated 10-fold and 6-fold risk of PPF. Nonteaching hospitals (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.01-1.32), hospitals in northeast (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.59), and rural hospitals (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.06-1.53) had higher incidence of PPF. Our study demonstrates that the incidence of PPF was low in our study population, and greater awareness is needed when performing primary THAs in patients with risk factors identified in our study to prevent PPF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A frictional study of total hip joint replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, S. C.; Unsworth, A.; Goldsmith, A. A. J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric wear debris produced by articulation of the femoral head against the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene socket of a total hip replacement has been implicated as the main cause of osteolysis and subsequent failure of these implants. Potential solutions to this problem are to employ hard bearing surface combinations such as metal-on-metal or ceramic-on-ceramic prostheses. The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in lubrication modes and friction of a range of material combinations using synthetic and biological fluids as the lubricants. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions of film thicknesses and lubrication modes. A strong correlation was observed between experiment and theory when employing carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) fluids as the lubricant. Under these conditions the ceramic-on-ceramic joints showed full fluid film lubrication while the metal-on-metal, metal-on-plastic, diamond-like carbon-coated stainless steel (DLC)-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic prostheses operated under a mixed lubrication regime. With bovine serum as the lubricant in the all ceramic joints, however, the full fluid film lubrication was inhibited due to adsorbed proteins. In the metal-on-metal joints this adsorbed protein layer acted to reduce the friction while in the ceramic coupling the friction was increased. The use of bovine serum as the lubricant also significantly increased the friction in both the metal-on-plastic and ceramic-on-plastic joints. The friction produced by the DLC-on-plastic joints depended on the quality of the coating. Those joints with a less consistent coating and therefore a higher surface roughness gave significantly higher friction than the smoother, more consistently coated heads.

  15. Constrained total hip megaprosthesis for primary periacetabular tumors.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Takafumi; Kakunaga, Shigeki; Takenaka, Satoshi; Araki, Nobuhito; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-03-01

    Limb-salvage reconstruction for periacetabular malignant tumors is one of the most challenging problems in orthopaedic oncology. Reconstructive options include resection arthroplasty, endoprosthesis, allograft, recycled autobone graft, arthrodesis, and pseudarthrosis. However, no standard procedure exists because of rarity and clinical variability of the disease. We previously developed a megaprosthetic system with a constrained total hip mechanism (C-THA). We evaluated (1) survival of patients and C-THA; (2) postoperative function; and (3) complications. We retrospectively reviewed 25 patients with primary periacetabular tumors treated using C-THA between 1985 and 2009. There were 18 male and seven female patients with a median age of 44 years (range, 16-72 years). They included 11 chondrosarcomas, eight osteosarcomas, two giant cell tumors of bone (one locally aggressive benign, one malignant), and others in four. Surgical margin was wide in 18 patients, marginal in five, and intralesional in two. The minimum postoperative followup for survivors was 32 months (median, 163 months; range, 32-285 months). The 10-year overall survival rate of all patients was 47%. C-THA implants survived in 19 of 25 patients at last followup. Twenty-one patients acquired ambulatory activity. There were seven local recurrences, resulting in hemipelvectomy in one patient. Postoperative complications included deep infection in eight of the 25 patients, dislocation in four, and aseptic loosening in two, necessitating five revision surgeries and three implant removals. Our observations suggest C-THA using an acetabular reconstruction cup is a useful reconstructive option after resection of periacetabular malignant tumors despite frequent postoperative complications. Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  16. Patient satisfaction with mobile compression devices following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McAsey, Craig J; Gargiulo, Jeanine M; Parks, Nancy L; Hamilton, William G

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with the use of a mobile compression device after anterior total hip arthroplasty. Two hundred forty-seven patients used the mobile compression device for 10 days after surgery with recommended adjunctive 325 mg aspirin therapy. The device has a rechargeable battery pack that weighs 1.65 lb and is attached to compression sleeves worn over the calves of both lower extremities. It delivers sequential compression to the sleeves at a pressure of 50 mm Hg for about 10 seconds at a cycle of 1/min and is synchronized to the patient's venous blood flow pulses. A questionnaire was administered to all patients at 1-month follow-up to gauge patient perception of the device. There were 14 questions about comfort, noise, cost, pain, skin breakdown, rash, and falls related to the device. Overall, 234 of 247 (94.7%) patients stated that they would use the device again. The most common complaint from patients was that the mobile compression device was cumbersome (63.6%). Twenty-five patients (10.1%) reported having a fall while using the device, although no fall-related injuries were documented. Therefore, the authors recommend counseling patients about fall risk and reminding them to use caution while moving about with the device. Despite the limitations described in this study, the data confirmed that patients who used the device had an overall positive response to the system and would choose to use the device again rather than using chemical agents for deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis.

  17. Risk Factors for Early Revision after Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dy, Christopher J.; Bozic, Kevin J.; Pan, Ting Jung; Wright, Timothy M.; Padgett, Douglas E.; Lyman, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) is associated with increased cost, morbidity, and technical challenge compared to primary THA. A better understanding of the risk factors for early revision is needed to inform strategies to optimize patient outcomes. Methods 207,256 patients who underwent primary THA between 1997–2005 in California and New York were identified from statewide databases. Unique patient identifiers were used to identify early revision THA (<10 years from index procedure). Patient characteristics (demographics, comorbidities, insurance type, preoperative diagnosis), community characteristics (education level, poverty, population density), and hospital characteristics (annual THA volume, bed size, teaching status) were evaluated using multivariable regression to determine risk factors for early revision. Results The probabilities of undergoing early aseptic revision and early septic revision were 4% and less than 1% at 5 years, respectively. Women were 29% less likely than men to undergo early septic revision (p<0.001). Patients with Medicaid and Medicare were 91% and 24%, respectively, more likely to undergo early septic revision than privately-insured patients (p=0.01; p<0.001). Hospitals performing <200 THA annually had a 34% increased risk of early aseptic revision compared to hospitals performing >400 THA annually (p<0.001). Conclusion A number of identifiable factors, including younger age, Medicaid, and low hospital volume increase the risk of undergoing early revision THA. Patient-level characteristics distinctly affect the risk of revision within 10 years, particularly if due to infection. Our findings reinforce the need for continued investigation of the predictors of early failure following THA. PMID:24285406

  18. Transfusion-Transmitted Babesiosis During Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Joseph; Feller, Ross; Shalvoy, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Babesiosis is a potentially life-threatening zoonotic disease that is endemic to the northeastern United States and increasing in prevalence worldwide. Transmitted by the same Ixodes tick responsible for Lyme disease, the intraerythrocytic parasite Babesia causes a wide range of clinical presentations--from asymptomatic carriage to a fulminant course with rapid deterioration. Symptoms typically present 1 to 6 weeks after inoculation, with the gradual onset of fatigue, malaise, weakness, and intermittent or sustained fever as high as 40.9°C. Severe cases are associated with parasitemia greater than 4%, alkaline phosphatase greater than 125 U/L, and white blood cell counts greater than 5×10(9)/L. Definitive diagnosis is made by microscopic examination of thin blood smears, polymerase chain reaction, and indirect immunofluorescent antibody testing. The increasing frequency of babesiosis paired with a lack of blood-donor screening assays poses a serious threat to the safety of the US blood supply. Although babesiosis is responsible for 3.6% of transfusion-related deaths, the Food and Drug Administration has yet to approve mandatory screening for the parasite in donated blood. Historically, transfusion-transmitted babesiosis has been thought to be isolated to the immunocompromised patient population. However, a recent case of transfusion-transmitted babesiosis in an immunocompetent patient following total hip arthroplasty is the first reported in the literature and may represent a growing risk to a far greater segment of the population than previously thought. This article summarizes the current state of transfusion-transmitted babesiosis and the detrimental impact of this infection on blood transfusion safety. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Pulmonary embolism associated with canine total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Liska, William D; Poteet, Brian A

    2003-01-01

    To determine by pulmonary perfusion scans and ultrasonography if embolemia occurs during total hip replacement (THR) surgery in dogs. Prospective clinical study. Forty client-owned dogs that had THR surgery. Thoracic radiographs were taken immediately after THR and immediately after completion of (99m)Tc-MAA lung scans. Scintigraphy was performed in 28 dogs, 48 hours after THR. Intraoperative ultrasonography (intercostal or transesophageal) was performed in another 12 dogs that had THR. The right atrium and ventricle and pulmonary outflow tract were observed during and for 5 to 8 minutes after femoral component insertion into medullary canals prepared by reaming, and lavage and aspiration of debris before filling with polymethylmethacrylate in dough stage. A modified Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) classification system was used to evaluate lung scans. No pulmonary radiographic abnormalities were identified. Segmental and subsegmental perfusion defects occurred in 23 (82%) dogs and were classified as severe in 9 (32%) dogs, moderate in 11, and mild in 3. There was no particular lobe predilection. Patchy mulberry-appearing defects, indicative of fat embolism, were most common. Embolemia was observed by ultrasound in 10 dogs. Variable-sized particles occurred in 8 dogs, particles and bubbles in 2 dogs, and no emboli were observed in 2 dogs. Embolemia was observed within 10 seconds after femoral stem insertion and lasted < 1 minute. Pneumoemboli remained in the right atrium for > 8 minutes before dislodgement. Embolemia of either air, particles, or both occurs in most dogs during THR surgery. Most dogs seemingly spontaneously recover from pulmonary embolism that occurs during THR. The risk of clinical complications from this pulmonary embolism should be taken seriously, even though the exact morbidity and mortality rates are unknown. Copyright 2003 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons

  20. Wear products of total hip arthroplasty: The case of polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Massin, P; Achour, S

    2017-03-01

    Among the bearing surfaces involved in a total hip arthroplasty, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is the weak link. It is submitted to the friction of a harder bearing, producing wear particles, which, in turn, initiate an inflammatory reaction ultimately leading to osteolysis. This kind of bone deterioration sometimes turns out to an aggressive granuloma and may provoke implant loosening. Wear resistance of UHMWPE depends on its molecular weight and crystallinity. Some steps of the manufacturing process were improved to optimize its tribological properties and to slow down degradation resulting from mechanical (abrasion) and chemical (oxidation) phenomena. Its preparation and conservation must be performed in an inert atmosphere, i.e. without ambient oxygen. Its resistance to abrasion depends on its cross-linking degree. Its cross-linking rate was observed to increase proportionally to the irradiation doses, improving its wear resistance. However, its mechanical properties are impaired and moreover, it becomes oxidation sensitive. It is therefore necessary to submit it to a thermal treatment to eliminate free radicals that were produced during irradiation. More recently impregnation by vitamin E, a powerful anti-oxidant product, was proposed to preserve the polymer from in vivo oxidation while maintaining its mechanical properties. We raised the hypothesis that last-generation UHMWPE could offer the same wear resistance as the most performing bearings (ceramic-on-ceramic). Recent clinical results confirm the tribological performance of highly crosslinked UHMWPE in vivo. However, it remains to be seen whether this excellent wear resistance would persist under eccentric load such as edge loading, and if, in the long run, this kind of bearing proves capable of reducing the risk of osteolysis in young and active patients.

  1. Assessment of asymmetric leg loading before and after total hip arthroplasty using instrumented shoes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramírez, Alicia; Weenk, Dirk; Lecumberri, Pablo; Verdonschot, Nico; Pakvis, Dean; Veltink, Peter H

    2014-02-28

    Total hip arthroplasty is a successful surgical treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. Different questionnaires are used by the clinicians to assess functional capacity and the patient's pain, despite these questionnaires are known to be subjective. Furthermore, many studies agree that kinematic and kinetic parameters are crucial to evaluate and to provide useful information about the patient's evolution for clinicians and rehabilitation specialists. However, these quantities can currently only be obtained in a fully equipped gait laboratory. Instrumented shoes can quantify gait velocity, kinetic, kinematic and symmetry parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the instrumented shoes is a sufficiently sensitive instrument to show differences in mobility performance before and after total hip arthroplasty. In this study, patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty were measured before and 6-8 months after total hip arthroplasty. Both measurement sessions include 2 functional mobility tasks while the subject was wearing instrumented shoes. Before each measurement the Harris Hip Score and the Traditional Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index were administered as well. The stance time and the average vertical ground reaction force measured with the instrumented shoes during walking, and their symmetry index, showed significant differences before and after total hip arthroplasty. However, the data obtained with the sit to stand test did not reveal this improvement after surgery. Our results show that inter-limb asymmetry during a walking activity can be evaluated with the instrumented shoes before and after total hip arthroplasty in an outpatient clinical setting.

  2. Mid-term clinical results of total hip arthroplasty using a Wagner standard cup for dysplastic hip

    PubMed Central

    Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Nozawa, Masahiko; Yuasa, Takahito; Aritomi, Kentaro; Ogawa, Seiki; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty depends on many factors. We must not forget fundamental things those are design of outer surface of the component, that leads bone ingrowth into the prosthesis, better initial stability, and better insertional techniques. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty with a Wagner standard cup for patients who had acetabular dysplasia. Patients and methods Fifty-four patients with 55 hips underwent primary metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (Metasul prosthesis) with a Wagner standard cup (44–48 mm in outer diameter) and were followed for a minimum of 10 years. All patients received the same type of cementless femoral component (Natural hip stem) and femoral head (28 mm in diameter). Results Seventeen of the 55 Wagner standard cups (30.9%) showed aseptic loosening over a mean period of 3.6 years after surgery, and there were no bone anchors on the outer surface of the 16 retrieved cups. Conclusion From our experience, the small Wagner standard cup does not achieve sufficient osteointegration and we do not recommend the use of this cup, especially for patients with acetabular dysplasia and/or those with a small stature. PMID:25561751

  3. Research evidence for the use of preoperative exercise in patients preparing for total hip or total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Barbay, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Preoperative exercise/rehabilitation is currently being considered to improve outcomes for orthopaedic surgery. This article presents an evidence-based practice review of the current research literature from 1998 to 2008 to determine whether preoperative exercise alone will be beneficial to patients preparing for total knee or hip arthroplasty. Only 3 studies met the inclusion criteria of preoperative exercise as the sole intervention. Each of these studies indicated that preoperative exercise had some postoperative benefit to total knee or hip arthroplasty patients. In general, the results are inconclusive due to the lack of strong research evidence, and only a pragmatic recommendation for preoperative exercise prior to total hip or knee arthroplasty is supported. More research is needed in the area of preoperative exercise for persons preparing for total hip or knee arthroplasty.

  4. Reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty cost-effectiveness: A quality-adjusted life years comparison with total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Daniel; Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) cost-effectiveness with total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. METHODS: This study used a stochastic model and decision-making algorithm to compare the cost-effectiveness of RSA and total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent pre-operative, and 3, 6, and 12 mo post-operative clinical examinations and Short Form-36 Health Survey completion. Short form-36 Health Survey subscale scores were converted to EuroQual Group Five Dimension Health Outcome scores and compared with historical data from age-matched patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) improvements based on life expectancies were calculated. RESULTS: The cost/QALY was $3900 for total hip arthroplasty and $11100 for RSA. After adjusting the model to only include shoulder-specific physical function subscale items, the RSA QALY improved to 2.8 years, and its cost/QALY decreased to $8100. CONCLUSION: Based on industry accepted standards, cost/QALY estimates supported both RSA and total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the quality of life improvement “gold standard” among arthroplasty procedures, cost/QALY estimates identified in this study support the growing use of RSA to improve patient quality of life. PMID:26925384

  5. Reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty cost-effectiveness: A quality-adjusted life years comparison with total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Daniel; Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan

    2016-02-18

    To compare reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) cost-effectiveness with total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. This study used a stochastic model and decision-making algorithm to compare the cost-effectiveness of RSA and total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent pre-operative, and 3, 6, and 12 mo post-operative clinical examinations and Short Form-36 Health Survey completion. Short form-36 Health Survey subscale scores were converted to EuroQual Group Five Dimension Health Outcome scores and compared with historical data from age-matched patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) improvements based on life expectancies were calculated. The cost/QALY was $3900 for total hip arthroplasty and $11100 for RSA. After adjusting the model to only include shoulder-specific physical function subscale items, the RSA QALY improved to 2.8 years, and its cost/QALY decreased to $8100. Based on industry accepted standards, cost/QALY estimates supported both RSA and total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the quality of life improvement "gold standard" among arthroplasty procedures, cost/QALY estimates identified in this study support the growing use of RSA to improve patient quality of life.

  6. The use of a constrained cementless acetabular component for instability in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Rady, Ahmad Emad; Asal, Mohammed Kamal; Bassiony, Ayman Abdelaziz

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent dislocation after total hip arthroplasty is a disabling complication that can be difficult to treat. We evaluated the early clinical and radiographic outcome associated with the use of a constrained acetabular component for instability in total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent either primary or revision total hip arthroplasty with a cementless constrained acetabular component for different indications. The mean patient age at surgery was 57.4 years and the mean clinical and radiological follow-up period was 26.4 months. Clinical assessment was performed by the Harris hip score and at the latest follow up patients reported outcome using the Oxford hip score questionnaire. All radiographs were evaluated for evidence of loosening. Only one patient experienced redislocation with the constrained prosthesis. The average Harris hip score increased from a preoperative mean of 22 (range, 16 - 36) to a postoperative mean of 85 (range, 66-94). Preoperatively, the mean Oxford Hip Score was 48.6, which decreased to 20.5 at the final examination. All but one of the 15 hips had a well-fixed, stable cup. Femoral component stability with bone ingrowth was achieved in 10 cases. A constrained acetabular component is an effective option for the treatment of hip instability in primary and revision arthroplasty in those at high risk of dislocation. The potential for aseptic loosening requires evaluation by long term studies.

  7. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Skeletal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Daniel; Kendoff, Daniel; Omar, Mohamed; Cui, Liang R; Gehrke, Thorsten; Haasper, Carl

    2015-09-01

    127 patients with a height ≤ 150 cm (non metric ≤ 4 feet and 11 inches) who received hip arthroplasty surgery between July 1, 2006 and May 30, 2013 at our institution were enrolled. Retrospective data evaluation was performed for two different times of follow-up (1 year and 5 years respectively). 115 patients were evaluated for 1-year follow up. Out of these, 27 patients were available for 5-year follow up. The mean Harris Hip Score increased from 40 ± 13 on admission to 82 ± 20 (P<0.001) at 1-year follow-up and 79 ± 17 (P<0.001) at 5-year follow-up. Hip arthroplasty can be performed in patients with dwarfism with good clinical benefits. However, survival rates are worse compared to the general population.

  8. Change in preoperative expectations in patients undergoing staged bilateral primary total knee or total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Poultsides, Lazaros A; Ghomrawi, Hassan M K; Lyman, Stephen; Aharonoff, Gina B; Mancuso, Carol A; Sculco, Thomas P

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare preoperative expectation scores between stages in patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). For patients with TKA (57), ICC was 0.449, indicating fair agreement between stages; expectations did not change for 31% of patients, whereas 40% had higher and 29% had lower expectations. For patients with THA (55), ICC was 0.663, indicating moderate agreement; expectations did not change for 42% of patients, whereas 38% had higher and 20% had lower expectations. In multivariable analyses controlling for first expectation score, second expectation score was associated with better Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index stiffness score for TKA and with worse Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index function score for patients with THA. For most patients, expectations changed between staged bilateral TKA and THA, but the direction of change was not uniform.

  9. Single-dose radiation therapy for prevention of heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, W.L.; Lo, T.C.; Covall, D.J.; Pfeifer, B.A.; Wasilewski, S.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Single-dose radiation therapy was prospectively evaluated for its efficacy in prevention of heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Thirty-one patients (34 hips) were treated between 1981 and 1988. Risk factors for inclusion in the protocol included prior evidence of heterotopic ossification, ankylosing spondylitis, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Patients with hypertrophic osteoarthritis or traumatic arthritis with osteophytes were not included. Operations on 34 hips included 19 primary total and 11 revision total hip arthroplasties and 4 excisions of heterotopic ossification. All patients received radiotherapy to the hip after operation with a single dose of 700 centigray. Radiotherapy is recommended on the first postoperative day. After this single-dose radiation treatment, no patient had clinically significant heterotopic ossification. Recurrent disease developed in two hips (6%), as seen on radiography (grades 2 and 3). This series documents a 100% clinical success rate and a 94% radiographic success rate in preventing heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Single-dose radiotherapy is as effective as other radiation protocols in preventing heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty. It is less expensive and easier to administer than multidose radiotherapy.

  10. Treatment of primary hip osteoarthritis for the primary care physician and the indications for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Levine, Mathew E; Nace, James; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Issa, Kimona; Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffery J; Mont, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition that commonly affects knees and hips with an annual incidence of 88 in 100,000 people in the United States. The purpose of this study was to review the clinical presentation of osteoarthritis of the hip as well as the available management options. We reviewed the recent literature in regard to epidemiology, presentation, and treatment options available to patients. Nonoperative treatments include weight loss and low-impact, aerobic exercises. Along with weight loss and exercise, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), narcotics, and intra-articular steroid injections have been used to improve patient's symptoms. Surgical intervention is a viable option; however, indications such as severe pain that is refractory to nonsurgical management, osteophytes, or joint space narrowing on radiographic films, or impairment of function should be present. The most common surgical option, total hip arthroplasty, has been shown to improve a patient's physical and psychological well-being. However, inherent risks are present with surgery and these should be addressed with the patient so a sound decision can be made. Osteoarthritis of the hip can be bothersome to patients, but physicians can begin management with lifestyle changes or pharmaceuticals. In the event nonoperative measures fail to markedly improve quality of life, total hip arthroplasty remains a viable option.

  11. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient's clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor. PMID:27752378

  12. Actis Total Hip System 2 Year Follow-up

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-14

    Osteoarthritis; Traumatic Arthritis; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head; Acute Traumatic Fracture of the Femoral Head or Neck; Certain Cases of Ankylosis; Non-union of Femoral Neck Fractures; Certain High Sub-Capital & Femoral Neck Fractures in Elderly

  13. [Is suction drainage necessary in elective total hip arthroplasty?].

    PubMed

    Major, Tibor; Bikov, András; Holnapy, Gergely; Bejek, Zoltán; Bakos, Bernadett; Szendrői, Miklós; Skaliczki, Gábor

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have been published which questioned the use of suction drain during elective hip arthroplasty. In this prospective study the authors examined how the use of suction drainage affected complications related to perioperative blood loss and hemorrhage in patients undergoing elective hip arthroplasty. Eighty-six patients undergoing elective hip arthroplasty were divided into two groups. In 54 patients ("drain" group) suction drains were used during operation, whereas in 32 patients no suction drain was applied. Perioperative blood loss, use of tranexamic acid, method of thrombosis prophylaxis, transfusion requirement, incidental postoperative hemorrhage, septic complications, and all other postoperative complications were recorded. Perioperative blood loss was affected with the use of tranexamic acid but not with the use of drainage (p = 0.94). Patients without the use of drain showed a tendency of lower transfusion requirement (p = 0.08). There was no correlation between any complications and the use of drainage. In accordance with published results the authors conclude that the routine use of suction drainage during elective hip arthroplasty is not definitely necessary. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(29), 1171-1176.

  14. Short-term total hip replacement outcomes in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Susan M; Zhu, Rebecca; Figgie, Mark P; Huang, Wei-Ti; Mandl, Lisa A

    2014-10-01

    While rates of total hip replacement (THR) in spondyloarthritis are increasing, contemporary outcomes are not well described. This study analyzes 2-year outcomes in a contemporary cohort of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients undergoing THR. A case-control study was performed using data from an institutional arthroplasty registry. Validated AS cases were matched 4:1 by age and procedure to patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Data were obtained prior to surgery and at 2 years. Multiple imputation techniques were performed to avoid systematic bias due to missing data. Thirty eligible AS cases were identified between May 2007 and February 2010. Ankylosing spondylitis cases had worse American Society of Anesthesia class (P < 0.001) and more comorbidities (P = 0.02) compared with OA. Ankylosing spondylitis had worse preoperative lower-extremity Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index pain (46.8 vs 55.4; P = 0.03), function (43.0 vs 55.1; P = 0.04), and general health status measured as SF-12 (Short-Form Health Survey) physical component scale (PCS) score (29.6 vs 36.0; P < 0.001), however, there was no difference at two years in pain (89.4 vs 92.5; P = 0.23) or function (83.9 vs 90.1; P = 0.04). Physical component scale score remained significantly worse (41.2 vs 50.1; P < 0.001). Better preoperative SF-12 PCS score significantly decreased the risk of a poor pain outcome (odds ratio, 0.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.40). Overall satisfaction was high. Although patients with AS in a contemporary cohort have more comorbidities and worse physical function prior to THR, they achieve similar gains as OA. In a multivariate regression controlling for multiple potential confounders including back pain, only preoperative health status measured as SF-12 PCS score was a significant risk factor for a poor 2-year pain. Among contemporary patients, AS is not an independent risk factor for poor THR outcomes.Take-Home Message Patients with AS have significant

  15. Alternative materials to improve total hip replacement tribology.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, Seppo; Böhler, Max; Harris, William H; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Lappalainen, Reijo; Muratoglu, Orhun; Rieker, Claude; Salzer, Martin

    2003-08-01

    An improvement in tribology of bearing surfaces is an effective means of increasing the longevity of total hip replacement (THR). Currently, 3 approaches are available to achieve this aim: first, use of highly cross-linked UHMWPE; second, aluminum oxide ceramic bearings, and third, metal-on-metal bearings. Cross-linking reduces the wear resistance of UHMWPE markedly without impairment of other significant properties of the material. Simulator studies and some clinical long-term (10-22 years) follow-up surveys suggest an almost immeasurable wear of the highly cross-linked UHMWPE-based acetabular components during an expected clinical life span. Bioinert alumina ceramic (aluminum oxide) was introduced 3 decades ago for THR-bearing surfaces to improve performance and longevity. Alumina ceramic is entirely biostable and bioinert and has good mechanical properties. For correctly positioned alumina-on-alumina bearings, the annual linear wear rate has been reported to be 3.9 microm. Alumina heads have been successfully used in combination with polyethylene sockets, but as regards wear, the best results have been obtained with alumina-on-alumina bearings. In ceramic THR bearings, precise manufacture and contact surface geometry, including optimal clearance, are most important. For the currently available products, the component fracture risk is almost nonexistent (less than 1 per 1000). Metal-on-metal bearings were used in the early stage of THR surgery, although not all old designs were successful. More recent analyses of the early series have shown the advantages of metal-on-metal to be better and have led to a renaissance of this articulation. Initially, stainless steel was used because it was easy to manufacture and polish. Current metal-on-metal bearings are based on cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys with varying carbon contents. Such bearings are self-polishing. Linear wear rates remain at the level of a few microm a year. An improvement in technology has increased

  16. Periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peterson, C A; Lewallen, D G

    1996-08-01

    Eleven patients who had sustained a periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum at a mean of 6.2 years (range, one month to thirteen years) after a total hip arthroplasty were managed at our institution between 1985 and 1991. Five patients had a fracture of the medial wall; three, a fracture of the posterior column; two, a transverse fracture; and one, a fracture of the anterior column. Six fractures were displaced by two millimeters or more. Eight fractures were caused by blunt trauma or a fall, and three occurred spontaneously. A fracture was classified as type 1 if the acetabular component was clinically and radiographically stable (eight patients) and as type 2 if the component was unstable (three patients). One patient, who had a displaced type-2 fracture of the posterior column, died of an associated intrapelvic vascular injury. The other two patients who had a type-2 fracture were managed with revision of the acetabular component without supplemental plate fixation, immediately after the diagnosis of the fracture. The eight patients who had a type-1 fracture initially were managed with limitation of weight-bearing or modification of activity; in six of these patients, the fracture united without additional treatment. The ten surviving patients were followed for a mean of sixty-two months after the fracture. Eight of these patients-including four in whom a type-1 fracture had united after non-operative treatment-had a revision of the acetabular component because of pain, loosening, or non-union by the time of the most recent follow-up. Two patients (one of whom had a type-1 fracture and the other, a type-2 fracture) had multiple revisions of the acetabular component; both had supplemental internal fixation with a plate. All ten patients ultimately had a stable, functioning prosthesis. We conclude that periprosthetic acetabular fractures are associated with a poor prognosis with regard to the survival of the acetabular component but that it is possible to

  17. A longitudinal study of quality of life and functional status in total hip and total knee replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Mandzuk, Lynda L; McMillan, Diana E; Bohm, Eric R

    2015-05-01

    Primary total hip and primary total knee surgeries are commonly performed to improve patients' quality of life and functional status. This longitudinal retrospective study (N = 851) examined self-reported quality of life and functional status over the preoperative and postoperative periods: 12 months prior to surgery, one month prior to surgery and 12 months following surgery. A linear mixed effects model was used to analyze the changes in quality of life and functional status over the sampling period. Patients in the convenience sample reported improvements in quality of life and functional status utilizing the SF-12 and Oxford Hip and Oxford Knee, although differences were noted by procedure and gender. Total hip patients tended to demonstrate greater improvement than total knee patients and males reported higher levels of physical and mental quality of life as well as functional status when compared to females. Of particular note was that mental health scores were consistently lower in both total hip and total knee replacement patients across the perioperative period and up to one year postoperative. This study identifies an opportunity for health care providers to proactively address the mental health of total hip and total knee replacement patients throughout their joint replacement trajectory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nerve Palsy after Total Hip Arthroplasty without Subtrochanteric Femoral Shortening Osteotomy for a Completely Dislocated Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Sonohata, Motoki; Kitajima, Masaru; Kawano, Shunsuke; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurological injuries are a rare but devastating complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the frequency of nerve palsy after THA without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy in patients with a completely dislocated hip joint without pseudo-articulation between the femoral head and iliac bone. Methods: Between October 1999 and September 2001, nine primary THAs were performed for patients with a completely dislocated hip joint. The limb lengths, neurological abnormalities, and the extent of their neurological recovery were evaluated. Three THAs were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy, and six THAs were combined without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Results: The mean length of the operation was 4.8 cm (range, 3.0-6.5 cm). Sciatic nerve palsy developed in four of the nine patients after THA. None of the cases with sciatic nerve palsy were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Three of four patients did not completely recover from sciatic nerve palsy. Conclusions: THA for patients with a completely dislocated hip was associated with a high risk of nerve palsy due to excessive limb lengthening; the potential for recovery from nerve palsy was observed to be poor. Subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy should be used in combination with THA in patients with a completely dislocated hip. PMID:28217204

  19. Total Hip Arthroplasty for the Paralytic and Non-paralytic Side in Patient with Residual Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sonohata, Motoki; Kitajima, Masaru; Kawano, Shunsuke; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty (THA) for poliomyelitis is a problematic procedure due to difficulty in positioning the cup of the prosthesis in the true acetabulum and the risk of dislocation after THA due to the low muscle tone. Methods: We herein present a case of bilateral hip pain with a history of poliomyelitis. Radiograph showed bilateral hip osteoarthritis caused by hip dysplasia due to residual poliomyelitis in right hip joint or developing dysplasia of the hip joint in left hip joint. THA was performed to bilateral hip joints. Results: Six years after bilateral THA, bilateral hip pain significantly improved. Additionally, the muscle strength on the paralyzed right side partially improved. However, the muscle strength on the non-paralyzed left side did not significantly improve. No complications related to the surgery were observed. Conclusion: Promising early results were obtained for THA in our patient with residual poliomyelitis. However, surgeons should pay attention to the potential development of complications concerning THA that may arise due to the residual poliomyelitis. PMID:27347238

  20. Mid-term result of ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tozun, Ismail Remzi; Ozden, Vahit Emre; Dikmen, Goksel; Beksac, Burak

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate our clinical experience with ceramic-on-ceramic cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) and complications after an average follow-up of more than eight years. From January 2001 to December 2008, 540 THA with ceramic-on-ceramic bearings were performed in 448 patients (92 bilateral, 54 of which were operated simultaneously) with a mean age 49.9 years (range 18-84) by a senior surgeon. Pre-operative aetiological reasons were developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in 205 hips, degenerative arthritis in 157 hips, avascular necrosis in 51 hips, rheumatoid diseases in 40 hips, posttraumatic arthritis in 40 hips, other reasons in 25 hips and revision surgery in 22 hips. Patients were evaluated with Harris hip score (HSS), and radiological findings of acetabular and femoral component loosening or osteolysis with ceramic bearing related complications like squeaking, liner and head fractures were recorded. The average duration of follow-up time was 8.2 years (range, five to 13.2). The main Harris hip score increased from 42.4 points preoperatively to 94.9 points at the time of last follow-up. We had one fracture of the ceramic head, 11 clicking and four squeaking; one of them was revised because of terrible squeaking due to acetabular liner fracture, the other three were seldom audible from the outside and followed conservatively. We did not observed loosening or osteolysis due to ceramic bearings at the time of the final follow-up. Our study has demonstrated that ceramic-on-ceramic bearings can be used safely in different etiological problems. Incidences of noisy hips are becoming less frequent.

