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Sample records for charnley total hip

  1. Tribological measurements on a Charnley-type artificial hip joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A total hip simulator was used to determine the friction and wear properties of Charnley-type (316L stainless steel balls and sterile ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene cups) hip prostheses. Three different sets of specimens were tested to 395,000, 101,500 and 233,000 walking cycles, respectively. All tests were run unlubricated, at ambient conditions (22 to 26 C, 30 to 50 percent relative humidity), at 30 walking cycles per minute, under a dynamic load simulating walking. Polyethylene cup wear rates ranged from 1.4 to 39 ten billions cu m which corresponds to dimensional losses of 4.0 to 11 microns per year. Although these wear rates are lower than those obtained from other hip simulators and from in vivo X-ray measurements, they are comparable when taking run-in and plastic deformation into account. Maximum tangential friction forces ranged from 93 to 129 N under variable load (267 to 3090 N range) and from 93 to 143 N under a static load of 3090 N. A portion of one test 250,000 walking cycles) run under dry air ( 1 percent relative humidity) yielded a wear rate almost 6 times greater than that obtained under wet air ( 70 percent relative humidity) conditions.

  2. Living history in current orthopaedic hip surgery: intrapelvic teflon granuloma after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiu, Daniel; Peter, Viju; Lynch, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The teflon hip arthroplasty design was used by Sir John Charnley in the early 60's but was taken off the market due to high complication rates. A case is reported of an intrapelvic granuloma after total hip arthroplasty following the use of a teflon socket. This appears to be the last surviving patient treated by Sir John Charnley using a Teflon hip socket design.

  3. Bone sparing surgical options for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Audrey; Pesut, Tracy; Peacock, Charity; Tucci, Michelle; Buckhalter, Ruth Ann

    2003-01-01

    Between 4/5/99 and 5/20/2002, our university performed 31 total hip arthroplasties in 27 young patients utilizing a conservative hip prosthesis developed at the Mayo Clinic. Eleven patients underwent Bipolar replacement, while the remaining twenty required an acetabular component. The patients ranged in age from 25 to 50 (mean of 39.9). The mean follow up was 12.4 months (range 4.5-27). Twenty-eight hips were treated for AVN secondary to RA, HIV, ETOH abuse, and SLE; while two underwent THA for OA secondary to trauma, and one for JRA. Three patients were lost to follow up at less than 6 months and were excluded from the study. The patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months utilizing the Harris hip score, the Charnley hip score, and radiographic evaluation including subsidence, radiolucency, and calcar resorption. Four patients (13%) had subsidence ranging from 1 to 3 mm at the most recent visit. One patients (3.2%) had radiographic evidence of radiolucency measuring 2 mm. Nine patients (29%) developed 1-3 mm of calcar resorption. No hips required revision. Thirty patients had improvement in their Harris hip score and Charnley hip score. The one patient who decreased his score had developed AVN secondary to ETOH abuse. Three hips had an intra-operative complication of lateral cortex penetration and required circlage wiring. Comparisons were made utilizing Multiple Logistic Regression to determine if preoperative BMI, Dorr score, and gender had an impact on the postoperative hip scores or degree of osteolysis, subsidence, and calcar resorption. Although the Harris hip score and Charnley hip scores significantly improved postoperatively, the preoperative BMI, Dorr score, and gender did not correlate with patient outcome. Our patients improved clinically in pain level, function and ROM. Further follow up will reveal if this component truly preserves bone stock for ease of future revision.

  4. Total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Siopack, J S; Jergesen, H E

    1995-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty, or surgical replacement of the hip joint with an artificial prosthesis, is a reconstructive procedure that has improved the management of those diseases of the hip joint that have responded poorly to conventional medical therapy. In this review we briefly summarize the evolution of total hip arthroplasty, the design and development of prosthetic hip components, and the current clinical indications for this procedure. The possible complications of total hip arthroplasty, its clinical performance over time, and future directions in hip replacement surgery are also discussed. Images PMID:7725707

  5. Total hip arthroplasty in the ankylosed hip.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Megan A; Huo, Michael H

    2011-12-01

    Altered biomechanics secondary to hip ankylosis often result in degeneration of the lumbar spine, ipsilateral knee, and contralateral hip and knee. Symptoms in these joints may be reduced with conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA) of the ankylosed hip. THA in the ankylosed hip is a technically challenging procedure, and the overall clinical outcome is generally less satisfactory than routine THA performed for osteoarthritis and other etiologies. Functional integrity of the hip abductor muscles is the most important predictor of walking ability following conversion THA. Many patients experience persistent limp, and it can take up to 2 years to fully assess final functional outcome. Risk factors cited for increased risk of failed THA include prior surgical ankylosis and age <50 years at the time of conversion THA.

  6. The John Charnley Award Paper. The role of joint fluid in the tribology of total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mazzucco, Daniel; Spector, Myron

    2004-12-01

    The effect of joint fluid on the tribology (ie, lubrication, friction, and wear) of total hip arthroplasty has not yet been investigated adequately. In the current study, a friction assay was used to assess four hypotheses relating to the effect of human joint fluid and its principal components on the articulation of metal-on-polyethylene. First, joint fluid was found to produce a widely varying amount of friction between cobalt-chromium and polyethylene; this range exceeded the range produced when the articulation was lubricated by water or bovine serum. Second, it was shown that hyaluronic acid, phospholipid, albumin, and gamma-globulin were not acting as boundary lubricants, but that one or more other proteins (as yet unidentified) were responsible for reducing friction in this couple. Third, lower friction was found when oxidized zirconium alloy replaced cobalt-chromium as a bearing surface on polyethylene. Finally, a pilot study suggested that lubricin, which contributes to cartilage-on-cartilage lubrication, is not a protein responsible for the tribological variabiation found among joint fluid samples. The current study showed that joint fluid is a patient factor that influences the tribology of metal-on-polyethylene arthroplasty.

  7. Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankle pump exercises, and early mobilization. Leg-length Inequality Sometimes after a hip replacement, one leg may ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 12 ) AAOS does ...

  8. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  9. A Historical and Economic Perspective on Sir John Charnley, Chas F. Thackray Limited, and the Early Arthroplasty Industry

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    In the 1960s, Sir John Charnley pioneered modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) and spent the next two decades refining all aspects of the procedure, working with the commercial firm of Chas F. Thackray Limited, now a subsidiary of DePuy Orthopaedics, a Johnson and Johnson Company. We review here that relationship, in light of the complex relationships today that exist among industry, researchers, surgeons, and the public. PMID:16089068

  10. Arthroscopic treatment of unstable total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Ricardo; Aguinaga, Iñaki; Corcuera, Irene; Ponte, Juan; Usabiaga, Jaime

    2010-06-01

    Hip arthroscopy may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of apparently well-implanted but unstable total hip replacement prostheses. We present 2 cases of arthroscopically assisted capsular tightening in unstable total hip replacements. Both cases had significant capsular laxity. Case 2 had impingement of the lower part of the acetabulum with the lesser trochanter that caused hip dislocation. Early revision surgery can be avoided with the use of this technique in selected cases of unstable total hip replacements.

  11. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty in small-proportioned patients.

    PubMed

    Rahimtoola, Z O; Finger, S; Imrie, S; Goodman, S B

    2000-01-01

    In a prospective, consecutive series, 41 total hip arthroplasties were performed in 27 small-proportioned patients with small femoral dimensions. The 17 female and 10 male patients averaged 23.6 years (range, 14-47 years), and the mean height and weight were 157 cm (range, 132-183 cm) and 53.5 kg (range, 36-84 kg). The most common preoperative diagnosis was juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in 18 patients (28 hips). Most patients were severely disabled in their daily activity, and 68% of the patients were classified as Charnley functional class C. The femoral implants consisted primarily of the proximally porous-coated miniature Anatomic Medullary Locking femoral component (AML/CDH, Depuy, Warsaw, IN) in 33 hips in 22 patients (average stem diameter, 9.5 mm; range, 8-12.0 mm). A porous ingrowth acetabular cup fixed with screws was used in all procedures. At an average follow-up of 51 months, Harris Hip Scores improved significantly from 34 points (range, 0-65 points) preoperatively to 85 points (range, 33-100 points) after arthroplasty. There were no intraoperative complications. There was 1 revision because of femoral implant loosening. Three cementless femoral components showed evidence of nonprogressive subsidence. One patient had significant bilateral acetabular component polyethylene wear and underwent revision. All other femoral and acetabular components were radiographically stable. The relief of pain and improvement of function were dramatic. The miniature AML/CDH femoral component, combined with an uncemented acetabular cup, provides a promising, off-the-shelf alternative in small-proportioned patients.

  12. Total hip replacement in dancers.

    PubMed

    Buyls, Inge R A E; Rietveld, A B M Boni; Ourila, Tiia; Emerton, Mark E; Bird, H A

    2013-04-01

    A case report of a professional contemporary dancer who successfully returned to the stage after bilateral total hip replacements (THR) for osteoarthritis is presented, together with her own commentary and a retrospective cohort study of total hip replacements in dancers. In the presented cohort, there were no post-operative dislocations or infections, the original pain had been relieved, rehabilitation was objectively normal and all resumed their dance (teaching) activities. Nevertheless, they were disappointed about the prolonged rehabilitation. Due to their high demands as professional dancers, post-operative expectations were too optimistic in view of the usual quick and favourable results of THR in the older and less physically active, general population. In all dancers with unilateral osteoarthritis, the left hip was involved, which may reflect the tendency to use the left leg as standing leg and be suggestive that strenuous physical activity may lead to osteoarthritis. Better rehabilitation guidelines are needed for dancer patients undergoing THR, especially drawing their attention to realistic post-operative expectations.

  13. A modified technique to extract fractured femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Akrawi, Hawar; Magra, Merzesh; Shetty, Ajit; Ng, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The removal of well-fixed broken femoral component and cement mantle can be extremely demanding, time consuming and potentially damaging to the host bone. Different methods have been described to extract broken femoral stem yet this remains one of the most challenging prospect to the revision hip surgeon. PRESENTATION OF CASE The authors present two cases underwent a modified sliding cortical window technique utilising a tungsten carbide drill, Charnley pin retractor and an orthopaedic mallet to aid extraction of a fractured cemented femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty. DISCUSSION The modified technique offers a simple and controlled method in extracting a well fixed fractured cemented femoral stem. It has the advantage of retaining the cement mantle with subsequent good seal of the femoral cortical window secured with cable ready system. Furthermore, tungsten carbide drill bit and Charnley pin retractor are relatively readily available to aid the extraction of the broken stem. Finally, it yields the option of implanting a standard femoral stem and obviates the need for bypassing the cortical window with long revision femoral component. CONCLUSION Fractured femoral stem is a rare yet a complex and very demanding prospect to both patients and hip surgeons. The sliding cortical window technique utilising tungsten carbide drill and Charnley pin retractor is technically easy and most importantly; preserves host bone stock with cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty. We believe this technique can be added to the armamentarium of revision hip surgeon when faced with the challenge of extracting a fractured cemented femoral stem. PMID:24858980

  14. Current attitudes to total hip replacement in the younger patient: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Tennent, T D; Goddard, N J

    2000-01-01

    A postal questionnaire was sent to all practicing consultant orthopaedic surgeons in the UK seeking information regarding their usual total hip replacement practice, the age at which they would define a patient as falling into the 'young hip group' and whether this might modify their practice. In particular, in the 'younger' age group, we were interested in the frequency of usage of uncemented implants, the choice of implant and the bearing surfaces. Of 1242 surgeons surveyed, we had a response from 935 who currently undertake total hip arthroplasty. Their responses confirm that approximately 60,645 total hip replacements are performed annually in the UK of which 9,376 are performed in the younger age group (mean age 57.5 years). As with our previous survey, the most popular prosthesis in the 'older' age group overall was the Charnley (51%) followed by the Exeter (15%). These implants also proved to be the most popular in the 'younger' age group (40% Charnley, 18% Exeter), with 75% of surgeons choosing a cemented stem, and 65% also opting to cement the socket. 23% of surgeons used hydroxy-apatite coated implants on both the femoral and acetabular sides of the joint. Stainless steel remained the most popular choice of femoral head bearing surface (42%) followed by chrome-cobalt (33%) and ceramic (25%). On the acetabular side, high density polyethylene predominated--accounting for 95%, with only 3% using chrome cobalt and 2% ceramic. There would appear to be a remarkably conservative attitude among British surgeons, the majority of whom prefer to stick with tried and tested cemented femoral implants when dealing with the younger patient. There are a small number of uncemented acetabulae and the hybrid configuration. Hydroxy-apatite coatings seem to be the most popular choice for the non-cemented prostheses. Ceramic femoral heads are used more frequently than the ceramic acetabular bearing, and equally metal/metal bearings remain infrequently used.

  15. Traumatic breakage of the ceramic head of prosthesis in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Moreschini, O; Braidotti, P

    1991-09-01

    The authors describe breakage of the 32 mm alumina AL2 O3 ceramic head in 3 cases of total hip replacement using two different models of prosthesis (Charnley-Müller and Mittelmeier). All three patients were of average height, weight, and activity (Brown et al., 1985; Callaghan et al., 1988), and the breakage had been caused by an accidental fall. The same mechanism of injury, in people the same age as our subjects, can cause femoral neck fractures. Reoperation was necessary in order to replace the component. The implants all appeared to be positioned correctly, and the patients had reported no symptoms. Before the trauma that caused breakage, there had been no other injuries worth noting. All patients were satisfied with their hip replacements.

  16. Total hip replacement in young adults with hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Dysplasia of the hip increases the risk of secondary degenerative change and subsequent total hip replacement. Here we report on age at diagnosis of dysplasia, previous treatment, and quality of life for patients born after 1967 and registered with a total hip replacement due to dysplasia in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. We also used the medical records to validate the diagnosis reported by the orthopedic surgeon to the register. Methods Subjects born after January 1, 1967 and registered with a primary total hip replacement in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register during the period 1987–2007 (n = 713) were included in the study. Data on hip symptoms and quality of life (EQ-5D) were collected through questionnaires. Elaborating information was retrieved from the medical records. Results 540 of 713 patients (76%) (corresponding to 634 hips) returned the questionnaires and consented for additional information to be retrieved from their medical records. Hip dysplasia accounted for 163 of 634 hip replacements (26%), 134 of which were in females (82%). Median age at time of diagnosis was 7.8 (0–39) years: 4.4 years for females and 22 years for males. After reviewing accessible medical records, the diagnosis of hip dysplasia was confirmed in 132 of 150 hips (88%). Interpretation One quarter of hip replacements performed in patients aged 40 or younger were due to an underlying hip dysplasia, which, in most cases, was diagnosed during late childhood. The dysplasia diagnosis reported to the register was correct for 88% of the hips. PMID:21434808

  17. Trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for congenital hip disease.

    PubMed

    Hartofilakidis, G; Babis, G C; Georgiades, G; Kourlaba, G

    2011-05-01

    We studied the effect of trochanteric osteotomy in 192 total hip replacements in 140 patients with congenital hip disease. There was bony union in 158 hips (82%), fibrous union in 29 (15%) and nonunion in five (3%). The rate of union had a statistically significant relationship with the position of reattachment of the trochanter, which depended greatly on the pre-operative diagnosis. The pre-operative Trendelenburg gait substantially improved in all three disease types (dysplasia, low and high dislocation) and all four categories of reattachment position. A persistent Trendelenburg gait post-operatively was noticed mostly in patients with defective union (fibrous or nonunion). Acetabular and femoral loosening had a statistically significant relationship with defective union and the position of reattachment of the trochanter. These results suggest that the complications of trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for patients with congenital hip disease are less important than the benefits of this surgical approach.

  18. [Treatment of infected total hip endoprostheses].

    PubMed

    Zilkens, K W; Forst, R; Casser, H R

    1989-07-01

    In total hip arthroplasty the most serious complication besides aseptic loosening is infection. The results observed in 42 cases of infected hip arthroplasties are presented. In contrast to early superficial infection, deep infection following total hip replacement is difficult to treat. Depending on the general condition of the patient, a well-defined, adequate treatment is required. In patients at vital risk the provocation of a permanent fistula can be recommended as an alternative method in preference to revision arthroplasty.

  19. Total hip arthroplasty after lower extremity amputation.

    PubMed

    Amanatullah, Derek F; Trousdale, Robert T; Sierra, Rafael J

    2015-05-01

    There are approximately 1.6 million lower extremity amputees in the United States. Lower extremity amputees are subject to increased physical demands proportional to their level of amputation. Lower extremity amputees have a 6-fold higher risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in the ipsilateral hip and a 2-fold risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in contralateral hip when compared with the non-amputee population. Additionally, there is a 3-fold increased risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in the ipsilateral hip after an above knee amputation when compared with a below knee amputation. The authors retrospectively reviewed 35 total hip arthroplasties after lower extremity amputation. The mean clinical follow-up was 5.3±4.0 years. The mean time from lower extremity amputation to total hip arthroplasty was 12.2±12.8 years after a contralateral amputation and 5.4±6.0 years after an ipsilateral amputation (P=.050). The mean time to total hip arthroplasty was 15.6±15.4 years after an above knee amputation and 6.4±6.1 years after a below knee amputation (P=.021). There was a statistically significant improvement in the mean Harris Hip Score from 35.9±21.8 to 76.8±12.8 with total hip arthroplasty after a contralateral amputation (P<.001). There also was a statistically significant improvement in the mean Harris Hip Score from 25.4±21.7 to 78.6±17.1 with total hip arthroplasty after an ispilateral amputation (P<.001). Three (17.7%) total hip arthroplasties after a contralateral amputation and 2 (11.1%) total hip arthroplasties after an ipsilateral amputation required revision total hip arthroplasty. Patients with an ipsilateral amputation or a below knee amputation progress to total hip arthroplasty faster than those with a contralateral amputation or an above knee amputation, respectively. Lower extremity amputees experience clinically significant improvements with total hip arthroplasty after lower extremity amputation.

  20. Total hip replacement for hip fracture: Surgical techniques and concepts.

    PubMed

    Coomber, Ross; Porteous, Matthew; Hubble, Matthew J W; Parker, Martyn J

    2016-10-01

    When treating a hip fracture with a total hip replacement (THR) the surgical technique may differ in a number of aspects in comparison to elective arthroplasty. The hip fracture patient is more likely to have poor bone stock secondary to osteoporosis, be older, have a greater number of co-morbidities, and have had limited peri-operative work-up. These factors lead to a higher risk of complications, morbidity and perioperative mortality. Consideration should be made to performing the THR in a laminar flow theatre, by a surgeon experienced in total hip arthroplasty, using an anterolateral approach, cementing the implant in place, using a large head size and with repair of the joint capsule. Combined Ortho-geriatric care is recommended with similar post-operative rehabilitation to elective THR patients but with less expectation of short length of stay and consideration for fracture prevention measures.

  1. Primary total hip replacement versus hip resurfacing - hospital considerations.

    PubMed

    Ward, William G; Carter, Christina J; Barone, Marisa; Jinnah, Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors regarding surgical procedures and patient selection affect hospital staffing needs as well as hospital revenues. In order to better understand the potential impact on hospitals that hip arthroplasty device selection (standard total hip arthroplasty vs. resurfacing) creates, a review of all primary hip arthroplasties performed at one institution was designed to identify factors that impacted hospital staffing needs and revenue generation. All primary hip arthroplasties undertaken over three fiscal years (2008 to 2010) were reviewed, utilizing only hospital business office data and medical records data that had been previously extracted prior for billing purposes. Analysis confirmed differing demographics for two hip arthroplasty populations, with the resurfacing patients (compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty population) consisting of younger patients (mean age, 50 vs. 61 years), who were more often male (75% vs. 45%), were more likely to have osteoarthritis as their primary diagnosis (83 vs. 67%) and were more often covered by managed care or commercial insurance (83 vs. 34%). They also had shorter hospital stays (mean length of stay, 2.3 vs. 4.1 days) and consequently provided a more favorable financial revenue stream to the hospital on a per patient basis. Several trends appeared during the study periods. There was a steady increase in all procedures in all groups except for the resurfacings, which decreased 26% in males and 53% in females between 2009 and 2010. Differences were observed in the demographics of patients presenting for resurfacing, compared to those presenting for conventional total hip arthroplasty. In addition to the revenue stream considerations, institutions undertaking a resurfacing program must commit the resources and planning in order to rehabilitate these patients more expeditiously than is usually required with conventional hip arthroplasty patients.

  2. NEW BEARING SURFACES IN TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is being increasingly indicated for younger and more active patients, in addition to a naturally growing demand for the procedure because of increasing life expectancy among patients. The high costs of this surgery and the controversies regarding implant performance have made this topic the subject of constant research, seeking new materials with better resistance to wear and better biocompatibility. The present article provides a review of new surfaces in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27042614

  3. Femoral osteolysis following total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Dattani, R

    2007-01-01

    Total hip replacement represents the most significant advance in orthopaedic surgery in the 20th century. Periprosthetic osteolysis remains the most significant long‐term complication with total hip replacement. It has been reported with all materials and prosthetic devices in use or that have been used to date. This paper reviews the current thinking on the aetiology, pathogenesis, management and future treatment options for osteolysis. PMID:17488859

  4. [Surgical treatment of hip osteoarthritis: update in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Ilizaliturri Sánchez, Víctor M; Mangino Pariente, Gerardo; Camacho Galindo, Javier

    2007-10-01

    Total hip replacement is one of the most successful procedures in orthopaedic surgery. There are two different technologies for implant fixation in total hip replacement: cemented and cementless, both can be combined, which is called Hybrid arthroplasty. Long term implant stability results in long term function. The most important factor that limits longevity of well-fixed implants is the wear of the articular surfaces. Wear of the polyethylene from the acetabulum generates particles that access the implant bone or the implant-cement-bone interface. This produces an inflammatory reaction, osteolysis and implant loosening. Polyethylene of higher resistance to wear and prosthetic articulations without polyethylene (hard on hard bearings), have been introduced to improve wear particle generation. Minimally invasive surgical techniques minimize surgical trauma to sort tissue around the hip joint, facilitating a better and more rapid recovery.

  5. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty, but not of total knee arthroplasty, is related to the preoperative radiographic severity of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, Claire; Holtslag, Maarten J; Tordoir, Rutger L; Leichtenberg, Claudia S; Verdegaal, Suzan H M; Kroon, Herman M; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus on the impact of radiographic severity of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) on the clinical outcome of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether preoperative radiographic severity of OA is related to improvements in functioning, pain, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 1 year after THA or TKA. Patients and methods This prospective cohort study included 302 THA patients and 271 TKA patients with hip or knee OA. In the THA patients, preoperatively 26% had mild OA and 74% had severe OA; in the TKA patients, preoperatively 27% had mild OA and 73% had severe OA. Radiographic severity was determined according to the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) classification. Clinical assessments preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively included: sociodemographic characteristics and patient-reported outcomes (PROMs): Oxford hip/knee score, hip/knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS/KOOS), SF36, and EQ5D. Change scores of PROMs were compared with mild OA (KL 0–2) and severe OA (KL 3–4) using a multivariate linear regression model. Results Adjusted for sex, age, preoperative scores, BMI, and Charnley score, radiographic severity of OA in THA was associated with improvement in HOOS “Activities of daily living”, “Pain”, and “Symptoms”, and SF36 physical component summary (“PCS”) scale. In TKA, we found no such associations. Interpretation The decrease in pain and improvement in function in THA patients, but not in TKA patients, was positively associated with the preoperative radiographic severity of OA. PMID:26484651

  6. Hip Squeaking after Ceramic-on-ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qi; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the characteristics and influencing factors of squeaking after ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to analyze the possible mechanisms of the audible noise. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were based on articles from PubMed and Web of Science. Study Selection: The articles selected for review were original articles and reviews found based on the following search terms: “total hip arthroplasty”, “ceramic-on-ceramic”, “hip squeaking”, and “hip noise.” Results: The mechanism of the squeaking remains unknown. The possible explanations included stripe wear, edge loading, a third body, fracture of the ceramic liner, and resonance of the prosthesis components. Squeaking occurrence is influenced by patient, surgical, and implant factors. Conclusions: Most studies indicated that squeaking after CoC THA was the consequence of increasing wear or impingement, caused by prosthesis design, patient characteristics, or surgical factors. However, as conflicts exist among different articles, the major reasons for the squeaking remain to be identified. PMID:27453238

  7. Bladder tear during revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Grauer, Jonathan N; Halim, Andrea; Keggi, Kristaps J

    2014-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and revision total hip arthroplasty are among the most commonly performed orthopedic procedures. There are many reported complications of THA, but intrapelvic complications are a rare subset. Bladder injuries have infrequently been described in association with this common procedure. We present an unusual case of a bladder tear occurring intraoperatively during a revision THA. It is suspected that the patient's history of multiple prior hip procedures caused adhesions of the bladder to the pelvic floor and predisposed the bladder to injury during acetabular revision. Previous reports of bladder injury relating to THA have described thermal necrosis, component migration, and occasional direct perforation. There are no prior case reports describing bladder tears related to adhesions occurring intraoperatively during revision THA. This case report highlights the importance of surgeon awareness of an unusual complication. In this case, intraoperative and postoperative recognition of a hematuria diagnosis led to the appropriate treatment, and this patient had an acceptable outcome.

  8. Iliopsoas bursitis following total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y M; Gupte, C M; Beverly, M J

    2004-12-01

    We report the imaging features of a 52-year-old man presenting with a groin mass and gross lower limb oedema secondary to venous occlusion by massive cystic enlargement of the iliopsoas bursa 4 years after uncemented primary total hip replacement. Ultrasonography of the groin mass demonstrated a large cystic lesion extending into the pelvis. CT showed displacement of the external iliac vessels with venous compression. Bursography showed the bursa's margins and no communication with the hip joint. Diagnostic aspiration excluded infection, but fluid recollection occurred subsequently. Complete resolution of symptoms, including limb swelling, followed surgical excision with no recurrence at the 5-year follow-up. We believe iliopsoas bursitis occurred as a tissue response to polyethylene wear within the prosthetic hip and occurred even in the absence of loosening or a direct communication between bursa and joint.

  9. Total hip and total knee replacement: preoperative nursing management.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Brian

    Total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgery are carried out for the relief of hip or knee pain, usually caused by osteoarthritis. This is the first of two articles on THR and TKR. It will outline the different types of replacement used in lower limb joint replacement surgery. Preparation of patients for surgery requires attention to physical, psychological and social factors and these are explored in detail. The organization of services along the patient pathway to ensure comprehensive preparation is considered and the nursing role highlighted. The second article, to be published in the next issue, will discuss recovery and rehabilitation from THR and TKR surgery.

  10. Total Hip Joint Replacement Biotelemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Luntz, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a biotelemetry system that is hermetically sealed within a total hip replacement implant is reported. The telemetry system transmits six channels of stress data to reconstruct the major forces acting on the neck of the prosthesis and uses an induction power coupling technique to eliminate the need for internal batteries. The activities associated with the telemetry microminiaturization, data recovery console, hardware fabrications, power induction systems, electrical and mechanical testing and hermetic sealing test results are discussed.

  11. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty: in opposition.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2004-06-01

    At the Knee Society Winter Meeting in 2003, Seth Greenwald and I debated about whether there should be new standards (ie, regulations) applied to the release of information to the public on "new developments." I argued for the public's "right to know" prior to the publication of peer-reviewed literature. He argued for regulatory constraint or "proving by peer-reviewed publication" before alerting the public. It is not a contradiction for me to currently argue against the public advertising of minimally invasive (MIS) total hip arthroplasty as not yet being in the best interest of the public. It is hard to remember a concept that has so captured both the public's and the surgical community's fancy as MIS. Patients are "demanding" MIS without knowing why. Surgeons are offering it as the next best, greatest thing without having developed the skill and experience to avoid the surgery's risks. If you put "minimally invasive hip replacement" into the Google search engine (http://www.google.com), you get 5,170 matches. If you put the same words in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi), referencing the National Library of Medicine database, you get SEVENTEEN; none is really a peer-reviewed article. Most are 1 page papers in orthopedics from medical education meetings. On the other hand, there are over 6,000 peer-reviewed articles on total hip arthroplasty. Dr. Thomas Sculco, my couterpart in this debate, wrote an insightful editorial in the American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery in which he stated: "Although these procedures have generated incredible interest and enthusiasm, I am concerned that they may be performed to the detriment of our patients." I couldn't agree with him more. Smaller is not necessarily better and, when it is worse, it will be the "smaller" that is held accountable.

  12. Dual mobility cups in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    De Martino, Ivan; Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios Konstantinos; Sculco, Peter Keyes; Sculco, Thomas Peter

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is considered one of the most successful surgical procedures in orthopaedics. With the increase in the number of THAs performed in the world in the next decades, reducing or preventing medical and mechanical complications such as post-operative THA instability will be of paramount importance, particularly in an emerging health care environment based on quality control and patient outcome. Dual mobility acetabular component (also known as unconstrained tripolar implant) was introduced in France at the end of the 1970s as an alternative to standard sockets, to reduce the risk of THA dislocation in patients undergoing primary THA in France. Dual mobility cups have recently gained wider attention in the United States as an alternative option in the prevention and treatment of instability in both primary and revision THA and offer the benefit of increased stability without compromising clinical outcomes and implant longevity. In this article, we review the use of dual mobility cup in total hip arthroplasty in terms of its history, biomechanics, outcomes and complications based on more than 20 years of medical literature. PMID:25035820

  13. Staged total hip arthroplasty in a patient with hip dysplasia and a large pertrochanteric bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Langston, Joseph R; DeHaan, Alexander M; Huff, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Hip arthroplasty in young patients requires thoughtful preoperative planning. Patients with proximal femoral bone loss complicate this planning and may require a staged procedure to optimize implant insertion. We report on a case of a 26-year-old woman with secondary hip arthritis from developmental dysplasia of the hip and a large pertrochanteric bone cyst that was treated with staged total hip arthroplasty. The cyst was decompressed and filled with an osteoconductive and osteoinductive bone graft substitute called EquivaBone. One year later, the patient underwent a successful primary total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen-month follow-up after her hip replacement revealed resolution of postoperative pain and significant functional improvement.

  14. Radiological evaluation of painful total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Jamshid, T.; Schneider, R.; Freiberger, R.H.

    1981-11-01

    Ninety-four cases of clinically failed, cemented, total hip prostheses requiring surgery were reviewed to determine the accuracy of preoperative plain radiography, culture of aspirated fluid, arthrography, and bone scanning. When radiopaque cement had been used to embed the prosthesis, plain radiography was highly accurate in detecting a loose femoral component, less so in detecting a loose acetabular component. Culture of aspirated fluid was accurate in diagnosing infection. A positive arthrogram identified loosening with good accuracy; however, a negative arthrogram did not reliably exclude loosening. /sup 99/mTc bone scans frequently differentiated loosening from loosening with infection. The suggested sequence of diagnostic tests is plain radiography followed by bone scanning. If the bone scan shows diffuse augmented uptake, culture of aspirated fluid followed by arthrography is indicated.

  15. Radiological evaluation of painful total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Schneider, R.; Freiberger, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Ninety-four cases of clinically failed, cemented, total hip prostheses requiring surgery were reviewed to determine the accuracy of preoperative plain radiography, culture of aspirated fluid, arthrography, and bone scanning. When radiopaque cement had been used to embed the prosthesis, plain radiography was highly accurate in detecting a loose femoral component, less so in detecting a loose acetabular component. Culture of aspirated fluid was accurate in diagnosing infection. A positive arthrogram identified loosening with good accuracy; however, a negative arthrogram did not reliably exclude loosening. /sup 99/mTc bone scans frequently differentiated loosening from loosening with infection. The suggested sequence of diagnostic tests is plain radiography followed by bone scanning. If the bone scan shows diffuse augmented uptake, culture of aspirated fluid followed by arthrography is indicated.

  16. Reproduction of Hip Offset and Leg Length in Navigated Total Hip Arthroplasty: How Accurate Are We?

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Mahajan, Vivek; Deakin, Angela H; Deep, Kamal

    2015-06-01

    This study assesses how accurately we can restore hip offset and leg length in navigated total hip arthroplasty (THA). 152 consecutive patients with navigated THA formed the study group. The contra-lateral hip formed control for measuring hip offset and leg length. All radiological measurements were made using Orthoview digital software. In the normal hip offset group, the mean is 75.73 (SD- 8.61). In the reconstructed hip offset group, the mean is 75.35 (SD - 7.48). 95.39% had hip offset within 6 mm of opposite side while 96.04% had leg length restored within 6 mm of contra-lateral side. Equivalence test revealed that the two groups of hip offsets were essentially the same. We conclude that computer navigation can successfully reproduce hip offset and leg length accurately.

  17. Process optimized minimally invasive total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gebel, Philipp; Oszwald, Markus; Ishaque, Bernd; Ahmed, Gaffar; Blessing, Recha; Thorey, Fritz; Ottersbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse a new concept of using the the minimally invasive direct anterior approach (DAA) in total hip replacement (THR) in combination with the leg positioner (Rotex- Table) and a modified retractor system (Condor). We evaluated retrospectively the first 100 primary THR operated with the new concept between 2009 and 2010, regarding operation data, radiological and clinical outcome (HOOS). All surgeries were perfomed in a standardized operation technique including navigation. The average age of the patients was 68 years (37 to 92 years), with a mean BMI of 26.5 (17 to 43). The mean time of surgery was 80 min. (55 to 130 min). The blood loss showed an average of 511.5 mL (200 to 1000 mL). No intra-operative complications occurred. The postoperative complication rate was 6%. The HOOS increased from 43 points pre-operatively to 90 (max 100 points) 3 months after surgery. The radiological analysis showed an average cup inclination of 43° and a leg length discrepancy in a range of +/− 5 mm in 99%. The presented technique led to excellent clinic results, showed low complication rates and allowed correct implant positions although manpower was saved. PMID:22577504

  18. Acetabular blood flow during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    ElMaraghy, Amr W.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Waddell, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the immediate effect of reaming and insertion of the acetabular component with and without cement on periacetabular blood flow during primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Design A clinical experimental study. Setting A tertiary referral and teaching hospital in Toronto. Patients Sixteen patients (9 men, 7 women) ranging in age from 30 to 78 years and suffering from arthritis. Intervention Elective primary THA with a cemented (8 patients) and noncemented (8 patients) acetabular component. All procedures were done by a single surgeon who used a posterior approach. Main outcome measure Acetabular bone blood-flow measurements made with a laser Doppler flowmeter before reaming, after reaming and after insertion of the acetabular prosthesis. Results Acetabular blood flow after prosthesis insertion was decreased by 52% in the noncemented group (p < 0.001) and 59% in the cemented group (p < 0.001) compared with baseline (prereaming) values. Conclusion The significance of these changes in periacetabular bone blood flow during THA may relate to the extent of bony ingrowth, periprosthetic remodelling and ultimately the incidence of implant failure because of aseptic loosening. PMID:10851413

  19. Pneumatic compression hemodynamics in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Westrich, G H; Specht, L M; Sharrock, N E; Sculco, T P; Salvati, E A; Pellicci, P M; Trombley, J F; Peterson, M

    2000-03-01

    A crossover study was performed to evaluate the effect of several pneumatic compression devices and active dorsoplantar flexion in 10 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Using the Acuson 128XP/10 duplex ultrasound unit with a 5-MHz linear array probe, peak venous velocity and venous volume were assessed above and below the greater saphenous vein and common femoral vein junction. A computer generated randomization table was used to determine the order of the test conditions. The pneumatic compression devices evaluated included two foot pumps, one foot and calf pump, one calf pump, and three calf and thigh pumps. Statistical analyses included analysis of variance and analysis of variance with covariance between devices and patients. The covariates tested were the baseline measurements and the order in which the devices were tested. Differences between devices relate in part to the frequency and rate of inflation and the location and type of compression. Pulsatile calf and foot and calf pneumatic compression with a rapid inflation time produced the greatest increase in peak venous velocity, whereas compression of the calf and thigh showed the greatest increase in venous volume. Because patient and nursing compliance is essential to the success of mechanical prophylaxis for thromboembolic disease, the more simple, yet efficacious, devices that are easier to apply and less cumbersome appear to have a greater likelihood of success. In the active and alert patient, active dorsoplantar flexion should be encouraged.

  20. Dual mobility total hip replacement in a high risk population

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Jatinder Singh; Al Riyami, Amur; Allami, Mohamad Kasim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate results of dual mobility total replacement in a high risk population who take hip into hyperflexed position while sitting and praying on the floor. Method: The study included 65 (35 primary total replacement and 30 complex total hip replacement) cases of total hip replacement using avantage privilege dual mobility cup system from biomet. A cemented acetabular component and on femoral side a bimetric stem, either cemented or uncemented used depending on the canal type. Ten cases were examined fluoroscopically in follow up. Result: There was dislocation in one patient undergoing complex hip replacement. Fluoroscopy study showed no impingement between the neck of prosthesis and acetabular shell at extremes of all movements. Conclusion: The prevalence of dislocation is low in our high risk population and we consider it preferred concept for patients undergoing complex total hip replacement. PMID:27924742

  1. Future Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  2. Future bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun-Dong

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  3. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior ipsilateral hip fusion.

    PubMed

    Romness, D W; Morrey, B F

    1992-03-01

    Sixteen total knee arthroplasties performed between 1977 and 1985 in 13 patients with prior ipsilateral hip arthrodesis or ankylosis were studied to determine the preferred sequence and long-term follow-up of procedures in this clinical setting. Twelve of 16 underwent fusion takedown and total hip arthroplasty prior to knee replacement. The average age at total knee arthroplasty was 52.7 years and the average time from hip fusion to total knee arthroplasty was 36.3 years. Mean follow-up after total knee arthroplasty was 5.5 years (range, 2.3 to 10 years). The Hospital for Special Surgery knee score increased from a mean of 31.8 preoperatively to 72.2 after surgery. In patients who had conversion of the hip fusion prior to knee replacement, knee scores were 28 before and 72.5 after both procedures. Patients who retained their hip fusion had mean scores of 43.5 and 72.1, respectively. None of the knees has been removed and 14 of 16 had no pain at last follow-up. One had mild pain and one had moderate pain attributed to pes anserine bursitis. Although the numbers are small, this experience reveals that takedown of the fusion with total hip arthroplasty is an effective technique before performing the knee replacement. Though successful in some instances, the experience is too small to show that if hip fusion is in good position, knee replacement without fusion takedown is acceptable.

  4. Reconstruction of the Acetabulum in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Christodoulou, Michael; Sasalos, Gregory; Babis, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) or congenital hip dysplasia (CDH) is the most prevalent developmental childhood hip disorder. It includes a wide spectrum of hip abnormalities ranging from dysplasia to subluxation and complete dislocation of the hip joint. The natural history of neglected DDH in adults is highly variable. The mean age of onset of symptoms is 34.5 years for dysplastic DDH, 32.5 years for low dislocation, 31.2 years for high dislocation with a false acetabulum, and 46.4 years for high dislocation without a false acetabulum. Thorough understanding of the bony and soft tissue deformities induced by dysplasia is crucial for the success of total hip arthroplasty. It is important to evaluate the existing acetabular deformity three-dimensionally, and customize the correction in accordance with the quantity and location of ace tabular deficiencies. Acetabular reconstruction in patients with DDH is challenging. Interpretation of published data is difficult and should be done with caution because most series include patients with different types of hip disease. In general, the complication rate associated with THA is higher in patients with hip dysplasia than it is in patients with osteoarthritis. Overall, clinical and functional outcomes following THA in patients hip dysplasia (DDH) differ from those treated for primary hip osteoarthritis, possibly due to the lower age and level of activity. Although function scores decline with age, the scores for pain and range of motion presented with a statistically significant improvement in the long-term. PMID:25386570

  5. Algorithm of physical therapy exercises following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stryła, Wanda; Pogorzała, Adam M; Rogala, Piotr; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-09

    Authors present a set of exercises for patients after total hip replacement (THR) treated due to idiopathic hip joint osteoarthritis. Outcome of surgical treatment depends largely on physical therapy conducted after the procedure. Physical therapy following total hip arthroplasty involves restoration of proper physical function. Exercises increase the strength of hip girdle muscles and stabilize the involved hip joint. Total postoperative rehabilitation improves the gait esthetics. Restoring patient's full independence in everyday and professional life after total hip arthroplasty is the best test for properly conducted rehabilitation. A rehabilitation algorithm following hip arthroplasty was established based on the data acquired from literature and authors' own studies. Methods of rehabilitation following total arthroplasty was unified with regard to the type of endoprosthesis (cemented and non-cemented). Rehabilitation after revision and cancer arthroplasties were not taken into consideration. Exercises were divided into those performed in supine and standing positions as well as resistance training (using an elastic TheraBand® tape). At a later stage of rehabilitation, marching and walking as well as cycloergometer training were included. Patient's position during the day and in the sleep for two months following THR was taken into account, including some types of exercises that are contraindicated and pose a threat of endoprosthesis luxation.

  6. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using S-ROM Prosthesis for Dysplastic Hip

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Ryuh Sup; Park, Seung Rim; Lee, Jung Sun; Shin, Sang Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of total hip arthroplasty using a proximal modular femoral stem in patients who had secondary coxarthrosis associated with a dysplastic hip. Materials and Methods Forty-two patients (45 hips) with secondary coxarthrosis were evaluated after undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty using an S-ROM proximal modular femoral stem. The average follow-up was 80 months (range: 60 to 96 months). Clinical and radiological assessments were performed based on the Harris hip score and the radiological changes around the prosthesis. Results The average Harris hip score improved from 52.2 points to 88.5 points. All femoral stems showed stable fixation; there were 37 cases by bony ingrowth and 8 cases by stable fibrous ingrowth. Neither osteolysis nor progressive radiolucent lines around the femoral stem were found at the last follow-up. Forty-one hips (91.9%) revealed excellent or good clinical results at the most recent follow-up. Conclusion For advanced secondary coxarthrosis, total hip arthroplasty with the use of the proximal modular femoral stem yielded good mid-term results with respect to the clinical and radiological criteria. PMID:21623609

  7. Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Girdlestone Hip following a Failed Hemiarthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, VJ; Ranganath, BT

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Girdlestone hip arthroplasty, though described as a salvage procedure for infected hip joints, can also be considered for failed Hemiarthroplasty procedures. The functional results of such Girdlestone hip may not be satisfactory. They may require total hip replacement to improve the quality of life, which are technically challenging. Here we are reporting such a case ina 60 year old male patient, with review of literature. Case Report: A 60 year old male patient underwent cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty for fracture neck of femur which failed, owing to improper implantation. Subsequently he underwent Girdlestone arthroplasty which resulted in persistent painful hip. He presented to us in this situation, where we successfully converted the Girdlestone arthroplasty to a Total Hip arthroplasty. Conclusion: Improper implantation in Hemiarthroplasty fails subsequently. In such cases Girdlestone arthroplasty may be an option to consider, though it may not give requisite relief to patient in some cases. In such situations total hip arthroplasty procedure, though technically challenging will give stable painless hip to the patient. PMID:27299043

  8. Trochanteric osteotomy and fixation during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Archibeck, Michael J; Rosenberg, Aaron G; Berger, Richard A; Silverton, Craig D

    2003-01-01

    Once used routinely, trochanteric osteotomy in total hip arthroplasty now is usually limited to difficult primary and revision cases. There are three types: the standard trochanteric osteotomy and its variations, the trochanteric slide, and the extended trochanteric osteotomy. Each has unique indications, fixation techniques, and complications. Primary total hip arthroplasty procedures requiring the enhanced exposure provided by trochanteric osteotomy may be needed in patients with hip ankylosis or fusion, protrusio acetabuli, proximal femoral deformities, developmental dysplasia, or abductor muscle laxity. Trochanteric osteotomies in revision arthroplasties, primarily the extended trochanteric osteotomy, facilitate the removal of well-fixed femoral components, provide direct access to the diaphysis for distal fixation, and enhance acetabular exposure.

  9. Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty Involving Trochanteric Osteotomy without Subtrochanteric Shortening for High Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soong Joon; Kim, Hee Joong

    2017-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty with subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy is widely performed for high hip dislocation. However, suboptimal leg length discrepancy correction and nonunion of the osteotomy site remain concerns. Although total hip arthroplasty using trochanteric osteotomy without subtrochanteric osteotomy was introduced, cemented implants have been more commonly used than contemporary cementless implants in this procedure. We evaluated the long-term results of cementless total hip arthroplasty with trochanteric osteotomy without subtrochanteric osteotomy for high hip dislocation. Methods From 1990 to 2002, 27 cementless total hip arthroplasties using trochanteric osteotomy without subtrochanteric osteotomy were performed in 26 patients with Crowe III or IV high hip dislocation and a mean age of 36.4 ± 12.9 years. Seven ceramic-on-ceramic, 8 ceramic-on-polyethylene, 10 metal-on-polyethylene, and 2 metal-on-metal bearings were inserted. Mean follow-up was 15.1 ± 3.7 years. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and radiographic data and evaluated the clinical and radiological results including the Harris hip score, implant survival, correction of leg length discrepancy, and occurrence of complications. Results The mean Harris hip score and leg length discrepancy improved significantly from 73.3 to 94.9 points and from 4.3 cm to 1.0 cm, respectively. With revision for loosening set as the end point, implant survival rates at 10 and 15 years postoperatively were 96.0% and 90.9% for stems and 74.1% and 52.3% for cups. In 8 of 10 hips with the metal-on-polyethylene bearing and 4 of 8 hips with the ceramic-on-polyethylene bearing, revision surgery was performed for aseptic loosening. However, no revision was performed in hips with the ceramic-on-ceramic bearing or the metal-on-metal bearing. Implant survival was significantly different by the type of bearing surface. Two permanent neurologic complications occurred in patients with a limb lengthening

  10. Two-Stage Cementless Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty for Infected Primary Hip Arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Camurcu, Yalkin; Sofu, Hakan; Buyuk, Abdul Fettah; Gursu, Sarper; Kaygusuz, Mehmet Akif; Sahin, Vedat

    2015-09-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to analyze the clinical features, the most common infective agents, and the results of two-stage total hip revision using a teicoplanin-impregnated spacer. Between January 2005 and July 2011, 41 patients were included. At the clinical status analysis, physical examination was performed, Harris hip score was noted, isolated microorganisms were recorded, and the radiographic evaluation was performed. The mean Harris hip score was improved from 38.9 ± 9.6 points to 81.8 ± 5.8 points (P<0.05). Infection was eradicated in 39 hips. Radiographic evidence of stability was noted in 37 acetabular revision components, and all femoral stems. Two-stage revision of the infected primary hip arthroplasty is a time-consuming but a reliable procedure with high rates of success.

  11. Effects of preoperative physiotherapy in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Czyżewska, Anna; Walesiak, Katarzyna; Krawczak, Karolina; Cabaj, Dominika; Górecki, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) claimed osteoarthritis as a civilization-related disease. The effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy among patients suffering hip osteoarthritis (OA) at the end of their conservative treatment is rarely described in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life and musculoskeletal health status of patients who received preoperative physiotherapy before total hip replacement (THR) surgery within a year prior to admission for a scheduled THR and those who did not. Material and methods Forty-five patients, admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Locomotor System for elective total hip replacement surgery, were recruited for this study. The assessment consisted of a detailed interview using various questionnaires: the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), as well as physical examination. Patients were assigned to groups based on their attendance of preoperative physiotherapy within a year prior to surgery. Results Among patients who received preoperative physiotherapy a significant improvement was found for pain, daily functioning, vitality, psychological health, social life, and (active and passive) internal rotation (p < 0.05). Conclusions Patients are not routinely referred to physiotherapy within a year before total hip replacement surgery. This study confirmed that pre-operative physiotherapy may have a positive influence on selected musculoskeletal system status indicators and quality of life in hip osteoarthritis patients awaiting surgery. PMID:25395951

  12. Bilateral total hip arthroplasty in siblings with Stickler Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, D; Anderson, J A; Taveras, N A; González Della Valle, A

    2007-01-01

    Stickler Syndrome is an infrequent autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder. The most prevalent mutation affects type II collagen gene and results in abnormalities in cartilage, vitreous and nucleus pulposus. Orthopaedic manifestations include joint hyper- mobility and pain with early development of secondary osteoarthritis. The condition has a predilection for the femoral head and patients usually present in their third to fourth decade with secondary hip arthritis. We report on two siblings with Stickler Syndrome who presented with hip osteoarthritis in their third decade of life and underwent staged bilateral total hip arthroplasties (THA). The patients experienced pain relief and improved quality of life after surgery.

  13. [Particle disease--aseptic loosening of the total hip endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Kolundzić, Robert; Orlić, Dubravko

    2008-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) improves the ability and quality of life in patients with hip dysfunction due to different causes. Aseptic loosening is the major cause of the late hip endoprosthesis failure. It results from aseptic inflammatory reaction induced by the implant wear debris accumulating at the prosthesis interface, and is mediated by numerous cellular and humoral factors. Due to presence of wear debris we call aseptic loosening of the total hip endoprosthesis as "particle disease". In the most important of factors affecting the risk of aseptic instability include patient's age, sex, body mass index, underlying morbidity (reason for THA), endoprosthetic material and surgeon's skill. However, taken together, all these factors explain only a minor part of variability of this phenomenon. Factors that are decisive for the occurrence of aseptic instability are still largely unknown. The existence of "individual disposition" for development of aseptic instability that is not determined by demographic or biomechanical factors is well recognized.

  14. Composite technology for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Skinner, H B

    1988-10-01

    Composite materials, which can be very strong while having a low modulus of elasticity, are being studied because such materials have potential to be made into isoelastic hip prostheses. Composites intended for medical applications incorporate carbon or polyamide as a fiber component, while polysulfone, polyetheretherketone, or polyethylene is used as a matrix component. Mechanical properties (especially the modulus of elasticity) are emphasized because of the desire to match those properties of the proximal femur. Many of the variables that affect the mechanical properties of these materials are explained. The application of stress to different fiber orientations demonstrates the mechanical properties of the composite, and this is proved mathematically. It is shown that in composites with fibers oriented in the same direction, the modulus of elasticity in the direction of the fibers generally approaches that of the fibers as the amount of matrix decreases. Perpendicular to the fibers, the modulus of elasticity of the composite is only slightly greater than that of the matrix material. For isotropic chopped-fiber composites, the modulus of elasticity approaches that of the matrix as the fiber content decreases; at high-fiber content, the modulus is significantly less than that of oriented long-fiber composites. In general, the modulus of elasticity and fiber content have a linear relationship. Composites have fatigue properties that vary with direction and approach ultimate strength in tension but are lower in compression. The fatigue properties of proposed composites are discussed. Abrasion as a cause of stress concentration sites and wear particles is considered.

  15. Psoas abscess associated with infected total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Buttaro, M; González Della Valle, A; Piccaluga, F

    2002-02-01

    A 65-year-old man with a left uncemented total hip arthroplasty performed 11 years previously was admitted with a history of progressive low back pain, left hip pain, and sepsis that had begun 6 months earlier. On physical examination, a gross, fluctuant mass was palpated in the left thigh. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a 6.5 x 3 cm left retrofascial psoas abscess communicating with the hip joint. The patient underwent irrigation and débridement of the hip with removal of the components. The psoas abscess was drained through the iliopsoas bursa. A residual psoas abscess was drained percutaneously under CT guidance. Cultures isolated Escherichia coli, and the patient responded to 6 months of ciprofloxacin therapy. After 1 year, the patient had no evidence of infection. Pathways of infection spread, diagnosis, and treatment of a patient with this rare association are discussed with a review of the literature.

  16. Is tantalum protective against infection in revision total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Tokarski, A T; Novack, T A; Parvizi, J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesised that the use of tantalum (Ta) acetabular components in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) was protective against subsequent failure due to infection. We identified 966 patients (421 men, 545 women and 990 hips) who had undergone revision THA between 2000 and 2013. The mean follow up was 40.2 months (3 months to 13.1 years). The mean age of the men and women was 62.3 years (31 to 90) and 65.1 years (25 to 92), respectively. Titanium (Ti) acetabular components were used in 536 hips while Ta components were used in 454 hips. In total, 73 (7.3%) hips experienced subsequent acetabular failure. The incidence of failure was lower in the Ta group at 4.4% (20/454) compared with 9.9% (53/536) in the Ti group (p < 0.001, odds ratio 2.38; 95% CI 1.37 to 4.27). Among the 144 hips (64 Ta, 80 Ti) for which revision had been performed because of infection, failure due to a subsequent infection was lower in the Ta group at 3.1% (2/64) compared with 17.5% (14/80) for the Ti group (p = 0.006). Thus, the use of Ta acetabular components during revision THA was associated with a lower incidence of failure from all causes and Ta components were associated with a lower incidence of subsequent infection when used in patients with periprosthetic joint infection.

  17. Implant survival of the most common cemented total hip devices from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association database

    PubMed Central

    Junnila, Mika; Laaksonen, Inari; Eskelinen, Antti; Pulkkinen, Pekka; Ivar Havelin, Leif; Furnes, Ove; Marie Fenstad, Anne; Pedersen, Alma B; Overgaard, Søren; Kärrholm, Johan; Garellick, Göran; Malchau, Henrik; Mäkelä, Keijo T

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose According to previous Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) data, the 10-year implant survival of cemented total hip arthroplasties (THAs) is 94% in patients aged 65–74 and 96% in patients aged 75 or more. Here we report a brand-level comparison of cemented THA based on the NARA database, which has not been done previously. Patients and methods We determined the rate of implant survival of the 9 most common cemented THAs in the NARA database. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis with 95% CI to study implant survival at 10 and 15 years, and Cox multiple regression to assess survival and hazard ratios (HRs), with revision for any reason as endpoint and with adjustment for age, sex, diagnosis, and femoral head material. Results Spectron EF THA (89.9% (CI: 89.3–90.5)) and Elite THA (89.8% (CI: 89.0–90.6)) had the lowest 10-year survivorship. Lubinus (95.7% survival, CI: 95.5–95.9), MS 30 (96.6%, CI: 95.8–97.4), and C-stem THA (95.8%, CI: 94.8–96.8) had a 10-year survivorship of at least 95%. Lubinus (revision risk (RR) = 0.77, CI: 0.73–0.81), Müller (RR =0.83, CI: 0.70–0.99), MS-30 (RR =0.73, CI: 0.63–0.86), C-stem (RR =0.70, CI: 0.55–0.90), and Exeter Duration THA (RR =0.84, CI: 0.77–0.90) had a lower risk of revision than Charnley THA, the reference implant. Interpretation The Spectron EF THA and the Elite THA had a lower implant survival than the Charnley, Exeter, and Lubinus THAs. Implant survival of the Müller, MS 30, CPT, and C-stem THAs was above the acceptable limit for 10-year survival. PMID:27550058

  18. Lower limb length and offset in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Flecher, X; Ollivier, M; Argenson, J N

    2016-02-01

    Restoration of normal hip biomechanics is a key goal of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and favorably affects functional recovery. Furthermore, a major concern for both the surgeon and the patient is preservation or restoration of limb length equality, which must be achieved without compromising the stability of the prosthesis. Here, definitions are given for anatomic and functional limb length discrepancies and for femoral and hip offset, determined taking anteversion into account. Data on the influence of operated-limb length and offset on patient satisfaction, hip function, and prosthesis survival after THA are reviewed. Errors may adversely impact function, quality of life, and prosthetic survival and may also generate conflicts between the surgeon and patient. Surgeons rely on two- or three-dimensional preoperative templating and on intraoperative landmarks to manage offset and length. Accuracy can be improved by using computer-assisted planning or surgery and the more recently introduced EOS imaging system. The prosthetic's armamentarium now includes varus-aligned and lateralized implants, as well as implants with modular or custom-made necks, which allow restoration of the normal hip geometry, most notably in patients with coxa vara or coxa valga. Femoral anteversion must also receive careful attention. The most common errors are limb lengthening and a decrease in hip offset. When symptoms are caused by an error in length and/or offset, revision arthroplasty may deserve consideration.

  19. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Min, Byung-Woo; Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty.

  20. The tribology of metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A

    2006-02-01

    Total hip surgery is an effective way of alleviating the pain and discomfort caused by diseased or damaged joints. However, in the majority of cases, these joints have a finite life. The main reason for failure is osteolysis (bone resorption). It is well documented that an important cause of osteolysis, and therefore the subsequent loosening and failure of conventional metal- or ceramic-on-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene joints, is the body's immunological response to the polyethylene wear particles. To avoid this, interest has been renewed in metal-on-metal joints. The intention of this paper is to review the studies that have taken place within different laboratories to determine the tribological performance of new-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements. These types of joint offer a potential solution to enhance the longevity of prosthetic hip systems; however, problems may arise owing to the effects of metal ion release, which are, as yet, not fully understood.

  1. Charnley low-frictional torque arthroplasty in patients under the age of 51 years. Follow-up to 33 years.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, B M; Siney, P D; Fleming, P A

    2002-05-01

    Between November 1962 and December 1990 a group of 1092 patients, 668 women and 424 men, under the age of 51 years at the time of surgery, underwent 1434 primary Charnley low-frictional torque arthroplasties and are being followed up indefinitely. Their mean age at operation was 41 years (12 to 51). At the latest review in June 2001 the mean follow-up had been for 15 years 1 month. Of the 1092 patients 54 (66 hips) could not be traced, 124 (169 hips) were known to have died and 220 (248 hips) had had a revision procedure. At a mean follow-up of 17 years and 5 months, 759 patients (951 hips) are still attending. In this group satisfaction with the outcome is 96.2%. The incidence of deep infection for the whole group was 1.67%. It was more common in patients who had had previous surgery (hemi- and total hip arthroplasties excluded), 2.2% compared with 1.5% in those who had not had previous surgery, but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.4). There were fewer cases of deep infection if gentamicin-containing cement was used, 0.9% compared with 1.9% in those with plain acrylic cement, but this was not also statistically significant (p = 0.4). There was a significantly higher rate of revision in patients who had had previous hip surgery, 24.8% compared with 14.1% in those who had not had previous surgery (p < 0.001). At the latest review, 1.95% are known to have had at least one dislocation and 0.4% have had a revision for dislocation. The indication for revision was aseptic loosening of the cup (11.7%), aseptic loosening of the stem (4.9%), a fractured stem (1.7%), deep infection (1.5%) and dislocation (0.4%). With revision for any indication as the endpoint the survivorship was 93.7% (92.3 to 95.0) at ten years, 84.7% (82.4 to 87.1) at 15 years, 74.3% (70.5 to 78.0) at 20 years and 55.3% (45.5 to 65.0) at 27 years, when 55 hips remained 'at risk'.

  2. A Water Rehabilitation Program in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Before and After Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Cabak, Anna; Tederko, Piotr; Włostowska, Ewa; Stanisławska, Iwona; Szypuła, Jan; Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain associated with coxarthrosis, typically occurring in middle-aged and elderly patients, very commonly causes considerable limitation of motor fitness and dependence on pharmacotherapy. This article provides an assessment of a rehabilitation program with tailored water exercises in patients with osteoarthritis before and after total hip replacement. Material/Methods A total of 192 patients (the mean age 61.03±10.89) suffering from hip osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated before and after total hip replacement (THR). The clinical study covered measurements of hip active ranges of motion (HAROM) and the forces generated by pelvis stabilizer muscles. Pain intensity was assessed according to analogue-visual scale of pain (VAS) and according to the Modified Laitinen Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 6 groups (4 treatment and 2 control). We compared 2 rehabilitation programs using kinesitherapy and low-frequency magnetic field. One of them also had specially designed exercises in the water. Statistical analysis was carried out at the significance level α=0.05. This was a cross-sectional study. Results A positive effect of water exercises on a number of parameters was found in patients with OA both before and after total hip replacement surgery. We noted a significant reduction of pain (p<0.001), increased ranges of motion and muscle strength, and reduced use of medicines (NASAIDs) (p<0.001). A correlation was found between the degree of degenerative deforming lesions and the effects of the treatment process (p<0.01). Conclusions 1. The rehabilitation program including water exercises most significantly reduced pain in patients with OA before and after total hip replacement surgery. 2. Inclusion of water exercises in a rehabilitation program can reduce the use of medicines in patient with OA and after THR. PMID:27455419

  3. Effects of Neuromuscular Reeducation on Hip Mechanics and Functional Performance in Patients after Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Dana L.; Winters, Joshua D.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.; Christiansen, Cory L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following total hip arthroplasty, patients demonstrate compensatory movement strategies during activities of daily living such as walking and stair climbing. Movement compensations are important markers of functional decline in older adults and are related to poor functional capacity. Despite increased utilization of hip arthroplasty, persistent movement compensation, and functional performance deficits, no consensus on postoperative rehabilitation exists. Neuromuscular reeducation techniques offer a strategy to improve movement quality by emphasizing hip abductor performance and pelvic stability. This case series illustrates changes in movement strategy around the hip in response to targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques after hip arthroplasty. Methods Five participants received an 8-week exercise program following total hip arthroplasty, emphasizing targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques hallmarked by specific, weight-bearing exercise to improve hip abductor performance and pelvic stability. Five additional participants were supervised and followed for comparison. Findings Participants in the neuromuscular reeducation program improved their internal hip abductor moments and vertical ground reaction forces during walking and stair climbing. They also improved their functional performance and hip abductor strength outcomes. Interpretation Targeted neuromuscular reeducation techniques after total hip arthroplasty provided a positive effect on biomechanical outcomes, functional performance, and muscle strength. Through focused use of the hip abductor muscles, increased internal hip abductor moments were observed. This intervention potentially promotes pelvic stability, and may contribute to improved performance on tasks such as stair climbing, fast walking, and balance. The results suggest that neuromuscular reeducation offers a unique effect on movement strategy and function for patients following total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26802531

  4. Treatment of symptomatic greater trochanteric fracture after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Jeffrey I; Chuang, Michael J; Cerynik, Douglas L; Johanson, Norman A

    2009-08-01

    Isolated greater trochanter fractures after total hip arthroplasty are associated with major comorbidities such as debilitating weakness, pain, and dislocation. No definitive standard of care has been established for these fracture. However, it is well known that reestablishing osseous union in these patients is strongly associated with return of functional status. We report a case of an elderly patient with multiple hip revision surgeries now presenting with unilateral greater trochanter fracture. Treatment incorporated the use of a trochanteric claw plate, cerclage wiring, and adjuvant demineralized bone matrix allograft to achieve successful osseous union. This is the first reported use of adjuvant demineralized bone matrix for fixing these fractures.

  5. [Rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty of hip and knee].

    PubMed

    Jansen, E; Brienza, S; Gierasimowicz-Fontana, A; Matos, C; Reynders-Frederix-Dobre, C; HateM, S M

    2015-09-01

    Numbers of total hip and knee arthroplasties are increasing on a regular basis. Clinical pathways tend to shorten the duration of hospitalization in acute care after surgery. Therefore, the preoperative preparation of the patient and his abilities for postoperative rehabilitation should be carefully addressed. Before the surgical intervention, it is recommended that the patient receives an educational program and a physical preparation. After the surgical intervention, the patient can benefit from a home-based rehabilitation program supervised by a physiotherapist, if there were no preoperative reasons for prolonging the hospital stay and if the surgery took place without complications. Some patients may benefit from postsurgical rehabilitation in a specialized locomotor rehabilitation long-stay care unit. The indications for inpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation are : two simultaneous arthroplasties, revision of a previous hip or knee arthroplasty, postsurgical complications, advanced age, comorbidities influencing the rehabilitation process, social difficulties, necessity for adaptation of the environment, insufficient or unadapted out-patient (para)medical care. The goals of the rehabilitation treatment depend on the patient's characteristics and environment, on the properties of the prosthesis and on the postsurgical complications. The functional prognosis of a total joint arthroplasty of the knee or hip is excellent, provided that there are no post-surgical complications and that the patient benefits from adequate rehabilitation therapy. The present paper describes the different phases of rehabilitation treatment and the general and specific complications of total hip and knee arthroplasties that may influence the rehabilitation outcome.