  1. [Total hip arthroplasty for treatment of Crowe type IV congenital dysplasia of hip with dislocation in adults].

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbo; Zhang, Wenming; Bai, Guochang; Huang, Zida; Shen, Rongkai

    2013-10-01

    To study the effectiveness and acetabular prosthesis selection of the total hip arthroplasty (THA) for Crowe type IV congenital dysplasia of the hip with dislocation in adults. Between June 2008 and May 2012, 8 adult patients (8 hips) with Crowe type IV congenital dysplasia of the hip with dislocation underwent THA. They were all female, aged 20-35 years with a mean age of 25 years. The left hip was involved in 5 cases and the right hip in 3 cases. The Harris score of involved hip was 53.9 +/- 6.6. The shortened length of involved extremity was 4-6 cm (mean, 4.8 cm). The X-ray films showed complete dislocation in all cases. The acetabular prosthesis with diameter of 42-44 mm and S-ROM femoral prosthesis were used in THA. The incisions healed by first intention. There was no hip dislocation events and sciatic nerve injury during the follow-up. Femoral nerve injury occurred in 1 case and asymptomatic venous thrombosis of the leg muscle occurred in 2 cases. All the patients were followed up 1-5 years (mean, 3 years). All cases showed obvious improvement of claudication and could restore to work. At 6 months after operation, the mean length difference between affected and contralateral extremities was 0.4 cm (range, 1.0-0.6 cm); the Harris score was significantly increased to 87.6 +/- 0.3 (t = 1.77, P = 0.00). The X-ray films showed that all cases got bony union at 3-6 months after operation and stable interface between acetabular prosthesis and bone. No revision was involved during the follow-up. THA with small acetabular cup and subtrochanteric osteotomy is an effective method in the treatment of Crowe type IV congenital dysplasia of the hip with dislocation in adults. The early effectiveness is satisfactory. The long-term survival rate of prosthesis needs to be followed up.

  2. Tissue preserving total hip arthroplasty using superior capsulotomy.

    PubMed

    Capuano, N; Del Buono, A; Maffulli, N

    2015-08-01

    The goals of a tissue-preserving minimally invasive approach to the hip are to allow early short-term recovery, achieve hip joint stability, minimize muscle strength loss from surgery, spare the peri-articular soft tissues, and allow unrestricted motion in the long term. Hip arthroplasty in patients with no pre-existing hardware, with a sufficient space between the acetabular rim and greater trochanter; management of subcapital femoral fractures in older patients. Protrusio acetabuli. Joint stiffness. This is the main concern when undertaking the superior capsulotomy. Stiffness may result from bone causes, including ankylosis, large osteophytes, bone bridges etc., extra-articular retraction of surrounding soft tissues with capsular contracture of both ligaments and muscles, or a combination of bony and soft tissues causes, resulting in limited adduction. Indeed, maximal adduction is necessary to increase the distance between the apex of the greater trochanter and the superior acetabular edge. In the approach described in the present article, the real limitation is the impossibility to introduce a straight stem through the trochanteric fossa without weakening the trochantericarea. If adduction is restricted, excessive lateralization of the femoral stem would result in postoperative pain and discomfort, especially as we advocate immediate full weight bearing. Even though patients fare better when the trochanteric area is intact, many types of stem such as the GTS (Biomet), or stem Microplasty (Biomet) or even stem Parva (Adler Ortho) may pressurize the internal bone of the trochanteric structures. Therefore, these stems may be implanted in maximal hip adduction. This is the case in coxa profunda or coxa vara, which require more invasive and destabilizing surgical approaches. Lateral position, 5-8 cm incision from the tip of the greater trochanter, identification and transaction of piriformis tendon. Anterior mobilization of the gluteus minimus and exposure of the

  3. Bearing surfaces in hip replacement – Evolution and likely future

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narinder; Arora, Gen N.C.; Datta, Barun

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty has evolved from the first total hip arthroplasty in 1938, through the revolutionization of hip arthroplasty by principles of low friction arthroplasty introduced by Sir John Charnley in 1960s to the present state of the art implants and techniques. The main concern regarding failure of total hip arthroplasty has been the biological response to particulate polyethylene debris generated by conventional metal on polyethylene bearing surfaces leading to osteolysis and aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. Therefore, recent research has been focussing on alternative bearing surfaces to reduce the particulate debris generated. These bearing surfaces include ceramic-polyethylene, metal–metal as well as ceramic–ceramic articulations and have demonstrated lesser friction rates as well as significantly lower wear rates as compared to widely used metal on polyethylene surfaces. Clinical experience until now has shown that metal on metal articulations have significant safety concerns whereas metal-on-highly crosslinked polyethylene, ceramic on ceramic and ceramic on highly crosslinked polyethylene articulations have shown encouraging results to hold promise for wider use in younger and more active patients. This review article discusses positives and drawbacks of various bearing surfaces in current clinical use in total hip arthroplasty as well as briefly explores the newer technologies on the horizon which may even further decrease wear and improve total hip arthroplasty survivorship. PMID:25382913

  4. Second-generation cementless total hip arthroplasty. Eight to eleven-year results.

    PubMed

    Archibeck, M J; Berger, R A; Jacobs, J J; Quigley, L R; Gitelis, S; Rosenberg, A G; Galante, J O

    2001-11-01

    Second-generation cementless femoral components were designed to provide more reliable ingrowth and to limit distal osteolysis by incorporating circumferential proximal ingrowth surfaces. We examined the eight to eleven-year results of total hip arthroplasty with a cementless, anatomically designed femoral component and a cementless hemispheric acetabular component. Ninety-two consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties with implantation of a femoral component with a circumferential proximal porous coating (Anatomic Hip) and a cementless hemispheric porous-coated acetabular component (Harris-Galante II) were performed in eighty-five patients. These patients were prospectively followed clinically and radiographically. Six patients (seven hips) died and five patients (seven hips) were lost to follow-up, leaving seventy-four patients (seventy-eight hips) who had been followed for a mean of ten years (range, eight to eleven years). The mean age at the time of the arthroplasty was fifty-two years. The mean preoperative Harris hip score of 51 points improved to 94 points at the time of final follow-up; 86% of the hips had a good or excellent result. Thigh pain was reported as mild to severe after seven hip arthroplasties. No femoral component was revised for any reason, and none were loose radiographically at the time of the last follow-up. Two hips underwent acetabular revision (one because of dislocation and one because of loosening). Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis was performed with revision or loosening of any component as the end point. The ten-year survival rate was 96.4% +/- 2.1% for the total hip prosthesis, 100% for the femoral component, and 96.4% +/- 2.1% for the acetabular component. Radiolucencies adjacent to the nonporous portion of the femoral component were seen in sixty-eight (93%) of the -seventy-three hips with complete radiographic follow-up. Femoral osteolysis proximal to the lesser trochanter was noted in four hips (5%). No osteolysis was

  5. Association between contact hip stress and RSA-measured wear rates in total hip arthroplasties of 31 patients.

    PubMed

    The, Bertram; Hosman, Anton; Kootstra, Johan; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Flivik, Gunnar; Verdonschot, Nico; Diercks, Ron

    2008-01-01

    The main concern in the long run of total hip replacements is aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. Optimization of the biomechanics of the hip joint is necessary for optimization of long-term success. A widely implementable tool to predict biomechanical consequences of preoperatively planned reconstructions still has to be developed. A potentially useful model to this purpose has been developed previously. The aim of this study is to quantify the association between the estimated hip joint contact force by this biomechanical model and RSA-measured wear rates in a clinical setting. Thirty-one patients with a total hip replacement were measured with RSA, the gold standard for clinical wear measurements. The reference examination was done within 1 week of the operation and the follow-up examinations were done at 1, 2 and 5 years. Conventional pelvic X-rays were taken on the same day. The contact stress distribution in the hip joint was determined by the computer program HIPSTRESS. The procedure for the determination of the hip joint contact stress distribution is based on the mathematical model of the resultant hip force in the one-legged stance and the mathematical model of the contact stress distribution. The model for the force requires as input data, several geometrical parameters of the hip and the body weight, while the model for stress requires as input data, the magnitude and direction of the resultant hip force. The stress distribution is presented by the peak stress-the maximal value of stress on the weight-bearing area (p(max)) and also by the peak stress calculated with respect to the body weight (p(max)/W(B)) which gives the effect of hip geometry. Visualization of the relations between predicted values by the model and the wear at different points in the follow-up was done using scatterplots. Correlations were expressed as Pearson r values. The predicted p(max) and wear were clearly correlated in the first year post-operatively (r = 0.58, p = 0

  6. A prospective comparative study of cementless total hip arthroplasty and hip resurfacing in patients under the age of 55 years: a ten-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Haddad, F S; Konan, S; Tahmassebi, J

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ten-year clinical and functional outcome of hip resurfacing and to compare it with that of cementless hip arthroplasty in patients under the age of 55 years. Between 1999 and 2002, 80 patients were enrolled into the study: 24 were randomised (11 to hip resurfacing, 13 to total hip arthroplasty), 18 refused hip resurfacing and chose cementless total hip arthroplasty with a 32 mm bearing, and 38 insisted on resurfacing. The mean follow-up for all patients was 12.1 years (10 to 14). Patients were assessed clinically and radiologically at one year, five years and ten years. Outcome measures included EuroQol EQ5D, Oxford, Harris hip, University of California Los Angeles and University College Hospital functional scores. No differences were seen between the two groups in the Oxford or Harris hip scores or in the quality of life scores. Despite a similar aspiration to activity pre-operatively, a higher proportion of patients with a hip resurfacing were running and involved in sport and heavy manual labour after ten years. We found significantly higher function scores in patients who had undergone hip resurfacing than in those with a cementless hip arthroplasty at ten years. This suggests a functional advantage for hip resurfacing. There were no other attendant problems. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  7. Hip resurfacing versus total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review comparing standardized outcomes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Deborah A; Pykerman, Karen; Werle, Jason; Lorenzetti, Diane; Wasylak, Tracy; Noseworthy, Tom; Dick, Donald A; O'Connor, Greg; Sundaram, Aish; Heintzbergen, Sanne; Frank, Cy

    2014-07-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing was developed for younger, active patients as an alternative to THA, but it remains controversial. Study heterogeneity, inconsistent outcome definitions, and unstandardized outcome measures challenge our ability to compare arthroplasty outcomes studies. We asked how early revisions or reoperations (within 5 years of surgery) and overall revisions, adverse events, and postoperative component malalignment compare among studies of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing with THA among patients with hip osteoarthritis. Secondarily, we compared the revision frequency identified in the systematic review with revisions reported in four major joint replacement registries. We conducted a systematic review of English language studies published after 1996. Adverse events of interest included rates of early failure, time to revision, revision, reoperation, dislocation, infection/sepsis, femoral neck fracture, mortality, and postoperative component alignment. Revision rates were compared with those from four national joint replacement registries. Results were reported as adverse event rates per 1000 person-years stratified by device market status (in use and discontinued). Comparisons between event rates of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and THA are made using a quasilikelihood generalized linear model. We identified 7421 abstracts, screened and reviewed 384 full-text articles, and included 236. The most common study designs were prospective cohort studies (46.6%; n = 110) and retrospective studies (36%; n = 85). Few randomized controlled trials were included (7.2%; n = 17). The average time to revision was 3.0 years for metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (95% CI, 2.95-3.1) versus 7.8 for THA (95% CI, 7.2-8.3). For all devices, revisions and reoperations were more frequent with metal-on-metal hip resurfacing than THA based on point estimates and CIs: 10.7 (95% CI, 10.1-11.3) versus 7.1 (95% CI, 6.7-7.6; p = 0.068), and 7.9 (95% CI, 5.4-11.3) versus 1

  8. Morbid Obesity and Congestive Heart Failure Increase Operative Time and Room Time in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gholson, J Joseph; Shah, Apurva S; Gao, Yubo; Noiseux, Nicolas O

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is increasingly common in patients having total hip arthroplasty, and previous studies have shown a correlation with increased operative time in total hip arthroplasty. Decreasing operative time and room time is essential to meeting the increased demand for total hip arthroplasty, and factors that influence these metrics should be quantified to allow for targeted reduction in time and adjusted reimbursement models. This is the first study to use a multivariate approach to identify which factors increase operative time and room time in total hip arthroplasty. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to identify a cohort of 30,361 patients having total hip arthroplasty between 2006 and 2012. Patient demographics, comorbidities including body mass index, and anesthesia type were used to create generalized linear models identifying independent predictors of increased operative time and room time. Morbid obesity (body mass index >40) independently increased operative time by 13 minutes and room time 18 by minutes. Congestive heart failure led to the greatest increase in overall room time, resulting in a 20-minute increase. Anesthesia method further influenced room time, with general anesthesia resulting in an increased room time of 18 minutes compared with spinal or regional anesthesia. Obesity is the major driver of increased operative time in total hip arthroplasty. Congestive heart failure, general anesthesia, and morbid obesity each lead to substantial increases in overall room time, with congestive heart failure leading to the greatest increase in overall room time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Successful treatment of late Salmonella infections in total hip replacement - report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Kálmán; Janositz, Gábor; Kovács, Gyula; Sisák, Krisztián; Rudner, Ervin

    2010-06-08

    Salmonella species can be rarely isolated from periprosthetic joint infections, however when present, are usually part of a severe septic clinical picture. Two patients presented with late infected hip replacements to our institution. The first patient with multiple comorbidities had a confirmed Salmonella Enteridis infection with an abscess in the groin, with loosening of both components. He underwent a successful one stage cemented revision hip replacement, followed by 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy (ciprofloxacin). He had no recurrence or complications. The second patient was admitted in a septic condition with ARDS to the Intensive Care Unit 7 years following an uncemented total hip replacement. From an ultrasound guided hip aspirate Salmonella cholerae-suis was isolated. He underwent a successful a two-stage revision hip replacement. Successful treatment of such potentially life threatening infections is achievable using modern orthopaedic techniques and close collaboration with the infectious diseases specialists.

  10. The sex specificity of hip-joint muscles offers an explanation for better results in men after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Preininger, Bernd; Schmorl, Kathrin; von Roth, Philipp; Winkler, Tobias; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Tohtz, Stephan

    2012-06-01

    Choosing a surgical approach for total hip arthroplasty (THA) has a patient-specific impact on peri-operative muscle damage as well as postoperative functional outcome. Women and aged patients increasingly benefit from minimally invasive surgical procedures. For this reason, and due to the distinctly different bony anatomy of men and women, the hypothesis of this study is that muscle distribution around the hip joint is dependent on sex and age. The goal of this study was to analyse hip musculature in men and women and to correlate total muscle volume distribution. From 93 computed tomography (CT) scans of the pelvis (45 men, 48 women) volumes of gluteus medius (GMV), gluteus maximus (GXV) and tensor faciae latae (TFL) muscles were measured on both sides of the pelvis. The distribution of muscle volumes was normalised to patient weight and then correlated with sex and age. The measured muscle volumes featured no major differences between the left and the right side. The absolute total volume of the hip-encompassing muscular system (TMV) is bigger in men than in women. Correlations between TMV and collected data were observed in both sexes in relation to body weight and size (men p < .00001; women p 0.001). With increased body weight, the TMV of the male patients increased progressively (women 11.2 cm TMV/kg KG vs. men 17.4 cm TMV/kg KG) (p 0.04). The relative distribution of each muscle volume (GMV, GXV, TFL) around the hip joint showed no major differences with respect to sex and/or age (p 0.986 and 0.996, respectively). The equal relative muscle distribution in men and women around the hip joint reflects neither sex-related differences observed in clinical outcomes after THA nor bony anatomy. Yet men exhibited more muscle reserves (muscle volume; absolute and in relation to body mass) , which could explain the better outcome in men after THA. Furthermore, this suggests the extraordinary importance of muscle-sparing surgical approaches in women. The results

  11. The use of a constrained acetabular component to treat instability after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shrader, M Wade; Parvizi, Javad; Lewallen, David G

    2003-11-01

    Recurrent dislocation after total hip arthroplasty is a disabling complication that can be difficult to treat and may not be amenable to nonoperative management. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome associated with the use of a constrained acetabular component as a salvage treatment for instability after hip arthroplasty. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic outcome of 110 arthroplasties, in 109 patients, that had been performed with use of a single design of constrained acetabular component. In seventy-nine hips the constrained component was implanted for the treatment of recurrent instability, and in thirty-one hips it was implanted because of absent or grossly deficient soft-tissue attachments that were believed to be associated with a high risk for subsequent instability. The constrained acetabular device eliminated or prevented hip instability in all patients except two, who continued to have sensations of subluxation. The mean Harris hip score improved significantly, from 62.7 points preoperatively to 76.4 points at the time of the latest follow-up (p < 0.0001). There were no instances of dislocation or disassembly of the hip components. Radiographic analysis revealed radiolucent lines around the cup in fifteen hips (14%). There was a total of nine revisions: six for deep infection, two for acetabular component loosening, and one for a periprosthetic fracture of the femur. A constrained acetabular component reliably restores and maintains hip stability in patients with recalcitrant recurrent instability and can dependably prevent dislocation in those who are at high risk because of absent or deficient soft tissues about the hip. However, because of the early appearance of radiolucent lines around some components and concerns about long-term fixation, the use of these devices should be reserved for situations in which other methods are inadequate or have already failed.

  12. CT-based surgical planning software improves the accuracy of total hip replacement preoperative planning.

    PubMed

    Viceconti, M; Lattanzi, R; Antonietti, B; Paderni, S; Olmi, R; Sudanese, A; Toni, A

    2003-06-01

    The present study is aimed to compare accuracy and the repeatability in planning total hip replacements with the conventional templates on radiographs to that attainable on the same clinical cases when using CT-based planning software. The sizes of the cementless components planned with new computer aided preoperative planning system called Hip-Op and with standard templates were compared to those effectively implanted. The study group intentionally included only difficult clinical cases. The most common aetiology was congenital dysplasia of hip (65.6%). The Hip-Op planning system allowed the surgeons to obtain a preoperative planning more accurate than with templates, especially for the socket. Assuming correct a size planned one calliper above or below that implanted the accuracy increased from 83% for the stem and 69% for the socket when using templates to 86% for the stem and 93% for the socket when using the Hip-Op system. The repeatability of the Hip-Op system was found comparable to that of the template procedure, which is much more familiar to the surgeons. Furthermore, the repeatability of the preoperative planning with the Hip-Op system was consistent between surgeons, independently from their major or minor experience. The study clearly shows the advantages of a three-dimensional computer-based preoperative planning over the traditional template planning, especially when deformed anatomies are involved. The surgical planning performed with the Hip-Op system is accurate and repeatable, especially for the socket and for less experienced surgeons.

  13. Association between Dairy Product Consumption and Incidence of Total Hip Arthroplasty for Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sultana Monira; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen E; Wluka, Anita E; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this prospective cohort study was to determine whether dairy product consumption was associated with the incidence of total hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis (OA). There were 38,924 participants from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study who had dairy product consumption recorded in 1990-1994. The incidence of total hip arthroplasty for OA during 2001-2013 was determined by linking cohort records to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Over an average of 11.8 years of followup, 1505 total hip arthroplasties for OA were identified (524 in men, 981 in women). In men, a 1 SD increase in dairy product consumption was associated with a 21% increased incidence of total hip arthroplasty for OA (HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.33), with a dose-response relationship observed for quartiles of dairy product consumption (p for trend = 0.001). These results were independent of age, body mass index, country of birth, education, smoking status, vigorous physical activity, calcium supplementation, energy consumption, circulating 25-hydroxy vitamin D, hypertension, and diabetes. No significant association was observed for women (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.95-1.09). Increasing dairy product consumption was associated with an increased risk of total hip arthroplasty for men with OA, with no significant association observed for women. Understanding the mechanisms may help identify strategies to prevent hip OA, particularly for men.

  14. Assessment of asymmetric leg loading before and after total hip arthroplasty using instrumented shoes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty is a successful surgical treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. Different questionnaires are used by the clinicians to assess functional capacity and the patient's pain, despite these questionnaires are known to be subjective. Furthermore, many studies agree that kinematic and kinetic parameters are crucial to evaluate and to provide useful information about the patient’s evolution for clinicians and rehabilitation specialists. However, these quantities can currently only be obtained in a fully equipped gait laboratory. Instrumented shoes can quantify gait velocity, kinetic, kinematic and symmetry parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the instrumented shoes is a sufficiently sensitive instrument to show differences in mobility performance before and after total hip arthroplasty. Methods In this study, patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty were measured before and 6–8 months after total hip arthroplasty. Both measurement sessions include 2 functional mobility tasks while the subject was wearing instrumented shoes. Before each measurement the Harris Hip Score and the Traditional Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index were administered as well. Results The stance time and the average vertical ground reaction force measured with the instrumented shoes during walking, and their symmetry index, showed significant differences before and after total hip arthroplasty. However, the data obtained with the sit to stand test did not reveal this improvement after surgery. Conclusions Our results show that inter-limb asymmetry during a walking activity can be evaluated with the instrumented shoes before and after total hip arthroplasty in an outpatient clinical setting. PMID:24581227

  15. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Anwander, H.; Cron, G. O.; Rakhra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hips with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) have a high rate of adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR), often associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) measures tissue perfusion with the parameter Ktrans (volume transfer constant of contrast agent). Our purpose was 1) to evaluate the feasibility of DCE-MRI in patients with THA and 2) to compare DCE-MRI in patients with MoM bearings with metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) bearings, hypothesising that the perfusion index Ktrans in hips with MoM THA is higher than in hips with MoP THA. Methods In this pilot study, 16 patients with primary THA were recruited (eight MoM, eight MoP). DCE-MRI of the hip was performed at 1.5 Tesla (T). For each patient, Ktrans was computed voxel-by-voxel in all tissue lateral to the bladder. The mean Ktrans for all voxels was then calculated. These values were compared with respect to implant type and gender, and further correlated with clinical parameters. Results There was no significant difference between the two bearing types with both genders combined. However, dividing patients by THA bearing and gender, women with MoM bearings had the highest Ktrans values, exceeding those of women with MoP bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.053 min−1; p-value < 0.05) and men with MoM bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.034 min−1; p-value < 0.001). Considering only the men, patients with MoM bearings had lower Ktrans than those with MoP bearings (0.034 min−1 versus 0.046 min−1; p < 0.05). Conclusion DCE-MRI is feasible to perform in tissues surrounding THA. Females with MoM THA show high Ktrans values in DCE-MRI, suggesting altered tissue perfusion kinematics which may reflect relatively greater inflammation. Cite this article: Dr P. E. Beaule. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty: A pilot stud. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:73–79. DOI: 10

  16. Effects of hip joint center location and femoral offset on abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Taro; Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Ike, Hiroyuki; Kubota, So; Kawamura, Masaki; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2015-07-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to examine the changes in the hip joint center (HJC) position and the femoral offset (FO) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and 2) to investigate the effects of the HJC and FO on isometric abductor muscle strength. We evaluated 51 patients who underwent unilateral primary THA. The FO, and horizontal and vertical distances from the HJC to the tip of the teardrop were measured and isometric hip abductor muscle strength was measured. The HJC of the affected side moved medially postoperatively compared with that of the unaffected side (p < 0.05), and the FO was reconstructed similarly to the unaffected side. There were significant negative correlations between the changes in the horizontal distance from the HJC and FO to the tip of the teardrop. An increase in the FO and infero-medial cup position optimized hip abductor muscle strength. The HJC was reconstructed medially and superiorly, and the change in the FO after THA was influenced by the change in the horizontal distance of the HJC. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the medial and inferior HJC and increase in the FO constitute an effective procedure for restoring abductor strength.

  17. Periacetabular bone mineral density changes after resurfacing hip arthroplasty versus conventional total hip arthroplasty. A randomized controlled DEXA study.

    PubMed

    Smolders, José M H; Pakvis, Dean F; Hendrickx, Baudewijn W; Verdonschot, Nico; van Susante, Job L C

    2013-08-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to evaluate acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) changes after hip resurfacing (RHA) versus an established conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 71 patients were allocated randomly to receive either an RHA press-fit cobalt-chromium cup (n=38) or a THA with a threaded titanium cup and polyethylene-metal-inlay insert (n=33). The BMD in five separate periacetabular regions of interest (ROI) was prospectively quantified preoperative until 24 months. We conclude that, in contrast to our hypothesis, periacetabular BMD was better preserved after RHA than after placement of a conventional THA. Long term follow-up studies are necessary to see whether this benefit in bone preservation sustains over longer time periods and whether it is turned into clinical benefits at future revision surgery.

  18. Uncemented primary press-fit total hip arthroplasty: a 3 to 6 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Vidyadhara, S; Rao, S K

    2007-04-01

    To analyse the 3 to 6 years' clinicoradiological outcome of 45 uncemented total hip arthroplasties performed in 37 patients using cementless Spotorno stem and St Nabor cup. The main indications for surgery were avascular necrosis of the femoral head and rheumatoid arthritis. Younger patients with good bone quality and a trumpet-shaped femur were eligible. A single surgeon performed all the operations using a posterolateral approach. Patients were reviewed at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and yearly thereafter. The clinical status was recorded using the Harris Hip Score. All radiographs were analysed by 2 independent blinded observers on 2 separate occasions. The mean follow-up period was 49 months and the mean Harris Hip Score at the latest follow-up was 94. Osseointegration in the form of trabeculae running from the endosteum to the prosthesis surface along with tropism of the calcar was evident in 73% of the hips. None of the remaining hips showed any continuous radio-opaque lines suggestive of a lack of bone ongrowth. Patients with endosteal condensation had better Harris Hip Scores. Intra-operative stability of the implants could fairly predict outcome. Initial clinicoradiological results of uncemented total hip arthroplasty are promising in younger patients with good bone quality and a trumpet-shaped femur.

  19. [The use of radiotherapy in the prevention of heterotopic ossification in patients with total hip replacement].

    PubMed

    Marziano, C; Pichi, E; Chiarlone, R; Luzi, G; Siccardi, C

    1996-12-01

    In order to prevent heterotopic ossification (HO) after total hip replacement, 21 high risk hips were irradiated pre- and postoperatively to prevent heterotopic bone formation in the St. Paul Department of Radiation Oncology from 1993 to September, 1995. Eighteen hips in 15 patients were eligible for analysis with a minimum follow-up of 3 months. All the hips in our series were at high risk of heterotopic bone formation. All assessable patients had radiographic findings of ipsilateral or contralateral previous ectopic bone formation, 8 following total hip arthroplasty, 4 following trauma and 3 had heterotopic osteoarthritis. Four hips were treated 46 hours preoperatively, while all the others were treated on the first postoperative day. The irradiation field was limited to the hip region and radiation exposure to a rectangular field, ranging in size from 8 x 12 to 10 x 15 cm, to include the lateral aspect of the greater trochanter. We used a cobalt-60 unit. Opposed anterior-posterior fields were irradiated at midplan, with a source-to-axis distance of 80 cm; the dose was 6-8 Gy in one fraction. Preoperative irradiation appeared as effective as postoperative treatment, and more comfortable for the patients. There were neither side-effects nor failure of ossification. The treatment appeared effective in the prophylaxis of HO in 88% of patients, with clinical advantages in 67% of them.

  20. Calcaneal stress fracture: an adverse event following total hip and total knee arthroplasty: a report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takaaki; Miki, Takahito; Nishiyama, Akihiro

    2014-01-15

    Stress fractures have been reported to occur in the pubis, femoral neck, proximal part of the tibia, and fabella during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty. However, to our knowledge, calcaneal stress fractures after total hip or total knee arthroplasty have not been reported in the English-language literature. Most orthopaedic surgeons are not familiar with calcaneal stress fractures that may occur in elderly patients after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features, imaging findings, and bone mineral content of the proximal part of the femur and the distal end of the radius in five patients who had a calcaneal stress fracture after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty. All patients were women with a mean age of 76.8 years. All fractures occurred in the calcaneus on the same side as the arthroplasty. The fracture appeared at a mean of 10.2 weeks postoperatively. All patients reported heel pain on walking. Swelling and local heat were found in four and three patients, respectively. Pain was elicited by squeezing the calcaneus in all patients. Early radiographs had normal findings in two patients, and an irregular sclerotic line appeared later in the radiographs of all patients. All fractures were treated conservatively. Four fractures healed uneventfully, but one fracture displaced. All patients had osteoporosis. Calcaneal stress fractures during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty may not be as rare as previously thought. Because clinical symptoms of the fracture appear insidiously and radiographic findings are absent or subtle in the early stage, a high index of suspicion is needed for orthopaedic surgeons to make the correct diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging or repeated radiographs may be necessary to make the correct diagnosis when no abnormality is apparent on the initial radiograph.

  1. Practical implications of the lumbar spine and its function on total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Brahman Shankar; Levy, Yadin David; Pierrepont, Jim; Bruce, Warwick James

    2016-01-01

    Correct component placement is of significant importance to ensure optimal outcomes in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Traditionally, the Lewinnek plane has been referenced as an adequate “safe zone”, formed between the anterior superior iliac spines and public tubercles to optimize acetabular orientation. However, recent evidence shows that the positioning of this plane may vary due to the biomechanical relationship between the lumbar spine and hip. Therefore, the plane acquired intraoperatively may not accurately recreate the actual functional plane and acetabular orientation encountered outside of the intraoperative environment. This review summarizes the hip-spine relationship and its implications on THA. PMID:28097253

  2. Review of quality of x-rays for templating for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faiz; Ahmad, Tayyab; Condon, Finbarr; Lenehan, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Digital templating of x-rays for total hip arthroplasty is used routinely for pre-operative planning. This is to assure that appropriately sized implants are selected to replicate patient's hip biomechanics. Multiple studies have shown that templating does not always correspond to the final implants used. The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of the x-rays taken pre-operatively for templating for total hip arthroplasty. We undertook a review of a series of pre-operative templating pelvis x-rays in 100 consecutive patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. These x-rays were compared against set criteria to determine their suitability for use for templating. We determined that six x-rays met the criteria whereas ninety four x-rays did not meet the criteria for suitable x-rays. Twenty patients had repeat x-rays. The reasons for unsuitability were inadequate opposite femur (66%), absence or incomplete template (54%), inadequate femur length (47%), external rotation (39%), absence of opposite hip (4%). The twenty repeated x-rays were also reviewed for the same parameters and two (10%) satisfied the established criteria. It is imperative that x-rays for templating for total hip arthroplasty are done to a strict standard to obtain an x-ray that is appropriate for templating and there is minimal exposure of the patient to irradiation.

  3. Lower-limb joint mechanics after total hip arthroplasty during sitting and standing tasks.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Mario; Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Varin, Daniel; Beaulé, Paul E

    2012-10-01

    While the effect of total hip arthroplasty on the operated limb mechanics is well documented, little is known on its effect on the contralateral limb. The purpose of this study was to measure the joint mechanics of both lower limbs during the tasks of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit. Twenty total hip arthroplasty patients and 20 control participants performed three trials of each task from which 3D lower-limb joint kinematics and kinetics were obtained. Total hip arthroplasty patients exhibited lower operated-hip joint flexion, extension moments, and power, occurring most frequently near seat-on and seat-off. Despite these reduced kinetic variables in the operated hip, the joints of the non-operated limb generated similar joint kinetics as the matched control participants. These results indicated the patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty could adopt a strategy that allowed them to reduce moments and power generated at the operated lower-limb joints without overcompensating with the non-operated leg. Although such a strategy may be desirable given that higher loads can increase friction and accelerate wear of the prosthesis, reduced loading may be an indication of inadequate muscle strength that needs to be addressed.

  4. Clinical outcome of design modifications to the CLS Spotorno Stem in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    GRACEFFA, ANGELO; INDELLI, PIER FRANCESCO; LATELLA, LEONARDO; POLI, PAOLO; FULCO, ALEXANDER; MARCUCCI, MASSIMILIANO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose historically, the original CLS Spotorno Stem has demonstrated excellent survival. The design of this stem was recently modified, resulting in the introduction of a shorter, modular version (CLS Brevius). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the functional, radiological and survivorship outcomes of the cementless CLS Brevius Stem in a multi-surgeon, single center, consecutive series study at two years post-surgery. Methods the Authors performed 170 total hip arthroplasties in 155 patients using the shorter, triple-taper stem design (CLS Brevius). The patients’ diagnoses were primary hip osteoarthritis (OA) in 74.4%, secondary hip OA in 22.6%, and post-traumatic hip OA in 3%. All operations were performed through a mini-posterior approach, with the patient in the lateral decubitus position. The mean follow-up was 32 months (24–44 months). Outcome was assessed using the Harris Hip Score (HHS). Results the mean HHS improved from 32 preoperatively to 92 points at final follow-up, while the stem survival rate was 99.4%. Overall, the results were excellent in148 hips (87%), good in 14 hips (8.2%), fair in six hips (3.6%), and poor in two hips (1.2%). Intraoperative complications included a calcar fissure in three hips (1.7%). Correct femoral offset was reproduced in 97% while the planned center of hip rotation was achieved in 98%. Only one hip underwent early stem revision; this was due to major subsidence. Conclusions the modified CLS stem design showed excellent short-term results with a low rate of early postoperative complications. One of the main findings of this study was the high correlation between the planned femoral offset and center of hip rotation and the final radiographic measurements. This high reproducibility, which indicates the ability of the system to restore normal hip anatomy, is indeed due to the extensive modularity that characterizes this stem system. Long-term follow-up studies are necessary to fully compare the outcomes of

  5. Mid-term results of the BIOLOX delta ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y K; Ha, Y C; Yoo, J-I; Jo, W L; Kim, K-C; Koo, K H

    2017-06-01

    We conducted a prospective study of a delta ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA) to determine the rate of ceramic fracture, to characterise post-operative noise, and to evaluate the mid-term results and survivorship. Between March 2009 and March 2011, 274 patients (310 hips) underwent cementless THA using a delta ceramic femoral head and liner. At each follow-up, clinical and radiological outcomes were recorded. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was undertaken to estimate survival. Four patients (four hips) died and 18 patients (20 hips) were lost to follow-up within five years. The remaining 252 patients (286 hips) were followed for a mean of 66.5 months (60 to 84). There were 144 men (166 hips) and 108 women (120 hips) with a mean age of 49.7 years (16 to 83) at surgery. The mean pre-operative Harris Hip Score of 47.1 points improved to 93.8 points at final follow-up. Six patients reported squeaking in seven hips; however, none were audible. Radiolucent lines involving Gruen zones one and/or seven were seen in 52 hips (18.2%). No hip had detectable wear, focal osteolysis or signs of loosening. One hip was revised because of fracture of the ceramic liner, which occurred due to an undetected malseating of the ceramic liner at the time of surgery. One hip was revised for a periprosthetic fracture of the femur, and one hip was treated for periprosthetic joint infection. The six-year survivorship with re-operation for any reason as the endpoint was 99.0% (95% confidence interval 97.8% to 100%). The rate of delta ceramic fracture was 0.3% (one of 286). While ceramic head fracture was dominant in previous ceramic-on-ceramic THA, fracture of the delta ceramic liner due to malseating is a concern. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:741-8. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  6. Use of postoperative irradiation for the prevention of heterotopic bone formation after total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, J.E.; Greenberg, P.; Selch, M.T.; Thomas, B.J.; Amstutz, H.

    1988-03-01

    Formation of heterotopic bone (HTB) following total hip replacement may partially or completely ankylose the joint space, causing pain and/or limiting the range of motion. Patients at high risk for formation of HTB postoperatively include those with previous HTB formation, heterotopic osteoarthritis, and active rheumatoid spondylitis. Patients in these high risk groups have a 63-69% incidence of post-operative HTB formation, usually seen radiographically by 2 months post-operation. From 1980-1986 twenty-nine hips in 28 consecutively treated patients were irradiated post-operatively at the UCLA Center for the Health Sciences. The indication for irradiation was documented HTB formation previously in 26 of the 27 hips presented below. From 1980-1982 patients received 20 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions; from 1982-1986 the dose was reduced to 10 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Twenty-seven hips in 26 patients completed therapy and were available for evaluation, with a minimum of 2 month follow-up, and a median follow-up of 12 months. Three of 27 hips developed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV) post-operatively, whereas 5 of 27 hips developed minor, nonsymptomatic HTB (Brooker grade I). When irradiation was begun by postoperative day 4, 0 of 17 hips formed significant HTB. If irradiation began after post-operative day 4, 3 of 10 hips formed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV). These 3 hips received doses of 10 Gy in one hip and 20 Gy in the other 2 hips. There were no differences in the incidence or severity of side effects in the 10 Gy vs. the 20 Gy treatment groups. Eighteen hips received 10 Gy, 8 hips 20 Gy and, 1 hip 12 Gy. In conclusion, 10 Gy in 5 fractions appears as effective as 20 Gy in 10 fractions at preventing post-operative formation of HTB. For optimal results, treatment should begin as early as possible prior to post-operative day 4.

  7. Congenital hip dysplasia treated by total hip arthroplasty using cementless tapered stem in patients younger than 50 years old: results after 12-years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Faldini, Cesare; Miscione, Maria Teresa; Chehrassan, Mohammadreza; Acri, Francesco; Pungetti, Camilla; d'Amato, Michele; Luciani, Deianira; Giannini, Sandro

    2011-12-01

    Congenital hip dysplasia may lead to severe acetabular and femoral abnormalities that can make total hip arthroplasty a challenging procedure. We assessed a series of patients affected by developmental hip dysplasia treated with total hip arthroplasty using cementless tapered stem and here we report the outcomes at long-term follow-up. Twenty-eight patients (24 women and 4 men) aged between 44 and 50 years (mean 47 years) were observed. Clinical evaluation was rated with the Harris Hip Score. Radiographic evaluation consisted in standard anteroposterior and axial view radiographs of the hip. According to Crowe's classification, 16 hips presented dysplasia grade 1, 14 grade 2, and 4 grade 3. All patients were treated with total hip arthroplasty using a cementless tapered stem (Wagner Cone Prosthesis). Six patients were operated bilaterally, with a totally of 34 hips operated. After surgery, the patients were clinically and radiographically checked at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter until an average follow-up of 12 years (range 10-14 years). Average Harris Hip Score was 56 ± 9 (range 45-69) preoperatively, 90 ± 9 (range 81-100) 12 months after surgery, and 91 ± 8 (range 83-100) at last follow-up. Radiographic evaluation demonstrated excellent osteointegration of the implants. Signs of bone resorption were present in 6 hips, nevertheless no evidence of loosening was observed and none of the implants has been revised. Even in dysplasic femur, the tapered stem allowed adequate stability and orientation of the implant. We consider tapered stem a suitable option for total hip arthroplasty in developmental hip dysplasia, also in case of young patients, thanks to the favourable long-term results.

  8. [Dissociation of the acetabular metallic inlay of a metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Cazenave, A

    2008-06-01

    Total hip arthroplasty was performed in November 2001 in a 30-year-old active patient with degenerative hip disease. A metal-on-metal bearing was used. Follow-up was considered excellent until the development of pain and squeaking at hip mobilization, leading to revision in March 2006. The acetabular metallic inlay of the metal-on-metal insert was found detached from the polyethylene insert; half of the diameter of the neck of the femoral stem was sectioned. Complete revision was performed with an acetabular graft. At one year follow-up, anatomic and functional outcome has been excellent. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this kind of mechanical failure of a metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

  9. [FE-analysis of surface stresses for the tribological system in total hip prostheses].

    PubMed

    Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Helms, Gabriele; Pösse, Olaf; Nolte, Ingo; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andrea; Rittmann, Pia; Windhagen, Henning; Pressel, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    The implantation of a total hip prosthesis is an operation which is performed frequently due to advanced hip joint damage both in humans and in veterinary medicine in dogs. The long-term result of a hip prosthesis is mainly determined by aseptic loosening of the prosthesis; among other causes, abrasion particles of the tribological pairing are responsible for the loosening. For the analysis of the surface stresses with different tribological pairings, a finite element model was generated which was based on the CAD data of a commercial total hip prosthesis. After transmission of a physiological force in the components of the three tribological pairings ceramic/polyethylene, ceramic/ceramic and metal/polyethylene, stresses were calculated. Stresses in the ceramic/ceramic tribological pairings were conspicuously higher than in the other material pairings. In the future adapted prostheses have to be developed that ensure optimal friction and absorption characteristics of the components.

  10. Single-incision anterior approach for total hip arthroplasty on an orthopaedic table.

    PubMed

    Matta, Joel M; Shahrdar, Cambize; Ferguson, Tania

    2005-12-01

    Dislocation remains the leading early complication of total hip arthroplasty; surgical approach and implant positioning have been recognized as factors influencing total hip arthroplasty stability. We describe a total hip arthroplasty technique done through a single, tissue sparing anterior approach that allows implantation of the femoral and acetabular components without detaching or sectioning any of the muscles and tendons around the hip joint. A series of 437 consecutive, unselected patients who had 494 primary total hip arthroplasty surgeries done through an anterior approach on an orthopaedic table from September 1996 to September 2004 was reviewed. There were 54 hybrid and 442 uncemented hips in the 437 patients (57 bilateral). The average patient age was 64 years. Radiographic analysis showed an average abduction angle of 42 degrees , with 96% in the range of 35 degrees to 50 degrees abduction. The average cup anteversion was 19 degrees with 93% within the target range of 10 degrees to 25 degrees . Postoperative leg length discrepancy averaged 3 +/- 2 mm (range, 0-26 mm). Three patients sustained dislocations for an overall dislocation rate of 0.61%, and no patients required revision surgery for recurrent dislocation. There were 17 operative complications, including one deep infection, three wound infections, one transient femoral nerve palsy, three greater trochanter fracture, two femoral shaft fractures four calcar fractures, and three ankle fractures. Operative time averaged 75 minutes (range 40-150 minutes), and the average blood loss was 350 mL (range, 100-1300 mL). The mean hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1-17 days). The anterior approach on the orthopaedic table is a minimally invasive technique applicable to all primary hip patients. This technique allows accurate and reproducible component positioning and leg-length restoration and does not increase the rate of hip dislocation. Therapeutic study, Level IV-1 (case series). See the Guidelines for

  11. Systematic review: Do patient expectations influence treatment outcomes in total knee and total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective This systematic review aims to summarise all the available evidence related to the association between pre-operative patient expectations (outcome expectations, process expectations and self efficacy expectations) and 5 different treatment outcomes (overall improvement, pain, function, stiffness and satisfaction) in patients with total knee or total hip arthroplasty at three different follow-op periods (>6 weeks; >6 weeks- ≤6 months; >6 months). Methods English and Dutch language articles were identified through PubMed, EMBASE.com, PsycINFO, CINAHL and The Cochrane Library from inception to September 2012. Articles assessing the association between pre-operative patient expectations and treatment outcomes for TKA/THA in either adjusted or unadjusted analysis were included. Two reviewers, working independently, determined eligibility, rated methodological quality and extracted data on study design, population, expectation measurements, outcome measurements and strength of the associations. Methodological quality was rated by the same reviewers on a 19 item scale. The scores on the quality assessment were taken into account when drawing final conclusions. Results The search strategy generated 2252 unique references, 18 articles met inclusion criteria. Scores on the methodological quality assessment ranged between 6% and 79%. Great variety was seen in definitions and measurement methods of expectations. No significant associations were found between patient expectations and overall improvement, satisfaction and stiffness. Both significant positive and non-significant associations were found for the association between expectations and pain and function. Conclusions There was no consistency in the association between patients’ pre-operative expectations and treatment outcomes for TKA and THA indentified in this systematic review. There exists a need for a sound theoretical framework underlying the construct of ‘patient expectations’ and consistent use

  12. [Partial exchange in total hip arthroplasty : What can we combine?

    PubMed

    Weber, P; Steinbrück, A; Paulus, A C; Woiczinski, M; Schmidutz, F; Fottner, A; Jansson, V

    2017-02-01

    In case of hip revision arthroplasty, one component (cup/stem) is often well fixed and does not need to be exchanged. The newly implanted component needs to be compatible with the well-fixed implant. The combination of implants from different companies leads to "mix and match" or even mismatch between the implants. The objective of this work was to describe possible combinations including their specifications that need to be considered in partial exchange of hip prostheses. For this purpose the literature, surgical techniques of companies and judgements concerning this topic were analysed and our own results and experiences were included. Partial revision arthroplasty can be challenging and needs to be planned in detail. In case of isolated cup or inlay revision with exchange of a modular head the cone of the stem needs to be identified. A ceramic head may be used in revision with a titanium sleeve even from a different company as long as they are compatible. Patients however need to give their informed consent for this mix and match procedure. This procedure is done frequently and good study results support this, however from a juristic point of view a definite recommendation cannot be given. If the inlay of a cup is replaced, the original inlay should be used. If this is not available anymore, it can be manufactured as a special product in many cases. If this is also not possible, an inlay can also be cemented into a well-fixed cup. Biomechanical and clinical studies support this off-label technique. In case of an isolated exchange of the stem with a ceramic inlay that is retained in a well-fixed cup, the revision stem and ceramic head need to be from the same company as the cup. In case of ceramic fracture, a ceramic head with a titanium sleeve should be combined with a PE or ceramic inlay, a metal head or inlay should never be used.

  13. Does haptic robot-assisted total hip arthroplasty better restore native acetabular and femoral anatomy?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Dimitriou, Dimitris; Li, Jing-Sheng; Kwon, Young-Min

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to evaluate whether total hip arthroplasty (THA) using haptic robot assistance restores hip geometry better than the free-hand technique. Twelve robot-assisted and 14 free-hand unilateral THA patients underwent CT scan for three-dimensional (3D) hip models. The anteversion, inclination and hip joint centre locations of the native and implanted hips in each patient were quantified and compared. Significant increase of combined anteversion by 19.1 ± 11.7° and 23.5 ± 23.6° and decrease of cup inclination by 16.5 ± 6.0° and 10.2 ± 6.8° were observed in the robot-assisted and the free-hand THAs, respectively. Less variation in the difference of the component orientations (max 11.1 vs 18.3°) and the femoral head centre (max 4.5 vs 6.3 mm) were found in the robot-assisted group. This study demonstrated that neither robot-assisted nor free-hand THAs had fully restored native hip geometry. However, the higher precision of the robot-assisted THA suggested that it has potential utility in restoring the native hip geometry. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. [Reflections on a small series of cementless total hip prostheses].

    PubMed

    Troussel, S; Van Innis, F; Thys, R

    1990-01-01

    We report on our series of 48 patients with uncemented hip prostheses, with an average follow-up of 3 years. The clinical results, according to the Merle d'Aubigné's classification, are comparable to those obtained with cemented prostheses except for transitory pain, very often localized to the lateral aspect of the thigh, which seems to be correlated with the bone adaptation to the implant. Radiological findings are valuable in the assessment of long-term results with uncemented prostheses. During the operation, it is of utmost importance that the surgeon obtain a very tight fit of the prosthesis into the bone, which must be confirmed on postoperative X-ray. Under such conditions, the radiological appearance remains the same, showing a condensation line outlining the cup and absence of radiolucent lines along the stem. On the other hand, cortical thickening, bony condensation around the tip of the stem and sclerotic lines are the radiological evidence of bone adaptation to the prosthesis. They are not indicative of a less good result. Finally, radiolucent lines wider than 1 millimeter, extending along the stem, or a progressive sinking of the femoral component are the radiological signs of implant instability. In these rare cases, the prognosis may be compromised.

  15. Emergence of the alumina matrix composite in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Pure alumina ceramic has been in clinical use in orthopaedics since 1971 and, currently, up to 5 million components have been implanted. Alumina offers advantages like stability, biocompatibility and low wear; however, it has limited strength. Applications are limited by design considerations. Engineers in biomaterials have worked on improving the performance of the material by optimising the manufacturing process. To fulfil surgeons’ and patients’ increasingly exacting requirements, ceramists have also developed a new ceramic composite, the alumina matrix composite (AMC). This material combines the great principles of the reinforcement of ceramics with its tribological qualities and presents a better mechanical resistance than alumina. The examination of the tribological situation of AMC, especially under the challenging conditions of hydrothermal ageing, shows the aptitude of this material in wear applications. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved ceramic ball heads articulating against polyethylene inserts. Since its introduction, more than 65,000 ball heads and 40,000 inserts of AMC have been implanted. With a 6-year follow up, no complication has been reported to the manufacturer. Improved toughness and the excellent wear of AMC makes it a potentially more flexible alternative to the more traditional alumina for hip prostheses. PMID:18043920

  16. Center of Mass Compensation during Gait in Hip Arthroplasty Patients: Comparison between Large Diameter Head Total Hip Arthroplasty and Hip Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Bouffard, Vicky; Nantel, Julie; Therrien, Marc; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Lavigne, Martin; Prince, François

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To compare center of mass (COM) compensation in the frontal and sagittal plane during gait in patients with large diameter head total hip arthroplasty (LDH-THA) and hip resurfacing (HR). Design. Observational study. Setting. Outpatient biomechanical laboratory. Participants. Two groups of 12 patients with LDH-THA and HR recruited from a larger randomized study and 11 healthy controls. Interventions. Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures. To compare the distance between the hip prosthetic joint center (HPJC) and the COM. The ratio (RHPJC-COM) and the variability (CVHPJC-COM) were compared between groups. Hip flexor, abductor, and adductor muscle strength was also correlated between groups while radiographic measurements were correlated with the outcome measures. Results. In the frontal plane, HR shows less variability than healthy controls at push-off and toe-off and RHPJC-COM is correlated with the muscle strength ratios (FRABD) at heel contact, maximal weight acceptance, and mid stance. In the sagittal plane, LDH-THA has a higher RHPJC-COM than healthy controls at push-off, and CVHPJC-COM is significantly correlated with FRFLEX. Conclusions. One year after surgery, both groups of patients, LDH-THA and HR, demonstrate minor compensations at some specific instant of the gait cycle, in both frontal and sagittal planes. However, their locomotion pattern is similar to the healthy controls. PMID:22110976

  17. Normalization of widespread pressure pain hypersensitivity after total hip replacement in patients with hip osteoarthritis is associated with clinical and functional improvements.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Villalobos, Pilar; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Navarro-Espigares, Jose L; Hernández-Torres, Elisa; Villalobos, Mercedes; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the relevance of ongoing nociceptive joint inputs to the maintenance of widespread pain hypersensitivity in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) and to determine whether a reversal in the widespread pressure hypersensitivity together with an improvement in pain and function occurs after total hip replacement in these patients. Forty patients with hip OA participated. Twenty patients underwent total hip replacement, and the other 20 patients were assigned to a waiting list. Pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) over the second metacarpal bone and the gluteus medius, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and tibialis anterior muscles were assessed bilaterally with a pressure algometer before and 3 months after total hip replacement surgery. Assessments of pain intensity (by visual analog scale [VAS]), physical function (by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index), and health status (by the Short Form 12 health survey and the EuroQol 5-domain index) were also performed. Patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty exhibited a reduction in widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia (increases in PPTs) over local and distant pain-free areas, as compared with before surgery and as compared with the patients assigned to the waiting list. PPTs were related to hip pain intensity, and significant correlations were found between higher VAS scores and lower average PPTs over all points assessed (-0.409 < r < -0.306, P < 0.05). Patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty exhibited a greater decrease in pain intensity and greater increases in function and health status than did those who were on the waiting list. Changes in the intensity of hip pain were moderately associated with changes in pressure pain sensitivity in the hip arthroplasty group. Normalization of widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia was found after successful hip joint replacement in patients with hip OA. Altered pain processing seems to be driven by ongoing peripheral joint

  18. Impact of declining reimbursement and rising hospital costs on the feasibility of total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boardman, D L; Lieberman, J R; Thomas, B J

    1997-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty, although a very successful clinical treatment, remains an expensive procedure in an era of constrained health care resources. Hospitalization cost, charge, and reimbursement data were compared between all patients who underwent elective, primary, unilateral total hip arthroplasty in 1988 and 1993 at the UCLA Medical Center. Although length of hospitalization decreased by 36%, increases both in unit supply costs and in the intensity of hospital services prevented a statistically significant reduction in total hospitalization cost. Reimbursement declined by 27% after calculating inflation with the Consumer Price Index for Medical Care. Further, the margin by which reimbursement exceeded cost decreased from 66% in 1988 to 8% in 1993. These trends constitute a serious threat to the financial feasibility of total hip arthroplasty.

  19. Abrasive wear and metallosis associated with cross-linked polyethylene in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sean T; Burnell, Colin D; Hedden, David R; Brandt, Jan-M

    2013-01-01

    A 34-year-old female patient received a cobalt-chromium (CoCr) alloy femoral head on cross-linked polyethylene total hip replacement for the revision of her fractured ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacement. The CoCr alloy femoral head became severely worn due to third-body abrasive wear by ceramic particles that could not be removed by synovectomy or irrigation at revision surgery. Ceramic particles were found embedded in the cross-linked polyethylene liner. The CoCr alloy femoral head exhibited a total mass loss of 14.2 g and the generated wear particles triggered metallosis in the patient. The present case study suggests not revising a fractured ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacement with a CoCr alloy femoral head and a cross-linked polyethylene liner to avoid metallosis due to third-body abrasive wear.