  6. Fracture of the Modular Neck in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, A.; Gargallo-Margarit, A.; Barro, V.; Gallardo-Calero, I.; Sallent, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity of the components in total hip arthroplasty has had an increase in popularity in the last decades. We present the case of a 53-year-old man with a history of avascular necrosis of the femoral head due to a hypophyseal adenoma. A total hip modular arthroplasty was implanted. Three and a half years after the surgery the patient attended the emergency room due to acute left hip pain with no prior traumatism. Radiological examination confirmed a fracture of the modular neck. A revision surgery was performed finding an important pseudotumoral well-organized periprosthetic tissue reaction. Through an extended trochanteric osteotomy the femoral component was removed, and a straight-stem revision prosthesis implanted. There are several potential advantages when using modularity in total hip arthroplasty that surgeons may benefit from, but complications have arisen and must be addressed. Various circumstances such as large femoral head with a long varus neck, corrosion, patient's BMI, and activity level may participate in creating the necessary environment for fatigue failure of the implant. PMID:26266069

  7. MINIMALLY INVASIVE ANTEROLATERAL ACCESS ROUTE FOR TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Sawaia, Rogério Naim; Galvão, Antonio Felipe Martensen; Oliveira, Fernando Machado; Secunho, Guilherme Rondinelli; Filho, Geraldo Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to present a minimally invasive anterolateral access route and to ascertain whether this enables total hip replacement without compromising the quality of the implant positioning, while maintaining the integrity of the gluteus muscles. Method: A retrospective study was conducted on 260 patients (186 females and 74 males) with an average age of 62 years. There were 18 bilateral cases, totaling 278 hips. All the patients had osteoarthritis and had undergone non-cemented total hip arthroplasty (metal-metal or metal-polyethylene) between October 2004 and December 2007. A minimally invasive anterolateral access route was used, measuring 7 to 10 cm in length, according to body weight and the size of the femoral head. The patients were assessed clinically regarding age, sex and presence of the Trendelenburg sign, and radiologically regarding acetabular and femoral positioning. Results: The acetabular inclination was between 30° and 40° in 78 patients, between 41° and 50° in 189 patients, and 51° or over in 11 patients. On anteroposterior radiographs to study femoral positioning, the positioning was central in 209 cases, 41 presented valgus deviation and 28 presented varus deviation. On lateral views, 173 were central, 67 anterior and 38 posterior. The mean duration of the procedure was 63 minutes. Regarding complications, there were five cases of infection, three of deep vein thrombosis, two of hip dislocation, 80 of lengthening of the lower limbs and five of shortening of the operated limb. The Trendelenburg sign was present in four cases, of which one showed superior gluteal nerve injury. Conclusion: The minimally invasive anterolateral access route made it possible to perform total hip arthroplasty without compromising the positioning of the implants, thereby maintaining the integrity of the gluteus muscles. PMID:27027008

  8. A Useful Anatomical Reference Guide for Stem Anteversion during Total Hip Arthroplasty in the Dysplastic Hip.

    PubMed

    Tsukeoka, Tadashi; Tsuneizumi, Yoshikazu; Lee, Tae Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography scans of 50 dysplastic hips were obtained and reconstructed using preoperative planning software for total hip arthroplasty. The anteversion of the stem implanted parallel to the line connecting the trochanteric fossa and the middle of the medial cortex of the femoral neck (T line) was measured. The cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm above the lesser trochanter were simulated. The mean difference of the anteversion of the stem using the T line and the native femoral anteversion was 2.7° (95% CI: 1.0°-4.5°) and 3.5° (95% CI: 1.5°-5.5°) at cutting heights of 5mm and 10mm respectively. An anteversion using a T line is compatible with native femoral anteversion even in developmental dysplasia of the hip.

  9. The Influence of Hip Rotation on Femoral Offset Following Short Stem Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boese, Christoph K; Bredow, Jan; Ettinger, Max; Eysel, Peer; Thorey, Fritz; Lechler, Philipp; Budde, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Short stem total hip arthroplasty (THA) is thought to be an advantageous surgical option for young patients. Femoral offset has been identified as an important factor for clinical outcome of THA. However, little is known on functional implications of femoral offset after short stem THA. Importantly, hip rotation influences the projected femoral offset and may lead to significant underestimation. Therefore, a novel method to identify and account for hip rotation was applied to a prospectively enrolled series of 37 patients (48 radiographs) undergoing short stem THA. Repeated measurements were performed and intraobserver and interobserver reliability was assessed and femoral offset was corrected for rotation. Based on this study, rotation-correction of femoral offset is of highest relevance for the correct interpretation in future studies.

  10. Piroxicam and naproxen in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip waiting for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Alho, A; Jaer, O; Slungaard, U; Holme, I

    1988-06-01

    Two-hundred and fifty-two patients waiting for a total hip replacement for degenerative hip disease were randomized to two groups of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication using piroxicam, 20 mg per day, and naproxen, 750 mg per day, after exclusion for severe dyspepsia or peptic ulcer, asthma, idiosyncracy, dissent, age below 50 years, Harris hip score above 50, or significant contralateral disease. A significant improvement in the pain and daily activity parameters was obtained in both groups. The effect was better in the piroxicam group one month after the commencement of the treatment, and equal in the groups later during the observation period of 2-5 months. We conclude that continuous medication is beneficial in patients with severe osteoarthritis scheduled for operation. However, the side effects of the medication have to be carefully considered and followed up.

  11. Psychological factors as risk factors for poor hip function after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Benditz, Achim; Jansen, Petra; Schaible, Jan; Roll, Christina; Grifka, Joachim; Götz, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is influenced by several psychological aspects, such as depression, anxiety, resilience, and personality traits. We hypothesized that preoperative depression impedes early functional outcome after THA (primary outcome measure). Additional objectives were perioperative changes in the psychological status and their influence on perioperative outcome. This observational study analyzed depression, anxiety, resilience, and personality traits in 50 patients after primary unilateral THA. Hip functionality was measured by means of the Harris Hip Score. Depression, state anxiety, and resilience were evaluated preoperatively as well as 1 and 5 weeks postoperatively. Trait anxiety and personality traits were measured once preoperatively. Patients with low depression and anxiety levels had significantly better outcomes with respect to early hip functionality. Resilience and personality traits did not relate to hip functionality. Depression and state anxiety levels significantly decreased within the 5-week stay in the acute and rehabilitation clinic, whereas resilience remained at the same level. Our study suggests that low depression and anxiety levels are positively related to early functionality after THA. Therefore, perioperative measurements of these factors seem to be useful to provide the best support for patients with risk factors. PMID:28260910

  12. The provision of total hip replacement for displaced intracapsular hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) currently recommends the use of total hip replacement (THR) for displaced intracapsular hip fractures in patients who meet certain mobility, cognitive and health criteria. Methods A multicentre prospective audit was conducted within a defined geographic region to assess current practice and variation in provision of THR for displaced intracapsular hip fractures. Results A total of 879 patients with hip fractures, admitted to 8 acute trauma units, were included in this study. Of 462 patients with displaced intracapsular hip fractures, 169 fulfilled the NICE criteria for THR. THR was performed for only 49 of (29%) the eligible patients. There was significant variation in THR provision between the eight units (0% to 50% THR usage, p<0.001). There were statistically significant differences in age, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade, abbreviated mental test score and walking ability prior to the injury between patients who underwent fixation, THR or hemiarthroplasty (all p≤0.05). There was a significantly increased chance of not undergoing THR if a patient was older than 77 years (median age for the THR eligible cohort; relative risk [RR]: 7.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.8–22.0, p<0.001). There was also a trend for this with patients who were ASA grade 3 compared with ASA grade 1 or 2 (RR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.0–7.3, p=0.06). The surgeons gave multifactorial reasons for not performing THR in eligible patients. Conclusions There is significant variation in the provision of THR for eligible hip fracture patients, which is influenced by both patient demographics and the unit to which a patient is admitted. PMID:26741658

  13. Risk assessment tools used to predict outcomes of total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Joseph F; Hansen, Viktor J; Rubash, Harry E; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews recently proposed clinical tools for predicting risks and outcomes in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty patients. Additionally, we share the Massachusetts General Hospital experience with using the Risk Assessment and Prediction Tool to predict the need for an extended care facility after total joint arthroplasty.

  14. Conventional Versus Cross-Linked Polyethylene for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Monestier, Luca; Vulcano, Ettore; Harwin, Steven F; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The clinical and radiographic outcomes of 88 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with either conventional polyethylene or cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) from the same manufacturer were compared. There were no significant differences between the 2 subpopulations regarding average age, gender, side affected, or prosthetic stem and cup size. The average follow-up was 104 months (range, 55 to 131 months). To the authors' knowledge, this is the longest follow-up for this particular insert. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results showed that XLPE has a significantly greater wear reduction than that of standard polyethylene in primary total hip arthroplasty. At the longest available follow-up for these specific inserts, XLPE proved to be effective in reducing wear.

  15. [Modern tribology in total hip arthroplasty: pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Gómez-García, F

    2014-01-01

    The wear products and adverse reactions that occur on bearing surfaces represent one of the greatest challenges in prosthetic replacements, as the latter experience increasing demands due to the large number of young and older adult patients that have a long life expectancy and remarkable activity. The purpose of this review is to analyze the pros and cons of the new advances in the bearing components of the articular surfaces of current total hip arthroplasties. We also discuss the strategies used historically, their problems, results and the surgeon's role in prescribing the tribologic couple that best fits each patient's needs. We conclude with practical recommendations for the prescription and management of the latest articular couples for total hip arthroplasty.

  16. The importance of acetabular component position in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Daines, Brian K; Dennis, Douglas A

    2012-11-01

    Correct acetabular cup position is critical to successful total hip replacement. Unfortunately, malposition of acetabular cups is common and leads to increased rates of dislocation, wear, and ion toxicity. Despite the popularity of Lewinnek's safe zone, the exact target of acetabular abduction and version remains elusive. Differences in functional pelvic position, surgical approach, and femoral anteversion affect the optimal cup position for individual patients. Surgeons need to be aware of pelvic position changes from the supine to lateral decubitus position.

  17. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Paget's Disease A Review.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Vineet; Lajam, Claudette; Deshmukh, Ajit J

    2016-11-01

    Paget's disease of the bone is a chronic osteopathy that leads to structural weakness, hypervascularity, and bone deformities. Rapid bone turnover in patients with Paget's disease may affect outcomes following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Most literature on THA in the setting of Paget's disease is limited to isolated case reports or case series documenting a single institution experience. By completing a comprehensive analysis of the available cases, this study aims to investigate the outcomes and complications of THA in patients with Paget's disease.

  18. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this review was to assess the safety and effectiveness of metal on metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty for young patients compared with that of total hip replacement (THR) in the same population. Clinical Need Total hip replacement has proved to be very effective for late middle-aged and elderly patients with severe degenerative diseases of the hips. As indications for THR began to include younger patients and those with a more active life style, the longevity of the implant became a concern. Evidence suggests that these patients experience relatively higher rates of early implant failure and the need for revision. The Swedish hip registry, for example, has demonstrated a survival rate in excess of 80% at 20 years for those aged over 65 years, whereas this figure was 33% by 16 years in those aged under 55 years. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to THR that restores normal joint biomechanics and load transfer. The technique has been used around the world for more than 10 years, specifically in the United Kingdom and other European countries. The Technology Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative procedure to conventional THR in younger patients. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is less invasive than THR and addresses the problem of preserving femoral bone stock at the initial operation. This means that future hip revisions are possible with THR if the initial MOM arthroplasty becomes less effective with time in these younger patients. The procedure involves the removal and replacement of the surface of the femoral head with a hollow metal hemisphere, which fits into a metal acetabular cup. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a technically more demanding procedure than is conventional THR. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is retained, which makes it much more difficult to access the acetabular cup. However, hip resurfacing arthroplasty has several advantages over a

  19. Orthopaedic Surgeons’ Cardiovascular Response During Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Orlic, Dubravko

    2008-01-01

    The literature contains limited and contradictory information regarding the amount of physical effort and/or emotional stress needed to perform surgery. We therefore investigated cardiovascular response to psychophysical stress in orthopaedic surgeons while they were performing surgery. We monitored 29 male orthopaedic surgeons from four university centers while they performed total hip arthroplasties. Changes in their cardiovascular parameters were recorded by ambulatory monitoring methods. Exercise stress testing of each participant was used as a control state. We compared the cardiovascular response during surgery to energy requirements of everyday activities. Preoperative and postoperative testing showed lower values of cardiovascular parameters than during physically less difficult parts of the operation; physically more difficult phases of the operation additionally increased the values of parameters. We concluded performing total hip arthroplasty increases surgeons’ cardiovascular parameters because of psychologic stress and physical effort. Excitement of the cardiovascular system during total hip arthroplasty appears similar to the excitement during moderate-intensity daily activities, such as walking the dog, leisurely bicycling, or climbing stairs. PMID:18196425

  20. Orthopaedic surgeons' cardiovascular response during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bergovec, Marko; Orlic, Dubravko

    2008-02-01

    The literature contains limited and contradictory information regarding the amount of physical effort and/or emotional stress needed to perform surgery. We therefore investigated cardiovascular response to psychophysical stress in orthopaedic surgeons while they were performing surgery. We monitored 29 male orthopaedic surgeons from four university centers while they performed total hip arthroplasties. Changes in their cardiovascular parameters were recorded by ambulatory monitoring methods. Exercise stress testing of each participant was used as a control state. We compared the cardiovascular response during surgery to energy requirements of everyday activities. Preoperative and postoperative testing showed lower values of cardiovascular parameters than during physically less difficult parts of the operation; physically more difficult phases of the operation additionally increased the values of parameters. We concluded performing total hip arthroplasty increases surgeons' cardiovascular parameters because of psychologic stress and physical effort. Excitement of the cardiovascular system during total hip arthroplasty appears similar to the excitement during moderate-intensity daily activities, such as walking the dog, leisurely bicycling, or climbing stairs.

  1. Basic Science Considerations in Primary Total Hip Replacement Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Saqeb B; Dunlop, Douglas G; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Naqvi, Syed G; Gangoo, Shafat; Salih, Saif

    2010-01-01

    Total Hip Replacement is one of the most common operations performed in the developed world today. An increasingly ageing population means that the numbers of people undergoing this operation is set to rise. There are a numerous number of prosthesis on the market and it is often difficult to choose between them. It is therefore necessary to have a good understanding of the basic scientific principles in Total Hip Replacement and the evidence base underpinning them. This paper reviews the relevant anatomical and biomechanical principles in THA. It goes on to elaborate on the structural properties of materials used in modern implants and looks at the evidence base for different types of fixation including cemented and uncemented components. Modern bearing surfaces are discussed in addition to the scientific basis of various surface engineering modifications in THA prostheses. The basic science considerations in component alignment and abductor tension are also discussed. A brief discussion on modular and custom designs of THR is also included. This article reviews basic science concepts and the rationale underpinning the use of the femoral and acetabular component in total hip replacement. PMID:20582240

  2. General Compared with Spinal Anesthesia for Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basques, Bryce A.; Toy, Jason O.; Bohl, Daniel D.; Golinvaux, Nicholas S.; Grauer, Jonathan N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty may be performed under general or spinal anesthesia. The purpose of the current study was to compare perioperative outcomes between anesthetic types for patients undergoing primary elective total hip arthroplasty. Methods: Patients who had undergone primary elective total hip arthroplasty from 2010 to 2012 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Operating room times, length of stay, thirty-day adverse events, and readmission were compared between patients who had received general anesthesia and those who had received spinal anesthesia. Propensity-adjusted multivariate analysis was used to control for selection bias and baseline patient characteristics. Results: A total of 20,936 patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty met inclusion criteria for this study. Of these, 12,752 patients (60.9%) had received general anesthesia and 8184 patients (39.1%) had received spinal anesthesia. On propensity-adjusted multivariate analyses, general anesthesia for total hip arthroplasty was associated with increased operative time (+12 minutes [95% confidence interval, +11 to +13 minutes]; p < 0.001) and postoperative room time (+5 minutes [95% confidence interval, +4 to +6 minutes]; p < 0.001). General anesthesia was also associated with the occurrence of any adverse event (odds ratio, 1.31 [95% confidence interval, 1.23 to 1.41]; p < 0.001), prolonged postoperative ventilator use (odds ratio, 5.81 [95% confidence interval, 1.35 to 25.06]; p = 0.018), unplanned intubation (odds ratio, 2.17 [95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 4.29]; p = 0.024), stroke (odds ratio, 2.51 [95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 6.20]; p = 0.046), cardiac arrest (odds ratio, 5.04 [95% confidence interval, 1.15 to 22.07]; p = 0.032), any minor adverse event (odds ratio, 1.35 [95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 1.45]; p = 0.001), and blood transfusion (odds ratio, 1.34 [95% confidence interval, 1.25 to

  3. Impingement and Dislocation in Total HIP Arthroplasty: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D; Elkins, Jacob M; Pedersen, Douglas R; Callaghan, John J

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary total hip arthroplasty, instability has been a complication in approximately 2% to 5% of primary surgeries and 5% to 10% of revisions. Due to the reduction in the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis that has been achieved over the last decade, instability now stands as the single most common reason for revision surgery. Moreover, even without frank dislocation, impingement and subluxation are implicated in a set of new concerns arising with advanced bearings, associated with the relatively unforgiving nature of many of those designs. Against that backdrop, the biomechanical factors responsible for impingement, subluxation, and dislocation remain under-investigated relative to their burden of morbidity. This manuscript outlines a 15-year program of laboratory and clinical research undertaken to improve the scientific basis for understanding total hip impingement and dislocation. The broad theme has been to systematically evaluate the role of surgical factors, implant design factors, and patient factors in predisposing total hip constructs to impinge, sublux, and/or dislocate. Because this class of adverse biomechanical events had not lent itself well to study with existing approaches, it was necessary to develop (and validate) a series of new research methodologies, relying heavily on advanced finite element formulations. Specific areas of focus have included identifying the biomechanical challenges posed by dislocation-prone patient activities, quantifying design parameter effects and component surgical positioning effects for conventional metal-on-polyethylene implant constructs, and the impingement/dislocation behavior of non-conventional constructs, quantifying the stabilizing role of the hip capsule (and of surgical repairs of capsule defects), and systematically studying impingement and edge loading of hard-on-hard bearings, fracture of ceramic liners, confounding effects of patient obesity, and subluxation-mediated worsening of third body

  4. Digital versus analogue preoperative planning of total hip arthroplasties: a randomized clinical trial of 210 total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    The, Bertram; Verdonschot, Nico; van Horn, Jim R; van Ooijen, Peter M A; Diercks, Ron L

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this randomized clinical trial was to compare the clinical and technical results of digital preoperative planning for primary total hip arthroplasties with analogue planning. Two hundred and ten total hip arthroplasties were randomized. All plans were constructed on standardized radiographs by the surgeon who performed the arthroplasty the next day. The main outcome was accuracy of the preoperative plan. Secondary outcomes were operation time and a radiographic assessment of the arthroplasty. Digital preoperative plans were more accurate in planning the cup (P < .05) and scored higher on the postoperative radiologic assessment of cemented cup (P = .03) and stem (P < .01) components. None of the other comparisons reached statistical significance. We conclude that digital plans slightly outperform analogue plans.

  5. Low revision rate after total hip arthroplasty in patients with pediatric hip diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The results of primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) after pediatric hip diseases such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), or Perthes’ disease have been reported to be inferior to the results after primary osteoarthritis of the hip (OA). Materials and methods We compared the survival of primary THAs performed during the period 1995–2009 due to previous DDH, SCFE, Perthes’ disease, or primary OA, using merged individual-based data from the Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish arthroplasty registers, called the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA). Cox multiple regression, with adjustment for age, sex, and type of fixation of the prosthesis was used to calculate the survival of the prostheses and the relative revision risks. Results 370,630 primary THAs were reported to these national registers for 1995–2009. Of these, 14,403 THAs (3.9%) were operated due to pediatric hip diseases (3.1% for Denmark, 8.8% for Norway, and 1.9% for Sweden) and 288,435 THAs (77.8%) were operated due to OA. Unadjusted 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival of THAs after pediatric hip diseases (94.7% survival) was inferior to that after OA (96.6% survival). Consequently, an increased risk of revision for hips with a previous pediatric hip disease was seen (risk ratio (RR) 1.4, 95% CI: 1.3–1.5). However, after adjustment for differences in sex and age of the patients, and in fixation of the prostheses, no difference in survival was found (93.6% after pediatric hip diseases and 93.8% after OA) (RR 1.0, CI: 1.0–1.1). Nevertheless, during the first 6 postoperative months more revisions were reported for THAs secondary to pediatric hip diseases (RR 1.2, CI: 1.0–1.5), mainly due to there being more revisions for dislocations (RR 1.8, CI: 1.4–2.3). Comparison between the different diagnosis groups showed that the overall risk of revision after DDH was higher than after OA (RR 1.1, CI: 1.0–1.2), whereas the combined

  6. Accelerating failure rate of the ASR total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Langton, D J; Jameson, S S; Joyce, T J; Gandhi, J N; Sidaginamale, R; Mereddy, P; Lord, J; Nargol, A V F

    2011-08-01

    There is widespread concern regarding the incidence of adverse soft-tissue reactions after metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacement. Recent National Joint Registry data have shown clear differences in the rates of failure of different designs of hip resurfacing. Our aim was to update the failure rates related to metal debris for the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR). A total of 505 of these were implanted. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a failure rate of 25% at six years for the ASR resurfacing and of 48.8% for the ASR total hip replacement (THR). Of 257 patients with a minimum follow-up of two years, 67 (26.1%) had a serum cobalt concentration which was greater than 7 μg/l. Co-ordinate measuring machine analysis of revised components showed that all patients suffering adverse tissue reactions in the resurfacing group had abnormal wear of the bearing surfaces. Six THR patients had relatively low rates of articular wear, but were found to have considerable damage at the trunion-taper interface. Our results suggest that wear at the modular junction is an important factor in the development of adverse tissue reactions after implantation of a large-diameter MoM THR.

  7. Polyethylene Oxidation in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Evolution and New Advances

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Medel, Francisco; Puértolas, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains the gold standard acetabular bearing material for hip arthroplasty. Its successful performance has shown consistent results and survivorship in total hip replacement (THR) above 85% after 15 years, with different patients, surgeons, or designs. As THR results have been challenged by wear, oxidation, and liner fracture, relevant research on the material properties in the past decade has led to the development and clinical introduction of highly crosslinked polyethylenes (HXLPE). More stress on the bearing (more active, overweighted, younger patients), and more variability in the implantation technique in different small and large Hospitals may further compromise the clinical performance for many patients. The long-term in vivo performance of these materials remains to be proven. Clinical and retrieval studies after more than 5 years of in vivo use with HXLPE in THR are reviewed and consistently show a substantial decrease in wear rate. Moreover, a second generation of improved polyethylenes is backed by in vitro data and awaits more clinical experience to confirm the experimental improvements. Also, new antioxidant, free radical scavengers, candidates and the reinforcement of polyethylene through composites are currently under basic research. Oxidation of polyethylene is today significantly reduced by present formulations, and this forgiving, affordable, and wellknown material is still reliable to meet today’s higher requirements in total hip replacement. PMID:20111694

  8. Intraoperative Proximal Femoral Fracture in Primary Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Shahi, Alisina; Park, Andrew G; Purtill, James J

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative proximal femoral fracture is a complication of primary cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) at rates of 2.95-27.8%. A retrospective review of 2423 consecutive primary cementless THA cases identified 102 hips (96 patients) with fracture. Multivariate analysis compared fracture incidences between implants, Accolade (Stryker Orthopaedics) and Tri-Lock (DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc.), and evaluated potential risk factors using a randomized control group of 1150 cases without fracture. The fracture incidence was 4.4% (102/2423), 3.7% (36/1019) using Accolade and 4.9% using Tri-Lock (66/1404) (P=0.18). Female gender (OR=1.96; 95% CI 1.19-3.23; P=0.008) and smaller stem size (OR=1.64; 95% CI 1.04-2.63; P=0.03) predicted increased odds of fracture. No revisions of the femoral component were required in the fracture cohort.

  9. When is total hip arthroplasty a failure? The patients' perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Hellman, E. J.; Feinberg, J. R.; Capello, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients (186 primary, 92 revision) were surveyed regarding their satisfaction, their expectations regarding longevity, of the hip implant, and their perspective on the potential or actual need for revision surgery. The vast majority of patients were glad they had the original THA, would do it again if faced with a similar choice, and would recommend it to others. One-third of patients believed their current implants would last the rest of their life. The most common responses to either potential or actual failure were happiness it lasted as long as it did, accepting it as "one of those things," and disappointment. No primary THA patients and only 7% of revision of THA patients indicated that they would consider the primary THA a failure when revision surgery was indicated. PMID:9129281

  10. Acetabular augmentation for the treatment of unstable total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholl, J. E.; Koka, S. R.; Bintcliffe, I. W.; Addison, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-eight unstable total hip arthroplasties were treated with an acetabular augmentation wedge. Of the hips, 23 have had no further dislocations at a mean follow-up of 26 months. Five patients continued to dislocate and have needed further surgery. To our knowledge this is the largest reported series of acetabular augmentation with as good results as those of the most successful reported series of this technique, and a success rate comparable to other methods of treating recurrent dislocation. Careful patient selection, and using a thin augmentation wedge to avoid impingement, are important to the success of a technique which is a useful option in the management of recurrent dislocation. Images Figure 1 PMID:10364973

  11. Digital templating in total hip arthroplasty: Additional anteroposterior hip view increases the accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Stigler, Sophia K; Müller, Franz J; Pfaud, Sebastian; Zellner, Michael; Füchtmeier, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    AIM To analyze planning total hip arthroplasty (THA) with an additional anteroposterior hip view may increases the accuracy of preoperative planning in THA. METHODS We conducted prospective digital planning in 100 consecutive patients: 50 of these procedures were planned using pelvic overview only (first group), and the other 50 procedures were planned using pelvic overview plus antero-posterior (a.p.) hip view (second group). The planning and the procedure of each patient were performed exclusively by the senior surgeon. Fifty procedures with retrospective analogues planning were used as the control group (group zero). After the procedure, the planning was compared with the eventually implanted components (cup and stem). For statistic analysis the χ2 test was used for nominal variables and the t test was used for a comparison of continuous variables. RESULTS Preoperative planning with an additional a.p. hip view (second group) significantly increased the exact component correlation when compared to pelvic overview only (first group) for both the acetabular cup and the femoral stem (76% cup and 66% stem vs 54% cup and 32% stem). When considering planning ± 1 size, the accuracy in the second group was 96% (48 of 50 patients) for the cup and 94% for the stem (47 of 50 patients). In the analogue control group (group zero), an exact correlation was observed in only 1/3 of the cases. CONCLUSION Digital THA planning performed by the operating surgeon and based on additional a.p. hip view significantly increases the correlation between preoperative planning and eventual implant sizes. PMID:28144576

  12. Short-Term Results of Novel Constrained Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Thomas; Finley, Stephen; Snider, Rebecca; Looper, Jayme; Tanner, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Constrained acetabular components have only been recommended as a salvage option for the persistently unstable total hip arthroplasty (THA), due to limited range of motion and less than satisfactory component failure rates. This is a retrospective review of 137 patients with 154 consecutive primary constrained THAs performed between November 2003 and August 2007. We reviewed serial radiographs, postoperative complications, groin/thigh pain, and compared preoperative and postoperative Harris Hip Scores. With a mean follow-up of 6 years, there was 1.9% dislocation rate, 0% component failure rate, and 2.6% infection rate. Seven patients reported continued groin pain, and three had continued thigh pain. One patient showed radiographic evidence of 1 mm polyethylene wear. Radiographic review showed no evidence of osteolysis or stem subsidence. Harris Hip Scores improved from a mean of 68.8 (range 58-87) preoperatively to 98.9 (range 65-100) at final clinical assessment. This constrained acetabular prosthesis had a dislocation rate of less than 2%, with 0% component failure rate at a minimum of 2 years of follow-up suggesting this prosthesis may be a viable alternative for patients at risk for instability or those known to have recurrent instability. PMID:26330992

  13. Post-operative neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Su, E P

    2017-01-01

    Nerve palsy is a well-described complication following total hip arthroplasty, but is highly distressing and disabling. A nerve palsy may cause difficulty with the post-operative rehabilitation, and overall mobility of the patient. Nerve palsy may result from compression and tension to the affected nerve(s) during the course of the operation via surgical manipulation and retractor placement, tension from limb lengthening or compression from post-operative hematoma. In the literature, hip dysplasia, lengthening of the leg, the use of an uncemented femoral component, and female gender are associated with a greater risk of nerve palsy. We examined our experience at a high-volume, tertiary care referral centre, and found an overall incidence of 0.3% out of 39 056 primary hip arthroplasties. Risk factors found to be associated with the incidence of nerve palsy at our institution included the presence of spinal stenosis or lumbar disc disease, age younger than 50, and smoking. If a nerve palsy is diagnosed, imaging is mandatory and surgical evacuation or compressive haematomas may be beneficial. As palsies are slow to recover, supportive care such as bracing, therapy, and reassurance are the mainstays of treatment. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B(1 Supple A):46-9.

  14. A new anterolateral surgical approach for total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    GRANO, GIOVANNI F.; PAVLIDOU, MARIA; TODESCO, ALBERTO; PALERMO, AUGUSTO; MOLFETTA, LUIGI

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of the present paper is to present the short-term results of a “detachment-free” (DF) anterolateral approach for primary total hip replacement (THR) performed in a large series of patients. Methods two hundred patients submitted to primary THR were retrospectively reviewed for the present study. In all cases, the surgery was performed using a minimally invasive DF anterolateral approach, which entails no disconnection of tendons and no muscle damage. The study population consisted of 96 men (48%) and 104 women (52%), with an average age of 69.4 years (range 38–75). Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed after 12 months. Results the clinical results, evaluated using the Harris Hip Score, were excellent in 95% of the cases and good in 5%; no cases had fair or poor results. X-rays taken at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery did not show heterotopic ossification, mobilization of the prosthetic components, or hip dislocation. No infections, deep vein thrombosis, or failure of the gluteal muscles were reported. Conclusions the DF anterolateral approach for THR proved safe and provided effective results at short-term follow-up. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:27900306

  15. Effects of perioperative factors and hip geometry on hip abductor muscle strength during the first 6 months after anterolateral total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Takashi; Jinno, Tetsuya; Aizawa, Junya; Masuda, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kazuo; Ninomiya, Kazunari; Suzuki, Kouji; Morita, Sadao

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The importance and effect of hip joint geometry on hip abductor muscle strength are well known. In addition, other perioperative factors are also known to affect hip abductor muscle strength. This study examined the relative importance of factors affecting hip abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 97 females with osteoarthritis scheduled for primary unilateral THA. The following variables were assessed preoperatively and 2 and 6 months after surgery: isometric hip abductor strength, radiographic analysis (Crowe class, postoperative femoral offset (FO)), Frenchay Activities Index, compliance rate with home exercise, Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip-Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ), and demographic data. Factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength 2 and 6 months after surgery were examined. [Results] Significant factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength at 2 and 6 months after surgery were, in extraction order: 1. isometric hip abductor muscle strength in the preoperative period; 2. BMI; and 3. the JHEQ mental score at 2 and 6 months after surgery. [Conclusion] Preoperative factors and postoperative mental status were related to postoperative isometric hip abductor strength. FO was not extracted as a significant factor related to postoperative isomeric hip abductor strength. PMID:28265161

  16. Effects of perioperative factors and hip geometry on hip abductor muscle strength during the first 6 months after anterolateral total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takashi; Jinno, Tetsuya; Aizawa, Junya; Masuda, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kazuo; Ninomiya, Kazunari; Suzuki, Kouji; Morita, Sadao

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The importance and effect of hip joint geometry on hip abductor muscle strength are well known. In addition, other perioperative factors are also known to affect hip abductor muscle strength. This study examined the relative importance of factors affecting hip abductor muscle strength after total hip arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 97 females with osteoarthritis scheduled for primary unilateral THA. The following variables were assessed preoperatively and 2 and 6 months after surgery: isometric hip abductor strength, radiographic analysis (Crowe class, postoperative femoral offset (FO)), Frenchay Activities Index, compliance rate with home exercise, Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip-Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ), and demographic data. Factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength 2 and 6 months after surgery were examined. [Results] Significant factors related to isometric hip abductor muscle strength at 2 and 6 months after surgery were, in extraction order: 1. isometric hip abductor muscle strength in the preoperative period; 2. BMI; and 3. the JHEQ mental score at 2 and 6 months after surgery. [Conclusion] Preoperative factors and postoperative mental status were related to postoperative isometric hip abductor strength. FO was not extracted as a significant factor related to postoperative isomeric hip abductor strength.

  17. Tribological characteristics of a composite total-surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous fiber, woven E glass composite femoral shells having the same elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle wear tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these continuous fiber particulate composite femoral shells articulating with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups were comparable to those of a vitallium ball articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cup.

  18. Cementless total hip arthroplasty in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Zeng, Min; Xie, Jie; Wen, Ting; Hu, Yihe

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Controversies on the surgical protocols and efficacies of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) still exist. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the perioperative managements and their outcomes related to performing THA on patients with AS. Data of 54 AS patients who underwent 81 THAs between 2008 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and imaging data were collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and during the follow-up period for surgical efficacy. Using posterolateral approach, cementless prostheses were selected in all cases. Mean follow-up period was 3.6 years (range, 2–8 years). Inclinations and anteversions of acetabular cups were 36.3°±4.5° (range, 30°–50°) and 12.3°±4.9° (range, 0°–25°) respectively. Mean visual analog scale (VAS) score decreased from 6.7 ± 2.1 (range, 4–10) preoperatively to 1.5 ± 1.0 (range, 0–4) at final follow-up, and mean Harris hip score (HHS) improved from 31.2 ± 11.6 (range, 15–45) to 86.1 ± 4.3 (range, 80–95) (P < 0.05). Postoperative range of motion (ROM) in flexion was improved from 6.7°±13.5° (range, 0°–50°) preoperatively to 82.5°±6.4° (range, 70°–100°) at final follow-up, and ROM in extension was improved from 1.8°±5.7°(range, 0°–15°) to 15.4°±2.6° (range, 10°–20°) (P < 0.05). Heterotopic ossification (HO) was documented in 9 hips (11.1%). Signs of stable fibrous ingrowth and bone ingrowth were detected in 52 and 29 hips, respectively. Sciatic never injury was occurred in 3 cases, and treated conservatively. There were no signs of periprosthetic fractures, dislocation, or prosthesis loosening. Surgical efficacies of THA for AS patients with severe hip involvement are satisfactory. PMID:28121928

  19. Physical functioning four years after total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vissers, M M; Bussmann, J B; de Groot, I B; Verhaar, J A N; Reijman, M

    2013-06-01

    Our previous study showed that 6 months after total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA), patients reported having less difficulty with daily activities, showed better functional capacity, and performed activities in their natural environment faster compared to preoperatively. However, their actual daily activity level was not significantly improved. Six months is a rather short follow-up period and the discrepancy in recovery among different aspects of functioning might be explained by this limited duration of follow-up. The objective of the present study was to examine the recovery of different aspects of physical functioning at a follow-up nearly 4 years after THA/TKA. Special attention was given to the actual daily activity level, and whether it had increased 4 years after THA/TKA compared to 6 months postoperatively. Seventy-seven (35 hip, 42 knee) patients who were measured preoperatively and postoperatively (6 months after surgery) in a previous study were invited to participate; 44 patients (23 hip, 21 knee) agreed to participate. The 4-year follow-up data were compared with the preoperative and 6-month postoperative data. The daily activity level after 4 years was found to be actually lower than at 6 months post-surgery (128 min vs. 138 min activity per 24h; p-value 0.48). However, the patients continued to improve in other aspects of physical functioning. In conclusion, 4-year post-surgery patients continued to improve on perceived physical functioning, capacity, and performance of activities in daily life. However, even in this relatively healthy study population, patients did not adopt a more active lifestyle 4 years after surgery.

  20. The appropriateness of blood transfusion following primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Joy, PJ; Bennet, SJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A significant proportion of all red cell transfusions are given to patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery. Concern over transfusion safety and cost, coupled with evidence showing that restrictive transfusion policies benefit patients, prompted us to audit our blood prescribing practice at Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in order to assess the appropriateness of every transfusion episode following elective primary total hip replacement. METHODS All patients undergoing a primary total hip replacement in our department over a six-month period were included in the study. Data were collected retrospectively using case note examination and transfusion service data. Standards were dictated by the British Orthopaedic Association guidelines on blood conservation in elective orthopaedic surgery. RESULTS Twenty-seven per cent of patients (39/143) were transfused. Forty-six per cent of these (18/39) were transfused inappropriately and twenty-three per cent (9/39) appropriately. Thirteen per cent (5/39) had a valid indication for transfusion but were over-transfused and in eighteen per cent (7/39) the quality of documentation did not allow an assessment to be made. Fifty-two per cent of patients who had surgical drains (29/56) were transfused. Reaudit following staff education and amendments to the local transfusion policy did not demonstrate a reduction in transfusion rates. CONCLUSIONS This audit showed that significant potential exists for reducing transfusion rates based on optimising prescribing practice alone. It also demonstrated that changing local practice based on audit data can be challenging. PMID:22507728

  1. Effect of pneumatic compression on fibrinolysis after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, William; Westrich, Geoffrey; Sharrock, Nigel; Sculco, Thomas P; Jhon, Peter H; Peterson, Margaret G E; Salvati, Eduardo A

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this prospective randomized clinical study was to investigate the enhanced systemic fibrinolysis mechanism of venous thrombosis prevention by pneumatic compression after total hip arthroplasty. Fifty patients were randomized into one of two groups (one with pneumatic compression [n=25] and one without [n=25]). Blood was drawn from a radial arterial line immediately preoperatively (baseline), at skin closure, and 8 hours and 22 hours after the baseline sample. Serum determinations of antigen of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 were done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. These data do not support the enhancement of systemic fibrinolysis mechanism for lowering thromboembolic risk after total hip arthroplasty by pneumatic compression devices. The results of this study showed no differences that were statistically significant between the two groups. The greatest difference was observed 8 hours after surgery for the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 marker, (28.12 with compression versus 22.07 ng/mL without); however, this result was not statistically significant. The beneficial effect of mechanical compression is more likely achieved through increased flow, local fibrinolytic effects, or both.

  2. A modified S-ROM stem in primary total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Tamegai, Hideaki; Otani, Takuya; Fujii, Hideki; Kawaguchi, Yasuhiko; Hayama, Tetsuo; Marumo, Keishi

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the clinical outcome of 220 hips in 196 Asian patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) for treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) using a modified S-ROM modular (S-ROM-A) stem designed for Asians, after 2-5 years (mean, 3.3 years) of follow-up. The stem was placed so that the anteversion angle of the neck was decreased against the sleeve in 56% of the hips and increased in 18% of the hips. Bone ingrown fixation was achieved in 99.5% of the hips on X-ray at final follow-up. There were 2 (0.9%) dislocations postoperatively. In primary THA for treatment of DDH accompanied by femoral rotational deformity, the freely-rotatable modular stem provided favorable short-term outcomes by affording both morphological and functional advantages.

  3. Christiansen's artificial hip joints--what went wrong?

    PubMed

    Sudmann, Einar; Ramstad, Knut Rasmus; Engesæter, Lars Birger

    2013-12-10

    Modern arthroplasty is undoubtedly the greatest contribution that orthopaedic surgery has ever made to medical science. The honour for the good results achieved with total hip replacement surgery goes chiefly to the Briton John Charnley (1911-1982). However, the Norwegian Tor Aas Christiansen (1917-1981) has also earned a place in this history. He wanted to improve the operative treatment of dislocated, medial fractures of the femoral neck, and in the 1960s he constructed a hemiprosthesis. Later, he also made a total prosthesis for the hip joint. Over time, the prostheses proved to be less than successful. Nevertheless, approximately 6,500 Christiansen prostheses were fitted in Norway before a prospective Charnley vs. Christiansen study at the Coastal Hospital in Hagavik finally put an end to his prostheses in 1983. Indirectly, the study led to the establishment of a national register of hip prostheses, now the National Arthroplasty Register, at Haukeland University Hospital. Based on our personal cooperation with Christiansen, as well as original drawings and correspondence from the Polaris factory in Sandnes, we will tell the story of Christiansen's hemi- and total prostheses. These are a key element in the history of hip arthroplasty in Norway.

  4. The impact of surgeon handedness in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, A; Stewart, T; Stone, M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Total hip replacement (THR) is successful and performed commonly. Component placement is a determinant of outcome. Influence of surgeon handedness on component placement has not been considered previously. This study was a radiographic assessment of component positioning with respect to handedness. Early data from 160 patients are reported. Methods Overall, 160 primary THRs for osteoarthritis were included. Equal numbers of left and right THRs were performed by four surgeons, two right-handed and two left-handed. Postoperative radiography was assessed for THR component position by measurement of leg length inequality, acetabular inclination and centre of rotation. Surgeons’ handedness was assessed using the Edinburgh inventory. Results For leg length inequality, no significant interaction was seen between hip side and surgeon handedness. Acetabular inclination angles showed a statistically significant difference, however, depending on hand dominance, with higher inclination angles recorded when operating on the dominant side. There was a trend towards greater medialisation of the centre of rotation on the non-dominant side although this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Surgeon handedness appears to influence acetabular component position during THR but it is one factor of many that interact to achieve a successful outcome. PMID:25198975

  5. Profunda Femoris Pseudoaneurysm following Total Hip Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Katharine; Iorio, Justin; Balasubramanian, Easwaran

    2015-01-01

    Vascular injuries following total hip arthroplasty (THA) are very rare, with pseudoaneurysm being a small subset. We report a case of profunda femoris artery (PFA) pseudoaneurysm in a 61-year-old male following a posterior approach revision left THA. Presentation involved continued blood transfusion requirements several weeks postoperatively. Diagnosis of the pseduoaneurysm was made by contrast CT of the lower extremity, with confirmation via IR angiography. Successful embolization was achieved with selective coiling and Gelfoam. Presenting complaints of such complications are often vague and therefore lead to delayed diagnosis. Causes of such complications are not completely understood, particularly with PFA injuries in THA. Possible mechanisms are discussed in this paper. Vascular complications following THA can be difficult to diagnose. High suspicion in the setting of continued postoperative pain or bleeding may allow prompt diagnosis and avoidance of serious limb-threatening complications. PMID:26347839

  6. Patient sensitivity to polyethylene particles with cemented total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ise, Kentaro; Kawanabe, Keiichi; Matsusaki, Takashi; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Onishi, Eijiro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2007-10-01

    To determine whether sensitivity to polyethylene particles varies among patients, we studied 25 patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. We used pelvic radiographs to measure annual polyethylene wear and the area of osteolysis. The ratio of the area of osteolysis to the volumetric polyethylene wear was defined as sensitivity index. Adherent cells from peripheral blood were cocultured with polyethylene particles, and the amount of bone-resorptive cytokines was measured. The amount of interleukin-6, but not of interleukin-1beta or tumor necrosis factor-alpha, released from adherent cells in the in vitro experiment correlated with the in vivo sensitivity indices. This technique appears capable of predicting the development of polyethylene-induced osteolysis, allowing surgeons to avoid using polyethylene as the bearing surface in patients at risk for osteolysis.

  7. Impingement in Total Hip Replacement: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D.; Callaghan, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of total hip impingement, whether or not accompanied by frank dislocation, holds substantial untoward clinical consequences, especially as less-forgiving advanced bearing implant designs come into ever more widespread use. Biomechanical aspects of impingement and dislocation have historically received relatively little scientific attention, although that situation is now rapidly changing. The present article reviews contemporary laboratory and clinical research on the impingement/dislocation phenomena, focusing particularly on how implant design variables, surgical implantation factors and patient activity each act individually and in concert to pose impingement and dislocation challenges. In recent years, several powerful new research methodologies have emerged that have greatly expanded the scope for clinical translation of systematic laboratory study. Transferring the findings from such research into yet better implant designs, and even better surgical procedures, offers encouragement that the clinical impact of this troublesome complication can be further reduced. PMID:19956356

  8. Regulation of UHMWPE biomaterials in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kasser, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    This manuscript provides a brief history of the development of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHWMPE) biomaterials and how the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates medical devices. The flowchart used to decide whether a device is medium or high risk, known as the 510(k) flowchart, is illustrated by taking several examples through the flowchart. In order to demonstrate how changes to UHWMPE material used in the acetabular liners of total hips have been regulated, two major modifications to UHMWPE, highly crosslinked polyethylene and Vitamin E polyethylene, are taken through the flowchart. This manuscript describes the testing that has been provided to demonstrate safety and effectiveness of these modifications, as well as an explanation why the testing was supplied to the FDA.

  9. Ceramic materials as bearing surfaces for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, James A; Sutton, Kate

    2009-02-01

    During the past decade, advances in total hip arthroplasty component design have produced implants with reliable clinical results in regard to fixation. The foremost unresolved challenge has been the development of bearing surfaces that can withstand the higher demands of younger and more active patients. New alternative bearings with superior wear characteristics that minimize debris include ceramic-on-ceramic, metal-on-metal, and highly cross-linked polyethylenes in combination with ceramic or metal. Alumina-on-alumina ceramic bearings are extremely hard and scratch resistant and provide superior lubrication and wear resistance compared with other bearing surfaces in clinical use. Survivorship revision for any reason for the alumina ceramic bearings at 10 years was significantly higher compared with metal-on-polyethylene. Bearings currently being studied because of their encouraging wear performance in the laboratory are an alumina matrix (82% alumina, 17% zirconia, 0.3% chromium oxide), zirconium oxide, and ceramic-on-cobalt-chromium.

  10. Cemented total hip prosthesis: Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Aliabadi, P.; Tumeh, S.S.; Weissman, B.N.; McNeil, B.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Conventional radiographs, technetium-99m bone scans, and gallium-67 scans were reviewed in 44 patients who had undergone cemented total hip joint replacement and were imaged because of suspicion of prosthesis loosening or infection. A complete radiolucent line of 2 mm or wider along the bone-cement interface or metal-cement lucency on conventional radiographs was used as the criterion for prosthetic loosening with or without infection and proved to be 54% sensitive and 96% specific. Scintigraphic criteria for prosthetic loosening were increased focal uptake of the radiopharmaceutical for the femoral component and increased focal or diffuse uptake for the acetabular component. For bone scintigraphy, sensitivity was 73% and specificity was 96%. Combining the results of conventional radiographs and bone scans increased sensitivity to 84% and decreased specificity to 92% for the diagnosis of loosening, infection, or both. The study also showed that Ga-67 scintigraphy has a low sensitivity for the detection of infection.

  11. Clinical experience with ceramics in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Oonishi, H; Wakitani, S; Murata, N; Saito, M; Imoto, K; Kim, S; Matsuura, M

    2000-10-01

    As part of a search for better articulation in total hip prostheses, the decrease in the thickness of the socket in different total hip prostheses was measured in vivo. The wear rates of (1) RCH 1000 (molecular weight, 10(6)) socket gamma-irradiated with 100 Mrad articulating with a crude COP (stainless steel containing 20% cobalt and 0.01% phosphorous) metal femoral head; (2) RCH 1000 socket nonirradiated articulating with a crude COP femoral head; (3) RCH 1000 socket irradiated with 100 Mrad articulating with an alumina femoral head; (4) ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (molecular weight, 5-6 x 10(6)) socket articulating with an alumina femoral head; and (5) ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene socket articulating with a stainless steel femoral head (T-28) were 0.06, 0.30, 0.06, 0.1 and 0.25 mm/year, respectively, in the authors' clinical cases. Alumina femoral heads were effective in decreasing wear of the polyethylene socket. However, the wear rates of gamma-irradiated sockets articulating with alumina and with metal femoral heads wear very low and were not different from each other. Regarding the relationship between wear rate and the thickness of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene socket articulating with a 28 mm alumina femoral head, on radiographs, average wear rates of socket thicknesses of 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 mm were 0.14, 0.15, 0.12, 0.06, and 0.08 mm/year, respectively. On measuring retrieved prostheses, average wear rates of 7, 8, 9 and 11 mm thickness sockets were 0.2, 0.19, 0.14, and 0.1 mm/year, respectively. The wear of sockets has been proven to be minimal in alumina femoral heads articulating with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene sockets thicker than 10 mm.

  12. Physiotherapy Rehabilitation After Total Knee or Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy analysis was to determine, where, how, and when physiotherapy services are best delivered to optimize functional outcomes for patients after they undergo primary (first-time) total hip replacement or total knee replacement, and to determine the Ontario-specific economic impact of the best delivery strategy. The objectives of the systematic review were as follows: To determine the effectiveness of inpatient physiotherapy after discharge from an acute care hospital compared with outpatient physiotherapy delivered in either a clinic-based or home-based setting for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of outpatient physiotherapy delivered by a physiotherapist in either a clinic-based or home-based setting in addition to a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of preoperative exercise for people who are scheduled to receive primary total knee or hip replacement surgery Clinical Need Total hip replacements and total knee replacements are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in Ontario. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after first-time total hip or knee replacement surgery is accepted as the standard and essential treatment. The aim is to maximize a person’s functionality and independence and minimize complications such as hip dislocation (for hip replacements), wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. The Therapy The physiotherapy rehabilitation routine has 4 components: therapeutic exercise, transfer training, gait training, and instruction in the activities of daily living. Physiotherapy rehabilitation for people who have had total joint replacement surgery varies in where, how, and when it is delivered. In Ontario, after discharge from an acute care hospital, people who have had a primary total knee or hip replacement may

  13. Total hip arthroplasty using imageless computer-assisted hip navigation: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Lass, Richard; Kubista, Bernd; Olischar, Boris; Frantal, Sophie; Windhager, Reinhard; Giurea, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    In a prospective randomized study of two groups of 65 patients each, we compared the acetabular component position when using the imageless navigation system compared to the freehand conventional technique for cementless total hip arthroplasty. The position of the component was determined postoperatively on computed tomographic scans of the pelvis. There was no significant difference for postoperative mean inclination (P = 0.29), but a significant difference for mean postoperative acetabular component anteversion (P = 0.007), for mean deviation of the postoperative anteversion from the target position of 15° (P = 0.02) and for the outliers regarding inclination (P = 0.02) and anteversion (P < 0.05) between the computer-assisted and the freehand-placement group. Our results demonstrate the importance of imageless navigation for the accurate positioning of the acetabular component.

  14. Primary total hip replacement: a comparison of a nationally agreed guide to best practice and current surgical technique as determined by the North West Regional Arthroplasty Register.

    PubMed Central

    Malik, M. H. A.; Gambhir, A. K.; Bale, L.; Pradhan, N.; Porter, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 1999, a statement of best practice in primary total hip replacement was approved by the Council of the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) and by the British Hip Society (BHS) to provide a basis for regional and national auditable standards. We have compared practice in the North West Region of England to this document to ascertain adherence to this guide to best practice. METHODS: A total of 86 surgeons from 26 hospitals were included in a questionnaire study. RESULTS: A mean of 93.3% of operations were performed in the surgeon's usual theatre. All of these theatres had vertical laminar air flow systems. Of respondents, 42.2% routinely used exhaust suits, 68.1% routinely used impermeable disposable gowns, and 26.1% used impermeable re-usable gowns. The Charnley femoral and acetabular prostheses were the most commonly used prostheses. All surgeons used some form of anti-thromboembolic prophylaxis: 66.2% use a combination of both mechanical and chemical means. All surgeons used antibiotic prophylaxis. The most popular choice of antibiotic was a cephalosporin--70.7% used a 3-dose regimen over 24 h, 2.6% of surgeons continued antibiotic prophylaxis for 48 h after surgery, and 93.7% of surgeons routinely use antibiotic-loaded cement. All surgeons routinely cleaned, irrigated and dried the acetabulum and femur before cement insertion. Only one surgeon did not use any form of femoral canal occlusion. 69.4% used an intramedullary bone block. Retrograde filling of the femoral shaft by means of a cement gun was practised by 65.1%. CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated considerable variation of practice in total hip arthroplasty across the North West Region and significant divergence from the statement of best practice approved by the BOA and BHS. The introduction of a properly funded national hip register will surely help to clarify the effect of such diverse practice on patient outcome. We would recommend that all trusts locally audit their practices

  15. Revision total hip arthroplasty in a centenarian: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Grey, Monique A; Keggi, Kristaps J

    2006-12-01

    The clinical success of primary total hip arthroplasty in elderly patients is well established. Because of the rapid growth rate of the population aged 85 years and older and the increasing life expectancy of this group of patients, the number of patients in their 8th, 9th, and even 10th decades of life requiring revision total hip arthroplasty will increase. We present the only documented case of revision total hip arthroplasty in a centenarian and a review of the relevant literature.

  16. Analysis of Femoral Components of Cemented Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shantanu; Harsha, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    There have been continuous on-going revisions in design of prosthesis in Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) to improve the endurance of hip replacement. In the present work, Finite Element Analysis was performed on cemented THA with CoCrMo trapezoidal, CoCrMo circular, Ti6Al4V trapezoidal and Ti6Al4V circular stem. It was observed that cross section and material of femoral stem proved to be critical parameters for stress distribution in femoral components, distribution of interfacial stress and micro movements. In the first part of analysis, designs were investigated for micro movements and stress developed, for different stem materials. Later part of the analysis focused on investigations with respect to different stem cross sections. Femoral stem made of Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) resulted in larger debonding of stem at cement-stem interface and increased stress within the cement mantle in contrast to chromium alloy (CoCrMo) stem. Thus, CoCrMo proved to be a better choice for cemented THA. Comparison between CoCrMo femoral stem of trapezium and circular cross section showed that trapezoidal stem experiences lesser sliding and debonding at interfaces than circular cross section stem. Also, trapezium cross section generated lower peak stress in femoral stem and cortical femur. In present study, femur head with diameter of 36 mm was considered for the analysis in order to avoid dislocation of the stem. Also, metallic femur head was coupled with cross linked polyethylene liner as it experiences negligible wear compared to conventional polyethylene liner and unlike metallic liner it is non carcinogenic.

  17. Intraoperative measurement of limb lengthening during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios Vasileiou; Koulouvaris, Panagiotis; Aggelidakis, Georgios Charalambos; Tsantes, Andreas Georgios; Lykissas, Marios Georgios; Mavrodontidis, Alexandros

    2017-01-01

    Background: Limb length discrepancy (LLD) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a common problem which cannot be completely resolved. Many techniques have been described in order to minimize postoperative LLD, but most of these techniques are difficult to apply. Ideal technique must be simple and accurate. The most simple technique using a suture tied on the skin has well-known limitations, but its accuracy has not been evaluated before. Materials and Methods: Sixty THAs in sixty patients (mean age 71 years, 1:1 male to female ratio) with hip osteoarthritis (37 cases in the right, and 23 cases in the left side) were studied in this prospective study. In all surgeries, the intraoperataive measurement of limb lengthening was performed using a suture tied on the skin of the lateral pelvis. The accuracy of this technique and correlation between intraoperative and postoperative radiological measurements of lengthening were evaluated. Results: The mean preoperative LLD was –7.5 mm while the mean postoperative LLD was 1.58 mm. The accuracy of this technique, defined as the mean difference between the intraoperative and postoperative measurements was 1.8 mm. A strong correlation between these two measurements was noticed (r = 0.86). Conclusion: The accuracy and correlation index of this simple technique were similar to those of other techniques. The studied technique is quite accurate when attention is given to certain details, such as the amount of tension applied on the suture, the position of the tied point on the skin, and the position of the leg during measurements.

  18. Robotic-Arm Assisted Surgery in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Randa K; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Jauregui, Julio J; Padden, David A; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Complications following total hip arthroplasty (THA), such as dislocation, component loosening and wear, continue to be common indications for revision surgery. Multiple studies have attributed some of these problems to poor acetabular cup alignment and placement outside of the purported radiographic safe zone. In addition, it has been shown that conventional manually performed acetabular cup placement may not lead to optimal alignment, regardless of surgical experience. Additionally, incorrect leg length and offset can lead to dissatisfaction and instability. Therefore, robotic-arm assisted surgery has been introduced to improve accuracy of cup placement and leg length, and to offset with the aim of reducing the risk of hip instability and improving satisfaction after primary THA. Our aim was to prospectively review the use of robotic-arm assisted surgery in 224 patients and to assess whether the pre-operatively determined radiographic targets were achieved post-operatively and the proportion of acetabular cups outside of the safe zone. Pre-determined anteversion and inclination were 15 and 40 degrees, respectively. Our results have shown that the use of robotic-arm assisted surgery resulted in a post-operative mean inclination of 40 degrees (range, 34 to 51 degrees) and a mean anteversion of 16 degrees (range, 9 to 25 degrees). Ninety-nine percent of the patients remained within the pre-designated safe zone. Evidence has shown that robotic-arm assisted surgery may have improved accuracy in cup placement when compared to conventional surgery and possibly to computer-assisted surgery. When compared to the literature on robotic-arm assisted surgery, our results were comparable. We believe that this surgical technique may aid in reducing post-operative THA complications, such as aseptic loosening and dislocations, but further prospective studies are needed to evaluate clinical outcomes and long-term results.

  19. Uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis of hip secondary to low and high dislocated hips: A mid-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; O’Dwyer, Sinead; Masterson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Performing successful total hip replacement (THR) in dysplastic, subluxed, and dislocated hip is a challenging task. Here, we assessed midterm clinical and radiological outcomes of uncemented total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis (OA) of hip secondary to Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocated hips with a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of prospectively collected data was designed involving all consecutive patients who underwent uncemented THR for OA of hip secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip and Grade II or Grade III Hartofilakidis classification. Results: Thirty-two patients underwent 45 THR, with 23 Grade II (low dislocation) and 22 Grade III (high-dislocation) of Hartofilakidis classification. Thirteen patients had bilateral hip replacements, 19 patients had unilateral THR. There was highly statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative HHS and SF-36v2™ at each follow-up. Survivorship of original implant was 98.88% at a mean follow-up of 8.8 years. The mean improvement in leg length in this series was 3.6 cm (1.8-4.5, 95% confidence interval). No sciatic nerve or femoral nerve palsies were observed. Conclusions: Uncemented THR provides better function and quality of life. However, longer follow-up studies are needed to assess survivorship of uncemented THR in Hartofilakidis low and high-dislocations. PMID:27433063

  20. Durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dion, Neil T; Bragdon, Charles; Muratoglu, Orhun; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the history of the development of highly cross-linked polyethylene and provides an in-depth review of the clinical results regarding the durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The use of polyethylene as a bearing surface has contributed to the success of THA and TKA; however, polyethylene wear and osteolysis can lead to failure. Ongoing clinical and retrieval studies are required to analyze outcomes at longer-term follow-up.

  1. Intraoperative Hypothermia in Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Pepper, Andrew M; Rooney, Edward; Silverton, Craig

    2016-10-25

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are common and successful orthopedic procedures, and as their frequency continues to increase substantially, the focus on limiting perioperative complications heightens. Intraoperative normothermia is recommended to minimize additional complications, but limited evidence exists regarding the effect of hypothermia on orthopedic patients. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of perioperative hypothermia in the setting of TKA and THA, and to evaluate its impact on complications and outcomes. The clinical records of 2580 consecutive patients who underwent TKA or THA at a single institution between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013 were reviewed. After excluding patients with complex or revision procedures, a total of 2397 patients comprised the study population. Patient demographic data, surgery-specific data, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and 30-day readmission were recorded. Patients with a mean intraoperative temperature less than 36°C were identified as hypothermic. Statistical analysis evaluated associations with hypothermia and the effect on complications and outcomes. The incidence of mean intraoperative hypothermia was 37%, 43.9%, and 32.6% for arthroplasty, THA, and TKA, respectively. General anesthesia was significantly associated with hypothermia (P<.001). Women and THA patients were at higher risk for hypothermia. In the arthroplasty and THA cohorts, longer operating room time and re-warmer use were associated with hypothermia (P=.010). Overall, hypothermia was associated with increased estimated blood loss, but no increase in associated transfusion was demonstrated (P=.006). Hypothermia was not associated with postoperative complications. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  2. Intravenous versus topical tranexamic acid in primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Liang, Yuan; Chen, Pengtao; Fang, Yongchao; He, Jinshan; Wang, Jingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: As the prevalence of total hip arthroplasty (THA) is increasing, it is usually associated with considerable blood loss. Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been reported to reduce perioperative blood loss in hip joint arthroplasty. But the best route of TXA administration continues to be controversial. So, we conducted a meta-analysis that integrated all data from the 7 included trials to compare the effectiveness and safety of topical and intravenous TXA administration in primary THA. The endpoints assessed in this meta-analysis include the comparisons of total blood loss, postoperative hemoglobin decline, transfusion rates, the incidence rate of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolisms (PE), and wound infection. Methods: Literature searches of PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese Biomedical Literature database, the CNKI database, and Wan Fang Data were performed up to August 30, 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in our meta-analysis if they compared the efficiency and safety of intravenous versus topical administration of TXA in patients who underwent primary THA. The endpoints included the comparisons of total blood loss, postoperative hemoglobin decline, transfusion rates, the incidence rate of DVT, PE, and wound infection. A meta-analysis was performed following the guidelines of the Cochrane Reviewer's Handbook and the PRISMA statement. The pooling of data was carried out by using RevMan 5.3, Denmark. Results: Seven RCTs involving 964 patients met the inclusion criteria. Our meta-analysis indicated that there were no significant differences in the 2 groups in terms of total blood loss ([mean difference (MD) = −14.74, 95% confidence interval (CI): −89.21 to 59.74, P = 0.7], transfusion rates [RD = −0.02, 95% CI: −0.05 to 0.02, P = 0.39]; no significant differences were found regarding the incidence of adverse effects such as deep venous thrombosis [DVT] [RD = 0.00, 95% CI: −0

  3. Revision total hip arthroplasty: the femoral side using cemented implants.

    PubMed

    Holt, Graeme; Hook, Samantha; Hubble, Matthew

    2011-02-01

    Advances in surgical technique and implant technology have improved the ten-year survival after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Despite this, the number of revision procedures has been increasing in recent years, a trend which is predicted to continue into the future. Revision THA is a technically demanding procedure often complicated by a loss of host bone stock which may be compounded by the need to remove primary implants. Both cemented and uncemented implant designs are commonly used in the United Kingdom for primary and revision THA and much controversy still exists as to the ideal method of stem fixation. In this article we discuss revision of the femur using cemented components during revision THA. We focus on three clinical scenarios including femoral cement-in-cement revision where the primary femoral cement-bone interface remains well fixed, femoral cement-in-cement revision for peri-prosthetic femoral fractures, and femoral impaction grafting. We discuss the clinical indications, surgical techniques and clinical outcomes for each of these procedures.

  4. Medial cortex strain distribution during noncemented total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elias, J J; Nagao, M; Chu, Y H; Carbone, J J; Lennox, D W; Chao, E Y

    2000-01-01

    Intraoperative proximal femur fractures are a significant concern during noncemented total hip arthroplasty. The current study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that broaching the femur and inserting the stem without using mallet applied impact loads will reduce the risk of intraoperative fracture. Rosette strain gauges were applied to the medial and anteromedial cortex of six human anatomic specimen femurs to compare the strain distribution for broaching and stem insertion. Eight additional femurs were used to compare the strain distribution for stem insertion using impact loading and constant rate stem insertion. For the impact loading stem insertions, the soft tissues surrounding the femur were modeled. Constant rate stem insertions were performed using a mechanical testing machine. The largest strains measured at the medial and anteromedial sites primarily were aligned with the femur hoop axis. The largest strain magnitude, orientation, and sign (tensile or compressive) varied widely among femurs. The stem insertion strains were significantly larger than the broaching strains (two-way analysis of variance with replication). The impact stem insertion strains were not significantly different from the constant rate stem insertion strains. The results indicate that the femur geometry and material properties have a greater influence on the strain distribution than does the implantation technique.

  5. Multimodal analgesia without routine parenteral narcotics for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Aditya Vikram; Boutary, Myriam; Yun, Andrew G; Sirianni, Leigh Ellen; Dorr, Lawrence D

    2006-12-01

    Methods for managing pain after a total hip replacement have changed substantially in the past 5 years. We documented the outcome of patients treated with a multimodal pain program designed to avoid parenteral narcotics. Avoidance of parenteral narcotics can essentially eliminate the complications of respiratory depression, ileus, and narcotic-induced hypotension. It can minimize nausea and vomiting which cause dissatisfaction with an operation. Twenty-one of 140 patients (15%) needed parenteral narcotics postoperatively with only nine patients (6.4%) using parenteral narcotics after the day of surgery. Mean pain scores were below 3 of 10 on all postoperative days. There were no patients with respiratory depression or ileus, and four (2.9%) with urinary retention. Nausea occurred with 35 patients (25%) in the recovery room and in 28 patients (20%) thereafter. Emesis occurred in five patients (3.6%) with two incidences in the recovery room. One hundred and thirty-eight patients (98.6%) were discharged home at a mean of 2.7 seven days postoperatively with 98 (70%) on a single assistive device. The multimodal pain management program, which avoided parenteral narcotics, was effective in providing pain relief, nearly eliminating emesis, and eliminating the severe complications of respiratory depression, urinary tract infection and ileus, as well as accelerating function.

  6. Total hip arthroplasty in paralytic dislocation from poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Laguna, Rafael; Barrientos, Jesús

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a case of a patient with degenerative hip disease in paralytic dislocation by poliomyelitis. Poliomyelitis is an acute infection disease caused by a group of neurotrophic viruses, which has a special affinity by the anterior horns cells of the spinal cord and for certain motor nuclei of the brain stem. Paralysis is a flaccid type and characteristically paralysis is asymmetrical. It is said that the joints of the affected limb by poliomyelitis are protected from the development of osteoarthritis. Hip dislocation in poliomyelitis is an acquired deformity caused by flaccid paralysis and the resulting muscular imbalance. In young children, when the gluteus maximus and medius muscles are paralyzed and the hip flexors and adductors are of normal strength, eventual luxation of the hip is almost inevitable. Hip osteoarthritis in a limb with poliomyelitis is an unusual entity because these limbs do not support excessive loads. In patients who present with the residual effects of poliomyelitis including degenerative disease and hip dysplastic, surgery is one of the most difficult challenges faced by reconstructive surgeons. In such cases, surgeons should attempt to optimize the component position and choice, surgical approach, and soft tissue tensioning because stability of the prosthesis can be problematic.

  7. Outcome in design-specific comparisons between highly crosslinked and conventional polyethylene in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Per-Erik; Furnes, Ove; Ivar Havelin, Leif; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Pedersen, Alma B; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Mäkelä, Keijo; Kärrholm, Johan

    2017-04-04

    Background and purpose - Most registry studies regarding highly crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) have focused on the overall revision risk. We compared the risk of cup and/or liner revision for specific cup and liner designs made of either XLPE or conventional polyethylene (CPE), regarding revision for any reason and revision due to aseptic loosening and/or osteolysis. Patients and methods - Using the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) database, we identified cup and liner designs where either XLPE or CPE had been used in more than 500 THAs performed for primary hip osteoarthritis. We assessed risk of revision for any reason and for aseptic loosening using Cox regression adjusted for age, sex, femoral head material and size, surgical approach, stem fixation, and presence of hydroxyapatite coating (uncemented cups). Results - The CPE version of the ZCA cup had a risk of revision for any reason similar to that of the XLPE version (p = 0.09), but showed a 6-fold higher risk of revision for aseptic loosening (p < 0.001). The CPE version of the Reflection All Poly cup had an 8-fold elevated risk of revision for any reason (p < 0.001) and a 5-fold increased risk of revision for aseptic loosening (p < 0.001). The Charnley Elite Ogee/Marathon cup and the Trilogy cup did not show such differences. Interpretation - Whether XLPE has any advantage over CPE regarding revision risk may depend on the properties of the polyethylene materials being compared, as well as the respective cup designs, fixation type, and follow-up times. Further research is needed to elucidate how cup design factors interact with polyethylene type to affect the risk of revision.