  20. Metallosis with pseudotumour formation: Long-term complication following cementless total hip replacement in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Volstad, Nicola J.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Snyder, Laura A.; Meinen, Jeffrey B.; Sample, Susannah J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Case description A 10-year-old female Belgian Teruven dog was presented to our clinic for total hip revision following a diagnosis of implant (cup) failure with metallosis and abdominal pseudotumour formation. The patient had a cementless metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement performed nine years prior to presentation. Clinical findings The clinical findings, including pseudotumour formation locally and at sites distant from the implant and pain associated with the joint replacement, were similar to those described in human patients with this condition. Histopathological, surgical, and radiographic findings additionally supported the diagnosis of metallosis and pseudotumour formation. Treatment and outcome Distant site pseudo tumours were surgically removed and the total hip replacement was explanted due to poor bone quality. The patient recovered uneventfully and has since resumed normal activity. Conclusion In veterinary patients with metal-on-polyethylene total hip implants, cup failure leading to metallosis and pseudotumour formation should be considered as a potential cause of ipsilateral hindlimb lameness, intra-pelvic abdominal tumours, or a combination of both. These clinical findings may occur years after total hip replacement surgery. PMID:27189390

  1. Experimental validation of finite element modelling of a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Wang, Ling; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Fisher, John

    2014-07-01

    Finite element models are becoming increasingly useful tools to conduct parametric analysis, design optimisation and pre-clinical testing for hip joint replacements. However, the verification of the finite element model is critically important. The purposes of this study were to develop a three-dimensional anatomic finite element model for a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement for predicting its contact mechanics and to conduct experimental validation for a simple finite element model which was simplified from the anatomic finite element model. An anatomic modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement model (anatomic model) was first developed and then simplified with reasonable accuracy to a simple modular total hip replacement model (simplified model) for validation. The contact areas on the articulating surface of three polyethylene liners of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement bearings with different clearances were measured experimentally in the Leeds ProSim hip joint simulator under a series of loading conditions and different cup inclination angles. The contact areas predicted from the simplified model were then compared with that measured experimentally under the same conditions. The results showed that the simplification made for the anatomic model did not change the predictions of contact mechanics of the modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement substantially (less than 12% for contact stresses and contact areas). Good agreements of contact areas between the finite element predictions from the simplified model and experimental measurements were obtained, with maximum difference of 14% across all conditions considered. This indicated that the simplification and assumptions made in the anatomic model were reasonable and the finite element predictions from the simplified model were valid.

  2. Late Disassembly of Femoral Head and Neck of A Modular Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Parvej; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Modular total hip arthroplasty system are now widely used, as these components increase the flexibility during primary and revision total hip arthoplasty. But this modularity itself associated with some risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Case Report: We report a case of late disassembly of a primary total arthroplasty in a 42 years old patient five years after the replacement surgery where the femoral head remained in the acetabular socket. Conclusion: Femoral head should be solidly impacted onto the stem and confirm that it has been assembled correctly before reduction. PMID:27299010

  3. Long-term results using the straight tapered femoral cementless hip stem in total hip arthroplasty: a minimum of twenty-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ateschrang, Atesch; Weise, Kuno; Weller, Siegfried; Stöckle, Ulrich; de Zwart, Peter; Ochs, Björn Gunnar

    2014-08-01

    We report the first long-term results of a prospective cohort study after total hip arthroplasty using the cementless Bicontact hip stem. Between 1987 and 1990, 250 total hip arthroplasties in 236 patients were performed using the cementless Bicontact hip stem. The average follow-up was 22.8 years (20.4-24.8) and average age at index surgery was 58.1 years. Eighty-one patients died and 9 were lost to follow-up. We noted 11 stem revisions revealing an overall Kaplan Meier survival rate of 95.0% (CI 95%: 91.1-97.2%). The average Harris Hip Score revealed 81 points (range 24-93). The Bicontact hip stem demonstrated high survival rates despite high ages and osteopenic changes, which are equivalent to other long-term reports of cementless stem fixation.

  4. Compatibility of the totally replaced hip. Reduction of wear by amorphous diamond coating.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, Seppo

    2003-12-01

    Particulate wear debris in totally replaced hips causes adverse local host reactions. The extreme form of such a reaction, aggressive granulomatosis, was found to be a distinct condition and different from simple aseptic loosening. Reactive and adaptive tissues around the totally replaced hip were made of proliferation of local fibroblast like cells and activated macrophages. Methylmethacrylate and high-molecular-weight polyethylene were shown to be essentially immunologically inert implant materials, but in small particulate form functioned as cellular irritants initiating local biological reactions leading to loosening of the implants. Chromium-cobalt-molybdenum is the most popular metallic implant material; it is hard and tough, and the bearings of this metal are partially self-polishing. In total hip implants, prerequisites for longevity of the replaced hip are good biocompatibility of the materials and sufficient tribological properties of the bearings. The third key issue is that the bearing must minimize frictional shear at the prosthetic bone-implant interface to be compatible with long-term survival. Some of the approaches to meet these demands are alumina-on-alumina and metal-on-metal designs, as well as the use of highly crosslinked polyethylene for the acetabular component. In order to avoid the wear-based deleterious properties of the conventional total hip prosthesis materials or coatings, the present work included biological and tribological testing of amorphous diamond. Previous experiments had demonstrated that a high adhesion of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coatings to a substrate can be achieved by using mixing layers or interlayers. Amorphous diamond was found to be biologically inert, and simulator testing indicated excellent wear properties for conventional total hip prostheses, in which either the ball or both bearing surfaces were coated with hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous diamond films. Simulator testing with such total hip prostheses

  5. Improvement in quality of lifesix months after primary total hip arthroplasty in a Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Zubairi, Akbar Jaleel; Bin Mahmood, Syed Usman; Ali, Moiz; Noordin, Shahryar

    2016-10-01

    This prospective, cohort study was carried out to assess the improvement in quality of life of patients undergoing elective primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). It was conducted at the orthopaedic department of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from June 2014 to May 2015, and comprised patients who had undergone THA. A total of 89 patients having a mean age of 41.5±12.0 years with a baseline core outcomes measure index (COMI)-hip score of > 3.5 were included. A decrease in COMI-hip score by >3 points six months post-operatively was considered improvement in quality of life. Patient satisfaction with restriction to squatting was assessed separately. The mean reduction in COMI-hip was 4.9±1.3 with 83(93%) patients experiencing significant improvement in quality of life. Age >50 years and American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) level >III was significantly associated with no improvement in quality of life. Most patients were satisfied with their disability to squat irrespective of COMI-hip score. THA was found to be associated with significant improvement in quality of life and COMI-hip score was applicable in our population despite its inability to assess disability with restriction in squatting.

  6. High prevalence of noise following Delta ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Salo, P P; Honkanen, P B; Ivanova, I; Reito, A; Pajamäki, J; Eskelinen, A

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the short-term functional outcome and prevalence of bearing-specific generation of audible noise in 301 patients (336 hips) operated on with fourth generation (Delta) medium diameter head, ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasties (THAs). There were 191 female (63%) and 110 male patients (37%) with a mean age of 61 years (29 to 78) and mean follow-up of 2.1 years (1.3 to 3.4). Patients completed three questionnaires: Oxford Hip Score (OHS), Research and Development 36-item health survey (RAND-36) and a noise-specific symptom questionnaire. Plain radiographs were also analysed. A total of three hips (0.9%) were revised. There were 52 patients (54 hips, 17%) who reported noise, and in 25 (48%) of them the noise was frequently heard. In the multiple regression analysis, the only independent risk factor for noise was a specific THA brand, with a threefold increased risk (95% confidence intervals 1.39 to 6.45, p = 0.005) of noise compared with the reference THA brand. Patients with noisy hips had lower median OHS (43 versus 46.5, p = 0.002) and their physical functioning (p = 0.021) subscale in RAND-36 was reduced. Noise was surprisingly common in this population. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:44-50. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  7. Large diameter metal on metal total hip replacement for femoral neck fractures with neurological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Jinzhu; Liu, Denghui; Xu, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with Parkinson's disease and poliomyelitis can have a femoral neck fracture; yet, the optimal methods of treatment for these hips remains controversial. Many constrained or semi-constrained prostheses, using constrained liners (CLs) with a locking mechanism to capture the femoral head, were used to treat femoral neck fractures in patients with neurological disorders. We retrospectively studied a group of patients with Parkinson's disease and poliomyelitis who sustained femoral neck fractures and were treated by total hip arthroplasty using an L-MoM prosthesis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 12 hips in 12 patients who underwent large-diameter metal-on-metal (L-MoM) total hip replacement between May 2007 and October 2009. Eight of the 12 patients (8 hips; 66.7%) had Parkinson's disease and 4 patients (4 hips; 33.3%) were affected with poliomyelitis. Results: The followup time was 5.2 years (range 3.6-6.0 years). At the latest followup, all the patients showed satisfactory clinical and radiographic results, with pain relief. No complications, such as dislocation or aseptic loosening occurred. Conclusion: We believe the use of L-MoM can diminish the rate of instability or dislocation, after operation. The L-MoM is an option for patients with Parkinson's disease and poliomyelitis with femoral neck fracture. PMID:25404774

  8. The role of femoral offset and abductor lever arm in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bjørdal, Filip; Bjørgul, Kristian

    2015-12-01

    In order to create a well-functioning total hip arthroplasty (THA), it is important to restore femoral off-set and thus the abductor lever arm. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical effect of increasing the abductor lever arm to and beyond the anatomical native lever arm in minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty performed through a direct anterior approach. We compared the lever arm of the operated hip to the lever arm of the contralateral native hip on radiographs in 148 patients following THA. The patients were divided in two groups based on whether they kept their anatomical lever arm or had an increased lever arm. The clinical outcome was assessed using hip osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS), Harris hip score and UCLA activity score. Patients who kept their anatomical lever arm did not experience a significantly better clinical outcome than the patients with an increased abductor lever arm. We found no significant difference in clinical scores at any of the follow-ups during the first year after THA. The results of this study suggest that an increase in the abductor lever arm does not have major effects on the clinical outcome after THA. To avoid the potential negative effects of decreasing the lever arm, the surgeon should aim for an equal or slightly increased lever arm.

  9. Clinically insignificant trunnionosis in large-diameter metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kendoff, D.; Lausmann, C.; Henckel, J.; Gehrke, T.; Skinner, J.; Hart, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Mechanical wear and corrosion at the head-stem junction of total hip arthroplasties (THAs) (trunnionosis) have been implicated in their early revision, most commonly in metal-on-metal (MOM) hips. We can isolate the role of the head-stem junction as the predominant source of metal release by investigating non-MOM hips; this can help to identify clinically significant volumes of material loss and corrosion from these surfaces. Methods In this study we examined a series of 94 retrieved metal-on-polyethylene (MOP) hips for evidence of corrosion and material loss at the taper junction using a well published visual grading method and an established roundness-measuring machine protocol. Hips were retrieved from 74 male and 20 female patients with a median age of 57 years (30 to 76) and a median time to revision of 215 months (2 to 324). The reasons for revision were loosening of both the acetabular component and the stem (n = 29), loosening of the acetabular component (n = 58) and infection (n = 7). No adverse tissue reactions were reported by the revision surgeons. Results Evidence of corrosion was observed in 55% of hips. The median Goldberg taper corrosion score was 2 (1 to 4) and the annual rate of material loss at the taper was 0.084 mm3/year (0 to 0.239). The median trunnion corrosion score was 1 (1 to 3). Conclusions We have reported a level of trunnionosis for MOP hips with large-diameter heads that were revised for reasons other than trunnionosis, and therefore may be clinically insignificant. Cite this article: H. S. Hothi, D. Kendoff, C. Lausmann, J. Henckel, T. Gehrke, J. Skinner, A. Hart. Clinically insignificant trunnionosis in large-diameter metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:52–56. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.61.BJR-2016-0150.R2. PMID:28108481

  10. One Stage Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty in Siblings with Larsen Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Christian; Waldstein, Wenzel; Lipman, Joseph D; Kasparek, Maximilian F; Boettner, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Background: Larsen syndrome is a rare genetic disorder caused by congenital weakness of the connective tissues. It can present with a variety of musculoskeletal and cardiovascular abnormalities. The current report describes two siblings with Larsen Syndrome who presented with severe bilateral hip arthritis and underwent one stage bilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim was to report on the clinical features of Larsen Syndrome and their implications for total hip replacement surgery. Methods: Two siblings, a 32 year-old female and a 30 year-old male, presented with severe bilateral hip arthritis and a history of Larsen Syndrome. Both patients underwent a detailed, multidisciplinary preoperative medical work up and radiological imaging including computer tomography. All four hips were operated using a cementless primary press-fit cup (Pinnacle, DePuy, Warsaw, IN) and a cementless modular stem system (S-ROM, DePuy, Warsaw, IN) utilizing a posterior approach. Prophylactic cerclages wires were placed proximal to the lesser trochanter before stem preparation and bone grafting of bone cysts in the greater trochanter was performed in all four hips. Results: After 2 years both patients reported significant improvements of function, pain and quality of life. The Oxford hip score improved from preoperative 21 (range 12-24) points up to 39 (range 38-41) points at 2-year follow up. Radiographic follow-up showed good graft incorporation and no signs of implant loosening. Conclusion: The current case report suggests that one stage bilateral THA is a feasible treatment option for young adults with Larsen syndrome and secondary arthritis of the hip. PMID:28144369

  11. Treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures following total hip arthroplasty with femoral component revision.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Berry, Daniel J; Lewallen, David G

    2003-11-01

    Revision total hip arthroplasty is indicated for most periprosthetic fractures that occur around the stem of the femoral implant. The purpose of the present study was to assess the results and complications of revision total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures. We evaluated 118 hips in 116 patients who underwent revision total hip arthroplasty because of an acute Vancouver type-B periprosthetic femoral fracture. The femoral implant used for the revision was a cemented stem in forty-two hips, a proximally porous-coated uncemented stem in twenty-eight, an extensively porous-coated stem in thirty, and an allograft-prosthesis composite or tumor prosthesis in eighteen. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.4 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the probability of survival was 90% at five years and 79.2% at ten years with revision or removal of the femoral implant for any reason as the end point. Sixteen femoral components were rerevised: ten were rerevised because of loosening; three, because of loosening in association with a fracture nonunion; two, because of recurrent dislocation; and one, because of a new periprosthetic fracture. Additionally, six femoral implants were resected because of deep infection (five) or prosthetic loosening (one). Radiographs of the ninety-six hips with a surviving implant showed that twenty-one had evidence of loosening of the femoral implant, four had a nonunion of the femoral fracture, and two had both a nonunion and loosening of the femoral implant. Revision total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of a periprosthetic fracture around the stem of the femoral implant successfully restored function for most patients. The greatest long-term problems were prosthetic loosening and fracture nonunion. Better results were seen when an uncemented, extensively porous-coated stem was used.

  12. Pharmacokinetic model for cefazolin distribution during total hip arthroplasty in dogs.

    PubMed

    Marcellin-Little, D J; Papich, M G; Richardson, D C; DeYoung, D J

    1996-05-01

    To compare cefazolin pharmacokinetics in serum and concentrations in tissues during total hip arthroplasty in dogs with and without hip dysplasia, and to calculate the optimal dosage of cefazolin for prophylactic use during total hip arthroplasty. 10 dogs with hip dysplasia and 3 clinically normal dogs. Blood samples and tissue specimens from the coxofemoral joint capsule, acetabulum, and femur were obtained during unilateral total hip arthroplasty. Cefazolin concentrations in serum and tissue specimen supernatant were determined, using high-performance liquid chromatography, for use in pharmacokinetic analysis. Mathematical simulation of serum cefazolin concentration was used to to predict the optimal dose. Mean pharmacokinetic constants (SEM) were 0.146 (0.013) min-1 for alpha, 4.47 min for t1/2 alpha 0.015 (0.004) min-1 for beta, 46.83 min for t1/2 beta. Significant different was not detected for cefazolin distribution and elimination between dogs with and without hip dysplasia. Additional, significant difference was not observed in pharmacokinetic parameters describing distribution and elimination between the first and second doses of cefazolin. The predicted optimal dosage regimen was 8 mg/kg of body weight, i.v. every hour or mg/kg, i.v. every 2 hours. For prophylactic i.v. treatment during total hip arthroplasty, use of cefazolin at a dosage of 8 mg/kg every hour or 22 mg/kg every 2 hours should maintain serum cefazolin concentrations at least 10x the minimum inhibitory concentration for 3 to 4 hours.

  13. Alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasty. A five-year minimum follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong Joon; Kim, Young-Min; Yoon, Kang Sup; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Song, Won Seok; Kim, Hee Joong

    2005-03-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic couplings are attractive alternative bearing surfaces that have been reported to eliminate or reduce problems related to polyethylene wear debris. Disappointing experiences with alumina ceramic bearings in the past have led to many improvements in the manufacture and design of ceramic implants. The purpose of the present study was to report the results of contemporary alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasties with regard to wear, osteolysis, and fracture of the ceramic after a minimum duration of follow-up of five years. We evaluated the results of a consecutive series of 100 primary alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasties that had been performed with use of a metal-backed socket and a cementless stem in eighty-four patients. All of the patients were sixty-five years of age or younger (mean age, forty-one years), and a single surgeon performed all of the procedures. After a minimum duration of follow-up of sixty months, one patient (one hip) had died and four patients (six hips) had been lost to follow-up, leaving a total of seventy-nine patients (ninety-three hips) available for study. All of these patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically with special attention to wear, periprosthetic osteolysis, and ceramic failure. The mean Harris hip score was 97 points at the time of the latest follow-up evaluation. All prostheses demonstrated radiographic evidence of bone ingrowth. No implant was loose radiographically, and no implant was revised. Ceramic wear was not detectable in the thirty-seven hips in which the femoral head could be differentiated from the cup on radiographs. Periprosthetic osteolysis was not observed in any hip. A fracture of the alumina femoral head and a peripheral chip fracture of the alumina insert occurred in one hip following a motor-vehicle accident. The results of contemporary alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasty with a metal-backed socket and a cementless stem were encouraging after a minimum

  14. Total Hip Replacement for the Treatment of End Stage Arthritis of the Hip: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Grove, Amy; Freeman, Karoline; Court, Rachel; Johnson, Samantha; Connock, Martin; Clarke, Aileen; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Evolvements in the design, fixation methods, size, and bearing surface of implants for total hip replacement (THR) have led to a variety of options for healthcare professionals to consider. The need to determine the most optimal combinations of THR implant is warranted. This systematic review evaluated the clinical effectiveness of different types of THR used for the treatment of end stage arthritis of the hip. Methods A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in major health databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews published from 2008 onwards comparing different types of primary THR in patients with end stage arthritis of the hip were included. Results Fourteen RCTs and five systematic reviews were included. Patients experienced significant post-THR improvements in Harris Hip scores, but this did not differ between impact types. There was a reduced risk of implant dislocation after receiving a larger femoral head size (36 mm vs. 28 mm; RR = 0.17, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.78) or cemented cup (vs. cementless cup; pooled odds ratio: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.89). Recipients of cross-linked vs. conventional polyethylene cup liners experienced reduced femoral head penetration and revision. There was no impact of femoral stem fixation and cup shell design on implant survival rates. Evidence on mortality and complications (aseptic loosening, femoral fracture) was inconclusive. Conclusions The majority of evidence was inconclusive due to poor reporting, missing data, or uncertainty in treatment estimates. The findings warrant cautious interpretation given the risk of bias (blinding, attrition), methodological limitations (small sample size, low event counts, short follow-up), and poor reporting. Long-term pragmatic RCTs are needed to allow for more definitive conclusions. Authors are encouraged to specify the minimal clinically important difference and power calculation for their primary outcome(s) as well CONSORT, PRISMA and STROBE

  15. Leg length discrepancy after total hip arthroplasty: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Desai, Aravind S; Dramis, Asterios; Board, Tim N

    2013-12-01

    Discrepancy of leg length is often considered to be a problem after total hip replacement and can adversely affect an otherwise excellent outcome. Furthermore, it has been associated with patient dissatisfaction and remains one of the most common reasons for litigation against the orthopedic community. As a consequence of the need to equalize leg length, several authors have sought to validate methods of minimizing limb length discrepancy based on preoperative planning with preoperative radiological templates or intraoperative methods of measurement. In this article, we present a review of the limb length discrepancy in total hip arthroplasty, its implications and several techniques to avoid it. We recommend that a combination of the above mentioned methods will give the best chance for the surgeon to minimise the risk of leg length discrepancy following total hip replacement.

  16. Total hip and knee replacement in a patient with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kimberly A; Fisher, David A

    2014-04-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a complex disorder that leads to joint stiffness and deformities in 2 or more joints in afflicted children. Late manifestations of this disorder can include secondary degeneration of the abnormal joints with arthritic symptoms of pain and loss of function. There are few reports in the orthopedic literature on the use of total joint arthroplasty to improve the pain and function in patients with arthrogryposis. This case report presents one patient who underwent bilateral total hip and total knee arthroplasties for deteriorating function and pain in her hips and knees secondary to the congenital deformities created by arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. We discuss the intraoperative difficulties and techniques used to reconstruct her hips and knees, as well as the potential indications for joint arthroplasty in this challenging group of patients.

  17. Association between trochanteric bursitis, osteoarthrosis and total hip arthroplasty☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Loss, Felipe; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro; Furian, Roque; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Zanatta, Júlia Mazzuchello; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes

    2014-01-01

    Objective this was an epidemiological study on trochanteric bursitis at the time of performing total hip arthroplasty. Methods sixty-two sequential patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthrosis, without any previous history of trochanteric bursitis, were evaluated. The bursas were collected and evaluated histologically. Results there were 35 female patients (56.5%) and 27 male patients (43.5%), with a mean age of 65 years (±11). Trochanteric bursitis was conformed histologically in nine patients (14.5%), of whom six were female (66.7%) and three were male (33.3%). Conclusions 14.5% of the bursas analyzed presented inflammation at the time that the primary total hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthrosis was performed, and the majority of the cases of bursitis were detected in female patients. PMID:26229811

  18. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon’s preference. PMID:27329869

  19. Third-generation ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surfaces in revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun-Dong; Kamdar, Rutuj; Yoo, Je-Hyun; Hur, Mina; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2009-12-01

    With an increase of revision total hip arthroplasty (THA), the choice of bearing surface becomes more important. Wear debris by conventional metal-on-polyethylene articulations may cause extensive osteolysis, especially in young patients. We analyzed the clinical and radiographic outcomes after revision THA using third-generation ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surfaces in 42 hips. The mean age of the patients was 48.8 years (32-59 years), and the mean duration of follow-up monitoring was 5.4 years (3.2-8.0 years). At final follow-up examination, the average Harris Hip Score was 91.3. Although minor complications were observed in 6 hips (14.3%), no hips required additional revision surgery. No hip showed radiolucent lines, acetabular cup migration, or osteolysis. Our data show that clinical and radiographic outcomes after revision THA using third-generation ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surfaces are favorable. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surfaces can be preferentially considered for revision THA, especially in young patients. Further studies with long-term follow-up data are warranted.

  20. Similar Wear in Total Hip Arthroplasties with Metallic or Zirconia Femoral Heads

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Randy M.; González Della Valle, Alejandro; Peterson, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic femoral heads have been used in an attempt at reducing polyethylene wear of total hip arthroplasties. Clinical results with zirconia femoral heads have been mixed. This study was undertaken to compare the polyethylene wear and incidence of periprosthetic osteolysis in total hip replacements performed using a 28-mm zirconia versus a 28-mm cobalt chromium femoral head. Thirty-five hips with a 28-mm cobalt chromium head and 68 hips with a 28-mm zirconia head were evaluated after a minimum follow-up of 2 years (average, 4.0 years; range, 2.0 to 9.1 years). A monoblock acetabular component was used in all patients. Polyethylene wear was measured in serial radiographs from 58 of the hips utilizing a computer-assisted vector wear technique. Periacetabular osteolysis developed in three patients (two with a zirconia head and one with a cobalt chromium head). The total wear and the annual wear rate were 0.48 mm and 0.11 mm/year for the cobalt chromium heads and 0.53 mm and 0.14 mm/year for the zirconia heads, respectively. We found no benefit with respect to the rate of polyethylene wear or incidence of osteolysis with the use of zirconia femoral heads. PMID:18815852

  1. AQUILA: assessment of quality in lower limb arthroplasty. An expert Delphi consensus for total knee and total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pijls, Bart G; Dekkers, Olaf M; Middeldorp, Saskia; Valstar, Edward R; van der Heide, Huub J L; Van der Linden-Van der Zwaag, Henrica M J; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2011-07-22

    In the light of both the importance and large numbers of case series and cohort studies (observational studies) in orthopaedic literature, it is remarkable that there is currently no validated measurement tool to appraise their quality. A Delphi approach was used to develop a checklist for reporting quality, methodological quality and generalizability of case series and cohorts in total hip and total knee arthroplasty with a focus on aseptic loosening. A web-based Delphi was conducted consisting of two internal rounds and three external rounds in order to achieve expert consensus on items considered relevant for reporting quality, methodological quality and generalizability. The internal rounds were used to construct a master list. The first external round was completed by 44 experts, 35 of them completed the second external round and 33 of them completed the third external round. Consensus was reached on an 8-item reporting quality checklist, a 6-item methodological checklist and a 22-item generalizability checklist. Checklist for reporting quality, methodological quality and generalizability for case series and cohorts in total hip and total knee arthroplasty were successfully created through this Delphi. These checklists should improve the accuracy, completeness and quality of case series and cohorts regarding total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

  2. [Gluteal compartment syndrome after total hip replacement. A presentation of two cases].

    PubMed

    Villalba, J; Solernou, X

    2013-01-01

    Many postoperative complications have been described after a total hip arthroplasty, with early and acute, as well as late, complications being reported. Two cases of compartment syndrome of the buttock are described following a hybrid total hip arthroplasty (cemented stem and press-fit and screwed acetabulum) performed on 2 patients of 60 and 68 years old, both diagnosed and treated 24-48 hours after the surgery. Both cases had a primary prosthesis with no previous significant pathological findings. This condition is still rare, and few cases have been described at the medical literature.

  3. Hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Soon; Diwanji, Sanket R; Kim, Hyung Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo; Yoon, Taek Rim

    2009-08-01

    Iliopsoas bursitis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of total hip arthroplasty and is usually associated with polyethylene wear. Here, the authors report a case of hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating an otherwise well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic arthroplasty performed by minimal invasive modified 2-incision technique. The bursitis in turn resulted in femoral nerve palsy and femoral vein compression. In this report, there was no evidence to support that the bursitis was due to an inflammatory response to ceramic wear particles or any other wear particles originating from the total hip arthroplasty.