  8. Total arthroplasty in displaced dysplastic hips with acetabular reconstruction and femoral shortening - technical note.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paulo; de Oliveira, Leandro Alves; Coelho, Danilo Lopes; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Rebello, Percival Rosa; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    To describe a new procedure of total hip replacement in patient with severe developmental dysplasia of the left hip, using technique of acetabular reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts and subtrochanteric shortening femoral osteotomy. Total hip replacement done in January of 2003. The Eftekhar's classification was used and included type D, neglected dislocations. Bone graft incorporated in acetabular shelf and femoral osteotomy. Our contribution is the use of an Allis plate to better fix acetabular grafts, avoiding loosening, and cerclage around bone graft in femoral osteotomy site, which diminish pseudoarthrosis risk. This technique shows efficiency, allowing immediately resolution for this case with pain and range of motion of hip improvement. It also allows the acetabular dysplasia reconstruction, equalization of the limb length (without elevated risk of neurovascular lesion) and repairs the normal hip biomechanics due to the correction of the hip's center of rotation.

  9. Patient perspective survey of total hip vs total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Justin; Petruccelli, Danielle; Adili, Anthony; Piccirillo, Liz; Wismer, David; Winemaker, Mitch

    2012-06-01

    A 42-item survey was developed and administered to determine patient perception of and satisfaction with total hip arthroplasty (THA) vs total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 153 patients who had both primary THA and TKA for osteoarthritis with 1-year follow-up were identified. Survey response rate was 72%. Patients were more satisfied with THA meeting expectations for improvement in function and quality of life (P < .05), whereas pain relief expectations were equivalent. Most patients (70.9%) reported that TKA required more physiotherapy. One-year Oxford score and improvement in Oxford score from preoperative to 1 year were superior for THAs (P = .000). Despite equivalent pain relief, THAs trend toward higher satisfaction compared with TKAs. THA is more likely to "feel normal" with greater improvement in Oxford score. Recovery from TKA requires more physiotherapy and a longer time to achieve a satisfactory recovery status. Patients should be counseled accordingly.

  10. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I-III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I-III).

  11. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I–III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I–III). PMID:27512242

  12. Patient satisfaction with mobile compression devices following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McAsey, Craig J; Gargiulo, Jeanine M; Parks, Nancy L; Hamilton, William G

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with the use of a mobile compression device after anterior total hip arthroplasty. Two hundred forty-seven patients used the mobile compression device for 10 days after surgery with recommended adjunctive 325 mg aspirin therapy. The device has a rechargeable battery pack that weighs 1.65 lb and is attached to compression sleeves worn over the calves of both lower extremities. It delivers sequential compression to the sleeves at a pressure of 50 mm Hg for about 10 seconds at a cycle of 1/min and is synchronized to the patient's venous blood flow pulses. A questionnaire was administered to all patients at 1-month follow-up to gauge patient perception of the device. There were 14 questions about comfort, noise, cost, pain, skin breakdown, rash, and falls related to the device. Overall, 234 of 247 (94.7%) patients stated that they would use the device again. The most common complaint from patients was that the mobile compression device was cumbersome (63.6%). Twenty-five patients (10.1%) reported having a fall while using the device, although no fall-related injuries were documented. Therefore, the authors recommend counseling patients about fall risk and reminding them to use caution while moving about with the device. Despite the limitations described in this study, the data confirmed that patients who used the device had an overall positive response to the system and would choose to use the device again rather than using chemical agents for deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis.

  13. Wear products of total hip arthroplasty: The case of polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Massin, P; Achour, S

    2017-03-01

    Among the bearing surfaces involved in a total hip arthroplasty, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is the weak link. It is submitted to the friction of a harder bearing, producing wear particles, which, in turn, initiate an inflammatory reaction ultimately leading to osteolysis. This kind of bone deterioration sometimes turns out to an aggressive granuloma and may provoke implant loosening. Wear resistance of UHMWPE depends on its molecular weight and crystallinity. Some steps of the manufacturing process were improved to optimize its tribological properties and to slow down degradation resulting from mechanical (abrasion) and chemical (oxidation) phenomena. Its preparation and conservation must be performed in an inert atmosphere, i.e. without ambient oxygen. Its resistance to abrasion depends on its cross-linking degree. Its cross-linking rate was observed to increase proportionally to the irradiation doses, improving its wear resistance. However, its mechanical properties are impaired and moreover, it becomes oxidation sensitive. It is therefore necessary to submit it to a thermal treatment to eliminate free radicals that were produced during irradiation. More recently impregnation by vitamin E, a powerful anti-oxidant product, was proposed to preserve the polymer from in vivo oxidation while maintaining its mechanical properties. We raised the hypothesis that last-generation UHMWPE could offer the same wear resistance as the most performing bearings (ceramic-on-ceramic). Recent clinical results confirm the tribological performance of highly crosslinked UHMWPE in vivo. However, it remains to be seen whether this excellent wear resistance would persist under eccentric load such as edge loading, and if, in the long run, this kind of bearing proves capable of reducing the risk of osteolysis in young and active patients.

  14. The use of a constrained cementless acetabular component for instability in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Rady, Ahmad Emad; Asal, Mohammed Kamal; Bassiony, Ayman Abdelaziz

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent dislocation after total hip arthroplasty is a disabling complication that can be difficult to treat. We evaluated the early clinical and radiographic outcome associated with the use of a constrained acetabular component for instability in total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent either primary or revision total hip arthroplasty with a cementless constrained acetabular component for different indications. The mean patient age at surgery was 57.4 years and the mean clinical and radiological follow-up period was 26.4 months. Clinical assessment was performed by the Harris hip score and at the latest follow up patients reported outcome using the Oxford hip score questionnaire. All radiographs were evaluated for evidence of loosening. Only one patient experienced redislocation with the constrained prosthesis. The average Harris hip score increased from a preoperative mean of 22 (range, 16 - 36) to a postoperative mean of 85 (range, 66-94). Preoperatively, the mean Oxford Hip Score was 48.6, which decreased to 20.5 at the final examination. All but one of the 15 hips had a well-fixed, stable cup. Femoral component stability with bone ingrowth was achieved in 10 cases. A constrained acetabular component is an effective option for the treatment of hip instability in primary and revision arthroplasty in those at high risk of dislocation. The potential for aseptic loosening requires evaluation by long term studies.

  15. Research evidence for the use of preoperative exercise in patients preparing for total hip or total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Barbay, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Preoperative exercise/rehabilitation is currently being considered to improve outcomes for orthopaedic surgery. This article presents an evidence-based practice review of the current research literature from 1998 to 2008 to determine whether preoperative exercise alone will be beneficial to patients preparing for total knee or hip arthroplasty. Only 3 studies met the inclusion criteria of preoperative exercise as the sole intervention. Each of these studies indicated that preoperative exercise had some postoperative benefit to total knee or hip arthroplasty patients. In general, the results are inconclusive due to the lack of strong research evidence, and only a pragmatic recommendation for preoperative exercise prior to total hip or knee arthroplasty is supported. More research is needed in the area of preoperative exercise for persons preparing for total hip or knee arthroplasty.

  16. Reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty cost-effectiveness: A quality-adjusted life years comparison with total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Daniel; Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) cost-effectiveness with total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. METHODS: This study used a stochastic model and decision-making algorithm to compare the cost-effectiveness of RSA and total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent pre-operative, and 3, 6, and 12 mo post-operative clinical examinations and Short Form-36 Health Survey completion. Short form-36 Health Survey subscale scores were converted to EuroQual Group Five Dimension Health Outcome scores and compared with historical data from age-matched patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) improvements based on life expectancies were calculated. RESULTS: The cost/QALY was $3900 for total hip arthroplasty and $11100 for RSA. After adjusting the model to only include shoulder-specific physical function subscale items, the RSA QALY improved to 2.8 years, and its cost/QALY decreased to $8100. CONCLUSION: Based on industry accepted standards, cost/QALY estimates supported both RSA and total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the quality of life improvement “gold standard” among arthroplasty procedures, cost/QALY estimates identified in this study support the growing use of RSA to improve patient quality of life. PMID:26925384

  17. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Skeletal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Daniel; Kendoff, Daniel; Omar, Mohamed; Cui, Liang R; Gehrke, Thorsten; Haasper, Carl

    2015-09-01

    127 patients with a height ≤ 150 cm (non metric ≤ 4 feet and 11 inches) who received hip arthroplasty surgery between July 1, 2006 and May 30, 2013 at our institution were enrolled. Retrospective data evaluation was performed for two different times of follow-up (1 year and 5 years respectively). 115 patients were evaluated for 1-year follow up. Out of these, 27 patients were available for 5-year follow up. The mean Harris Hip Score increased from 40 ± 13 on admission to 82 ± 20 (P<0.001) at 1-year follow-up and 79 ± 17 (P<0.001) at 5-year follow-up. Hip arthroplasty can be performed in patients with dwarfism with good clinical benefits. However, survival rates are worse compared to the general population.

  18. Single-dose radiation therapy for prevention of heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, W.L.; Lo, T.C.; Covall, D.J.; Pfeifer, B.A.; Wasilewski, S.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Single-dose radiation therapy was prospectively evaluated for its efficacy in prevention of heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Thirty-one patients (34 hips) were treated between 1981 and 1988. Risk factors for inclusion in the protocol included prior evidence of heterotopic ossification, ankylosing spondylitis, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Patients with hypertrophic osteoarthritis or traumatic arthritis with osteophytes were not included. Operations on 34 hips included 19 primary total and 11 revision total hip arthroplasties and 4 excisions of heterotopic ossification. All patients received radiotherapy to the hip after operation with a single dose of 700 centigray. Radiotherapy is recommended on the first postoperative day. After this single-dose radiation treatment, no patient had clinically significant heterotopic ossification. Recurrent disease developed in two hips (6%), as seen on radiography (grades 2 and 3). This series documents a 100% clinical success rate and a 94% radiographic success rate in preventing heterotopic ossification in patients at high risk after total hip arthroplasty. Single-dose radiotherapy is as effective as other radiation protocols in preventing heterotopic ossification after total hip arthroplasty. It is less expensive and easier to administer than multidose radiotherapy.

  19. Change in preoperative expectations in patients undergoing staged bilateral primary total knee or total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Poultsides, Lazaros A; Ghomrawi, Hassan M K; Lyman, Stephen; Aharonoff, Gina B; Mancuso, Carol A; Sculco, Thomas P

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare preoperative expectation scores between stages in patients with bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). For patients with TKA (57), ICC was 0.449, indicating fair agreement between stages; expectations did not change for 31% of patients, whereas 40% had higher and 29% had lower expectations. For patients with THA (55), ICC was 0.663, indicating moderate agreement; expectations did not change for 42% of patients, whereas 38% had higher and 20% had lower expectations. In multivariable analyses controlling for first expectation score, second expectation score was associated with better Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index stiffness score for TKA and with worse Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index function score for patients with THA. For most patients, expectations changed between staged bilateral TKA and THA, but the direction of change was not uniform.

  20. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient's clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor. PMID:27752378

  1. Actis Total Hip System 2 Year Follow-up

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-15

    Osteoarthritis; Traumatic Arthritis; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head; Acute Traumatic Fracture of the Femoral Head or Neck; Certain Cases of Ankylosis; Non-union of Femoral Neck Fractures; Certain High Sub-Capital & Femoral Neck Fractures in Elderly

  2. Alternative materials to improve total hip replacement tribology.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, Seppo; Böhler, Max; Harris, William H; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Lappalainen, Reijo; Muratoglu, Orhun; Rieker, Claude; Salzer, Martin

    2003-08-01

    An improvement in tribology of bearing surfaces is an effective means of increasing the longevity of total hip replacement (THR). Currently, 3 approaches are available to achieve this aim: first, use of highly cross-linked UHMWPE; second, aluminum oxide ceramic bearings, and third, metal-on-metal bearings. Cross-linking reduces the wear resistance of UHMWPE markedly without impairment of other significant properties of the material. Simulator studies and some clinical long-term (10-22 years) follow-up surveys suggest an almost immeasurable wear of the highly cross-linked UHMWPE-based acetabular components during an expected clinical life span. Bioinert alumina ceramic (aluminum oxide) was introduced 3 decades ago for THR-bearing surfaces to improve performance and longevity. Alumina ceramic is entirely biostable and bioinert and has good mechanical properties. For correctly positioned alumina-on-alumina bearings, the annual linear wear rate has been reported to be 3.9 microm. Alumina heads have been successfully used in combination with polyethylene sockets, but as regards wear, the best results have been obtained with alumina-on-alumina bearings. In ceramic THR bearings, precise manufacture and contact surface geometry, including optimal clearance, are most important. For the currently available products, the component fracture risk is almost nonexistent (less than 1 per 1000). Metal-on-metal bearings were used in the early stage of THR surgery, although not all old designs were successful. More recent analyses of the early series have shown the advantages of metal-on-metal to be better and have led to a renaissance of this articulation. Initially, stainless steel was used because it was easy to manufacture and polish. Current metal-on-metal bearings are based on cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys with varying carbon contents. Such bearings are self-polishing. Linear wear rates remain at the level of a few microm a year. An improvement in technology has increased

  3. Nerve Palsy after Total Hip Arthroplasty without Subtrochanteric Femoral Shortening Osteotomy for a Completely Dislocated Hip Joint

    PubMed Central

    Sonohata, Motoki; Kitajima, Masaru; Kawano, Shunsuke; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurological injuries are a rare but devastating complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the frequency of nerve palsy after THA without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy in patients with a completely dislocated hip joint without pseudo-articulation between the femoral head and iliac bone. Methods: Between October 1999 and September 2001, nine primary THAs were performed for patients with a completely dislocated hip joint. The limb lengths, neurological abnormalities, and the extent of their neurological recovery were evaluated. Three THAs were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy, and six THAs were combined without subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Results: The mean length of the operation was 4.8 cm (range, 3.0-6.5 cm). Sciatic nerve palsy developed in four of the nine patients after THA. None of the cases with sciatic nerve palsy were combined with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy. Three of four patients did not completely recover from sciatic nerve palsy. Conclusions: THA for patients with a completely dislocated hip was associated with a high risk of nerve palsy due to excessive limb lengthening; the potential for recovery from nerve palsy was observed to be poor. Subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy should be used in combination with THA in patients with a completely dislocated hip. PMID:28217204

  4. Total Hip Arthroplasty for the Paralytic and Non-paralytic Side in Patient with Residual Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sonohata, Motoki; Kitajima, Masaru; Kawano, Shunsuke; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty (THA) for poliomyelitis is a problematic procedure due to difficulty in positioning the cup of the prosthesis in the true acetabulum and the risk of dislocation after THA due to the low muscle tone. Methods: We herein present a case of bilateral hip pain with a history of poliomyelitis. Radiograph showed bilateral hip osteoarthritis caused by hip dysplasia due to residual poliomyelitis in right hip joint or developing dysplasia of the hip joint in left hip joint. THA was performed to bilateral hip joints. Results: Six years after bilateral THA, bilateral hip pain significantly improved. Additionally, the muscle strength on the paralyzed right side partially improved. However, the muscle strength on the non-paralyzed left side did not significantly improve. No complications related to the surgery were observed. Conclusion: Promising early results were obtained for THA in our patient with residual poliomyelitis. However, surgeons should pay attention to the potential development of complications concerning THA that may arise due to the residual poliomyelitis. PMID:27347238

  5. Bearing surfaces in hip replacement – Evolution and likely future

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narinder; Arora, Gen N.C.; Datta, Barun

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty has evolved from the first total hip arthroplasty in 1938, through the revolutionization of hip arthroplasty by principles of low friction arthroplasty introduced by Sir John Charnley in 1960s to the present state of the art implants and techniques. The main concern regarding failure of total hip arthroplasty has been the biological response to particulate polyethylene debris generated by conventional metal on polyethylene bearing surfaces leading to osteolysis and aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. Therefore, recent research has been focussing on alternative bearing surfaces to reduce the particulate debris generated. These bearing surfaces include ceramic-polyethylene, metal–metal as well as ceramic–ceramic articulations and have demonstrated lesser friction rates as well as significantly lower wear rates as compared to widely used metal on polyethylene surfaces. Clinical experience until now has shown that metal on metal articulations have significant safety concerns whereas metal-on-highly crosslinked polyethylene, ceramic on ceramic and ceramic on highly crosslinked polyethylene articulations have shown encouraging results to hold promise for wider use in younger and more active patients. This review article discusses positives and drawbacks of various bearing surfaces in current clinical use in total hip arthroplasty as well as briefly explores the newer technologies on the horizon which may even further decrease wear and improve total hip arthroplasty survivorship. PMID:25382913

  6. CT-based surgical planning software improves the accuracy of total hip replacement preoperative planning.

    PubMed

    Viceconti, M; Lattanzi, R; Antonietti, B; Paderni, S; Olmi, R; Sudanese, A; Toni, A

    2003-06-01

    The present study is aimed to compare accuracy and the repeatability in planning total hip replacements with the conventional templates on radiographs to that attainable on the same clinical cases when using CT-based planning software. The sizes of the cementless components planned with new computer aided preoperative planning system called Hip-Op and with standard templates were compared to those effectively implanted. The study group intentionally included only difficult clinical cases. The most common aetiology was congenital dysplasia of hip (65.6%). The Hip-Op planning system allowed the surgeons to obtain a preoperative planning more accurate than with templates, especially for the socket. Assuming correct a size planned one calliper above or below that implanted the accuracy increased from 83% for the stem and 69% for the socket when using templates to 86% for the stem and 93% for the socket when using the Hip-Op system. The repeatability of the Hip-Op system was found comparable to that of the template procedure, which is much more familiar to the surgeons. Furthermore, the repeatability of the preoperative planning with the Hip-Op system was consistent between surgeons, independently from their major or minor experience. The study clearly shows the advantages of a three-dimensional computer-based preoperative planning over the traditional template planning, especially when deformed anatomies are involved. The surgical planning performed with the Hip-Op system is accurate and repeatable, especially for the socket and for less experienced surgeons.

  7. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Anwander, H.; Cron, G. O.; Rakhra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hips with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) have a high rate of adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR), often associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) measures tissue perfusion with the parameter Ktrans (volume transfer constant of contrast agent). Our purpose was 1) to evaluate the feasibility of DCE-MRI in patients with THA and 2) to compare DCE-MRI in patients with MoM bearings with metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) bearings, hypothesising that the perfusion index Ktrans in hips with MoM THA is higher than in hips with MoP THA. Methods In this pilot study, 16 patients with primary THA were recruited (eight MoM, eight MoP). DCE-MRI of the hip was performed at 1.5 Tesla (T). For each patient, Ktrans was computed voxel-by-voxel in all tissue lateral to the bladder. The mean Ktrans for all voxels was then calculated. These values were compared with respect to implant type and gender, and further correlated with clinical parameters. Results There was no significant difference between the two bearing types with both genders combined. However, dividing patients by THA bearing and gender, women with MoM bearings had the highest Ktrans values, exceeding those of women with MoP bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.053 min−1; p-value < 0.05) and men with MoM bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.034 min−1; p-value < 0.001). Considering only the men, patients with MoM bearings had lower Ktrans than those with MoP bearings (0.034 min−1 versus 0.046 min−1; p < 0.05). Conclusion DCE-MRI is feasible to perform in tissues surrounding THA. Females with MoM THA show high Ktrans values in DCE-MRI, suggesting altered tissue perfusion kinematics which may reflect relatively greater inflammation. Cite this article: Dr P. E. Beaule. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty: A pilot stud. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:73–79. DOI: 10

  8. Assessment of asymmetric leg loading before and after total hip arthroplasty using instrumented shoes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty is a successful surgical treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. Different questionnaires are used by the clinicians to assess functional capacity and the patient's pain, despite these questionnaires are known to be subjective. Furthermore, many studies agree that kinematic and kinetic parameters are crucial to evaluate and to provide useful information about the patient’s evolution for clinicians and rehabilitation specialists. However, these quantities can currently only be obtained in a fully equipped gait laboratory. Instrumented shoes can quantify gait velocity, kinetic, kinematic and symmetry parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the instrumented shoes is a sufficiently sensitive instrument to show differences in mobility performance before and after total hip arthroplasty. Methods In this study, patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty were measured before and 6–8 months after total hip arthroplasty. Both measurement sessions include 2 functional mobility tasks while the subject was wearing instrumented shoes. Before each measurement the Harris Hip Score and the Traditional Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index were administered as well. Results The stance time and the average vertical ground reaction force measured with the instrumented shoes during walking, and their symmetry index, showed significant differences before and after total hip arthroplasty. However, the data obtained with the sit to stand test did not reveal this improvement after surgery. Conclusions Our results show that inter-limb asymmetry during a walking activity can be evaluated with the instrumented shoes before and after total hip arthroplasty in an outpatient clinical setting. PMID:24581227

  9. Periacetabular bone mineral density changes after resurfacing hip arthroplasty versus conventional total hip arthroplasty. A randomized controlled DEXA study.

    PubMed

    Smolders, José M H; Pakvis, Dean F; Hendrickx, Baudewijn W; Verdonschot, Nico; van Susante, Job L C

    2013-08-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to evaluate acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) changes after hip resurfacing (RHA) versus an established conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 71 patients were allocated randomly to receive either an RHA press-fit cobalt-chromium cup (n=38) or a THA with a threaded titanium cup and polyethylene-metal-inlay insert (n=33). The BMD in five separate periacetabular regions of interest (ROI) was prospectively quantified preoperative until 24 months. We conclude that, in contrast to our hypothesis, periacetabular BMD was better preserved after RHA than after placement of a conventional THA. Long term follow-up studies are necessary to see whether this benefit in bone preservation sustains over longer time periods and whether it is turned into clinical benefits at future revision surgery.

  10. Practical implications of the lumbar spine and its function on total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Brahman Shankar; Levy, Yadin David; Pierrepont, Jim; Bruce, Warwick James

    2016-01-01

    Correct component placement is of significant importance to ensure optimal outcomes in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Traditionally, the Lewinnek plane has been referenced as an adequate “safe zone”, formed between the anterior superior iliac spines and public tubercles to optimize acetabular orientation. However, recent evidence shows that the positioning of this plane may vary due to the biomechanical relationship between the lumbar spine and hip. Therefore, the plane acquired intraoperatively may not accurately recreate the actual functional plane and acetabular orientation encountered outside of the intraoperative environment. This review summarizes the hip-spine relationship and its implications on THA. PMID:28097253

  11. Lower-limb joint mechanics after total hip arthroplasty during sitting and standing tasks.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Mario; Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Varin, Daniel; Beaulé, Paul E

    2012-10-01

    While the effect of total hip arthroplasty on the operated limb mechanics is well documented, little is known on its effect on the contralateral limb. The purpose of this study was to measure the joint mechanics of both lower limbs during the tasks of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit. Twenty total hip arthroplasty patients and 20 control participants performed three trials of each task from which 3D lower-limb joint kinematics and kinetics were obtained. Total hip arthroplasty patients exhibited lower operated-hip joint flexion, extension moments, and power, occurring most frequently near seat-on and seat-off. Despite these reduced kinetic variables in the operated hip, the joints of the non-operated limb generated similar joint kinetics as the matched control participants. These results indicated the patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty could adopt a strategy that allowed them to reduce moments and power generated at the operated lower-limb joints without overcompensating with the non-operated leg. Although such a strategy may be desirable given that higher loads can increase friction and accelerate wear of the prosthesis, reduced loading may be an indication of inadequate muscle strength that needs to be addressed.

  12. Clinical outcome of design modifications to the CLS Spotorno Stem in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    GRACEFFA, ANGELO; INDELLI, PIER FRANCESCO; LATELLA, LEONARDO; POLI, PAOLO; FULCO, ALEXANDER; MARCUCCI, MASSIMILIANO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose historically, the original CLS Spotorno Stem has demonstrated excellent survival. The design of this stem was recently modified, resulting in the introduction of a shorter, modular version (CLS Brevius). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the functional, radiological and survivorship outcomes of the cementless CLS Brevius Stem in a multi-surgeon, single center, consecutive series study at two years post-surgery. Methods the Authors performed 170 total hip arthroplasties in 155 patients using the shorter, triple-taper stem design (CLS Brevius). The patients’ diagnoses were primary hip osteoarthritis (OA) in 74.4%, secondary hip OA in 22.6%, and post-traumatic hip OA in 3%. All operations were performed through a mini-posterior approach, with the patient in the lateral decubitus position. The mean follow-up was 32 months (24–44 months). Outcome was assessed using the Harris Hip Score (HHS). Results the mean HHS improved from 32 preoperatively to 92 points at final follow-up, while the stem survival rate was 99.4%. Overall, the results were excellent in148 hips (87%), good in 14 hips (8.2%), fair in six hips (3.6%), and poor in two hips (1.2%). Intraoperative complications included a calcar fissure in three hips (1.7%). Correct femoral offset was reproduced in 97% while the planned center of hip rotation was achieved in 98%. Only one hip underwent early stem revision; this was due to major subsidence. Conclusions the modified CLS stem design showed excellent short-term results with a low rate of early postoperative complications. One of the main findings of this study was the high correlation between the planned femoral offset and center of hip rotation and the final radiographic measurements. This high reproducibility, which indicates the ability of the system to restore normal hip anatomy, is indeed due to the extensive modularity that characterizes this stem system. Long-term follow-up studies are necessary to fully compare the outcomes of

  13. Use of postoperative irradiation for the prevention of heterotopic bone formation after total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, J.E.; Greenberg, P.; Selch, M.T.; Thomas, B.J.; Amstutz, H.

    1988-03-01

    Formation of heterotopic bone (HTB) following total hip replacement may partially or completely ankylose the joint space, causing pain and/or limiting the range of motion. Patients at high risk for formation of HTB postoperatively include those with previous HTB formation, heterotopic osteoarthritis, and active rheumatoid spondylitis. Patients in these high risk groups have a 63-69% incidence of post-operative HTB formation, usually seen radiographically by 2 months post-operation. From 1980-1986 twenty-nine hips in 28 consecutively treated patients were irradiated post-operatively at the UCLA Center for the Health Sciences. The indication for irradiation was documented HTB formation previously in 26 of the 27 hips presented below. From 1980-1982 patients received 20 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions; from 1982-1986 the dose was reduced to 10 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Twenty-seven hips in 26 patients completed therapy and were available for evaluation, with a minimum of 2 month follow-up, and a median follow-up of 12 months. Three of 27 hips developed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV) post-operatively, whereas 5 of 27 hips developed minor, nonsymptomatic HTB (Brooker grade I). When irradiation was begun by postoperative day 4, 0 of 17 hips formed significant HTB. If irradiation began after post-operative day 4, 3 of 10 hips formed significant HTB (Brooker grade III or IV). These 3 hips received doses of 10 Gy in one hip and 20 Gy in the other 2 hips. There were no differences in the incidence or severity of side effects in the 10 Gy vs. the 20 Gy treatment groups. Eighteen hips received 10 Gy, 8 hips 20 Gy and, 1 hip 12 Gy. In conclusion, 10 Gy in 5 fractions appears as effective as 20 Gy in 10 fractions at preventing post-operative formation of HTB. For optimal results, treatment should begin as early as possible prior to post-operative day 4.

  14. Center of Mass Compensation during Gait in Hip Arthroplasty Patients: Comparison between Large Diameter Head Total Hip Arthroplasty and Hip Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Bouffard, Vicky; Nantel, Julie; Therrien, Marc; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Lavigne, Martin; Prince, François

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To compare center of mass (COM) compensation in the frontal and sagittal plane during gait in patients with large diameter head total hip arthroplasty (LDH-THA) and hip resurfacing (HR). Design. Observational study. Setting. Outpatient biomechanical laboratory. Participants. Two groups of 12 patients with LDH-THA and HR recruited from a larger randomized study and 11 healthy controls. Interventions. Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures. To compare the distance between the hip prosthetic joint center (HPJC) and the COM. The ratio (RHPJC-COM) and the variability (CVHPJC-COM) were compared between groups. Hip flexor, abductor, and adductor muscle strength was also correlated between groups while radiographic measurements were correlated with the outcome measures. Results. In the frontal plane, HR shows less variability than healthy controls at push-off and toe-off and RHPJC-COM is correlated with the muscle strength ratios (FRABD) at heel contact, maximal weight acceptance, and mid stance. In the sagittal plane, LDH-THA has a higher RHPJC-COM than healthy controls at push-off, and CVHPJC-COM is significantly correlated with FRFLEX. Conclusions. One year after surgery, both groups of patients, LDH-THA and HR, demonstrate minor compensations at some specific instant of the gait cycle, in both frontal and sagittal planes. However, their locomotion pattern is similar to the healthy controls. PMID:22110976

  15. Long-term results using the straight tapered femoral cementless hip stem in total hip arthroplasty: a minimum of twenty-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ateschrang, Atesch; Weise, Kuno; Weller, Siegfried; Stöckle, Ulrich; de Zwart, Peter; Ochs, Björn Gunnar

    2014-08-01

    We report the first long-term results of a prospective cohort study after total hip arthroplasty using the cementless Bicontact hip stem. Between 1987 and 1990, 250 total hip arthroplasties in 236 patients were performed using the cementless Bicontact hip stem. The average follow-up was 22.8 years (20.4-24.8) and average age at index surgery was 58.1 years. Eighty-one patients died and 9 were lost to follow-up. We noted 11 stem revisions revealing an overall Kaplan Meier survival rate of 95.0% (CI 95%: 91.1-97.2%). The average Harris Hip Score revealed 81 points (range 24-93). The Bicontact hip stem demonstrated high survival rates despite high ages and osteopenic changes, which are equivalent to other long-term reports of cementless stem fixation.

  16. Metallosis with pseudotumour formation: Long-term complication following cementless total hip replacement in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Volstad, Nicola J.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Snyder, Laura A.; Meinen, Jeffrey B.; Sample, Susannah J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Case description A 10-year-old female Belgian Teruven dog was presented to our clinic for total hip revision following a diagnosis of implant (cup) failure with metallosis and abdominal pseudotumour formation. The patient had a cementless metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement performed nine years prior to presentation. Clinical findings The clinical findings, including pseudotumour formation locally and at sites distant from the implant and pain associated with the joint replacement, were similar to those described in human patients with this condition. Histopathological, surgical, and radiographic findings additionally supported the diagnosis of metallosis and pseudotumour formation. Treatment and outcome Distant site pseudo tumours were surgically removed and the total hip replacement was explanted due to poor bone quality. The patient recovered uneventfully and has since resumed normal activity. Conclusion In veterinary patients with metal-on-polyethylene total hip implants, cup failure leading to metallosis and pseudotumour formation should be considered as a potential cause of ipsilateral hindlimb lameness, intra-pelvic abdominal tumours, or a combination of both. These clinical findings may occur years after total hip replacement surgery. PMID:27189390

  17. Experimental validation of finite element modelling of a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Wang, Ling; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Fisher, John

    2014-07-01

    Finite element models are becoming increasingly useful tools to conduct parametric analysis, design optimisation and pre-clinical testing for hip joint replacements. However, the verification of the finite element model is critically important. The purposes of this study were to develop a three-dimensional anatomic finite element model for a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement for predicting its contact mechanics and to conduct experimental validation for a simple finite element model which was simplified from the anatomic finite element model. An anatomic modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement model (anatomic model) was first developed and then simplified with reasonable accuracy to a simple modular total hip replacement model (simplified model) for validation. The contact areas on the articulating surface of three polyethylene liners of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement bearings with different clearances were measured experimentally in the Leeds ProSim hip joint simulator under a series of loading conditions and different cup inclination angles. The contact areas predicted from the simplified model were then compared with that measured experimentally under the same conditions. The results showed that the simplification made for the anatomic model did not change the predictions of contact mechanics of the modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement substantially (less than 12% for contact stresses and contact areas). Good agreements of contact areas between the finite element predictions from the simplified model and experimental measurements were obtained, with maximum difference of 14% across all conditions considered. This indicated that the simplification and assumptions made in the anatomic model were reasonable and the finite element predictions from the simplified model were valid.

  18. Late Disassembly of Femoral Head and Neck of A Modular Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Parvej; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Modular total hip arthroplasty system are now widely used, as these components increase the flexibility during primary and revision total hip arthoplasty. But this modularity itself associated with some risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Case Report: We report a case of late disassembly of a primary total arthroplasty in a 42 years old patient five years after the replacement surgery where the femoral head remained in the acetabular socket. Conclusion: Femoral head should be solidly impacted onto the stem and confirm that it has been assembled correctly before reduction. PMID:27299010

  19. Large diameter metal on metal total hip replacement for femoral neck fractures with neurological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Jinzhu; Liu, Denghui; Xu, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with Parkinson's disease and poliomyelitis can have a femoral neck fracture; yet, the optimal methods of treatment for these hips remains controversial. Many constrained or semi-constrained prostheses, using constrained liners (CLs) with a locking mechanism to capture the femoral head, were used to treat femoral neck fractures in patients with neurological disorders. We retrospectively studied a group of patients with Parkinson's disease and poliomyelitis who sustained femoral neck fractures and were treated by total hip arthroplasty using an L-MoM prosthesis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 12 hips in 12 patients who underwent large-diameter metal-on-metal (L-MoM) total hip replacement between May 2007 and October 2009. Eight of the 12 patients (8 hips; 66.7%) had Parkinson's disease and 4 patients (4 hips; 33.3%) were affected with poliomyelitis. Results: The followup time was 5.2 years (range 3.6-6.0 years). At the latest followup, all the patients showed satisfactory clinical and radiographic results, with pain relief. No complications, such as dislocation or aseptic loosening occurred. Conclusion: We believe the use of L-MoM can diminish the rate of instability or dislocation, after operation. The L-MoM is an option for patients with Parkinson's disease and poliomyelitis with femoral neck fracture. PMID:25404774

  20. One Stage Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty in Siblings with Larsen Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Christian; Waldstein, Wenzel; Lipman, Joseph D; Kasparek, Maximilian F; Boettner, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Background: Larsen syndrome is a rare genetic disorder caused by congenital weakness of the connective tissues. It can present with a variety of musculoskeletal and cardiovascular abnormalities. The current report describes two siblings with Larsen Syndrome who presented with severe bilateral hip arthritis and underwent one stage bilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim was to report on the clinical features of Larsen Syndrome and their implications for total hip replacement surgery. Methods: Two siblings, a 32 year-old female and a 30 year-old male, presented with severe bilateral hip arthritis and a history of Larsen Syndrome. Both patients underwent a detailed, multidisciplinary preoperative medical work up and radiological imaging including computer tomography. All four hips were operated using a cementless primary press-fit cup (Pinnacle, DePuy, Warsaw, IN) and a cementless modular stem system (S-ROM, DePuy, Warsaw, IN) utilizing a posterior approach. Prophylactic cerclages wires were placed proximal to the lesser trochanter before stem preparation and bone grafting of bone cysts in the greater trochanter was performed in all four hips. Results: After 2 years both patients reported significant improvements of function, pain and quality of life. The Oxford hip score improved from preoperative 21 (range 12-24) points up to 39 (range 38-41) points at 2-year follow up. Radiographic follow-up showed good graft incorporation and no signs of implant loosening. Conclusion: The current case report suggests that one stage bilateral THA is a feasible treatment option for young adults with Larsen syndrome and secondary arthritis of the hip. PMID:28144369

  1. Clinically insignificant trunnionosis in large-diameter metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kendoff, D.; Lausmann, C.; Henckel, J.; Gehrke, T.; Skinner, J.; Hart, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Mechanical wear and corrosion at the head-stem junction of total hip arthroplasties (THAs) (trunnionosis) have been implicated in their early revision, most commonly in metal-on-metal (MOM) hips. We can isolate the role of the head-stem junction as the predominant source of metal release by investigating non-MOM hips; this can help to identify clinically significant volumes of material loss and corrosion from these surfaces. Methods In this study we examined a series of 94 retrieved metal-on-polyethylene (MOP) hips for evidence of corrosion and material loss at the taper junction using a well published visual grading method and an established roundness-measuring machine protocol. Hips were retrieved from 74 male and 20 female patients with a median age of 57 years (30 to 76) and a median time to revision of 215 months (2 to 324). The reasons for revision were loosening of both the acetabular component and the stem (n = 29), loosening of the acetabular component (n = 58) and infection (n = 7). No adverse tissue reactions were reported by the revision surgeons. Results Evidence of corrosion was observed in 55% of hips. The median Goldberg taper corrosion score was 2 (1 to 4) and the annual rate of material loss at the taper was 0.084 mm3/year (0 to 0.239). The median trunnion corrosion score was 1 (1 to 3). Conclusions We have reported a level of trunnionosis for MOP hips with large-diameter heads that were revised for reasons other than trunnionosis, and therefore may be clinically insignificant. Cite this article: H. S. Hothi, D. Kendoff, C. Lausmann, J. Henckel, T. Gehrke, J. Skinner, A. Hart. Clinically insignificant trunnionosis in large-diameter metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:52–56. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.61.BJR-2016-0150.R2. PMID:28108481

  2. Total Hip Replacement for the Treatment of End Stage Arthritis of the Hip: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Grove, Amy; Freeman, Karoline; Court, Rachel; Johnson, Samantha; Connock, Martin; Clarke, Aileen; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Evolvements in the design, fixation methods, size, and bearing surface of implants for total hip replacement (THR) have led to a variety of options for healthcare professionals to consider. The need to determine the most optimal combinations of THR implant is warranted. This systematic review evaluated the clinical effectiveness of different types of THR used for the treatment of end stage arthritis of the hip. Methods A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in major health databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews published from 2008 onwards comparing different types of primary THR in patients with end stage arthritis of the hip were included. Results Fourteen RCTs and five systematic reviews were included. Patients experienced significant post-THR improvements in Harris Hip scores, but this did not differ between impact types. There was a reduced risk of implant dislocation after receiving a larger femoral head size (36 mm vs. 28 mm; RR = 0.17, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.78) or cemented cup (vs. cementless cup; pooled odds ratio: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.89). Recipients of cross-linked vs. conventional polyethylene cup liners experienced reduced femoral head penetration and revision. There was no impact of femoral stem fixation and cup shell design on implant survival rates. Evidence on mortality and complications (aseptic loosening, femoral fracture) was inconclusive. Conclusions The majority of evidence was inconclusive due to poor reporting, missing data, or uncertainty in treatment estimates. The findings warrant cautious interpretation given the risk of bias (blinding, attrition), methodological limitations (small sample size, low event counts, short follow-up), and poor reporting. Long-term pragmatic RCTs are needed to allow for more definitive conclusions. Authors are encouraged to specify the minimal clinically important difference and power calculation for their primary outcome(s) as well CONSORT, PRISMA and STROBE

  3. Association between trochanteric bursitis, osteoarthrosis and total hip arthroplasty☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Loss, Felipe; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro; Furian, Roque; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Zanatta, Júlia Mazzuchello; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes

    2014-01-01

    Objective this was an epidemiological study on trochanteric bursitis at the time of performing total hip arthroplasty. Methods sixty-two sequential patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthrosis, without any previous history of trochanteric bursitis, were evaluated. The bursas were collected and evaluated histologically. Results there were 35 female patients (56.5%) and 27 male patients (43.5%), with a mean age of 65 years (±11). Trochanteric bursitis was conformed histologically in nine patients (14.5%), of whom six were female (66.7%) and three were male (33.3%). Conclusions 14.5% of the bursas analyzed presented inflammation at the time that the primary total hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthrosis was performed, and the majority of the cases of bursitis were detected in female patients. PMID:26229811

  4. Chronic Lymphedema of the Lower Limb: A Rare Cause of Dislocation of Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Nishint; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-04-20

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) in a patient with chronic lymphedema of both lower limbs is rarely reported in the literature. Chronic lymphedema is a challenging condition associated with various complications especially in a patient with THA. However, dislocation of the total hip prosthesis due to acute exacerbation of lower limb swelling in the postoperative period is an extremely rare complication. The cause that led to the dislocation of the prosthesis is intricate and difficult to assess, as this has not been discussed in the literature yet. We believe that the excessive weight of the limb due to chronic lymphedema had a deleterious effect on the biomechanics of total hip prosthesis, thereby increasing the tendency for dislocation. This case illustrates that chronic lymphedema of the lower limb should be dealt with aggressively using various modalities like intermittent pneumatic compression pumps and compression stockings after THA in such patients.

  5. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon’s preference. PMID:27329869

  6. Similar Wear in Total Hip Arthroplasties with Metallic or Zirconia Femoral Heads

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Randy M.; González Della Valle, Alejandro; Peterson, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic femoral heads have been used in an attempt at reducing polyethylene wear of total hip arthroplasties. Clinical results with zirconia femoral heads have been mixed. This study was undertaken to compare the polyethylene wear and incidence of periprosthetic osteolysis in total hip replacements performed using a 28-mm zirconia versus a 28-mm cobalt chromium femoral head. Thirty-five hips with a 28-mm cobalt chromium head and 68 hips with a 28-mm zirconia head were evaluated after a minimum follow-up of 2 years (average, 4.0 years; range, 2.0 to 9.1 years). A monoblock acetabular component was used in all patients. Polyethylene wear was measured in serial radiographs from 58 of the hips utilizing a computer-assisted vector wear technique. Periacetabular osteolysis developed in three patients (two with a zirconia head and one with a cobalt chromium head). The total wear and the annual wear rate were 0.48 mm and 0.11 mm/year for the cobalt chromium heads and 0.53 mm and 0.14 mm/year for the zirconia heads, respectively. We found no benefit with respect to the rate of polyethylene wear or incidence of osteolysis with the use of zirconia femoral heads. PMID:18815852

  7. Hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Soon; Diwanji, Sanket R; Kim, Hyung Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo; Yoon, Taek Rim

    2009-08-01

    Iliopsoas bursitis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of total hip arthroplasty and is usually associated with polyethylene wear. Here, the authors report a case of hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating an otherwise well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic arthroplasty performed by minimal invasive modified 2-incision technique. The bursitis in turn resulted in femoral nerve palsy and femoral vein compression. In this report, there was no evidence to support that the bursitis was due to an inflammatory response to ceramic wear particles or any other wear particles originating from the total hip arthroplasty.

  8. [Gluteal compartment syndrome after total hip replacement. A presentation of two cases].

    PubMed

    Villalba, J; Solernou, X

    2013-01-01

    Many postoperative complications have been described after a total hip arthroplasty, with early and acute, as well as late, complications being reported. Two cases of compartment syndrome of the buttock are described following a hybrid total hip arthroplasty (cemented stem and press-fit and screwed acetabulum) performed on 2 patients of 60 and 68 years old, both diagnosed and treated 24-48 hours after the surgery. Both cases had a primary prosthesis with no previous significant pathological findings. This condition is still rare, and few cases have been described at the medical literature.

  9. Hip fracture evaluation with alternatives of total hip arthroplasty versus hemiarthroplasty (HEALTH): protocol for a multicentre randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Mohit; Devereaux, P J; Einhorn, Thomas A; Thabane, Lehana; Schemitsch, Emil H; Koval, Kenneth J; Frihagen, Frede; Poolman, Rudolf W; Tetsworth, Kevin; Guerra-Farfán, Ernesto; Madden, Kim; Sprague, Sheila; Guyatt, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hip fractures are a leading cause of mortality and disability worldwide, and the number of hip fractures is expected to rise to over 6 million per year by 2050. The optimal approach for the surgical management of displaced femoral neck fractures remains unknown. Current evidence suggests the use of arthroplasty; however, there is lack of evidence regarding whether patients with displaced femoral neck fractures experience better outcomes with total hip arthroplasty (THA) or hemiarthroplasty (HA). The HEALTH trial compares outcomes following THA versus HA in patients 50 years of age or older with displaced femoral neck fractures. Methods and analysis HEALTH is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial where 1434 patients, 50 years of age or older, with displaced femoral neck fractures from international sites are randomised to receive either THA or HA. Exclusion criteria include associated major injuries of the lower extremity, hip infection(s) and a history of frank dementia. The primary outcome is unplanned secondary procedures and the secondary outcomes include functional outcomes, patient quality of life, mortality and hip-related complications—both within 2 years of the initial surgery. We are using minimisation to ensure balance between intervention groups for the following factors: age, prefracture living, prefracture functional status, American Society for Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class and centre number. Data analysts and the HEALTH Steering Committee are blinded to the surgical allocation throughout the trial. Outcome analysis will be performed using a χ2 test (or Fisher's exact test) and Cox proportional hazards modelling estimate. All results will be presented with 95% CIs. Ethics and dissemination The HEALTH trial has received local and McMaster University Research Ethics Board (REB) approval (REB#: 06-151). Results Outcomes from the primary manuscript will be disseminated through publications in academic journals and presentations

  10. Comparison of total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis of mechanical and rheumatologic causes

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Leonhardt, Nathalia Zalc; Fernandes, Laura Fillipini Lorimier; Leonhardt, Marcos de Camargo; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the use of uncemented implants in total hip arthroplasty in patients with rheumathologic diseases and mechanical osteoarthrosis. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 196 patients who were operated by the Hip and Arthroplasty Surgery Group of the IOT-HCFMUSP between 2005 and 2009. Patients were divided into two groups: mechanical causes (165 patients) and rheumathologic causes (31 patients). Groups were compared between each other in age, gender and follow-up time. Osseointegration rate and percentage of failure in arthroplasty were evaluated. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in osseointegration rates (in both femoral and acetabular components) in both groups. The rates of revision surgery and implant survival also did not show statistically significant differences. Conclusion: The use of uncemented total hip arthroplasty did not show worse results in rheumathologic patients. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Case Control Study. PMID:24644419

  11. Delayed catastrophic failure of a ceramic head in hybrid total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Imran; Bhatnagar, Gauraang; Atrah, Salah

    2009-01-01

    Catastrophic failure of ceramic implants is a rare but known complication of total hip arthroplasty where such implants have been used. We report an unusual case of a 67-year-old woman who underwent bilateral hybrid total hip arthroplasty using ceramic-on-polyethylene bearings. Seven years later, she presented with left-sided hip pain in the absence of any trauma. She was found to have a completely shattered ceramic head, with subsequent erosion of the metal taper of the femoral stem through the polyethylene insert, its metal shell, and into the pelvis. This complicated subsequent revision surgery, as removal of the acetabular component resulted in a large pelvic defect that required an acetabular reinforcement ring and bone grafting. She recovered well after the revision procedure.

  12. Tribological investigations of the wear couple alumina-CFRP for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Früh, H J; Willmann, G

    1998-07-01

    Wear debris is the main reason for aseptic loosening in total hip. Most troublesome is the wear of polyethylene cups. Ceramic femoral heads were introduced about 20 years ago. The combination ceramic-on-polyethylene reduces the wear rate and the loosening rate. But cups of polyethylene are still the weakest link in a hip prosthesis. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) was proposed as an alternative for polyethylene. Various test were performed to study the combination metal-on-CFRP, zirconia-on-CFRP, and alumina-on-CFRP. The simulator tests showed that the wear rate of alumina-on-CFRP is in the order of 1-3 microm per year. Based on investigation of retrieved implants the wear rate is 6.3 microm per year. Based on these results the combination alumina femoral heads (Biolox-forte) and CFRP cups (Caproman) could be approved for total hip replacement.

  13. Cemented Müller straight stem total hip replacement: 18 year survival, clinical and radiological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Vasileios S; Korres, Demetrios; Lallos, Stergios; Mavrogenis, Andreas; Lazarettos, Ioannis; Sourlas, Ioannis; Efstathopoulos, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To present the 18 year survival and the clinical and radiological outcomes of the Müller straight stem, cemented, total hip arthroplasty (THA). METHODS: Between 1989 and 2007, 176 primary total hip arthroplasties in 164 consecutive patients were performed in our institution by the senior author. All patients received a Müller cemented straight stem and a cemented polyethylene liner. The mean age of the patients was 62 years (45-78). The diagnosis was primary osteoarthritis in 151 hips, dysplasia of the hip in 12 and subcapital fracture of the femur in 13. Following discharge, serial follow-up consisted of clinical evaluation based on the Harris Hip Score and radiological assessment. The survival of the prosthesis using revision for any reason as an end-point was calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: Twenty-four (15%) patients died during the follow-up study, 6 (4%) patients were lost, while the remaining 134 patients (141 hips) were followed-up for a mean of 10 years (3-18 years). HSS score at the latest follow-up revealed that 84 hips (59.5%) had excellent results, 30 (22.2%) good, 11 (7.8%) fair and 9 (6.3%) poor. There were 3 acetabular revisions due to aseptic loosening. Six (4.2%) stems were diagnosed as having radiographic definitive loosening; however, only 1 was revised. 30% of the surviving stems showed no radiological changes of radiolucency, while 70% showed some changes. Survival of the prosthesis for any reason was 96% at 10 years and 81% at 18 years. CONCLUSION: The 18 year survival of the Müller straight stem, cemented THA is comparable to those of other successful cemented systems. PMID:24147267

  14. Navigated Acetabular Cup Fixation for Acetabular Deformity or Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Yu, Jung Jin; Seo, Hyo-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of navigated acetabular cup fixation for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods This study enrolled 28 patients with at least 12 months' follow-up. The safe zone of the acetabular cup was defined as 40°±10°in inclination and 15°±10°in anteversion. The authors used the navigation and radiographic data to determine whether the acetabular cup was located within the safe zone or not. To evaluate the clinical outcomes, preoperative and last follow-up Harris hip scores were checked, and the occurrence of complications was evaluated. Results According to the navigation data, the mean inclination and anteversion were 38.5°±4.7°(range, 32°-50°) and 16.6°±4.0°(range, 8°-23°), respectively. According to the radiographic data the mean inclination and anteversion were 40.5°±4.6°(range, 32°-50°) and 19.4°±4.2°(range, 8°-25°), respectively. In both cases, all values were within the safe zone. Harris hip score was improved in all patients from preoperative 52.3±14.4 points (range, 29-87 points) to 88.0±9.0 points (range, 65-99 points) at the last follow-up. There was no dislocation or loosening of both cases. Conclusion Navigated acetabular cup fixation is a useful technique for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty because it prevents the malposition and related complications. PMID:27536573

  15. Lifestyle and health-related quality of life in Asian patients with total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kimie; Xia, Zhenlan; Liu, Xueqin; Mawatari, Masaaki; Makimoto, Kiyoko

    2014-09-01

    Total hip arthroplasty reduces pain and restores physical function in patients with hip joint problems. This study examined lifestyle and health-related quality of life before and after total hip arthroplasty in Japanese and Chinese patients. Two hospitals in China recruited 120 patients and 120 Japanese patients matched by age and operative status were drawn from a prospective cohort database. Oxford Hip Score, EuroQol, and characteristics of Asian lifestyle and attitudes toward the operation were assessed. There were no differences between patients from the two countries in quality-of-life-scale scores: postoperative patients had significantly better quality-of-life scores than preoperative patients in both countries. In China, patients who reported that living at home was inconvenient had significantly worse Oxford Hip Scores than those who did not. Mean scores for anxiety items concerning possible dislocation and durability of the implant were significantly higher in Japanese than in Chinese subjects. Our findings suggest that providing information about housing conditions and lifestyles would result in improved quality of life and reduced anxiety in patients with implanted joints.

  16. Long-Term Outcome after Rehabilitation of Bilateral Total Hip Arthroplasty in Renal Transplant Recipient – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Erieta Nikolikj; Adamov, Aleksandar; Koevska, Valentina; Mitrevska, Biljana; Gacevikj, Ivan; Agushi, Arsim

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Total hip replacement is generally proposed for renal transplant patients with avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to report the long-term outcome after rehabilitation of bilateral total hip arthroplasty in a patient with renal transplantation suffering from avascular osteonecrosis of the both femoral heads. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The patient S.D, 49 years old at follow-up. Few months after renal transplantation, the patient had got avascular osteonecrosis of both femoral head. One year after transplantation the total hip arthroplasty for both hip joints were performed. Three years later repeat total hip arthroplasty surgery for left hip was performed. After any surgery intervention the patient was referred for inpatient rehabilitation. For clinical assessment the clinical findings and Harris Hip Score have been used. The rehabilitation program consisted of exercises, occupational therapy, and patient education. RESULTS: After any rehabilitation treatment the patient had improvement of clinical findings. At follow-up assessment outcome for both hip function was good - Harris Hip Score was 81 points. CONCLUSION: Rehabilitation is integral part of multidisciplinary treatment of renal transplant recipient after total hip arthroplasty. Regular exercise training of these patients is very important for improving of their long-term outcome. PMID:27275350

  17. [Total knee and hip prosthesis: variables associated with costs].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Espiñeira, Carmen; Escobar, Antonio; Navarro-Espigares, José Luis; Castillo, Juan de Dios Lunadel; García-Pérez, Lidia; Godoy-Montijano, Amparo

    2013-01-01

    antecedentes: la alta prevalencia de artrosis en los países occidentales, el elevado costo de las intervenciones de artroplastia de cadera y rodilla y las amplias variaciones en la práctica médica generan gran interés por comparar los costos asociados antes y después de la cirugía. Objetivo: conocer el costo de las intervenciones de reemplazo total de cadera y rodilla durante la estancia hospitalaria y al año de seguimiento posterior al alta. material y métodos: estudio multicéntrico y prospectivo efectuado en 15 hospitales de tres comunidades autónomas. La relación entre las variables independientes con el costo de la estancia y costo post-alta, se analizó con modelos multinivel y para agrupar los casos se utilizó la variable "hospital." Las variables independientes fueron: edad, sexo, índice de masa corporal, calidad de vida prequirúrgica (cuestionarios ED-5D, SF-12 y Womac), intervención (cadera-rodilla), índice Charlson, complicaciones, número de camas y dependencia económico-institucional del hospital, comunidad autó-noma y presencia de cuidador. Resultados: el costo promedio por paciente, sin incluir el costo de la prótesis, fue de 4,734 Euros ± 2,136 y el costo del seguimiento post alta de 554 Euros ± 509. Si se incluye el costo de la prótesis, al final del año el costo total asciende a 7,645 Euros ± 2,248. Conclusiones: existe un margen considerable en la reducción de los costos de estancia; más de 44% de la variabilidad observada no está determinada por las condiciones clínicas de los pacientes sino por el comportamiento de los centros hospitalarios.

  18. "Pros and cons" of total hip arthroplasty with metaphyseal Proxima endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Wraźen, Waldemar; Golec, Edward B; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Golec, Piotr; Jaworowski, Michał de Lubicz; Dudkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    The authors present their own experience concerning total hip arthroplasty with the metaphyseal prosthesis Proxima. Proxima, a metaphyseal prosthesis, provides an innovative supplement to total hip arthroplasty. In this study, the authors present their own experience using Proxima in patients with hip osteoarthritis. This study was performed between 2008 to 2013 and comprised of 62 patients, of which 38 were male (61.3%) and 24 female (38.7%). All patients were operated on due to hip osteoarthritis using total hip arthroplasty with the metaphyseal prosthesis Proxima. The age of patients included into the study ranged from 23 years to 62 years with the mean age of 46 years. The authors paid close attention to the "pros and cons" of surgical techniques and assessed clinical and radiological results in both the short and long-term observation periods. The clinical evaluation was based on the Harris Hip Score and radiological assessment of fixation of the acetabular cup of the endoprosthesis was based on Pradhan's criteria. The endoprosthesis Proxima stem was positioned using the manufacturer's recommended method, evaluating the direction, scope and duration of the displacement in the marrow cavity of the proximal stump of the femur. According to the authors' analysis, the surgery gives good functional and radiological results both in the short- and long-term observation periods. The effectiveness depends on precise qualification for surgery, proper surgical techniques and specific anatomical conditions of the proximal femur stump. The most common reasons for primary and secondary dislocations of the metaphyseal endoprosthesis Proxima stem occur during the first three months post surgery. This is due to incorrect surgical techniques, which disregard the importance of specific anatomical conditions of the proximal femoral stump, which affects Proxima implantation, and cause deviations towards a varus or valgus orientation.

  19. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee arthroplasty: a survey of Canadian orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Michael; Anderson, David R.; Nagpal, Seema; O’Brien, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacologic and physical modalities used by orthopedic surgeons in Canada to prevent venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Design Mail survey sent to all members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association. Setting A nation-wide study. Methods A total of 828 questionnaires, designed to identify the type and frequency of prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism that were used after hip and knee arthroplasty were mailed to orthopedic surgeons. Outcome measures Demographic data and the frequency and type of thromboprophylaxis. Results Of the 828 surveys mailed 445 (54%) were returned, and 397 were included in this analysis. Of the respondents, 97% used prophylaxis routinely for patients who undergo total hip or knee arthroplasty. Three of the 397 (0.8%) did not use any method of prophylaxis. Warfarin was the most common agent used (46%), followed by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (36%). Combination therapy with both mechanical and pharmacologic methods were used in 39% of patients. Objective screening tests were not frequently performed before discharge. Extended prophylaxis beyond the duration of hospitalization was used by 36% of physicians. Conclusion Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism with warfarin or LMWH has become standard care after total hip or knee arthroplasty in Canada. PMID:10593248

  20. Elevated risk of early reoperation in total hip replacement during the stage of unit closure

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Mikko; Malmivaara, Antti; Paavola, Mika; Seitsalo, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effects of launch or closure of an entire arthroplasty unit on the first or last patients treated in these units have not been studied. Using a 3-year follow-up, we investigated whether patients who were treated at the launch or closure stage of an arthroplasty unit of a hospital would have a higher risk of reoperation than patients treated in-between at the same units. Patients and methods — From the Finnish Arthroplasty Register, we identified all the units that had performed total joint arthroplasty and the units that were launched or closed in Finland between 1998 and 2011. The risks of reoperation within 3 years for the 41,748 total hip and knee replacements performed due to osteoarthritis in these units were modeled with Cox proportional-hazards regression, separately for hip and knee and for the launch and the closure stage. Results — The unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for total hip and knee replacements performed in the initial stage of activity of the units that were launched were similar to the reoperation risks in patients who were operated in these units after the early stage of activity. The unadjusted and risk-adjusted HRs for early reoperation after total hip replacement (THR) were increased at the closure stage (adjusted HR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2–2.8). The reoperation risk at the closure stage after total knee replacement (TKR) was not increased. Interpretation — The results indicate that closure of units performing total hip replacements poses an increased risk of reoperation. Closures need to be managed carefully to prevent the quality from deteriorating when performing the final arthroplasties. PMID:26541178

  1. Total hip replacement in two dogs with unsuccessful femoral head ostectomy

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Su-Young

    2015-01-01

    An English setter (case 1) and a Tibetan mastiff (case 2) presented with intermittent weight-bearing lameness on the right hind limb when trotting. The dogs had a history of femoral head and neck ostectomy (FHNO). Orthopedic examination revealed pain and crepitus on the right hip joint. The dogs underwent total hip replacement (THR). At the 2-year (case 1) and 1-year (case 2) follow-up, both dogs had resumed normal activity without lameness. The muscle mass and range of motion were significantly improved in the affected hind limb. In conclusion, FHNO with poor functional outcomes can be successfully ameliorated with THR. PMID:25269715

  2. Abductor Reconstruction with Gluteus Maximus Transfer in Primary Abductor Deficiency during Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Se Ang; Byun, Young Soo; Gu, Tae Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Abductor deficiency in native hip joint may cause severe limping and pain. It is more serious situation in case of arthroplasty due to instability and recurrent dislocation. Well-known causes of abductor deficiency are repeated surgery, chronic trochanteric bursitis, superior gluteal nerve injury, failure of repair of abductor tendon insertion to the greater trochanter. Author had experienced primary abductor deficiency during total hip replacement and treated successfully with the transfer of gluteus maximus. We'd like to introduce the operation technique with the review of literature. PMID:27777922

  3. Does bearing size influence metal ion levels in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty? A comparison of three total hip systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was twofold: first, to determine whether there is a statistically significant difference in the metal ion levels among three different large-head metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip systems. The second objective was to assess whether position of the implanted prostheses, patient demographics or factors such as activity levels influence overall blood metal ion levels and whether there is a difference in the functional outcomes between the systems. Methods In a cross-sectional cohort study, three different metal-on-metal total hip systems were assessed: two monoblock heads, the Durom socket (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Birmingham socket (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA), and one modular metal-on-metal total hip system (Pinnacle, Depuy Orthopedics, Warsaw, IN, USA). Fifty-four patients were recruited, with a mean age of 59.7 years and a mean follow-up time of 41 months (12 to 60). Patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and biochemically. Statistical analysis was performed on all collected data to assess any differences between the three groups in terms of overall blood metal ion levels and also to identify whether there was any other factor within the group demographics and outcomes that could influence the mean levels of Co and Cr. Results Although the functional outcome scores were similar in all three groups, the blood metal ion levels in the larger monoblock large heads (Durom, Birmingham sockets) were significantly raised compared with those of the Pinnacle group. In addition, the metal ion levels were not found to have a statistically significant relationship to the anteversion or abduction angles as measured on the radiographs. Conclusions When considering a MOM THR, the use of a monoblock large-head system leads to higher elevations in whole blood metal ions and offers no advantage over a smaller head modular system. PMID:24472283

  4. [Minimally invasive approaches to hip and knee joints for total joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Rittmeister, M; König, D P; Eysel, P; Kerschbaumer, F

    2004-11-01

    The manuscript features the different minimally invasive approaches to the hip for joint replacement. These include medial, anterior, anterolateral, and posterior approaches. The concept of minimally invasive hip arthroplasty makes sense if it is an integral part of a larger concept to lower postoperative morbidity. Besides minimal soft tissue trauma, this concept involves preoperative patient education, preemptive analgesia, and postoperative physiotherapy. It is our belief that minimal incision techniques for the hip are not suited for all patients and all surgeons. The different minimally invasive approaches to the knee joint for implantation of a knee arthroplasty are described and discussed. There have been no studies published yet that fulfill EBM criteria. The data so far show that minimally invasive approaches and implantation techniques for total knee replacements lead to quicker rehabilitation of patients.

  5. Total hip arthroplasty using a cylindrical cementless stem in patients with a small physique.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshihide; Mitsui, Hiromasa; Kikuchi, Akira; Toh, Satoshi; Katano, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We performed total hip arthroplasty using an anatomic medullary locking cementless stem for small-physique patients from 1988 to 1995. We conducted a retrospective study of 50 joints in 44 cases, including 40 developmentally dysplastic hips followed for 12 to 20 years (average, 15.1 years). Average height and body weight were 152 cm and 56 kg (5.0 ft and 124 lb), respectively, with an average body mass index of 24.2. Twelve joints (24%) were revised for acetabular-sided failures. Forty-eight stems (96%) showed bone ingrowth fixation, and there were no unstable stems. The simple cylindrical shape of the distal portion of the AML stem was less affected by deformity of the proximal femur of developmental dysplasia of the hip in patients with a small physique, and both clinically and radiologically good results were confirmed at long-term follow-up.

  6. Formation of a pseudotumor in total hip arthroplasty using a tribological metal-polyethylene pair.

    PubMed

    Fagotti, Lorenzo; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Miyahara, Helder Souza; de Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Bernabé, Antônio Carlos; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to report a case of a young adult patient who evolved with tumor formation in the left thigh, 14 years after revision surgery on hip arthroplasty. Davies in 2005 made the first description of this disease in patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. Over the last decade, however, pseudotumors around metal-on-polyethylene surfaces have become more prevalent. Our patient presented with increased volume of the left thigh 8 years after hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Two years before the arising of the tumor in the thigh, a nodule in the inguinal region was investigated to rule out a malignant neoplastic process, but the results were inconclusive. The main preoperative complaints were pain, functional limitation and marked reduction in the range of motion of the left hip. Plain radiographs showed loosening of acetabular and femoral, and a large mass between the muscle planes was revealed through magnetic resonance imaging of the left thigh. The surgical procedure consisted of resection of the lesion and removal of the components through lateral approach. In respect of total hip arthroplasty, pseudotumors are benign neoplasms in which the bearing surface consists of metal-on-metal, but they can also occur in different tribological pairs, as presented in this case.

  7. Application and evaluation of biomechanical models and scores for the planning of total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Eschweiler, Jörg; Fieten, Lorenz; Dell'Anna, Jasmin; Kabir, Koroush; Gravius, Sascha; Tingart, Markus; Radermacher, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Intimate knowledge of the biomechanics of a given individual hip joint provides a potential advantage during the planning of total hip arthroplasty, and would thus have a positive influence over the outcome of such an intervention. In current clinical practise, the surgical planning is based solely on the status of the individual hip and its radiographic appearance. However, additional information could be gathered from the radiography to be used as input data for biomechanical models aimed at calculating the resultant force FR within the hip joint. An investigation of the biomechanical models by Pauwels, Debrunner and Iglič was performed, where the magnitude of FR calculated by the models showed a favourable comparison to the in-vivo data from instrumented prostheses by Bergmann. The Blumentritt model returned abnormally high results. The computational results showed large variations for FR orientation, which tends to depend more on the model used than on patient-specific parameters. Furthermore, a discrepancy was found between the data gathered from instrumented prostheses and the Standing Human Model within the 'AnyBody Modeling System™' software by AnyBody Tech. Additionally, the variations in inter-rater and intra-rater errors made while localizing radiographic landmarks were analysed with respect to their influence on Babisch-Layher-Blumentritt (BLB)-scoring using the Blumentritt hip model.