  4. Total Hip Arthroplasty around the Inception of the Interface Bioactive Bone Cement Technique

    PubMed Central

    Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Background To augment cement-bone fixation, Dr. Hironobu Oonishi attempted additional physicochemical bonding through interposition of osteoconductive crystal hydroxyapatite (HA) granules at the cement-bone interface in 1982. He first used the interface bioactive bone cement (IBBC) technique in 12 selected patients (12 hips) in 1982 (first stage) and followed them for 2 years. In 1985, the technique was applied in 25 total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients (second stage) and the effects were investigated by comparing the side with the IBBC technique and the other side without the IBBC technique. He has employed this technique in all THA patients since 1987 (third stage). Methods In the IBBC technique, HA granules (2 to 3 g) were smeared on the bone surface just before the acetabular and femoral components were cemented. In the first stage, 12 hips were operated using the IBBC technique in 1982. In the second stage, THA was performed without the IBBC technique on one side and with the IBBC technique on the other side within 1 year in 25 patients. In the third stage, THA was performed with the IBBC technique in 285 hips in 1987. Results In the first stage patients, implant loosening was not detected at 30 years after operation. In the second stage patients, revision was required in 7 hips without the IBBC technique due to cup loosening (5 hips) and stem loosening (2 hips), whereas no hip was revised after THA with the IBBC technique at 26 years after operation. In the third stage patients, the incidence of radiolucent lines and osteolysis was very few at 25 years after operation. Conclusions The long-term follow-up of THA performed around the inception of the IBBC technique has revealed low incidences of radiolucent lines, osteolysis, and revision surgery. PMID:27583104

  5. Hip fracture evaluation with alternatives of total hip arthroplasty versus hemiarthroplasty (HEALTH): protocol for a multicentre randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Mohit; Devereaux, P J; Einhorn, Thomas A; Thabane, Lehana; Schemitsch, Emil H; Koval, Kenneth J; Frihagen, Frede; Poolman, Rudolf W; Tetsworth, Kevin; Guerra-Farfán, Ernesto; Madden, Kim; Sprague, Sheila; Guyatt, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hip fractures are a leading cause of mortality and disability worldwide, and the number of hip fractures is expected to rise to over 6 million per year by 2050. The optimal approach for the surgical management of displaced femoral neck fractures remains unknown. Current evidence suggests the use of arthroplasty; however, there is lack of evidence regarding whether patients with displaced femoral neck fractures experience better outcomes with total hip arthroplasty (THA) or hemiarthroplasty (HA). The HEALTH trial compares outcomes following THA versus HA in patients 50 years of age or older with displaced femoral neck fractures. Methods and analysis HEALTH is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial where 1434 patients, 50 years of age or older, with displaced femoral neck fractures from international sites are randomised to receive either THA or HA. Exclusion criteria include associated major injuries of the lower extremity, hip infection(s) and a history of frank dementia. The primary outcome is unplanned secondary procedures and the secondary outcomes include functional outcomes, patient quality of life, mortality and hip-related complications—both within 2 years of the initial surgery. We are using minimisation to ensure balance between intervention groups for the following factors: age, prefracture living, prefracture functional status, American Society for Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class and centre number. Data analysts and the HEALTH Steering Committee are blinded to the surgical allocation throughout the trial. Outcome analysis will be performed using a χ2 test (or Fisher's exact test) and Cox proportional hazards modelling estimate. All results will be presented with 95% CIs. Ethics and dissemination The HEALTH trial has received local and McMaster University Research Ethics Board (REB) approval (REB#: 06-151). Results Outcomes from the primary manuscript will be disseminated through publications in academic journals and presentations

  6. Hip fracture evaluation with alternatives of total hip arthroplasty versus hemiarthroplasty (HEALTH): protocol for a multicentre randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Mohit; Devereaux, P J; Einhorn, Thomas A; Thabane, Lehana; Schemitsch, Emil H; Koval, Kenneth J; Frihagen, Frede; Poolman, Rudolf W; Tetsworth, Kevin; Guerra-Farfán, Ernesto; Madden, Kim; Sprague, Sheila; Guyatt, Gordon

    2015-02-13

    Hip fractures are a leading cause of mortality and disability worldwide, and the number of hip fractures is expected to rise to over 6 million per year by 2050. The optimal approach for the surgical management of displaced femoral neck fractures remains unknown. Current evidence suggests the use of arthroplasty; however, there is lack of evidence regarding whether patients with displaced femoral neck fractures experience better outcomes with total hip arthroplasty (THA) or hemiarthroplasty (HA). The HEALTH trial compares outcomes following THA versus HA in patients 50 years of age or older with displaced femoral neck fractures. HEALTH is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial where 1434 patients, 50 years of age or older, with displaced femoral neck fractures from international sites are randomised to receive either THA or HA. Exclusion criteria include associated major injuries of the lower extremity, hip infection(s) and a history of frank dementia. The primary outcome is unplanned secondary procedures and the secondary outcomes include functional outcomes, patient quality of life, mortality and hip-related complications-both within 2 years of the initial surgery. We are using minimisation to ensure balance between intervention groups for the following factors: age, prefracture living, prefracture functional status, American Society for Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class and centre number. Data analysts and the HEALTH Steering Committee are blinded to the surgical allocation throughout the trial. Outcome analysis will be performed using a χ(2) test (or Fisher's exact test) and Cox proportional hazards modelling estimate. All results will be presented with 95% CIs. The HEALTH trial has received local and McMaster University Research Ethics Board (REB) approval (REB#: 06-151). Outcomes from the primary manuscript will be disseminated through publications in academic journals and presentations at relevant orthopaedic conferences. We will communicate trial

  7. Delayed catastrophic failure of a ceramic head in hybrid total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Imran; Bhatnagar, Gauraang; Atrah, Salah

    2009-01-01

    Catastrophic failure of ceramic implants is a rare but known complication of total hip arthroplasty where such implants have been used. We report an unusual case of a 67-year-old woman who underwent bilateral hybrid total hip arthroplasty using ceramic-on-polyethylene bearings. Seven years later, she presented with left-sided hip pain in the absence of any trauma. She was found to have a completely shattered ceramic head, with subsequent erosion of the metal taper of the femoral stem through the polyethylene insert, its metal shell, and into the pelvis. This complicated subsequent revision surgery, as removal of the acetabular component resulted in a large pelvic defect that required an acetabular reinforcement ring and bone grafting. She recovered well after the revision procedure.

  8. Tribological investigations of the wear couple alumina-CFRP for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Früh, H J; Willmann, G

    1998-07-01

    Wear debris is the main reason for aseptic loosening in total hip. Most troublesome is the wear of polyethylene cups. Ceramic femoral heads were introduced about 20 years ago. The combination ceramic-on-polyethylene reduces the wear rate and the loosening rate. But cups of polyethylene are still the weakest link in a hip prosthesis. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) was proposed as an alternative for polyethylene. Various test were performed to study the combination metal-on-CFRP, zirconia-on-CFRP, and alumina-on-CFRP. The simulator tests showed that the wear rate of alumina-on-CFRP is in the order of 1-3 microm per year. Based on investigation of retrieved implants the wear rate is 6.3 microm per year. Based on these results the combination alumina femoral heads (Biolox-forte) and CFRP cups (Caproman) could be approved for total hip replacement.

  9. Comparison of total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis of mechanical and rheumatologic causes

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Leonhardt, Nathalia Zalc; Fernandes, Laura Fillipini Lorimier; Leonhardt, Marcos de Camargo; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the use of uncemented implants in total hip arthroplasty in patients with rheumathologic diseases and mechanical osteoarthrosis. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 196 patients who were operated by the Hip and Arthroplasty Surgery Group of the IOT-HCFMUSP between 2005 and 2009. Patients were divided into two groups: mechanical causes (165 patients) and rheumathologic causes (31 patients). Groups were compared between each other in age, gender and follow-up time. Osseointegration rate and percentage of failure in arthroplasty were evaluated. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in osseointegration rates (in both femoral and acetabular components) in both groups. The rates of revision surgery and implant survival also did not show statistically significant differences. Conclusion: The use of uncemented total hip arthroplasty did not show worse results in rheumathologic patients. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Case Control Study. PMID:24644419

  10. Optimal sterilization method for the zirconia/alumina composites used for total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kwang Woo; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Yoon, Kang Sup; Kim, Hee Joong

    2009-08-01

    Zirconia/alumina composite ceramics have been recently developed for total hip arthroplasty because of their excellent mechanical properties and tribologic characteristics. All such materials used clinically must be easily sterilized, but no report has been issued concerning methods for sterilizing zirconia/alumina composite hip prostheses. Here, we show that 50 kGy of gamma irradiation effectively sterilizes both the surfaces and interiors of these materials. In addition, it was found that the commonly used ethylene oxide and 25-kGy gamma irradiation sterilization methods inadequately sterilize deep inside the femoral head. Moreover, no changes in the chemical or mechanical properties of the composites were noted after exposure to 50-kGy gamma irradiation. We suggest that 50-kGy gamma irradiation is an optimal sterilization method for zirconia/alumina composite total hip replacements.

  11. Highly cross-linked polyethylene bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Atienza, Cesar; Maloney, William J

    2008-01-01

    Polyethylene wear-induced osteolysis is the most significant primary factor limiting the life span of total joint arthroplasty. To reduce ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) particulate wear debris, highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXPE) bearings have been introduced in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In vitro hip simulator wear studies with HXPE have demonstrated a decrease in volumetric wear at the hip by 42% to 100% when compared with conventional metal-on-polyethylene bearings. Early to intermediate clinical results suggest that the in vivo wear properties of HXPE products are superior to those of conventional UHMWPE. Second-generation HXPE materials that utilize alternate cross-linking and free radical quenching techniques have been developed and propose to further minimize wear and oxidation.

  12. Cemented Müller straight stem total hip replacement: 18 year survival, clinical and radiological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Vasileios S; Korres, Demetrios; Lallos, Stergios; Mavrogenis, Andreas; Lazarettos, Ioannis; Sourlas, Ioannis; Efstathopoulos, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To present the 18 year survival and the clinical and radiological outcomes of the Müller straight stem, cemented, total hip arthroplasty (THA). METHODS: Between 1989 and 2007, 176 primary total hip arthroplasties in 164 consecutive patients were performed in our institution by the senior author. All patients received a Müller cemented straight stem and a cemented polyethylene liner. The mean age of the patients was 62 years (45-78). The diagnosis was primary osteoarthritis in 151 hips, dysplasia of the hip in 12 and subcapital fracture of the femur in 13. Following discharge, serial follow-up consisted of clinical evaluation based on the Harris Hip Score and radiological assessment. The survival of the prosthesis using revision for any reason as an end-point was calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: Twenty-four (15%) patients died during the follow-up study, 6 (4%) patients were lost, while the remaining 134 patients (141 hips) were followed-up for a mean of 10 years (3-18 years). HSS score at the latest follow-up revealed that 84 hips (59.5%) had excellent results, 30 (22.2%) good, 11 (7.8%) fair and 9 (6.3%) poor. There were 3 acetabular revisions due to aseptic loosening. Six (4.2%) stems were diagnosed as having radiographic definitive loosening; however, only 1 was revised. 30% of the surviving stems showed no radiological changes of radiolucency, while 70% showed some changes. Survival of the prosthesis for any reason was 96% at 10 years and 81% at 18 years. CONCLUSION: The 18 year survival of the Müller straight stem, cemented THA is comparable to those of other successful cemented systems. PMID:24147267

  13. Anxiety and depressive symptoms before and after total hip and knee arthroplasty: a prospective multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Duivenvoorden, T; Vissers, M M; Verhaar, J A N; Busschbach, J J V; Gosens, T; Bloem, R M; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; Reijman, M

    2013-12-01

    A subset of patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has suboptimal postoperative results in terms of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs), and psychological factors could contribute to these suboptimal results. To examine the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients undergoing primary THA or TKA preoperatively and postoperatively, and the relationship between preoperative anxiety and depressive symptoms on PROs of THA and TKA. In this prospective study patients were measured preoperatively, and 3 and 12 months postoperatively. Patients filled in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) or Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) and a satisfaction questionnaire. Data were obtained from 149 hip and 133 knee patients. The prevalence of anxiety symptoms decreased significantly from 27.9% to 10.8% 12 months postoperatively in hip patients, and from 20.3% to 14.8% in knee patients. Depressive symptoms decreased significantly from 33.6% to 12.1% 12 months postoperatively in hip patients, and from 22.7% to 11.7% in knee patients. In hip and knee patients, preoperative depressive symptoms predicted smaller changes in different HOOS or KOOS subscales and patients were less satisfied 12 months postoperatively. Preoperatively, the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms was high. At 3 and 12 months postoperatively, the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms was decreased in both hip and knee patients. However, patients with preoperative anxiety and depressive symptoms had worse PROs 3 and 12 months after THA and TKA and were less satisfied than patients without anxiety or depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. What are the risk factors for infection in hemiarthroplasties and total hip arthroplasties?

    PubMed

    Cordero-Ampuero, José; de Dios, Marisol

    2010-12-01

    Late infection is the second most frequent early complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and the most frequent after hemiarthroplasty. Known risk factors for infection after THA include posttraumatic osteoarthritis, previous surgery, chronic liver disease, corticoid therapy, and excessive surgical time. However, risk factors for hemiarthroplasty are not clearly established. We therefore determined the preoperative and intraoperative risk factors for late infection (more than 3 months after surgery) in patients with hemiarthroplasties and THAs. We retrospectively compared 47 patients with a hip arthroplasty (23 hemiarthroplasties, 24 total hip arthroplasties) and late infection with 200 randomly-selected patients with primary arthroplasty (100 hemiarthroplasties, 100 total hip arthroplasties) during the same time period of time without any infection during followup. Potential risk factors were identified from medical records. Minimum followup was 12 months (mean, 27 months; range, 12-112 months) for the study group and 18 months (mean, 84 months; range, 18-144 months) for the control group. The following factors were more frequent in late infected hemiarthroplasties: female gender; previous surgery; obesity (body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2)); glucocorticoid and immunosuppressant treatments; prolonged surgical time; inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis; prolonged wound drainage; hematoma; dislocation; and cutaneous, urinary, and/or abdominal infections. The following were more frequent in infected total hip arthroplasties: posttraumatic osteoarthritis; previous surgery; glucocorticoids; chronic liver disease; alcohol and intravenous drug abuse; prolonged surgical time; prolonged wound drainage; dislocation; subsequent surgery; and cutaneous, urinary, respiratory and abdominal infections. Diabetes did not appear to be a risk factor. Our data suggest there are specific risk factors for infection in hemiarthroplasties. The major risk factors for late

  15. Navigated Acetabular Cup Fixation for Acetabular Deformity or Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Yu, Jung Jin; Seo, Hyo-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of navigated acetabular cup fixation for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods This study enrolled 28 patients with at least 12 months' follow-up. The safe zone of the acetabular cup was defined as 40°±10°in inclination and 15°±10°in anteversion. The authors used the navigation and radiographic data to determine whether the acetabular cup was located within the safe zone or not. To evaluate the clinical outcomes, preoperative and last follow-up Harris hip scores were checked, and the occurrence of complications was evaluated. Results According to the navigation data, the mean inclination and anteversion were 38.5°±4.7°(range, 32°-50°) and 16.6°±4.0°(range, 8°-23°), respectively. According to the radiographic data the mean inclination and anteversion were 40.5°±4.6°(range, 32°-50°) and 19.4°±4.2°(range, 8°-25°), respectively. In both cases, all values were within the safe zone. Harris hip score was improved in all patients from preoperative 52.3±14.4 points (range, 29-87 points) to 88.0±9.0 points (range, 65-99 points) at the last follow-up. There was no dislocation or loosening of both cases. Conclusion Navigated acetabular cup fixation is a useful technique for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty because it prevents the malposition and related complications. PMID:27536573

  16. Lifestyle and health-related quality of life in Asian patients with total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kimie; Xia, Zhenlan; Liu, Xueqin; Mawatari, Masaaki; Makimoto, Kiyoko

    2014-09-01

    Total hip arthroplasty reduces pain and restores physical function in patients with hip joint problems. This study examined lifestyle and health-related quality of life before and after total hip arthroplasty in Japanese and Chinese patients. Two hospitals in China recruited 120 patients and 120 Japanese patients matched by age and operative status were drawn from a prospective cohort database. Oxford Hip Score, EuroQol, and characteristics of Asian lifestyle and attitudes toward the operation were assessed. There were no differences between patients from the two countries in quality-of-life-scale scores: postoperative patients had significantly better quality-of-life scores than preoperative patients in both countries. In China, patients who reported that living at home was inconvenient had significantly worse Oxford Hip Scores than those who did not. Mean scores for anxiety items concerning possible dislocation and durability of the implant were significantly higher in Japanese than in Chinese subjects. Our findings suggest that providing information about housing conditions and lifestyles would result in improved quality of life and reduced anxiety in patients with implanted joints. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Early failure of total hip replacements implanted at distant hospitals to reduce waiting lists.

    PubMed Central

    Ciampolini, Jac; Hubble, Matthew J. W.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: In the years 1990-1993, in an effort to reduce waiting-list time, a small number of patients were sent from Exeter to hospitals in London to undergo elective total hip replacement. No medium- or long-term follow-up was arranged. Our aim was to audit the outcome of these hip replacements. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Review of the records of the referring medical practices, Regional Health Authority, local orthopaedic hospital and the distant centres at which the surgery was performed identified 31 cases. A total of 27 hip replacements in 24 patients were available for clinical and radiological review. RESULTS: 12 (44%) hips have so far required revision surgery, at a mean of 6.5 years. Of these, three (11%) have been for deep infection. A further three hips (11%) are radiologically loose and are being closely monitored. Two patients (7%) suffered permanent sciatic nerve palsy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients whose surgery was performed locally over a similar time period have a published failure rate of only 4.9%. This difference is highly statistically significant (P < 0.001). The causes for such a difference in outcome were analysed and include surgical technique, implant selection and absence of follow-up. In the light of this evidence, we would like to urge the government to address waiting list problems by investing in the local infrastructure. Expanding those facilities where properly audited and fully accountable surgeons operate must be the way forward. PMID:15720905

  18. Effects of the Length of Stay on the Cost of Total Knee and Total Hip Arthroplasty from 2002 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Ilda B; Martin, Brook I; Moschetti, Wayne E; Jevsevar, David S

    2017-03-01

    Utilization of total knee and hip arthroplasty has greatly increased in the past decade in the United States; these are among the most expensive procedures in patients with Medicare. Advances in surgical techniques, anesthesia, and care pathways decrease hospital length of stay. We examined how trends in hospital cost were altered by decreases in length of stay. Procedure, demographic, and economic data were collected on 6.4 million admissions for total knee arthroplasty and 2.8 million admissions for total hip arthroplasty from 2002 to 2013 using the National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample, a component of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Trends in mean hospital costs and their association with length of stay were estimated using inflation-adjusted, survey-weighted generalized linear regression models, controlling for patient demographic characteristics and comorbidity. From 2002 to 2013, the length of stay decreased from a mean time of 4.06 to 2.97 days for total knee arthroplasty and from 4.06 to 2.75 days for total hip arthroplasty. During the same time period, the mean hospital cost for total knee arthroplasty increased from $14,988 (95% confidence interval [CI], $14,927 to $15,049) in 2002 to $22,837 (95% CI, $22,765 to $22,910) in 2013 (an overall increase of $7,849 or 52.4%). The mean hospital cost for total hip arthroplasty increased from $15,792 (95% CI, $15,706 to $15,878) in 2002 to $23,650 (95% CI, $23,544 to $23,755) in 2013 (an increase of $7,858 or 49.8%). If length of stay were set at the 2002 mean, the growth in cost for total knee arthroplasty would have been 70.8% instead of 52.4% as observed, and the growth in cost for total hip arthroplasty would have been 67.4% instead of 49.8% as observed. Hospital costs for joint replacement increased from 2002 to 2013, but were attenuated by reducing inpatient length of stay. With demographic characteristics showing an upward trend in the utilization of joint arthroplasty, including a shift

  19. Long-Term Outcome after Rehabilitation of Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty in Renal Transplant Recipient – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Erieta Nikolikj; Adamov, Aleksandar; Koevska, Valentina; Mitrevska, Biljana; Gacevikj, Ivan; Agushi, Arsim

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Total hip replacement is generally proposed for renal transplant patients with avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to report the long-term outcome after rehabilitation of bilateral total hip arthroplasty in a patient with renal transplantation suffering from avascular osteonecrosis of the both femoral heads. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The patient S.D, 49 years old at follow-up. Few months after renal transplantation, the patient had got avascular osteonecrosis of both femoral head. One year after transplantation the total hip arthroplasty for both hip joints were performed. Three years later repeat total hip arthroplasty surgery for left hip was performed. After any surgery intervention the patient was referred for inpatient rehabilitation. For clinical assessment the clinical findings and Harris Hip Score have been used. The rehabilitation program consisted of exercises, occupational therapy, and patient education. RESULTS: After any rehabilitation treatment the patient had improvement of clinical findings. At follow-up assessment outcome for both hip function was good - Harris Hip Score was 81 points. CONCLUSION: Rehabilitation is integral part of multidisciplinary treatment of renal transplant recipient after total hip arthroplasty. Regular exercise training of these patients is very important for improving of their long-term outcome. PMID:27275350

  20. ANALYSIS ON QUALITY OF LIFE OF PATIENTS WITH OSTEOARTHROSIS UNDERGOING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY.

    PubMed

    de Araújo Loures, Elmanq; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the health-related quality of life among patients affected by hip osteoarthrosis who were treated by means of total hip arthroplasty. A cohort of 38 patients operated by a single surgeon in a regional referential teaching hospital during the year 2010 was prospectively studied and followed up for at least six months until they had achieved satisfactory rehabilitation. Each patient gave responses to the SF-36 form immediately before the operation and six months later and the Harris Hip Score was obtained at the same time. The pre and postoperative results were analyzed and compared with the literature. The pre and postoperative SF-36 results were as follows: physical function: 13.4-53.7; role physical: 9.21-48.0; body pain: 23.1-62.6; general health: 54.2-71.3; vitality: 40.3-69.9; social function: 40.8-74.3; role emotional: 23.7-64.9; and mental health: 52.6-80.4. The Harris Hip Score went from 36.1 to 92.1, on average. All the results were statistically significant (p < 0.001). The combination of two scales was shown to be valuable in identifying bias and gave greater reliability for understanding the different variables. The study showed that there was a significant improvement in health-related quality of life among patients affected by osteoarthrosis of different etiologies who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Health-related quality of life evaluations cannot replace clinical evaluations provided by specific instruments and physicians' experience but can add important data through giving value to patients' sets of expectations regarding medical treatment. Moreover, such evaluations can be considered to be an efficient tool for analyzing the outcomes from total hip arthroplasty.

  1. "Pros and cons" of total hip arthroplasty with metaphyseal Proxima endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Wraźen, Waldemar; Golec, Edward B; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Golec, Piotr; Jaworowski, Michał de Lubicz; Dudkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    The authors present their own experience concerning total hip arthroplasty with the metaphyseal prosthesis Proxima. Proxima, a metaphyseal prosthesis, provides an innovative supplement to total hip arthroplasty. In this study, the authors present their own experience using Proxima in patients with hip osteoarthritis. This study was performed between 2008 to 2013 and comprised of 62 patients, of which 38 were male (61.3%) and 24 female (38.7%). All patients were operated on due to hip osteoarthritis using total hip arthroplasty with the metaphyseal prosthesis Proxima. The age of patients included into the study ranged from 23 years to 62 years with the mean age of 46 years. The authors paid close attention to the "pros and cons" of surgical techniques and assessed clinical and radiological results in both the short and long-term observation periods. The clinical evaluation was based on the Harris Hip Score and radiological assessment of fixation of the acetabular cup of the endoprosthesis was based on Pradhan's criteria. The endoprosthesis Proxima stem was positioned using the manufacturer's recommended method, evaluating the direction, scope and duration of the displacement in the marrow cavity of the proximal stump of the femur. According to the authors' analysis, the surgery gives good functional and radiological results both in the short- and long-term observation periods. The effectiveness depends on precise qualification for surgery, proper surgical techniques and specific anatomical conditions of the proximal femur stump. The most common reasons for primary and secondary dislocations of the metaphyseal endoprosthesis Proxima stem occur during the first three months post surgery. This is due to incorrect surgical techniques, which disregard the importance of specific anatomical conditions of the proximal femoral stump, which affects Proxima implantation, and cause deviations towards a varus or valgus orientation.

  2. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee arthroplasty: a survey of Canadian orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Michael; Anderson, David R.; Nagpal, Seema; O’Brien, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacologic and physical modalities used by orthopedic surgeons in Canada to prevent venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Design Mail survey sent to all members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association. Setting A nation-wide study. Methods A total of 828 questionnaires, designed to identify the type and frequency of prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism that were used after hip and knee arthroplasty were mailed to orthopedic surgeons. Outcome measures Demographic data and the frequency and type of thromboprophylaxis. Results Of the 828 surveys mailed 445 (54%) were returned, and 397 were included in this analysis. Of the respondents, 97% used prophylaxis routinely for patients who undergo total hip or knee arthroplasty. Three of the 397 (0.8%) did not use any method of prophylaxis. Warfarin was the most common agent used (46%), followed by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (36%). Combination therapy with both mechanical and pharmacologic methods were used in 39% of patients. Objective screening tests were not frequently performed before discharge. Extended prophylaxis beyond the duration of hospitalization was used by 36% of physicians. Conclusion Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism with warfarin or LMWH has become standard care after total hip or knee arthroplasty in Canada. PMID:10593248

  3. A low-cost solution for the restoration of femoral head centre during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hill, Janet C; Salazar-Torres, Jose J; Orr, John F; Archbold, H A Pooler; Beverland, David E

    2013-06-01

    Restoration of joint centre during total hip arthroplasty is critical. While computer-aided navigation can improve accuracy during total hip arthroplasty, its expense makes it inaccessible to the majority of surgeons. This article evaluates the use, in the laboratory, of a calliper with a simple computer application to measure changes in femoral head centres during total hip arthroplasty. The computer application was designed using Microsoft Excel and used calliper measurements taken pre- and post-femoral head resection to predict the change in head centre in terms of offset and vertical height between the femoral head and newly inserted prosthesis. Its accuracy was assessed using a coordinate measuring machine to compare changes in preoperative and post-operative head centre when simulating stem insertion on 10 sawbone femurs. A femoral stem with a modular neck was used, which meant nine possible head centre configurations were available for each femur, giving 90 results. The results show that using this technique during a simulated total hip arthroplasty, it was possible to restore femoral head centre to within 6 mm for offset (mean 1.67 ± 1.16 mm) and vertical height (mean 2.14 ± 1.51 mm). It is intended that this low-cost technique be extended to inform the surgeon of a best-fit solution in terms of neck length and neck type for a specific prosthesis.

  4. Elevated risk of early reoperation in total hip replacement during the stage of unit closure

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Mikko; Malmivaara, Antti; Paavola, Mika; Seitsalo, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effects of launch or closure of an entire arthroplasty unit on the first or last patients treated in these units have not been studied. Using a 3-year follow-up, we investigated whether patients who were treated at the launch or closure stage of an arthroplasty unit of a hospital would have a higher risk of reoperation than patients treated in-between at the same units. Patients and methods — From the Finnish Arthroplasty Register, we identified all the units that had performed total joint arthroplasty and the units that were launched or closed in Finland between 1998 and 2011. The risks of reoperation within 3 years for the 41,748 total hip and knee replacements performed due to osteoarthritis in these units were modeled with Cox proportional-hazards regression, separately for hip and knee and for the launch and the closure stage. Results — The unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for total hip and knee replacements performed in the initial stage of activity of the units that were launched were similar to the reoperation risks in patients who were operated in these units after the early stage of activity. The unadjusted and risk-adjusted HRs for early reoperation after total hip replacement (THR) were increased at the closure stage (adjusted HR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2–2.8). The reoperation risk at the closure stage after total knee replacement (TKR) was not increased. Interpretation — The results indicate that closure of units performing total hip replacements poses an increased risk of reoperation. Closures need to be managed carefully to prevent the quality from deteriorating when performing the final arthroplasties. PMID:26541178

  5. Cancellous impaction bone grafting of acetabular defects in complex primary and revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilesh; Hwang, Katherine; Goodman, Stuart B

    2012-03-07

    The reconstruction of major acetabular bone defects during revision, conversion, and primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) is challenging. We reviewed a consecutive series of 168 THAs (108 revisions, 8 conversions, and 52 primary THAs) performed by 1 surgeon (S.B.G.) between 1997 and 2008 using impaction bone grafting for acetabular reconstruction. Autograft, cancellous allograft croutons, and demineralized bone matrix were used to fill bone defects as needed. The acetabular bone deficiency was classified according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: type I, segmental deficiency with significant rim defect; type II, cavitary defects medially or posteriorly; type III, combined cavitary and segmental deficiency; type IV, pelvic discontinuity; and type V, arthrodesis. According to this method, 56 hips had type I, 31 hips had type II, 48 hips had type III, and 27 hips had type IV deficiencies. Of the 168 patients, 19 subsequently died of causes unrelated to the THA, and 11 were lost to follow-up. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Average Harris Hip Score improved from 45.5±17.9 preoperatively to 81.1±16.5 postoperatively (P<.05) for revision THAs, from 40.0±11.3 preoperatively to 85.0±12.8 postoperatively (P<.05) for conversion THAs, and from 42.3±14.9 preoperatively to 85.0±12.0 postoperatively (P<.05) for primary THAs. All impaction grafted bone (allograft, autograft, or a combination) incorporated radiographically, thus restoring bone stock. Complications included 1 early infection, which was managed successfully with debridement and liner exchange, and 2 late infections that were managed successfully with staged revision. Two revisions required subsequent re-revision for late loosening. Two hip dislocations occurred, 1 of which required surgical treatment to place a constrained liner. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Outcomes at least 10 years after cemented PF® (Zimmer) total hip arthroplasty: 83 cases.

    PubMed

    Aubault, M; Druon, J; Le Nail, L; Rosset, P

    2013-06-01

    Cementless total hip arthroplasty (TKA) is gaining ground over cemented TKA. The objective of this study was to assess survival rates of a cemented THA implant (PF(®), Zimmer), after at least 10 years and to assess changes in acetabular bone structure. Eighty-three ceramic-on-polyethylene THA prostheses were implanted between 1998 and 2001. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Harris hip score and Postel Merle d'Aubigné score. For each hip, radiographs were examined for acetabular radiolucent lines, geodes, and granulomas; in addition, changes in bone structure and trabeculae were assessed comparatively to the other hip and classified from no change to severe osteolysis. Changes in trabeculae served to assess the loads applied to the bone. Polyethylene wear was assessed using the Livermore method. A single patient was lost to follow-up. At last follow-up, 16 patients had died and six were contacted and had not required revision surgery; the remaining 52 patients (59 THAs) were re-evaluated and none had evidence of loosening. The Harris hip score at last evaluation was 91.6 compared to 60.5 preoperatively. No hips had evidence of acetabular osteolysis. For two hips, the radiographs showed complete acetabular radiolucent lines less than 2mm in width, with no mobilisation. Trabecular distribution was homogeneous with no stress shielding. Mean annual rate of wear was 0.08mm. No instances of femoral component loosening were recorded; granulomas involving no more than five Gruën zones were seen in three cases. This study confirms the reliability of cemented THA, with a 12-year survival rate of 98.3%, in keeping with earlier data. Thus, our results establish that cemented ceramic-on-polyethylene prostheses remain valid options for THA. IV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Abductor Reconstruction with Gluteus Maximus Transfer in Primary Abductor Deficiency during Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Se Ang; Byun, Young Soo; Gu, Tae Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Abductor deficiency in native hip joint may cause severe limping and pain. It is more serious situation in case of arthroplasty due to instability and recurrent dislocation. Well-known causes of abductor deficiency are repeated surgery, chronic trochanteric bursitis, superior gluteal nerve injury, failure of repair of abductor tendon insertion to the greater trochanter. Author had experienced primary abductor deficiency during total hip replacement and treated successfully with the transfer of gluteus maximus. We'd like to introduce the operation technique with the review of literature. PMID:27777922

  8. Contemporary total hip arthroplasty with and without cement in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Oh, S-H; Kim, J-S; Koo, K-H

    2003-04-01

    The rate of failure of primary total hip arthroplasty in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head is higher than that in patients with osteoarthritis. The purpose of this prospective study was to document the clinical and radiographic results of arthroplasty with so-called third-generation cementing and the results of second-generation cementless total hip arthroplasty in ninety-eight consecutive patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Fifty patients who had had simultaneous bilateral total hip arthroplasty with a cemented stem in one hip and a cementless stem in the other and forty-eight patients who had had a unilateral total hip arthroplasty with a cementless stem were included in the study. A cementless acetabular component was used in all hips. The presumed cause of the osteonecrosis was ethanol abuse in fifty-seven patients, unknown in twenty-seven, fracture of the femoral neck in nine, and steroid use in five. There were eighty men and eighteen women. The mean age at the time of the arthroplasty was 47.3 years (range, twenty-six to fifty-eight years). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed preoperatively; at six weeks; at three, six, and twelve months; and yearly thereafter. The average duration of follow-up was 9.3 years. The average Harris hip scores in the group treated with unilateral arthroplasty (97 points) and the group treated with bilateral arthroplasty (94 points) were similar at the time of final follow-up. They were also similar between the group treated with cement (mean, 96 points) and that treated without cement (95 points). No component had aseptic loosening in either group. In one hip, a cemented femoral stem (2%) and a cementless cup were revised because of infection. Two cementless stems (2%) were revised because of fracture of the proximal part of the femur with loosening of the stem. Annual wear of the polyethylene liner averaged 0.22 mm in the group treated with cement (a zirconia head) and 0.14 mm in the

  9. Total hip replacement in two dogs with unsuccessful femoral head ostectomy

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Su-Young

    2015-01-01

    An English setter (case 1) and a Tibetan mastiff (case 2) presented with intermittent weight-bearing lameness on the right hind limb when trotting. The dogs had a history of femoral head and neck ostectomy (FHNO). Orthopedic examination revealed pain and crepitus on the right hip joint. The dogs underwent total hip replacement (THR). At the 2-year (case 1) and 1-year (case 2) follow-up, both dogs had resumed normal activity without lameness. The muscle mass and range of motion were significantly improved in the affected hind limb. In conclusion, FHNO with poor functional outcomes can be successfully ameliorated with THR. PMID:25269715

  10. Does bearing size influence metal ion levels in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty? A comparison of three total hip systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was twofold: first, to determine whether there is a statistically significant difference in the metal ion levels among three different large-head metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip systems. The second objective was to assess whether position of the implanted prostheses, patient demographics or factors such as activity levels influence overall blood metal ion levels and whether there is a difference in the functional outcomes between the systems. Methods In a cross-sectional cohort study, three different metal-on-metal total hip systems were assessed: two monoblock heads, the Durom socket (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Birmingham socket (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA), and one modular metal-on-metal total hip system (Pinnacle, Depuy Orthopedics, Warsaw, IN, USA). Fifty-four patients were recruited, with a mean age of 59.7 years and a mean follow-up time of 41 months (12 to 60). Patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and biochemically. Statistical analysis was performed on all collected data to assess any differences between the three groups in terms of overall blood metal ion levels and also to identify whether there was any other factor within the group demographics and outcomes that could influence the mean levels of Co and Cr. Results Although the functional outcome scores were similar in all three groups, the blood metal ion levels in the larger monoblock large heads (Durom, Birmingham sockets) were significantly raised compared with those of the Pinnacle group. In addition, the metal ion levels were not found to have a statistically significant relationship to the anteversion or abduction angles as measured on the radiographs. Conclusions When considering a MOM THR, the use of a monoblock large-head system leads to higher elevations in whole blood metal ions and offers no advantage over a smaller head modular system. PMID:24472283

  11. [Minimally invasive approaches to hip and knee joints for total joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Rittmeister, M; König, D P; Eysel, P; Kerschbaumer, F

    2004-11-01

    The manuscript features the different minimally invasive approaches to the hip for joint replacement. These include medial, anterior, anterolateral, and posterior approaches. The concept of minimally invasive hip arthroplasty makes sense if it is an integral part of a larger concept to lower postoperative morbidity. Besides minimal soft tissue trauma, this concept involves preoperative patient education, preemptive analgesia, and postoperative physiotherapy. It is our belief that minimal incision techniques for the hip are not suited for all patients and all surgeons. The different minimally invasive approaches to the knee joint for implantation of a knee arthroplasty are described and discussed. There have been no studies published yet that fulfill EBM criteria. The data so far show that minimally invasive approaches and implantation techniques for total knee replacements lead to quicker rehabilitation of patients.

  12. A second-generation cementless total hip arthroplasty mean 9-year results.

    PubMed

    Surdam, Jonathan W; Archibeck, Michael J; Schultz, Steven C; Junick, Daniel W; White, Richard E

    2007-02-01

    Two hundred fifty-eight primary total hip arthroplasties in 231 patients were implanted using a circumferentially, proximally porous-coated, collared femoral component and a cementless, hemispherical, porous-coated acetabular component and followed up for a mean of 9 years (5-14 years). Four femoral components were revised (2 stems for infection and 2 stems for aseptic loosening). One additional femoral component was radiographically loose at last follow-up. Nine hips underwent acetabular revision (4 for instability, 2 for infection, 2 for loosening, and 1 for osteolysis). Ten-year survivorship with revision or loosening of any component as the end point was 92%; with femoral component aseptic loosening as end point, survivorship was 98%; with acetabular aseptic loosening as the end point, survivorship was 99%. Osteolysis was identified in 26 hips (13%).

  13. Total hip arthroplasty using a cylindrical cementless stem in patients with a small physique.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshihide; Mitsui, Hiromasa; Kikuchi, Akira; Toh, Satoshi; Katano, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We performed total hip arthroplasty using an anatomic medullary locking cementless stem for small-physique patients from 1988 to 1995. We conducted a retrospective study of 50 joints in 44 cases, including 40 developmentally dysplastic hips followed for 12 to 20 years (average, 15.1 years). Average height and body weight were 152 cm and 56 kg (5.0 ft and 124 lb), respectively, with an average body mass index of 24.2. Twelve joints (24%) were revised for acetabular-sided failures. Forty-eight stems (96%) showed bone ingrowth fixation, and there were no unstable stems. The simple cylindrical shape of the distal portion of the AML stem was less affected by deformity of the proximal femur of developmental dysplasia of the hip in patients with a small physique, and both clinically and radiologically good results were confirmed at long-term follow-up.

  14. Contemporary ceramic total hip arthroplasty in patients with cerebral palsy: does it work?

    PubMed

    Yoon, Byung-Ho; Lee, Young-Kyun; Ha, Yong-Chan; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2015-03-01

    Adult patients with cerebral palsy (CP), who have advanced degenerative arthritis of the hip, have been treated with resection arthroplasty and arthrodesis. Although total hip arthroplasty (THA) has also been used as one of the alternative options, there are few studies on contemporary bearings used in THA. Therefore, we evaluated the results of the contemporary ceramic-on-ceramic THA in adult patients with CP. From January 2005 to December 2007, five adult CP patients (5 hips) underwent THA using contemporary ceramic-on-ceramic bearings. All patients were able to stand or ambulate with intermittent use of assistive devices at home. We retrospectively reviewed the series to determine the results of THA in terms of pain relief, improved function, and durability of prosthesis. There were 3 men and 2 women with a mean age of 35.9 years. All patients had pain relief without decline in mobility postoperatively. One hip was dislocated, which was treated successfully with closed reduction and an abduction brace for 2 months. There was no ceramic fracture, loosening, or osteolysis during the mean follow-up of 6.8 years (range, 5.8 to 8.3 years). Cementless THA using contemporary ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is a useful option for the treatment of advanced degenerative arthritis of the hip in ambulatory adults with CP.

  15. Formation of a pseudotumor in total hip arthroplasty using a tribological metal-polyethylene pair.

    PubMed

    Fagotti, Lorenzo; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Miyahara, Helder Souza; de Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Bernabé, Antônio Carlos; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to report a case of a young adult patient who evolved with tumor formation in the left thigh, 14 years after revision surgery on hip arthroplasty. Davies in 2005 made the first description of this disease in patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. Over the last decade, however, pseudotumors around metal-on-polyethylene surfaces have become more prevalent. Our patient presented with increased volume of the left thigh 8 years after hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Two years before the arising of the tumor in the thigh, a nodule in the inguinal region was investigated to rule out a malignant neoplastic process, but the results were inconclusive. The main preoperative complaints were pain, functional limitation and marked reduction in the range of motion of the left hip. Plain radiographs showed loosening of acetabular and femoral, and a large mass between the muscle planes was revealed through magnetic resonance imaging of the left thigh. The surgical procedure consisted of resection of the lesion and removal of the components through lateral approach. In respect of total hip arthroplasty, pseudotumors are benign neoplasms in which the bearing surface consists of metal-on-metal, but they can also occur in different tribological pairs, as presented in this case.

  16. Formation of a pseudotumor in total hip arthroplasty using a tribological metal–polyethylene pair☆

    PubMed Central

    Fagotti, Lorenzo; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Miyahara, Helder Souza; de Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Bernabé, Antônio Carlos; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to report a case of a young adult patient who evolved with tumor formation in the left thigh, 14 years after revision surgery on hip arthroplasty. Davies in 2005 made the first description of this disease in patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. Over the last decade, however, pseudotumors around metal-on-polyethylene surfaces have become more prevalent. Our patient presented with increased volume of the left thigh 8 years after hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Two years before the arising of the tumor in the thigh, a nodule in the inguinal region was investigated to rule out a malignant neoplastic process, but the results were inconclusive. The main preoperative complaints were pain, functional limitation and marked reduction in the range of motion of the left hip. Plain radiographs showed loosening of acetabular and femoral, and a large mass between the muscle planes was revealed through magnetic resonance imaging of the left thigh. The surgical procedure consisted of resection of the lesion and removal of the components through lateral approach. In respect of total hip arthroplasty, pseudotumors are benign neoplasms in which the bearing surface consists of metal-on-metal, but they can also occur in different tribological pairs, as presented in this case. PMID:27218090

  17. Application and evaluation of biomechanical models and scores for the planning of total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Eschweiler, Jörg; Fieten, Lorenz; Dell'Anna, Jasmin; Kabir, Koroush; Gravius, Sascha; Tingart, Markus; Radermacher, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Intimate knowledge of the biomechanics of a given individual hip joint provides a potential advantage during the planning of total hip arthroplasty, and would thus have a positive influence over the outcome of such an intervention. In current clinical practise, the surgical planning is based solely on the status of the individual hip and its radiographic appearance. However, additional information could be gathered from the radiography to be used as input data for biomechanical models aimed at calculating the resultant force FR within the hip joint. An investigation of the biomechanical models by Pauwels, Debrunner and Iglič was performed, where the magnitude of FR calculated by the models showed a favourable comparison to the in-vivo data from instrumented prostheses by Bergmann. The Blumentritt model returned abnormally high results. The computational results showed large variations for FR orientation, which tends to depend more on the model used than on patient-specific parameters. Furthermore, a discrepancy was found between the data gathered from instrumented prostheses and the Standing Human Model within the 'AnyBody Modeling System™' software by AnyBody Tech. Additionally, the variations in inter-rater and intra-rater errors made while localizing radiographic landmarks were analysed with respect to their influence on Babisch-Layher-Blumentritt (BLB)-scoring using the Blumentritt hip model.

  18. Impingement and stability of total hip arthroplasty versus femoral head resurfacing using a cadaveric robotics model.

    PubMed

    Colbrunn, R W; Bottros, J J; Butler, R S; Klika, A K; Bonner, T F; Greeson, C; van den Bogert, A J; Barsoum, W K

    2013-07-01

    We identified and compared the impingent-free range of motion (ROM) and subluxation potential for native hip, femoral head resurfacing (FHR), and total hip arthroplasty (THA). These constructs were also compared both with and without soft tissue to elucidate the role of the soft tissue. Five fresh-frozen bilateral hip specimens were mounted to a six-degree of freedom robotic manipulator. Under load-control parameters, in vivo mechanics were recreated to evaluate impingement free ROM, and the subluxation potential in two "at risk" positions for native hip, FHR, and THA. Impingement-free ROM of the skeletonized THA was greater than FHR for the anterior subluxation position. For skeletonized posterior subluxations, stability for THA and FHR constructs were similar, while a different pattern was observed for specimens with soft tissues intact. FHR constructs were more stable than THA constructs for both anterior and posterior subluxations. When the femoral neck is intact the joint has an earlier impingement profile placing the hip at risk for subluxation. However, FHR design was shown to be more stable than THA only when soft tissues were intact. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  19. Effect of cup inclination on predicted contact stress-induced volumetric wear in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Rijavec, B; Košak, R; Daniel, M; Kralj-Iglič, V; Dolinar, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the lifetime of the total hip endoprosthesis, it is necessary to understand mechanisms leading to its failure. In this work, we address volumetric wear of the artificial cup, in particular the effect of its inclination with respect to the vertical. Volumetric wear was calculated by using mathematical models for resultant hip force, contact stress and penetration of the prosthesis head into the cup. Relevance of the dependence of volumetric wear on inclination of the cup (its abduction angle ϑA) was assessed by the results of 95 hips with implanted endoprosthesis. Geometrical parameters obtained from standard antero-posterior radiographs were taken as input data. Volumetric wear decreases with increasing cup abduction angle ϑA. The correlation within the population of 95 hips was statistically significant (P = 0.006). Large cup abduction angle minimises predicted volumetric wear but may increase the risk for dislocation of the artificial head from the cup in the one-legged stance. Cup abduction angle and direction of the resultant hip force may compensate each other to achieve optimal position of the cup with respect to wear and dislocation in the one-legged stance for a particular patient.

  20. Influence of cementless cup surface on stability and bone fixation 2 years after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urbański, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Artur; Dragan, Szymon Ł; Kulej, Mirosław; Dragan, Szymon F

    2012-01-01

    Loss of fixation between bone and implant surface is one of the main treatment problems in total hip arthroplasty. It might lead to implant instability, bone loss and treatment failure resulting in revision surgery. Surface modification is a method for improving bone response to implant and increasing implant osseointegration. However, the currently applied modifications such as hydroxyapatite coatings do not meet expectation and do not provide good clinical result. The object of the study was to evaluate the influence of acetabular cup surface modification on fixation and bone remodelling in total hip arthroplasty. Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated in patients two years after cementless total hip replacement. Two groups were compared: patients with acetabular component with uncoated titanium surface and patients with hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular surface. Hips X-rays were analysed for early signs of losing stability of acetabular cups. Two years after surgery the analysis of X-rays did not reveal any statistical differences in stability, migration of acetabular components of endoprosthesis between both groups. No differences were also observed in bone remodelling around implants. Particularly high percentage of cups, i.e. 17.64%, were classified into the group with high risk of early implant loosening, i.e., the group with HA coatings. Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium cementless acetabular cups implanted by press-fit technique have no influence on their stability, bone-implant fixation and the remodelling of bone surrounding an implant two years after surgery.

  1. Total hip replacement in younger patients: survival rate after avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Wolfgang; Knahr, Karl

    2004-04-01

    A high risk of loosening has been reported in replacements performed because of avascular necrosis. To study cementless total hip replacement (THR) in younger patients with avascular necrosis (AVN), we analyzed retrospectively the outcome in 129 cases: 46 Mittelmeier monobloc ceramic hips (22 cases with AVN), and 83 Zweymüller total hip systems (35 cases with AVN) clinically and radiographically. At follow-up, 17 Mittelmeier prostheses (10 AVN) and 4 Zweymüller prostheses (none with AVN) had been revised. The diagnosis did not affect the implant survival, but the Zweymüller THR fared better than the Mittelmeier system. The main reason for revision of Mittelmeier implants was aseptic loosening, 3 of 4 Zweymüller revisions were necessary due to polyethylene wear. This difference was confirmed by the radiographic evaluation of the still intact implants: Zweymüller THR showed better values for signs of osseointegration, radiolucent lines around the implants and migration, but more acetabular wear. None of these differences was affected by the AVN diagnosis. We could not confirm that AVN is a risk factor in total hip replacement.

  2. Lunar phase does not influence perioperative complications in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ficklscherer, Andreas; Angermann, Alexander; Weber, Patrick; Wegener, Bernd; Pietschmann, Matthias; Müller, Peter

    2012-02-29

    Lunar calendars, publishing recommendations for daily life, are gaining more and more attention in Germany, where 10.5% of the population believe in lunar effects on disease. A widespread and often heard belief is that a full moon has the most negative effects on surgical outcome. The present study evaluates the effects of lunar phase on perioperative complications in total hip arthroplasty. We performed a retrospective study with 305 patients being provided with a primary hip arthroplasty. To identify possible influences of the lunar phase on perioperative complications we investigated data such as operation length, blood loss and course of C-reactive protein that were collected during the patients' stay in the hospital and allocated them to moon illumination. There were no significant differences in all collected data concerning the lunar phase (p > 0.05). Although not statistically significant, there were fewer operations during the full moon phase. Therefore there is no evidence that lunar phase has an effect on perioperative complications in total hip arthroplasty. Fewer, though not significantly fewer, operations were performed during the full moon phase. Although this was not a prospective randomized trial, the statistical magnitude of the results does not support any recommendations for scheduling patients for total hip arthroplasty at any particular day of the lunar phase.

  3. Lunar phase does not influence perioperative complications in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Angermann, Alexander; Weber, Patrick; Wegener, Bernd; Pietschmann, Matthias; Müller, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Lunar calendars, publishing recommendations for daily life, are gaining more and more attention in Germany, where 10.5% of the population believe in lunar effects on disease. A widespread and often heard belief is that a full moon has the most negative effects on surgical outcome. The present study evaluates the effects of lunar phase on perioperative complications in total hip arthroplasty. Material and methods We performed a retrospective study with 305 patients being provided with a primary hip arthroplasty. To identify possible influences of the lunar phase on perioperative complications we investigated data such as operation length, blood loss and course of C-reactive protein that were collected during the patients’ stay in the hospital and allocated them to moon illumination. Results There were no significant differences in all collected data concerning the lunar phase (p > 0.05). Although not statistically significant, there were fewer operations during the full moon phase. Conclusions Therefore there is no evidence that lunar phase has an effect on perioperative complications in total hip arthroplasty. Fewer, though not significantly fewer, operations were performed during the full moon phase. Although this was not a prospective randomized trial, the statistical magnitude of the results does not support any recommendations for scheduling patients for total hip arthroplasty at any particular day of the lunar phase. PMID:22457684

  4. Total hip arthroplasty in steroid-induced osteonecrosis: early functional and radiological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Wael A.; Garbuz, Donald S.; Masri, Bassam A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The proportion of total hip arthroplasties (THAs) associated with corticosteroid use is uncertain, and the mechanisms of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis remain unknown. We sought to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes, complications and satisfaction with THA among patients with corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis. Methods We retrospectively assessed functional outcome at a minimum 1-year follow-up using the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC); Oxford Hip Score; Short Form (SF)-12; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Activity; and patient satisfaction scores. Results We included 31 patients (35 hips). The average follow-up was 20 (range 12–55) months, and the average age at surgery was 47 (range 19–78) years. At follow-up, patients showed significant improvement in all 4 components of the WOMAC (means: function 84, stiffness 75, pain 86, global 84), Oxford-12 (mean 83) and SF-12 (means: mental 40 and physical 48) scores. However, there was no significant improvement in the UCLA Activity scores. Mean patient satisfaction scores were good for pain relief (86), function (80), recreation (77.5) and overall results of surgery (86). Radiographic review at follow-up showed that all components were well fixed with no evidence of loosening. The complication rate was high (17%), with 6 complications in 5 patients (6 of 35 hips). Four patients (4 of 35 hips; 11%) required reoperations. Conclusion Total hip arthroplasty in patients with corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head is successful in reducing pain and improving function; however, the rate of complications and reoperation is high. PMID:22992403

  5. Severe Pelvic Obliquity Affects Femoral Offset in Patients with Total Hip Arthroplasty but Not Leg-Length Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong; Chen, Yunsu; Peng, Xiaochun; Mao, Yuanqing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Beigang; Wang, Xiuhui; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Leg-length inequality is an extensively studied complication of total hip arthroplasty in normal patients. However, few studies have focused on the pelvic obliquity of coronal pelvic malrotation. We hypothesized that pelvic obliquity with a fixed abduction/adduction contracture deformity of the hip may intraoperatively affect the release of soft tissues, ultimately resulting in a leg-length inequality. This study also investigated whether the femoral and vertical offsets of total hip arthroplasty were correlated with pelvic obliquity. This prospective study divided 98 patients into six groups based on the inclination of pelvic obliquity before total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality, variation of pelvic obliquity, offset, and vertical offset were measured after total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality and vertical offset were not significantly different among groups, whereas the variation of pelvic obliquity was significantly higher in type IIC pelvic obliquity than in other groups. Type IC pelvic obliquity had a significantly shorter offset than did the other groups, which may have been an important factor leading to type IC pelvic obliquity. Pelvic obliquity exhibited no significant effect on leg-length inequality in patients with total hip arthroplasty. A shorter offset may be caused by the higher tension of the abductor in the operated hip, which may result in the formation of type IC pelvic obliquity. Releasing the abductor contracture and restoring femoral offset are important for increasing hip stability and maintaining pelvic balance following total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26673427

  6. Severe Pelvic Obliquity Affects Femoral Offset in Patients with Total Hip Arthroplasty but Not Leg-Length Inequality.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong; Chen, Yunsu; Peng, Xiaochun; Mao, Yuanqing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Beigang; Wang, Xiuhui; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Leg-length inequality is an extensively studied complication of total hip arthroplasty in normal patients. However, few studies have focused on the pelvic obliquity of coronal pelvic malrotation. We hypothesized that pelvic obliquity with a fixed abduction/adduction contracture deformity of the hip may intraoperatively affect the release of soft tissues, ultimately resulting in a leg-length inequality. This study also investigated whether the femoral and vertical offsets of total hip arthroplasty were correlated with pelvic obliquity. This prospective study divided 98 patients into six groups based on the inclination of pelvic obliquity before total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality, variation of pelvic obliquity, offset, and vertical offset were measured after total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality and vertical offset were not significantly different among groups, whereas the variation of pelvic obliquity was significantly higher in type IIC pelvic obliquity than in other groups. Type IC pelvic obliquity had a significantly shorter offset than did the other groups, which may have been an important factor leading to type IC pelvic obliquity. Pelvic obliquity exhibited no significant effect on leg-length inequality in patients with total hip arthroplasty. A shorter offset may be caused by the higher tension of the abductor in the operated hip, which may result in the formation of type IC pelvic obliquity. Releasing the abductor contracture and restoring femoral offset are important for increasing hip stability and maintaining pelvic balance following total hip arthroplasty.

  7. The effect of total hip and hip resurfacing arthroplasty on vertical ground reaction force and impulse symmetry during a sit-to-stand task.

    PubMed

    Caplan, N; Stewart, S; Kashyap, S; Banaszkiewicz, P; St Clair Gibson, A; Kader, D; Ewen, A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of total hip arthroplasty and hip resurfacing arthroplasty on limb loading symmetry before, and after, hip reconstruction surgery during a sit-to-stand task. Fourteen patients were recruited that were about to receive either a total hip prosthesis (n=7) or a hip resurfacing prosthesis (n=7), as well as matched controls. Patients performed a sit-to-stand movement before, 3 months after, and 12 months after surgery. Peak vertical ground reaction force and impulse were measured for each leg, from which ground reaction force and impulse symmetry ratios were calculated. Before surgery, hip resurfacing patients showed a small asymmetry which was not different to normal for ground reaction force (0.88(0.28) vs. 1.00(0.11); p=0.311) or impulse (0.87(0.29) vs. 0.99(0.09); p=0.324) symmetry ratios. Total hip patients offloaded their affected hip by 30% in terms of impulse symmetry ratio (0.71(0.36) vs. 0.99(0.23); p=0.018). At 3 months following surgery asymmetries were seen that were different to normal in both hip resurfacing patients for ground reaction force (0.77(0.16); p=0.007), and total hip patients for ground reaction force (0.70(0.15); p=0.018) and impulse (0.72(0.16); p=0.011) symmetry ratios. By 12 months after surgery total hip patients regained a symmetrical loading pattern for both ground reaction force (0.95(0.06); p=0.676) and impulse (1.00(0.06); p=0.702) symmetry ratios. Hip resurfacing patients, however, performed the task by overloading their operated hip, with impulse symmetry ratio being larger than normal (1.16(0.16); p=0.035). Physiotherapists should appreciate the need for early recovery of limb loading symmetry as well as subsequent differences in the responses observed with different prostheses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Total hip replacements done without cement after acetabular fractures: a 4- to 8-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Huo, M H; Solberg, B D; Zatorski, L E; Keggi, K J

    1999-10-01

    Twenty-one patients (21 hips) underwent cementless total hip replacement surgeries for previous acetabular fractures. The mean age at the time of hip replacement was 52 years (range, 23-78 years). The mean follow-up was 65 months (range, 48-104 months). One hip required revision of the stem secondary to a periprosthetic femur fracture from a fall at 3 months after surgery. Good to excellent clinical rating was achieved and maintained in 19 hips. Radiographic evaluation demonstrated stable cup and stem fixation in 17 and 15 hips. Only 1 patient with radiographic loosening of the components was sufficiently symptomatic. The results in this series appeared slightly better than those reported previously in hip replacements done with cement at comparable medium-term follow-up. The mechanical failure rates remained high in this patient population: 19% for the cups and 29% for the stems.

  9. Is closed suction drainage effective in early recovery of hip joint function? Comparative evaluation in one-stage bilateral total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Koyano, Gaku; Jinno, Tetsuya; Koga, Daisuke; Hoshino, Chisato; Muneta, Takeshi; Okawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    One-stage primary bilateral cementless total hip arthroplasty with unilateral closed suction drainage (CSD) was prospectively performed for 51 patients (102 hips), and local effects of CSD were quantitatively evaluated. Postoperatively, pain scores evaluated by visual analog scale and periwound temperatures measured by thermography were lower in the CSD side than the non-CSD side. CT measurements also showed that postoperative cross-sectional area of the thigh was smaller in the CSD side. Active straight leg raising and weight bearing were more accelerated in the CSD side., showing earlier recovery of hip joint function. CSD for hip arthroplasty has an advantage in reducing postoperative local inflammation and be recommended from the viewpoint of postoperative pain relief and early recovery of hip joint function.

  10. Differences in the trajectory of bone mineral density change measured at the total hip and femoral neck between men and women following hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Rathbun, Alan M; Shardell, Michelle; Orwig, Denise; Hebel, J Richard; Hicks, Gregory E; Beck, Thomas; Hochberg, Marc C; Magaziner, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Research has not examined changes in bone mineral density (BMD) between men and women following hip fracture. The aim was to evaluate sex differences in BMD following hip fracture. Men experienced significant declines in BMD, while not statistically greater than women, underscoring the necessity for better osteoporosis care in men. Each year in the USA, approximately 260,000 older adults experience a hip fracture. Women experiencing hip fracture have excess decline in BMD in the year following fracture compared to expected decrements due to aging, but few studies have assessed sex differences in the sequelae of hip fracture. Thus, our objective was to examine sex differences in BMD change in the year after hip fracture. The sample (n = 286) included persons enrolled in the Baltimore Hip Studies 7th cohort, a study that matched (1:1) men and women experiencing hip fracture. Weighted estimating equations that accounted for missing data and selective survival were used to estimate sex differences in 12-month total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN) BMD changes. Men had larger average adjusted percent decline in TH and FN BMD. Adjusted 12-month decreases at the FN showed a statistically significant decline of -4.60% (95% confidence interval [CI] -7.76%, -0.20%) in men and an insignificant change of -1.62% (95% CI -4.57%, 1.32%) in women. Yet, the difference in change between men and women was not statistically significant (P = 0.17). The estimated sex differences for TH BMD loss were smaller in magnitude. There is evidence of significant BMD loss among men at the FN in the year after hip fracture. Although not statistically greater than women, these clinically significant findings highlight the need for improved osteoporosis care among men prior to and after hip fracture.