  8. Effect of cup inclination on predicted contact stress-induced volumetric wear in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Rijavec, B; Košak, R; Daniel, M; Kralj-Iglič, V; Dolinar, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the lifetime of the total hip endoprosthesis, it is necessary to understand mechanisms leading to its failure. In this work, we address volumetric wear of the artificial cup, in particular the effect of its inclination with respect to the vertical. Volumetric wear was calculated by using mathematical models for resultant hip force, contact stress and penetration of the prosthesis head into the cup. Relevance of the dependence of volumetric wear on inclination of the cup (its abduction angle ϑA) was assessed by the results of 95 hips with implanted endoprosthesis. Geometrical parameters obtained from standard antero-posterior radiographs were taken as input data. Volumetric wear decreases with increasing cup abduction angle ϑA. The correlation within the population of 95 hips was statistically significant (P = 0.006). Large cup abduction angle minimises predicted volumetric wear but may increase the risk for dislocation of the artificial head from the cup in the one-legged stance. Cup abduction angle and direction of the resultant hip force may compensate each other to achieve optimal position of the cup with respect to wear and dislocation in the one-legged stance for a particular patient.

  9. Severe Pelvic Obliquity Affects Femoral Offset in Patients with Total Hip Arthroplasty but Not Leg-Length Inequality.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong; Chen, Yunsu; Peng, Xiaochun; Mao, Yuanqing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Beigang; Wang, Xiuhui; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Leg-length inequality is an extensively studied complication of total hip arthroplasty in normal patients. However, few studies have focused on the pelvic obliquity of coronal pelvic malrotation. We hypothesized that pelvic obliquity with a fixed abduction/adduction contracture deformity of the hip may intraoperatively affect the release of soft tissues, ultimately resulting in a leg-length inequality. This study also investigated whether the femoral and vertical offsets of total hip arthroplasty were correlated with pelvic obliquity. This prospective study divided 98 patients into six groups based on the inclination of pelvic obliquity before total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality, variation of pelvic obliquity, offset, and vertical offset were measured after total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality and vertical offset were not significantly different among groups, whereas the variation of pelvic obliquity was significantly higher in type IIC pelvic obliquity than in other groups. Type IC pelvic obliquity had a significantly shorter offset than did the other groups, which may have been an important factor leading to type IC pelvic obliquity. Pelvic obliquity exhibited no significant effect on leg-length inequality in patients with total hip arthroplasty. A shorter offset may be caused by the higher tension of the abductor in the operated hip, which may result in the formation of type IC pelvic obliquity. Releasing the abductor contracture and restoring femoral offset are important for increasing hip stability and maintaining pelvic balance following total hip arthroplasty.

  10. Severe Pelvic Obliquity Affects Femoral Offset in Patients with Total Hip Arthroplasty but Not Leg-Length Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong; Chen, Yunsu; Peng, Xiaochun; Mao, Yuanqing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Beigang; Wang, Xiuhui; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Leg-length inequality is an extensively studied complication of total hip arthroplasty in normal patients. However, few studies have focused on the pelvic obliquity of coronal pelvic malrotation. We hypothesized that pelvic obliquity with a fixed abduction/adduction contracture deformity of the hip may intraoperatively affect the release of soft tissues, ultimately resulting in a leg-length inequality. This study also investigated whether the femoral and vertical offsets of total hip arthroplasty were correlated with pelvic obliquity. This prospective study divided 98 patients into six groups based on the inclination of pelvic obliquity before total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality, variation of pelvic obliquity, offset, and vertical offset were measured after total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality and vertical offset were not significantly different among groups, whereas the variation of pelvic obliquity was significantly higher in type IIC pelvic obliquity than in other groups. Type IC pelvic obliquity had a significantly shorter offset than did the other groups, which may have been an important factor leading to type IC pelvic obliquity. Pelvic obliquity exhibited no significant effect on leg-length inequality in patients with total hip arthroplasty. A shorter offset may be caused by the higher tension of the abductor in the operated hip, which may result in the formation of type IC pelvic obliquity. Releasing the abductor contracture and restoring femoral offset are important for increasing hip stability and maintaining pelvic balance following total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26673427

  11. Total hip arthroplasty in steroid-induced osteonecrosis: early functional and radiological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Wael A.; Garbuz, Donald S.; Masri, Bassam A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The proportion of total hip arthroplasties (THAs) associated with corticosteroid use is uncertain, and the mechanisms of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis remain unknown. We sought to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes, complications and satisfaction with THA among patients with corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis. Methods We retrospectively assessed functional outcome at a minimum 1-year follow-up using the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC); Oxford Hip Score; Short Form (SF)-12; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Activity; and patient satisfaction scores. Results We included 31 patients (35 hips). The average follow-up was 20 (range 12–55) months, and the average age at surgery was 47 (range 19–78) years. At follow-up, patients showed significant improvement in all 4 components of the WOMAC (means: function 84, stiffness 75, pain 86, global 84), Oxford-12 (mean 83) and SF-12 (means: mental 40 and physical 48) scores. However, there was no significant improvement in the UCLA Activity scores. Mean patient satisfaction scores were good for pain relief (86), function (80), recreation (77.5) and overall results of surgery (86). Radiographic review at follow-up showed that all components were well fixed with no evidence of loosening. The complication rate was high (17%), with 6 complications in 5 patients (6 of 35 hips). Four patients (4 of 35 hips; 11%) required reoperations. Conclusion Total hip arthroplasty in patients with corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head is successful in reducing pain and improving function; however, the rate of complications and reoperation is high. PMID:22992403

  12. Is closed suction drainage effective in early recovery of hip joint function? Comparative evaluation in one-stage bilateral total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Koyano, Gaku; Jinno, Tetsuya; Koga, Daisuke; Hoshino, Chisato; Muneta, Takeshi; Okawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    One-stage primary bilateral cementless total hip arthroplasty with unilateral closed suction drainage (CSD) was prospectively performed for 51 patients (102 hips), and local effects of CSD were quantitatively evaluated. Postoperatively, pain scores evaluated by visual analog scale and periwound temperatures measured by thermography were lower in the CSD side than the non-CSD side. CT measurements also showed that postoperative cross-sectional area of the thigh was smaller in the CSD side. Active straight leg raising and weight bearing were more accelerated in the CSD side., showing earlier recovery of hip joint function. CSD for hip arthroplasty has an advantage in reducing postoperative local inflammation and be recommended from the viewpoint of postoperative pain relief and early recovery of hip joint function.

  13. Results of Wagner SL revision stem with impaction bone grafting in revision total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Somesh P; Bhalodiya, Haresh P

    2013-01-01

    Background: As the number of total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed increases, so do the number of required revisions. Impaction bone grafting with Wagner SL Revision stem is a good option for managing bone deficiencies arising from aseptic osteolysis. We studied the results of cementless diaphyseal fixation in femoral revision after total hip arthroplasty and whether there was spontaneous regeneration of bone stock in the proximal femur after the use of Wagner SL Revision stem (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) with impaction bone grafting. Materials and Methods: We performed 53 hip revisions using impaction bone grafting and Wagner SL Revision stems in 48 patients; (5 cases were bilateral) for variety of indications ranging from aseptic osteolysis to preiprosthetic fractures. The average age was 59 years (range 44-68 years). There were 42 male and 6 female patients. Four patients died after surgery for reasons unrelated to surgery. 44 patients were available for complete analysis. Results: The mean Harris Hip Score was 42 before surgery and improved to 86 by the final followup evaluation at a mean point of 5.5 years. Of the 44 patients, 87% (n=39) had excellent results and 10% (n=5) had good results. The stem survival rate was 98% (n=43). Conclusion: Short term results for revision THA with impaction bone grafting and Wagner SL revision stems are encouraging. However, it is necessary to obtain long term results through periodic followup evaluation, as rate of complications may increase in future. PMID:23960279

  14. Total arthroplasty in displaced dysplastic hips with acetabular reconstruction and femoral shortening – technical note☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paulo; de Oliveira, Leandro Alves; Coelho, Danilo Lopes; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Rebello, Percival Rosa; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    To describe a new procedure of total hip replacement in patient with severe developmental dysplasia of the left hip, using technique of acetabular reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts and subtrochanteric shortening femoral osteotomy. Total hip replacement done in January of 2003. The Eftekhar's classification was used and included type D, neglected dislocations. Bone graft incorporated in acetabular shelf and femoral osteotomy. Our contribution is the use of an Allis plate to better fix acetabular grafts, avoiding loosening, and cerclage around bone graft in femoral osteotomy site, which diminish pseudoarthrosis risk. This technique shows efficiency, allowing immediately resolution for this case with pain and range of motion of hip improvement. It also allows the acetabular dysplasia reconstruction, equalization of the limb length (without elevated risk of neurovascular lesion) and repairs the normal hip biomechanics due to the correction of the hip's center of rotation. PMID:26229775

  15. Strain shielding inspired re-design of proximal femoral stems for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cilla, Myriam; Checa, Sara; Duda, Georg N

    2017-02-08

    A large number of hip prosthesis with different designs have been developed. However, the influence of hip implant design changes on the strains induced in the bone remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to better understand the mechanics of short stem total hip arthroplasty. Specifically, it investigates whether strain shielding can be avoided by changing implant shape and/or material properties. It is hypothesized that the re-design of existing implant designs can result in further reduction of strain shielding and thus keep bone loss minimal following total hip replacement. Finite element methods were used to compare healthy and implanted models. The local mechanics strains/stresses in the intact and implanted femurs were determined under patient-specific muscle and joint contact forces. Results suggest that small changes in implant geometry and material properties have no major effect on strain shielding. Furthermore, it was found that improvement depends on a dramatic re-design of the original implant design. Whereas the benefit of this strategy of modification of the original geometry of a given short-stemmed hip consists in reduced bone remodeling, care should be taken with regard to long-term bone anchorage and implant fatigue strength. It is also shown that geometrical and material changes have a limited potential in avoiding strain shielding even in short-stemmed implants. Finally, it is suggested that an understanding of the influence of these changes on the strain distribution within the bone can guide in the process of optimizing the current stem designs toward minimal strain shielding effects. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  16. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional cup coverage in total hip arthroplasty with developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liao; Thoreson, Andrew R; Trousdale, Robert T; Morrey, Bernard F; Dai, Kerong; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-06-21

    We analyzed the mean difference and correlation between 2D cup coverage measured from different projections and three-dimensional (3D) cup coverage to investigate their precise relationship in total hip arthroplasty (THA) among patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We created DDH-THA models on six foam pelvic models. 3D cup coverage was measured using a motion capture system and imaging software. Digitally reconstructed radiographs with predetermined pelvic rotations were simulated using image processing software at three different angles of rotation around the long body axis (0°, 25° and 45°). 2D cup coverage was then measured on these reconstructed radiographs. The 3D technique showed excellent intra-observer (κ>0.98) and inter-observer (κ>0.99) reliability. The 2D technique tended to overestimate the real cup coverage by about 15%. The smallest difference between 2D and 3D cup coverage occurred when 2D measurement was performed on the radiographs with 45° of pelvic rotation toward the operated side (14.50%, P<0.0001), meanwhile, the highest correlation coefficient between 2D and 3D cup coverage was also observed when the 2D measurement was performed on the radiographs at this same pelvic rotation (r=0.67, P=0.0003). Published recommendations regarding the minimum cup coverage based on 2D measurement should be interpreted cautiously. The minimal cup coverage, as an intra-operative 3D parameter related to the long term fixation of the cup component, should be more accurately determined with intra-operative measurement.

  17. Quality of life and functionality after total hip arthroplasty: a long-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a lack of data on the long-term outcome of total hip arthroplasty procedures, as assessed by validated tools. Methods We conducted a follow-up study to evaluate the quality of life and functionality of 250 patients an average of 16 years (range: 11-23 years) after total hip arthroplasty using a validated assessment set including the SF-36 questionnaire, Harris Hip Score, WOMAC score, Functional Comorbidity Index, and a study specific questionnaire. Models of multiple stepwise linear and logistic regression analysis were constructed to evaluate the relationships between several explanatory variables and these functional outcomes. Results The SF-36 physical indexes of these patients compared negatively with the normative values but positively with the results obtained in untreated subjects with severe hip osteoarthritis. Similar results were detected for the Harris Hip Score and WOMAC score. There was a 96% rate of post-surgical satisfaction. Hip functionality and comorbidities were the most important determinants of physical measures on the SF-36. Conclusions Patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty have impaired long-term self-reported physical quality of life and hip functionality but they still perform physically better than untreated patients with advanced hip osteoarthritis. However, the level of post-surgical satisfaction is high. PMID:21978244

  18. Mechanical failure of metal-polyethylene sandwich liner in metal-on-metal total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yasushi; Fetto, Joseph F

    2015-01-01

    Metal-on-metal had been proposed as an optimal articulation in THRs, however, many monoblock prostheses have been recalled in the USA because of significant high rates of early failure. Metal-on-metal prostheses had been implanted in our institution, and this is a case history of a single patient, in whom metal-on-metal THRs with different femoral sizes of heads were implanted. A 57-year-old female patient underwent bilateral total hip replacements with metal-on-metal prostheses using metal-polyethylene "sandwich" liners 9 years ago on the right side and 7 years ago on the left side respectively. The only difference in both sides was the femoral head diameter of 28 mm in right and 34 mm in left. Seven years after the left surgery, the acetabular liner was dissociated, however, metallosis was not detected. Although the larger femoral head was thought to increase hip joint stability, it dictated a reduction in polyethylene thickness in this prosthesis design, and it was 4 mm in the left hip. Recently, metal-on-metal articulations are thought not to be optimal for hip joint bearing surface, however, this clinical failure was due to the polyethylene thickness and quality.

  19. Tribological characterisation of UHMWPE used in dual mobility total hip prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essefi, I.; Hakkouna, H.; Ouenzerfi, G.; Mollon, G.; Hamza, S.; Renault, E.; Berthier, Y.; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, A.-M.

    2016-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty represents an effective solution for bone and joint diseases. Nevertheless, the hip prosthesis has a limited lifetime, in the average around fifteen years. Their improvement, especially their dual mobility is the objective of this study. Therefore, our strategy is focused on improving the material by comparing three types of polyethylene to determine the best one from a friction mechanism and wear rate minimization standpoint. A dual mobility hip prosthesis, containing a two-sided steel and cobalt chrome cup, was tested with a TORNIER hip joint simulator in calf serum. The rubbed surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal fluorescence microscopy. All these multiscale characterization techniques (from nanoscale to millimeter and micro- scale) showed that the velocity accommodation mechanism is different from one type of polyethylene to another. The wear in the case of standard polyethylene was noticeable and the particles were large and scattered between the surface of polyethylene, the surface of the cup and in the calf serum. For the crosslinked polyethylene, the particles coming from the wear, were not as large, but they were spread the same way as the first case. Even though it shares the same accommodation principle on the detachment of the material with the crosslinked polyethylene the wear particles for the crosslinked vitaminized polyethylene were large and they were only found on the surface of the polyethylene.

  20. Implant survival and radiographic outcome of total hip replacement in patients less than 20 years old

    PubMed Central

    Tsukanaka, Masako; Halvorsen, Vera; Nordsletten, Lars; EngesæTer, Ingvild Ø; EngesæTer, Lars B; Marie Fenstad, Anne; Röhrl, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total hip replacement (THR) is not recommended for children and very young teenagers because early and repetitive revisions are likely. We investigated the clinical and radiographic outcomes of THR performed in children and teenage patients. Patients and methods We included 111 patients (132 hips) who underwent THR before 20 years of age. They were identified in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, together with information on the primary diagnosis, types of implants, and any revisions that required implant change. Radiographs and Harris hip score (HHS) were also evaluated. Results The mean age at primary THR was 17 (11–19) years and the mean follow-up time was 14 (3–26) years. The 10-year survival rate after primary THR (with the endpoint being any revision) was 70%. 39 patients had at least 1 revision and 16 patients had 2 or more revisions. In the latest radiographs, osteolysis and atrophy were observed in 19% and 27% of the acetabulae and 21% and 62% of the femurs, respectively. The mean HHS at the final follow-up was 83 (15–100). Interpretation The clinical score after THR in these young patients was acceptable, but many revisions had been performed. However, young patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip had lower implant survival. Moreover, the bone stock in these patients was poor, which could complicate future revisions. PMID:27435903

  1. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Implant Rupture after Surgery for Atypical Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Yu; Ochi, Hironori; Watari, Taiji; Matsumoto, Mikio; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Treatment methods for delayed union and nonunion of atypical femoral fracture are still controversial. Moreover, no treatment method has been established for implant rupture caused by delayed union and nonunion. We encountered a 74-year-old female in whom nonunion-induced implant rupture occurred after treatment of atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture with internal fixation using a long femoral nail. It was unlikely that sufficient fixation could be obtained by repeating osteosynthesis alone. Moreover, the patient was elderly and early weight-bearing activity was essential for early recovery of ADL. Based on these reasons, we selected one-stage surgery with total hip arthroplasty and osteosynthesis with inverted condylar locking plate as salvage procedures. Bone union was achieved at 6 months after surgery. This case illustrated that osteosynthesis-combined one-staged total hip arthroplasty could be considered as one of the options for nonunion-induced implant rupture of atypical femoral subtrochanteric fracture. PMID:27818818

  2. Continuous Quadratus Lumborum Block for Postoperative Pain in Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Margaret M; Hembrador, Sheena; Lee, Alex

    2016-09-15

    A 69-year-old man with a history of chronic pain and opioid use presented for total hip arthroplasty. In the interests of ensuring early mobilization and pain control, we chose a continuous quadratus lumborum block technique, a novel ultrasound-guided block that has not yet been described for total hip arthroplasty, hypothesizing that it would be motor-sparing. While the perineural catheter was infused, the patient required no IV opioids. He was able to ambulate on the first postoperative day, reporting pain scores between 0 and 3/10. The quadratus lumborum block is a promising technique that, in our patient, was motor-sparing and provided excellent pain control.

  3. Animal-associated bacteria, Erysipelotrix rhusiopathiae, as the cause of infection in a total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Troelsen, Andres; Møller, Jens K; Bolvig, Lars; Prynø, Thomas; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Søballe, Kjeld

    2010-04-01

    Invasive infection with animal-associated bacteria, Erysipelotrix rhusiopathiae, is unusual and has, to our knowledge, never been described as the cause of infected total hip arthroplasty. We describe how an infected total hip arthroplasty caused by these bacteria is eradicated using standard surgical and antibiotic treatment. Before 2-stage revision surgery, the patient had persistent groin pain, elevated C-reactive protein, radiographic periprosthetic osteolysis, excessive intra-articular fluid, and periprosthetic activity accumulation on the white cell scan. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin after confirmed sensitivity of E rhusiopathiae diagnosed by culture of five tissue samples and polymerase chain reaction of the prosthetic sonicate sample. Sixteen weeks after the last stage of revision surgery, there were no signs of reoccurring infection.

  4. Corrosion on the acetabular liner taper from retrieved modular metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, Trevor C; Dyrkacz, Richard M; Turgeon, Thomas R; Burnell, Colin D; Wyss, Urs P; Brandt, Jan-M

    2014-10-01

    Eight retrieved metal-on-metal total hip replacements displayed corrosion damage along the cobalt-chromium alloy liner taper junction with the Ti alloy acetabular shell. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the primary mechanism of corrosion to be grain boundary and associated crevice corrosion, which was likely accelerated through mechanical micromotion and galvanic corrosion resulting from dissimilar alloys. Coordinate measurements revealed up to 4.3mm(3) of the cobalt-chromium alloy taper surface was removed due to corrosion, which is comparable to previous reports of corrosion damage on head-neck tapers. The acetabular liner-shell taper appears to be an additional source of metal corrosion products in modular total hip replacements. Patients with these prostheses should be closely monitored for signs of adverse reaction towards corrosion by-products.

  5. Cobalt toxicity after revision total hip replacement due to fracture of a ceramic head.

    PubMed

    Pelayo-de Tomás, J M; Novoa-Parra, C; Gómez-Barbero, P

    2017-01-25

    Symptomatic cobalt toxicity from a failed total hip replacement is a rare, but devastating complication. Potential clinical findings include cardiomyopathy, hypothyroidism, skin rash, visual and hearing impairment, polycythaemia, weakness, fatigue, cognitive impairment, and neuropathy. The case is presented of a 74year-old man in whom, after a ceramic-ceramic replacement and two episodes of prosthetic dislocation, it was decided to replace it with a polyethylene-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA). At 6months after the revision he developed symptoms of cobalt toxicity, confirmed by analytical determination (serum cobalt level=651.2μg/L). After removal of the prosthesis, the levels of chromium and cobalt in blood and urine returned to normal, with the patient currently being asymptomatic. It is recommended to use a new ceramic on ceramic bearing at revision, in order to minimise the risk of wear-related cobalt toxicity following breakage of ceramic components.

  6. Revision of failed hip resurfacing to total hip arthroplasty rapidly relieves pain and improves function in the early post operative period

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the results of 25 consecutive patients who underwent revision of a hip resurfacing prosthesis to a total hip replacement. Revisions were performed for recurrent pain and effusion, infection and proximal femoral fractures. Both components were revised in 20 cases. There were 12 male and 13 female patients with average time to revision of 34.4 and 26.4 months respectively. The mean follow up period was 12.7 months (3 to 31). All patients reported relief of pain and excellent satisfaction scores. Two patients experienced stiffness up to three months post operatively. Pre operative Oxford, Harris and WOMAC hip scores were 39.1, 36.4 and 52.2 respectively. Mean post operative scores at last follow up were 17.4, 89.8 and 6.1 respectively (p < 0.001 for each score). These results show that conversion of hip resurfacing to total hip arthroplasty has high satisfaction rates. These results compare favourably with those for revision total hip arthroplasty. PMID:21114835

  7. Management strategies for infected total hip arthroplasty. A critical appreciation of problems and techniques.

    PubMed

    Karachalios, Theofilos; Koutalos, Antonios; Komnos, George

    2014-10-02

    Infection is a devastating complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Risk factors have been recognised and prevention is possible. The nature of the disease is heterogeneous and for satisfactory management one has to weigh factors related to pathogen, host, local soft tissue, bone stock, surgeon experience and financial resources. Available data in the current literature is of poor quality and there is a lack of data comparing different techniques. Referral of patients to dedicated departments with the appropriate facilities may be more appropriate.

  8. Fabrication and wear test of a continuous fiber/particulate composite total surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous fiber woven E-glass composite femoral shells having the ame elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle were tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these shells atriculating with the acetabular cups are comparable to a vitallium bal articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene cup.

  9. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  10. Modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov external fixator as a salvage method in the management of severely infected total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kliushin, Nikolai M; Ababkov, Yuri V; Ermakov, Artem M; Malkova, Tatiana A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resection arthroplasty or hip arthrodesis after total hip replacement (THR) can be used to salvage the limb in case with deep infection and severe bone loss. The Ilizarov fixator provides stability, axial correction, weight-bearing and good fusion rates. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively assessed the outcomes of 37 patients with severe periprosthetic infection after THR treated between 1999 and 2011. The treatment included implant removal, debridement and a modified Girdestone arthroplasty (29 cases) or hip arthrodesis (seven cases) using the Ilizarov fixator. The Ilizarov fixation continued from 45 to 50 days in the modified arthroplasty group and 90 days in the arthrodesis group. One case was treated using the conventional resection arthroplasty bilaterally. Results: Eighteen months after treatment, infection control was seen in 97.3% cases. Six hips were fused as one patient died in this group. Limb length discrepancy (LLD) averaged 5.5 cm. The Harris hip score ranged from 35 to 92 points. Hip joint motion ranged from 10° to 30° in the modified arthroplasty group. All subjects could walk independently or using support aids. No subluxation or LLD progression was observed. Conclusion: The modified Girdlestone arthroplasty and hip arthrodesis using the Ilizarov apparatus results in sufficient ability for ambulation and good infection control in cases of failed THR associated with severe infection. PMID:26955173

  11. Effectiveness of an Acetabular Positioning Device in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Stephen L.; Mologne, Timothy S.; Peterson, Drew A.; Holley, Keith A.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a commercially available acetabular positioning device, we performed a prospective evaluation of 40 consecutive patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty. All surgery was performed by the same surgeon, in the same operating room, and on the same operating table. The acetabular positioning device was designed to place the component in 45° of abduction. At 6 weeks, all radiographs were evaluated by 3 investigators not involved with the surgery. Each radiograph was evaluated by each reviewer on 3 separate occasions, blinded to the findings of the other reviewer to assess interobserver and intraobserver variability. The mean cup abduction angle was 42.1°, with a range from 23° to 57° (SD 8.3°). Intraobserver and interobserver variability were 0.2 and 0.3°, respectively. The findings of this study demonstrate a wide variability in acetabular cup placement in primary total hip arthroplasty. We believe this is due to movement of the pelvis, which may occur during preparation, draping, and retracting during surgery. We feel surgeons should not rely solely on positioning devices when implanting the acetabular component in total hip arthroplasty. Identification of bone landmarks and determination of superolateral implant coverage noted on preoperative templating is advocated to improve the precision of component position. PMID:18751812

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF THE SURGICAL APPROACH CONCERNING DISLOCATION IN TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Pires, André Fernandes; Lee, Bruno Takasaki; Leonhardt, Marcos Camargo; Ejnisman, Leandro; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Our primary aim was to evaluate the occurrence of dislocation of non-cemented total hip arthroplasty, when using the posterior and the direct lateral approaches. Methods: We performed a comparative retrospective study with 232 patients submitted to non-cemented total hip arthroplasty, due to the diagnosis of primary or secondary osteoarthritis. The posterior approach was used in 105 patients while direct lateral approach was used in 127 patients. There was only one prosthesis model and the same rehabilitation program and post-operative care was used for all patients. We checked the occurrence of dislocation, the acetabular positioning and also the size of the components. Results: There was only one case of dislocation, treated with closed reduction successfully. This was a 47 year-old female, submitted to direct lateral approach. The mean follow-up time for both groups was 23.7 months, ranging from six to 42 months. Conclusion: The authors conclude that the prevalence of total hip arthroplasty dislocation is similar for both approaches, and educational measures besides the use of a higher femoral offset seem to reduce the risk of this complication. PMID:27077060

  13. Radiation-blocking shields to localize periarticular radiation precisely for prevention of heterotopic bone formation around uncemented total hip arthroplasties

    SciTech Connect

    Jasty, M.; Schutzer, S.; Tepper, J.; Willett, C.; Stracher, M.A.; Harris, W.H. )

    1990-08-01

    Sixteen patients (18 hips) were treated with localized radiation therapy limited to periarticular regions surrounding the femoral neck by shielding the prosthesis and the adjacent regions to prevent heterotopic bone formation around the uncemented prosthesis. All hips received 1500 rads. Eight of these hips were irradiated after excising severe heterotopic bone, five because they developed extensive heterotopic ossification in the opposite hip, and five others because they were considered to be at high risk for developing heterotopic ossification. Only two of the 18 hips developed a small amount of heterotopic bone after localized periarticular radiation. All wounds healed primarily. No progressive radiolucencies developed at the bone-prosthesis interface. There was only one trochanteric nonunion of six trochanteric osteotomies. Localized periarticular radiation therapy with precision shielding of the prosthetic components and adjacent skeletal structures is an effective means to prevent heterotopic bone formation around cementless total hip arthroplasties. It also has the advantage of not adversely affecting the healing of the trochanteric osteotomy.

  14. Total hip arthroplasty after failed curved intertrochanteric varus osteotomy for avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Takegami, Yasuhiko; Komatsu, Daigo; Seki, Taisuke; Ishiguro, Naoki; Hasegawa, Yukiharu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curved intertrochanteric varus osteotomy (CVO) is one of the good surgical procedures for avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) patients. However, some patients with failed CVO are converted to total hip arthroplasty (THA) as a salvage operation. We compared the clinical and radiographic outcomes of 10 hips converted to THA after failed CVO (Group O) (mean age 43.0 years, 8 male and 2 female) with an age and gender matched control group of 20 hips that underwent primary THA for ANFH (Group C). Perioperative blood loss in Group O was significantly higher than that in Group C (535 g vs 282 g (P = 0.002)). Infection and dislocation occurred in 1 and 2 hips in Group O. There were no significant differences in both pre- and post-Harris Hip Score (HHS) between the groups. The stems in the AP radiograph were placed at 2.1° in a valgus position in Group O, whereas those in Group O were inserted at 1.0° in a varus position, a significant difference (P = 0.01). The stem alignment in the Lauenstein view in Group O was 1.2° in the extension position and in Group C was 0.4° in the flexion position, a significantly difference (P = 0.04). THA after failed CVO provides with the stem inserted in a valgus and extension position. Operative bleeding was increased. THA after failed CVO is a technically demanding arthroplasty. We believe that careful preoperative planning and preparation are necessary for this arthroplasty. PMID:27019530

  15. Correlation of corrosion and biomechanics in the retrieval of a single modular neck total hip arthroplasty design: modular neck total hip arthroplasty system.

    PubMed

    Lanting, Brent A; Teeter, Matthew G; Vasarhelyi, Edward M; Ivanov, Todor G; Howard, James L; Naudie, Douglas D R

    2015-01-01

    Increased modularity of total hip arthroplasty components has occurred, with theoretical advantages and disadvantages. Recent literature indicates the potential for elevated revision rates of modular neck systems and the potential for local pseudotumor and metallosis formation at the modular neck/stem site. Retrieval analysis of one modular neck implant design including SEM (SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY) assessment was done and correlated with FEA (finite element analysis) as well as clinical features of patient demographics, implant and laboratory analysis. Correlation of the consistent corrosion locations to FEA indicates that the material and design features of this system may result in a biomechanical reason for failure. The stem aspect of the modular neck/stem junction may be at particular risk.

  16. Cost of Radiotherapy Versus NSAID Administration for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Jonathan B. Chen, Sea S.; Shah, Anand P.; Coon, Alan B.; Dickler, Adam

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO), or abnormal bone formation, is a common sequela of total hip arthroplasty. This abnormal bone can impair joint function and must be surgically removed to restore mobility. HO can be prevented by postoperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use or radiotherapy (RT). NSAIDs are associated with multiple toxicities, including gastrointestinal bleeding. Although RT has been shown to be more efficacious than NSAIDs at preventing HO, its cost-effectiveness has been questioned. Methods and Materials: We performed an analysis of the cost of postoperative RT to the hip compared with NSAID administration, taking into account the costs of surgery for HO formation, treatment-induced morbidity, and productivity loss from missed work. The costs of RT, surgical revision, and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding were estimated using the 2007 Medicare Fee Schedule and inpatient diagnosis-related group codes. The cost of lost wages was estimated using the 2006 median salary data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Results: The cost of administering RT was estimated at $899 vs. $20 for NSAID use. After accounting for the additional costs associated with revision total hip arthroplasty and gastrointestinal bleeding, the corresponding estimated costs were $1,208 vs. $930. Conclusion: If the costs associated with treatment failure and treatment-induced morbidity are considered, the cost of NSAIDs approaches that of RT. Other NSAID morbidities and quality-of-life differences that are difficult to quantify add to the cost of NSAIDs. These considerations have led us to recommend RT as the preferred modality for use in prophylaxis against HO after total hip arthroplasty, even when the cost is considered.

  17. Late Nontraumatic Dissociation of the Femoral Head and Trunnion in a Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Simon J. M.; Khan, Wasim; Mellor, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background. Modular total hip arthroplasties are increasingly popular because customisation allows optimal restoration of patient biomechanics. However, the introduction of component interfaces provides greater opportunities for failure. We present a case of late nontraumatic dissociation of the head-neck interface, more than 10 years after insertion. Case Description. A 58-year-old woman had a left metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty in 2002 for hip dysplasia. Following an uneventful 10-year period, she presented to hospital in severe pain after standing from a seated position, and radiographs demonstrated complete dissociation of the modular femoral head from the stem, with the femoral head remaining in its cup. There was no prior trauma or infection. Mild wear and metallosis were present on the articulating surface between the femoral head and trunnion. Soft tissues were unaffected. Discussion and Conclusions. This is the latest occurrence reported to date for nontraumatic component failure in such an implant by more than 7 years. The majority of cases occur in the context of dislocation and attempted closed reduction. We analyse and discuss possible mechanisms for failure, aiming to raise awareness of this potential complication and encouraging utmost care in component handling and insertion, as well as the long term follow-up of such patients. PMID:26078899

  18. Correlation between patient age at total hip replacement surgery and lifeexpectancy.

    PubMed

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Crestani, Marcus Vinicius; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most cost-effective hip surgeries among orthopedic procedures. We conducted an extensive literature review with 5,394 papers regarding survival rates after THA. We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library from January 1(st), 1970 to July 31(th), 2014 looking for all citations about total hip arthroplasty with a long term follow-up (longer than 10 years). The criteria were rigorous: no loss of follow-up, and follow-up more than 10 years. The authors should have known the complete history of patients (whether the patient is alive or dead). Considering the criteria, we found only 15 papers. To evaluate the relationship between follow-up and survival, a linear regression analysis was applied. Considering the papers analysed, and applying the search criteria, we obtained a mean age for the patients above 57.5 years. The chance of survival at 15 years was 57.6%, at 20 years it was 34.6% and at 25 years it is only 11.6%. The relationship between follow-up and survival was significantly linear (p <0.001). Only 11.6% of patients undergoing THA will be still alive 25 years after the surgical procedure. Level of Evidence I, Prognostic Study.

  19. Bisphosphonate treatment for osteolysis in total hip arthroplasty. A report of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Carlo; Nava, Veronica; Mattavelli, Marta; Parra, Cleber Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aseptic loosening due to wear debris is the most frequent modality of failure in total hip arthroplasty. Bisphosphonates, a class of molecules which inhibit bone resorption showed an inhibitory effects on particles-induced osteolysis in vitro and in animal models. We report the clinical, radiographic and densitometric outcome of four postmenopausal women with total hip arthroplasty affected by peri-prosthetic osteolysis treated with neridronate due to their unwillingness to be operated. After neridronate treatment, there was general improvement in pain and function: VAS decrease 13 points (15%), the Harris Hip Score increase 9 points (15%). An average number of 3.3 x-ray per patients with an average follow-up of 23 months (range 12–34) were collected and evaluated. In all the patients except one, serial radiographs didn’t show any progression of radioluciencies lines or periprosthetic osteolysis. Bone density was evaluated by Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry after an average follow-up of 21 months (range 6–46 mo): periprosthetic BMD around the whole stem and the cup increased respectively 2.4% and 7.1%. Treatment was well tolerated and no significant side effects were registered. This retrospective collection of a small group of patients suggest that bisphosphonates should be clinically useful in preventing periprosthetic wear debris mediated osteolysis and claim for dedicated clinical trials. PMID:23858314

  20. Correlation between patient age at total hip replacement surgery and lifeexpectancy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann1, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Crestani, Marcus Vinicius; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most cost-effective hip surgeries among orthopedic procedures. We conducted an extensive literature review with 5,394 papers regarding survival rates after THA. We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library from January 1st, 1970 to July 31th, 2014 looking for all citations about total hip arthroplasty with a long term follow-up (longer than 10 years). The criteria were rigorous: no loss of follow-up, and follow-up more than 10 years. The authors should have known the complete history of patients (whether the patient is alive or dead). Considering the criteria, we found only 15 papers. To evaluate the relationship between follow-up and survival, a linear regression analysis was applied. Considering the papers analysed, and applying the search criteria, we obtained a mean age for the patients above 57.5 years. The chance of survival at 15 years was 57.6%, at 20 years it was 34.6% and at 25 years it is only 11.6%. The relationship between follow-up and survival was significantly linear (p <0.001). Only 11.6% of patients undergoing THA will be still alive 25 years after the surgical procedure. Level of Evidence I, Prognostic Study. PMID:27057147

  1. The fate of osteophytes in the superolateral region of the acetabulum after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuanqing; Yu, Degang; Xu, Chen; Liu, Fengxiang; Li, Huiwu; Zhu, Zhenan

    2014-12-01

    Acetabular osteophytes are common during total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, the fate and role of superolateral osteophytes of the acetabulum after THA remain unclear. The present study reviewed a series of radiographic changes in the osteophytes on the superolateral region of the acetabulum in 35 hips. The mean follow-up period was 42.2months. The results revealed that the osteophytes that were not in contact with the superolateral edge of acetabular cup were gradually absorbed after THA. In contrast, the osteophytes that were in contact with the superolateral edge of the acetabular cup underwent remodeling, formed regular trabecula, were stress bearing, and eventually integrated with the acetabular cup and the original acetabular bone, and should play a role in stabilizing the acetabular cup.

  2. Effect of femoral offset on pain and function after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Kevin A; Noticewala, Manish S; Macaulay, William; Lee, Jonathan H; Geller, Jeffrey A

    2012-12-01

    The effects of altering patients' femoral offset (FO) during total hip arthroplasty on postoperative pain and function have not been well described. This study compared clinical outcomes as assessed by the Short Form 12 Health Survey and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index between patients who had their FOs restored to varying degrees (compared to the contralateral normal hip [CL]). We retrospectively measured postoperative FOs on standard anteroposterior pelvis radiographs and compared to the CL. Patients were categorized into one of 3 groups: decreased offset (< -5 mm compared to CL), normal offset (between -5 and +5 mm), and increased offset (> +5 mm). The decreased offset group exhibited Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index Physical Function scores that were less than those of the normal offset and increased offset groups (72.03, 82.23, and 79.51, respectively [P = .019]). In conclusion, reducing a patients' native FO led to inferior functional outcome scores.

  3. Trochanteric bursitis after total hip arthroplasty: incidence and evaluation of response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Kevin W; Jones, Lynne C; Brownson, Kirstyn E; Khanuja, Harpal S; Hungerford, Marc W

    2010-02-01

    We examined the efficacy of corticosteroid injection as treatment for postarthroplasty trochanteric bursitis and the risk factors for failure of nonoperative treatment. There were 32 (4.6%) cases of postsurgical trochanteric bursitis in 689 primary total hip arthroplasties. Of the 25 hips with follow-up, 11 (45%) required multiple injections. Symptoms resolved in 20 (80%) but persisted in 5. We found no statistically significant differences between patients who did and did not develop trochanteric bursitis, or between those who did and did not respond to treatment. There was a trend toward younger age and greater limb-length discrepancy in nonresponders. In conclusion, (1) corticosteroid injection(s) for postoperative trochanteric bursitis is effective; and (2) nonoperative management may be more likely to fail in young patients and those with leg-length discrepancy.

  4. Current Concepts of Using Large Femoral Heads in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Kee; Kim, Jae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Instability and dislocation after total hip arthroplasty are the most common causes of revisions and major complications for failure of inserted prostheses, leading to a reduction in quality of life. Because the use of artificial femoral head sizes smaller than patient's own size is the important cause for dislocation, the use of large femoral head have increased. Femoral head sizes greater than 32 mm offer multiple advantages in physical function and activity levels of patients by improving hip stability, decreasing dislocation rate and increasing range of motion. However, various concerns are encountered including wear debris generation at the trunnion-bore interface and increases in frictional torque and stress over the component-bone interface when using larger head sizes. So, the use of femoral head sizes less than 40 mm is recommended. PMID:27777915

  5. Acetabular distraction: an alternative approach to pelvic discontinuity in failed total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Brown, N M; Hellman, M; Haughom, B H; Shah, R P; Sporer, S M; Paprosky, W G

    2014-11-01

    A pelvic discontinuity occurs when the superior and inferior parts of the hemi-pelvis are no longer connected, which is difficult to manage when associated with a failed total hip replacement. Chronic pelvic discontinuity is found in 0.9% to 2.1% of hip revision cases with risk factors including severe pelvic bone loss, female gender, prior pelvic radiation and rheumatoid arthritis. Common treatment options include: pelvic plating with allograft, cage reconstruction, custom triflange implants, and porous tantalum implants with modular augments. The optimal technique is dependent upon the degree of the discontinuity, the amount of available bone stock and the likelihood of achieving stable healing between the two segments. A method of treating pelvic discontinuity using porous tantalum components with a distraction technique that achieves both initial stability and subsequent long-term biological fixation is described.

  6. Streptococcus gordonii—a rare cause of prosthetic joint infection in a total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Fenelon, Christopher; Galbraith, John G.; Dalton, David M.; Masterson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with a history of bilateral total hip replacements presented with rigors, fever and sudden onset left groin pain. A pelvic X-ray showed well-fixed implants. Blood results revealed a leucocytosis (white cell count 22.3 × 109 l–1) and elevated C-reactive protein (211 mg/l). Ultrasound-guided aspiration of her left hip grew Streptococcus gordonii. No source infection could be identified apart from a new chronic sinus infection in a left upper incisor. Following a discussion with the patient a 6-week course of intravenous ceftriaxone was started and was successful in normalizing her inflammatory markers. She was placed on long-term suppressive amoxicillin following this. Her suppressive antibiotic therapy was complicated by the development of a clostridium difficile infection and her antibiotics were changed to doxycycline. At 1-year follow-up, she was asymptomatic with no further episodes of groin pain or fever. PMID:28096320

  7. Economic impact of tranexamic acid in healthy patients undergoing primary total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gillette, Blake P; Maradit Kremers, Hilal; Duncan, Christopher M; Smith, Hugh M; Trousdale, Robert T; Pagnano, Mark W; Sierra, Rafael J

    2013-09-01

    Tranexamic acid (TA) has been shown to reduce perioperative blood loss and blood transfusion. While concern remains about the cost of antifibrinolytic medication, we hypothesized that routine use of tranexamic acid would result in lower direct hospital total cost by decreasing costs associated with blood transfusion, laboratory testing, and room & board. Patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class II or less undergoing primary total hip or knee arthroplasty at a single institution during 2007-2008 were retrospectively reviewed. The estimated mean direct hospital total cost, operating room, blood/lab, room & board, and pharmacy costs were compared between patients who did and did not receive TA. The study population included 1018 patients, and 580 patients received TA. The mean direct total cost of hospitalization with and without TA was $15,099 and $15,978 (P<.0002) respectively, a difference of $879. The only increased cost associated with TA was the pharmacy cost which was $921 versus $781 (P<.0001). The routine use of tranexamic acid TA was associated with lower mean direct hospital total costs after primary total hip and knee arthroplasty as the increase in pharmacy costs was more than offset by cost savings in other categories.

  8. Fatal fat embolism following femoral head resection in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Walker, N M; Bateson, T; Reavley, P; Prakash, D

    2008-01-01

    We report a rare complication during primary total hip arthroplasty. A fatal fat pulmonary embolism immediately followed removal of the femoral head, prior to further preparation of the acetabulum or femoral shaft. Fat embolism syndrome is a well-known complication during total joint arthroplasty, usually attributed to preparation of the femoral shaft, particularly intramedullary reaming and insertion of the prosthesis. These risk factors have previously been identified in the literature. We believe that this case highlights the need for further research to establish the intramedullary pressures during the processes of dislocation and resection of the femoral neck and the attendant risk.

  9. Citrobacter koseri as a cause of early periprosthetic infection after primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Adam M; Watters, Tyler Steven; Henderson, Robert A; Wellman, Samuel S; Bolognesi, Michael P

    2011-09-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection in the acute setting is usually caused by gram-positive species and remains a major problem facing total joint surgeons. We report a case of a 53-year-old male who presented with drainage 3 weeks after primary total hip arthroplasty. Citrobacter koseri was cultured from an infected hematoma in his deep tissues. Surgical treatment included irrigation and debridement with femoral head and liner exchange. He received a 6-week course of ertapenem and is currently asymptomatic. We present C. koseri as a rare cause of acute periprosthetic infection and offer an effective treatment protocol.

  10. Responsiveness and ceiling effects of the Forgotten Joint Score-12 following total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Giesinger, J. M.; MacDonald, D. J.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.; Howie, C. R.; Giesinger, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the responsiveness and ceiling/floor effects of the Forgotten Joint Score -12 and to compare these with that of the more widely used Oxford Hip Score (OHS) in patients six and 12 months after primary total hip arthroplasty. Methods We prospectively collected data at six and 12 months following total hip arthroplasty from 193 patients undergoing surgery at a single centre. Ceiling effects are outlined with frequencies for patients obtaining the lowest or highest possible score. Change over time from six months to 12 months post-surgery is reported as effect size (Cohen’s d). Results The mean OHS improved from 40.3 (sd 7.9) at six months to 41.9 (sd 7.2) at 12 months. The mean FJS-12 improved from 56.8 (sd 30.1) at six months to 62.1 (sd 29.0) at 12 months. At six months, 15.5% of patients reached the best possible score (48 points) on the OHS and 8.3% obtained the best score (100 points) on the FJS-12. At 12 months, this percentage increased to 20.8% for the OHS and to 10.4% for the FJS-12. In terms of the effect size (Cohen’s d), the change was d = 0.10 for the OHS and d = 0.17 for the FJS-12. Conclusions The FJS-12 is more responsive to change between six and 12 months following total hip arthroplasty than is the OHS, with the measured ceiling effect for the OHS twice that of the FJS-12. The difference in effect size of change results in substantial differences in required sample size if aiming to detect change between these two time points. This has important implications for powering clinical trials with patient-reported measures as the primary outcome. Cite this article: Dr D. F. Hamilton. Responsiveness and ceiling effects of the Forgotten Joint Score-12 following total hip arthroplasty. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:87–91. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.53.2000480. PMID:26965167

  11. Monocular Vision- and IMU-Based System for Prosthesis Pose Estimation During Total Hip Replacement Surgery.

    PubMed

    Su, Shaojie; Zhou, Yixin; Wang, Zhihua; Chen, Hong

    2017-03-30

    The average age of population increases worldwide, so does the number of total hip replacement surgeries. Total hip replacement, however, often involves a risk of dislocation and prosthetic impingement. To minimize the risk after surgery, we propose an instrumented hip prosthesis that estimates the relative pose between prostheses intraoperatively and ensures the placement of prostheses within a safe zone. We create a model of the hip prosthesis as a ball and socket joint, which has four degrees of freedom (DOFs), including 3-DOF rotation and 1-DOF translation. We mount a camera and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) inside the hollow ball, or "femoral head prosthesis," while printing customized patterns on the internal surface of the socket, or "acetabular cup." Since the sensors were rigidly fixed to the femoral head prosthesis, measuring its motions poses a sensor ego-motion estimation problem. By matching feature points in images of the reference patterns, we propose a monocular vision based method with a relative error of less than 7% in the 3-DOF rotation and 8% in the 1-DOF translation. Further, to reduce system power consumption, we apply the IMU with its data fused by an extended Kalman filter to replace the camera in the 3-DOF rotation estimation, which yields a less than 4.8% relative error and a 21.6% decrease in power consumption. Experimental results show that the best approach to prosthesis pose estimation is a combination of monocular vision-based translation estimation and IMU-based rotation estimation, and we have verified the feasibility and validity of this system in prosthesis pose estimation.

  12. Th1 type lymphocyte reactivity to metals in patients with total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hallab, Nadim James; Caicedo, Marco; Finnegan, Alison; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2008-01-01

    Background All prostheses with metallic components release metal debris that can potentially activate the immune system. However, implant-related metal hyper-reactivity has not been well characterized. In this study, we hypothesized that adaptive immunity reaction(s), particularly T-helper type 1 (Th1) responses, will be dominant in any metal-reactivity responses of patients with total joint replacements (TJAs). We tested this hypothesis by evaluating lymphocyte reactivity to metal "ions" in subjects with and without total hip replacements, using proliferation assays and cytokine analysis. Methods Lymphocytes from young healthy individuals without an implant or a history of metal allergy (Group 1: n = 8) were used to assess lymphocyte responses to metal challenge agents. In addition, individuals (Group 2: n = 15) with well functioning total hip arthroplasties (average Harris Hip Score = 91, average time in-situ 158 months) were studied. Age matched controls with no implants were also used for comparison (Group 3, n = 8, 4 male, 4 female average age 70, range 49–80). Group 1 subjects' lymphocyte proliferation response to Aluminum+3, Cobalt+2, Chromium+3, Copper+2, Iron+3, Molybdenum+5, Manganeese+2, Nickel+2, Vanadium+3 and Sodium+2 chloride solutions at a variety of concentrations (0.0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 10.0 mM) was studied to establish toxicity thresholds. Mononuclear cells from Group 2 and 3 subjects were challenged with 0.1 mM CrCl3, 0.1 mM NiCl2, 0.1 mM CoCl2 and approx. 0.001 mM titanium and the reactions measured with proliferation assays and cytokine analysis to determine T-cell subtype prominence. Results Primary lymphocytes from patients with well functioning total hip replacements demonstrated a higher incidence and greater magnitude of reactivity to chromium than young healthy controls (p < 0.03). Of the 15 metal ion-challenged subjects with well functioning total hip arthroplasties, 7 demonstrated a proliferative response to Chromium, Nickel

  13. Exercise therapy may postpone total hip replacement surgery in patients with hip osteoarthritis: a long-term follow-up of a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Svege, Ida; Nordsletten, Lars; Fernandes, Linda; Risberg, May Arna

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise treatment is recommended for all patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA), but its effect on the long-term need for total hip replacement (THR) is unknown. Methods We conducted a long-term follow-up of a randomised trial investigating the efficacy of exercise therapy and patient education versus patient education only on the 6-year cumulative survival of the native hip to THR in 109 patients with symptomatic and radiographic hip OA. Results regarding the primary outcome measure of the trial, self-reported pain at 16 months follow-up, have been reported previously. Results There were no group differences at baseline. The response rate at follow-up was 94%. 22 patients in the group receiving both exercise therapy and patient education and 31 patients in the group receiving patient education only underwent THR during the follow-up period, giving a 6-year cumulative survival of the native hip of 41% and 25%, respectively (p=0.034). The HR for survival of the native hip was 0.56 (CI 0.32 to 0.96) for the exercise therapy group compared with the control group. Median time to THR was 5.4 and 3.5 years, respectively. The exercise therapy group had better self-reported hip function prior to THR or end of study, but no significant differences were found for pain and stiffness. Conclusions Our findings in this explanatory study suggest that exercise therapy in addition to patient education can reduce the need for THR by 44% in patients with hip OA. ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00319423 (original project protocol) and NCT01338532 (additional protocol for long-term follow-up). PMID:24255546

  14. A case report of severely damaged hip joint caused by SAPHO syndrome treated with 2-stage total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Ingwon; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Youn-Soo; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome is an increasingly recognized entity. The hip joint is known as a less frequently affected site in SAPHO syndrome, and there has been limited reports about hip joint diseases caused by SAPHO syndrome, and as such adequate treatment for this disease spectrum is still not fully elucidated. Case: We describe the case of a 52-year-old man admitted for SAPHO syndrome who went on to be diagnosed with advanced secondary hip arthritis associated with disabling right hip pain. The diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome was delayed; the patient was given a clinical diagnosis of osteomyelitis and treated with prolonged courses of antibiotics and open surgical debridement at previous tertiary health facility. The patient underwent 2-stage joint replacement surgery in our hospital. At 1 year after the surgery, he is well, with minimal right hip pain and the prosthesis is functioning well. Conclusion: This case shows the safety and effectiveness of the 2-stage joint replacement in treating destructive hip disease caused by SAPHO syndrome mimicking infectious arthritis. PMID:27399138

  15. Case report of early aseptic loosening of total hip arthroplasty in monostotic paget disease, a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Crego-Vita, Diana; Aedo-Martín, Daniel; Sánchez-Pérez, Coral

    2016-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone is a localised chronic osteopathy which produces bone deformities, bone hypervascularity, structural weakness and altered joint biomechanics. Although radiological diagnosis of Paget's disease of bone is usually straightforward, monostotic cases may potentially raise specific problems which require invasive and expensive procedures such as bone biopsies. The pelvis and upper femur are frequently affected, resulting in disabling hip disease that may require total hip arthroplasty. We report a case of Paget disease of bone in an 84-year-old woman, which was initially identified as avascular necrosis of the hip, reason for which she underwent total hip arthroplasty. During follow up, the patient complained about hip pain and in a few months she was not able to walk because of an early loosening with bone destruction. Radiological and laboratory exams were carried out with normal results except for alkaline phosphatase (AP). After treatment with biphosphonates hip pain relieved but hip reconstruction was not possible. In this paper we present an early aseptic loosening of hip arthroplasty due to monostotic Paget's disease of bone, a rare ethiology of loosening which poses particular diagnostic difficulties prompting an excessive use of excisional biopsies.

  16. Experience with Designing and Implementing a Bundled Payment Program for Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, Winthrop F.; Lagu, Tara; Krushell, Robert J.; Lehman, Andrew P.; Greenbaum, Jordan; McGirr, Joan; Pekow, Penelope S.; Calcasola, Stephanie; Benjamin, Evan; Mayforth, Janice; Lindenauer, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bundled payments, also known as episode-based payments, are intended to contain health care costs and promote quality. In 2011 a bundled payment pilot program for total hip replacement was implemented by an integrated health care delivery system in conjunction with a commercial health plan subsidiary. In July 2015 the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model to test bundled payment for hip and knee replacement. Methods Stakeholders were identified and a structure for program development and implementation was created. An Oversight Committee provided governance over a Clinical Model Subgroup and a Financial Model Subgroup. Results The pilot program included (1) a clinical model of care encompassing the period from the preoperative evaluation through the third postoperative visit, (2) a pricing model, (3) a program to share savings, and (4) a patient engagement and expectation strategy. Compared to 32 historical controls— patients treated before bundle implementation—45 post-bundle-implementation patients with total hip replacement had a similar length of hospital stay (3.0 versus 3.4 days, p = .24), higher rates of discharge to home or home with services than to a rehabilitation facility (87% versus 63%), similar adjusted median total payments ($22,272 versus $22,567, p = .43), and lower median posthospital payments ($704 versus $1,121, p = .002), and were more likely to receive guideline-consistent care (99% versus 95%, p = .05). Discussion The bundled payment pilot program was associated with similar total costs, decreased posthospital costs, fewer discharges to rehabilitation facilities, and improved quality. Successful implementation of the program hinged on buy-in from stakeholders and close collaboration between stakeholders and the clinical and financial teams. PMID:26289235

  17. Determinants of return to work 12 months after total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Leichtenberg, C S; Tilbury, C; Kuijer, Ppfm; Verdegaal, Shm; Wolterbeek, R; Nelissen, Rghh; Frings-Dresen, Mhw; Vliet Vlieland, Tpm

    2016-07-01

    Introduction A substantial number of patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA) do not or only partially return to work. This study aimed to identify differences in determinants of return to work in THA and TKA. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of working patients aged <65 years undergoing THA or TKA for osteoarthritis. The primary outcome was full versus partial or no return to work 12 months postoperatively. Factors analysed included preoperative sociodemographic and work characteristics, alongside the Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS)/Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Oxford Hip and Knee Scores. Results Of 67 THA and 56 TKA patients, 9 (13%) and 10 (19%), respectively, returned partially and 5 (7%) and 6 (11%), respectively, did not return to work 1 year postoperatively. Preoperative factors associated with partial or no return to work in THA patients were self-employment, absence from work and a better HOOS Activities of Daily Living (ADL) subscale score, whereas only work absence was relevant in TKA patients. Type of surgery modified the impact of ADL scores on return to work. Conclusions In both THA and TKA, absence from work affected return to work, whereas self-employment and better preoperative ADL subscale scores were also associated in THA patients. The impact of ADL scores on return to work was modified by type of surgery. These results suggest that strategies aiming to influence modifiable factors should consider THA and TKA separately.

  18. Determinants of return to work 12 months after total hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, C; Kuijer, PPFM; Verdegaal, SHM; Wolterbeek, R; Nelissen, RGHH; Frings-Dresen, MHW; Vliet Vlieland, TPM

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A substantial number of patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA) do not or only partially return to work. This study aimed to identify differences in determinants of return to work in THA and TKA. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of working patients aged <65 years undergoing THA or TKA for osteoarthritis. The primary outcome was full versus partial or no return to work 12 months postoperatively. Factors analysed included preoperative sociodemographic and work characteristics, alongside the Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS)/Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Oxford Hip and Knee Scores. Results Of 67 THA and 56 TKA patients, 9 (13%) and 10 (19%), respectively, returned partially and 5 (7%) and 6 (11%), respectively, did not return to work 1 year postoperatively. Preoperative factors associated with partial or no return to work in THA patients were self-employment, absence from work and a better HOOS Activities of Daily Living (ADL) subscale score, whereas only work absence was relevant in TKA patients. Type of surgery modified the impact of ADL scores on return to work. Conclusions In both THA and TKA, absence from work affected return to work, whereas self-employment and better preoperative ADL subscale scores were also associated in THA patients. The impact of ADL scores on return to work was modified by type of surgery. These results suggest that strategies aiming to influence modifiable factors should consider THA and TKA separately. PMID:27138849

  19. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR.

  20. High Re-Operation Rates Using Conserve Metal-On-Metal Total Hip Articulations

    PubMed Central

    Mogensen, S.L.; Jakobsen, T.; Christoffersen, H.; Krarup, N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Metal-on-metal hip articulations have been intensely debated after reports of adverse reactions and high failure rates. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the implant of a metal-on.metal total hip articulation (MOM THA) from a single manufacture in a two-center study. Materials and Methods: 108 CONSERVE® MOM THA were implanted in 92 patients between November 2005 and December 2010. Patients had at time of retrospective evaluation their journals reviewed for re-operations and adverse reactions. Results: 20 hips were re-operated (18.4%) at a mean follow up of 53 months. 4 pseudotumors were diagnosed at time of follow up but no substantiated link was made between adverse reactions and re-operations. Conclusion: The high re-operation rates found in this study raised concern about the usage of the MOM THA and subsequently lead to the termination of implantation of this MOM THA at the two orthopaedic departments. PMID:27099640

  1. The capsule's contribution to total hip construct stability--a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Jacob M; Stroud, Nicholas J; Rudert, M James; Tochigi, Yuki; Pedersen, Douglas R; Ellis, Benjamin J; Callaghan, John J; Weiss, Jeffrey A; Brown, Thomas D

    2011-11-01

    Instability is a significant concern in total hip arthroplasty (THA), particularly when there is structural compromise of the capsule due to pre-existing pathology or due to necessities of surgical approach. An experimentally grounded fiber-direction-based finite element model of the hip capsule was developed, and was integrated with an established three-dimensional model of impingement/dislocation. Model validity was established by close similarity to results from a cadaveric experiment in a servohydraulic hip simulator. Parametric computational runs explored effects of graded levels of capsule thickness, of regional detachment from the capsule's femoral or acetabular insertions, of surgical incisions of capsule substance, and of capsule defect repairs. Depending strongly upon the specific site, localized capsule defects caused varying degrees of construct stability compromise, with several specific situations involving over 60% decrement in dislocation resistance. Construct stability was returned substantially toward intact-capsule levels following well-conceived repairs, although the suture sites involved were often at substantial risk of failure. These parametric model results underscore the importance of retaining or robustly repairing capsular structures in THA, in order to maximize overall construct stability. 

  2. [Superficial femoral vein thrombosis due to large psoas bursitis secondary to particle disease in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Lax-Pérez, R; Salinas-Gilabert, J E; Lajara-Marco, F; Lax-Pérez, A; Corraliza-Zamorano, A; García-Gálvez, A; Izquierdo-Plazas, L

    2012-01-01

    Male, 76 year-old patient with a history of total hip arthroplasty who presents with a mass in the iliac fossa with swelling of the thigh and hip pain upon flexion and extension. Complementary ultrasound and computed tomography scan studies show a giant lobulated cystic mass in the left iliac fossa, 7 cm in diameter, near the prosthesis. Cyst formation caused by polyethylene disease after total hip arthroplasty is infrequent. We present a case of large psoas bursitis secondary to the release of polyethylene particles which caused superficial femoral vein compression and thrombosis.

  3. [Thrombosis of the superficial femoral vein due to psoas bursitis secondary to particle disease in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Lax-Pérez, R; Salinas-Gilabert, J E; Lajara-Marco, F; Lax-Pérez, A; Corraliza-Zamorano, A; García-Gálvez, A; Izquierdo-Plazas, L

    2011-01-01

    The case of a male 76 year-old patient with a history of total hip replacement surgery is presented herein. The patient had tumors in the iliac fossa with swelling of the thigh and pain upon hip flexion and extension. The complementary ultrasound and computed tomography show a large lobed cystic tumor in the left iliac fossa, 7 cm in diameter, close to the prosthesis. The diagnosis was psoas bursitis secondary to the release of polyethylene particles that caused compression and thrombosis of the superficial femoral vein. Cyst formation caused by polyethylene disease after total hip arthroplasty is infrequent.

  4. Identifying clinically meaningful benchmarks for gait improvement after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C

    2016-01-01

    There are no established benchmarks for gait mechanics after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This study sought to identify minimum clinically important postoperative (MCIP) or minimum clinically important improvement (MCII) values for self-selected walking speed, sagittal plane dynamic hip range of motion (HROM) (peak flexion-peak extension) and peak hip adduction moments measured during quantitative gait analysis. Preoperative and 1-year postoperative data collected during quantitative gait analysis, along with Harris Hip Scores (HHS), for 145 subjects were collected from a motion analysis data repository. The MCIP (or MCII) was defined as the 75th percentile mark on a plot of the cumulative percent of subjects with HHS ≥ 80 versus the postoperative value (or change) in the respective variable. 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Logistic regression was used to test the association of age, sex, BMI, and preoperative HHS with benchmarks. The MCIP of speed was 1.34 m/s (95%CI 1.30, 1.37); MCII was 0.32 (0.30, 0.35) m/s. The HROM MCIP was 30.0° (29.4°, 30.7°); MCII was 13.3° (12.1°, 14.8°). The adduction moment MCIP was 4.2% Body Weight × Height (4.0, 4.4); MCII was 0.87 (0.57, 1.17) % Body Weight × Height. Women were more likely to achieve MCII for HROM and MCIP for adduction moment (ORs 2.4-11.6, p ≤ 0.031). Lower BMI predicted HROM and adduction moment MCIPs (ORs 0.85-0.88, p ≤ 0.015). Lower preoperative HHS predicted speed, HROM and adduction moment MCIIs (ORs 0.95-0.97, p ≤ 0.012). With further validation, clinically-relevant gait benchmarks can enhance efforts to improve THA outcomes.

  5. A Smart Tool for Intraoperative Leg Length Targeting in Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Paul; Snider, Matthew; Muir, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leg length discrepancies following total hip arthroplasty (THA) may necessitate subsequent interventions, from heel lifts to revision surgery. Current intraoperative methods of determining leg length are either inaccurate or expensive and invasive. Objective: The objective of the current study was to investigate the ability of a novel, intraoperative smart tool (Intellijoint HIP®, Intellijoint Surgical®, Inc., Waterloo, ON) to provide accurate, real-time leg length measurements during THA. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 25 patients who underwent THA utilizing the Intellijoint HIP smart tool between February and August 2014. Intraoperative leg length data was compared with radiographic leg length calculations. Two observers blinded to the Intellijoint HIP findings independently assessed all post-procedure radiographs. Results: The mean difference between smart tool and radiographic measurements was 1.3 mm [CI: -0.1, 2.7]. 88% (22/25) of intraoperative measurements were within 5 mm of radiographic measurements; 100% (25/25) were within 10 mm. A Bland-Altman analysis showed excellent agreement, with 96% (24/25) of measurements within the statistical limit for acceptable agreement, and 84% (21/25) within the clinically acceptable range (± 5 mm). Removal of the first 13 procedures (surgeon training) decreased the mean difference between methods to 0.6 mm [-0.6, 1.9]. All post-training procedures were associated with a difference of <5 mm. There were no reported adverse events related to the use of the smart tool. Conclusion: The Intellijoint HIP smart tool is a safe and accurate tool for providing intraoperative measurements of leg length in real-time. PMID:27843511

  6. Primary ileus after total hip arthroplasty: rare complication or sentinel event?

    PubMed

    Vannelli, Alberto; Laveneziana, Domenico; Rampa, Mario; Battaglia, Luigi; Leo, Ermanno

    2011-09-01

    The incidence of hip dislocation after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been reported to range from 1 to 25% in THA revision. Here, we explore the hypothesis that there is a correlation between postoperative ileus (POI) and THA dislocation, with POI after THA possibly representing a sentinel event. We retrospectively identified a cohort of 529 consecutive patients who underwent hip arthroplasty from 2008 to 2010. Of them, 251 were male and 278 were female, and a mean average for age of 71.5 (range 65-76). In particular, 19 THA patients showed signs of gastrointestinal complications, and therapeutic consultation was performed with the onset of the first intestinal symptom. Of these 19 patients, 3 THA patients developed POI within 1 week after surgical treatment. A conservative treatment was practised and it seemed to improve the condition: canalization returned and all patients were discharged from the hospital. Unfortunately, two of these patients were readmitted after 2 weeks due to THA dislocation and they underwent THA revision and were discharged from the hospital 7 days later. Follow-up revealed no further problems at 6 months. Our clinical experience with these post-THA primary ileus patients raises the possibility that intra-abdominal symptoms represent a sentinel event in THA dislocation. THA dislocation using neuronal pathway of immunomodulation may modulate POI. Since the risk of THA dislocation is the greatest in the first 3 months after hip arthroplasty, the surgeon should be familiar with the relationship between THA and various pelvic and visceral complications to ensure that POI remains only a rare complication.

  7. Simple, hybrid deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolus prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ward, W G; Olin, M D

    1999-01-01

    A 7.1% deep venous thrombosis rate followed total hip arthroplasty in 56 patients using a hybrid prophylactic regimen against deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolus. There were no bleeding complications, no symptomatic pulmonary emboli, and no unexplained deaths. The regimen consisted of an initial loading dose of warfarin, usually 10 mg, the night of surgery followed by 2.5 mg/day for 3 weeks, with dosage adjustments only in cases of over-anticoagulation. This regimen was combined with elevated sling suspension of the operative leg, bilateral pedal intermittent pneumatic compression devices, and early mobilization. This prophylactic regimen is simple, inexpensive, efficacious, and compatible with an early hospital discharge.

  8. Titanium-copper-nitride coated spacers for two-stage revision of infected total hip endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Haenle, Maximilian; Lenz, Robert; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Within the first two years after total hip arthroplasty implant-associated infection has become the second most common reason for a revision surgery. Two-stage implant exchange is frequently conducted using temporary spacers made of antibiotic-loaded cement in order to prevent a bacterial colonization on the spacer. Avoiding several disadvantages of cement spacers, a conventional hemi-endoprosthesis was equipped with a copper-containing implant coating for inhibition of bacterial biofilms. In the present paper details of this novel treatment concept are presented including a case report. PMID:22242097

  9. Conversion of failed proximal femoral internal fixation to total hip arthroplasty in osteopetrotic bone.

    PubMed

    Ramiah, Reagon D; Baker, Richard P; Bannister, Gordon C

    2006-12-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare disease. When fractures are encountered, fixation is extremely difficult. A 38-year-old man with osteopetrosis who sustained a displaced Pauwels type IV fracture with 3 failed internal fixations required total hip arthroplasty. Two main problems were perceived during preoperative planning: the removal of failed and broken metalwork and reaming of the tight intramedullary canal to allow seating of the femoral stem. We present technical solutions to aid the surgeon in the management of this difficult type of case using custom-made tungsten carbide instrumentation.

  10. Titanium-copper-nitride coated spacers for two-stage revision of infected total hip endoprostheses.

    PubMed

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Haenle, Maximilian; Lenz, Robert; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Within the first two years after total hip arthroplasty implant-associated infection has become the second most common reason for a revision surgery. Two-stage implant exchange is frequently conducted using temporary spacers made of antibiotic-loaded cement in order to prevent a bacterial colonization on the spacer. Avoiding several disadvantages of cement spacers, a conventional hemi-endoprosthesis was equipped with a copper-containing implant coating for inhibition of bacterial biofilms. In the present paper details of this novel treatment concept are presented including a case report.

  11. Cementless total hip arthroplasty in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: A retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Zeng, Min; Xie, Jie; Wen, Ting; Hu, Yihe

    2017-01-01

    Controversies on the surgical protocols and efficacies of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) still exist. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the perioperative managements and their outcomes related to performing THA on patients with AS.Data of 54 AS patients who underwent 81 THAs between 2008 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and imaging data were collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and during the follow-up period for surgical efficacy.Using posterolateral approach, cementless prostheses were selected in all cases. Mean follow-up period was 3.6 years (range, 2-8 years). Inclinations and anteversions of acetabular cups were 36.3°±4.5° (range, 30°-50°) and 12.3°±4.9° (range, 0°-25°) respectively. Mean visual analog scale (VAS) score decreased from 6.7 ± 2.1 (range, 4-10) preoperatively to 1.5 ± 1.0 (range, 0-4) at final follow-up, and mean Harris hip score (HHS) improved from 31.2 ± 11.6 (range, 15-45) to 86.1 ± 4.3 (range, 80-95) (P < 0.05). Postoperative range of motion (ROM) in flexion was improved from 6.7°±13.5° (range, 0°-50°) preoperatively to 82.5°±6.4° (range, 70°-100°) at final follow-up, and ROM in extension was improved from 1.8°±5.7°(range, 0°-15°) to 15.4°±2.6° (range, 10°-20°) (P < 0.05). Heterotopic ossification (HO) was documented in 9 hips (11.1%). Signs of stable fibrous ingrowth and bone ingrowth were detected in 52 and 29 hips, respectively. Sciatic never injury was occurred in 3 cases, and treated conservatively. There were no signs of periprosthetic fractures, dislocation, or prosthesis loosening.Surgical efficacies of THA for AS patients with severe hip involvement are satisfactory.

  12. Outcome Analysis of Hemiarthroplasty vs. Total Hip Replacement in Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Bhanu; Kumar, Krishna; Kohli, Navneet; Katoch, Punit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Management of displaced fracture neck femur in the elderly population is frequently done by Hemiarthroplasty or Total Hip Replacement (THR). It avoids high rates of nonunion and avascular necrosis which usually occur after internal fixation of neck femur fractures in this age group. Aim The present study aimed to evaluate patient function and complications following hemiarthroplasty and total hip replacement in elderly population with displaced femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods Patients above 60 years of age with displaced fracture neck femur were studied over the period of four years. All the clinical parameters and co-morbid conditions were noted at the time of presentation. The patients associated with co-morbid conditions and underlying pathology were excluded from study. Garden’s classification was used for classification of neck femur fractures. After due informed consent patients of displaced fracture neck femur were randomized by simple randomization and allocated for hemiarthroplasty or THR. Antibiotics were given preoperatively at the time of induction and postoperatively for 5-7 days. Surgery was carried out by Modified Gibson approach. Any complications during pre and postoperative period were noted. Follow-up of patients was done 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year interval with the help of Harris hip score. Results Total 80 patients were enrolled in the study group, with 40 patients in each group. The mean age of patients was 73 years in hemiarthroplasty group and 78 years in THR group. Female to male ratio was 55:45. Mean operative time was 35 minutes in hemiarthroplasty group and 45 minutes in THR. Average intraoperative blood loss was 200cc and 300cc in hemiarthroplasty and THR respectively. The mean hospital stay was 14 days in both the groups. Superficial wound infection was noted in hemiarthroplasty group while in THR group deep wound infection (n=1) and prolonged ICU stay (n=1) were noted. The mean Harris hip score

  13. Prescription trajectories and effect of total hip arthroplasty on the use of analgesics, hypnotics, antidepressants, and anxiolytics: results from a population of total hip arthroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Blågestad, Tone; Nordhus, Inger H; Grønli, Janne; Engesæter, Lars B; Ruths, Sabine; Ranhoff, Anette H; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2016-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been shown to reduce pain and improve function. In addition, it is suggested that THA improves sleep and alleviates symptoms of anxiety and depression. Patients with chronic pain are frequent users of analgesic and psychotropic drugs and thereby risk adverse drug events. The impact of THA on such drug use has not been thoroughly investigated. Based on merged data from the Norwegian Prescription Database and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, this study sought to investigate redeemed medications in a complete population (N = 39,688) undergoing THA in 2005 to 2011. User rates and redeemed drug volume of analgesics (nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, and nonopioids) and psychotropics (hypnotics, anxiolytics, and antidepressants) were calculated for 4 quarters before and 4 quarters after surgery. We analysed preoperative prescription trends (Q1 vs Q4), postoperative prescription (Q4 vs Q5), and long-term effect of surgery (Q4 vs Q8). Before surgery, use of all drug groups increased from Q1 to Q4. Use of opioids, nonopioids, and hypnotics dramatically increased from Q4 to Q5. Long-term (Q4 vs Q8) surgery reduced prescriptions of analgesics, hypnotics, and anxiolytics, but not antidepressants. Overall, the present results extend the positive effects of THA to include reduced reliance on medication to alleviate symptoms.

  14. Return to Golf Following Left Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Golfer Who is Right Handed

    PubMed Central

    Betlach, Michael; Senkarik, Ryan; Smith, Robyn; Voight, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Research indicates return to golf is a safe activity following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Frequently, individuals have shown both physical faults and swing faults after THA, which can persist even following rehabilitation. Physical limitations and pain often lead to faults in the golfers swing, most notably “hanging back.” These problems may not be improved after surgery unless the proper re-training takes place. Objectives Using pre-surgical as well as post-surgical information, physical faults and swing faults were identified. A corrective training protocol was developed to normalize physical and swing limitations. Case description The patient is a 52-year old male golfer who underwent left total hip arthroplasty secondary to left hip osteoarthritis. Video analysis both pre and post surgery indicated the patient was “hanging back.” This “hanging back” can lead to an inefficient golf swing and potential injury. Following a physical evaluation, a training protocol was designed to correct abnormal physical findings to assist the patient in creating an efficient golf swing. Outcomes The patient was able to swing the golf club with proper weighting of the lead lower extremity, significant improvement of swing efficiency, and return to play at a zero handicap following a corrective training protocol. Discussion A return to full weight bearing, functional strength, range of motion, stability, and balance are critical to regaining the physical skills necessary to properly swing the golf club. Further, mastery of these objective components lend themselves to the trust needed to load the lead leg with confidence during the golf swing. PMID:21509144

  15. Wear Analysis of Second-generation Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Samujh, Christopher; Bhimani, Samrath; Smith, Langan; Malkani, Arthur L

    2016-11-01

    A major limiting factor in the longevity of total hip replacement is the wear rate of the hip bearing. As manufacturing technology has improved during the past several decades, much attention has been focused on developing newer generations of polyethylene that have lower rates of wear while minimizing free radical formation and subsequent osteolysis. The turning point for the manufacture of polyethylene was moving from gamma irradiation in air to irradiation in a low oxygen environment, which reduced free radical formation while increasing the wear resistance. New polyethylene manufacturing methods, including multiple cycles of irradiation and annealing, have resulted in greater wear resistance. Wear analysis studies are essential to determine if these new liners actually show a benefit from prior generations of polyethylene and, more importantly, if they are safe to use. This study involved a single center retrospective review of 60 patients with a mean follow-up of 5.5 years who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with a second-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene manufactured by 3 cycles of sequential irradiation and annealing. Linear and volumetric wear rates were determined from digitized radiographs using contemporary wear analysis software. The mean linear wear rate for the entire group was 0.025 millimeters per year (mm/y). This value represents a linear wear rate 2.7 times less than that of a first-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene and 4.2 times less than that of a conventional polyethylene. At an average of 5 years, compared with a first-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene, a second-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene appears to show significant improvement regarding wear. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1178-e1182.].

  16. Development of an extremely wear-resistant ultra high molecular weight polyethylene for total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Shen, F W; Lu, B; Campbell, P; Salovey, R

    1999-03-01

    Osteolysis induced by ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris is one of the primary factors limiting the lifespan of total hip replacements. Crosslinking polyethylene is known to improve its wear resistance in certain industrial applications, and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups have shown improved wear resistance in two clinical studies. In the present study, crosslinked polyethylene cups were produced by two methods. Chemically crosslinked cups were produced by mixing a peroxide with ultra high molecular weight polyethylene powder and then molding the cups directly to shape. Radiation-crosslinked cups were produced by exposing conventional extruded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene bar stock to gamma radiation at various doses from 3.3 to 100 Mrad (1 Mrad = 10 kGy), remelting the bars to extinguish residual free radicals (i.e., to minimize long-term oxidation), and then machining the cups by conventional techniques. In hip-joint simulator tests lasting as long as 5 million cycles, both types of cross-linked cups exhibited dramatically improved resistance to wear. Artificial aging of the cups by heating for 30 days in air at 80 degrees C induced oxidation of the chemically crosslinked cups. However, a chemically crosslinked cup that was aged 2.7 years at room temperature had very little oxidation. Thus, whether substantial oxidation of chemically crosslinked polyethylene would occur at body temperature remains unclear. The radiation-crosslinked remelted cups exhibited excellent resistance to oxidation. Because crosslinking can reduce the ultimate tensile strength, fatigue strength, and elongation to failure of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, the optimal crosslinking dose provides a balance between these physical properties and the wear resistance of the implant and might substantially reduce the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis with total hip replacements.

  17. Postoperative Changes in In Vivo Measured Friction in Total Hip Joint Prosthesis during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Philipp; Bender, Alwina; Bergmann, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the artificial cup and inlay is the most common reasons for total hip replacement failures. Polyethylene wear and aseptic loosening are frequent reasons. Furthermore, over the past few decades, the population of patients receiving total hip replacements has become younger and more active. Hence, a higher level of activity may include an increased risk of implant loosening as a result of friction-induced wear. In this study, an instrumented hip implant was used to measure the contact forces and friction moments in vivo during walking. Subsequently, the three-dimensional coefficient of friction in vivo was calculated over the whole gait cycle. Measurements were collected from ten subjects at several time points between three and twelve months postoperative. No significant change in the average resultant contact force was observed between three and twelve months postoperative. In contrast, a significant decrease of up to 47% was observed in the friction moment. The coefficient of friction also decreased over postoperative time on average. These changes may be caused by ‘running-in’ effects of the gliding components or by the improved lubricating properties of the synovia. Because the walking velocity and contact forces were found to be nearly constant during the observed period, the decrease in friction moment suggests an increase in fluid viscosity. The peak values of the contact force individually varied by 32%-44%. The friction moment individually differed much more, by 110%-129% at three and up to 451% at twelve months postoperative. The maximum coefficient of friction showed the highest individual variability, about 100% at three and up to 914% at twelve months after surgery. These individual variations in the friction parameters were most likely due to different ‘running-in’ effects that were influenced by the individual activity levels and synovia properties. PMID:25806805

  18. Intermittent Pneumatic Compression for the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism after Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hong Suk; Cho, Jai Ho; Kim, Jung Taek; Yoo, Jeong Joon

    2017-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a relatively common and potentially life threatening complication after major hip surgery. There are two main types of prophylaxis: chemical and mechanical. Chemical prophylaxis is very effective but causes bleeding complications in surgical wounds and remote organs. On the other hand, mechanical methods are free of hemorrhagic complications but are less effective. We hypothesized that mechanical prophylaxis is effective enough for Asians in whom VTE occurs less frequently. This study evaluated the effect of intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) in the prevention of VTE after major hip surgery. Methods Incidences of symptomatic VTE after primary total hip arthroplasty with and without application of IPC were compared. A total of 379 patients were included in the final analysis. The IPC group included 233 patients (106 men and 127 women) with a mean age of 54 years. The control group included 146 patients (80 men and 66 women) with a mean age of 53 years. All patients took low-dose aspirin for 6 weeks after surgery. IPC was applied to both legs just after surgery and maintained all day until discharge. When a symptom or a sign suspicious of VTE, such as swelling or redness of the foot and ankle, Homans' sign, and dyspnea was detected, computed tomography (CT) angiogram or duplex ultrasonogram was performed. Results Until 3 months after surgery, symptomatic VTE occurred in three patients in the IPC group and in 6 patients in the control group. The incidence of VTE was much lower in the IPC group (1.3%) than in the control group (4.1%), but the difference was not statistically significant. Complications associated with the application of IPC were not detected in any patient. Patients affected by VTE were older and hospitalized longer than the unaffected patients. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that IPC might be an effective and safe method for the prevention of postoperative VTE. PMID:28261425

  19. Improving Planning and Post-Operative Assessment for Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pétursson, Þröstur; Edmunds, Kyle; Magnúsdóttir, Gígja; Halldórsson, Grétar; jr., Halldór Jónsson; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) remains the gold standard of treatment for patients who suffer with a variety of hip-related pathological degeneration or trauma. These patients often exhibit significantly less post-operative pain and an increase in the range of motion of the joint, but there are still relatively common instances of debilitating periprosthetic complications that call into question the method for pre-surgical implant choice. Currently, there are two principal options for THA prostheses: cemented or non cemented. Utilizing the cemented procedure ensures a faster acquisition of adequate implant stability than with the non cemented procedure, but can eventually lead to an increased periprosthetic fracture risk. Non cemented prosthetic stems are more frequently revised within the first few years following THA due to periprosthetic fracture, but non cemented revision surgeries generally result in fewer complications than those of cemented implants. Surgeons typically rely on experience or simple patient metrics such as age and sex to prescribe which implant procedure is optimal, and while this may work for most patients, there is a clear need to analyze more rigoriously patient conditions that correlate to optimal post-THA outcomes. The results from the investigation reported herein indicate that an understanding of how the percent composition and quality of a patient's quadriceps muscle in both healthy and operated legs may be a better indicator for prosthetic choice. Additionally, these data emphasize that the traditional metrics of age and sex inadequately predict changes in quadriceps composition and quality and thereby have comparatively minor utility in determining the patient-appropriate prosthetic type. Key Words: Total Hip Arthroplasty, Prosthetic selection, Muscle size and quality, Anatomical modeling, Surgical planning. PMID:26913152

  20. Qualifying CT for wrist arthroplasty: extending techniques for total hip arthroplasty to total wrist arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, Yvonne; Olivecrona, Henrik; Olivecrona, Lotta; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Sollerman, Christer

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous work to detect migration of total wrist arthroplasty non-invasively, and with greater accuracy. Two human cadaverous arms, each with a cemented total wrist implant, were used in this study. In one of the arms, 1 mm tantalum balls were implanted, six in the carpal bones and five in the radius. Five CT scans of each arm were acquired, changing the position of the arm each time to mimic different positions patients might take on repeated examinations. Registration of CT volume data sets was performed using an extensively validated, 3D semi-automatic volume fusion tool in which co-homologous point pairs (landmarks) are chosen on each volume to be registered. Three sets of ten cases each were obtained by placing landmarks on 1) bone only (using only arm one), 2) tantalum implants only, and 3) bone and tantalum implants (both using only arm two). The accuracy of the match was assessed visually in 2D and 3D, and numerically by calculating the distance difference between the actual position of the transformed landmarks and their ideal position (i.e., the reference landmark positions). All cases were matched visually within one width of cortical bone and numerically within one half CT voxel (0.32 mm, p = 0.05). This method matched only the bone/arm and not the prosthetic component per se, thus making it possible to detect prosthetic movement and wear. This method was clinically used for one patient with pain. Loosening of the carpal prosthetic component was accurately detected and this was confirmed at surgery.

  1. Total hip replacement in an ipsilateral above-the-knee amputation: surgical technique, rehabilitation, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Malagelada, Francesc; Coll Rivas, Moisès; Jiménez Obach, Albert; Auleda, Jaume; Guirao, Lluis; Pleguezuelos, Eulogio

    2013-03-01

    In this article, we present a case report of a 62-year-old patient who previously underwent an above-the-knee amputation for vascular disease and we performed a total hip replacement on him because of hip osteoarthritis. As the only postoperative complication, the patient developed a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection, which was successfully treated. The surgical technique and the postoperative rehabilitation program are described in detail in an attempt to detect and face the challenges that patients with major lower limb amputations may present. The literature is reviewed and all known cases of hip replacements in amputees are presented.

  2. Subject-specific finite element model with an optical tracking system in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Li, Qing; Chen, Youngang; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Intra-operative peri-prosthetic femoral fractures are a significant concern in total hip arthroplasty and can occur at any time during surgery, with the highest incidence during implant insertion. This study combines subject-specific finite element analysis modeling with an optical tracking system to characterize the resultant strain in the bone and results of impaction during total hip replacement surgery. The use of ABG II femoral stem (Stryker Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ, USA) in the model yielded the following results. Hammer velocity was measured experimentally using a three-dimensional optical tracking system and these data were input into the finite element analysis model so that intra-operative loading scenario could be simulated. A quasi-static explicit simulation and a dynamic loading step using two implant-bone interface friction (0.1 and 0.4 friction coefficients) states were simulated. The maximum swing velocity of a mallet was experimentally measured at 1.5 m/s and occurred just before impaction of the hammer with implant introducer. Two friction states resulted in different results with the lower friction coefficient generating higher strains in the anterior regions of the model and higher displacement of the implant with respect to the femur when compared to the high friction state.

  3. Late deep venous thrombosis and delayed weightbearing after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Buehler, K O; D'Lima, D D; Petersilge, W J; Colwell, C W; Walker, R H

    1999-04-01

    One hundred ninety-nine patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty and used in hospital pneumatic compression stockings and aspirin as thromboembolic prophylaxis were screened for deep venous thrombosis using duplex ultrasonography on the fourth postoperative day. Of the initial 98 patients, 21 underwent noncemented arthroplasty, maintained touchdown weightbearing for 6 weeks after surgery, and then began progressive partial weightbearing. Of the subsequent 101 patients, 28 underwent noncemented arthroplasty and began progressive weightbearing immediately after surgery. All other patients underwent hybrid arthroplasty and began weightbearing to tolerance immediately after surgery. After duplex screening examination, patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis were given anticoagulation therapy, and patients with negative study results were observed clinically. The relative risk of proximal deep venous thrombosis after noncemented arthroplasty using delayed weightbearing was compared with that after noncemented arthroplasty using immediate progressive weightbearing. Of patients with noncemented arthroplasty, the prevalence of proximal deep venous thrombosis was significantly lower in those using progressive weightbearing immediately after surgery (none) than in those using delayed weightbearing rehabilitation (19%). This study showed that patients undergoing noncemented total hip arthroplasty with delayed weightbearing rehabilitation risk greater potential for deep venous thrombosis after hospital discharge. This study suggests consideration for continued thromboembolic prophylaxis or routine deep venous thrombosis surveillance, or both measures, after hospital discharge, unless more rapid progression of weightbearing is allowed.

  4. [Comparation of the antero-lateral and posterior approaches in primary total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Macedo, C A; Galia, C R; Rosito, R; Valin, M R; Kruel, A V; Muller, L; Rodríguez, F A

    1999-01-01

    Comparison between the antero-lateral and posterior approaches in primary total hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective study, 184 patients were enrolled, 95 submitted to the anterolateral (Watson jones) and 89 to the posterior approach (Moore) from June 1993 to June 1997. The outcomes assessed were perioperative data (operative time, hospital stay, time from surgery until hospital discharge, surgical bleeding and the need for blood transfusion), as well as late complications (deep venous thrombosis DVP, pulmonary embolism, periopheral nerve injury, prothesis instability and others). Both groups did not differ in terms of preoperative parameters. Those submitted to the posterior approach had shorter operative times (p < 0.001), as well as reduced bleeding (p < 0.05) and need for blood transfusion (p < 0.001) during surgery. The outcomes, such as late complications, had similar reduced frequency in both groups. The posterior approach has been successfully applied in our service and proves to be an excellent alternative surgical access to the total hip arthroplasty.

  5. Development of Computer-Tailored Education Program for Patients with Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yeo Won

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop a Web-based computer-tailored education program to promote self-care for patients with total hip replacement. Methods The program was developed in five phases. Results Phase 1: Program content was developed, including the educational needs of patients with total hip replacement, based on a review of previous research and literature. Phase 2: A computer-tailored algorithm written as a series of 'if-then' statements was developed to offer the appropriate type of intervention based on an individual's personal health characteristics. Phase 3: A professional Web programmer produced then the program for use on the Web. Phase 4: An expert evaluation was performed focusing on two aspects, Web contents and website design. SPSS ver. 16.0 was used for the analysis, and grade point averages were used to compare each evaluation item. Phase 5: Based on comments from the experts' evaluation, modifications and revisions were made, and the program was completed. Conclusions The developed program presented tailored messages using animations, video and flash considering the individual health status and characteristics of the primary target generation. In addition, the expert evaluation confirmed the validity of the program's content and design. PMID:25405061

  6. Expression of tenascin-C in aseptic loosening of total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Konttinen, Y.; Li, T.; Michelsson, O.; Xu, J.; Sorsa, T.; Santavirta, S.; Imai, S.; Virtanen, I.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess if the bonding interlayer between the implant and bone in aseptic loosening of total hip replacement (THR) is qualitatively deteriorated by excessive accumulation of anti-adhesive glycoprotein, tenascin-C.
METHODS—Alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) method was used for immunohistochemical staining of tenascin-C in interface tissue and control synovial tissue.
RESULTS—Tenascin-C was found to be a major component of the extracellular matrix at a hitherto unrecognised site, namely the synovial membrane-like interface tissue between implant and bone in aseptic loosening of THR. The overall tenascin-C staining (median score 4.0) was greatly increased in aseptic loosening compared with synovial membrane (median score 2.0; p<0.001) and fibrous capsule (median score 2.0; p<0.001) from primary THR operations. Topological analysis disclosed that tenascin-C was also found at the critical implant-interface and interface-bone surfaces.
CONCLUSION—Local tenascin-C expression is increased as a result of a chronic foreign body type reaction associated with excessive cytokine production and tissue injury mediated by microtrauma and neutral endoproteinases. This qualitative and topological deterioration of the bonding interlayer by an increase of anti-adhesive tenascin-C expression may inadvertantly contribute to loosening.

 Keywords: tenascin; aseptic loosening; total hip replacement PMID:9893574

  7. Relationship between cup position and obturator externus muscle in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is often challenging to find the causes for postoperative pain syndromes after total hip replacement, since they can be very allotropic. One possible cause is the muscular impingement syndrome. The most commonly known impingement syndrome is the psoas impingement. Another recently described impingement syndrome is the obturator externus muscle impingement. The aim of this study is to analyze pathological conditions of the Obturator externus and to show possible causes. Methods 40 patients who had undergone a total hip replacement were subjected to clinical and MRI examinations 12 months after the surgery. The Harris Hip Score (HHS) was used to analyze pain and function. Additionally, a satisfaction score and a pain score (VAS) were determined. The MRI allowed for the assessment of the spatial relation between the obturator externus muscle and the acetabulum. Also measured were the acetabular inclination angle as well as the volume and cross-sectional area of the obturator externus muscle. Results The patients were assigned to 3 groups in accordance with their MRI results. Group 1 patients (n = 18) showed no contact between the obturator externus and the acetabulum. Group 2 (n = 13) showed contact, and group 3 (n = 9) an additional clear displacement of the muscle in its course. It was not possible to establish a connection between the imaging findings, the HHS, the VAS, and patient satisfaction. What was striking, however, was a significant difference between the median inclination angle in group 1 (40° ± 5.4°) and group 3 (49° ± 4.7°) (p < 0.05), and the corresponding image-morphological pathology. The average inclination angle in group 2 was 43.3° ± 3.8° Conclusion Contact between the obturator externus muscle and the caudal acetabula border occurs frequently, but is only rarely accompanied by a painful muscular impingement. The position of the acetabula must be seen as one of the main risk factors for contact between the acetabula border

  8. Simulated studies of wear and friction in total hip prosthesis components with various ball sizes and surface finishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swikert, M. A.; Johnson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a newly designed total hip joint simulator. The apparatus closely simulates the complex motions and loads of the human hip in normal walking. The wear and friction of presently used appliance configurations and materials were determined. A surface treatment of the metal femoral ball specimens was applied to influence wear. The results of the investigation indicate that wear can be reduced by mechanical treatment of metal femoral ball surfaces. A metallographic examination and surface roughness measurements were made.

  9. Mixing of components from different manufacturers in total hip arthroplasty: prevalence and comparative outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Keith; Pickford, Martin; Newell, Claire; Howard, Peter; Hunt, Linda P; Blom, Ashley W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — There have recently been highly publicized examples of suboptimal outcomes with some newer implant designs used for total hip replacement. This has led to calls for tighter regulation. However, surgeons do not always adhere to the regulations already in place and often use implants from different manufacturers together to replace a hip, which is against the recommendations of the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and the directions of the manufacturers. Patients and methods — We used data from the National Joint Registry of England and Wales (NJR) to investigate this practice. Results — Mixing of components was common, and we identified over 90,000 cases recorded between 2003 and 2013. In the majority of these cases (48,156), stems and heads from one manufacturer were mixed with polyethylene cemented cups from another manufacturer. When using a cemented stem and a polyethylene cup, mixing of stems from one manufacturer with cups from another was associated with a lower revision rate. At 8 years, the cumulative percentage of revisions was 1.9% (95% CI: 1.7–2.1) in the mixed group as compared to 2.4% (2.3–2.5) in the matched group (p = 0.001). Mixing of heads from one manufacturer with stems from another was associated with a higher revision rate (p < 0.001). In hip replacements with ceramic-on-ceramic or metal-on-metal bearings, mixing of stems, heads, and cups from different manufacturers was associated with similar revision rates (p > 0.05). Interpretation — Mixing of components from different manufacturers is a common practice, despite the fact that it goes against regulatory guidance. However, it is not associated with increased revision rates unless heads and stems from different manufacturers are used together. PMID:26201845

  10. A National Analysis of Complications Following Total Hip Replacement in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Lu, Hsueh-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of osteoporosis and fractures. The incidence rate of hip fracture has steadily increased over time and is a major common event in patients with osteoporosis and COPD. Total hip replacement (THR) is commonly performed in patients with hip fracture. Our aim was to compare the complications of THR between patients with and without COPD. Longitudinally linked data from the National Health Insurance Research Database, which consists of registration, claims, and reimbursement records, for a cohort of 1,000,000 randomly selected enrollees traced retrospectively from 1996 to 2000 in Taiwan. Patients who had undergone THR surgery between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2008, were identified and divided into COPD and non-COPD cohorts. Outcomes and complications, including 90-day mortality, 1-year mortality, 1-year wound infection, 30-day readmission for hospitalization, 30-day pneumonia, 30-day acute respiratory failure, 30-day cerebrovascular accident, and length of stay during hospitalization, were measured after THR. The COPD group had a significantly higher ratio of complications, including 30-day readmission (14.0% vs 8.4%), 30-day pneumonia (10.4% vs 4.4%), 30-day acute respiratory failure (1.5% vs 0.5%), 1-year mortality (6.9% vs 2.7%), and length of stay in the hospital (10.6% vs 0.8%) than the non-COPD group. In addition to airway diseases, patients in the COPD group had higher mortality than those in non-COPD group after THR. Surgeons should give more attention to airway evaluation and selection of patients with COPD for THR. PMID:27015210

  11. Prevalence of periprosthetic osteolysis after total hip replacement in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perez Alamino, Rodolfo; Casellini, Carolina; Baňos, Andrea; Schneeberger, Emilce Edith; Gagliardi, Susana Alicia; Maldonado Cocco, José Antonio; Citera, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis (PO) is a frequent complication in patients with joint implants. There are no data regarding the prevalence of PO in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and osteoarthritis (OA). Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of PO in patients with RA, JCA, AS, and OA, who have undergone total hip replacement (THR), and to identify factors associated with its development. Methods The study included patients diagnosed with RA (ACR 1987), AS (modified New York criteria), JCA (European 1977 criteria), and osteoarthritis (OA) (ACR 1990 criteria) with unilateral or bilateral THR. Demographic, clinical, and therapeutic data were collected. Panoramic pelvic plain radiographs were performed, to determine the presence of PO at acetabular and femoral levels. Images were read by two independent observers. Results One hundred twenty-two hip prostheses were analyzed (74 cemented, 30 cementless, and 18 hybrids). The average time from prosthesis implantation to pelvic radiograph was comparable among groups. PO was observed in 72 hips (59%). In 55% of cases, PO was detected on the femoral component, with a lower prevalence in RA (53%) vs AS (64.7%) and JCA (76.5%). Acetabular PO was more frequent in JCA patients (58.8%), compared with RA (11.6%) and OA (28.5%) patients (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.06, respectively). There was no significant association between the presence of PO and clinical, functional, or therapeutic features. Conclusion The prevalence of PO was 59%, being more frequent at the femoral level. Larger studies must be carried out to determine the clinical significance of radiologic PO. PMID:27790012

  12. A National Analysis of Complications Following Total Hip Replacement in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Lu, Hsueh-Yi

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of osteoporosis and fractures. The incidence rate of hip fracture has steadily increased over time and is a major common event in patients with osteoporosis and COPD. Total hip replacement (THR) is commonly performed in patients with hip fracture. Our aim was to compare the complications of THR between patients with and without COPD.Longitudinally linked data from the National Health Insurance Research Database, which consists of registration, claims, and reimbursement records, for a cohort of 1,000,000 randomly selected enrollees traced retrospectively from 1996 to 2000 in Taiwan. Patients who had undergone THR surgery between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2008, were identified and divided into COPD and non-COPD cohorts. Outcomes and complications, including 90-day mortality, 1-year mortality, 1-year wound infection, 30-day readmission for hospitalization, 30-day pneumonia, 30-day acute respiratory failure, 30-day cerebrovascular accident, and length of stay during hospitalization, were measured after THR.The COPD group had a significantly higher ratio of complications, including 30-day readmission (14.0% vs 8.4%), 30-day pneumonia (10.4% vs 4.4%), 30-day acute respiratory failure (1.5% vs 0.5%), 1-year mortality (6.9% vs 2.7%), and length of stay in the hospital (10.6% vs 0.8%) than the non-COPD group.In addition to airway diseases, patients in the COPD group had higher mortality than those in non-COPD group after THR. Surgeons should give more attention to airway evaluation and selection of patients with COPD for THR.

  13. Tribology and total hip joint replacement: current concepts in mechanical simulation.

    PubMed

    Affatato, S; Spinelli, M; Zavalloni, M; Mazzega-Fabbro, C; Viceconti, M

    2008-12-01

    Interest in the rheology and effects of interacting surfaces is as ancient as man. This subject can be represented by a recently coined word: tribology. This term is derived from the Greek word "tribos" and means the "science of rubbing". Friction, lubrication, and wear mechanism in the common English language means the precise field of interest of tribology. Wear of total hip prosthesis is a significant clinical problem that involves, nowadays, a too high a number of patients. In order to acquire further knowledge on the tribological phenomena that involve hip prosthesis wear tests are conducted on employed materials to extend lifetime of orthopaedic implants. The most basic type of test device is the material wear machine, however, a more advanced one may more accurately reproduce some of the in vivo conditions. Typically, these apparatus are called simulators, and, while there is no absolute definition of a joint simulator, its description as a mechanical rig used to test a joint replacement, under conditions approximating those occurring in the human body, is acceptable. Simulator tests, moreover, can be used to conduct accelerated protocols that replicate/simulate particularly extreme conditions, thus establishing the limits of performance for the material. Simulators vary in their level of sophistication and the international literature reveals many interpretations of the design of machines used for joint replacement testing. This paper aims to review the current state of the art of the hip joint simulators worldwide. This is specified through a schematic overview by describing, in particular, constructive solutions adopted to reproduce in vivo conditions. An exhaustive commentary on the evolution and actually existing simulation standards is proposed by the authors. The need of a shared protocol among research laboratories all over the world could lead to a consensus conference.

  14. Massive Blood Transfusion during Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty under Combined Spinal Epidural Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kandemir, Tünay; Kandemir, Erbin; Aşkın, Tuğba; Dal, Tülay; Kılıç, Yeliz; Ünver, Süheyla

    2016-01-01

    Revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an orthopaedic surgery that is known to be associated with excessive bleeding. The rates of mortality and morbidity are high in patients with massive haemorrhage. The patient in this study was administered blood products with high fresh frozen plasma/red blood cell (RBC) suspension ratio and high platelet/RBC suspension ratio without waiting for haemostasis test results. This study suggests that this approach might prove beneficial in reducing the incidence of intra- and postoperative complications. this study presents our experience with a patient who underwent THA and required a transfusion that was three times her estimated total blood volume. The patient was successfully managed with close monitoring of haemorrhage and timely administration of blood and blood products before hypotension and loss of consciousness occurred. PMID:27366558

  15. Racial disparities in receiving total hip/knee replacement surgery: the effect of hospital admission sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Rizzo, John A; Parasuraman, Shreekant; Gunnarsson, Candace

    2013-02-01

    Using a nationally-representative inpatient care dataset (the HCUP National Inpatient Sample from 2002 to 2007) we examined racial disparities in receiving total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgeries. Multivariable logistic regression models revealed that racial minorities were significantly less likely to receive THR or TKR than Whites, controlling for patients' hospital admission source and hospital characteristics. Employing Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition techniques, we found that observed difference in population characteristics explained 55%-67% and 78% of the racial disparities in THR and TKR, respectively. Differences in patients' hospital admission source emerged as the major individual factor associated with these disparities, explaining 57%-77% of racial disparities in THR and 26%-50% of racial disparities in TKR. This study suggests that substantive racial and ethnic disparities exist in utilization of THR and TKR surgery. Observed population characteristics accounted for most of these differences, with hospital admission source being the key factor.

  16. Predictors and complications of blood transfusion in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Wessell, Nolan M; Charters, Michael A; Yu, Stephen; Jeffries, James J; Silverton, Craig D

    2014-09-01

    Perioperative patient optimization can minimize the need for blood transfusions in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine predictors and complications of transfusions. This retrospective review analyzed 1795 patients who underwent primary THA and TKA at our institution between January 2011 and December 2012. Of the 1573 patients ultimately included the rates of transfusion were 9.27% in TKA and 26.6% in THA. Significant predictors for transfusion include: preoperative hemoglobin, age, female gender, body mass index, creatinine, TKA, operating room time, operative blood loss, and intra-operative fluids. The DVT rate was comparable, but deep surgical site infection rate among transfused patients was 2.4% compared to 0.5% in non-transfused patients (P = 0.0065).

  17. Comprehensive Operative Note Templates for Primary and Revision Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Electricwala, Ali J.; Amanatullah, Derek F.; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat I.; Huddleston, James I.; Maloney, William J.; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adequate preoperative planning is the first and most crucial step in the successful completion of a revision total joint arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the availability, adequacy and accuracy of operative notes of primary surgeries in patients requiring subsequent revision and to construct comprehensive templates of minimum necessary information required in the operative notes to further simplify re-operations, if they should become necessary. Methods: The operative notes of 144 patients (80 revision THA’s and 64 revision TKA’s) who underwent revision total joint arthroplasty at Stanford Hospital and Clinics in the year 2013 were reviewed. We assessed the availability of operative notes and implant stickers prior to revision total joint arthroplasty. The availability of implant details within the operative notes was assessed against the available surgical stickers for adequacy and accuracy. Statistical comparisons were made using the Fischer-exact test and a P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The primary operative note was available in 68 of 144 revisions (47%), 39 of 80 revision THAs (49%) and 29 of 66 revision TKAs (44%, p = 0.619). Primary implant stickers were available in 46 of 144 revisions (32%), 26 of 80 revision THAs (32%) and 20 of 66 revision TKAs (30%, p = 0.859). Utilizing the operative notes and implant stickers combined identified accurate primary implant details in only 40 of the 80 revision THAs (50%) and 34 of all 66 revision TKAs (52%, p = 0.870). Conclusion: Operative notes are often unavailable or fail to provide the necessary information required which makes planning and execution of revision hip and knee athroplasty difficult. This emphasizes the need for enhancing the quality of operative notes and records of patient information. Based on this information, we provide comprehensive operative note templates for primary and revision total hip and knee

  18. Midterm results of 36 mm metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Akrawi, Hawar; Hossain, Fahad S; Niculescu, Stefan; Hashim, Zaid; Ng, Arron Biing; Shetty, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the many perceived benefits of metal-on-metal (MoM) articulation in total hip arthroplasty (THA), there have been growing concerns about metallosis and adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD). Analysis of size 36 mm MoM articulation THAs is presented. These patients were evaluated for patient characteristics, relationship between blood metal ions levels and the inclination as well as the version of acetabular component, cumulative survival probability at final followup and functional outcome at final followup. Materials and Methods: 288, size 36 mm MoM THAs implanted in 269 patients at our institution from 2004 to 2010 were included in this retrospective study. These patients were assessed clinically for hip symptoms, perioperative complications and causes of revision arthroplasty were analysed. Biochemically, blood cobalt and chromium metal ions level were recorded and measurements of acetabular inclination and version were examined. Radiological evaluation utilizing Metal Artefact Reduction Sequence (MARS) MRI was undertaken and implant cumulative survivorship was evaluated. Results: The mean followup was 5 years (range 2–7 years), mean age was 73 years and the mean Oxford hip score was 36.9 (range 5–48). Revision arthroplasty was executed in 20 (7.4%) patients, of which 15 patients underwent single-stage revision THA. The causes of revision arthroplasty were: ARMD changes in 6 (2.2%) patients, infection in 5 (1.9%) patients and aseptic loosening in 5 (1.9%) patients. Three (1.1%) patients had their hips revised for instability, 1 (0.3%) for raised blood metal ions levels. The implant cumulative survival rate, with revision for any reason, was 68.9% at 7 years. Conclusions: Although medium-sized MoM THA with a 36 mm head has a marginally better survivorship at midterm followup, compared to larger size head MoM articulating THA, our findings nonetheless are still worryingly poor in comparison to what has been quoted in the literature

  19. Computed tomography for preoperative planning in total hip arthroplasty: what radiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Huppertz, Alexander; Radmer, Sebastian; Wagner, Moritz; Roessler, Torsten; Hamm, Bernd; Sparmann, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The number of total hip arthroplasties is continuously rising. Although less invasive surgical techniques, sophisticated component design, and intraoperative navigation techniques have been introduced, the rate of peri- and postoperative complications, including dislocations, fractures, nerve palsies, and infections, is still a major clinical problem. Better patient outcome, faster recovery and rehabilitation, and shorter operation times therefore remain to be accomplished. A promising strategy is to use minimally invasive techniques in conjunction with modular implants, aimed at independently reconstructing femoral offset and leg length on the basis of highly accurate preoperative planning. Plain radiographs have clear limitations for the correct estimation of hip joint geometry and bone quality. Three-dimensional assessment based on computed tomography (CT) allows optimizing the choice and positions of implants and anticipating difficulties to be encountered during surgery. Postoperative CT is used to monitor operative translation and plays a role in arthroplastic quality management. Radiologists should be familiar with the needs of orthopedic surgeons in terms of CT acquisition, post-processing, and data transfer. The CT protocol should be optimized to enhance image quality and reduce radiation exposure. When dedicated orthopedic CT protocols and state-of-the-art scanner hardware are used, radiation exposure can be decreased to a level just marginally higher than that of conventional preoperative radiography. Surgeons and radiologists should use similar terminology to avoid misunderstanding and inaccuracies in the transfer of preoperative planning.

  20. New polyethylenes in total hip replacement: A ten- to 12-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    García-Rey, E; García-Cimbrelo, E; Cruz-Pardos, A

    2013-03-01

    Between 1999 and 2001, 90 patients underwent total hip replacement using the same uncemented acetabular and femoral components with a 28 mm metallic femoral head but with prospective randomisation of the acetabular liner to either Durasul highly cross-linked polyethylene or nitrogen-sterilised Sulene polyethylene. We assessed 83 patients at a minimum follow-up of ten years. Linear penetration of the femoral head was estimated at six weeks, six and 12 months and annually thereafter, using the Dorr method, given the non-spherical shape of the acetabular component. There was no loosening of any component; only one hip in the Sulene group showed proximal femoral osteolysis. The mean penetration of the femoral head at six weeks was 0.08 mm (0.02 to 0.15) for the Durasul group and 0.16 mm (0.05 to 0.28) for the Sulene group (p = 0.001). The mean yearly linear penetration was 64.8% lower for the Durasul group at 0.05 mm/year (sd 0.035) for the Sulene group and 0.02 mm/year (sd 0.016) for the Durasul (p < 0.001). Mean linear femoral head penetration at ten years was 61% less in the Durasul than Sulene group. Highly cross-linked polyethylene gives excellent results at ten years.

  1. Size of metallic and polyethylene debris particles in failed cemented total hip replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Salvati, E. A.; Betts, F.; DiCarlo, E. F.; Doty, S. B.; Bullough, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of differing failure rates of total hip prostheses made of various metals prompted us to measure the size of metallic and polyethylene particulate debris around failed cemented arthroplasties. We used an isolation method, in which metallic debris was extracted from the tissues, and a non-isolation method of routine preparation for light and electron microscopy. Specimens were taken from 30 cases in which the femoral component was of titanium alloy (10), cobalt-chrome alloy (10), or stainless steel (10). The mean size of metallic particles with the isolation method was 0.8 to 1.0 microns by 1.5 to 1.8 microns. The non-isolation method gave a significantly smaller mean size of 0.3 to 0.4 microns by 0.6 to 0.7 microns. For each technique the particle sizes of the three metals were similar. The mean size of polyethylene particles was 2 to 4 microns by 8 to 13 microns. They were larger in tissue retrieved from failed titanium-alloy implants than from cobalt-chrome and stainless-steel implants. Our results suggest that factors other than the size of the metal particles, such as the constituents of the alloy, and the amount and speed of generation of debris, may be more important in the failure of hip replacements.

  2. Cobalt Intoxication Heart Failure after Revision Total Hip Replacement for Ceramic Head Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Choi, Young Hyun; Jeong, Mi Yeon; Chang, Jae Suk

    2016-01-01

    In 1960s, toxic heart failure due to cobalt poisoning was firstly reported from Canadian industrial worker. Following development of bearing materials in hip arthroplasties, using cobalt-chrome alloy in bearing surface, there were rarely reported of systemic affect toxic cobaltism include toxic heart failure due to articulation wear in Western countries. It could be happened more easily by third body wear from ceramic particle especially revision total hip replacement (THR) surgery using cobalt-chrome alloy following ceramic articulation breakage which index surgery performed by ceramic on ceramic bearing. In Korea, due to many surgeons prefer ceramic on ceramic bearing in THR compared to Western countries, it might be more important issue within a time. However in our knowledge, there was no previous report about cobalt poisoning heart failure in Korea. It is still very rare and hard to diagnose cobalt intoxication heart failure after THR, so we report a case of fatal heart failure caused by cobalt intoxication after revision THR in 53-year old man who successfully underwent re-revision THR. PMID:28097117

  3. An Unusual Cause of Fever in a Patient with Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-02-14

    Pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a challenging clinical problem despite recent advances in the diagnostic modalities. The diagnosis of the cause of fever is especially difficult in the postoperative period as the focus remains on the operative site. We present an unusual cause of PUO in a patient with advanced HIV disease during an immediate postoperative period following total hip arthroplasty (THA) for osteoarthritis (OA) of the left hip. The fever started on the eighth postoperative day, and after an extensive workup to rule out infection it was found that the patient was allergic to sulfa drugs. The fever subsided after discontinuation of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Fever in an immunocompromised patient should not be attributed only to infection. A high index of suspicion along with careful history making is required to diagnose drug fever. An early diagnosis of drug fever can reduce hospital stay and the costs of investigations and treatment.

  4. Cobalt Intoxication Heart Failure after Revision Total Hip Replacement for Ceramic Head Fracture: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Choi, Young Hyun; Jeong, Mi Yeon; Chang, Jae Suk; Yoon, Pil Whan

    2016-12-01

    In 1960s, toxic heart failure due to cobalt poisoning was firstly reported from Canadian industrial worker. Following development of bearing materials in hip arthroplasties, using cobalt-chrome alloy in bearing surface, there were rarely reported of systemic affect toxic cobaltism include toxic heart failure due to articulation wear in Western countries. It could be happened more easily by third body wear from ceramic particle especially revision total hip replacement (THR) surgery using cobalt-chrome alloy following ceramic articulation breakage which index surgery performed by ceramic on ceramic bearing. In Korea, due to many surgeons prefer ceramic on ceramic bearing in THR compared to Western countries, it might be more important issue within a time. However in our knowledge, there was no previous report about cobalt poisoning heart failure in Korea. It is still very rare and hard to diagnose cobalt intoxication heart failure after THR, so we report a case of fatal heart failure caused by cobalt intoxication after revision THR in 53-year old man who successfully underwent re-revision THR.

  5. Accuracy and Reliability of Preoperative On-screen Templating Using Digital Radiographs for Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jong Ki; Son, Seung Min; Kim, Tae Woo; Shin, Won Chul; Lee, Jung Sub

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Preoperative on-screen templating is a method of using acetate templates on digital images. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy, intra- and interobserver reliabilities of preoperative on-screen templating using digital radiographs for total hip arthroplasty (THA). Materials and Methods Two hundred patients with hip disease who were treated with primary cementless THA were retrospectively evaluated. The accuracy of on-screen templating was assessed by comparing the predicted prosthesis sizes with the actual sizes used operatively. The inter- and intraobserver reliabilities of the templating results were also evaluated. Results The prosthesis prediction accuracy within ±one size was 96.6% for the cup size and 97.8% for the stem size. The inter- and intraobserver reliabilities for the implant size were substantial (kappa>0.70). The intra- and interobserver reliabilities for the leg length discrepancy and femoral offset difference using the intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.89 to 0.97. Conclusion Preoperative on-screen templating using digital radiographs showed substantial accuracy and reliability for implant prediction. It is an effective method for predicting the size of implant, correcting the leg length discrepancy and restoring the femoral offset. PMID:28097109

  6. Blood flow changes to the proximal femur during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hupel, Thomas M.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Aksenov, Sergei A.; Waddell, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the changes in perfusion to the proximal femur that occur during cemented and uncemented total hip arthroplasty (THA). Design Case series. Setting A single tertiary-care centre. Patients Twenty-two consecutive patients. Those who had undergone previous hip surgery or received systemic corticosteroid therapy were excluded. Intervention Cemented (11 procedures) or uncemented (12 procedures) THA. Main outcome measure Changes in blood flow at the level of the proximal femur, measured with laser Doppler flowmetry at 4 different times during THA. Results In both the cemented and the uncemented procedure overall proximal femoral blood flow was reduced (p = 0.002, p = 0.008, respectively). A greater reduction in overall proximal femoral perfusion was seen in the cemented group compared with the uncemented group (p = 0.004). This greater reduction in perfusion was seen primarily in the proximal femoral diaphysis (p = 0.004). Conclusion The extensive canal preparation involved with the cemented procedure or the introduction of bone cement under pressure into the femoral canal may contribute to the greater reduction in perfusion to the proximal femur. PMID:11045094

  7. Preoperative gluteus medius muscle atrophy as a predictor of walking ability after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    NANKAKU, Manabu; TSUBOYAMA, Tadao; AOYAMA, Tomoki; KURODA, Yutaka; IKEGUCHI, Ryosuke; MATSUDA, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To elucidate the relation between certain preoperative physical parameters and walking with a limp after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and determine whether it is possible to predict the walking ability of patients 6 months after THA. Methods: The subjects of this study comprised 74 female patients who had undergone unilateral THA. Before surgery, the hip abductor and knee extensor strengths were measured, the cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the gluteus medius and rectus abdominis muscles were measured, and the Timed Up and Go test was conducted. The patients were then divided into two groups according to gait observation results 6 months postoperatively: walking without a limp (n=37) and walking with a limp (n=37). Results: The discriminating criteria between the two groups were age (61 years), CSA of the gluteus medius muscle (2000 mm2), and CSA of the rectus abdominis muscle (340 mm2). In the multiple logistic regression analysis, the gluteus medius muscle was the only significant predictor of limping after THA (β=1.64, R2=0.19, p<0.01). Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that preoperative atrophy of the gluteus medius is an useful indicator for predicting walking with a limp 6 months postoperatively. PMID:28289576

  8. Delayed Presentation of Sciatic Nerve Injury after Total Hip Arthroplasty: Neurosurgical Considerations, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linda W.; Veeravagu, Anand; Azad, Tej D.; Harraher, Ciara; Ratliff, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Background  Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an established treatment for end-stage arthritis, congenital deformity, and trauma with good long-term clinical and functional outcomes. Delayed sciatic nerve injury is a rare complication after THA that requires prompt diagnosis and management. Methods  We present a case of sciatic nerve motor and sensory deficit in a 52-year-old patient 2 years after index left THA. Electromyography (EMG) results and imaging with radiographs and CT of the affected hip demonstrated an aberrant acetabular cup screw in the posterior-inferior quadrant adjacent to the sciatic nerve. Case Description  The patient underwent surgical exploration that revealed injury to the peroneal division of the sciatic nerve due to direct injury from screw impingement. A literature review identified 11 patients with late-onset neuropathy after THA. Ten patients underwent surgical exploration and pain often resolved after surgery with 56% of patients recovering sensory function and 25% experiencing full recovery of motor function. Conclusions  Delayed neuropathy of the sciatic nerve is a rare complication after THA that is most often due to hardware irritation, component failure, or wear-related pseudotumor formation. Operative intervention is often pursued to explore and directly visualize the nerve with limited results in the literature showing modest relief of pain and sensory symptoms and poor restoration of motor function. PMID:27602309

  9. [What's new in orthopaedic surgery: hopes and facts in total hip and spine arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Gillet, P

    2007-01-01

    Progress in implant design and surface properties have improved long-term survival of total hip prosthesis and lowered the incidence of dislocation. New materials, particularly ceramics and metals, decrease the risk for implant loosening because they induce less particle disease than polyethylene debris. These new materials have been submitted to simulator studies before being released for clinical use. They have been used since a sufficient amount of time in clinical practice to consider them as being part of our current armamentarium. They enable the orthopaedic surgeon to tailor the optimal hip prosthesis to each patient's need, depending on his/her bone stock, activity level and life expectancy. Disk prostheses and the general concept of non fusion surgery in spine surgery seems attractive, since intervertebral fusion carries a number of drawbacks, particularly at the level of adjacent segments. However, the documented follow-up of non-fusion spine surgery is at present insufficient to consider a widespread use of these new technologies. Their own possible complications are largely unknown and they do not replace bone fusion in the most clear-cut accepted indications for spine surgery. The use of disk prostheses should therefore be strictly limited according to present knowledge.

  10. Is Drain Tip Culture Prognostic of Surgical Site Infection? Results of 1380 Drain Tip Cultures in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Takada, Ryohei; Jinno, Tetsuya; Koga, Daisuke; Hirao, Masanobu; Muneta, Takeshi; Okawa, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a prognostic value of drain tip culture for surgical site infection (SSI) after total hip arthroplasty. A total of 1380 closed suction drain tips cultured after removal in primary total hip arthroplasty were included in this study. Drains were removed in 12-72 hours after surgery. Drain tip cultures were positive in 11 cases (0.8%). SSI was found in 4 cases (0.3%), where the drain tip cultures were all negative. The sensitivity of drain tip culture for infection after surgery was 0%, and the specificity was 99.7%. We concluded that, drain tip culture cannot be prognostic for SSI after total hip arthroplasty. Routine use of drain tip culture is not supported.

  11. New options for anticoagulation following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty: new oral agents on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2012-08-01

    Patients undergoing surgery for total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are at particularly high risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Despite the existence of effective therapies for VTE prevention, THA/TKA patients remain at risk for developing thrombi. Furthermore, the incidence of VTE is predicted to increase as an aging and increasingly obese population experiences joint damage necessitating THA and TKA. Current guidelines recommend the use of a wide range of antithrombotic agents in patients undergoing THA and TKA. These agents include vitamin K antagonists, low-molecular-weight heparins, fondaparinux, and the new oral anticoagulants. However, adherence to guidelines in clinical practice is disappointingly low. The limitations of traditional anticoagulants present management challenges following orthopedic surgery. Vitamin K antagonists present a number of drawbacks, including a narrow therapeutic window and unpredictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The subcutaneous route of administration of fondaparinux and low-molecular-weight heparins may make them unacceptable to patients in the outpatient setting. The introduction of a new generation of anticoagulants promises to address many of the drawbacks associated with the traditional agents. Clinical studies have shown the new oral anticoagulants to be as effective as traditional thromboprophylaxis, with good tolerability profiles. Clinical knowledge of these new agents will be essential to ensure that patients receive appropriate care following orthopedic surgery. This article will discuss the prevention of VTE after THA and TKA based on current evidence-based practice guidelines, the limitations of conventional anticoagulants, and the promise of new therapeutics.

  12. Blood Loss in the Minimally Invasive Posterior Approach to Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Jose Ricardo Negreiros; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; de Camargo, Olavo Pire

    2008-01-01

    AIMS Our primary aim was to evaluate whether there is really less bleeding in patients for whom the minimally invasive posterior approach is used in comparison with the direct lateral approach for primary total hip arthroplasty. Our secondary aim was to evaluate the clinical functional results after six months as well as the postoperative radiographic result. METHODS In a comparative non-random prospective study, 76 adult patients underwent elective total hip arthroplasty using one of two approaches. The minimally invasive posterior approach (34 cases; mini-incision group) was compared with the standard direct lateral approach (42 cases; control group). RESULTS Lower total estimated bleeding (means of 1083.5 ml versus 1682.3 ml; p < 0.001) and lower intraoperative bleeding (means of 745.6 ml versus 1282.8 ml; p < 0.001) were found in the mini-incision group. There was, however, no difference in the volume of blood drained after the operation (means of 340 ml and 399 ml; p = 0.77). There was also a difference between the two groups regarding the need for allogenic transfusion (8.8% in the mini-incision group versus 28.6%, p = 0.02). We observed a better clinical result in the mini-incision group (p = 0.002) despite the lack of difference between the two groups in relation to the radiographic result. DISCUSSION Our results draw attention to the possibility that other authors may have underestimated blood losses when using minimally invasive approaches. CONCLUSION The minimally invasive approach gave rise to a positive final impression with regard to lower blood loss. PMID:18568245

  13. A Multicenter Approach Evaluating the Impact of Vitamin E-Blended Polyethylene in Cementless Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Marcus; van Wasen, Andrea; Warwas, Sebastian; Landgraeber, Stefan; Haversath, Marcel; Group, VITAS

    2014-01-01

    Since polyethylene is one of the most frequently used biomaterials as a liner in total hip arthroplasty, strong efforts have been made to improve design and material properties over the last 50 years. Antioxidants seems to be a promising alternative to further increase durability and reduce polyethylene wear in long term. As of yet, only in vitro results are available. While they are promising, there is yet no clinical evidence that the new material shows these advantages in vivo. To answer the question if vitamin-E enhanced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is able to improve long-term survivorship of cementless total hip arthroplasty we initiated a randomized long-term multicenter trial. Designed as a superiority study, the oxidation index assessed in retrieval analyses of explanted liners was chosen as primary parameter. Radiographic results (wear rate, osteolysis, radiolucency) and functional outcome (Harris Hip Scores, University of California-Los Angeles, Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Visual Analogue Scale) will serve as secondary parameters. Patients with the indication for a cementless total hip arthroplasty will be asked to participate in the study and will be randomized to either receive a standard hip replacement with a highly cross-linked UHMWPE-X liner or a highly cross-linked vitamin-E supplemented UHMWPE-XE liner. The follow-up will be 15 years, with evaluation after 5, 10 and 15 years. The controlled randomized study has been designed to determine if Vitamin-E supplemented highly cross-linked polyethylene liners are superior to standard XLPE liners in cementless total hip arthroplasty. While several studies have been started to evaluate the influence of vitamin-E, most of them evaluate wear rates and functional results. The approach used for this multicenter study, to analyze the oxidation status of retrieved implants, should make it possible to directly evaluate the ageing process and development of the implant

  14. A multicenter approach evaluating the impact of vitamin e-blended polyethylene in cementless total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Marcus; van Wasen, Andrea; Warwas, Sebastian; Landgraeber, Stefan; Haversath, Marcel; Group, Vitas

    2014-04-22

    Since polyethylene is one of the most frequently used biomaterials as a liner in total hip arthroplasty, strong efforts have been made to improve design and material properties over the last 50 years. Antioxidants seems to be a promising alternative to further increase durability and reduce polyethylene wear in long term. As of yet, only in vitro results are available. While they are promising, there is yet no clinical evidence that the new material shows these advantages in vivo. To answer the question if vitamin-E enhanced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is able to improve long-term survivorship of cementless total hip arthroplasty we initiated a randomized long-term multicenter trial. Designed as a superiority study, the oxidation index assessed in retrieval analyses of explanted liners was chosen as primary parameter. Radiographic results (wear rate, osteolysis, radiolucency) and functional outcome (Harris Hip Scores, University of California-Los Angeles, Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Visual Analogue Scale) will serve as secondary parameters. Patients with the indication for a cementless total hip arthroplasty will be asked to participate in the study and will be randomized to either receive a standard hip replacement with a highly cross-linked UHMWPE-X liner or a highly cross-linked vitamin-E supplemented UHMWPE-XE liner. The follow-up will be 15 years, with evaluation after 5, 10 and 15 years. The controlled randomized study has been designed to determine if Vitamin-E supplemented highly cross-linked polyethylene liners are superior to standard XLPE liners in cementless total hip arthroplasty. While several studies have been started to evaluate the influence of vitamin-E, most of them evaluate wear rates and functional results. The approach used for this multicenter study, to analyze the oxidation status of retrieved implants, should make it possible to directly evaluate the ageing process and development of the implant

  15. Health-related quality of life after total hip replacement: a Taiwan study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hon-Yi; Khan, Mahmud; Culbertson, Richard; Chang, Je-Ken; Wang, Jun-Wen; Chiu, Herng-Chia

    2009-10-01

    This study applied the generalised estimating equations (GEE) in a large-scale prospective cohort study of predictors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a Taiwan population. The study population included all patients who had undergone primary total hip replacement (THR) performed between March 1998 and December 2002 by either of two orthopaedic surgeons in two hospitals. The SF-36 was used in pre- and postoperative assessments of 335 patients. Young age, male gender, minimal comorbidity, use of epidural anaesthesia, lack of readmission within the previous 30 days, and higher preoperative functional status were positively associated with HRQoL (P < 0.05). Patients should be advised that their postoperative HRQoL may depend not only on their postoperative health care but also on their preoperative functional status. These analytical results should be applicable to other Taiwan hospitals and to other countries with similar social and cultural practices.

  16. Review article: Perioperative care in enhanced recovery for total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Marinus D J; Lemanu, Daniel P; Coleman, Brendan; Hill, Andrew G; Munro, Jacob T

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced recovery pathways for total hip and knee arthroplasty can reduce length of hospital stay and perioperative morbidity. 22 studies were reviewed for identification of perioperative care interventions, including preoperative (n=4), intra-operative (n=8), and postoperative (n=4) care interventions. Factors that improve outcomes included use of pre-emptive and multimodal analgesia regimens to reduce opioid consumption, identification of patients with poor nutritional status and provision of supplements preoperatively to improve wound healing and reduce length of hospital stay, use of warming systems and tranexamic acid, avoidance of drains to reduce operative blood loss and subsequent transfusion, and early ambulation with pharmacological and mechanical prophylaxis to reduce venous thromboembolism and to speed recovery.

  17. Pose measurement of Anterior Pelvic Plane based on inertial measurement unit in total hip replacement surgeries.

    PubMed

    Zhe Cao; Shaojie Su; Hong Chen; Hao Tang; Yixin Zhou; Zhihua Wang

    2016-08-01

    In Total Hip Replacement (THR), inaccurate measurement of Anterior Pelvic Plane (APP), which is usually used as a reference plane, will lead to malposition of the acetabular prosthesis. As a result, the risk of impingement, dislocation and wear will increase and the safe range of motion will be limited. In order to acquire the accurate pose of APP, a measurement system is designed in this paper, which includes two parts: one is used to estimate the initial pose of APP and the other is used to trail dynamic motion of APP. Both parts are composed of an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and magnetometer sensors. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is adopted to fuse the data from IMU and the magnetometer sensors to estimate the orientation of the pelvis. The test results show that the error angle between calculated axis and true axis of the pelvis in geodetic coordinate frame is less than 1.2 degree, which meets the requirement of the surgery.

  18. [Rehabilitation of patients after total endoprosthesis replacement of hip joint by the method of functional electrostimulation].

    PubMed

    Oskanian, T L; Solopova, I A; Grishin, A A; Sidorov, V D

    2008-01-01

    Patients after total endoprosthesis replacement of hip joint underwent method of functional electrostimulation (FES) with the purpose to recovery correct walking stereotype, to increase leisured muscle strength, to prevent secondary coxarthrosis development via stimulation or relaxation of muscles, and for analgesia of joints and pain zones at walking. Results of treatment of 143 patients received rehabilitation course of FES (15 procedures of 30 minutes) were compared with results of treatment of 54 patients received traditional methods. It is shown that FES is effective method of rehabilitation because it makes possible to improve muscle strength significantly, to eliminate or reduce motor deficit, to decrease pain syndrome, to form correct walking stereotype, and to perform early prophylaxis of secondary coxarthrosis on contralateral side. The main advantage of proposed method of nonmedicamental influence is better clinic-biomechanical result without use of drugs.

  19. Implication of femoral stem on performance of articular surface replacement (ASR) XL total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cip, Johannes; von Strempel, Archibald; Bach, Christian; Luegmair, Matthias; Benesch, Thomas; Martin, Arno

    2014-11-01

    Taper junctions of large diameter metal-on-metal femoral heads and femoral stems were described as metal ion generator due to accelerated wear and corrosion. However, literature about the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) total hip arthroplasty (THA) invariably deals with stems manufactured by DePuy Orthopedics (Warsaw, IN, USA). Nothing is known whether different stems with common 12/14 mm tapers affect failure rate or ion release. 99 ASR THA (88 patients) implanted with CoxaFit or ARGE Geradschaft stems (K-Implant, Hannover, Germany) were retrospectively analyzed. After a mean follow-up of 3.5 years revision rate was 24.5%, mostly due to adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD). CT scan revealed component loosening in 10.3% and pseudotumoral lesions in 12.6%. Elevated ion concentrations (>7 μg/l) were found in 38.6%.

  20. Iliopsoas tendon rupture: a new differential for atraumatic groin pain post-total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Robert Pearse; Doody, Orla; Quinlan, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    Groin pain post-total hip arthroplasty (THA) is of concern for the patient and the surgeon, especially when there is no history of any traumatic event. Obvious concern centres on complications from the prosthesis. The use of multiple imaging modalities allow for accurate diagnosis of groin pain. Atraumatic iliopsoas rupture is rare and has only been reported once before in the setting of THA. We present the case of 53-year old female with atraumatic rupture of the iliopsoas tendon that presented with severe groin pain and limited flexion. We discuss the clinical presentation, radiological features and follow-up of the patient. We also discuss the relevant published literature on the topic. This is a rare phenomenon but should be consider in patients with groin pain post-THA, especially after prosthesis complications have been ruled out. PMID:25721835

  1. Improving acetabular cup orientation in total hip arthroplasty by using smartphone technology.

    PubMed

    Peters, Frank M; Greeff, Richard; Goldstein, Neal; Frey, Chris T

    2012-08-01

    Acetabular cup placement in total hip arthroplasty is often difficult to assess, especially in the lateral position and using the posterior approach. Conventional techniques and computer-assisted surgery are the 2 most popular methods for proper placement of the acetabular cup in Lewinnek's safe zone of orientation (anteversion 15° ± 10° and lateral inclination 40° ± 10°). We developed a system that uses the accelerometer and camera function of the iPhone. A level indicator application and protractor application were downloaded to the iPhone and used to improve acetabular cup placement. This system has proven to be accurate and quick. Our series of 50 prospective cases showed good results with all our acetabular cups being placed within a narrow range in the safe zone and with less than 5% difference between the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative acetabular inclinations.