  11. Neuraxial vs general anaesthesia for total hip and total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review of comparative-effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R L; Kopp, S L; Burkle, C M; Duncan, C M; Jacob, A K; Erwin, P J; Murad, M H; Mantilla, C B

    2016-02-01

    This systematic review evaluated the evidence comparing patient-important outcomes in spinal or epidural vs general anaesthesia for total hip and total knee arthroplasty. MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO CINAHL, Thomson Reuters Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from inception until March 2015 were searched. Eligible randomized controlled trials or prospective comparative studies investigating mortality, major morbidity, and patient-experience outcomes directly comparing neuraxial (spinal or epidural) with general anaesthesia for total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty, or both were included. Independent reviewers working in duplicate extracted study characteristics, validity, and outcomes data. Meta-analysis was conducted using the random-effects model. We included 29 studies involving 10 488 patients. Compared with general anaesthesia, neuraxial anaesthesia significantly reduced length of stay (weighted mean difference -0.40 days; 95% confidence interval -0.76 to -0.03; P=0.03; I2 73%; 12 studies). No statistically significant differences were found between neuraxial and general anaesthesia for mortality, surgical duration, surgical site or chest infections, nerve palsies, postoperative nausea and vomiting, or thromboembolic disease when antithrombotic prophylaxis was used. Subgroup analyses failed to find statistically significant interactions (P>0.05) based on risk of bias, type of surgery, or type of neuraxial anaesthesia. Neuraxial anaesthesia for total hip or total knee arthroplasty, or both appears equally effective without increased morbidity when compared with general anaesthesia. There is limited quantitative evidence to suggest that neuraxial anaesthesia is associated with improved perioperative outcomes. Future investigations should compare intermediate and long-term outcome differences to better inform anaesthesiologists, surgeons, and patients on importance of anaesthetic selection. © The Author 2016. Published

  12. On the validity of the results from the Swedish National Total Hip Arthroplasty register.

    PubMed

    Söderman, P

    2000-12-01

    The Swedish National Total Hip Arthroplasty Register contains more than 200,000 primary and secondary hip replacements. The failure end-point definition is revision. The aim of this thesis was to validate the results presented by the register and to study the outcome of hip replacement surgery in Sweden. The hypothesis was firstly that the number of failure reported to the Swedish THA register are valid and secondly that adding clinical and radiographic failure criteria will dramatically decrease the survival rate for THR implants. The study consisted of three parts with 2-10 years follow-up of patients with total hip replacements (THR). In part I, three general health questionnaires (Nottingham Health Profile, SF-36, EuroQol) and two disease-specific instruments (WOMAC, Harris Hip Score) were tested for validity and reliability (n = 62). The results showed the disease specific questionnaires are at least as valid and reliable as the general instruments are. In part II, all THRs reported to the Swedish THA register 1986 to 1994 (84,884 primary and 10,176 revision hip replacements) were compared with the data from the Discharge register and the Cause of Death register in Sweden. 2,604 patients were randomly selected from the Discharge register to determine if they had undergone any revision surgery. The study showed that the Swedish THA register covers 94% of the revisions actually performed in Sweden and the results did not differ significantly from the data in the Discharge register and the results reported by the patients. In part III, 1,056 patients from the selected cohort were studied further concerning general health and disease-specific health, using the Nottingham Health Profile, SF-36 and WOMAC. An age and gender matched subcohort of 344 patients were then examined clinically, using the Harris Hip Score, and radiographically. The clinical and radiographic failure rates were in several tests as high as the revision rates documented in the Swedish THA

  13. Total hip replacement as primary treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Amarjit Singh; Singh, Ajay Pal; Singh, Arun Pal; Singh, Sukhraj

    2010-08-01

    Fifty-three patients with A2.2 and A2.3 intertrochanteric fracture according to the Muller classification were treated with total hip replacement between April 2000 and February 2004. The average age of the patients was 77 years. Average follow-up period was 3.7 years. We studied postoperative complications, mortality rate, functional outcome using the Harris hip score, time to return to normal activities, and radiographic evidence of healing. Two patients died on the third and fifth postoperative days. Seven more patients died within one year. The Harris hip score at one month was 66 +/- 7 (mean +/- standard deviation); at three months 72 +/- 6; at one year 74 +/- 5; at three years 76 +/- 6 and in the 27 patients who completed five year follow-up it was 76 +/- 8. Mobilisation and weight-bearing was started immediately in the postoperative period. Average time taken to return to normal daily activities was 28 days (range 24-33). No loosening or infection of the implants was observed. Total hip arthroplasty is a valid treatment option for mobile and mentally healthy elderly patients with intertrochanteric fractures. This procedure offers quick recovery with little risk of mechanical failure, avoids the risks associated with internal fixation and enables the patient to maintain a good level of function immediately after surgery.

  14. [Radiological analysis of osseointegration after implantation of the Zweymüller-Alloclassic total hip system].

    PubMed

    Dohle, J; Becker, W; Braun, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify typical radiological patterns of osseointegration following implantation of the Zweymüller-Alloclassic total hip system. The follow-up included the clinical and radiological evaluation of 115 consecutive hips. For each case the screw direction of the cup was calculated individually to fully observe the bony surroundings by properly tilted X-ray beam. After 8.1 years, the Harris hip score was 88.5 points on average. Trabecular condensations leading toward the threads of the cup were observed in 100 cases, underlining the importance of the threads for load transfer. A complete intrusion of the threads into the pelvic bone was not accomplished in 23 cases with marked sclerosis of the acetabulum. The reduced connection, however, did not impair stability or function. The area of the distal stem is characterized by cortical hypertrophy and trabecular condensation of the neighbouring marrow. Linear radiolucencies were frequently observed in Gruen-Zone 1 and 7, in 5 cases extending into zone 2 and 6 without influence on the clinical function of the implant. Material and geometry of the Zweymüller total hip lead to a load transfer through the threads of the cup. The integration of the stem relies on cortical interlocking. Proximal linear radiolucencies do not impair function. The signs of osseointegration around the cup can be fully demonstrated only by a specially tilted X-ray beam at a right angle to the screw direction of the cup.

  15. False aneurysm of the common femoral artery after total hip arthroplasty. A case report.

    PubMed

    Mallory, T H; Jaffe, S L; Eberle, R W

    1997-05-01

    A 59-year-old healthy man presented with osteoarthritis of his left hip that was recalcitrant to nonoperative treatment. He subsequently elected to have arthroplasty of the hip performed. At 3 months after arthroplasty, he returned reporting progressive groin pain: most remarkable was a palpable mass in the groin region. An arteriogram showed a radiodense mass adjacent to the acetabulum, and a computed tomography scan with contrast confirmed a large false aneurysm originating from the common femoral artery. In this particular case, a pointed Hohmann retractor punctured the common femoral artery, creating the dynamics of the development of a false aneurysm. Primary suture repair of the vascular defect was performed, followed by a complete and uncomplicated recovery of the patient to full activity. Since this case, the authors have discontinued the use of pointed. Hohmann retractors and now use a blunt, rounded Hohmann retractor during total hip arthroplasty without compromising acetabular exposure. However, care must be taken in blunt retractor placement to avoid retractor slippage during the procedure. This case shows the need for awareness of potential mechanisms for vascular injury related to total hip arthroplasty.

  16. Acoustic monitoring (RFM) of total hip arthroplasty - Results of a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Unger, A C; Cabrera-Palacios, H; Schulz, A P; Jürgens, Ch; Paech, Andreas

    2009-06-18

    At present there are no reliable non-traumatic and non- invasive methods to analyse the healing process and loosening status after total hip replacement. Therefore early as well as late loosening of prosthesis and interface component problems are difficult to be found or diagnosed at any time. In a cadaver study the potential application of Resonance Frequency Monitoring (RFM) will be evaluated as a non-invasive and non-traumatic method to monitor loosening and interface problems in hip replacement. In a 65 year old female cadaver different stability scenarios for a total hip replacement (shaft, head/modular head and cup, ESKA, Luebeck, Germany) are simulated in cemented and cement less prosthesis and then analysed with RFM. The types of stability vary from secure/press-fit to interface-shaft disruption. The RFM shows in cemented as well as cement less prosthesis significant intra-individual differences in the spectral measurements with a high dynamic (20 dB difference corresponding to the factor 100 (10000%)), regarding the simulated status of stability in the prosthesis system. The results of the study demonstrate RFM as a highly sensitive non-invasive and non-traumatic method to support the application of RFM as a hip prosthesis monitoring procedure. The data obtained shows the possibility to use RFM for osteointegration surveillance and early detection of interface problems, but will require further evaluation in clinical and experimental studies.

  17. Results of Wagner SL revision stem with impaction bone grafting in revision total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Somesh P; Bhalodiya, Haresh P

    2013-01-01

    Background: As the number of total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed increases, so do the number of required revisions. Impaction bone grafting with Wagner SL Revision stem is a good option for managing bone deficiencies arising from aseptic osteolysis. We studied the results of cementless diaphyseal fixation in femoral revision after total hip arthroplasty and whether there was spontaneous regeneration of bone stock in the proximal femur after the use of Wagner SL Revision stem (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) with impaction bone grafting. Materials and Methods: We performed 53 hip revisions using impaction bone grafting and Wagner SL Revision stems in 48 patients; (5 cases were bilateral) for variety of indications ranging from aseptic osteolysis to preiprosthetic fractures. The average age was 59 years (range 44-68 years). There were 42 male and 6 female patients. Four patients died after surgery for reasons unrelated to surgery. 44 patients were available for complete analysis. Results: The mean Harris Hip Score was 42 before surgery and improved to 86 by the final followup evaluation at a mean point of 5.5 years. Of the 44 patients, 87% (n=39) had excellent results and 10% (n=5) had good results. The stem survival rate was 98% (n=43). Conclusion: Short term results for revision THA with impaction bone grafting and Wagner SL revision stems are encouraging. However, it is necessary to obtain long term results through periodic followup evaluation, as rate of complications may increase in future. PMID:23960279

  18. Patient activity after total hip arthroplasty: a comparison of three different bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Plate, Johannes F; Issa, Kimona; Wright, Craig; Szczech, Bartlomiej W; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Banerjee, Samik; Mont, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Patients who receive hip arthroplasty today desire prostheses that not only have great longevity, but are also suitable for a very active lifestyle. Advances in metallurgy, tribologic behavior, surgical technique, as well as improvements in strength and microstructure, have made ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal bearings available for young patients requiring a great deal of mobility. The purpose of this study was to assess if the bearing surface had an effect, if any, on postoperative activity levels and clinical outcomes in patients receiving three different types of hip arthroplasty. This study includes three groups of 30 patients who had each received conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty (THA), ceramic-on-ceramic THA, or hip resurfacing arthroplasty. All groups were matched by men to women ratio, age, body mass index, diagnosis, preoperative activity levels, and length of follow-up. Clinical outcomes evaluated included weighted postoperative activity levels, Harris hip scores, patient satisfaction scores, revision rates, and complication rates. Patients who had received a metal-on-metal resurfacing had achieved significantly higher activity scores (mean 10.5 points; range, 1-28 points) compared to patients who had received ceramic-on-ceramic (mean 6.9 points; range, 0-34 points) or metal-on-polyethylene bearings (mean 5.6 points; range, 1-18 points). The mean postoperative Harris hip scores (94 vs 92 vs 91 points), patient satisfaction scores (9 vs 8.4 vs 8.3 points), aseptic revision (3% vs 0% vs 0%), and complication rates (3% vs 3% vs 3%) were similar between resurfacing, ceramic-on-ceramic, and metal-on-polyethylene bearing groups, respectively. This study showed that in cohorts of similarly matched arthroplasty patients in multiple demographics factors and preoperative activity levels, metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty may offer higher postoperative activity levels. For patients with higher activity levels, resurfacing

  19. Contribution of Hip Abductor Strength to Physical Function in Patients With Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Paulo E.P.; Almeida, Gustavo J.M.; Gil, Alexandra B.; DiGioia, Anthony M.; Levison, Timothy J.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2011-01-01

    Background Investigating modifiable factors that contribute to functional limitations in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may guide changes in rehabilitation protocols and improve functional outcomes. Whereas quadriceps muscle weakness has been demonstrated to contribute to functional limitations in TKA, the role of hip abductor weakness has not received attention. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether hip abductor strength (force-generating capacity) contributes to physical function beyond what can be explained by quadriceps muscle strength in patients after a TKA. Design A cross-sectional design was used in the study. Setting The study was conducted in a clinical laboratory at an academic center. Patients Thirty-one people with TKA (74% female; mean age=68 years, SD=8; mean body mass index=31 kg/m2, SD=5) participated in the study. Measurements Strength of quadriceps muscles and hip abductors was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Performance-based physical function was assessed with 4 measures: self-selected walking speed, the Figure-of-8 Walk Test, the Stair Ascend/Descend Test, and the 5-Chair Rise Test. Self-reported physical function was assessed with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index Physical Function Subscale. Results In hierarchical regression models, after accounting for demographic and anthropometric factors, quadriceps muscle strength was associated with performance on the Stair Ascend/Descend Test. After accounting for demographic, anthropometric, and quadriceps strength, hip abductor strength was associated with performance on the Stair Ascend/Descend Test, the Figure-of-8 Walk Test, and the 5-Chair Rise Test. Limitations The study design precluded ascertainment of causal relationships. Conclusions After TKA, hip abductor strength influenced physical function in participants more than did demographic or anthropometric measures or quadriceps strength. Longitudinal studies with

  20. Iliopsoas Impingement After Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty: Operative and Nonoperative Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Brian P; Sculco, Peter K; Sierra, Rafael J; Trousdale, Robert T; Berry, Daniel J

    2017-04-05

    A potential cause of persistent groin pain after total hip arthroplasty is impingement of the iliopsoas tendon. Treatment options include conservative management, tenotomy, and acetabular revision, but the literature, to our knowledge, has been limited to small case series on each technique. We present a series of patients with iliopsoas impingement after total hip arthroplasty and evaluate efficacy and risk factors for success or failure of each treatment strategy. Forty-nine patients treated at one institution for a diagnosis of iliopsoas impingement after primary total hip arthroplasty with hemispherical acetabular component and polyethylene bearing were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-one patients underwent acetabular revision, 8 patients underwent tenotomy, and 20 patients had nonoperative management. The mean follow-up was 4 years. Anterior acetabular component prominence was measured on true lateral hip radiographs. At the most recent follow-up, 10 patients (50%) in the nonoperative group had groin pain resolution compared with 22 patients (76%) in the operative group (p = 0.06). In patients with <8 mm of component prominence, tenotomy provided resolution of groin pain in 5 (100%) of 5 patients and a mean Harris hip score of 89 points. In patients with ≥8 mm of prominence, acetabular revision led to groin pain resolution in 12 (92%) of 13 patients compared with 1 (33%) of 3 patients treated with tenotomy (p = 0.07). Nonoperative management of iliopsoas impingement led to groin pain resolution in 50% of patients. In patients with minimal acetabular component prominence, iliopsoas release provided a high rate of success. Acetabular revision was more predictable for groin pain resolution in patients with ≥8 mm of anterior component prominence. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  1. Range of change of measured BMD in the femoral neck and total hip with rotation in women.

    PubMed

    Rosenthall, Leonard

    2004-01-01

    To obtain a quantitative assessment of the range of variation of bone mineral density (BMD) measurements in the femoral neck and total hip with rotation of the hip, 200 women, ages 21-86 years, were scanned by DXA in the neutral position and with 25% internal rotation of the leg. The difference in BMDs (neutral minus internal rotation) was > or =0 in about 65% of the patients, whereas the remaining 35% were <0. In terms of absolute change, the femoral neck median BMD of 0.025 g/cm2 was significantly greater than the total hip, 0.016 g/cm2. Percent absolute femoral neck change was 3.13% compared to 1.79% for the total hip. Absolute change of the total hip correlated positively with age, while the femoral neck showed a positive trend that was not statistically significant at the P = 0.05 level. Despite the total hip's lower precision error and smaller BMD change with rotation, the number of patients exceeding the 95% confidence limit for each site was virtually the same, 11% for the femoral neck and 13% for the total hip. This finding underlines the need to achieve confirmed repositioning accuracy in longitudinal studies, whether at zero femoral neck axis anteversion or otherwise, to appreciate the relative advantages of total hip measurement. The question that remains is what method can be employed to obtain this confirmation simply and economically in a busy clinical service facility with the usual turnover in personnel.

  2. Total arthroplasty in displaced dysplastic hips with acetabular reconstruction and femoral shortening – technical note☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paulo; de Oliveira, Leandro Alves; Coelho, Danilo Lopes; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Rebello, Percival Rosa; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    To describe a new procedure of total hip replacement in patient with severe developmental dysplasia of the left hip, using technique of acetabular reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts and subtrochanteric shortening femoral osteotomy. Total hip replacement done in January of 2003. The Eftekhar's classification was used and included type D, neglected dislocations. Bone graft incorporated in acetabular shelf and femoral osteotomy. Our contribution is the use of an Allis plate to better fix acetabular grafts, avoiding loosening, and cerclage around bone graft in femoral osteotomy site, which diminish pseudoarthrosis risk. This technique shows efficiency, allowing immediately resolution for this case with pain and range of motion of hip improvement. It also allows the acetabular dysplasia reconstruction, equalization of the limb length (without elevated risk of neurovascular lesion) and repairs the normal hip biomechanics due to the correction of the hip's center of rotation. PMID:26229775

  3. Greater Trochanteric Reattachment Using the Third-Generation Cable Plate System in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Sung; Pansey, Nachiket; Kansay, Rajeev K; Yoo, Je-Hyun; Lee, Hwang-Yong; Chang, Jun-Dong

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the radiologic and functional results of greater trochanteric reattachment using the third-generation cable plate system in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 47 trochanteric fixations (27 men and 18 women; mean age of 60.2 years) using the third-generation cable plate system in revision THA were retrospectively evaluated. The mean follow-up was 80.4 months (range 27-148 months). The osteotomized greater trochanter was reattached using the Cable-Ready system (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN) and the Dall-Miles cable system (Stryker, Mahwah, NJ). The clinical results with Harris hip score, visual analog scale, and radiologic outcomes were evaluated. The mean Harris hip score was improved from 55.7 (range 17-72) preoperatively to 90.8 (range 68-100; P = .001) postoperatively, and the mean pain score was improved from 6.6 (range 3-10) to 2.5 (range 0-6; P = .001), respectively. Nonunion was observed in 6 hips (12.7%). Migration of the osteotomized greater trochanteric fragment (>1 cm) was seen in 8 hips (17.0%). Cable breakage occurred in 13 cases (27.6%). Although 5 cable plate systems were removed, there was no need for reattachment of the greater trochanter in this study. This study showed a relatively high incidence of radiologic failure after greater trochanteric reattachment using the cable plate system in revision THA, although reattachments were not required and clinical outcome was relatively satisfactory. Periodic and close observation for the early detection of failure is necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Strain shielding inspired re-design of proximal femoral stems for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cilla, Myriam; Checa, Sara; Duda, Georg N

    2017-02-08

    A large number of hip prosthesis with different designs have been developed. However, the influence of hip implant design changes on the strains induced in the bone remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to better understand the mechanics of short stem total hip arthroplasty. Specifically, it investigates whether strain shielding can be avoided by changing implant shape and/or material properties. It is hypothesized that the re-design of existing implant designs can result in further reduction of strain shielding and thus keep bone loss minimal following total hip replacement. Finite element methods were used to compare healthy and implanted models. The local mechanics strains/stresses in the intact and implanted femurs were determined under patient-specific muscle and joint contact forces. Results suggest that small changes in implant geometry and material properties have no major effect on strain shielding. Furthermore, it was found that improvement depends on a dramatic re-design of the original implant design. Whereas the benefit of this strategy of modification of the original geometry of a given short-stemmed hip consists in reduced bone remodeling, care should be taken with regard to long-term bone anchorage and implant fatigue strength. It is also shown that geometrical and material changes have a limited potential in avoiding strain shielding even in short-stemmed implants. Finally, it is suggested that an understanding of the influence of these changes on the strain distribution within the bone can guide in the process of optimizing the current stem designs toward minimal strain shielding effects. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  5. [Total hip prosthesis for chronic juvenile arthritis. A review of a series of 34 prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Journeau, P; Mabesoone, F; Touzet, P; Prieur, A M; Rigault, P

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the results of total hip arthroplasty for chronic juvenile arthritis in order to evaluate risks, problems and benefits of this procedure. Between 1984 and 1992, 34 total hip prostheses were implanted for chronic juvenile arthritis in 20 patients. Most prosthesis were Zweymuller cementless prosthesis. Mean follow up was 5 years. Results were good. In 85 per cent of cases, patients had a normal activity recovery. Pain relief was very good since in 80 per cent cases patients had a total indolence. Beyond these good clinical results at this mean follow-up, the main interest of this study is to characterize two different periods in the surgical technique. The first period when cemented prosthesis was employed and the second one when cementless femoral implants with screwed acetabular component were used. Cementless prostheses appear to be a satisfying solution in this disease, preserving bones and showing very good radiological and functional results. Furthermore, the very low complication rate despite general discomfort may prompt us to use total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of chronic juvenile arthritis.

  6. Quality of life and functionality after total hip arthroplasty: a long-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a lack of data on the long-term outcome of total hip arthroplasty procedures, as assessed by validated tools. Methods We conducted a follow-up study to evaluate the quality of life and functionality of 250 patients an average of 16 years (range: 11-23 years) after total hip arthroplasty using a validated assessment set including the SF-36 questionnaire, Harris Hip Score, WOMAC score, Functional Comorbidity Index, and a study specific questionnaire. Models of multiple stepwise linear and logistic regression analysis were constructed to evaluate the relationships between several explanatory variables and these functional outcomes. Results The SF-36 physical indexes of these patients compared negatively with the normative values but positively with the results obtained in untreated subjects with severe hip osteoarthritis. Similar results were detected for the Harris Hip Score and WOMAC score. There was a 96% rate of post-surgical satisfaction. Hip functionality and comorbidities were the most important determinants of physical measures on the SF-36. Conclusions Patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty have impaired long-term self-reported physical quality of life and hip functionality but they still perform physically better than untreated patients with advanced hip osteoarthritis. However, the level of post-surgical satisfaction is high. PMID:21978244

  7. Tribological characterisation of UHMWPE used in dual mobility total hip prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essefi, I.; Hakkouna, H.; Ouenzerfi, G.; Mollon, G.; Hamza, S.; Renault, E.; Berthier, Y.; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, A.-M.

    2016-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty represents an effective solution for bone and joint diseases. Nevertheless, the hip prosthesis has a limited lifetime, in the average around fifteen years. Their improvement, especially their dual mobility is the objective of this study. Therefore, our strategy is focused on improving the material by comparing three types of polyethylene to determine the best one from a friction mechanism and wear rate minimization standpoint. A dual mobility hip prosthesis, containing a two-sided steel and cobalt chrome cup, was tested with a TORNIER hip joint simulator in calf serum. The rubbed surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal fluorescence microscopy. All these multiscale characterization techniques (from nanoscale to millimeter and micro- scale) showed that the velocity accommodation mechanism is different from one type of polyethylene to another. The wear in the case of standard polyethylene was noticeable and the particles were large and scattered between the surface of polyethylene, the surface of the cup and in the calf serum. For the crosslinked polyethylene, the particles coming from the wear, were not as large, but they were spread the same way as the first case. Even though it shares the same accommodation principle on the detachment of the material with the crosslinked polyethylene the wear particles for the crosslinked vitaminized polyethylene were large and they were only found on the surface of the polyethylene.

  8. Effect of Body Mass Index on Digital Templating for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sershon, Robert A; Diaz, Alejandro; Bohl, Daniel D; Levine, Brett R

    2017-03-01

    Digital templating is becoming more prevalent in orthopedics. Recent investigations report high accuracy using digital templating in total hip arthroplasty (THA); however, the effect of body mass index (BMI) on templating accuracy is not well described. Digital radiographs of 603 consecutive patients (645 hips) undergoing primary THA by a single surgeon were digitally templated using OrthoView (Jacksonville, FL). A 25-mm metallic sphere was used as a calibration marker. Preoperative digital hip templates were compared with the final implant size. Hips were stratified into groups based on BMI: BMI <30 (315), BMI 30-35 (132), BMI 35-40 (97), and BMI >40 (101). Accuracy between templating and final size did not vary by BMI for acetabular or femoral components. Digital templating was within 2 sizes of the final acetabular and femoral implants in 99.1% and 97.1% of cases, respectively. Digital templating is an effective means of predicting the final size of THA components. BMI does not appear to play a major role in altering THA digital templating accuracy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanical failure of metal-polyethylene sandwich liner in metal-on-metal total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yasushi; Fetto, Joseph F

    2015-01-01

    Metal-on-metal had been proposed as an optimal articulation in THRs, however, many monoblock prostheses have been recalled in the USA because of significant high rates of early failure. Metal-on-metal prostheses had been implanted in our institution, and this is a case history of a single patient, in whom metal-on-metal THRs with different femoral sizes of heads were implanted. A 57-year-old female patient underwent bilateral total hip replacements with metal-on-metal prostheses using metal-polyethylene "sandwich" liners 9 years ago on the right side and 7 years ago on the left side respectively. The only difference in both sides was the femoral head diameter of 28 mm in right and 34 mm in left. Seven years after the left surgery, the acetabular liner was dissociated, however, metallosis was not detected. Although the larger femoral head was thought to increase hip joint stability, it dictated a reduction in polyethylene thickness in this prosthesis design, and it was 4 mm in the left hip. Recently, metal-on-metal articulations are thought not to be optimal for hip joint bearing surface, however, this clinical failure was due to the polyethylene thickness and quality.

  10. Implant survival and radiographic outcome of total hip replacement in patients less than 20 years old

    PubMed Central

    Tsukanaka, Masako; Halvorsen, Vera; Nordsletten, Lars; EngesæTer, Ingvild Ø; EngesæTer, Lars B; Marie Fenstad, Anne; Röhrl, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total hip replacement (THR) is not recommended for children and very young teenagers because early and repetitive revisions are likely. We investigated the clinical and radiographic outcomes of THR performed in children and teenage patients. Patients and methods We included 111 patients (132 hips) who underwent THR before 20 years of age. They were identified in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, together with information on the primary diagnosis, types of implants, and any revisions that required implant change. Radiographs and Harris hip score (HHS) were also evaluated. Results The mean age at primary THR was 17 (11–19) years and the mean follow-up time was 14 (3–26) years. The 10-year survival rate after primary THR (with the endpoint being any revision) was 70%. 39 patients had at least 1 revision and 16 patients had 2 or more revisions. In the latest radiographs, osteolysis and atrophy were observed in 19% and 27% of the acetabulae and 21% and 62% of the femurs, respectively. The mean HHS at the final follow-up was 83 (15–100). Interpretation The clinical score after THR in these young patients was acceptable, but many revisions had been performed. However, young patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip had lower implant survival. Moreover, the bone stock in these patients was poor, which could complicate future revisions. PMID:27435903

  11. Routine one-stage exchange for chronic infection after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Lengert, Régis; Diesinger, Yann; Gaudias, Jeannot; Boeri, Cyril; Kempf, Jean-François

    2014-12-01

    We hypothesized that a routine one-stage exchange for treatment of chronically infected total hip replacement (THR) will lead to (1) a higher rate of infection recurrence and (2) a poorer hip outcome than the published rates after two-stage exchange. Sixty-five cases have been treated consecutively with one-stage exchange. All patients have been followed for a period of three to six years or until death or infection recurrence. The five-year rate for infection recurrence was 16%. The five-year survival rate for recurrence of the index infection was 8%. Forty-two percent of the hips had a good or excellent PMA score, and 46% a good or excellent OH score. Routine one-stage exchange was not associated with a higher recurrence rate and a poorer hip function than previously published series of two-stage exchange. Therefore, there is little support to choose two-stage exchange as the routine treatment for management of chronically infected THR.

  12. Acute fracture of the acetabulum secondary to a convulsive seizure 3 years after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Atilla, Bulent; Caglar, Omur; Akgun, Rahmi Can

    2008-03-01

    While aseptic loosening, osteolysis, and infection are the most common causes of failure after total hip arthroplasty (THA), late hip pain can also be the result of acetabular fracture related to trauma and resultant prosthetic failure. However, atraumatic fracture of the acetabulum around a well-fixed acetabular component is unusual. We present a patient with an acetabular fracture resulting from a generalized convulsive attack 3 years after an uncomplicated primary THA. A 33-year-old man presented with acute left hip pain. He had chronic renal insufficiency and had undergone bilateral THA due to avascular necrosis. The night prior to his admission, he suffered a generalized convulsive attack with severe extremity contractions. Afterwards, he had acute left groin pain and had difficulty walking. Physical examination revealed moderate left hip pain as well as a 1-cm shortening of the affected limb. Radiological examination demonstrated an acetabular fracture with medial wall comminution. The acetabular component had migrated medially and rotated horizontally. Revision of the acetabular component with a reinforcement ring and implantation of a cemented acetabular component was realized. Severe muscle spasms during generalized seizures are known to lead to various musculoskeletal injuries (fractures of the proximal humerus, femur, acetabulum, and dislocation of the shoulder). Seizures could also lead to acute periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum in patients with osteopenia. Therefore careful reaming is required to avoid overmedialization of the acetabular component in those patients.