  2. Preoperative pain level and patient expectation predict hospital length of stay after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Halawi, Mohamad J; Vovos, Tyler J; Green, Cindy L; Wellman, Samuel S; Attarian, David E; Bolognesi, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify preoperative predictors of length of stay after primary total hip arthroplasty in a patient population reflecting current trends toward shorter hospitalization and using readily obtainable factors that do not require scoring systems. A retrospective review of 112 consecutive patients was performed. High preoperative pain level and patient expectation of discharge to extended care facilities (ECFs) were the only significant multivariable predictors of hospitalization extending beyond 2 days (P=0.001 and P<0.001 respectively). Patient expectation remained significant after adjusting for Medicare's 3-day requirement for discharge to ECFs (P<0.001). The study was adequately powered to analyze the variables in the multivariable logistic regression model, which had a concordance index of 0.857.

  3. Three-dimensional printing for preoperative planning of total hip arthroplasty revision: case report.

    PubMed

    Zerr, Joseph; Chatzinoff, Yonatan; Chopra, Rajiv; Estrera, Kenneth; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2016-10-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing can be used to create material models to aid preoperative planning of complex orthopedic procedures as exemplified by this case of total hip arthroplasty failure due to infection with resulting severe acetabular bone stock deficiency. The 3D model allowed for trialing of the acetabular component to determine cup size, position, and screw placement. Most importantly, the model confirmed that there was not a pelvic discontinuity and the revision shell would be sufficient for the reconstruction. Previously, the cost and complexity of utilization of 3D printers were prohibitive. Recent improvements in commercially available 3D printers have made rapid prototype model creation a realistic option, which can facilitate difficult surgery.

  4. Iliopsoas tendon rupture: a new differential for atraumatic groin pain post-total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Robert Pearse; Doody, Orla; Quinlan, John Francis

    2015-02-26

    Groin pain post-total hip arthroplasty (THA) is of concern for the patient and the surgeon, especially when there is no history of any traumatic event. Obvious concern centres on complications from the prosthesis. The use of multiple imaging modalities allow for accurate diagnosis of groin pain. Atraumatic iliopsoas rupture is rare and has only been reported once before in the setting of THA. We present the case of 53-year old female with atraumatic rupture of the iliopsoas tendon that presented with severe groin pain and limited flexion. We discuss the clinical presentation, radiological features and follow-up of the patient. We also discuss the relevant published literature on the topic. This is a rare phenomenon but should be consider in patients with groin pain post-THA, especially after prosthesis complications have been ruled out.

  5. Physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM) care pathways: "patients after total hip arthroplasty".

    PubMed

    Ribinik, P; Le Moine, F; de Korvin, G; Coudeyre, E; Genty, M; Rannou, F; Yelnik, A; Calmels, P

    2012-11-01

    This document is part of a series of documents designed by the French Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Society (SOFMER) and the French Federation of PRM (FEDMER). These documents describe the needs for or a specific type of patients; PRM care objectives, human and material resources to be implemented, chronology as well as expected outcomes. "Care pathways in PRM" is a short document designed to enable the reader (physicians, decision-maker, administrator, lawyer or finance manager) to quickly apprehend the needs of these patients and the available therapeutic care structures for proper organization and pricing of these activities. Patients after total hip arthroplasty are classified into three care sequences and two clinical categories, each one being treated with the same six parameters according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO), while taking into account personal and environmental factors that could influence the needs of these patients.

  6. Lower Urinary Tract Infection and Periprosthetic Joint Infection after Elective Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Ho; Lee, Young-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a grave complication. Urinary tract infection (UTI) as a source for PJI is controversial. Our purposes were, (1) to evaluate the incidence of PJI after elective primary THA and (2) to determine whether UTI was associated with a risk of PJI after elective primary THA. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 527 patients who underwent elective primary THA by using universal aseptic technique from May 2003 to October 2007. UTI group (13 patients) was defined as patients who underwent THA in status of having an UTI, and the remaining patients were defined as control group (514 patients). We compared the incidence of PJI in both groups. Results During the study period, the incidence of PJI was 0%, regardless of existence (or presence) of UTI. Conclusion There was no significant association between UTI and PJI, when cautiously performed THA. PMID:28316960

  7. Comparison of Conventional Polyethylene Wear and Signs of Cup Failure in Two Similar Total Hip Designs

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Thomas B.; Keith, Kevin C.; Snider, Rebecca G.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; DesJardins, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple factors have been identified as contributing to polyethylene wear and debris generation of the acetabular lining. Polyethylene wear is the primary limiting factor in the functional behavior and consequent longevity of a total hip arthroplasty (THA). This retrospective study reviewed the clinical and radiographic data of 77 consecutive THAs comparing in vivo polyethylene wear of two similar acetabular cup liners. Minimum follow-up was 7 years (range 7–15). The incidence of measurable wear in a group of machined liners sterilized with ethylene oxide and composed of GUR 1050 stock resin was significantly higher (61%) than the compression-molded, GUR 1020, O2-free gamma irradiation sterilized group (24%) (P = 0.0004). Clinically, at a 9-year average followup, both groups had comparable HHS scores and incidence of thigh or groin pain, though the machined group had an increased incidence of osteolysis and annual linear wear rate. PMID:23662210

  8. Cancer risk estimates from radiation therapy for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theoharris; Damilakis, John; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication following total hip arthroplasty. This study was conducted to calculate the radiation dose to organs-at-risk and estimate the probability of cancer induction from radiotherapy for HO prophylaxis.Methods: Hip irradiation for HO with a 6 MV photon beam was simulated with the aid of a Monte Carlo model. A realistic humanoid phantom representing an average adult patient was implemented in Monte Carlo environment for dosimetric calculations. The average out-of-field radiation dose to stomach, liver, lung, prostate, bladder, thyroid, breast, uterus, and ovary was calculated. The organ-equivalent-dose to colon, that was partly included within the treatment field, was also determined. Organ dose calculations were carried out using three different field sizes. The dependence of organ doses upon the block insertion into primary beam for shielding colon and prosthesis was investigated. The lifetime attributable risk for cancer development was estimated using organ, age, and gender-specific risk coefficients.Results: For a typical target dose of 7 Gy, organ doses varied from 1.0 to 741.1 mGy by the field dimensions and organ location relative to the field edge. Blocked field irradiations resulted in a dose range of 1.4–146.3 mGy. The most probable detriment from open field treatment of male patients was colon cancer with a high risk of 564.3 × 10{sup −5} to 837.4 × 10{sup −5} depending upon the organ dose magnitude and the patient's age. The corresponding colon cancer risk for female patients was (372.2–541.0) × 10{sup −5}. The probability of bladder cancer development was more than 113.7 × 10{sup −5} and 110.3 × 10{sup −5} for males and females, respectively. The cancer risk range to other individual organs was reduced to (0.003–68.5) × 10{sup −5}.Conclusions: The risk for cancer induction from radiation therapy for HO prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty varies considerably by the

  9. Clinical and Wear Analyses of 9 Large Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Mathijssen, N. M. C.; Witt, F.; Morlock, M. M.; Vehmeijer, S. B. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metal-on-Metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasties (THA) are associated with pseudotumor formation and high revision rates. This prospective study analysed the clinical and wear analyses of 9 large Metal-on-Metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasties (THA) to understand the underlying mechanisms of failure. The MoM bearings were revised for multiple reasons; the main reason was pseudotumor formation. Materials and Methods From 2006 till 2010 the Reinier de Graaf Hospital implanted 160 large head M2a-Magnum™ (Biomet Inc. Warsaw, Indiana, USA) THAs in 150 patients. The first year, 9 bearings were revised and analysed at the Biomechanics Section, Hamburg University of Technology, Germany. We performed clinical (Harris Hip Score, radiographic analysis, blood cobalt and chromium) and wear analysis (implant, tissue and fluid) of the 9 bearings. Since this study did not fall under the scope of the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act in The Netherlands, no ethical approval was necessary. In this prospective study all patient details were anonymized by the corresponding author, all other authors were blinded during the research and wear analyses. Patients with bilateral MoM implants were excluded. Results The 9 bearings had a median (IQR) survival of 41.0 (25) months in situ. From these bearings, three showed no noticeable wear. The median (IQR) head wear volume was 3.2 (3.6) mm3 and maximum wear depth 0.02 (0.02) mm. For the cup the median (IQR) wear volume was 0.23 (0.3) mm3 with a maximum wear depth of 0.03 (0.05) mm. Conclusion An early identification of parameters related to failure of the MoM THA, such as pain, decreased range of motion, radiographic changes and high levels of blood cobalt and chromium is of great importance for patient’s quality of life. Especially now patients and surgeons face the long term effects of all these bearings still in situ. This study reports the clinical and wear analyses of 9 MoM THA. In the majority of this group the

  10. Pre-operative function, motivation and duration of symptoms predict sporting participation after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, M; Frey, S; Parratte, S; Flecher, X; Argenson, J N

    2014-08-01

    There is little in the literature on the level of participation in sports which patients undertake after total hip replacement (THR). Our aims in this study were to determine first, the level of sporting activity, second, the predictive factors for returning to sporting activity, and third, the correlation between participation in sports and satisfaction after THR. We retrospectively identified 815 patients who had undergone THR between 1995 and 2005. All were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire regarding their sporting activity. A total of 571 patients (71%) met the inclusion criteria and completed the evaluation. At a mean follow-up of 9.8 years (sd 2.9), 366 patients (64%) returned to sporting activity as defined by a University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score of > 5. The main reasons that patients had for refraining from sports were fear of dislocation (65; 31.6%), avoiding wear (52; 25.4%), and the recommendation of the surgeon (34; 16.6%). There was a significant relationship between higher post-operative participation in sport in those patients with a higher pre-operative Harris hip score (HHS) (p = 0.0074), motivation to participate in sporting activities (p = 0.00022) and a shorter duration of symptoms (p = 0.0034). Finally, there was a correlation between age (p = 0.00013), UCLA score (p = 0.012) and pre-operative HHS (p = 0.00091) and satisfaction. In conclusion, we found that most patients participate in sporting activity after THR, regardless of the advice of their surgeon, and that there is a correlation between the level of participation and pre-operative function, motivation, duration of symptoms and post-operative satisfaction.

  11. Efficacy of intra-articular magnesium for postoperative analgesia in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xinxian; Wen, Hong; Hu, Yuezheng; Liu, Zhongtang; Pan, Xiaoyun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of intra-articular magnesium sulphate and a saline placebo for postoperative pain control following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Sixty patients underwent THA and were randomly allocated into two groups to receive intra-articular injections of either 10 ml magnesium sulphate (100 mg/ml; magnesium group, n=30) or 10 ml normal saline solution (control group, n=30). Postoperative analgesia was maintained by intravenous morphine injection. The outcome measurements were visual analogue score (VAS), morphine consumption and Harris hip score (HHS). The two groups were well matched. The outcome of VAS at rest was significantly lower at postoperative hours 6 and 12 in the magnesium group as compared with the control group, although the difference was insignificant preoperatively and at postoperative hours 2, 4, 24 and 48, and days 3, 7 and 14. This indicator during activity was also lower in the magnesium group at postoperative hour 24 than that of the control group, although the difference was insignificant preoperatively and at hour 48, and days 7 and 14. The consumption of morphine (the total quantity) at 0–6, 6–12 and 0–48 h in the magnesium group was significantly lower than in the control group, although no significant differences were observed at 12–24 and 24–48 h between the groups. The improvements of HHS from preoperative to postoperative scores were statistically significant, however, no significant differences were identified between groups. Thus, the findings indicate that intra-articular magnesium sulphate injections provided improved pain control and reduced the need for morphine when compared with a saline placebo following THA. PMID:28357078

  12. Analysis of factors influencing return to work after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Rąpała, Kazimierz; Tarnowski, Adam; Kucharczyk, Wojciech

    2013-10-31

    BACKGROUND. Patients who undergo total hip arthroplasty (THA) find it difficult to return to work. OBJECTIVES. Analysis of factors influencing return to work after THA. Assessment of patients' quality of life and its impact on their attitude to work. MATERIAL AND METHODS. We studied patients operated on for degenerative hip disease at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education in Otwock between 2007 and 2012. The total number of the patients was 400; however, we chose only those patients who were younger than 65 and still in employment. The study population consisted of 54 of these patients. The mean patient age was 55.89 (±7.424). There were 29 men (57.3%) and 25 women (46.3%). RESULTS. 32 patients (59.3%) returned to work. There was a statistically significant difference regarding the attitude to work and return to work. An overwhelming majority of the patients who returned to work--31 out of 32 (96.6%)--liked their jobs. The 12 patients (22.22%) who did not return to work declared their intention to apply for a disability pension. The patients who returned to work assessed their physical health as better than the patients who did not return to work. CONCLUSIONS. 1. 40.7% of patients after THA did not return to preoperative employment. The reasons for not returning were not medical, because elimination of pain and an increased range of motion made return to work possible. 2. The perception of the quality of physical and psychological health among patients with THA who returned to work was significantly better than among those who did not return.

  13. Sick leave in Sweden before and after total joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Stigmar, Kjerstin; Dahlberg, Leif E; Zhou, Caddie; Jacobson Lidgren, Helena; Petersson, Ingemar F; Englund, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Little is know about patterns of sick leave in connection with total hip and knee joint replacement (THR and TKR) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods Using registers from southern Sweden, we identified hip and knee OA patients aged 40–59 years who had a THR or TKR in the period 2004–2012. Patients who died or started on disability pension were excluded. We included 1,307 patients with THR (46% women) and 996 patients with TKR (56% women). For the period 1 year before until 2 years after the surgery, we linked individual-level data on sick leave from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency. We created a matched reference cohort from the general population by age, birth year, and area of residence (THR: n = 4,604; TKR: n = 3,425). The mean number of days on sick leave and the proportion (%) on sick leave 12 and 24 months before and after surgery were calculated. Results The month after surgery, about 90% of patients in both cohorts were on sick leave. At the two-year follow-up, sick leave was lower for both cohorts than 1 year before surgery, except for men with THR, but about 9% of the THR patients and 12–17% of the TKR patients were still sick-listed. In the matched reference cohorts, sick leave was constant at around 4–7% during the entire study period. Interpretation A long period of sick leave is common after total joint replacement, especially after TKR. There is a need for better knowledge on how workplace adjustments and rehabilitation can facilitate the return to work and can postpone surgery. PMID:27996342

  14. Haemodynamic performance of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) during recovery from total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients post total hip arthroplasty (THA) remain at high risk of developing Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) during the recovery period following surgery despite the availability of effective pharmacological and mechanical prophylactic methods. The use of calf muscle neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) during the hospitalised recovery period on this patient group may be effective at preventing DVT. However, the haemodynamic effectiveness and comfort characteristics of NMES in post-THA patients immediately following surgery have yet to be established. Methods The popliteal veins of 11 patients, who had undergone unilateral total hip replacement surgery on the day previous to the study, were measured using Doppler ultrasound during a 4 hour neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) session of the calf muscles. The effect of calf muscle NMES on peak venous velocity, mean venous velocity and volume flow were compared to resting values. Comfort was assessed using a 100mm non-hatched visual analogue scale taken before application of NMES, once NMES was initiated and before NMES was withdrawn. Results In the operated limb NMES produced increases in peak venous velocity of 99% compared to resting. Mean velocity increased by 178% compared to resting and volume flow increased by 159% compared to resting. In the un-operated limb, peak venous velocity increased by 288%, mean velocity increased by 354% and volume flow increased by 614% compared to basal flow (p<0.05 in all cases). There were no significant differences observed between the VAS scores taken before the application of NMES, once NMES was initiated and before NMES was withdrawn (p=.211). Conclusions NMES produces a beneficial hemodynamic response in patients in the early post-operative period following orthopaedic surgery. This patient group found extended periods of calf-muscle NMES tolerable. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01785251 PMID:23497524

  15. Effect of training level on accuracy of digital templating in primary total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Andrew R; Kim, Jeffrey D; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Levine, Brett R

    2012-02-17

    The use of digital radiography and templating software continues to become more prevalent in orthopedics as the number of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures increases every year. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of training level on the accuracy of digital templating for primary THA and TKA. Digital radiographs of 97 patients undergoing primary THA (49 cases) and TKA (48 cases) were retrospectively templated using OrthoView digital planning software (OrthoView LLC, Jacksonville, Florida). Anteroposterior hip and lateral knee radiographs were digitally templated and compared with the actual size of the implants used intraoperatively. An implant sales representative, physician assistant, medical student (J.D.K.), resident (A.R.H.), and fellowship-trained arthroplasty surgeon (B.R.L.) templated all cases independently after a standardized orientation and were blinded to the actual component sizes used for surgery. The medical student, resident, and arthroplasty surgeon retemplated the same 97 cases 1 month later to determine intraobserver reliability. Digital templating was accurate in predicting the correct implant size in 33% of THAs and 54% of TKAs. In 73% of THAs and 92% of TKAs, digital templating was within 1 size of the actual implant used, and in 88% of THAs and 99% of TKAs, templating was within 2 sizes of the final components. In no cases did the templated implant size vary by >3 sizes from the final components. Interobserver reliability for templating THAs and TKAs showed good reliability as measured by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (ICC(THA)=.70; ICC(TKA)=.86). Intraobserver reliability for templating THAs had excellent reliability for the resident and arthroplasty surgeon, with a kappa coefficient (κ) of 0.92, and good reliability for the medical student (κ=0.78). Intraobserver reliability for templating TKAs showed excellent reliability among all examiners (κ=0.90).

  16. Uncemented porous tantalum acetabular components: early follow-up and failures in 613 primary total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Noiseux, Nicolas O; Long, William J; Mabry, Tad M; Hanssen, Arlen D; Lewallen, David G

    2014-03-01

    Uncemented tantalum acetabular components were introduced in 1997. The purpose was to determine the 2- to 10-year results with this implant material in primary total hip arthroplasty. Our registry identified all primary total hip cases with porous tantalum cups implanted from 1997 to 2004. Clinical outcomes and radiographs were studied. 613 cases were identified. Seventeen percent of patients were lost to follow-up. Twenty-five reoperations were performed (4.4%). Acetabular cup removal occurred in 6 cases (1.2%). No cups were revised for aseptic loosening. Incomplete radiolucent lines were found on 9.3% of initial postoperative radiographs. At 2 years, 67% had resolved. Zero new radiolucent lines were detected. Two- to 10-year results of porous tantalum acetabular components for primary total hip arthroplasty demonstrate high rates of initial stability and apparent ingrowth.

  17. Forgotten intrauterine contraceptive device – A threat to total hip prosthesis: A case report with review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sonam; Sharma, Sansar Chand

    2016-01-01

    Primary total hip replacement has become a routine procedure these days. With improvement in surgical techniques and implant designs, the survival rate of prosthesis has increased significantly but unfortunately, prosthetic infections though uncommon continue to be a threatening complication. We present a detailed review of the literature along with a case report of infected total hip prosthesis in a 36-year-old female who had been operated 6 years back. The causative organism was found to be Actinomyces israelii which was related to an infected intrauterine device used for contraception that had been forgotten after being implanted 8 years earlier. PMID:27182152

  18. [Femoral superficial vein thrombosis due to a large iliopsoas bursitis secondary to polyethylene wear debris in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Lax Pérez, R; Salinas Gilabert, J E; Lajara Marco, F; Lax Pérez, A; Ferrero Manzanal, F; García-Gálvez, A; Izquierdo Plazas, L

    2012-01-01

    A 76 year old male patient with a history of implantation of a total hip arthroplasty Perfecta (Orthomet(®)), who presented with an iliac fossa mass, increased diameter of the thigh, and pain during hip flexion and extension. CT and ultrasound show the presence of a giant cystic mass in left iliac fossa about 7 cm in diameter next to the prosthesis. A pseudo-tumour secondary to wear debris after placement of a total arthroplasty is rare. We present a case of a large iliopsoas bursitis caused by polyethylene particles, which caused compression and thrombosis of the superficial femoral vein.

  19. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma at the site of an alumina-on-alumina-bearing total hip arthroplasty mimicking infected trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Jang, Woo Young; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Yoon, Kang Sup; Kim, Hee Joong

    2012-02-01

    Although the incidence of malignant tumors in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasties (THAs) is known to be lower than the general population, there exist several reports on the development of malignant tumors at the site of THAs. We report another case of malignant fibrous histiocytoma at the site of a THA, which was developed in an older patient who presented a cystic mass around the total hip prosthesis using a ceramic-on-ceramic bearing system, even without evidence of osteolysis or loosening of implants. This is the second case associated with an aluminum oxide prosthesis in English literature.

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Suprainguinal Fascia Iliaca Technique Provides Benefit as an Analgesic Adjunct for Patients Undergoing Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bullock, W Michael; Yalamuri, Suraj M; Gregory, Stephen H; Auyong, David B; Grant, Stuart A

    2017-02-01

    Analgesia after total hip arthroplasty is often accomplished by the fascia iliaca compartment block, traditionally performed below the inguinal ligament, to anesthetize both femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves. The course of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve below the inguinal ligament is variable as opposed to consistent above the inguinal ligament in the pelvis. In this case series including 5 patients, we demonstrate that an ultrasound-guided suprainguinal fascia iliaca approach would consistently anesthetize the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve along with anterior cutaneous femoral nerve branches and provide cutaneous analgesia after total hip arthroplasty, as shown by decreased opioid consumption.

  1. Comparison of Balance, Proprioception and Skeletal Muscle Mass in Total Hip Replacement Patients With and Without Fracture: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there was a difference in balance, proprioception, and skeletal muscle mass among patients who undergo hip fracture surgery relative to and elective total hip replacement (THR). Methods Thirty-one THR patients were enrolled. The patients were categorized into two groups: fracture group (n=15) and non-fracture group (n=16). Berg Balance Scale (BBS) was used to balance the proprioception of the hip joint while a joint position sense (JPS) test was used to evaluate it. Skeletal muscle mass was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis and expressed as a skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). Quality of life (QOL) was also assessed using a 36-item short form health survey (SF-36). All tests were assessed at 3 months after the surgery. An independent t-test was used to compare the fracture group and non-fracture group. Spearman correlation was used to identify the correlation of each variable. Results In an independent t-test, the BBS score of patients undergoing elective surgery was higher than the BBS score of patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. There was a significant correlation between the BBS and JPS score after a THR. SMI also correlated with the score of BBS. Conclusion It seems that THR patients undergoing surgery for a hip fracture might have more trouble balancing than elective THR patients. Therefore THR patients undergoing hip fracture surgery might need more care during rehabilitation. PMID:28119837

  2. A Population-Based Study of Trends in the Use of Total Hip and Total Knee Arthroplasty, 1969-2008

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Vessely, Michael B.; Harmsen, W. Scott; Schleck, Cathy D.; Melton, L. Joseph; Kurland, Robert L.; Berry, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the rates of use of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) during the past 4 decades. METHODS: The Rochester Epidemiology Project was used to identify all Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents who underwent THA or TKA from January 1, 1969, through December 31, 2008. We used a population-based approach because few data are available on long-term trends in the use of THA and TKA in the United States. Rates of use were determined by age- and sex-specific person-years at risk. Poisson regression was used to assess temporal trends by sex and age group. RESULTS: The age- and sex-adjusted use of THA increased from 50.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.5-59.8) per 100,000 person-years in 1969-1972 to 145.5 (95% CI, 134.2-156.9) in 2005-2008, whereas TKA increased markedly from 31.2 (95% CI, 25.3-37.1) per 100,000 person-years in 1971-1976 to 220.9 (95% CI, 206.7-235.0) in 2005-2008. For both procedures, use was greater among females, and the rate generally increased with age. CONCLUSION: In this community, TKA and THA use rates have increased steadily since the introduction of the procedures and continue to increase for all age groups. On the basis of these population-based data, the probable need for TKA and THA exceeds current federal agency projections. PMID:20823375

  3. Telerehabilitation Versus Traditional Care Following Total Hip Replacement: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Michael; Crossley, Kay; Russell, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    Background Total hip replacement (THR) is the gold standard treatment for severe hip osteoarthritis. Effectiveness of physical rehabilitation for THR patients following discharge from hospital is supported by evidence; however, barriers such as geographical location and transport can limit access to appropriate health care. One solution to this issue is using an alternative model of care using telerehabilitation technology to deliver rehabilitation programs directly into patients’ homes. A telerehabilitation model may also have potential health care cost savings for health care providers. Objective This study aims to determine if a telerehabilitation model of care delivered remotely is as effective as face-to-face rehabilitation in the THR population and cost effective for health care providers and patients. Methods A total of 70 people undergoing THR will be recruited to participate in a randomized, single-blind, controlled noninferiority clinical trial. The trial will compare a technology-based THR rehabilitation program to in-person care. On discharge from hospital, participants randomized to the in-person group will receive usual care, defined as a paper home exercise program (HEP) targeting strengthening exercises for quadriceps, hip abductors, extensors, and flexors; they will be advised to perform their HEP 3 times per day. At 2, 4, and 6 weeks postoperatively, they will receive a 30-minute in-person physiotherapy session with a focus on gait retraining and reviewing and progressing their HEP. The telerehabilitation protocol will involve a program similar in content to the in-person rehabilitation program, except delivery will be directly into the homes of the participants via telerehabilitation technology on an iPad. Outcomes will be evaluated preoperatively, day of discharge from in-patient physiotherapy, 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. The primary outcome will be the quality of life subscale of the hip disability and osteoarthritis outcome score

  4. Postoperative high-dose intravenous iron sucrose with low dose erythropoietin therapy after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jiyeol; Kim, Sungmin; Lee, Soo Chan; Lim, Hongsub

    2010-12-01

    Erythropoietin combined with parenteral iron sucrose therapy is an alternative to blood transfusion in anemic patients. It was shown to be effective in surgical patients in several previous studies when used in conjunction with other methods. However, there are no guidelines about safety limits in dosage amounts or intervals. In this study, we report a case of significant postoperative hemorrhage managed with high dose parenteral iron sucrose, low dose erythropoietin, vitamin B(12), vitamin C, and folic acid. An 80-year-old female patient presented for severe anemia after a total hip arthroplasty and refused an allogenic blood transfusion as treatment. The preoperative hemoglobin of 12.2 g/dL decreased to 5.3 g/dL postoperatively. She received the aforementioned combination of iron sucrose, erythropoietin, and vitamins. A total of 1,500 mg of intravenous iron sucrose was given postoperatively for 6 consecutive days. Erythropoietin was also administered at 2,000 IU every other day for a total of 12,000 IU. The patient was discharged in good condition on the twelfth postoperative day with a hemoglobin of 8.5 g/dL. Her hemoglobin was at 11.2 g/dL on the twentieth postoperative day.

  5. Characterization and tribology of PEG-like coatings on UHMWPE for total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Kane, Sheryl R; Ashby, Paul D; Pruitt, Lisa A

    2010-03-15

    A crosslinked hydrogel coating similar to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was covalently bonded to the surface of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) to improve the lubricity and wear resistance of the UHWMPE for use in total joint replacements. The chemistry, hydrophilicity, and protein adsorption resistance of the coatings were determined, and the wear behavior of the PEG-like coating was examined by two methods: pin-on-disk tribometry to evaluate macroscale behavior, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to simulate asperity wear. As expected, the coating was found to be highly PEG-like, with approximately 83% ether content by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and more hydrophilic and resistant to protein adsorption than uncoated UHMWPE. Pin-on-disk testing showed that the PEG-like coating could survive 3 MPa of contact pressure, comparable to that experienced by total hip replacements. AFM nanoscratching experiments uncovered three damage mechanisms for the coatings: adhesion/microfracture, pure adhesion, and delamination. The latter two mechanisms appear to correlate well with wear patterns induced by pin-on-disk testing and evaluated by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy mapping. Understanding the mechanisms by which the PEG-like coatings wear is critical for improving the behavior of subsequent generations of wear-resistant hydrogel coatings.

  6. Patients’ Expectations Impact Their Satisfaction following Total Hip or Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Neuprez, Audrey; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Bruyère, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to assess the number and magnitude of preoperative expectations and to correlate them with the degree of satisfaction expressed one year after Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) or Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA), in patients with severe and painful osteoarthritis (OA). Materials and Methods Preoperative expectations (within 20 days prior to surgery) and postoperative satisfaction (one year after the intervention) were measured using the previously validated French version of the Hospital for Special Surgery Hip or Knee Replacement Expectations Survey. Postoperative satisfaction was measured using a specific scale, following the same methodology as that used for the assessment of expectations. Prediction of the satisfaction of the patients was performed using multivariate linear regression modelling. Results A total of 138 patients (80 THA and 58 TKA) completed the two parts of the study. The expectations score (mean ± SD) (range 0–100) was 72.58 ± 12.63 before THA and 69.10 ± 13.72 before TKA (p = 0.13). The number of expectations expressed was 14.34 ± 1.32 (out of a potential maximum of 18) before THA and 14.70 ± 2.29 (out of a potential maximum of 19) before TKA. After 1 year, THA generated a significantly higher degree of satisfaction compared to TKA (69.70 ± 14.46 v 60.44 ± 17.54, p<0.001) (range 0–100). The pre-operative expectations score was the single best positive predictor of the post-surgery satisfaction assessment both for TKA and THA. Conclusion Patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty for end-stage OA have a high level of expectations, before both THA and TKA. While both types of interventions significantly improve essential and non-essential activities, the rate of satisfaction is significantly greater post THA. Preoperative expectations are a major contributor to the final degree of satisfaction, one year after surgery. These results re-emphasize the need for an optimal preoperative interaction

  7. Gait abnormalities before and after total hip arthroplasty differ in men and women.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C

    2016-10-03

    This study tested the hypothesis that men and women have different preoperative and postoperative gait impairment relative to sex-matched healthy controls, and that the extent of gait improvement after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is different between men and women. A group of 124 THA subjects was identified from a motion analysis data repository; age and BMI-matched male and female control groups were then identified from the same repository. Dynamic sagittal plane hip range of motion (HROM) and peak 3D external moments at subjects' normal walking speeds were analyzed. Each hypotheses was tested using linear regression models, to adjust for potential confounding effects of walking speed. Preoperatively, the THA vs. control group differences in the HROM and peak adduction moments were larger in women than they were in men (p=0.007). The THA group vs. control group difference in the peak external rotation moment was larger in men (p=0.004). After surgery, HROM increased more in women than in men (p=0.020). However, peak adduction moment decreased in men but increased in women (-0.11±0.93 vs. 0.28±1.3%BWH, p=0.045). Accordingly, postoperatively the THA group vs. control group differences in the peak external rotation moment remained larger in men than in women (p=0.016). There were no other sex-specific differences (p=0.072-0.876). This study suggests that men and women have slightly different patterns of gait recovery after THA and may benefit from sex-specific rehabilitation strategies. These differences also underscore the importance of accounting for sex in biomechanical studies.

  8. Friction in Total Hip Joint Prosthesis Measured In Vivo during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Philipp; Dymke, Joern; Ackermann, Robert; Bender, Alwina; Graichen, Friedmar; Halder, Andreas; Beier, Alexander; Bergmann, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Friction-induced moments and subsequent cup loosening can be the reason for total hip joint replacement failure. The aim of this study was to measure the in vivo contact forces and friction moments during walking. Instrumented hip implants with Al2O3 ceramic head and an XPE inlay were used. In vivo measurements were taken 3 months post operatively in 8 subjects. The coefficient of friction was calculated in 3D throughout the whole gait cycle, and average values of the friction-induced power dissipation in the joint were determined. On average, peak contact forces of 248% of the bodyweight and peak friction moments of 0.26% bodyweight times meter were determined. However, contact forces and friction moments varied greatly between individuals. The friction moment increased during the extension phase of the joint. The average coefficient of friction also increased during this period, from 0.04 (0.03 to 0.06) at contralateral toe off to 0.06 (0.04 to 0.08) at contralateral heel strike. During the flexion phase, the coefficient of friction increased further to 0.14 (0.09 to 0.23) at toe off. The average friction-induced power throughout the whole gait cycle was 2.3 W (1.4 W to 3.8 W). Although more parameters than only the synovia determine the friction, the wide ranges of friction coefficients and power dissipation indicate that the lubricating properties of synovia are individually very different. However, such differences may also exist in natural joints and may influence the progression of arthrosis. Furthermore, subjects with very high power dissipation may be at risk of thermally induced implant loosening. The large increase of the friction coefficient during each step could be caused by the synovia being squeezed out under load. PMID:24260114

  9. A Novel Approach for Dynamic Testing of Total Hip Dislocation under Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Sven; Kluess, Daniel; Kaehler, Michael; Grawe, Robert; Rachholz, Roman; Souffrant, Robert; Zierath, János; Bader, Rainer; Woernle, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Constant high rates of dislocation-related complications of total hip replacements (THRs) show that contributing factors like implant position and design, soft tissue condition and dynamics of physiological motions have not yet been fully understood. As in vivo measurements of excessive motions are not possible due to ethical objections, a comprehensive approach is proposed which is capable of testing THR stability under dynamic, reproducible and physiological conditions. The approach is based on a hardware-in-the-loop (HiL) simulation where a robotic physical setup interacts with a computational musculoskeletal model based on inverse dynamics. A major objective of this work was the validation of the HiL test system against in vivo data derived from patients with instrumented THRs. Moreover, the impact of certain test conditions, such as joint lubrication, implant position, load level in terms of body mass and removal of muscle structures, was evaluated within several HiL simulations. The outcomes for a normal sitting down and standing up maneuver revealed good agreement in trend and magnitude compared with in vivo measured hip joint forces. For a deep maneuver with femoral adduction, lubrication was shown to cause less friction torques than under dry conditions. Similarly, it could be demonstrated that less cup anteversion and inclination lead to earlier impingement in flexion motion including pelvic tilt for selected combinations of cup and stem positions. Reducing body mass did not influence impingement-free range of motion and dislocation behavior; however, higher resisting torques were observed under higher loads. Muscle removal emulating a posterior surgical approach indicated alterations in THR loading and the instability process in contrast to a reference case with intact musculature. Based on the presented data, it can be concluded that the HiL test system is able to reproduce comparable joint dynamics as present in THR patients. PMID:26717236

  10. Templating in uncemented total hip arthroplasty—on intra- and interobserver reliability and professional experience

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Nils J.; Pripp, Are Hugo; Reikerås, Olav

    2017-01-01

    Background This study examines the intra-, and interobserver reliability of digital templating in uncemented total hip arthroplasty (THA), and assesses whether these values are dependent on professional experience. Methods Three independent observers retrospectively examined digital X-rays of 34 consecutive hips scheduled for uncemented THA. These were templated using templating software. Evaluations were carried out on two occasions at least 6 weeks apart. Findings were compared to each surgeon’s own findings, and then to the other surgeons’ findings. Data underwent statistical analysis to assess and describe reliability. Results The intraobserver reliability of the method was found to be good. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for individual surgeons ranged from 0.81 to 0.87 for acetabular components and 0.74 to 0.91 for femoral components. However, it was somewhat lower for neck length with kappa statistics (κ) from 0.41 to 0.51 with agreement in about 70% of the cases. Interobserver reliability was similar, with an ICC of 0.87 for the acetabular component and 0.79 for the femoral component, but somewhat lower for neck length with κ of 0.27 and agreement in 41% of the cases. We found no association between increasing experience and increasing precision, as the least experienced observer showed the highest intraobserver reliability. Conclusions The reliability of digital templating of uncemented THA is good for acetabular and femoral components, but inferior for neck length. Precision does not rely on professional experience. Digital templating provides surgeons with a valuable tool for preoperative planning, but cannot supersede the intraoperative assessment and final decision. PMID:28251122

  11. Ceramic-on-metal for total hip replacement: mixing and matching can lead to high wear.

    PubMed

    Affatato, Saverio; Spinelli, Michele; Zavalloni, Mara; Traina, Francesco; Carmignato, Simone; Toni, Aldo

    2010-04-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal bearing surfaces are often employed for total hip replacement because of their resistance to wear. However, they have some limits: brittleness is a major concern for ceramic, and ion release is a drawback for metal. To reduce the effect of these limitations, a hybrid coupling of ceramic-on-metal has been proposed. The theoretical advantage of this new coupling might lead orthopedic surgeons to use it indiscriminately. We asked whether the wear rate of this innovative solution was comparable with that of ceramic-on-ceramic, which is considered to be the gold standard for wear resistance. In a hip simulator study, we tested the wear pattern of a hybrid ceramic-on-metal coupling supplied by the same distributor; in particular, three different configurations were tested for 5 million cycles: 36-mm ceramic-on-ceramic, 32-mm and 36-mm ceramic-on-metal. These combinations were gravimetrically and geometrically evaluated. After 5 million cycles, the volumetric loss for the metal acetabular cups (Phi 36-mm) was 20-fold greater than that of the ceramic cups of the same size (Phi 36-mm); a volumetric loss of 4.35 mm(3) and 0.26 mm(3) was observed, respectively, for ceramic-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic combinations. Significant statistical differences were observed between all 36-mm different combinations (P < 0.0001). The increased diameter of the 36-mm ceramic-on-metal configuration resulted in a lower volumetric loss compared with that of the 32-mm ceramic-on-metal configuration. Our findings showed an increase in wear for the proposed hybrid specimens with respect to that of the ceramic-on-ceramic ones. This confirms that even in the case of ceramic-on-metal bearings, mixing and matching could not prove effective wear behavior, not even comparable with that of the ceramic-on-ceramic gold standard.

  12. Nationwide review of mixed and non-mixed components from different manufacturers in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Rinne M; van Steenbergen, Liza N; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Zeegers, Adelgunde V C M; Stewart, Roy E; Poolman, Rudolf W; Hosman, Anton H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Combining components from different manufacturers in total hip arthroplasty (THA) is common practice worldwide. We determined the proportion of THAs used in the Netherlands that consist of components from different manufacturers, and compared the revision rates of these mixed THAs with those of non-mixed THAs. Patients and methods Data on primary and revision hip arthroplasty are recorded in the LROI, the nationwide population-based arthroplasty register in the Netherlands. We selected all 163,360 primary THAs that were performed in the period 2007–2014. Based on the manufacturers of the components, 4 groups were discerned: non-mixed THAs with components from the same manufacturer (n = 142,964); mixed stem-head THAs with different manufacturers for the femoral stem and head (n = 3,663); mixed head-cup THAs with different head and cup manufacturers (n = 12,960), and mixed stem-head-cup THAs with different femoral stem, head, and cup manufacturers (n = 1,773). Mixed prostheses were defined as THAs (stem, head, and cup) composed of components made by different manufacturers. Results 11% of THAs had mixed components (n = 18,396). The 6-year revision rates were similar for mixed and non-mixed THAs: 3.4% (95% CI: 3.1w–3.7) for mixed THAs and 3.5% (95% CI: 3.4–3.7) for non-mixed THAs. Revision of primary THAs due to loosening of the acetabulum was more common in mixed THAs (16% vs. 12%). Interpretation Over an 8-year period in the Netherlands, 11% of THAs had mixed components—with similar medium-term revision rates to those of non-mixed THAs. PMID:27348544

  13. Acetabular cup position and risk of dislocation in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Seagrave, Kurt G; Troelsen, Anders; Malchau, Henrik; Husted, Henrik; Gromov, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — Hip dislocation is one of the most common complications following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Several factors that affect dislocation have been identified, including acetabular cup positioning. Optimal values for cup inclination and anteversion are debatable. We performed a systematic review to describe the different methods for measuring cup placement, target zones for cup positioning, and the association between cup positioning and dislocation following primary THA. Methods — A systematic search of literature in the PubMed database was performed (January and February 2016) to identify articles that compared acetabular cup positioning and the risk of dislocation. Surgical approach and methods for measurement of cup angles were also considered. Results— 28 articles were determined to be relevant to our research question. Some articles demonstrated that cup positioning influenced postoperative dislocation whereas others did not. The majority of articles could not identify a statistically significant difference between dislocating and non-dislocating THA with regard to mean angles of cup anteversion and inclination. Most of the articles that assessed cup placement within the Lewinnek safe zone did not show a statistically significant reduction in dislocation rate. Alternative target ranges have been proposed by several authors. Interpretation— The Lewinnek safe zone could not be justified. It is difficult to draw broad conclusions regarding a definitive target zone for cup positioning in THA, due to variability between studies and the likely multifactorial nature of THA dislocation. Future studies comparing cup positioning and dislocation rate should investigate surgical approach separately. Standardized tools for measurement of cup positioning should be implemented to allow comparison between studies. PMID:27879150

  14. A comparison between patient recall and concurrent measurement of preoperative quality of life outcome in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jonathan; Xu, Min; Duncan, Clive P; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S

    2008-09-01

    The objective is to evaluate the reliability of patients' recall of preoperative pain and function during the immediate postoperation period after total hip arthroplasty. A prospective cohort of 104 patients completed a survey about their quality of life before operation, and recalled preoperative status at 3 days, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks after operation. Quality of life was measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index, the Oxford-12 hip score, and the 12-item Short-Form score. The intraclass correlation coefficient and Spearman correlation coefficient were used to compare preoperative quality of life scores to the scores recalled. The reliability of recall remained high up to 3 months postoperation. Patients are able to accurately recall their preoperative function for up to 3 months after total hip arthroplasty.

  15. Minimum Lateral Bone Coverage Required for Securing Fixation of Cementless Acetabular Components in Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Hara, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the minimum lateral bone coverage required for securing stable fixation of the porous-coated acetabular components (cups) in hip dysplasia. Methods. In total, 215 primary total hip arthroplasties in 199 patients were reviewed. The average follow-up period was 49 months (range: 24–77 months). The lateral bone coverage of the cups was assessed by determining the cup center-edge (cup-CE) angle and the bone coverage index (BCI) from anteroposterior pelvic radiographs. Further, cup fixation was determined using the modified DeLee and Charnley classification system. Results. All cups were judged to show stable fixation by bone ingrowth. The cup-CE angle was less than 0° in 7 hips (3.3%) and the minimum cup-CE angle was −9.2° (BCI: 48.8%). Thin radiolucent lines were observed in 5 hips (2.3%), which were not associated with decreased lateral bone coverage. Loosening, osteolysis, dislocation, or revision was not observed in any of the cases during the follow-up period. Conclusion. A cup-CE angle greater than −10° (BCI > 50%) was acceptable for stable bony fixation of the cup. Considering possible errors in manual implantation, we recommend that the cup position be planned such that the cup-CE angle is greater than 0° (BCI > 60%). PMID:28299327

  16. Large-diameter total hip arthroplasty modular heads require greater assembly forces for initial stability

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, A. R.; Sullivan, N. P. T.; Whitehouse, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    to play a role in the high failure rates of large diameter MoM hips. Cite this article: A. R. MacLeod, N. P. T. Sullivan, M. R. Whitehouse, H. S. Gill. Large-diameter total hip arthroplasty modular heads require greater assembly forces for initial stability. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:338–346. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.58.BJR-2016-0044.R1. PMID:27496914

  17. The efficacy of periarticular drug infiltration for postoperative pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyang; Gao, Fuqiang; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bailiang; Guo, Wanshou; Li, Zirong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The ability of intraoperative periarticular drug infiltration (PDI) to control pain after total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been studied for many times, but it still remains controversial. Therefore, we undertook a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of PDI on postoperative pain after THA. Methods: Databases, including Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library, were searched to identify randomized controlled trials concerning PDI for pain management in patients undergoing THA. The primary outcomes included pain score with rest or activity and opioid consumption. Secondary outcomes were length of hospital stay and complications (nausea or vomiting). Results: A total of 666 THA patients from 8 randomized controlled trials were subjected to meta-analysis. The results showed that the PDI group had better pain relief, less opioid consumption, and less length of hospital, when compared with the placebo group (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in regard to visual analog score with activity and complications between the 2 groups. Conclusion: PDI may be recommended for the pain management after THA. However, due to the variations in the included studies, additional studies are still needed to validate these conclusions. PMID:28328836

  18. Validation of a Kinect-based telerehabilitation system with total hip replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Antón, David; Nelson, Mark; Russell, Trevor; Goñi, Alfredo; Illarramendi, Arantza

    2016-04-01

    The evolving telecommunications industry combined with medical information technology has been proposed as a solution to reduce health care cost and provide remote medical services. This paper aims to validate and show the feasibility and user acceptance of using a telerehabilitation system called Kinect Rehabilitation System (KiReS) in a real scenario, with patients attending repeated rehabilitation sessions after they had a Total Hip Replacement (THR). We present the main features of KiReS, how it was set up in the considered scenario and the experimental results obtained in relation to two different perspectives: patients' subjective perceptions (gathered through questionnaires) and the accuracy of the performed exercises (by analysing the data captured using KiReS). We made a full deployment of KiReS, defining step by step all the elements of a therapy: postures, movements, exercises and the therapy itself. Seven patients participated in this trial in a total of 19 sessions, and the system recorded 3865 exercise executions. The group showed general support for telerehabilitation and the possibilities that systems such as KiReS bring to physiotherapy treatment.

  19. Persistent pain after total knee or hip arthroplasty: differential study of prevalence, nature, and impact

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Patrícia R; McIntyre, Teresa; Ferrero, Ramón; Araújo-Soares, Vera; Almeida, Armando

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the incidence, nature, and impact of persistent post-surgical pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) and investigates differences between these procedures, with the focus on potential presurgical and post-surgical issues that could be related to the distinct persistent post-surgical pain outcomes between these two groups. A consecutive sample of 92 patients was assessed prospectively 24 hours before, 48 hours, and 4–6 months after surgery. The data show that TKA patients had a higher likelihood of developing persistent post-surgical pain, of reporting higher pain levels, and of using more neuropathic descriptors when classifying their pain. In addition, TKA patients more often reported interference from pain on functional domains, including general activity, walking ability, and normal work. Demographic factors, like gender and age, along with presurgical clinical factors like disease onset, existence of medical comorbidities, and other pain problems, may have contributed to these differences, whereas baseline psychologic factors and functionality levels did not seem to exert an influence. Heightened acute post-surgical pain experience among TKA patients could also be related to distinct outcomes for persistent post-surgical pain. Future prospective studies should therefore collect TKA and THA samples wherein patients are homogeneous for demographic and presurgical clinical issues. Overall, these findings contribute to a small but growing body of literature documenting persistent post-surgical pain after major arthroplasty, conducted in different countries and across different health care settings. PMID:24072977

  20. Conversion of bilateral hip and knee ankylosis to total joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Karva, A R; Board, T N; Porter, M L

    2008-05-01

    We present a 25-year-old patient with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosis of both hips and both knees treated by staged bilateral hip and knee arthroplasty. She was followed up for 18 months. We discuss the pre-operative planning, surgical details and post-operative rehabilitation.

  1. Pre-fracture individual characteristics associated with high total health care costs after hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Schousboe, J T; Paudel, M L; Taylor, B C; Kats, A M; Virnig, B A; Dowd, B E; Langsetmo, L; Ensrud, K E

    2017-03-01

    Older women with pre-fracture slow walk speed, high body mass index, and/or a high level of multimorbidity have significantly higher health care costs after hip fracture compared to those without those characteristics. Studies to investigate if targeted health care interventions for these individuals can reduce hip fracture costs are warranted.

  2. Ceramic-on-Ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty in a Twelve-Year-Old Patient: Case Report with a 27-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Save, Ameya V; Varthi, Arya; Talusan, Paul G; Gala, Raj; Nelson, Stephen; Keggi, Kristaps J

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty in the juvenile patient with a severely diseasedjoint can provide long-term pain relief and improvement in function. We present a patient with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who underwent a Mittelmeier ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty at age 12 in 1986. The implant provided the patient with a functioning hip for 24 years, but subsequently required revision due to femoral component loosening. This case report represents the longest reported clinical follow-up of noncemented, ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty in a juvenile patient and depicts an excellent outcome at 27 years. Our case is also unique in that the Mittelmeier ceramic acetabulum was left in place during revision surgery. In this report, we also describe the senior author's choice of the Mittelmeier hip prosthesis within its historical context and provide a brief review of the literature as it relates to total hip arthroplasty in the juvenile patient.

  3. High complication rate in the early experience of minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty by the direct anterior approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose There is growing interest in minimally invasive surgery techniques in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this study, we investigated the learning curve and the early complications of the direct anterior approach in hip replacement. Methods In the period January through December 2010, THA was performed in 46 patients for primary osteoarthritis, using the direct anterior approach. These cases were compared to a matched cohort of 46 patients who were operated on with a conventional posterolateral approach. All patients were followed for at least 1 year. Results Operating time was almost twice as long and mean blood loss was almost twice as much in the group with anterior approach. No learning effect was observed in this group regarding operating time or blood loss. Radiographic evaluation showed adequate placement of the implants in both groups. The early complication rate was higher in the anterior approach group. Mean time of hospital stay and functional outcome (with Harris hip score and Oxford hip score) were similar in both groups at the 1-year follow-up. Interpretation The direct anterior approach is a difficult technique, but adequate hip placement was achieved radiographically. Early results showed no improvement in functional outcome compared to the posterolateral approach, but there was a higher early complication rate. We did not observe any learning effect after 46 patients. PMID:22880711

  4. Reactivation of a tuberculous coxitis due to loosening of a total hip endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Fink, B; Casser, H R; Zilkens, K W; Rüther, W

    1995-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman who suffered from juvenile tuberculous coxitis at the age of 4 is presented. Her hip joint replacement lasted for 18 years and then needed replacing. Intraoperatively removed caseous soft tissue and an opalescent secretion histologically resembled a tuberculous focus, and bacteriological culture grew a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain. Four months after the replacement, the patient suffered from a tuberculosis-induced septic loosening of the newly replaced hip joint endoprosthesis. The tuberculosis relapse was probably due to aseptic loosening of the first hip joint endoprosthesis.

  5. Pre-operative ambulatory measurement of asymmetric lower limb loading during walking in total hip arthroplasty patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty is a successful surgical procedure to treat hip osteoarthritis. Clinicians use different questionnaires to assess the patient’s pain and functional capacity. Furthermore, they assess the quality of gait in a very global way. This clinical evaluation usually shows significant improvement after total hip arthroplasty, however, does not provide objective, quantifiable information about the movement patterns underlying the functional capacity, which can currently only be obtained in a gait laboratory. Instrumented force shoes can quantify gait velocity, ground reaction forces and the gait pattern easily in an outpatient setting. The main goal of this study was to investigate how mobility characteristics during walking, relate to gait velocity and questionnaire outcomes of patients with hip osteoarthritis in an outpatient setting. Methods 22 patients with primary osteoarthritis of the hip selected for a total hip arthroplasty participated in this study. For each patient the Harris Hip Score, the Traditional Western Ontario and the McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index were administered. Subsequently, the patients were instructed to walk through the corridor while wearing instrumented shoes. The gait velocity estimated with the instrumented force shoes was validated measuring the time required to walk a distance of 10 m using a stopwatch and a measuring tape as a reference system. A regression analysis between spatial, temporal, ground reaction force parameters, including asymmetry, and the gait velocity and the questionnaires outcomes was performed. Results The velocity estimated with the instrumented shoes did not differ significantly from the velocity measured independently. Although gait parameters correlated significantly with velocity, symmetry index parameters were not correlated with velocity. These symmetry index parameters show significant inter-limb asymmetry during walking. No correlation was found between any of the

  6. A Complication During Femoral Broaching in Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Waldstein, Wenzel; Boettner, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Press-fit component fixation is one of the primary goals in uncemented total hip arthroplasty. When aiming at proximal load transfer, the stem size has to be selected with regard to the shape of the proximal femoral canal. This can be challenging in patients with ‘champagne flute’ femurs with a relatively narrow diaphysis, especially when a long stem femoral component is used. The present case report describes a complication during femoral broaching for a primary uncemented femoral component. Because of the narrow diaphysis, the distal portion of the broach got caught in the narrow canal and it became impossible to remove the broach with conventional techniques. Via a second distal incision, the femur was split from the distal tip of the broach to approximately 5 cm distal of the femoral neck cut along the posterior aspects of the femur. This loosened the broach enough to allow for an uncomplicated removal. The longitudinal split was secured with cables before a similar size primary implant was press fitted into the femoral canal. PMID:23961301

  7. Return to work after total hip and knee arthroplasty: results from a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Tilbury, C; Leichtenberg, C S; Tordoir, R L; Holtslag, M J; Verdegaal, S H M; Kroon, H M; Nelissen, R G H H; Vliet Vlieland, T P M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to measure return to work and duration until return to work in patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA). This prospective study included patients under 65 years of age, undergoing THA or TKA, who provided information on their work status preoperatively (paid work yes/no and working hours) and 1 year thereafter (paid work yes/no, working hours and time until return to work). Seventy-one THA and 64 TKA patients had a paid job preoperatively. The employment rates 1 year postoperatively were 64/71 (90 %) after THA and 53/64 (83 %) after TKA. Of those who returned to work, 9/64 (14 %) of THA patients and 10/53 (19 %) of TKA patients worked less hours than preoperatively [mean decrease of 16 (SD 11.5) and 14 (SD 13.0) hours, respectively]. The mean time to return to work was 12.5 (SD 7.6) and 12.9 (SD 8.0) weeks in THA and TKA, respectively. The majority of working patients who underwent THA or TKA returned to work, after approximately 12 weeks. A considerable proportion of the patients returning to work worked less hours than preoperatively. More research into patients who do not return or decrease their working hours is needed.

  8. Vitamin E-stabilized highly crosslinked polyethylenes: The role and effectiveness in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kengo; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Yasuhito

    2017-02-10

    Morphology and design of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE or simply PE) acetabular components used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) have been evolving for more than half a century. Since the late-1990s, there were two major technological innovations in PE emerged from necessity to overcome the wear-induced periprosthetic osteolysis, i.e., the development of highly crosslinked PEs (HXLPEs). There are many literature reporting that radiation crosslinked and remelted/annealed (first-generation) HXLPEs markedly reduced the incidence of osteolysis and aseptic loosening. Regardless of such clinical success in the first-generation technologies, there were some recent shifts in Japan toward the use of new second-generation HXLPEs subjected to sequential irradiation/annealing or antioxidant vitamin E (α-tocopherol) incorporation. Although the selection rate of first-generation liners still account for more than half of all the PE THAs (∼58% in 2015), the use of vitamin E-stabilized liners has been steadily growing each year since their clinical introduction in 2010. In these contexts, it is of great importance to evaluate and understand the real clinical benefits of using the new second-generation liners as compared to the first generation. This article first summarizes structural evolution and characteristic features of first-generation HXLPEs, and then provides a detailed description of second-generation antioxidant HXLPEs in regard to the role of vitamin E incorporation on their chemical and mechanical performances in THA.

  9. An analytical approach to study the intraoperative fractures of femoral shaft during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Malekmotiei, Leila; Farahmand, Farzam; Shodja, Hossein M; Samadi-Dooki, Aref

    2013-04-01

    An analytical approach which is popular in micromechanical studies has been extended to the solution for the interference fit problem of the femoral stem in cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). The multiple inhomogeneity problem of THA in transverse plane, including an elliptical stem, a cortical wall, and a cancellous layer interface, was formulated using the equivalent inclusion method (EIM) to obtain the induced interference elastic fields. Results indicated a maximum interference fit of about 210 μm before bone fracture, predicted based on the Drucker-Prager criterion for a partially reamed section. The cancellous layer had a significant effect on reducing the hoop stresses in the cortical wall; the maximum press fit increased to as high as 480 μm for a 2 mm thick cancellous. The increase of the thickness and the mechanical quality, i.e., stiffness and strength, of the cortical wall also increased the maximum interference fit before fracture significantly. No considerable effect was found for the implant material on the maximum allowable interference fit. It was concluded that while larger interference fits could be adapted for younger patients, care must be taken when dealing with the elderly and those suffering from osteoporosis. A conservative reaming procedure is beneficial for such patients; however, in order to ensure sufficient primary stability without risking bone fracture, a preoperative analysis might be necessary.

  10. Patient-related risk factors that predict poor outcome after total hip replacement.

    PubMed Central

    MacWilliam, C H; Yood, M U; Verner, J J; McCarthy, B D; Ward, R E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with poor outcome after total hip replacement (THR) surgery. DATA SOURCES: This article is the first to present results from the American Medical Group Association (AMGA) THR consortium. STUDY DESIGN: The outcomes evaluated were pain and physical function. Eight patient risk factors were evaluated. These included the age, sex, race, marital status, and education of the patient; whether the patient had polyarticular disease or other comorbid conditions; and the patient's preoperative pain and physical function score. DATA COLLECTION: Data were collected from patients using AMGA-approved, self-administered questionnaires preoperatively and at six weeks, three months, six months, one year, and two years postoperatively. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the patient risk factors studied, race, education, number of comorbid conditions, and preoperative Health Status Questionnaire (HSQ) score were found to be associated with poor outcome. These risk factors were found to have an effect on both pain and physical function at six months postoperatively. Patients with higher preoperative scores were found to have higher postoperative scores, but substantially fewer of these patients received any benefit from their surgery. For each 10-point increase in preoperative score, patients could expect at least a 6-point decrease in postoperative improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that preoperative status is an important predictor of outcome for THR. PMID:8943994

  11. Sensor of total hip arthoplasty wear designed on principle of scanning profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Tomas; Mandat, Dusan; Gallo, Jiri; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Pochmon, Michal; Havranek, Vitezslav

    2008-12-01

    Total hip arthroplasty significantly improves the quality of life in majority of patients with osteoarthritis. However, prosthetic wear is a problem because of inducing the development of aseptic loosening and periprosthetic osteolysis which needs the revision surgery. Thus, the polyethylene wear measurement is the central to contemporary orthopaedics and this interesting has encouraged the development and improvement of both radiologic (in vivo) and non-radiologic (in vitro) methods for polyethylene wear quantification. The principles of polyethylene liner wear measurements are predominantly geometric; nevertheless, the realization of individual types of in vivo measurements brings with it the necessity of many simplifications and compromising steps to acquire approximately accurate values. In fact, the volumetric wear can be obtained by mathematical conversion based on the most linear shift of femoral head in the cup. However, such approach is understood to be somewhat insufficient. Our ongoing research pointed to the development of optical non-contact method for wear measurement and its results are introduced in this paper including the methodology designed for the usability validation of the method for the given purpose and the description of sensor, its principle, technical realization, design and parameters.

  12. Effect of femoral neck modularity upon the prosthetic range of motion in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Turley, Glen A; Griffin, Damian R; Williams, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    In total hip arthroplasty, aseptic loosening and dislocation are associated with not being able to achieve the correct prosthetic component orientation. Femoral neck modularity has been proposed as a solution to this problem by allowing the surgeon to alter either the neck-shaft or version angle of the prosthetic femoral component intra-operatively. A single replicate full factorial design was used to evaluate how effective a modular femoral neck cementless stem was in restoring a healthy prosthetic range of motion in comparison with a leading fixed-neck cementless stem with the standard modular parameters. It was found that, if altered to a large enough degree, femoral neck modularity can increase the amount of prosthetic motion as well as alter its position to where it is required physiologically. However, there is a functional limit to the amount that can be corrected and there is a risk with regard to the surgeon having to select the optimum modular neck before any benefit is realised.

  13. Total hip arthroplasty in an outpatient setting in 27 selected patients

    PubMed Central

    den Hartog, Yvon M; Mathijssen, Nina M C; Vehmeijer, Stephan B W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — As a result of introduction of a fast-track program, length of hospital stay after total hip arthroplasty (THA) decreased in our hospital. We therefore wondered whether THA in an outpatient setting would be feasible. We report our experience with THA in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods — In this prospective cohort study, we included 27 patients who were selected to receive primary THA in an outpatient setting between April and July 2014. Different patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were recorded preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. Furthermore, anchor questions on how patients functioned in daily living were scored at 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. Results — 3 of the 27 patients did not go home on the day of surgery because of nausea and/or dizziness. The remaining 24 patients all went home on the day of surgery. PROMs improved substantially in these patients. Moreover, anchor questions on how patients functioned in their daily living indicated that the patients were satisfied with the postoperative results. 1 re-admission occurred at 11 days after surgery because of seroma formation. There were no other complications or reoperations. Interpretation — At our hospital, with a fast-track protocol, outpatient THA was found to be feasible in selected patients with satisfying results up to 3 months postoperatively, without any outpatient procedure-specific complications or re-admissions. PMID:26139431

  14. RSA wear measurements with or without markers in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Börlin, Niclas; Röhrl, Stephan M; Bragdon, Charles R

    2006-01-01

    Novel algorithms for radiostereometric (RSA) measurements of the femoral head and metal-backed, hemi-spherical cups of a total hip replacement are presented and evaluated on phantom images and clinical double examinations of 20 patients. The materials were analysed with classical RSA and three novel algorithms: (1) a dual-projection head algorithm using the outline of the femoral head together with markers in the cup; (2) a marker-less algorithm based on measurements of the outline of the femoral head, the cup shell and opening circle of the cup; and (3) a combination of both methods. The novel algorithms improve current, marker-based, RSA measurements, as well as allows studies without marked cups. This opens the possibility of performing wear measurements on larger group of patients, in clinical follow-ups, even retrospective studies. The novel algorithms may help to save patient data in current RSA studies lost due to insufficiently marked cups. Finally, the novel algorithms simplify the RSA procedure and allow new studies without markers, saving time, money, and reducing safety concerns. Other potential uses include migration measurements of re-surfacing heads and measuring spherical sections as implant landmarks instead of markers.

  15. Role of parenteral iron in transfusion requirements after total hip replacement. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Naveira, E; Seara, J; Palmer, J H; Cuenca, J; García-Erce, J A

    2006-04-01

    An important percentage of patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) receive allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) to avoid the risks of acute anaemia. However, concerns about the risks of ABT have led to the search for alternatives, such as stimulation of erythropoiesis. We prospectively investigated the effect of postoperative administration of 300 mg of intravenous iron sucrose on ABT requirements in THR patients (group 2; n = 24). A previous series of 22 THR patients served as the control group (group 1). All patients were operated on by the same surgeon, using the same implant, and a set of clinical data was gathered. No adverse reactions to iron administration were observed. The group-given iron showed a trend to a lower transfusion rate (46 vs. 73%; P = 0.067) and lower transfusion index (0.96 vs. 1.68 units/patient; P = 0.038). Moreover, amongst the non-transfused patients, admission haemoglobin levels were lower in those coming from the iron group than those from the control group (12.7 +/- 0.9 vs. 14.0 +/- 1.2 g dL(-1), respectively; P = 0.017). Postoperative parenteral iron administration could be a safe and effective way to reduce ABT requirements in the THR patients. A large, randomized controlled trial to confirm these results is warranted.

  16. Evaluation of silicon nitride as a wear resistant and resorbable alternative for total hip joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Johanna; Grehk, T. Mikael; Berlind, Torun; Persson, Cecilia; Jacobson, Staffan; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Many of the failures of total joint replacements are related to tribology, i.e., wear of the cup, head and liner. Accumulation of wear particles at the implants can be linked to osteolysis which leads to bone loss and in the end aseptic implant loosening. Therefore it is highly desirable to reduce the generation of wear particles from the implant surfaces. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) has shown to be biocompatible and have a low wear rate when sliding against itself and is therefore a good candidate as a hip joint material. Furthermore, wear particles of Si3N4 are predicted to slowly dissolve in polar liquids and they therefore have the potential to be resorbed in vivo, potentially reducing the risk for aseptic loosening. In this study, it was shown that α-Si3N4-powder dissolves in PBS. Adsorption of blood plasma indicated a good acceptance of Si3N4 in the body with relatively low immune response. Si3N4 sliding against Si3N4 showed low wear rates both in bovine serum and PBS compared with the other tested wear couples. Tribofilms were built up on the Si3N4 surfaces both in PBS and in bovine serum, controlling the friction and wear characteristics. PMID:23507807

  17. Development of a non-invasive diagnostic technique for acetabular component loosening in total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Alshuhri, Abdullah A; Holsgrove, Timothy P; Miles, Anthony W; Cunningham, James L

    2015-08-01

    Current techniques for diagnosing early loosening of a total hip replacement (THR) are ineffective, especially for the acetabular component. Accordingly, new, accurate, and quantifiable methods are required. The aim of this study was to investigate the viability of vibrational analysis for accurately detecting acetabular component loosening. A simplified acetabular model was constructed using a Sawbones(®) foam block. By placing a thin silicone layer between the acetabular component and the Sawbones block, 2- and 4-mm soft tissue membranes were simulated representing different loosening scenarios. A constant amplitude sinusoidal excitation with a sweep range of 100-1500 Hz was used. Output vibration from the model was measured using an accelerometer and an ultrasound probe. Loosening was determined from output signal features such as the number and relative strength of observed harmonic frequencies. Both measurement methods were sufficient to measure the output vibration. Vibrational analysis reliably detected loosening corresponding to both 2 and 4 mm tissue membranes at driving frequencies between 100 and 1000 Hz (p < 0.01) using the accelerometer. In contrast, ultrasound detected 2-mm loosening at a frequency range of 850-1050 Hz (p < 0.01) and 4-mm loosening at 500-950 Hz (p < 0.01).

  18. Post-operative radiographic factors and patient-reported outcome after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Wylde, Vikki; Maclean, Angus; Blom, Ashley W

    2012-01-01

    Although total hip replacement (THR) is considered a very successful surgical intervention, a proportion of patients experience persistent pain or disability, and/or dissatisfaction with the outcome of surgery. Our aim was to determine whether post-operative radiographic variables were predictive of patient-reported pain, function and satisfaction after primary THR. At 1-3 years after surgery patients completed the WOMAC Pain scale, WOMAC Function scale and a validated measure of satisfaction with the outcome of surgery. Post-operative radiographs taken prior to discharge were graded for the restoration of offset, restoration of leg length, anteroposterior (AP) alignment of the femoral stem and AP acetabular inclination. Binary logistic regression was used to identify whether radiographic variables were significant predictors of patient-reported outcome scores. Radiographic and patient-reported outcomes data were available for 452 THR patients. No radiographic predictors were found to be significant predictors of patient reported pain, function or satisfaction at 1-3 years after THR. This highlights that patients with continuing problems after THR may benefit from a thorough multidisciplinary assessment to diagnose the underlying cause of the problems.

  19. The first 6 weeks of recovery after primary total hip arthroplasty with fast track

    PubMed Central

    Klapwijk, Lisette C M; Mathijssen, Nina M C; Van Egmond, Jeroen C; Verbeek, Bianca M; Vehmeijer, Stephan B W

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Fast-track protocols have been introduced worldwide to improve the recovery after total hip arthroplasty (THA). These protocols have reduced the length of hospital stay (LOS), and THA in an outpatient setting is also feasible. However, less is known regarding the first weeks after THA with fast track. We examined patients’ experiences of the first 6 weeks after hospital discharge following inpatient and outpatient THA with fast track. Patients and methods In a prospective cohort study, 100 consecutive patients who underwent THA surgery in a fast-track setting between February 2015 and October 2015 received a diary for 6 weeks. This diary contained various internationally validated questionnaires including HOOS-PS, OHS, EQ-5D, SF-12, and ICOAP. In addition, there were general questions regarding pain, the wound, physiotherapy, and thrombosis prophylaxis injections. Results 94 patients completed the diary, 42 of whom were operated in an outpatient setting. Pain and use of pain medication had gradually decreased during the 6 weeks. Function and quality of life gradually improved. After 6 weeks, 91% of all patients reported better functioning and less pain than preoperatively. Interpretation Fast track improves early functional outcome, and the PROMs reported during the first 6 weeks in this study showed continued improvement. They can be used as a baseline for future studies. The PROMs reported could also serve as a guide for staff and patients alike to modify expectations and therefore possibly improve patient satisfaction. PMID:28079428

  20. Lower Limb Loading during Gait in Patients Long Period after Total Hip Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Kubonova, Eliska; Janura, Miroslav; Duskova, Sarka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess lower limb loading during walking after unilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision. Twenty-three THA revision subjects (12 men, 11 women) were divided into three groups according to time since surgery as 1 to 6 years, 6 to 11 years, and over 11 years. Two force plates were used to measure the ground reaction force during the stance phase. On the operated limb, compared to nonoperated limb, we found lower first vertical peak in the group of 1 to 6 years after revision and lower propulsion peak in the group of 6 to 11 years since revision. In the group of 11 years since THA revision, no significant difference was found. With advancing years after surgery, the stance phase duration got reduced and propulsion peak increased in the operated limb; minimal vertical force decreased and the time of minimal vertical force increased in the nonoperated limb. The study findings suggest the tendency to a more gradual and safer weight acceptance on the operated limb during the first years after THA revision, followed by limitation of foot propulsion. Despite this fact, lower limb loading can be considered as symmetrical across the whole measured period. PMID:27579321

  1. Design optimization of a prosthesis stem reinforcing shell in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    de Beus, A M; Hoeltzel, D A; Eftekhar, N S

    1990-08-01

    The use of a perforated, titanium funicular shell to support the proximal femoral cortex in total hip arthroplasty was evaluated with the aid of both analytical and numerical techniques. The principal interactions between the femoral cortex, the metal shell, the implant stem and the acrylic bone cement were modeled using beam on elastic foundations theory and two-dimensional elasticity theory. Subsequent formulation of this model as a nonlinear design optimization problem enabled the determination of the dimensions of the implant and reinforcing shell which minimized an objective function based on a simplified material failure criterion. Two cases were examined, each with two cervico-diaphyseal angles: case A: with a rigid contact between a proximal prosthesis collar and the calcar femorale and case B: no collar contact (a collarless prosthesis or post-operative loosening). Case A achieved an optimal solution at a stem diameter 11-23 percent of the cortex inner diameter, a stem length to diameter ratio of 12-40, shell diameter 22-53 percent and thickness 0.2-7.2 percent of the cortex inner diameter and thickness, respectively. Case B achieved an optimal solution at a stem diameter 67-92 percent of the cortex inner diameter, length to diameter ratio of 4-6, and no shell. In case A the collar support makes the type of internal fixation unimportant, while in the more realistic case B, the shell is not recommended.

  2. Eradication of infection, survival, and radiological results of uncemented revision stems in infected total hip arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Born, Philipp; Ilchmann, Thomas; Zimmerli, Werner; Zwicky, Lukas; Graber, Peter; Ochsner, Peter E; Clauss, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — The use of uncemented revision stems is an established option in 2-stage procedures in patients with periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, in 1-stage procedures, they are still rarely used. There are still no detailed data on radiological outcome after uncemented 1-stage revisions. We assessed (1) the clinical outcome, including reoperation due to persistent infection and any other reoperation, and (2) the radiological outcome after 1- and 2-stage revision, using an uncemented stem. Patients and methods — Between January 1993 and December 2012, an uncemented revision stem was used in 81 THAs revised for PJI. Patients were treated with 1- or 2-stage procedures according to a well-defined algorithm (1-stage: n = 28; 2-stage: n = 53). All hips had a clinical and radiological follow-up. Outcome parameters were eradication of infection, re-revision of the stem, and radiological changes. Survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Radiographs were analyzed for bone restoration and signs of loosening. The mean clinical follow-up time was 7 (2–15) years. Results — The 7-year infection-free survival was 96% (95% CI: 92–100), 100% for 1-stage revision and 94% for 2-stage revision (95% CI: 87–100) (p = 0.2). The 7-year survival for aseptic loosening of the stem was 97% (95% CI: 93–100), 97% for 1-stage revision (95% CI: 90–100) and 97% for 2-stage revision (95% CI: 92–100) (p = 0.3). No further infection or aseptic loosening occurred later than 7 years postoperatively. The radiographic results were similar for 1- and 2-stage procedures. Interpretation — Surgical management of PJI with stratification to 1- or 2-stage exchange according to a well-defined algorithm combined with antibiotic treatment allows the safe use of uncemented revision stems. Eradication of infection can be achieved in most cases, and medium- and long-term results appear to be comparable to those for revisions

  3. Computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery and robotic surgery in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Various systems of computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) were reviewed. The first clinically applied system was an active robotic system (ROBODOC), which performed femoral implant cavity preparation as programmed preoperatively. Several reports on cementless THA with ROBODOC showed better stem alignment and less variance in limb-length inequality on radiographic evaluation, less incidence of pulmonary embolic events on transesophageal cardioechogram, and less stress shielding on the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis than conventional manual methods. On the other hand, some studies raise issues with active systems, including a steep learning curve, muscle and nerve damage, and technical complications, such as a procedure stop due to a bone motion during cutting, requiring re-registration and registration failure. Semi-active robotic systems, such as Acrobot and Rio, were developed for ease of surgeon acceptance. The drill bit at the tip of the robotic arm is moved by a surgeon's hand, but it does not move outside of a milling path boundary, which is defined according to three-dimensional (3D) image-based preoperative planning. However, there are still few reports on THA with these semi-active systems. Thanks to the advancements in 3D sensor technology, navigation systems were developed. Navigation is a passive system, which does not perform any actions on patients. It only provides information and guidance to the surgeon who still uses conventional tools to perform the surgery. There are three types of navigation: computed tomography (CT)-based navigation, imageless navigation, and fluoro-navigation. CT-based navigation is the most accurate, but the preoperative planning on CT images takes time that increases cost and radiation exposure. Imageless navigation does not use CT images, but its accuracy depends on the technique of landmark pointing, and it does not take into account the individual uniqueness of the anatomy

  4. Eradication of infection, survival, and radiological results of uncemented revision stems in infected total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Born, Philipp; Ilchmann, Thomas; Zimmerli, Werner; Zwicky, Lukas; Graber, Peter; Ochsner, Peter E; Clauss, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Background and purpose - The use of uncemented revision stems is an established option in 2-stage procedures in patients with periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, in 1-stage procedures, they are still rarely used. There are still no detailed data on radiological outcome after uncemented 1-stage revisions. We assessed (1) the clinical outcome, including reoperation due to persistent infection and any other reoperation, and (2) the radiological outcome after 1- and 2-stage revision, using an uncemented stem. Patients and methods - Between January 1993 and December 2012, an uncemented revision stem was used in 81 THAs revised for PJI. Patients were treated with 1- or 2-stage procedures according to a well-defined algorithm (1-stage: n = 28; 2-stage: n = 53). All hips had a clinical and radiological follow-up. Outcome parameters were eradication of infection, re-revision of the stem, and radiological changes. Survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Radiographs were analyzed for bone restoration and signs of loosening. The mean clinical follow-up time was 7 (2-15) years. Results - The 7-year infection-free survival was 96% (95% CI: 92-100), 100% for 1-stage revision and 94% for 2-stage revision (95% CI: 87-100) (p = 0.2). The 7-year survival for aseptic loosening of the stem was 97% (95% CI: 93-100), 97% for 1-stage revision (95% CI: 90-100) and 97% for 2-stage revision (95% CI: 92-100) (p = 0.3). No further infection or aseptic loosening occurred later than 7 years postoperatively. The radiographic results were similar for 1- and 2-stage procedures. Interpretation - Surgical management of PJI with stratification to 1- or 2-stage exchange according to a well-defined algorithm combined with antibiotic treatment allows the safe use of uncemented revision stems. Eradication of infection can be achieved in most cases, and medium- and long-term results appear to be comparable to those for revisions for aseptic

  5. Early mortality and morbidity after total hip arthroplasty in patients with femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hailer, Nils P; Garland, Anne; Rogmark, Cecilia; Garellick, Göran; Kärrholm, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Early postoperative mortality is relatively high after total hip arthroplasty (THA) that has been performed due to femoral neck fracture. However, this has rarely been investigated after adjustment for medical comorbidity and comparison with the mortality in an age-matched population. We therefore assessed early mortality in hip fracture patients treated with a THA, in the setting of a nationwide matched cohort study. Patients and methods — 24,699 patients who underwent THA due to a femoral neck fracture between 1992 and 2012 were matched with 118,518 controls. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to calculate cumulative unadjusted survival, and Cox regression models were fitted to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), with adjustment for age, sex, comorbidity, and socioeconomic background. Results — 90-day survival was 96.3% (95% CI: 96.0–96.5) for THA cases and 98.7% (95% CI: 98.6–98.8) for control individuals, giving an adjusted HR of 2.2 (95% CI: 2.0–2.4) for THA cases compared to control individuals. Comorbidity burden increased in THA cases over time, but the adjusted risk of death within 90 days did not differ statistically significantly between the time periods investigated (1992–1998, 1999–2005, and 2006–2012). A Charlson comorbidity index of 3 or more, an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade of 3 and above, male sex, an age of 80 years and above, an income below the first quartile, and a lower level of education were all associated with an increased risk of 90-day mortality. Interpretation — The adjusted early mortality in femoral neck fracture patients who underwent THA was about double that in a matched control population. Patients with femoral neck fracture but with no substantial comorbidity and an age of less than 80 years appear to have a low risk of early death. Patients older than 80 years and those with a Charlson comorbidity index of more than 2 have a high

  6. Relationship between Inflammatory Response and Estimated Complication Rate after Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu-Xu; Wang, Tao; Li, Jian; Kang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: After total hip arthroplasty (THA), there is a noteworthy inflammatory response. The inflammatory response is associated with postoperative recovery and complications. However, there had been few reports on the relationship between inflammatory response and postoperative complication rate. The aim of the present study was to investigate early inflammatory response in the first 3 days after THA, and to identify the relationship between inflammatory response and estimated complication rate after surgery. Methods: It was a prospective, nonrandomized cohort study. There were 148 patients who underwent unilateral THA in our hospital enrolled. Blood samples were collected preoperatively in the morning of the surgery and at 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in peripheral blood were measured. The modified physiological and operative severity score for the enumeration of the morbidity (POSSUM) was recorded pre- and intra-operatively. Based on the score, estimated complication rate was calculated. Harris score was used to assess hip function before and after surgery. Results: IL-6 levels reached the peak at 24 h after surgery and CRP at 48 h. After that, both of the levels decreased. The mean Harris scores significantly increased from 41.62 ± 23.47 before surgery to 72.75 ± 9.13 at 3 days after surgery. The Harris scores after surgery did not have a significant relation with either IL-6 or CRP peak levels (P = 0.165, P = 0.341, respectively). Both CRP and IL-6 peak levels significantly and positively correlated with estimated complication rate after surgery. The estimated complication rate calculated using the POSSUM system was 43 cases of 148 patients. Actually, there were only 28 cases that were observed to get postoperative complications during hospitalization. However, there was no significant difference between estimated and observed complication rates (P = 0.078). In the group with complications, the CRP and

  7. Effect of Body Mass Index on Blood Transfusion in Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas; Wessell, Nolan M; Charters, Michael; Peterson, Ed; Cann, Brett; Greenstein, Alex; Silverton, Craig D

    2016-09-01

    Perioperative blood management remains a challenge during total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to systematically examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and perioperative blood transfusion during THA and TKA while attempting to resolve conflicting results in previously published studies. The authors retrospectively evaluated 2399 patients, 896 of whom underwent THA and 1503 of whom underwent TKA. Various outcome variables were assessed for their relationship to BMI, which was stratified using the World Health Organization classification scheme (normal, <25 kg/m(2); overweight, 25-30 kg/m(2); obese, >30 kg/m(2)). Among patients undergoing THA, transfusion rates were 34.8%, 27.6%, and 21.9% for normal, overweight, and obese patients, respectively (P=.002). Among patients undergoing TKA, transfusion rates were 17.3%, 11.4%, and 8.3% for normal, overweight, and obese patients, respectively (P=.002). Patients with an elevated BMI have decreased rates of blood transfusion following both THA and TKA. This same cohort also loses a significantly decreased percentage of estimated blood volume. No trends were identified for a relationship between BMI and deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, discharge location, length of stay, 30-day readmission rate, and preoperative hemoglobin level. Elevated BMI was significantly associated with increased estimated blood loss in patients undergoing THA and those undergoing TKA. There was a statistically significant trend toward increased deep surgical-site infection in patients undergoing THA (P=.043). Patients with increased BMI have lower rates of blood transfusion and lose a significantly smaller percentage of estimated blood volume following THA and TKA. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e844-e849.].

  8. A case report of idiopathic iliopsoas hematoma which occurred soon after transfer to the wheelchair after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Tomoo; Fujita, Hiroshi; Harada, Hideto; Nishimura, Ryuuichi; Tominaga, Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 79-year-old woman was diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the left hip and scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. As two lesions were detected in branches of the coronary arteries, she was treated with catheter treatment. The patient was receiving anticoagulant treatment, which was suspended eight days before the operation; however, heparin was started at 6 days before the operation and was stopped 9 hours before the operation. On the 2nd postoperative day soon after transfer to the wheel chair, she was feeling unwell and was suffering from severe pain in her left buttock and left thigh. Her blood pressure had decreased to 70 mmHg. During abdominal contrast-enhanced CT, a hematoma was detected in the left iliopsoas muscle. Catheter therapy was started by the cardiovascular department and bleeding had stopped spontaneously. The patient was able to walk with a cane and was discharged on the 40th postoperative day. Abbreviations: THA: total hip arthroplasty, CT: computed tomography, JOA score: Japanese Orthopaedic Association hip score, HA: hydroxyapatite, PMMA: polymethyl-methacrylate, APTT: activated partial thromboplastin time PMID:28303063

  9. Two-Stage Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty for Periprosthetic Infections Using Antibiotic-Impregnated Cement Spacers of Various Types and Materials

    PubMed Central

    Takahira, Naonobu; Moriya, Mitsutoshi; Yamamoto, Takeaki; Minegishi, Yojiro; Sakai, Rina; Itoman, Moritoshi; Takaso, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-impregnated hip cement spacers of various types and materials have been used in the treatment of periprosthetic hip infections. We developed a handmade spacer by using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and/or α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP). In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the surgical outcomes in 36 consecutive patients treated with 2-stage revision total hip arthroplasty by using our antibiotic-impregnated hip cement spacers. We aimed to analyze the infection control and reinfection rates after revision surgery. Moreover, we analyzed the possible predictors of postoperative reinfection. After exclusion of 1 patient who died immediately after the first-stage surgery, infection was controlled in 33 of the 36 hips (success rate, 91.7%). Two of these 33 hips underwent resection arthroplasty. Of the 36 hips that had been treated with the antibiotic-cement spacer, 31 hips (86.1%) were eligible for the second-stage prosthesis re-implantation. The 31 protocol hip joints of patients followed up for >6 months (mean, 48.6 months). Ten of these 31 hips (32.3%) became reinfected. No possible predictor examined differed significantly between the reinfection-positive and reinfection-negative groups. However, spacers consisting of PMMA cement alone were associated with the highest risk of reinfection. Therefore, α-TCP-containing antibiotic-impregnated hip cement spacers might decrease the reinfection rate in patients undergoing re-implantation. PMID:24381509

  10. Intellijoint HIP®: a 3D mini-optical navigation tool for improving intraoperative accuracy during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Paprosky, Wayne G; Muir, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is an increasingly common procedure used to address degenerative changes in the hip joint due to osteoarthritis. Although generally associated with good results, among the challenges associated with hip arthroplasty are accurate measurement of biomechanical parameters such as leg length, offset, and cup position, discrepancies of which can lead to significant long-term consequences such as pain, instability, neurological deficits, dislocation, and revision surgery, as well as patient dissatisfaction and, increasingly, litigation. Current methods of managing these parameters are limited, with manual methods such as outriggers or calipers being used to monitor leg length; however, these are susceptible to small intraoperative changes in patient position and are therefore inaccurate. Computer-assisted navigation, while offering improved accuracy, is expensive and cumbersome, in addition to adding significantly to procedural time. To address the technological gap in hip arthroplasty, a new intraoperative navigation tool (Intellijoint HIP®) has been developed. This innovative, 3D mini-optical navigation tool provides real-time, intraoperative data on leg length, offset, and cup position and allows for improved accuracy and precision in component selection and alignment. Benchtop and simulated clinical use testing have demonstrated excellent accuracy, with the navigation tool able to measure leg length and offset to within <1 mm and cup position to within <1° in both anteversion and inclination. This study describes the indications, procedural technique, and early accuracy results of the Intellijoint HIP surgical tool, which offers an accurate and easy-to-use option for hip surgeons to manage leg length, offset, and cup position intraoperatively. PMID:27920583

  11. Changes in cardiopulmonary variables and platelet count during anesthesia for total hip replacement in dogs.

    PubMed

    Otto, K; Matis, U

    1994-01-01

    Changes in cardiopulmonary function and platelet count were determined in 22 dogs of various breeds that underwent total hip replacement with cemented femoral prostheses. In 11 dogs (group I) polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was inserted without venting the reamed and lavaged femoral canal. In a second group of 11 dogs (group II) a urethral catheter (ID: approximately 2.7 mm) was placed into the medullary cavity before the insertion of PMMA. The application of PMMA resulted in a decrease in end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PETCO2) until 5 minutes after insertion of bone cement. Increases in arterial to end-tidal pCO2 gradient [P(a-ET)CO2] and physiological dead space (VD/VT) were recorded between 2 minutes before and 5 minutes after insertion of PMMA in 12 dogs. A significant decrease in platelet count occurred in both groups of dogs. Decreases in arterial pO2 (PaO2), arterial/alveolar oxygen tension ratio (PaO2/PAO2), and percent O2 saturation of hemoglobin in arterial blood (SaO2) were not statistically significant. No significant differences could be detected between data obtained from both groups of dogs. An increase in femoral intramedullary pressure caused by the insertion of PMMA and subsequent pulmonary microembolism by medullary contents has been considered the most likely cause for changes in pulmonary function. The lack of statistically significant differences in cardiopulmonary variables and platelet count between the two groups of dogs could have been related to inefficient pressure reduction by the method used.

  12. Cost effectiveness of venous thromboembolism pharmacological prophylaxis in total hip and knee replacement: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Alok; Chuang, Warren; Radhakrishnan, Nila; Smith, Kenneth J; Berlowitz, Dan; Segal, Jodi B; Katz, Jeffrey N; Losina, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Total hip and knee replacements (THR and TKR) are high-risk settings for venous thromboembolism (VTE). This review summarizes the cost effectiveness of VTE prophylaxis regimens for THR and TKR. We searched MEDLINE (January 1997 to October 2009), EMBASE (January 1997 to June 2009) and the UK NHS Economic Evaluation Database (1997 to October 2009). We analysed recent cost-effectiveness studies examining five categories of comparisons: (i) anticoagulants (warfarin, low-molecular-weight heparin [LMWH] or fondaparinux) versus acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin); (ii) LMWH versus warfarin; (iii) fondaparinux versus LMWH; (iv) comparisons with new oral anticoagulants; and (v) extended-duration (> or =3 weeks) versus short-duration (<3 weeks) prophylaxis. We abstracted information on cost and effectiveness for each prophylaxis regimen in order to calculate an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Because of variations in effectiveness units reported and horizon length analysed, we calculated two cost-effectiveness ratios, one for the number of symptomatic VTE events avoided at 90 days and the other for QALYs at the 1-year mark or beyond. Our search identified 33 studies with 67 comparisons. After standardization, comparisons between LMWH and warfarin were inconclusive, whereas fondaparinux dominated LMWH in nearly every comparison. The latter results were derived from radiographic VTE rates. Extended-duration prophylaxis after THR was generally cost effective. Small numbers prohibit conclusions about aspirin, new oral anticoagulants or extended-duration prophylaxis after TKR. Fondaparinux after both THR and TKR and extended-duration LMWH after THR appear to be cost-effective prophylaxis regimens. Small numbers for other comparisons and absence of trials reporting symptomatic endpoints prohibit comprehensive conclusions.

  13. The influence of femoral offset on health-related quality of life after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Liebs, T R; Nasser, L; Herzberg, W; Rüther, W; Hassenpflug, J

    2014-01-01

    Several factors have been implicated in unsatisfactory results after total hip replacement (THR). We examined whether femoral offset, as measured on digitised post-operative radiographs, was associated with pain after THR. The routine post-operative radiographs of 362 patients (230 women and 132 men, mean age 70.0 years (35.2 to 90.5)) who received primary unilateral THRs of varying designs were measured after calibration. The femoral offset was calculated using the known dimensions of the implants to control for femoral rotation. Femoral offset was categorised into three groups: normal offset (within 5 mm of the height-adjusted femoral offset), low offset and high offset. We determined the associations to the absolute final score and the improvement in the mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) pain subscale scores at three, six, 12 and 24 months, adjusting for confounding variables. The amount of femoral offset was associated with the mean WOMAC pain subscale score at all points of follow-up, with the low-offset group reporting less WOMAC pain than the normal or high-offset groups (six months: 7.01 (sd 11.69) vs 12.26 (sd 15.10) vs 13.10 (sd 16.20), p = 0.006; 12 months: 6.55 (sd 11.09) vs 9.73 (sd 13.76) vs 13.46 (sd 18.39), p = 0.010; 24 months: 5.84 (sd 10.23) vs 9.60 (sd 14.43) vs 13.12 (sd 17.43), p = 0.004). When adjusting for confounding variables, including age and gender, the greatest improvement was seen in the low-offset group, with the normal-offset group demonstrating more improvement than the high-offset group.

  14. The Evolution of Computer-Assisted Total Hip Arthroplasty and Relevant Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Sung; Bhardwaj, Atul M.; Badami, Ramachandra N.

    2017-01-01

    In total hip arthroplasty (THA), the accurate positioning of implants is the key to achieve a good clinical outcome. Computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) has been developed for more accurate positioning of implants during the THA. There are passive, semi-active, and active systems in CAOS for THA. Navigation is a passive system that only provides information and guidance to the surgeon. There are 3 types of navigation: imageless navigation, computed tomography (CT)-based navigation, and fluoroscopy-based navigation. In imageless navigation system, a new method of registration without the need to register the anterior pelvic plane was introduced. CT-based navigation can be efficiently used for pelvic plane reference, the functional pelvic plane in supine which adjusts anterior pelvic plane sagittal tilt for targeting the cup orientation. Robot-assisted system can be either active or semi-active. The active robotic system performs the preparation for implant positioning as programmed preoperatively. It has been used for only femoral implant cavity preparation. Recently, program for cup positioning was additionally developed. Alternatively, for ease of surgeon acceptance, semi-active robot systems are developed. It was initially applied only for cup positioning. However, with the development of enhanced femoral workflows, this system can now be used to position both cup and stem. Though there have been substantial advancements in computer-assisted THA, its use can still be controversial at present due to the steep learning curve, intraoperative technical issues, high cost and etc. However, in the future, CAOS will certainly enable the surgeon to operate more accurately and lead to improved outcomes in THA as the technology continues to evolve rapidly. PMID:28316957

  15. Predictors of physical functioning after total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Buirs, L D; Van Beers, L W A H; Scholtes, V A B; Pastoors, T; Sprague, S; Poolman, R W

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this systematic review of the literature was to identify the predictors of functional outcome after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Method A systematic literature search in Web of Science, CINAHL, EMBASE and PubMed was conducted on 23 June 2015. The articles were selected based on their quality, relevance and measurement of the predictive factor. The level of evidence of all studies was determined using the GRADE rating scheme. Results The initial search resulted in 1092 citations. After application of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 33 articles met our eligibility criteria and were graded. Included studies were classified as level of evidence low (11), moderate (17) or high (5). Of the included studies, 18 evaluated body mass index (BMI), 17 evaluated preoperative physical functions, 15 evaluated age, 15 evaluated gender and 13 evaluated comorbidity. There was strong evidence suggesting an association between BMI, age, comorbidity, preoperative physical functions and mental health with functional outcome after THA. There was weak evidence suggesting an association between quadriceps strength and education with functional outcome after THA. The evidence was inconsistent for associations with gender and socioeconomic status and functional outcome following THA. We found limited evidence suggesting that alcohol consumption, vitamin D insufficiency and allergies were predictors of functional outcome following THA. Conclusions We have identified multiple predictors of functional outcome after THA, which will enable general practitioners and orthopaedic surgeons to better predict the improvement in physical functioning for their patients with THA. They can use this information to provide patient-specific advice regarding the referral for THA and the expected outcomes after THA. Further research with consistent measurement tools, outcomes and duration of follow-up across studies is needed to confirm the influence of these factors. PMID

  16. Bone creep and short and long term subsidence after cemented stem total hip arthroplasty (THA).

    PubMed

    Norman, T L; Shultz, T; Noble, G; Gruen, T A; Blaha, J D

    2013-03-15

    Stem-cement and cement-bone interfacial failures as well as cement fractures have been noted in cemented total hip arthroplasty (THA) as the cause of aseptic loosening. Attempts to reduce the risk of femoral component loosening include improving the stem-cement interface by various coatings, using a textured or porous coated stem surfaces or by using a tapered stem having a highly-polished surface. The latter approach, often referred to as "force-closed" femoral stem design, would theoretically result in stem stabilization subsequent to debonding and 'taper-lock'. Previous work using three-dimensional finite element analysis has shown a state of stress at the stem-cement interface indicative of 'taper-lock' for the debonded stem and indicated that stem-cement interface friction and bone cement creep played a significant role in the magnitudes of stresses and subsidence of the stem. However, the previous analysis did not include the viscoelastic properties of bone, which has been hypothesized to permit additional expansion of the bone canal and allow additional stem subsidence (Lu and McKellop, 1997). The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of bone viscoelastic behavior on stem subsidence using a 3D finite element analysis. It was hypothesized that the viscoelastic behavior of bone in the hoop direction would allow expansion of the bone reducing the constraint on bone over time and permit additional stem subsidence, which may account for the discrepancies between predicted and clinical subsidence measurements. Analyses were conducted using physiological loads, 'average peak loads' and 'high peak loads' for 'normal patient' and 'active patient' (Bergmann et al., 2010) from which short and long term subsidence was predicted. Results indicated that bone creep does contribute to higher stem subsidence initially and after 10 years of simulated loading. However, it was concluded that the "constraint" upon the cement mantle is not mitigated enough to result in

  17. Total hip replacement: A meta-analysis to evaluate survival of cemented, cementless and hybrid implants

    PubMed Central

    Phedy, Phedy; Ismail, H Dilogo; Hoo, Charles; Djaja, Yoshi P

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine whether cemented, cementless, or hybrid implant was superior to the other in terms of survival rate. METHODS Systematic searches across MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane that compared cemented, cementless and hybrid total hip replacement (THR) were performed. Two independent reviewers evaluated the risk ratios of revision due to any cause, aseptic loosening, infection, and dislocation rate of each implants with a pre-determined form. The risk ratios were pooled separately for clinical trials, cohorts and registers before pooled altogether using fixed-effect model. Meta-regressions were performed to identify the source of heterogeneity. Funnel plots were analyzed. RESULTS Twenty-seven studies comprising 5 clinical trials, 9 cohorts, and 13 registers fulfilled the research criteria and analyzed. Compared to cementless THR, cemented THR have pooled RR of 0.47 (95%CI: 0.45-0.48), 0.9 (0.84-0.95), 1.29 (1.06-1.57) and 0.69 (0.6-0.79) for revision due to any reason, revision due to aseptic loosening, revision due to infection, and dislocation respectively. Compared to hybrid THR, the pooled RRs of cemented THR were 0.82 (0.76-0.89), 2.65 (1.14-6.17), 0.98 (0.7-1.38), and 0.67 (0.57-0.79) respectively. Compared to hybrid THR, cementless THR had RRs of 0.7 (0.65-0.75), 0.85 (0.49-1.5), 1.47 (0.93-2.34) and 1.13 (0.98-1.3). CONCLUSION Despite the limitations in this study, there was some tendency that cemented fixation was still superior than other types of fixation in terms of implant survival. PMID:28251071

  18. Failure analysis of the cement mantle in total hip arthroplasty with an efficient probabilistic method.

    PubMed

    Kaymaz, Irfan; Bayrak, Ozgu; Karsan, Orhan; Celik, Ayhan; Alsaran, Akgun

    2014-04-01

    Accurate prediction of long-term behaviour of cemented hip implants is very important not only for patient comfort but also for elimination of any revision operation due to failure of implants. Therefore, a more realistic computer model was generated and then used for both deterministic and probabilistic analyses of the hip implant in this study. The deterministic failure analysis was carried out for the most common failure states of the cement mantle. On the other hand, most of the design parameters of the cemented hip are inherently uncertain quantities. Therefore, the probabilistic failure analysis was also carried out considering the fatigue failure of the cement mantle since it is the most critical failure state. However, the probabilistic analysis generally requires large amount of time; thus, a response surface method proposed in this study was used to reduce the computation time for the analysis of the cemented hip implant. The results demonstrate that using an efficient probabilistic approach can significantly reduce the computation time for the failure probability of the cement from several hours to minutes. The results also show that even the deterministic failure analyses do not indicate any failure of the cement mantle with high safety factors, the probabilistic analysis predicts the failure probability of the cement mantle as 8%, which must be considered during the evaluation of the success of the cemented hip implants.

  19. Mid-to long-term results of revision total hip replacement in patients aged 50 years or younger.

    PubMed

    Lee, P T H; Lakstein, D L; Lozano, B; Safir, O; Backstein, J; Gross, A E

    2014-08-01

    Revision total hip replacement (THR) for young patients is challenging because of technical complexity and the potential need for subsequent further revisions. We have assessed the survivorship, functional outcome and complications of this procedure in patients aged < 50 years through a large longitudinal series with consistent treatment algorithms. Of 132 consecutive patients (181 hips) who underwent revision THR, 102 patients (151 hips) with a mean age of 43 years (22 to 50) were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 11 years (2 to 26) post-operatively. We attempted to restore bone stock with allograft where indicated. Using further revision for any reason as an end point, the survival of the acetabular component was 71% (sd 4) and 54% (sd 7) at ten- and 20 years. The survival of the femoral component was 80% (sd 4) and 62% (sd 6) at ten- and 20 years. Complications included 11 dislocations (6.1%), ten periprosthetic fractures (5.5%), two deep infections (1.1%), four sciatic nerve palsies (2.2%; three resolved without intervention, one improved after exploration and freeing from adhesions) and one vascular injury (0.6%). The mean modified Harris Hip Score was 41 (10 to 82) pre-operatively, 77 (39 to 93) one year post-operatively and 77 (38 to 93) at the latest review. This overall perspective on the mid- to long-term results is valuable when advising young patients on the prospects of revision surgery at the time of primary replacement.

  20. Good outcome of total hip replacement in patients with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    King, Garry; Hunt, Linda P; Wilkinson, J Mark; Blom, Ashley W

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — People with cerebral palsy (CP) often have painful deformed hips, but they are seldom treated with hip replacement as the surgery is considered to be high risk. However, few data are available on the outcome of hip replacement in these patients. Patients and methods — We linked Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) records to the National Joint Registry for England and Wales to identify 389 patients with CP who had undergone hip replacement. Their treatment and outcomes were compared with those of 425,813 patients who did not have CP. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated to describe implant survivorship and the curves were compared using log-rank tests, with further stratification for age and implant type. Reasons for revision were quantified as patient-time incidence rates (PTIRs). Nationally collected patient-reported outcomes (PROMS) before and 6 months after operation were compared if available. Cumulative mortality (Kaplan-Meier) was estimated at 90 days and at 1, 3, and 5 years. Results — The cumulative probability of revision at 5 years post-surgery was 6.4% (95% CI: 3.8–11) in the CP cohort as opposed to 2.9% (CI 2.9–3%) in the non-CP cohort (p < 0.001). Patient-reported outcomes showed that CP patients had worse pain and function preoperatively, but had equivalent postoperative improvement. The median improvement in Oxford hip score at 6 months was 23 (IQR: 14–28) in CP and it was 21 (14–28) in non-CP patients. 91% of CP patients reported good or excellent satisfaction with their outcome. The cumulative probability of mortality for CP up to 7 years was similar to that in the controls after stratification for age and sex. Interpretation — Hip replacement for cerebral palsy appears to be safe and effective, although implant revision rates are higher than those in patients without cerebral palsy. PMID:26863583

  1. No association between serum metal ions and implant fixation in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Søballe, Kjeld; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of failure of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been related to a high rate of metal wear debris, which is partly generated from the head-trunnion interface. However, it is not known whether implant fixation is affected by metal wear debris. Patients and methods 49 cases of MoM THA in 41 patients (10 women) with a mean age of 52 (28–68) years were followed with stereoradiographs after surgery and at 1, 2, and 5 years to analyze implant migration by radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients also participated in a 5- to 7-year follow-up with measurement of serum metal ions, questionnaires (Oxford hip score (OHS) and Harris hip score (HHS)), and measurement of cup and stem positions and systemic bone mineral density. Results At 1–2 years, mean total translation (TT) was 0.04 mm (95% CI: –0.07 to 0.14; p = 0.5) for the stems; at 2–5 years, mean TT was 0.13 mm (95% CI: –0.25 to –0.01; p = 0.03), but within the precision limit of the method. For the cups, there was no statistically significant TT or total rotation (TR) at 1–2 and 2–5 years. At 2–5 years, we found 4 cups and 5 stems with TT migrations exceeding the precision limit of the method. There was an association between cup migration and total OHS < 40 (4 patients, 4 hips; p = 0.04), but there were no statistically significant associations between cup or stem migration and T-scores < –1 (n = 10), cup and stem positions, or elevated serum metal ion levels (> 7µg/L (4 patients, 6 hips)). Interpretation Most cups and stems were well-fixed at 1–5 years. However, at 2–5 years, 4 cups and 5 stems had TT migrations above the precision limits, but these patients had serum metal ion levels similar to those of patients without measurable migrations, and they were pain-free. Patients with serum metal ion levels > 7 µg/L had migrations similar to those in patients with serum metal ion levels < 7 µg/L. Metal wear debris does not appear to influence the

  2. Modular titanium alloy neck failure in total hip replacement: analysis of a relapse case.

    PubMed

    Ceretti, Marco; Falez, Francesco

    2016-04-29

    Modular neck hip prosthesis born in the 1990 with the aim of allowing the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intra-operatively restoring patient's original biomechanics. In order to achieve the best biomechanics of the reconstructed hip, preoperative planning is essential. In the last few years modularity has been questioned and an argument made for the return to mono block stems due to events of breakage or disconnection of modular components. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such modular device due to the contamination inside the modular coupling or to high loads. We present a case of repetitive modular femoral neck prosthesis fracture.

  3. Abiotrophia defectiva infection of a total hip arthroplasty diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rozemeijer, Wouter; Jiya, Timothy U; Rijnsburger, Martine; Heddema, Edou; Savelkoul, Paul; Ang, Wim

    2011-05-01

    We describe a case of a total hip arthroplasty infection caused by Abiotrophia defectiva, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Removal of the prosthesis followed by antibiotic treatment resulted in a good clinical outcome. 16S rRNA gene sequencing can be a useful tool in diagnosing infection with this fastidious microorganism that can easily be misidentified using phenotypic identification methods.

  4. Do different types of bearings and noise from total hip arthroplasty influence hip-related pain, function, and quality of life postoperatively?

    PubMed Central

    Varnum, Claus; Pedersen, Alma B; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Patient-reported outcome (PRO) is recognized as an important tool for evaluating the outcome and satisfaction after total hip arthroplasty (THA). We wanted to compare patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) scores from patients with ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) THAs and those with metal-on-metal (MoM) THAs to scores from patients with metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) THAs, and to determine the influence of THA-related noise on PROM scores. Patients and methods — We conducted a nationwide cross-sectional questionnaire survey in a cohort of patients identified from the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Registry. The PROMs included were: hip dysfunction and osteoarthritis and outcome score (HOOS), EQ-5D-3L, EQ VAS, UCLA activity score, and questions about noise from the THA. The response rate was 85% and the number of responders was 3,089. Of these, 45% had CoC THAs, 17% had MoM THAs, and 38% had MoP THAs, with a mean length of follow-up of 7, 5, and 7 years, respectively. Results — Compared to MoP THAs, the mean PROM scores for CoC and MoM THAs were similar, except that CoC THAs had a lower mean score for HOOS Symptoms than did MoP THA. 27% of patients with CoC THAs, 29% with MoM THAs, and 12% with MoP THAs reported noise from their hip. For the 3 types of bearings, PROM scores from patients with a noisy THA were statistically significantly worse than those from patients with a silent MoP THA. The exception was noisy CoC and MoM THAs, which had the same mean UCLA activity score as silent MoP THAs. Interpretation — A high proportion of patients reported noise from the THA, and these patients had worse PROM scores than patients with silent MoP THAs. PMID:27615443

  5. The effectiveness and safety of preoperative use of erythropoietin in patients scheduled for total hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Jiang, Chao; Peng, Huiming; Feng, Bin; Li, Yulong; Weng, Xisheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Because allogeneic blood transfusion carries a risk of serious complications, erythropoietin (EPO) has been used in patients scheduled for total hip or knee arthroplasty in an effort to reduce the need for allogeneic blood transfusion; however, its efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety are still controversial. The purpose of this review was to determine the hematopoiesis-promoting effect and potential complications, as well as the cost-effectiveness, of preoperative use of EPO in patients scheduled for total hip or knee arthroplasty. Methods: : We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases for relevant literature from 2000 to 2015. Risk of bias was assessed for all included studies and data were extracted and analyzed. Results: Preoperative use of EPO was associated with lower exposure to allogeneic blood transfusion (odds ratio = 0.41) and higher hemoglobin concentration after surgery (standardized mean difference = 0.86, P < 0.001). Complications were not generally reported, but there was no significant difference between the group with and without EPO based on given data. Cost-effectiveness was also summarized but was not conclusive. Conclusion: Preoperative administration of EPO reduces the requirement for allogeneic blood transfusion and increases hemoglobin level after surgery. The studies of cost-effectiveness were not conclusive. Further studies and guidelines specific to blood management in the perioperative stage of total knee and hip arthroplasty are expected. PMID:27399121

  6. [Delayed paresis of the femoral nerve after total hip arthroplasty associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP)].

    PubMed

    Schuh, A; Dürr, V; Weier, H; Zeiler, G; Winterholler, M

    2004-07-01

    Delayed lesions of the femoral or sciatic nerve are a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty. Several cases in association with cement edges, scar tissue, broken cerclages, deep hematoma, or reinforcement rings have been published. We report about a 62-year-old female who developed a pure motor paresis of the quadriceps muscle 2 weeks after total hip arthroplasty. After electrophysiological evaluation had revealed an isolated femoral nerve lesion, revision of the femoral nerve was performed. During operative revision no pathologic findings could be seen. One week later the patient developed paralysis of the left wrist and finger extensors after using crutches. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed several nerve conduction blocks in physiological entrapments and the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) was established. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a rare disease with increased vulnerability of the peripheral nerve system with mostly reversible sensorimotor deficits. It should be taken into consideration in cases of atypical findings of compression syndromes of peripheral nerves or delayed neuropathy, e. g., after total hip arthroplasty.

  7. Structural allograft and cemented long-stem prosthesis for complex revision hip arthroplasty: use of a trochanteric claw plate improves final hip function

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, Camille Thevenin; Kerboull, Marcel; Courpied, Jean Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Extensive bone loss raises formidable challenges in total hip revision. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of reconstruction using a cemented long-stem and massive structural allograft implanted in a filleted proximal femur, with and without the use of a trochanteric claw plate. Between 1988 and 2001, 44 revisions were performed in 42 patients. After a transtrochanteric approach, the femur was cut longitudinally. A long, cemented Charnley-type prosthesis was used, and flaps of the residual femur were folded around the allograft. The greater trochanter was reinserted with wires in all revisions, and with both wires and a claw plate in 20 revisions. Mean follow-up was 7.15 years (range: 3–16); seven patients, died and four were lost to follow-up. The follow-up exceeded five years in 34 patients. The major complication was nonunion of the greater trochanter, which occurred in 25 cases. Six dislocations, one recurrence of infection, two mechanical loosening, and two fractures below the stem were also recorded. The use of a trochanteric claw plate significantly improved final hip stability, even in patients with nonunion. Femoral reconstruction with a massive structural allograft is reliable and long-lived, and serious complications and long-term resorption are uncommon. The use of a trochanteric claw plate significantly improves final hip stability. Level of evidence: Therapeutic study, level III (retrospective comparative study). PMID:18008098

  8. Ipsilateral total hip arthroplasty in a dysvascular below-knee amputee for advanced hip osteoarthritis: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mak, Jenson; Solomon, Michael; Faux, Steven

    2008-06-01

    This retrospective file review outlines a case study of an 84 year-old man with a transtibial amputation for vascular disease who underwent an ipsilateral total hip replacement (THR). The question being addressed was how surgical techniques, rehabilitation processes and outcomes of joint arthroplasty would need to vary in a case of an ipsilateral dysvascular amputees. The surgery and associated rehabilitation was undertaken for groin pain, falls and reduced mobility due to mechanical osteoarthritis of the hip. The surgical technique and post-operative multidisciplinary rehabilitation is described in detail. Information on exercise regimes, length of stay and follow-up data on function, driving and pain management is presented. The literature is reviewed and all known cases of THR in amputees as well as data on survival of dysvascular amputees is presented. In light of advances in secondary prevention of vascular disease and cardiovascular surgical techniques, amputees with vascular disease may be living longer than they were 20 years ago. They may be beginning to experience the issues associated with aging such as osteoarthritis of the large joints. This case review and others in the literature may suggest that survival rates for vascular amputees be reviewed.

  9. Treatment of an old infection in a total hip replacement with an interim spacer prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Zilkens, K W; Casser, H R; Ohnsorge, J

    1990-01-01

    When treating a septic hip-joint prosthesis with bone loss of the proximal femur secondary to osteomyelitis, we implanted a specially designed prosthesis to act as a local antibiotic and spacer between the acetabulum and femur until the infection abated. Arthroplasty could then be carried out with no trouble and there was no recurrence of infection.

  10. Alumina Inlay Failure in Cemented Polyethylene-backed Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Hiroyoshi; Minoda, Yukihide; Ohashi, Hirotsugu; Takaoka, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings for THA have markedly improved in mechanical properties through advances in technology; however, alumina fracture is still a concern. We retrospectively reviewed 77 patients (82 hips) with cemented alumina-on-alumina THAs to identify factors relating to alumina failure. The mean age of the patients at surgery was 63 years. The prostheses had a cemented polyethylene-backed acetabular component with an alumina inlay and a 28-mm alumina head. Revision surgery was performed because of alumina inlay failure in four hips (three fractures and one dissociation; 5.6%), deep infection in two, and recurrent dislocation in one. The 8-year survival rate was 90.7% with revision for any reason and 94.4% with revision for alumina failure as the end point. There were no differences in age, body mass index, gender, mobility, function, abduction angle, or size of component among the four hips with alumina failure and the remaining 68 hips without it; however, radiolucent lines in the sockets were more apparent in four cases with alumina inlay failure. This alumina-on-alumina THA thus yielded unsatisfactory medium-term results because we observed a high rate of catastrophic alumina inlay failure. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18288546

  11. Does hydroxyapatite coating have no advantage over porous coating in primary total hip arthroplasty? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Lin; Lin, Tiao; Liu, An; Shi, Ming-Min; Hu, Bin; Shi, Zhong-Li; Yan, Shi-Gui

    2015-01-28

    There are some arguments between the use of hydroxyapatite and porous coating. Some studies have shown that there is no difference between these two coatings in total hip arthroplasty (THA), while several other studies have shown that hydroxyapatite has advantages over the porous one. We have collected the studies in Pubmed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane library from the earliest possible years to present, with the search strategy of "(HA OR hydroxyapatite) AND ((total hip arthroplasty) OR (total hip replacement)) AND (RCT* OR randomiz* OR control* OR compar* OR trial*)". The randomized controlled trials and comparative observation trials that evaluated the clinical and radiographic effects between hydroxyapatite coating and porous coating were included. Our main outcome measurements were Harris hip score (HHS) and survival, while the secondary outcome measurements were osteolysis, radiolucent lines, and polyethylene wear. Twelve RCTs and 9 comparative observation trials were included. Hydroxyapatite coating could improve the HHS (p < 0.01), reduce the incidence of thigh pain (p = 0.01), and reduce the incidence of femoral osteolysis (p = 0.01), but hydroxyapatite coating had no advantages on survival (p = 0.32), polyethylene wear (p = 0.08), and radiolucent lines (p = 0.78). Hydroxyapatite coating has shown to have an advantage over porous coating. The HHS and survival was duration-dependent-if given the sufficient duration of follow-up, hydroxyapatite coating would be better than porous coating for the survival. The properties of hydroxyapatite and the implant design had influence on thigh pain incidence, femoral osteolysis, and polyethylene wear. Thickness of 50 to 80 μm and purity larger than 90% increased the thigh pain incidence. Anatomic design had less polyethylene wear.

  12. Disappointing short-term results with the DePuy ASR XL metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bernthal, Nicholas M; Celestre, Paul C; Stavrakis, Alexandra I; Ludington, John C; Oakes, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    Outcomes of ultralarge-diameter femoral heads used in metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) are relatively unknown. This study reports on early failures of the ASR XL (Depuy, Warsaw, Ind) and assesses whether a correlation with cup positioning exists. A retrospective review of 70 consecutive MOM THAs with ultralarge-diameter femoral head and monoblock acetabular component was conducted. Minimum follow-up was 24 months. Of 70 THAs, 12 (17.1%) required revision within 3 years for pain (7), loosening (3), and squeaking (2). Three additional THAs noted squeaking, 2 noted grinding, and 3 additional hips had persistent pain. In total, 20 (28.6%) of 70 demonstrated implant dysfunction. Acetabular components for all symptomatic hips were in acceptable range of cup abduction and anteversion. The failures noted with this design do not correlate to cup placement. The high rate of implant dysfunction at early follow-up suggests serious concerns with the concept of MOM THA with an ultralarge-diameter femoral head paired with a monoblock acetabular cup.

  13. Tribo-biological deposits on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene total hip implants retrieved from patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhiwei; Tian, Yi-Xing; Yue, Wen; Yang, Lei; Li, Qunyang

    2016-01-01

    Artificial total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective orthopaedic surgeries that has been used for decades. However, wear of the articulating surfaces is one of the key failure causes limiting the lifetime of total hip implant. In this paper, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to explore the composition and formation mechanism of the tribo-layer on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene (MoPE) implants retrieved from patients. Results showed that, in contrast to conventional understanding, the attached tribo-layer contained not only denatured proteins but also a fraction of polymer particles. The formation of the tribo-layer was believed to relate to lubrication regime, which was supposed to be largely affected by the nature of the ultra-high-molecule-weight-polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear and formation of tribo-layer could be minimized in elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime when the UHMWPE was less stiff and have a morphology containing micro-pits; whereas the wear was more severe and tribo-layer formed in boundary lubrication. Our results and analyses suggest that enhancing interface lubrication may be more effective on reducing wear than increasing the hardness of material. This finding may shed light on the design strategy of artificial hip joints. PMID:27345704

  14. A prospective randomised study of periprosthetic femoral bone remodeling using four different bearings in hybrid total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Zerahn, Bo; Borgwardt, Lotte; Ribel-Madsen, Søren; Borgwardt, Arne

    2011-01-01

    We performed a study to assess whether different bearing materials have an impact on femoral bone remodeling within the first four years after a hybrid total hip arthroplasty. 205 of 300 patients were available for 4 years follow-up after being randomly allocated to four prosthetic combinations: A: Zirconia ceramic head, polyethylene cup; B: Cobalt-Chrome-Molybdenum head and cup; C: Zirconia ceramic head, polyethylene moulded on the Titanium shell of the Asian cup; D: Alumina head and cup. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured with Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry in seven Gruen zones adjacent to the femoral implant. Scans were performed within one week after surgery and four years postoperatively. Clinical outcomes were monitored using the Oxford Hip Score (OHS). A high proportion of patients from group D were excluded due to re-operations (19 patients). BMD decreased significantly in all Gruen zones with the largest declines in group D. BMD changes in Gruen zones 1, 2, 3, 6, and 7 correlated with height, and body weight. Advanced age was associated with an increase in bone loss in Gruen zones 1, 2, 3, 6, and 7. A large stem size was associated with a decline in BMD in Gruen zones 1, 6, and 7.Bone remodeling after total hip arthroplasty may depend on the composition of bearing materials, but age, height, weight, and stem size are also related to changes in BMD.

  15. Low in vitro third-body wear on total hip prostheses induced by calcium sulphate used for local antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, R; Wahl, P; Krieg, J; Gautier, E

    2014-10-23

    In case of implant associated infection, implant preservation is associated with high failure rates. Therefore, a removal or exchange of the implant is most often mandatory for treatment success. Alternatively, under certain conditions, local antibiotic delivery can be applied - preserving the implant, using for example calcium sulphate as a resorbable carrier. In this work, third-body wear on total hip prostheses caused by calcium sulphate particles was tested in a hip simulator. Inlays made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) against 28 mm CoCrMo heads and 36 mm alumina pairings were tested in triplicate, both with and without calcium sulphate particles in the test liquid. Neither the alumina articulations nor the CoCrMo heads were affected by the calcium sulphate particles since calcium sulphate is a relatively soft material. The polyethylene inlays showed 39-89 % higher wear during exposure compared to references, but wear returned to normal when no more particles were added. Thus, calcium sulphate might be used as antibiotic carrier even in the presence of total hip prostheses without fearing excessive third-body wear.

  16. Tribo-biological deposits on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene total hip implants retrieved from patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhiwei; Tian, Yi-Xing; Yue, Wen; Yang, Lei; Li, Qunyang

    2016-06-01

    Artificial total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective orthopaedic surgeries that has been used for decades. However, wear of the articulating surfaces is one of the key failure causes limiting the lifetime of total hip implant. In this paper, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to explore the composition and formation mechanism of the tribo-layer on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene (MoPE) implants retrieved from patients. Results showed that, in contrast to conventional understanding, the attached tribo-layer contained not only denatured proteins but also a fraction of polymer particles. The formation of the tribo-layer was believed to relate to lubrication regime, which was supposed to be largely affected by the nature of the ultra-high-molecule-weight-polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear and formation of tribo-layer could be minimized in elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime when the UHMWPE was less stiff and have a morphology containing micro-pits; whereas the wear was more severe and tribo-layer formed in boundary lubrication. Our results and analyses suggest that enhancing interface lubrication may be more effective on reducing wear than increasing the hardness of material. This finding may shed light on the design strategy of artificial hip joints.

  17. Postural and Chronological Change in Pelvic Tilt Five Years After Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients With Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip: A Three-Dimensional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Haruka; Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Ishida, Takashi; Ike, Hiroyuki; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The pelvis generally tilts to the posterior with movement from the supine to standing position, and with time after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This study aimed to investigate changes in pelvic tilt from the preoperative supine position to the standing position at 5 years after THA (pelvic change, PC). We measured pelvic tilt using a 2D-3D matching technique in 77 unilaterally affected patients who underwent primary THA. PC in 8% of all patients was ≤-20°, and the greatest PC was -25°. In these patients, posterior pelvic tilt continued up to 5 years after THA. These patients were older, and their lumbo-lordotic angle was small. For such cases, cup orientation should be planned to account for continuous posterior change in pelvic tilt after THA.

  18. A case report of idiopathic iliopsoas hematoma which occurred soon after transfer to the wheelchair after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Tomoo; Fujita, Hiroshi; Harada, Hideto; Nishimura, Ryuuichi; Tominaga, Tomohiro

    2017-02-01

    A 79-year-old woman was diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the left hip and scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. As two lesions were detected in branches of the coronary arteries, she was treated with catheter treatment. The patient was receiving anticoagulant treatment, which was suspended eight days before the operation; however, heparin was started at 6 days before the operation and was stopped 9 hours before the operation. On the 2nd postoperative day soon after transfer to the wheel chair, she was feeling unwell and was suffering from severe pain in her left buttock and left thigh. Her blood pressure had decreased to 70 mmHg. During abdominal contrast-enhanced CT, a hematoma was detected in the left iliopsoas muscle. Catheter therapy was started by the cardiovascular department and bleeding had stopped spontaneously. The patient was able to walk with a cane and was discharged on the 40th postoperative day.

  19. Revision total hip and knee arthroplasty implant identification: implications for use of Unique Device Identification 2012 AAHKS member survey results.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Natalia A; Jehn, Megan; York, Sally; Davis, Charles M

    2014-02-01

    FDA's Unique Device Identification (UDI) Rule will mandate manufacturers to assign unique identifiers to their marketed devices. UDI use is expected to improve implant documentation and identification. A 2012 American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons membership survey explored revision total hip and knee arthroplasty implant identification processes. 87% of surgeons reported regularly using at least 3 methods to identify failed implants pre-operatively. Median surgeon identification time was 20 min; median staff time was 30 min. 10% of implants could not be identified pre-operatively. 2% could not be identified intra-operatively. UDI in TJA registry and UDI in EMR were indicated practices to best support implant identification and save time. FDA's UDI rule sets the foundation for UDI use in patient care settings as standard practice for implant documentation.

  20. More complications with uncemented than cemented femoral stems in total hip replacement for displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chammout, Ghazi; Muren, Olle; Laurencikas, Evaldas; Bodén, Henrik; Kelly-Pettersson, Paula; Sjöö, Helene; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Total hip replacement (THR) is the preferred method for the active and lucid elderly patient with a displaced femoral neck fracture (FNF). Controversy still exists regarding the use of cemented or uncemented stems in these patients. We compared the effectiveness and safety between a modern cemented, and a modern uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated femoral stem in patients 65–79 years of age who were treated with THR for displaced FNF. Patients and methods In a single-center, single-blinded randomized controlled trial, we included 69 patients, mean age 75 (65–79) and with a displaced FNF (Garden III–IV). 35 patients were randomized to a cemented THR and 34 to a reverse-hybrid THR with an uncemented stem. Primary endpoints were: prevalence of all hip-related complications and health-related quality of life, evaluated with EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) index up to 2 years after surgery. Secondary outcomes included: overall mortality, general medical complications, and hip function. The patients were followed up at 3, 12, and 24 months. Results According to the calculation of sample size, 140 patients would be required for the primary endpoints, but the study was stopped when only half of the sample size was included (n = 69). An interim analysis at that time showed that the total number of early hip-related complications was substantially higher in the uncemented group, 9 (among them, 3 dislocations and 4 periprosthetic fractures) as compared to 1 in the cemented group. The mortality and functional outcome scores were similar in the 2 groups. Interpretation We do not recommend uncemented femoral stems for the treatment of elderly patients with displaced FNFs. PMID:27967333

  1. Short-term Recovery of Balance Control after Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lugade, Vipul; Klausmeier, Virginia; Jewett, Brian; Collis, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Hip osteoarthritis leads to chronic pain and deteriorated joint function, which affect weightbearing and balance during gait. THA effectively restores hip function but it is not known whether THA restores balance during gait. We hypothesized patients would have greater frontal plane and smaller sagittal plane center of mass-center of pressure inclination angles preoperatively compared with control subjects, and THA would improve these inclination angles by 16 weeks postsurgery. Compared with control subjects, we observed greater frontal plane inclination angles and smaller sagittal plane angles preoperatively, indicating gait imbalance. These inclination angles were improved postoperatively, providing better balance control. Despite improvement, patients differed in frontal and sagittal plane inclination angles compared with control subjects. This suggests residual deficits in dynamic balance control in patients undergoing THA before and up to 4 months after surgery. PMID:18781366

  2. Modular titanium alloy neck failure in total hip replacement: analysis of a relapse case

    PubMed Central

    Ceretti, Marco; Falez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Modular neck hip prosthesis born in the 1990 with the aim of allowing the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intra-operatively restoring patient’s original biomechanics. In order to achieve the best biomechanics of the reconstructed hip, preoperative planning is essential. In the last few years modularity has been questioned and an argument made for the return to mono block stems due to events of breakage or disconnection of modular components. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such modular device due to the contamination inside the modular coupling or to high loads. We present a case of repetitive modular femoral neck prosthesis fracture. PMID:27163109

  3. A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin to prevent deep venous thrombosis after elective total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gallay, Steve; Waddell, James P.; Cardella, Piera; Morton, Jane

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of a short course of low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin) in the prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after elective total hip replacement. Design A prospective cohort study. Follow-up was a minimum of 3 months. Setting An acute-care hospital with a large-volume practice of elective total joint replacement. Patients A prospective group of 150 patients who required primary total hip arthroplasty and a historic control group of 150 patients. All patients were treated with compression stockings, indomethacin and early mobilization. The treatment group received low-molecular-weight heparin, 30 mg every 12 hours for 5 days postoperatively; the control group received no specific anticoagulant therapy. Interventions Total hip replacement. Doppler venography on postoperative day 5 and 2 to 5 days later if required. Main outcome measures Presence or absence of deep venous thrombosis. Wound hemorrhage, transfusion rate, number of units of blood transfused and changes in the hemoglobin level. Results The incidence of proximal deep venous thrombosis (popliteal vein to common iliac vein) was 0% in the treatment group versus 4% in the control group. There was no difference in bleeding or number of transfusions required. There was, however, a significant (p = 0.005) drop in hemoglobin level in the treatment group. Conclusions A short course of low-molecular-weight heparin provides effective protection against proximal deep venous thrombosis without significantly increasing the risk to the patient. The treatment is compatible with early patient discharge and the pharmacologic prevention of heterotopic ossification after total joint replacement. PMID:9126125

  4. Preoperative autologous blood donation in total-hip arthroplasty. A cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Healy, J C; Frankforter, S A; Graves, B K; Reddy, R L; Beck, J R

    1994-04-01

    Preoperative autologous blood donation is employed with increasing frequency, particularly in patients undergoing elective orthopedic procedures. While autologous transfusion decreases the incidence of postoperative infections and other complications, the cost-effectiveness of this therapy has not been fully investigated. We constructed a decision analytic model to study the cost-effectiveness of preoperative autologous blood donation of packed red blood cells compared with allogeneic packed red blood cells in primary hip arthroplasty. We used data from 73 patients presenting at our blood center with a prescription for 2 U of autologous red blood cells prior to hip arthroplasty to establish probabilities for the number of units that would be donated. Patients were able to donate an average of 1.9 U (range, 0 to 2 U) of autologous blood. We also reviewed the charts of 56 patients who underwent primary hip arthroplasty to model the number of units given during hospitalization (1.5 U given; range, 0 to 5 U). We applied the model to a 65-year-old patient undergoing primary hip arthroplasty. Estimates for the incidence of posttransfusion hepatitis, chronic active hepatitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, postoperative bacterial infection, and fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction were derived from the literature. Patient utility was measured in life-years. Costs included the cost of preoperative autologous blood donation, blood administration, and medical care costs associated with the complications of transfusion. Costs were derived from local data and the literature. Future earnings lost were not modeled. In the baseline analysis, autologous transfusion results in a net cost savings compared with allogeneic blood over a wide range of complication rates, patient ages, and transfusion requirements. The dominant factor in the analysis is the effect of postoperative bacterial infection on length of hospital stay and the resultant increase in costs. The effect of

  5. Contact surface motion paths associated with leg length inequality following unilateral total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Budenberg, Sarah; Redmond, Anthony; White, Derek; Grainger, Andrew; O'Connor, Philip; Stone, Martin H; Stewart, Todd D

    2012-12-01

    In the past, there has been little research into leg length inequality (LLI) and its effect on hip arthroplasty bearing longevity. This investigation aimed to determine the effects of post-operative LLI on hip motions during gait and to postulate the subsequent influence on the wear of the artificial hip joint replacement. Motion data from a clinical gait analysis were processed with an in-house computational model to plot graphs showing the movement of loci of 20 points on the femoral head during one gait cycle for two cohorts: 19 LLI patients and 38 normal healthy patients. Loci paths were quantified by calculating the aspect ratio (AR) of the path shape. It was found that on average, LLI patients had a reduction in flexion/extension and abduction/adduction. Furthermore, the AR of LLI patients was found to be 8% smaller than the normal group. The shorter, more multidirectional, motion paths in LLI patients would suggest the potential for greater wear in a polyethylene bearing compared to an asymptomatic, non-LLI patient. The results have potential implications towards preclinical wear testing of joint replacements.

  6. Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene in Total Hip and Knee Replacement: Spatial Distribution of Molecular Orientation and Shape Recovery Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Masaoka, Toshinori; Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Shishido, Takaaki; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Kosuke

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated effects of processing procedures on morphology of highly cross-linked and re-melted UHMWPE (XLPE) in total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA, TKA). The shape recovery behavior was also monitored via uniaxial compression test at room temperature after non-destructive characterizations of the in-depth microstructure by confocal/polarized Raman spectroscopy. The goal of this study was to relate the manufacturing-induced morphology to the in vivo micromechanical performance, and ultimately to explore an optimal structure in each alternative joint bearing. It was clearly confirmed that the investigated XLPE hip and knee implants, which were produced from different orthopaedic grade resins (GUR 1050 and GUR 1020), consisted of two structural regions in the as-received states: the near-surface transitional anisotropic layer (≈100 μm thickness) and the bulk isotropic structural region. These XLPEs exhibited a different crystalline anisotropy and molecular texture within the near-surface layers. In addition, the knee insert showed a slightly higher efficiency of shape recovery against the applied strain over the hip liner owing to a markedly higher percentage of the bulk amorphous phase with intermolecular cross-linking. The quantitative data presented in this study might contribute to construct manufacturing strategies for further rationalized structures as alternative bearings in THA and TKA. PMID:25243183

  7. Highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and knee replacement: spatial distribution of molecular orientation and shape recovery behavior.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Masaoka, Toshinori; Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Shishido, Takaaki; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated effects of processing procedures on morphology of highly cross-linked and re-melted UHMWPE (XLPE) in total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA, TKA). The shape recovery behavior was also monitored via uniaxial compression test at room temperature after non-destructive characterizations of the in-depth microstructure by confocal/polarized Raman spectroscopy. The goal of this study was to relate the manufacturing-induced morphology to the in vivo micromechanical performance, and ultimately to explore an optimal structure in each alternative joint bearing. It was clearly confirmed that the investigated XLPE hip and knee implants, which were produced from different orthopaedic grade resins (GUR 1050 and GUR 1020), consisted of two structural regions in the as-received states: the near-surface transitional anisotropic layer (≈100 μm thickness) and the bulk isotropic structural region. These XLPEs exhibited a different crystalline anisotropy and molecular texture within the near-surface layers. In addition, the knee insert showed a slightly higher efficiency of shape recovery against the applied strain over the hip liner owing to a markedly higher percentage of the bulk amorphous phase with intermolecular cross-linking. The quantitative data presented in this study might contribute to construct manufacturing strategies for further rationalized structures as alternative bearings in THA and TKA.