  13. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional cup coverage in total hip arthroplasty with developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liao; Thoreson, Andrew R; Trousdale, Robert T; Morrey, Bernard F; Dai, Kerong; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-06-21

    We analyzed the mean difference and correlation between 2D cup coverage measured from different projections and three-dimensional (3D) cup coverage to investigate their precise relationship in total hip arthroplasty (THA) among patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We created DDH-THA models on six foam pelvic models. 3D cup coverage was measured using a motion capture system and imaging software. Digitally reconstructed radiographs with predetermined pelvic rotations were simulated using image processing software at three different angles of rotation around the long body axis (0°, 25° and 45°). 2D cup coverage was then measured on these reconstructed radiographs. The 3D technique showed excellent intra-observer (κ>0.98) and inter-observer (κ>0.99) reliability. The 2D technique tended to overestimate the real cup coverage by about 15%. The smallest difference between 2D and 3D cup coverage occurred when 2D measurement was performed on the radiographs with 45° of pelvic rotation toward the operated side (14.50%, P<0.0001), meanwhile, the highest correlation coefficient between 2D and 3D cup coverage was also observed when the 2D measurement was performed on the radiographs at this same pelvic rotation (r=0.67, P=0.0003). Published recommendations regarding the minimum cup coverage based on 2D measurement should be interpreted cautiously. The minimal cup coverage, as an intra-operative 3D parameter related to the long term fixation of the cup component, should be more accurately determined with intra-operative measurement.

  14. The effect of education and supervised exercise vs. education alone on the time to total hip replacement in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis. A randomized clinical trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Carsten; Roos, Ewa M; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Overgaard, Søren

    2013-01-14

    The age- and gender-specific incidence of total hip replacement surgery has increased over the last two decades in all age groups. Recent studies indicate that non-surgical interventions are effective in reducing pain and disability, even at later stages of the disease when joint replacement is considered. We hypothesize that the time to hip replacement can be postponed in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis following participation in a patient education and supervised exercise program when compared to patients receiving patient education alone. A prospective, blinded, parallel-group multi-center trial (2 sites), with balanced randomization [1:1]. Patients with hip osteoarthritis and an indication for hip replacement surgery, aged 40 years and above, will be consecutively recruited and randomized into two treatment groups. The active treatment group will receive 3 months of supervised exercise consisting of 12 sessions of individualized, goal-based neuromuscular training, and 12 sessions of intensive resistance training plus patient education (3 sessions). The control group will receive only patient education (3 sessions). The primary end-point for assessing the effectiveness of the intervention is 12 months after baseline. However, follow-ups will also be performed once a year for at least 5 years. The primary outcome measure is the time to hip replacement surgery measured on a Kaplain-Meier survival curve from time of inclusion. Secondary outcome measures are the five subscales of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, physical activity level (UCLA activity score), and patient's global perceived effect. Other measures include pain after exercise, joint-specific adverse events, exercise adherence, general health status (EQ-5D-5L), mechanical muscle strength and performance in physical tests. A cost-effectiveness analysis will also be performed. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized clinical trial comparing a patient education plus

  15. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Implant Rupture after Surgery for Atypical Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Yu; Ochi, Hironori; Watari, Taiji; Matsumoto, Mikio; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Treatment methods for delayed union and nonunion of atypical femoral fracture are still controversial. Moreover, no treatment method has been established for implant rupture caused by delayed union and nonunion. We encountered a 74-year-old female in whom nonunion-induced implant rupture occurred after treatment of atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture with internal fixation using a long femoral nail. It was unlikely that sufficient fixation could be obtained by repeating osteosynthesis alone. Moreover, the patient was elderly and early weight-bearing activity was essential for early recovery of ADL. Based on these reasons, we selected one-stage surgery with total hip arthroplasty and osteosynthesis with inverted condylar locking plate as salvage procedures. Bone union was achieved at 6 months after surgery. This case illustrated that osteosynthesis-combined one-staged total hip arthroplasty could be considered as one of the options for nonunion-induced implant rupture of atypical femoral subtrochanteric fracture. PMID:27818818

  16. Corrosion on the acetabular liner taper from retrieved modular metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, Trevor C; Dyrkacz, Richard M; Turgeon, Thomas R; Burnell, Colin D; Wyss, Urs P; Brandt, Jan-M

    2014-10-01

    Eight retrieved metal-on-metal total hip replacements displayed corrosion damage along the cobalt-chromium alloy liner taper junction with the Ti alloy acetabular shell. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the primary mechanism of corrosion to be grain boundary and associated crevice corrosion, which was likely accelerated through mechanical micromotion and galvanic corrosion resulting from dissimilar alloys. Coordinate measurements revealed up to 4.3mm(3) of the cobalt-chromium alloy taper surface was removed due to corrosion, which is comparable to previous reports of corrosion damage on head-neck tapers. The acetabular liner-shell taper appears to be an additional source of metal corrosion products in modular total hip replacements. Patients with these prostheses should be closely monitored for signs of adverse reaction towards corrosion by-products.

  17. Cobalt toxicity after revision total hip replacement due to fracture of a ceramic head.

    PubMed

    Pelayo-de Tomás, J M; Novoa-Parra, C; Gómez-Barbero, P

    2017-01-25

    Symptomatic cobalt toxicity from a failed total hip replacement is a rare, but devastating complication. Potential clinical findings include cardiomyopathy, hypothyroidism, skin rash, visual and hearing impairment, polycythaemia, weakness, fatigue, cognitive impairment, and neuropathy. The case is presented of a 74year-old man in whom, after a ceramic-ceramic replacement and two episodes of prosthetic dislocation, it was decided to replace it with a polyethylene-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA). At 6months after the revision he developed symptoms of cobalt toxicity, confirmed by analytical determination (serum cobalt level=651.2μg/L). After removal of the prosthesis, the levels of chromium and cobalt in blood and urine returned to normal, with the patient currently being asymptomatic. It is recommended to use a new ceramic on ceramic bearing at revision, in order to minimise the risk of wear-related cobalt toxicity following breakage of ceramic components.

  18. Thirty years of experience with alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zaoui, Amine; Zadegan, Frédéric; Sedel, Laurent; Nizard, Rémy

    2010-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty have been developed in an attempt to minimise debris and the occurrence of osteolytic lesions. The outstanding tribological properties of this bearing system are explained by low surface roughness, high hardness for major scratch resistance, and high wettability. Since the 1970s, technological improvements in the manufacturing process of alumina components together with a better understanding of Morse taper technology have provided a surgical grade material with high density, high purity and small grains. Published studies on the outcome of total hip arthroplasty performed with this new generation of implants showed high survivorship especially in young and active patients, with survival rates free of revision of 90.8% to 97.4% at ten years. However, concern remains over ceramic liner fracture and squeaking, which has been noted recently with increasing prevalence. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the use of alumina-on-alumina bearings. PMID:21191579

  19. Phase transformation of a zirconia ceramic head after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, K; Sugano, N; Nishii, T; Miki, H; Oka, K; Yoshikawa, H

    2001-09-01

    We report two cases of surface deterioration of a zirconia ceramic femoral head associated with phase transformation after total hip arthroplasty. One head was retrieved at revision due to recurrent dislocation after six years and the other because of failure of the locking mechanism of the polyethylene liner after three years. The monoclinic content of the zirconia ceramics rose from 1% to about 30% on the surface of the heads. SEM revealed numerous craters indicating extraction of the zirconia ceramics at the surface. Surface roughness increased from an initial value of 0.006 microm up to 0.12 microm. This is the first report to show that phase transformation of zirconia ceramics causes deterioration of the surface roughness of the head in vivo after total hip arthroplasty.

  20. Choices and compromises in the use of small head sizes in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, John J; Brown, Thomas D; Pedersen, Douglas R; Johnston, Richard C

    2002-12-01

    Observation cohort studies, a sliding-distance-coupled finite element model, and an expanded finite element model that simulates dislocation were used to evaluate the benefits and compromises associated with the use of smaller femoral heads in the total hip arthroplasty construct. Wear studies of total hip arthroplasty cohorts showed less polyethylene wear and less deleterious effects of third body debris when smaller femoral head sizes were used. The sliding-distance-coupled finite element model findings were corroborated by these clinical wear studies. The dislocation model predicted the increased propensity for dislocation when smaller modular head femoral components were used in the cohort studies. Impingement is not the only contributor to frank dislocation. The dislocation model explicitly defined the range of motion changes from impingement to dislocation, and the resisting moment changes between construct designs.

  1. Continuous Quadratus Lumborum Block for Postoperative Pain in Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Margaret M; Hembrador, Sheena; Lee, Alex

    2016-09-15

    A 69-year-old man with a history of chronic pain and opioid use presented for total hip arthroplasty. In the interests of ensuring early mobilization and pain control, we chose a continuous quadratus lumborum block technique, a novel ultrasound-guided block that has not yet been described for total hip arthroplasty, hypothesizing that it would be motor-sparing. While the perineural catheter was infused, the patient required no IV opioids. He was able to ambulate on the first postoperative day, reporting pain scores between 0 and 3/10. The quadratus lumborum block is a promising technique that, in our patient, was motor-sparing and provided excellent pain control.

  2. Animal-associated bacteria, Erysipelotrix rhusiopathiae, as the cause of infection in a total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Troelsen, Andres; Møller, Jens K; Bolvig, Lars; Prynø, Thomas; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Søballe, Kjeld

    2010-04-01

    Invasive infection with animal-associated bacteria, Erysipelotrix rhusiopathiae, is unusual and has, to our knowledge, never been described as the cause of infected total hip arthroplasty. We describe how an infected total hip arthroplasty caused by these bacteria is eradicated using standard surgical and antibiotic treatment. Before 2-stage revision surgery, the patient had persistent groin pain, elevated C-reactive protein, radiographic periprosthetic osteolysis, excessive intra-articular fluid, and periprosthetic activity accumulation on the white cell scan. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin after confirmed sensitivity of E rhusiopathiae diagnosed by culture of five tissue samples and polymerase chain reaction of the prosthetic sonicate sample. Sixteen weeks after the last stage of revision surgery, there were no signs of reoccurring infection.

  3. Infection of total hip prostheses by Peptococcus magnus: an immunofluorescence and ELISA study of two cases.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A G; Fincham, W J; Golding, M A; Cook, J

    1979-01-01

    In two cases of infected total hip replacements, Peptococcus magnus was isolated in pure culture from the implant when it was removed. Fluorescent antibody and ELISA studies have shown that both patients developed an antibody response to this anaerobic coccus soon after the replacement operation. These results suggest that the organism is a true infective agent, which was probably responsible for the failure of the arthroplasty operation. PMID:372250

  4. Phase transformation of a new generation yttria-stabilized zirconia femoral head after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hayaishi, Yasuhisa; Miki, Hidenobu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2008-01-01

    We examined a new-generation yttria-stabilized zirconia head manufactured by NGK 1 year after total hip arthroplasty. Monoclinic content of the retrieved head was twice that of the unused head at the pole and equator. A fourfold increase in monoclinic content was observed at 5 mm below the equator. Transformation from the tetragonal phase to the monoclinic phase occurred in the new generation zirconia with alumina doping within a relatively short period in vivo.

  5. [Two-year experience with cell salvage in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Buget, Mehmet I; Dikici, Fatih; Edipoğlu, İpek S; Yıldız, Eren; Valiyev, Natig; Kucukay, Suleyman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of the cell salvage system in total hip arthroplasty surgeries and whether the cell salvage system can reduce the allogeneic blood transfusion requirement in total hip arthroplasty patients. We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of patients who underwent hip arthroplasty surgeries between 2010 and 2012 in a university hospital. A total of 181 arthroplasty patients were enrolled in our study. In the cell salvage group, the mean perioperative rate of allogeneic blood transfusion was significantly lower (92.53±111.88mL) than that in the control group (170.14±116.79mL; p<0.001). When the mean postoperative transfusion rates were compared, the cell salvage group had lower values (125.37±193.33mL) than the control group (152.22±208.37mL), although the difference was not statistically significant. The number of patients receiving allogeneic blood transfusion in the CS group (n=29; 43.2%) was also significantly lower than control group (n=56; 73.6%; p<0.05). In the logistic regression analysis, perioperative amount of transfusion, odds ratio (OR) -4.257 (95% CI -0.502 to 0.184) and operation time, OR: 2.720 (95% CI 0.001-0.004) were independent risk factors for the usage of cell salvage system. Cell salvage is an effective strategy for reducing the need for allogeneic blood transfusion in the perioperative setting; it provides support to patient blood management interventions. Thus, we recommend the cell salvage system for use in total hip arthroplasty surgeries to reduce the need for allogeneic blood transfusion, if possible. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Management strategies for infected total hip arthroplasty. A critical appreciation of problems and techniques.

    PubMed

    Karachalios, Theofilos; Koutalos, Antonios; Komnos, George

    2014-10-02

    Infection is a devastating complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Risk factors have been recognised and prevention is possible. The nature of the disease is heterogeneous and for satisfactory management one has to weigh factors related to pathogen, host, local soft tissue, bone stock, surgeon experience and financial resources. Available data in the current literature is of poor quality and there is a lack of data comparing different techniques. Referral of patients to dedicated departments with the appropriate facilities may be more appropriate.

  7. Fabrication and wear test of a continuous fiber/particulate composite total surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous fiber woven E-glass composite femoral shells having the ame elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle were tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these shells atriculating with the acetabular cups are comparable to a vitallium bal articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene cup.

  8. Revision of failed hip resurfacing to total hip arthroplasty rapidly relieves pain and improves function in the early post operative period

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the results of 25 consecutive patients who underwent revision of a hip resurfacing prosthesis to a total hip replacement. Revisions were performed for recurrent pain and effusion, infection and proximal femoral fractures. Both components were revised in 20 cases. There were 12 male and 13 female patients with average time to revision of 34.4 and 26.4 months respectively. The mean follow up period was 12.7 months (3 to 31). All patients reported relief of pain and excellent satisfaction scores. Two patients experienced stiffness up to three months post operatively. Pre operative Oxford, Harris and WOMAC hip scores were 39.1, 36.4 and 52.2 respectively. Mean post operative scores at last follow up were 17.4, 89.8 and 6.1 respectively (p < 0.001 for each score). These results show that conversion of hip resurfacing to total hip arthroplasty has high satisfaction rates. These results compare favourably with those for revision total hip arthroplasty. PMID:21114835

  9. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  10. [Monitoring of IL-6 levels in patients after total hip joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Waldemar; Wierusz-Kozłowska, Małgorzata; Markuszewski, Jacek; Leśniewska, Kinga; Wiktorowicz, Krzysztof

    2004-01-01

    Total hip replacement became a method of choice in treatment of the severe osteoarthritis. Despite the progress in constructing the implants and also the surgical technique, the number of complications rises together with the number of arthroplasties performed. The periprosthetic osteolysis and its consequence--the loosening is the one of the greatest problems of today's joint replacement. It creates the main obstacle for the long-term efficiency of the total hip arthroplasty. It was proved by the numerous research, wear debris of the implant induce the chronic periprosthetic inflammatory process. Many studies emphasize the influence of the proinflammatory cytokines on the bone metabolism. The aim of the study was the evaluation of the inflammatory process in patients with the severe osteoarthritis before the surgery and in subsequent periods after total hip replacements and also in patients with the aseptic loosening of the endoprosthesis, by the monitoring the levels of IL-6 in serum of the peripheral blood. The results suggest, that in patients following THA with the elevated level of IL-6, the inflammatory process was present. This inflammation may lead in future to the aseptic loosening of the implant.

  11. Periprosthetic bone turnover after primary total hip arthroplasty measured by single-photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Venesmaa, P; Vanninen, E; Miettinen, H; Kröger, H

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in periprosthetic bone are common sequlae of prosthetic implants.This prospective 3-year study was performed to follow regional periprosthetic bone turnover after uncomplicated total hip arthroplasty (THA) using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Eighteen patients (nine men, nine women: mean age 61 years, range from 50 to 73 years) with primary hip osteoarthritis underwent either uncemented or cemented THA. The SPECT measurements were taken 6, 12, and 36 months after THA. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were performed on the patients during follow-up. The mean SPECT uptake ratios decreased significantly in the regions of interest (ROIs) during follow-up compared to baseline value, in the trochanter major (p = 0.006), the trochanter minor (p = 0.009) and the total area (p = 0.018). Despite these decreases the uptake ratios in the medial cortex (p = 0.014), tip (p = 0.002) and total area (p = 0.016) remained significantly higher in the operated side than in the contralateral side (non-operated) 3 years after THA. Changes in bone turnover in the vicinity of the implant did not correlate with changes in periprosthetic BMD. Local periprosthetic bone turnover decreased slowly after THA and did not recover to the level typical of non-operated hips. This led us to suggest that bone turnover around the femoral implants remains increased more than 3 years after THA even if there are no signs of failure of the prosthesis.

  12. Bone bleeding during total hip arthroplasty after administration of tranexamic acid.

    PubMed

    Garneti, Narendra; Field, Jeremy

    2004-06-01

    Numerous methods of controlling bleeding during total hip arthroplasty have been used. Thromboplastic agents have been used with some success, but the resultant fibrin layer interposed between the bone and cement weakens the interface. Topical freezing saline and hypotensive anesthesia have proved to be the most effective to date. The goal of this randomized, double blind, controlled study is to determine the effect of a single bolus dose of tranexamic acid, administered at the time of anesthesia, on bleeding during primary total hip arthroplasty. Fifty patients were randomized to receive either 10 mg/kg of tranexamic acid or a similar volume of normal saline as a preoperative bolus. Patients were not given pharmacologic thrombotic prophylaxis until 48 hours after surgery. The goal was to measure blood loss from the femoral canal at the time of surgery. An estimate of the internal and external blood loss during and after surgery was performed, and the transfusion requirement was recorded. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of blood loss from the femoral canal, the perioperative bleeding, and postoperative hemoglobin. In the group that received tranexamic acid, a greater number of patients required transfusion than in the placebo group. The results of this study do not support the routine use of tranexamic acid in primary total hip arthroplasty.

  13. Effectiveness of an Acetabular Positioning Device in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Stephen L.; Mologne, Timothy S.; Peterson, Drew A.; Holley, Keith A.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a commercially available acetabular positioning device, we performed a prospective evaluation of 40 consecutive patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty. All surgery was performed by the same surgeon, in the same operating room, and on the same operating table. The acetabular positioning device was designed to place the component in 45° of abduction. At 6 weeks, all radiographs were evaluated by 3 investigators not involved with the surgery. Each radiograph was evaluated by each reviewer on 3 separate occasions, blinded to the findings of the other reviewer to assess interobserver and intraobserver variability. The mean cup abduction angle was 42.1°, with a range from 23° to 57° (SD 8.3°). Intraobserver and interobserver variability were 0.2 and 0.3°, respectively. The findings of this study demonstrate a wide variability in acetabular cup placement in primary total hip arthroplasty. We believe this is due to movement of the pelvis, which may occur during preparation, draping, and retracting during surgery. We feel surgeons should not rely solely on positioning devices when implanting the acetabular component in total hip arthroplasty. Identification of bone landmarks and determination of superolateral implant coverage noted on preoperative templating is advocated to improve the precision of component position. PMID:18751812

  14. Factors affecting aseptic loosening of 4750 total hip arthroplasties: multivariate survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bordini, Barbara; Stea, Susanna; De Clerico, Manuela; Strazzari, Sergio; Sasdelli, Antonio; Toni, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty is a successful surgery, that fails at a rate of approximately 10% at ten years from surgery. Causes for failure are mainly aseptic loosening of one or both components partially due to wear of articular surfaces and partially to design. The present analysis aimed to identify risk factors and quantify their effects on aseptic failure. Methods Multivariate survival analysis was applied to 4,750 primary total hip arthroplasties performed between 1995 and 2000. Results The survival of the prosthesis is affected by gender, age, pathology, type of the prosthesis and skill of the. The worst conditions are male patients, younger than 40 years, affected by sequelae of congenital diseases, operated by a who performed less than 400 total hip artroplasty in the period. Furthermore, cemented cups and stems (less expensive) have a higher risk of failure compared with uncemented ones (more expensive). Conclusion The only variable that affects survival and that can be modified by is the type of prosthesis: a lower cost is associated to a higher risk. Results concerning the risk associated with cemented components are partially in disagreement with studies performed in countries where cemented prostheses are used more often than uncemented ones. PMID:17650301

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF THE SURGICAL APPROACH CONCERNING DISLOCATION IN TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Pires, André Fernandes; Lee, Bruno Takasaki; Leonhardt, Marcos Camargo; Ejnisman, Leandro; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Our primary aim was to evaluate the occurrence of dislocation of non-cemented total hip arthroplasty, when using the posterior and the direct lateral approaches. Methods: We performed a comparative retrospective study with 232 patients submitted to non-cemented total hip arthroplasty, due to the diagnosis of primary or secondary osteoarthritis. The posterior approach was used in 105 patients while direct lateral approach was used in 127 patients. There was only one prosthesis model and the same rehabilitation program and post-operative care was used for all patients. We checked the occurrence of dislocation, the acetabular positioning and also the size of the components. Results: There was only one case of dislocation, treated with closed reduction successfully. This was a 47 year-old female, submitted to direct lateral approach. The mean follow-up time for both groups was 23.7 months, ranging from six to 42 months. Conclusion: The authors conclude that the prevalence of total hip arthroplasty dislocation is similar for both approaches, and educational measures besides the use of a higher femoral offset seem to reduce the risk of this complication. PMID:27077060

  16. Modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov external fixator as a salvage method in the management of severely infected total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kliushin, Nikolai M; Ababkov, Yuri V; Ermakov, Artem M; Malkova, Tatiana A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resection arthroplasty or hip arthrodesis after total hip replacement (THR) can be used to salvage the limb in case with deep infection and severe bone loss. The Ilizarov fixator provides stability, axial correction, weight-bearing and good fusion rates. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively assessed the outcomes of 37 patients with severe periprosthetic infection after THR treated between 1999 and 2011. The treatment included implant removal, debridement and a modified Girdestone arthroplasty (29 cases) or hip arthrodesis (seven cases) using the Ilizarov fixator. The Ilizarov fixation continued from 45 to 50 days in the modified arthroplasty group and 90 days in the arthrodesis group. One case was treated using the conventional resection arthroplasty bilaterally. Results: Eighteen months after treatment, infection control was seen in 97.3% cases. Six hips were fused as one patient died in this group. Limb length discrepancy (LLD) averaged 5.5 cm. The Harris hip score ranged from 35 to 92 points. Hip joint motion ranged from 10° to 30° in the modified arthroplasty group. All subjects could walk independently or using support aids. No subluxation or LLD progression was observed. Conclusion: The modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov apparatus results in sufficient ability for ambulation and good infection control in cases of failed THR associated with severe infection. PMID:26955173

  17. Radiation-blocking shields to localize periarticular radiation precisely for prevention of heterotopic bone formation around uncemented total hip arthroplasties

    SciTech Connect

    Jasty, M.; Schutzer, S.; Tepper, J.; Willett, C.; Stracher, M.A.; Harris, W.H. )

    1990-08-01

    Sixteen patients (18 hips) were treated with localized radiation therapy limited to periarticular regions surrounding the femoral neck by shielding the prosthesis and the adjacent regions to prevent heterotopic bone formation around the uncemented prosthesis. All hips received 1500 rads. Eight of these hips were irradiated after excising severe heterotopic bone, five because they developed extensive heterotopic ossification in the opposite hip, and five others because they were considered to be at high risk for developing heterotopic ossification. Only two of the 18 hips developed a small amount of heterotopic bone after localized periarticular radiation. All wounds healed primarily. No progressive radiolucencies developed at the bone-prosthesis interface. There was only one trochanteric nonunion of six trochanteric osteotomies. Localized periarticular radiation therapy with precision shielding of the prosthetic components and adjacent skeletal structures is an effective means to prevent heterotopic bone formation around cementless total hip arthroplasties. It also has the advantage of not adversely affecting the healing of the trochanteric osteotomy.

  18. Low incidence of groin pain and early failure with large metal articulation total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Meding, John B; Meding, Lindsey K; Keating, E Michael; Berend, Michael E

    2012-02-01

    Large-diameter metal-on-metal articulations reportedly improve stability and wear in THAs. However, some reports suggest some patients have unexplained hip and early failures with these implants. Thus, the potential benefits may be offset by these concerns. However, the incidence of these problems is not clearly established. We therefore assessed hip pain, function, osteolysis, and complications in patients with large-diameter metal-on-metal THA. We retrospectively reviewed 611 patients who had 681 large-diameter metal-on-metal THAs with the same cup and head design. The average age at operation was 62 years, 53% of the THAs were in men, and the average body mass index was 32 kg/m(2). The diagnosis was osteoarthritis in 92% of the THAs. The minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 37 months; range, 24-60 months). Nine of the 611 patients (1.5%) experienced moderate or severe pain in the hip region that we considered to be coming from an extraarticular source in each case. Harris hip scores for pain averaged 42 points. Total Harris hip scores averaged 93 points. Cup abduction averaged 42°, and cup anteversion averaged 26°. There were no infections. Three cups (0.4%) were considered radiographically loose. All were secondary to inadequate seating of the shell. Our observations suggest with this implant the concerns of higher incidences of groin pain, early failures, and adverse tissue reactions were not confirmed. Early successes or failures with large-diameter metal-on-metal articulations may be implant specific. Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  19. Metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty - five- to 11-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Vassilios S; Petit, Alain; Debiparshad, Kevin; Huk, Olga L; Zukor, David J; Antoniou, John

    2011-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been introduced in an attempt to reduce the wear rate and the consequent osteolysis around implants. The aim of this study was to present the intermediate to long-term clinical and radiological outcomes and to investigate the metal ion levels in the blood of patients who had undergone primary uncemented MoM THA in our institution. Between July 1997 and November 2003, 166 patients (193 hips), with a mean age of 50 years (range, 18-65 years), underwent primary MoM THA. Clinical data, radiographs, and blood samples were obtained at regular follow-up visits. Cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), and molybdenum (Mo) ions were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) from the patient's whole blood. All patients were prospectively followed for a minimum of 5 years (mean, 7 years; range, 5-11 years). The mean Harris hip score (HHS) and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score at the latest follow-up was 88 ± 11 and 7 ± 1.8 points, respectively. Thirteen hips have been revised. Ten acetabular components had early failure, due to factory manufacturing problems. All other implants have been found stable, with no signs of aseptic loosening. The probability of survival at 11 years, if the hips that were revised due to manufacturing problems were excluded, was 98.4%. The Co and Cr metal ion levels, after increasing significantly during the first 4 to 5 years post-surgery, remained stable, with a tendency to decrease thereafter, but not significantly. During the same follow-up period, Mo ion levels remained stable. In this 5-to-11 year follow-up study of MoM THA patients, excellent survivorship, with low complications rates, was found. Results of longer follow-up studies are necessary to clarify the possible long-term effects of metal ion release.

  20. Total hip arthroplasty after failed curved intertrochanteric varus osteotomy for avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Takegami, Yasuhiko; Komatsu, Daigo; Seki, Taisuke; Ishiguro, Naoki; Hasegawa, Yukiharu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curved intertrochanteric varus osteotomy (CVO) is one of the good surgical procedures for avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) patients. However, some patients with failed CVO are converted to total hip arthroplasty (THA) as a salvage operation. We compared the clinical and radiographic outcomes of 10 hips converted to THA after failed CVO (Group O) (mean age 43.0 years, 8 male and 2 female) with an age and gender matched control group of 20 hips that underwent primary THA for ANFH (Group C). Perioperative blood loss in Group O was significantly higher than that in Group C (535 g vs 282 g (P = 0.002)). Infection and dislocation occurred in 1 and 2 hips in Group O. There were no significant differences in both pre- and post-Harris Hip Score (HHS) between the groups. The stems in the AP radiograph were placed at 2.1° in a valgus position in Group O, whereas those in Group O were inserted at 1.0° in a varus position, a significant difference (P = 0.01). The stem alignment in the Lauenstein view in Group O was 1.2° in the extension position and in Group C was 0.4° in the flexion position, a significantly difference (P = 0.04). THA after failed CVO provides with the stem inserted in a valgus and extension position. Operative bleeding was increased. THA after failed CVO is a technically demanding arthroplasty. We believe that careful preoperative planning and preparation are necessary for this arthroplasty. PMID:27019530