  8. A Multi-centre Study to Assess the Long-term Performance of the Summit™ Hip in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  9. A Randomised Multi-centre Study to Compare the Long-term Performance of the Future Hip to 3 Other Implants in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-06

    Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis; Perthes Disease

  10. Excellent long-term results of the Müller acetabular reinforcement ring in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sirka, Aurimas; Clauss, Martin; Tarasevicius, Sarunas; Wingstrand, Hans; Stucinskas, Justinas; Robertsson, Otto; Emil Ochsner, Peter; Ilchmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — The original Müller acetabular reinforcement ring (ARR) shows favorable medium-term results for acetabular reconstruction in total hip arthroplasty, where it is used when the acetabular bone stock is deficient. However, there are no data regarding long-term survival of the device. We therefore investigated long-term survival and analyzed radiological modes of failure. Patients and methods — Between 1984 and 2002, 321 consecutive primary arthroplasties using an ARR were performed in 291 patients. The mean follow-up time was 11 (0–25) years, and 24 hips were lost to follow-up. For survival analysis, we investigated 321 hips and the end of the follow-up was the date of revision, date of death, or the last patient contact date with implant still in situ. Radiological assessment was performed for 160 hips with a minimum of 10 years of follow-up and with radiographs of sufficient quality. It included evaluation of osteolysis, migration, and loosening. Results — 12 ARR THAs were revised: 1 isolated ARR revision for aseptic loosening, 4 revisions of the ARR and the stem for aseptic loosening, 6 for infection, and 1 for recurrent dislocation. The cumulative revision rate for all components, for any reason, at 20 years was 15% (95% CI: 10–22), while for the ARR only it was 7% (95% CI: 4–12) for any reason and 3.4% (95% CI: 1–9) for aseptic loosening. 21 (13%) of 160 ARR THAs examined had radiological changes: 7 had osteolysis but were not loose, and 14 were radiologically loose but were not painful and not revised. Interpretation — Our data suggest that the long-term survival of the ARR is excellent. PMID:26471881

  11. Results of Total Hip Arthroplasty after Core Decompression with Tantalum Rod for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun-Woo; Kim, Do-Youn; Lee, Young-Min; Eshnazarov, Kamolhuja Eshnazarovich; Yoon, Taek-Rim

    2016-01-01

    Background Early stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) has many treatment options including core decompression with implantation of a tantalum rod. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes and potential complications during conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA) in such patients. Methods Six male patients (8 hips) underwent THA subsequent to removing a tantalum rod (group I) from April 2010 to November 2011. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these patients. We enrolled 12 age- and sex-matched patients (16 hips) during the same period, who had undergone primary THA without a previous operation as the control group (group II). All patients were followed for at least 3 years. We checked the Harris hip score (HHS), operative time, and volume of blood loss. Radiological results, including inclination, anteversion of the acetabular cup, presence of periprosthetic osteolysis, and subsidence of femoral stem were checked at the last follow-up. Results The mean preoperative HHS values were 56.5 (range, 50 to 62) and 59.1 (range, 42 to 70) in groups I and II, respectively. The HHS improved to 96.0 (range, 93 to 100) and 97.6 (range, 93 to 100), respectively, at the 3-year follow-up (p = 0.172). Mean operation time was 98.8 minutes (range, 70 to 120 minutes) in group I and 77.5 minutes (range, 60 to 115 minutes) in group II (p = 0.006). Total blood loss volumes were 1,193.8 mL (range, 960 to 1,360 mL) and 944.1 mL (range, 640 to 1,280 mL) in groups I and II, respectively (p = 0.004). No significant differences in inclination or anteversion of acetabular cup and no evidence of osteolysis or subsidence of the femoral stem were reported in either group in radiological follow-up results. However, one case of squeaking occurred in group I during the follow-up. Conclusions The two groups showed no clinical or radiological differences except extended operative time and increased blood loss. However, the incidence of

  12. Paraplegia caused by giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk after combined spinal-epidural anesthesia in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Toshiyuki; Nakahira, Junko; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    Total paraplegia after epidural or spinal anesthesia is extremely rare. We herein report a case of total paraplegia caused by a giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk at the L3-L4 level after total hip arthroplasty for coxarthrosis. The patient had no preoperative neurologic abnormalities. Intraoperative anesthetic management involved combined spinal-epidural anesthesia at the L3-L4 level with continuous intravenous propofol administration. Postoperatively, the patient complained of numbness and total paraplegia of the lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a giant herniation of a lumbar disk compressing the spinal cord at the L3-L4 level. The intradural herniation was surgically treated, and the patient's symptoms completely resolved.

  13. Role of hyaluronic acid and phospholipid in the lubrication of a cobalt-chromium head for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Bong; Duong, Cong-Truyen; Chang, Ho-Geun; Sharma, Ashish R; Thompson, Mark S; Park, Sungchan; Kwak, Byung-Chan; Kim, Tae-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Park, Seonghun

    2014-09-01

    The tribological performance of total hip arthroplasty has an important influence on its success rate. This study examined the concentration-dependent role of hyaluronic acid (HA) and phospholipid (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC) in the boundary lubricating ability of retrieved cobalt-chromium femoral heads. The microscale frictional coefficients (μ) were measured by atomic force microscopy using a rectangular silicon cantilever integrated with sharp silicon tips. In the case of HA lubricant, the frictional coefficients decreased significantly at concentrations of 2.0 (0.16 ± 0.03) and 3.5 mg/ml (0.11 ± 0.01) while increased at 5.0 mg/ml (0.15 ± 0.01), compared to that with phosphate buffer saline (0.25 ± 0.03). The concentration-dependent lubrication behavior of DPPC was most effective when DPPC was in the physiological concentration range, showing μ = 0.16 ± 0.01 in polypropylene glycol, and 0.05 ± 0.01, 0.02 ± 0.01, and 0.03 ± 0.01 at a DPPC concentration of 0.05, 0.2, and 3.0 mg/ml, respectively. Results obtained show significant differences between the DPPC concentration groups. Conclusively, the microscale frictional response of the retrieved CoCr femoral head has a significant dependence on the concentrations of HA and DPPC. Moreover, observed optimal concentration of HA and DPPC for effective lubrication is similar to that observed in normal human synovial fluid. Therefore, a retrieval of the synovia may be considered during total hip replacement surgeries in an effort for reduction of friction between head and liner of total hip replacement implants.

  14. The Impact of Lumbar Spine Disease and Deformity on Total Hip Arthroplasty Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Blizzard, Daniel J; Nickel, Brian T; Seyler, Thorsten M; Bolognesi, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Concurrent spine and hip disease is common. Spinal deformities can restrict lumbar range of motion and lumbar lordosis, leading to pelvic obliquity and increased pelvic tilt. A comprehensive preoperative workup and component templating ensure appropriate compensation for altered pelvic parameters for implantation of components according to functional positioning. Pelvic obliquity from scoliosis must be measured to calculate appropriate leg length. Cup positioning should be templated on standing radiograph to limit impingement from cup malposition. In spinal deformity, the optimal position of the cup that accommodates pelvic parameters and limits impingement may lie outside the classic parameters of the safe zone.

  15. Preoperative Versus Postoperative Initiation of Warfarin Therapy in Patients Undergoing Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Cara; Erdle, Nicholas; Li, Kai; Curtin, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The optimal strategy for postoperative deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis remains controversial in hip and knee arthroplasty. Warfarin causes transient hypercoagulability; however, the optimal timing of treatment remains unclear. We evaluated the effects of preoperative versus postoperative warfarin therapy with a primary endpoint of perioperative change in hemoglobin. Warfarin was dosed according to a standard nomogram. No difference in perioperative hemoglobin change was observed. The preoperative group demonstrated higher INRs. Initiation of warfarin preoperatively was not associated with any difference in perioperative hemoglobin change. Larger studies are needed to determine whether the risk of adverse events is increased with either strategy.

  16. Ipsilateral total hip arthroplasty in patient with an above-knee amputee for femoral neck fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunhui; Lv, Qi; Yi, Chengqing; Ma, Jinzhong; Zhu, Libo

    2015-01-01

    There is limited literature about the outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) as a surgical option for above-knee amputees. Here, we described one case of femoral neck fracture with above-knee amputation. Two-year follow-up revealed an excellent clinical and radiological outcome. The main challenge of THA posed by the amputation was control of the lower extremity. We recommend inserting a pin at the greater trochanter of the femur to improve control of traction or rotation. PMID:25932163

  17. Blood conservation with tranexamic acid in total hip arthroplasty: a randomized, double-blind study in 40 primary operations.

    PubMed

    Benoni, G; Fredin, H; Knebel, R; Nilsson, P

    2001-10-01

    We performed a randomized, double-blind study on the effect of tranexamic acid on blood loss and blood transfusions in 40 primary total hip arthroplasties. Tranexamic acid, 10 mg/kg body weight, or placebo, was given intravenously just before the operation. Blood loss during the operation and postoperatively into the drains was recorded, as also were blood hemoglobin concentrations. Ultrasound examination 1 week postoperatively was done to estimate the blood loss due to remaining hematomas. Total (operation + drain) blood loss was 0.76 (95 CI 0.63-0.89) L in the tranexamic acid group as compared to 1.0 (CI 0.81-1.2) L in the placebo group (p = 0.03). The number of blood transfusions during the day of operation was 2 vs. 10 (p = 0.07) and the total number during the hospital stay was 5 vs. 13 (p = 0.2). 1 patient in each group had a pulmonary embolism.

  18. The damping effect of cement as a potential mitigation factor of squeaking in ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mengelle, D. E.; Ozols, A.; Fernandez, C.; Autorino, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Studies reporting specifically on squeaking in total hip arthroplasty have focused on cementless, and not on hybrid, fixation. We hypothesised that the cement mantle of the femur might have a damping effect on the sound transmitted through the metal stem. The objective of this study was to test the effect of cement on sound propagation along different stem designs and under different fixation conditions. Methods An in vitro model for sound detection, composed of a mechanical suspension structure and a sound-registering electronic assembly, was designed. A pulse of sound in the audible range was propagated along bare stems and stems implanted in cadaveric bone femurs with and without cement. Two stems of different alloy and geometry were compared. Results The magnitudes of the maximum amplitudes of the bare stem were in the range of 10.8 V to 11.8 V, whereas the amplitudes for the same stems with a cement mantle in a cadaveric bone decreased to 0.3 V to 0.7 V, implying a pulse-attenuation efficiency of greater than 97%. The same magnitude is close to 40% when the comparison is made against stems implanted in cadaveric bone femurs without cement. Conclusion The in vitro model presented here has shown that the cement had a remarkable effect on sound attenuation and a strong energy absorption in cement mantle and bone. The visco-elastic properties of cement can contribute to the dissipation of vibro-acoustic energy, thus preventing hip prostheses from squeaking. This could explain, at least in part, the lack of reports of squeaking when hybrid fixation is used. Cite this article: F. J. Burgo, D. E. Mengelle, A. Ozols, C. Fernandez, C. M. Autorino. The damping effect of cement as a potential mitigation factor of squeaking in ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:531–537. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.511.BJR-2016-0058.R1. PMID:27811144

  19. Postoperative Development of Bone Mineral Density and Muscle Strength in the Lower Limb After Cemented and Uncemented Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Tobias; Krüger, Christine; Kasch, Cornelius; Finze, Susanne; Steens, Wolfram; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Skripitz, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background : Numerous studies have shown reduction of periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD) after hip replacement. The effect on the whole limb, however, is still unexplored. This study’s objective was to analyse the postoperative development of BMD and muscle strength of the limb after total hip replacement (THR) and to determine links between these parameters. Methods : 55 patients, who underwent THR, were included. Depending on therapeutic indication, either an uncemented stem (Group A, n=30) or a cemented stem (Group B, n=25) has been implanted. In the limbs, the measurement of BMD using DEXA and the maximum isometric muscle strength, detected by a leg press, were undertaken preoperatively and after 3, 6 and 12 months. Results : A total of 12 patients (Group A: n = 6, Group B: n = 6) were excluded due to reasons which were not relevant to the study. So, the results refer to the data of 43 patients. In Group A (uncemented, n = 24), a significant decrease of BMD on the operated extremity was seen after 3, 6 and 12 months compared with preoperative values. Isometric muscle strength on the affected extremity increased significantly after 6 and 12 months. In Group B (cemented, n = 19), with a lower baseline compared to group A, an increase in BMD of the affected limb was seen postoperatively. This rise was significant after 12 months. With regard to the isometric muscle strength, a significant increase could be observed in this group after 6 and 12 months. Conclusion : Analogous to postoperative reduction of periprosthetic bone density, a decrease of the entire limb BMD on the operated leg occurred after implantation of uncemented hip stems. In contrast, an increase in BMD was recorded for cemented stems. Regardless of the type of anchoring, a substantial increase in muscular strength could be observed postoperatively in both groups. PMID:25246993

  20. Failure mechanisms in CoCrMo modular femoral stems for revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Parry, Michael; Masri, Bassam A; Duncan, Clive; Wang, Rizhi

    2016-04-28

    In this retrieval study, we reported the failure mechanisms of the CoCrMo-based hip implants. Systematic analyses on the clinically failed modular femoral stems from Revitan™ revision prostheses revealed a multistep fracture process. Multiple microcracks were first developed under the combined action of pitting corrosion and dynamic tensile stress on the lateral side of the CoCrMo connection taper. These microcracks then served as the initiation sites of further corrosion fatigue cracking leading to the final catastrophic failure. This crack initiation process has not been previously reported on retrieved CoCrMo components and our findings provide valuable information on the clinical performance of such implants, as well as the material selection and structural designs of future modular stems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  1. Risk Factors for Subsidence of a Modular Tapered Femoral Stem Used for Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tangsataporn, Suksan; Safir, Oleg A; Vincent, Alexander D; Abdelbary, Hesham; Gross, Allan E; Kuzyk, Paul R T

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, and the clinical and radiographic risk factors for significant subsidence of a cementless, modular tapered revision femoral stem. Femoral stem subsidence of at least 10 mm or subsidence requiring revision was considered significant subsidence. Ninety-seven patients (99 hips) were included with minimum radiographic follow-up of one year (mean 34 months; range, 12-91 months). The mean stem subsidence was 4.5 mm (range, 0-44 mm). Fourteen out of 99 (14.1%) stems had significant subsidence and 6 (6.1%) stems required revision due to subsidence. Patient weight greater than 80 kg (P=0.04) and femoral stem press-fit distance of less than 2 cm (P<0.01) were both independent risk factors for significant stem subsidence.

  2. Development and verification of a cementless novel tapered wedge stem for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Faizan, Ahmad; Wuestemann, Thies; Nevelos, Jim; Bastian, Adam C; Collopy, Dermot

    2015-02-01

    Most current tapered wedge hip stems were designed based upon the original Mueller straight stem design introduced in 1977. These stems were designed to have a single medial curvature and grew laterally to accommodate different sizes. In this preclinical study, the design and verification of a tapered wedge stem using computed tomography scans of 556 patients are presented. The computer simulation demonstrated that the novel stem, designed for proximal engagement, allowed for reduced distal fixation, particularly in the 40-60 year male population. Moreover, the physical micromotion testing and finite element analysis demonstrated that the novel stem allowed for reduced micromotion. In summary, preclinical data suggest that the computed tomography based stem design described here may offer enhanced implant fit and reduced micromotion.

  3. Combination Therapy with Continuous Three-in-One Femoral Nerve Block and Periarticular Multimodal Drug Infiltration after Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tetsunaga, Tomoko; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Endo, Hirosuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Various postoperative pain relief modalities, including continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB), local infiltration analgesia (LIA), and combination therapy, have been reported for total knee arthroplasty. However, no studies have compared CFNB with LIA for total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of CFNB versus LIA after THA. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the postoperative outcomes of 93 THA patients (20 men, 73 women; mean age 69.2 years). Patients were divided into three groups according to postoperative analgesic technique: CFNB, LIA, or combined CFNB+LIA. We measured the following postoperative outcome parameters: visual analog scale (VAS) for pain at rest, supplemental analgesia, side effects, mobilization, length of hospital stay, and Harris Hip Score (HHS). Results. The CFNB+LIA group had significantly lower VAS pain scores than the CFNB and LIA groups on postoperative day 1. There were no significant differences among the three groups in use of supplemental analgesia, side effects, mobilization, length of hospital stay, or HHS at 3 months after THA. Conclusions. Although there were no clinically significant differences in outcomes among the three groups, combination therapy with CFNB and LIA provided better pain relief after THA than CFNB or LIA alone, with few side effects. PMID:28070159

  4. Contributions of human tissue analysis to understanding the mechanisms of loosening and osteolysis in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Jiri; Vaculova, Jana; Goodman, Stuart B.; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic loosening and osteolysis are the most frequent late complications of total hip arthroplasty (THA) leading to revision of the prosthesis. This review aims to demonstrate how histopathological studies contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of aseptic loosening/osteolysis development. Only studies analysing periprosthetic tissues retrieved from failed implants in humans were included. Data from 101 studies (5532 patients with failure of THA implants) published in English or German between 1974 and 2013 were included. “Control” samples were reported in 45 of the 101 studies. The most frequently examined tissues were the bone-implant interface membrane and pseudosynovial tissues. Histopathological studies contribute importantly to determination of key cell populations underlying the biological mechanisms of aseptic loosening and osteolysis. The studies demonstrated the key molecules of the host response at the protein level (chemokines, cytokines, nitric oxide metabolites, metalloproteinases). However, these studies also have important limitations. Tissues harvested at revision surgery reflect specifically end-stage failure and may not adequately reveal the evolution of pathophysiological events that lead to prosthetic loosening and osteolysis. One possible solution is to examine tissues harvested from stable total hip arthroplasties that have been revised at various time periods due to dislocation or periprosthetic fracture in multicenter studies. PMID:24525037

  5. Migration pattern of cementless press fit cups in the presence of stabilizing screws in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the initial acetabular implant stability and late acetabular implant migration in press fit cups combined with screw fixation of the acetabular component in order to answer the question whether screws are necessary for the fixation of the acetabular component in cementless primary total hip arthroplasty. One hundred and seven hips were available for follow-up after primary THA using a cementless, porous-coated acetabular component. A total of 631 standardized radiographs were analyzed digitally by the "single-film-x-ray-analysis" method (EBRA). One hundred 'and one (94.4%) acetabular components did not show significant migration of more than 1 mm. Six (5.6%) implants showed migration of more than 1 mm. Statistical analysis did not reveal preoperative patterns that would identify predictors for future migration. Our findings suggest that the use of screw fixation for cementless porous- coated acetabular components for primary THA does not prevent cup migration. PMID:21486725

  6. Descriptive Epidemiology of Patients Undergoing Total Hip Arthroplasty in Korea with Focus on Incidence of Femoroacetabular Impingement: Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the causes leading to total hip arthroplasty (THA), aimed to clarify the incidence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) among the causes, and compared the incidence in Korea with those in other countries. From January 2000 to December 2014, 1,206 hips of 818 patients who underwent primary THA at our institute were reviewed retrospectively in terms of radiographs and electronic charts. The radiographs and radiographic parameters were reviewed and measured by 2 of the authors, who are orthopedic surgeons. Patients were categorized in terms of the causes leading to THA as primary osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), posttraumatic arthritis, post infectious arthritis, avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head, fracture of the femoral head or neck, ankylosing spondylitis (AS), developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD), FAI, and others. There were 32 patients (3.91%) in the primary OA group, 41 (5.01%) in the RA group, 84 (10.27%) in the posttraumatic arthritis group, 39 (4.77%) in the post infectious arthritis group, 365 (44.62%) in the AVN group, 39 (4.77%) in the fracture group, 21 (2.57%) in the AS group, 52 (6.36%) in the DDH group, 71 (8.68%) in the LCPD group, 52 (6.36%) in the FAI group, and 22 (2.69%) in the ‘other’ group. The causes leading to THA in Korea differ from those in Western countries. FAI could be causes of severe secondary OA that requires THA in Korea, therefore symptomatic FAI should not be neglected. PMID:28244282

  7. Kerboull-type plate in a direct anterior approach for severe bone defects at primary total hip arthroplasty: technical note

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Mikio; Baba, Tomonori; Ochi, Hironori; Ozaki, Yu; Watari, Taiji; Homma, Yasuhiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: For cases with extensive acetabular bone defects, we perform surgery combining the Kerboull-type (KT) plate and bone graft through direct anterior approach (DAA) in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) requiring acetabular reconstruction as minimally invasive surgery. This paper provides the details of the surgical procedure. Methods: The basic structure of the Kerboull-type plate is a cruciform plate. Since the hook of the Kerboull-type plate has to be applied to the tear drop, a space for it was exposed. The tear drop is located in the anterior lower region in surgery through DAA in supine position. It was also confirmed by fluoroscopy as needed. The bone grafting was performed using an auto- or allogeneic femoral head for bone defects in the weight-bearing region of the hip joint. Results: Of 563 patients who underwent primary THA between 2012 and 2014, THA using the KT plate through DAA was performed in 21 patients (3.7%). The mean duration of postoperative follow-up was 31.8 months. The mean operative time was 188.4 min, and the mean blood loss was 770 g. The patients became able to walk independently after 2.4 days on average (1–4 days). On clinical evaluation, the modified Harris Hip Score was 45.6 ± 12.4 before surgery, and it was significantly improved to 85.3 ± 8.97 on the final follow-up. Discussion: DAA is a true intermuscular approach capable of conserving soft tissue. Since it is applied in a supine position, fluoroscopy can be readily used, and it was very useful to accurately place the plate. PMID:28287388

  8. Effect of 3D physiological loading and motion on elastohydrodynamic lubrication of metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Gao, Leiming; Wang, Fengcai; Yang, Peiran; Jin, Zhongmin

    2009-07-01

    An elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) simulation of a metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip implant was presented, considering both steady state and transient physiological loading and motion gait cycle in all three directions. The governing equations were solved numerically by the multi-grid method and fast Fourier transform in spherical coordinates, and full numerical solutions were presented included the pressure and film thickness distribution. Despite small variations in the magnitude of 3D resultant load, the horizontal anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) load components were found to translate the contact area substantially in the corresponding direction and consequently to result in significant squeeze-film actions. For a cup positioned anatomically at 45 degrees , the variation of the resultant load was shown unlikely to cause the edge contact. The contact area was found within the cup dimensions of 70-130 degrees and 90-150 degrees in the AP and ML direction respectively even under the largest translations. Under walking conditions, the horizontal load components had a significant impact on the lubrication film due to the squeeze-film effect. The time-dependent film thickness was increased by the horizontal translation and decreased during the reverse of this translation caused by the multi-direction of the AP load during walking. The minimum film thickness of 12-20 nm was found at 0.4s and around the location at (95, 125) degrees. During the whole walking cycle both the average and centre film thickness were found obviously increased to a range of 40-65 nm, compared with the range of 25-55 nm under one load (vertical) and one motion (flexion-extension) condition, which suggested the lubrication in the current MOM hip implant was improved under 3D physiological loading and motion. This study suggested the lubrication performance especially the film thickness distribution should vary greatly under different operating conditions and the time and

  9. [Preoperative planning and surgical technic in achieving stability and leg length equality in total hip joint arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Cech, O; Fassbender, M; Kirschner, P; Rozkydal, Z

    2002-01-01

    One of the prerequisites for a good outcome of total hip arthroplasty is preoperative planning. Using a roentgenogram, the size of an implant, incision level on the femoral neck, depth required for fitting the cup, restoration of the center of hip rotation and, if necessary, correction of length descrepancy between the legs are determined. The preoperative planning based on an X-ray image was introduced by M. E. Müller and, in 1976, was modified by R. Schneider who used a transparent sheet for a template on which all relevant points guiding the surgical procedure are marked, i.e., the right position for implantation of the cup and stem, and incision lines. In uncomplicated cases, however, this approach is not necessary and the "planning principle of parallel lines" developed by L. Spotorno in 1988 can be used instead. The determination of length discrepancy between the legs is derived from a drawing of three reference lines on the roentgenogram. The lines parallel to each other indicace the same length for both legs. If the legs differ in length, the lines will diverge from each other in a way typical for this condition.

  10. Ultrasound-based registration of the pelvic coordinate system in the lateral position using symmetry for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Fieten, Lorenz; Dupraz, Ingrid; Reising, Kilian; Helwig, Peter; Heger, Stefan; Blömer, Wilhelm; Radermacher, Klaus

    2012-05-16

    In total hip replacement, patient placement in the lateral position is preferred by many surgeons. However, it complicates registration of the so-called pelvic coordinate system that is the standard reference for surgeons to measure cup orientation. This coordinate system comprises the anterior pelvic plane and the mid-sagittal plane, and it is conventionally registered on the basis of bony anatomical landmarks including the left and the right anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS). Ultrasound has been suggested for transcutaneous palpation of the bone surface. The difficulty in registration of the pelvic coordinate system with the patient in the lateral position arises because the contralateral ASIS cannot be reached easily by a mechanical pointer and is not accessible by means of an ultrasound probe. Up to now, methods to compensate for these missing data have not been used in clinical routine. This paper describes a new ultrasound-based method that requires neither image segmentation nor statistical shape models and uses symmetry to approximate the position of the contralateral ASIS. A detailed analysis based on computed tomography data of 60 hips following a cadaver study is presented to show the ability of our method to reliably reconstruct the pelvic coordinate system. The median angles between ground truth planes and the "reconstructed" planes were <2°. By choosing a standard cup orientation w.r.t. the "reconstructed" planes, the median abduction and version angle errors were <2°, too.

  11. Histologic, serologic, and tribologic findings in failed metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty: AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    Pelt, Christopher E; Erickson, Jill; Clarke, Ian; Donaldson, Thomas; Layfield, Lester; Peters, Christopher L

    2013-11-06

    Despite multiple changes in second-generation metal-on-metal hip implants, greater-than-expected revision rates have led to alarm. We hypothesized that the finding of intraoperative metallosis would be associated with a high metal load on histologic analysis and that both would be associated with increased wear, greater serum metal ion levels, and predictable biologic responses in the histologic sections. We evaluated the implant positioning, serum ion levels, intraoperative findings of metallosis, wear characteristics of retrieved implants (tribology), histology, and outcomes in a series of eighteen large-diameter metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties. The arthroplasties were divided into two groups on the basis of the intraoperative finding of metallosis and into two groups on the basis of the metal load score. Intraoperative metallosis was not associated with a high metal load score (p = 0.15). The finding of intraoperative metallosis was associated with greater serum metal ion levels, greater wear rates, and greater complication rates. Aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion (ALVAL) scores were similar between the metallosis and non-metallosis groups (p = 0.49) as well as between the high and low-metal-load groups (p = 0.56).

  12. Pre-operative psychological distress does not adversely affect functional or mental health gain after primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Munier; Parfitt, Daniel J; Beard, David J; Darrah, Clare; Nolan, John; Murray, David W; Andrew, John G

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative psychological distress has been reported to predict poor outcome and patient dissatisfaction after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to investigate if pre-operative psychological distress was associated with adverse functional outcome after primary THR. We analysed the database of a prospective multi-centre study undertaken between January 1999 and January 2002. We recorded the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and SF36 score preoperatively and up to five years after surgery for 1055 patients. We dichotomised the patients into the mentally distressed (Mental Health Scale score - MHS =56) and the not mentally distressed (MHS >56) groups based on their pre-operative MHS of the SF36. 762 (72.22%). Patients (595 not distressed and 167 distressed) were followed up at 5 years. Both pre and post-operative OHS and SF-36 scores were significantly worse in the distressed group (both p<0.001). However, both groups experienced statistically significant improvement in OHS and MHS, which was maximal at 1 year after surgery and was maintained over the follow up (p=0.00). There was a substantial improvement in mental distress in patients who reported mental distress prior to surgery. The results suggest that pre-operative psychological distress did not adversely compromise functional outcome gain after THA. Despite having worse absolute values both pre and post operatively, patients with mental distress did not have any less functional gain from THA as measured by improvement in OHS.

  13. Bilateral One-Stage Revision of Infected Total Hip Arthroplasties: Report of Two Cases and Management of Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pommepuy, Thomas; Lons, Adrien; Benad, Kevin; Beltrand, Eric; Senneville, Eric; Migaud, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations for the management of chronic and bilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) infection are lacking. However, this type of infection involves medical problems concerning the management of the antibiotic therapy. We report two cases of such infections operated as one-stage revision. For each case, both hips were infected with the same bacteria (Staphylococcus caprae for one patient and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus for the other). The probabilistic antibiotic treatment started during the first side (after harvesting intraoperative samples) did not prevent the culture of the bacteriologic harvested during the intervention of the second side. Cultures were positive for the same bacteria for both sides in the two cases presented herein. After results of intraoperative cultures, patients received culture-guided antibiotic therapy for three months and were considered cured at the end of a two-year follow-up. Our results suggest one-stage bilateral change of infected THA is a viable option and that early intraoperative antibiotic, started during the first-side exchange, does not jeopardize microbiological documentation of the second side. This work brings indirect arguments, in favor of the use of prophylactic antibiotics during revision of infected THA. PMID:26904335

  14. Temporal and spatial distributions of directional counterface motion at the acetabular bearing surface in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, D. R.; Brown, T. D.; Maxian, T. A.; Callaghan, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    The motions of counterface articulation against the bearing surface of the acetabular liner strongly influence polyethylene wear debris production in contemporary total hip arthroplasty. However, the available body of relevant articular force and motion information is largely confined to resultant load excursions measured relative to instrumented femoral components, and/or to global angular motions (flexion, adduction, endorotation) of the joint. Analytical frameworks are here developed to transform such information into temporal and spatial variations of the resultant load and of the local counterface sliding velocity relative to an ordered set of discrete locations (e.g., finite element nodes) on the acetabular bearing surface. Whole-duty-cycle time histories of acetabular resultant load and counterface velocity distributions are presented for two important practical situations: human level walking gait, and a 23 degrees biaxial rocking hip simulation machine. The local counterface motions occurring in the simulator are characterized by higher velocities, smoother motion patterns, and wider directional variation than those occurring in human gait. PMID:9807707

  15. Clinical results of the wear performance of cross-linked polyethylene in total hip arthroplasty: prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ise, Kentaro; Kawanabe, Keiichi; Tamura, Jiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Goto, Koji; Nakamura, Takashi

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the clinical results of cross-linked polyethylene (CLPE) and to compare the CLPE wear against zirconia and stainless steel heads, we studied the radiographic wear after a minimum 3-year follow-up in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Ninety-four hips were randomly implanted with a 22.225-mm head cemented THA-the group of non-CLPE against zirconia and CLPE against 2 different zirconias and stainless steel. The linear wear rate was significantly lower in the group of CLPE against zirconia (0.067, 0.059 mm/y) and against stainless steel (0.068 mm/y) compared with non-CLPE against zirconia (0.170 mm/y). In the short-term results, the wear performance of CLPE against zirconia was superior to that of non-CLPE; however, it did not show a better wear rate than CLPE against stainless steel. Furthermore, long-term investigations will be necessary for understanding CLPE wear in vivo.

  16. The association between use of serotonergic antidepressants and perioperative bleeding during total hip arthroplasty--a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dall, Michael; Primdahl, Annie; Damborg, Frank; Nymark, Tine; Hallas, Jesper

    2014-09-01

    In vitro studies have shown that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors inhibit platelet aggregation. It is well documented that SSRIs cause serious gastrointestinal bleeding, but studies on other bleeding manifestations have been equivocal. Our objective was to determine a possible association between use of serotonergic antidepressants (SA) and perioperative bleeding during hip replacements. We conducted a retrospective study between 1 January 2007 and 30 June 2012 among patients that underwent a primary unilateral uncemented total hip arthroplasty (THA). Information was collected on the observed blood loss and the need for blood transfusions among this group. We compared the blood loss between users of SA, users of non-serotonergic antidepressants (NSA) and non-users, while adjusting for potential confounders using multivariate linear regression. We indentified 1318 patients that underwent a THA in the study period. The average volume of surgical bleeding was 350 ml. The adjusted incremental blood loss associated with use of SA and NSA was 93, 95% confidence interval (38-147) ml and -50 (-125 to 25) ml compared with non-use. Only 48 subjects (3.6%) had transfusions. Use of SA was associated with an increased blood loss compared with non-users. The hypothesis that SA impairs haemostasis is supported by these results.

  17. Evaluation of the fixation of the trabecular metal wedge in patients undergoing revision of total hip arthroplasty☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Callado, Victor Magalhães; de Sandes Kimura, Osamu; de Carvalho Leal, Diogo; Teixeira de Sousa Filho, Pedro Guilme; Cury Fernandes, Marco Bernardo; Carvalho de Almendra Freitas, Emílio Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Objective this study aimed to evaluate the fixation of the trabecular metal wedge in patients undergoing revision of total hip arthroplasty. Methods twenty-three cases with minimum grading of Paprosky II-B that were operated between July 2008 and February 2013 were evaluated. These cases were evaluated based on radiographs before the operation, immediately after the operation and later on after the operation. Loss of fixation was defined as a change in the abduction angle of the component greater than 10° or any mobilization greater than 6 mm. Results it was found that there was 100% fixation of the acetabula after a mean of 29.5 months. One case underwent removal of the implanted components due to infection. Conclusions there is still no consensus regarding the best option for reconstructing hips with bone loss. However, revision using a trabecular metal wedge has presented excellent short- and medium-term results. This qualifies it as an important tool for achieving a fixed and stable acetabular component. PMID:26229828

  18. Air bacterial and particle counts in total hip replacement operations using non-woven and cotton gowns and drapes.

    PubMed

    Jalovaara, P; Puranen, J

    1989-11-01

    Air bacterial and particle counts were obtained in a conventionally ventilated operating theatre, during 8 operations for total hip replacement performed using synthetic non-woven fabrics as drapes for the patients and gowns for the staff (trousers and stockings were of conventional cotton material), ('non-woven' group), and in 8 corresponding operations using conventional cotton fabrics ('cotton' group). No significant difference between the groups with regard to air bacterial counts was observed. The use of cotton fabrics was associated with substantially higher particle counts, probably due to particles from the cotton textiles themselves. No significant correlation was observed between the bacterial and particle counts, indicating that these came from different sources and that the particles were mainly of sterile origin. Thus, the benefit of the synthetic, non-woven fabrics in hip replacement surgery, when these fabrics are used to cover theatre staff only partially in the form of gowns, seems questionable with regard to the reduction of air bacterial counts. On the other hand, the surgical textiles of non-woven material improve the purity of the operating theatre since unlike cotton fabrics they do not produce and disperse particles in the air.

  19. Understanding the differences between the wear of metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-Pina, C G; Yan, Y; Neville, A; Fisher, J

    2008-04-01

    Hip simulator studies have been carried out extensively to understand and test artificial hip implants in vitro as an efficient alternative to obtaining long-term results in vivo. Recent studies have shown that a ceramic-on-metal material combination lowers the wear by up to 100 times in comparison with a typical metal-on-metal design. The reason for this reduction remains unclear and for this reason this study has undertaken simple tribometer tests to understand the fundamental material loss mechanisms in two material combinations: metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic. A simple-configuration reciprocating pin-on-plate wear study was performed under open-circuit potential (OCP) and with applied cathodic protection (CP) in a serum solution using two tribological couples: firstly, cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) pins against Co-Cr plates; secondly, Co-Cr pins against alumina (Al2O3) plates. The pin and plate surfaces prior to and after testing were examined by profilometry and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed a marked reduction in wear when CP was applied, indicating that total material degradation under the OCP condition was attributed to corrosion processes. The substitution of the Co-Cr pin with an Al2O3 plate also resulted in a dramatic reduction in wear, probably due to the reduction in the corrosion-wear interactions between the tribological pair.

  20. Patient-Perceived Quality of Life after Total Hip Arthroplasty: Elective versus Traumatological Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Aprato, Alessandro; Massè, Alessandro; Caranzano, Francesco; Matteotti, Renato; Pautasso, Patrick; Daghino, Walter; Kain, Michael; Governale, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The aim was to evaluate and compare patient's health-related quality of life after THA for osteoarthritis and femoral neck fracture. The postoperative outcome was retrospectively evaluated in patients who underwent THA with an intracapsular femoral neck fracture (Group A) or with an hip osteoarthritis (Group B). Methods. Length discrepancy was measured on postoperative X-rays. Study groups were compared as to age, results of WOMAC and SF-36 tests, limb length discrepancy (LLD) by independent group t-test. Correlations between LLD and results obtained atWOMAC test were performed. 117 patients were enrolled. The 2 groups were similar as to age, type of implanted stem and sex. Mean follow up was 2,4 years for group A and 2,3 years for group B. Results. WOMAC score was found higher in group A in all items examinated. Correlation tests did not indicate a statistically significant linear relationship between LLD and WOMAC score in both groups. Conclusions. Patients who received THA for arthritis have better perception of quality of life than traumatologic patients. Although LLD should always be strongly considered by the surgeons performing a THA, LLD alone can't be considered as an indicator of patient dissatisfaction or clinical bad result after a 2-year followup. PMID:24977070

  1. Friction-induced whirl vibration: root cause of squeaking in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Cornelius; Hothan, Arne; Huber, Gerd; Morlock, Michael M; Hoffmann, Norbert P

    2012-01-10

    Squeaking is reported for ceramic-on-ceramic hip arthroplasty, and risk factors leading to this phenomenon have been investigated empirically in the past, this way giving hints to when this phenomenon occurs. The aim of this study is to present an experimentally validated explanation for the dynamical mechanism underlying the squeak, i.e. a description of what happens when noise is generated. First the kinematics of the ceramic bearing couple in relative motion are reconsidered. The relative motion at the contact zone can be understood as superposition of relative rotation and translation. The relative weight of both components depends substantially on the instantaneous load vector, which primarily determines the position of the contact area, and the instantaneous relative rotation vector. For the investigated gait scenarios, both load vector and rotation axis vary strongly during the gait cycle. Second, experimental vibration analysis during squeak is performed. A pronounced micrometer scale elliptical motion of the ball inside the liner is found. It is shown that the rotational component of the relative kinematics during gait indeed leads to friction induced vibrations. We show that a generic whirl type friction induced flutter instability, also known from similar (non bio-) mechanical systems, is the root cause of the emitted squeaking noise. Based on the identified mechanism, the role of THA system parameters (materials, design), patient risk factors, as well as the role of the gait cycle, will have to be reconsidered and linked in the future to develop effective measures against squeaking.

  2. Long-term results of allograft composite total hip prostheses for tumors.

    PubMed

    Langlais, F; Lambotte, J C; Collin, P; Thomazeau, H

    2003-09-01

    The functional results of standard reconstruction prostheses are impaired by instability because of poor muscular reinsertion, especially of the gluteal muscles. In 21 patients, composite hip prostheses including proximal femoral allografts were used after primary malignant tumor resection. Ten reconstructions used combined bone-tendon allografts that allowed reinsertion of the gluteal muscles to the allograft tendons. None of the 21 patients had dislocation or infection. Ten patients died within 2 years of surgery without complications requiring reoperations. The mean followup in the 11 other patients was 10 years. Eight patients had reoperation: four for loosening (two at 3 years, two at 11 and 12 years), and four had autologous graftings for nonunion of the trochanter or of the distal graft-bone interface. Evaluation of function in the 11 patients with follow-ups ranging from 4 to 15 years showed an average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 77%. Satisfactory strength of the abductor muscles was achieved by reinsertion of the trochanter or by suture of the patients gluteal muscles with the combined tendon-bone allograft. At long-term, radiologically, the bony allograft showed no change in five patients, very mild resorption in five, and severe resorption in one. Stem fixation was excellent in 10 patients and fair in one. Comparison between the functional results of reconstruction prostheses versus composite prostheses showed a significant improvement with the composite prosthesis. In the authors' institution, at 10 years, the mechanical survival of composite prostheses was 81%, as compared with only 65% for reconstruction prostheses.

  3. Hammering sound frequency analysis and prevention of intraoperative periprosthetic fractures during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Rina; Kikuchi, Aki; Morita, Towa; Takahira, Naonobu; Uchiyama, Katsufumi; Yamamoto, Takeaki; Moriya, Mistutoshi; Uchida, Kentaro; Fukushima, Kensuke; Tanaka, Kensei; Takaso, Masashi; Itoman, Moritoshi; Mabuchi, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Adequate fixation at the time of cementless stem implantation depends on the operator's experience. An objective evaluation method to determine whether the stem has been appropriately implanted may be helpful. We studied the relationship between the hammering sound frequency during stem implantation and internal stress in a femoral model, and evaluated the possible usefulness of hammering sound frequency analysis for preventing intraoperative fracture. Three types of cementless stem (BiCONTACT®, SL-PLUS®, and AI-Hip®) were used. Surgeons performed stem insertion using a procedure similar to that employed in a routine operation. Stress was estimated by finite element analysis, the hammering force was measured, and frequency analysis of hammering sound data obtained using a microphone. Finite element analysis showed a decrease in the hammering sound frequency with an increase in the estimated maximum stress. When a decrease in frequency was observed, adequate hammering had occurred, and the continuation of hammering risked fracture. Based on the relationship between stress and frequency, the evaluation of changes in frequency may be useful for preventing the development of intraoperative fractures. Using our method, when a decrease in frequency is observed, the hammering force should be reduced. Hammering sound frequency analysis may allow the prediction of bone fractures that can be visually confirmed, and may be a useful objective evaluation method for the prevention of intraoperative periprosthetic fractures during stem insertion.

  4. A randomized study on migration of the Spectron EF and the Charnley flanged 40 cemented femoral components using radiostereometric analysis at 2 years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose We performed a randomized study to determine the migration patterns of the Spectron EF femoral stem and to compare them with those of the Charnley stem, which is regarded by many as the gold standard for comparison of implants due to its extensive documentation. Patients and methods 150 patients with a mean age of 70 years were randomized, single-blinded, to receive either a cemented Charnley flanged 40 monoblock, stainless steel, vaquasheen surface femoral stem with a 22.2-mm head (n = 30) or a cemented Spectron EF modular, matte, straight, collared, cobalt-chrome femoral stem with a 28-mm femoral head and a roughened proximal third of the stem (n = 120). The patients were followed with repeated radiostereometric analysis for 2 years to assess migration. Results At 2 years, stem retroversion was 2.3° and 0.7° (p < 0.001) and posterior translation was 0.44 mm and 0.17 mm (p = 0.002) for the Charnley group (n = 26) and the Spectron EF group (n = 74), respectively. Subsidence was 0.26 mm for the Charnley and 0.20 mm for the Spectron EF (p = 0.5). Interpretation The Spectron EF femoral stem was more stable than the Charnley flanged 40 stem in our study when evaluated at 2 years. In a report from the Norwegian arthroplasty register, the Spectron EF stem had a higher revision rate due to aseptic loosening beyond 5 years than the Charnley. Initial stability is not invariably related to good long-term results. Our results emphasize the importance of prospective long-term follow-up of prosthetic implants in clinical trials and national registries and a stepwise introduction of implants. PMID:21895504

  5. Which patient characteristics influence length of hospital stay after primary total hip arthroplasty in a 'fast-track' setting?

    PubMed

    den Hartog, Y M; Mathijssen, N M C; Hannink, G; Vehmeijer, S B W

    2015-01-01

    After implementation of a 'fast-track' rehabilitation protocol in our hospital, mean length of hospital stay for primary total hip arthroplasty decreased from 4.6 to 2.9 nights for unselected patients. However, despite this reduction there was still a wide range across the patients' hospital duration. The purpose of this study was to identify which specific patient characteristics influence length of stay after successful implementation of a 'fast-track' rehabilitation protocol. A total of 477 patients (317 female and 160 male, mean age 71.0 years; 39.3 to 92.6, mean BMI 27.0 kg/m(2);18.8 to 45.2) who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty between 1 February 2011 and 31 January 2013, were included in this retrospective cohort study. A length of stay greater than the median was considered as an increased duration. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify potential factors associated with increased durations. Median length of stay was two nights (interquartile range 1), and the mean length of stay 2.9 nights (1 to 75). In all, 266 patients had a length of stay ≤ two nights. Age (odds ratio (OR) 2.46; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.72 to 3.51; p < 0.001), living situation (alone vs living together with cohabitants, OR 2.09; 95% CI 1.33 to 3.30; p = 0.002) and approach (anterior approach vs lateral, OR 0.29; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.46; p < 0.001) (posterolateral approach vs lateral, OR 0.24; 95% CI 0.10 to 0.55; p < 0.001) were factors that were significantly associated with increased length of stay in the multivariable logistic regression model.

  6. Comparison of two digital radiostereometric analysis methods in the determination of femoral head penetration in a total hip replacement phantom.

    PubMed

    Bragdon, Charles R; Estok, Daniel M; Malchau, Henrik; Kärrholm, Johan; Yuan, Xunhua; Bourne, Robert; Veldhoven, Jean; Harris, William H

    2004-05-01

    Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) has been used extensively to evaluate the magnitude and direction of penetration of the femoral head into the acetabular component of a total hip replacement as a result of polyethylene wear and creep. The accuracy and precision of an RSA study depends on several factors, including the radiographic technique, the analytical software, and the positioning of the tantalum markers. This study had three sequential purposes. First, an in vitro phantom model was used to quantify the accuracy and precision of digital images versus conventional radiography in RSA measurements of penetration of the femoral head into the acetabular shell in a total hip replacement. The Umeå RSA software package was used for analysis of both the conventional films, which were digitized at a resolution of 300 DPI, and digital radiographs, which were converted from a DICOM format at a resolution of 218 DPI. Digital radiography was found to be superior. Next, two methods of RSA analysis currently in use for determining femoral head penetration into polyethylene of total joint replacements were compared. Using the phantom model, we compared the Umeå RSA system (Biomedical Innovations AB) to the RSA-CMS (RSA Clinical Measurement Solution) and in both cases used the digital radiographs. The Umeå RSA system was found to be superior. Finally, two methods of marking the position of the acetabular component with tantalum beads were compared: one in which beads were inserted into previously described towers protruding from the back of the acetabular shell and another in which beads were placed into the peripheral flange of the polyethylene liner using the Umeå RSA analysis system of the digital radiographs. The results using the two marker configurations were similar.

  7. The influence of metallic shell deformation on the contact mechanics of a ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Changdong; Wang, Ling; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty of ceramic-on-ceramic bearing combinations is increasingly used clinically. The majority of these implants are used with cementless fixation that a metal-backing shell is press-fitted into the pelvic bone. This usually results in the deformation of the metallic shell, which may also influence the ceramic liner deformation and consequently the contact mechanics between the liner and the femoral head under loading. The explicit dynamic finite element method was applied to model the implantation of a cementless ceramic-on-ceramic with a titanium shell and subsequently to investigate the effect of the metallic shell deformation on the contact mechanics. A total of three impacts were found to be necessary to seat the titanium alloy shell into the pelvic bone cavity with a 1 mm diameter interference and a 1.3 kg impactor at 4500 mm s(-1) velocity. The maximum deformation of the metallic shell was found to be 160 µm in the antero-superior and postero-inferior direction and 97 µm in the antero-inferior and postero-superior direction after the press-fit. The corresponding values were slightly reduced to 67 and 45 µm after the ceramic liner was inserted and then modified to 74 and 43 µm under loading, respectively. The maximum deformation and the maximum principal stress of the ceramic liner were 31 µm and 144 MPa (tensile stress), respectively, after it was inserted into the shell and further increased to 52 µm and 245 MPa under loading. This research highlights the importance of the press-fit of the metallic shell on the contact mechanics of the ceramic liner for ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasties and potential clinical performances.

  8. Reattachment of the greater trochanter in total hip arthroplasty: the pin-sleeve system compared with the Dall-Miles cable grip system

    PubMed Central

    Itoman, Moritoshi; Uchiyama, Katsufumi; Takasaki, Sumitaka; Fukushima, Kensuke

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two different types of fixation systems used to reattach the greater trochanter after revision or total hip arthroplasty. This is a retrospective review of the results of patients that were treated with the two systems. We reviewed the clinical and radiological records of 35 hips with the Dall-Miles cable grip system (DMCGS) and 42 hips with the pin-sleeve system (PSS); follow-up averaged 24 months (range, 4–54) and 30 months (range, 11–42), respectively. The incidences of unsatisfactory clinical and radiological results in the PSS group was less than half that in the DMCGS group. Significant differences were found between the groups with respect to discomfort, tenderness, pain on motion, cable fragmentation, and bone absorption. Compared with the DMCGS, these results suggest the PSS could be the instrument of choice for re-attachment of the greater trochanter in hip arthroplasty. PMID:20238113

  9. Does tranexamic acid reduce blood transfusion cost for primary total hip arthroplasty? A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ryan N; Moskal, Joseph T; Capps, Susan G

    2015-02-01

    Peri-operative tranexamic acid (TXA) significantly reduces the need for allogeneic blood transfusion in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and thus hospital costs are reduced. Before employing TXA in primary THA at our institution, facility costs were $286.90/THA for blood transfusion and required 0.45 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 19.87%). After incorporating TXA, the cost for intravenous application was $123.38/THA for blood transfusion and TXA medication and 0.07 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 4.39%) and the cost for topical application was $132.41/THA for blood transfusion and TXA and 0.14 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 12.86%). TXA has the potential to reduce the facility cost per THA and the man-hours/THA from blood transfusions.

  10. Diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia, hemoglobin A1C and the risk of prosthetic joint infections in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Maradit Kremers, Hilal; Lewallen, Laura W; Mabry, Tad M; Berry, Daniel J; Berbari, Elie F; Osmon, Douglas R

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for infections but evidence is conflicting to what extent perioperative hyperglycemia, glycemic control and treatment around the time of surgery modify the risk of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs). In a cohort of 20,171 total hip and knee arthroplasty procedures, we observed a significantly higher risk of PJIs among patients with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio [HR] 1.55, 95% CI 1.11, 2.16), patients using diabetes medications (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.08, 2.25) and patients with perioperative hyperglycemia (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.07, 2.35), but the effects were attenuated after adjusting for body mass index, type of surgery, ASA score and operative time. Although data were limited, there was no association between hemoglobin A1c values and PJIs.

  11. Scaling digital radiographs for templating in total hip arthroplasty using conventional acetate templates independent of calibration markers.

    PubMed

    Brew, Christopher J; Simpson, Philip M; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Donnelly, William; Crawford, Ross W; Hubble, Matthew J W

    2012-04-01

    We describe a scaling method for templating digital radiographs using conventional acetate templates independent of template magnification without the need for a calibration marker. The mean magnification factor for the radiology department was determined (119.8%; range, 117%-123.4%). This fixed magnification factor was used to scale the radiographs by the method described. Thirty-two femoral heads on postoperative total hip arthroplasty radiographs were then measured and compared with the actual size. The mean absolute accuracy was within 0.5% of actual head size (range, 0%-3%) with a mean absolute difference of 0.16 mm (range, 0-1 mm; SD, 0.26 mm). Intraclass correlation coefficient showed excellent reliability for both interobserver and intraobserver measurements with intraclass correlation coefficient scores of 0.993 (95% CI, 0.988-0.996) for interobserver measurements and intraobserver measurements ranging between 0.990 and 0.993 (95% CI, 0.980-0.997).

  12. Does the lumbar spine need to be supported to stabilize the pelvis during total hip arthroplasty in the lateral position?

    PubMed

    Prakash, D; King, R; Hayes, C

    2002-04-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is done commonly with the patient in the lateral position. It has been postulated that the lumbar spine may sag in this position because it forms a mobile link between the rigidly held thoracic spine and the sacrum and may cause the pelvis to tilt in the coronal plane, leading to malpositioning of the acetabular cup. To confirm this hypothesis, 10 consecutive patients seen in the preoperative assessment clinic had 2 anteroposterior radiographs taken in the lateral position. The area of exposure was from the lower thoracic spine to the sacrum. In the first radiograph, the lumbar spine was unsupported, and in the second, it was supported. The radiographs showed that the support did not make any significant difference to the position of the lumbar spine or to the position of the pelvis.

  13. Tantalum acetabular augments in one-stage exchange of infected total hip arthroplasty: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Klatte, Till Orla; Kendoff, Daniel; Sabihi, Reza; Kamath, Atul F; Rueger, Johannes M; Gehrke, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    During the one-stage exchange procedure for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA), acetabular defects challenge reconstructive options. Porous tantalum augments are an established tool for addressing acetabular destruction in aseptic cases, but their utility in septic exchange is unknown. This retrospective case-control study presents the initial results of tantalum augmentation during one-stage exchange for PJI. Primary endpoints were rates of re-infection and short-term complications associated with this technique. Study patients had no higher risk of re-infection with equivalent durability at early follow-up with a re-infection rate in both groups of 4%. In conclusion, tantalum augments are a viable option for addressing acetabular defects in one-stage exchange for septic THA. Further study is necessary to assess long-term durability when compared to traditional techniques for acetabular reconstruction.

  14. Quantifying Gait Quality in Patients with Large-Head and Conventional Total Hip Arthroplasty--A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Carsten; Penny, Jeannette Ø; Nielsen, Dennis B; Overgaard, Søren; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2015-12-01

    We used the Gait Deviation Index (GDI) as method to compare preoperative to postoperative gait changes after uncemented 50 mm (median) large-head and 28/32 mm total hip arthroplasty (THA). We also identified predictors of improvements in GDI. Gait analysis and patient-reported (WOMAC) data were recorded in 35 patients before, 2 and 6-months after treatment. Twenty age-matched adults provided normative gait data. Contrary to our hypothesis, patients who received large-head THA had less improvement in GDI compared with patients who received 28/32 mm THA. The preoperative GDI score was identified as a predictor of postoperative GDI improvement, while WOMAC, age, gender and walking speed were not. This study provides useful information for clinicians and rehabilitation specialists about gait improvement that can be expected after THA.

  15. Revision of Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) Total Hip Arthroplasty: Correlation of Perioperative Data and Early Post-Revision Outcome Results.

    PubMed

    Cip, Johannes; Bach, Christian; Widemschek, Mark; Luegmair, Matthias; Martin, Arno

    2015-09-01

    The articular surface replacement (ASR) total hip arthroplasty (THA) showed accelerated failure rates due to adverse-reaction to metal debris (ARMD). Literature correlating preoperative with intraoperative revision findings respectively post-revision outcome results are rare. 30 of 99 available ASR THA were revised due to ARMD. Mean post-revision follow-up term was 2.3 years. In part, preoperative data did not correlate with intraoperative revision findings. ARMD was even found in asymptomatic patients with non-elevated ion levels. Postoperative pain and metal ions decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.016). Cobalt decreased faster than chrome. Patients with intraoperative pseudotumors, osteolysis or bilateral THA did not have higher pre- or postoperative ion values (P ≥ 0.053). Females showed higher postoperative chrome levels (P=0.031). One major post-revision complication (femoral nerve palsy) and one re-revision (late onset infection) occurred.

  16. Reliability of a new method for evaluating femoral stem positioning after total hip arthroplasty based on stereoradiographic 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Guenoun, Benjamin; El Hajj, Firass; Biau, David; Anract, Philippe; Courpied, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to validate a new method for determining femoral stem positioning based on 3D models derived from the EOS biplanar system. Independents observers measured stem anteversion and femoral offset using CT scan and EOS system of 28 femoral stems implanted in composite femurs. In parallel, the same parameters were measured on biplanar lower limb radiographs acquired from 30 patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. CT scanner and biplanar X-ray measurements on composite femurs were highly correlated: 0.94 for femoral offset (P < 0.01), 0.98 for stem anteversion (P < 0.01). The inter and intra-observer reproducibility when measuring composite bones was excellent with both imaging modalities as when measuring femoral stem positioning in patients with the biplanar X-ray system.

  17. Intra-articular bupivacaine reduces postoperative pain and meperidine use after total hip arthroplasty: a randomized, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dave W; Hu, Chih-Chien; Chang, Yu-Han; Lee, Mel S; Chang, Chee-Jen; Hsieh, Pang-Hsin

    2014-12-01

    One hundred patients receiving unilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) were randomized to receive an intra-articular injection of 300mg bupivacaine or normal saline after completion of surgery. Pain scores of the bupivacaine group were significantly lower than those of the control group the first 12hours postoperatively (all, P<0.001). A significantly lower dose of meperidine was used in the study group than in the control group the first 24hours postoperatively (median, 25 vs. 45mg, P<0.001). Nineteen patients in the study group required meperidine the first day after surgery, as compared to 45 patients in the control group. We conclude that intra-articular injection of bupivacaine after THA reduces pain and meperidine use in the first 12hours after surgery.

  18. Role of Sociodemographic, Co-morbid and Intraoperative Factors in Length of Stay Following Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Inneh, Ifeoma A; Iorio, Richard; Slover, James D; Bosco, Joseph A

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to examine and quantify the combined association of patient sociodemographic, preoperative comorbidities and intraoperative factors with extended and prolonged length of stay (LOS) following primary total hip arthroplasty. Longer LOS was associated with Age (≥65 years), BMI ≥30 kg/m(2), ASA score >2, minority race/ethnicity, low SES, general anesthesia, comorbidities of the Circulatory, Genitourinary and Respiratory systems, and operating time. Collectively, being of low SES, advanced age (≥65 years) and minority race/ethnicity was most significantly associated with prolonged LOS (>7 days). The combined associations of lower SES, female gender, advanced age, non-Caucasian race/ethnicity and certain comorbidities presented a synergistically elevated risk for longer LOS and may warrant the need to consider sociodemographic status when allocating resources to hospitals serving such patients.

  19. Spinal factors influencing change in pelvic sagittal inclination from supine position to standing position in patients before total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Satoru; Takao, Masaki; Sakai, Takashi; Nishii, Takashi; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2014-12-01

    In some atypical patients, pelvic sagittal inclination (PSI) changes posteriorly by >10° from supine to standing position before total hip arthroplasty (THA). Several studies have suggested PSI in standing position is related to lumbar degeneration. The purpose of this study was to investigate spinal factors influencing changes in PSI from supine to standing position before THA. Participants comprised 163 consecutive patients who had undergone THA. Presence of compression fractures, presence of lumbar spondylolisthesis, thoracic kyphosis angle, lumbar lordosis angle, S1 anterior tilt angle and T4 plumb line position were investigated as spinal factors. Presence of compression fractures, age, presence of lumbar spondylolisthesis and small S1 anterior tilt angle were independently associated with posterior change in PSI from supine to standing position in patients before THA.

  20. Posterior dislocation of the elbow as an unusual presentation after a total hip replacement: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Kumar; Meek, Dominic; Crossman, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Posterior dislocation of the elbow is usually associated with trauma to the joint with a reported incidence of 3%to 6%. Chronic instability is usually symptomatic following the initial injury. Case presentation We report a case of posterior dislocation of the elbow occurring in a patient while using her arm to lift herself using a monkey pole on the second day following a total hip replacement. The dislocation was reduced under sedation in the ward. There were no signs or symptoms suggesting any joint hypermobility syndrome in the patient. Follow up 4 months following the injury revealed a complete recovery in the range of motion and a pain free elbow. There were no signs and symptoms of any instability. Conclusion This is the first time such a case is reported in the literature. It certainly demonstrates that even in the absence of instability a patient can be predisposed to low energy dislocation of the elbow. PMID:18254950

  1. Venous thromboembolic disease in uncemented total hip replacement surgery--a one-year follow-up of 490 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, P H; Wittmann, F W; Ring, P A

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective study of the morbidity and mortality from deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolus (PE) in 490 consecutive patients undergoing uncemented total hip replacement was carried out in a district general hospital. Special diagnostic tests for DVT and PE were not available. Patients were followed up for one year. There were three deaths in hospital and eight further deaths during the first year, all unrelated to DVT and PE. The clinical incidence of venous thromboembolism was 2.04%. While clinical diagnosis of venous thromboembolic disease probably underestimates its incidence, the figures for mortality are accurate. With every patient accounted for one year after operation, there were no deaths attributable to PE in this series. PMID:1941855

  2. Prevalence and Perioperative Outcomes of Off-Label Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty in the United States, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Tennison; Szubski, Caleb R.; Schiltz, Nicholas K.; Klika, Alison K.; Koroukian, Siran M.; Barsoum, Wael K.

    2015-01-01

    “ Off-label use” refers to medical device utilization for purposes or subpopulations other than those approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. The primary goal of this study was to determine the current epidemiology of off-label total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA and TKA, respectively) in the United States and to project further off-label use through 2040. Over the past decade, the prevalence of off-label THA and TKA was 30.4% and 37.0%, respectively, growing ~70% from 2000 2010. By 2040, the majority of THA (86.1%) and TKA (91.5%) could be off-label. The high prevalence of off-label arthroplasty and the dramatically shifting patient profile illustrated by these results highlight the need for continued medical device surveillance among on-and off label patients. PMID:26059502

  3. Successful rehabilitation of a young adult with total hip arthroplasty a decade after a Girdlestone procedure: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Marinko, Lee N.; Christie, Renee E.; Lewis, Cara L.

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of a female who underwent a Girdlestone arthroplasty at age 10 and a total hip arthroplasty at age 21. Despite early post-operative rehabilitation, the patient experienced increasing pain, progressive gait deviations and functional limitations during the year following surgery. This course of care was initiated one year after surgery and focused on motor retraining to address pain and gait deviations. This case demonstrates that positive outcomes can be achieved after longstanding musculoskeletal dysfunction is corrected, but that prolonged rehabilitation may be necessary to produce changes in movement patterns at both the local (joint and muscle) and central (cortical) levels. Correction of both the structural problem and the learned movement patterns is necessary for a successful outcome. PMID:25857591

  4. Prevalence and Perioperative Outcomes of Off-Label Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty in the United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Tennison; Szubski, Caleb R; Schiltz, Nicholas K; Klika, Alison K; Koroukian, Siran M; Barsoum, Wael K

    2015-11-01

    "Off-label use" refers to medical device utilization for purposes or subpopulations other than those approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. The primary goal of this study was to determine the current epidemiology of off-label total hip and knee arthroplasties (THA and TKA, respectively) in the United States and to project further off-label use through 2040. Over the past decade, the prevalence of off-label THA and TKA was 30.4% and 37.0%, respectively, growing ~70% from 2000 to 2010. By 2040, the majority of THAs (86.1%) and TKAs (91.5%) could be off-label. The high prevalence of off-label arthroplasty and the dramatically shifting patient profile illustrated by these results highlight the need for continued medical device surveillance among on- and off label patients.

  5. Pseudotumour formation due to tribocorrosion at the taper interface of large diameter metal on polymer modular total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Cook, Richard B; Bolland, Benjamin J R F; Wharton, Julian A; Tilley, Simon; Latham, Jeremy M; Wood, Robert J K

    2013-09-01

    We present an in-depth failure analysis of two large diameter bearing metal-on-polymer (MoP) modular total hip replacements, which have required revision surgery due to pseudotumour formation. The failure analysis showed a discrete pattern of material loss from the distal end of the head taper/stem trunnion interface. We postulate that the use of a proximal contacting taper design had provided insufficient mechanical locking between the head and the stem, enabling the head to toggle on the trunnion. In addition, the difference in angle between the taper and the trunnion formed a crevice between the two components. Through a combination of crevice environment, mechanically assisted corrosion, mechanical wear and erosion; debris and metal-ions have been released resulting in the adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR).

  6. Tranexamic acid and the reduction of blood loss in total knee and hip arthroplasty: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic drug used as a blood-sparing technique in many surgical specialties. The principal objective of our meta-analysis was to review randomized, controlled trials (RCT) comparing total blood loss and the number of patients receiving allogeneic blood transfusions with and without the use of TXA for knee (TKA) and hip (THA) arthroplasty. Methods Studies were included if patients underwent primary unilateral TKA or THA; the study involved the comparison of a TXA treatment group to a control group who received either a placebo or no treatment at all; outcome measures included total blood loss TBL, number of patients receiving allogeneic blood transfusions, and/or incidence of thromboembolic complications; the study was a published or unpublished RCT from 1995 – July 2012. Results Data were tested for publication bias and statistical heterogeneity. Combined weighted mean differences in blood loss favoured TXA over control for TKA and THA patients respectively [ −1.149 (p < 0.001; 95% CI −1.298, -1.000), -0.504 (p < 0.001; 95% CI, -0.672, -0.336)]. Combined odds ratios favoured fewer patients requiring allogeneic transfusions for TKA and THA with the use of TXA respectively [0.145 (p < 0.001; 95% CI, 0.094, 0.223), 0.327 (p < 0.001; 95% CI, 0.208, 0.515)]. Combined odds ratios indicated no increased incidence of DVT with TXA use in TKA and THA respectively [1.030 (p = 0.946; 95% CI, 0.439, 2.420), 1.070 (p = 0.895; 95% CI, 0.393, 2.911)]. Conclusions TXA should be considered for routine use in primary knee and hip arthroplasty to decrease blood loss. PMID:23651507

  7. Risk of pneumonia and urinary tract infection within the first week after total hip arthroplasty and the impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    Glassou, Eva N; Hansen, Torben B; Pedersen, Alma B

    2017-01-01

    Background Pneumonia and urinary tract infections (UTIs) increase morbidity and mortality. There is little epidemiological evidence from large population-based studies on risk factors for these infections and subsequent mortality in total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients. Aim To examine the risk factors of postoperative pneumonia and UTI after THA and their impact on survival. Patients and methods We used the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register to identify THAs due to osteoarthritis registered from 2000 to 2013. We collected data about comorbidities, mortality and infections in relation to primary hospitalization and potential predictive variables from administrative databases. Regression models were used to estimate associations between potential risk factors and infection, and subsequently, between infection and mortality. Results In total 84,812 THAs were included. The cumulative incidence of pneumonia and UTI within 7 days of the primary procedure were 0.21 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18–0.25) and 0.29 (95% CI: 0.26–0.33), respectively. Patient-related risk factors for infection were being 80 years or older, gender and a comorbidity burden at time of surgery. The hazard ratio (HR) of dying within 90 days of the primary THA was 10.67 (95% CI: 5.79–19.57) compared to patients without pneumonia. For patients with UTIs, the HR was 1.64 (95% CI: 0.41–6.59) compared to those without a UTI. Conclusion Pneumonia was associated with an increased short-term risk of dying, despite adjustment for coexisting comorbidity and other potential confounders. Age, gender and comorbidity were the most important risk factors for pneumonia and UTIs. Individual initiatives to reduce the risk of pneumonia in select patient groups may be essential to the effort to optimize outcomes after a THA. PMID:28176979

  8. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain involves any pain in or around the hip jo