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Sample records for charolais suckler cattle

  1. Genomewide association analysis of growth traits in Charolais beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Jahuey-Martínez, F J; Parra-Bracamonte, G M; Sifuentes-Rincón, A M; Martínez-González, J C; Gondro, C; García-Pérez, C A; López-Bustamante, L A

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a genomewide association study (GWAS) for growth traits in Charolais beef cattle and to identify SNP markers and genes associated with these traits. Our study included 855 animals genotyped using 76,883 SNP from the GeneSeek Genomic Profiler Bovine HD panel. The examined phenotypic data included birth, weaning, and yearling weights as well as pre- and postweaning ADG. After quality control, 68,337 SNP and 823 animals were retained in the analysis. The association analysis was performed using the principal components method via the egscore function of the GenABEL version 1.8-0 package in the R environment. Eighteen SNP located in 13 BTA were associated with growth traits ( < 5 × 10). The most important genes in these genomic regions were (), (), (), (), and ( [angiotensinase C]), due to their relationships with perinatal and postnatal survival, bone growth, cell adhesion, regulation of adipogenesis, and appetite. In conclusion, this study is the first to describe a GWAS conducted in beef cattle in Mexico and represents a basis for further and future research. This study detected new QTL associated with growth traits and identified 5 positional and functional candidate genes that are potentially involved in variations of the analyzed traits. Future analyses of these regions could help to identify useful markers for marker-assisted selection and will contribute to the knowledge of the genetic basis of growth in cattle and be a foundation for genomic predictions in Mexican Charolais cattle.

  2. Assessment of progesterone profiles and postpartum onset of luteal activity in spring calving Hereford beef suckler cattle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reproduction is the single greatest factor limiting beef cattle production. Previous research on beef suckler luteal activity has largely focused on the mechanisms, and duration, of postpartum anoestrus. However, the temporal pattern of luteal activity after resumption of post-partum ovarian activity, and the impact of pattern type on days open (DO) in purebred beef suckler cows, are unknown. Methods Progesterone concentration was measured in milk samples taken thrice weekly from 120 lactations, in 87 animals, on 3 farms, over two years. Onset of luteal activity (OLA) was defined as the first day milk progesterone concentration exceeded 3 ng/ml for two successive measurements, or exceeded 5 ng/ml once. It was defined as delayed if it occurred more than 61 days postpartum. A short initial luteal phase consisted of progesterone concentrations which exceeded 3 ng/ml for fewer than 4 sequential measurements. Temporal progesterone patterns were classified as: 1) Normal cyclicity; 2) Cessation of luteal activity; 3) Prolonged luteal activity; 4) Erratic phase: failure to conform to 1, 2 or 3. Data concerning parity, previous calving interval, breeding values, calf birth and 200-d weight were obtained from the Norwegian Beef Cattle Recording System database. Results The mean (SD) OLA was 41 d (20). Parity and calf birth weight were inversely correlated with OLA. Delayed OLA occurred in 14.4% of lactations. A short first luteal phase occurred in 61.5% of lactations, but this was unrelated to irregular luteal phase occurrence, pregnancy or DO. Irregular luteal phases occurred in 22% of lactations. The irregularities were: prolonged luteal phase (11%); cessation of luteal activity (5%); erratic luteal activity (6%). Early OLA was associated with prolonged luteal phases. DO was positively correlated with irregular luteal phases and negatively correlated with calf 200-d weight. Conclusions This study demonstrates that irregular luteal phases negatively affect

  3. Assessment of progesterone profiles and postpartum onset of luteal activity in spring calving Hereford beef suckler cattle.

    PubMed

    Martin, Adam D; Lystad, Marit L; Reksen, Olav; Ropstad, Erik; Waldmann, Andres; Nafstad, Ola; Karlberg, Knut

    2010-06-15

    Reproduction is the single greatest factor limiting beef cattle production. Previous research on beef suckler luteal activity has largely focused on the mechanisms, and duration, of postpartum anoestrus. However, the temporal pattern of luteal activity after resumption of post-partum ovarian activity, and the impact of pattern type on days open (DO) in purebred beef suckler cows, are unknown. Progesterone concentration was measured in milk samples taken thrice weekly from 120 lactations, in 87 animals, on 3 farms, over two years. Onset of luteal activity (OLA) was defined as the first day milk progesterone concentration exceeded 3 ng/ml for two successive measurements, or exceeded 5 ng/ml once. It was defined as delayed if it occurred more than 61 days postpartum. A short initial luteal phase consisted of progesterone concentrations which exceeded 3 ng/ml for fewer than 4 sequential measurements. Temporal progesterone patterns were classified as: 1) Normal cyclicity; 2) Cessation of luteal activity; 3) Prolonged luteal activity; 4) Erratic phase: failure to conform to 1, 2 or 3. Data concerning parity, previous calving interval, breeding values, calf birth and 200-d weight were obtained from the Norwegian Beef Cattle Recording System database. The mean (SD) OLA was 41 d (20). Parity and calf birth weight were inversely correlated with OLA. Delayed OLA occurred in 14.4% of lactations. A short first luteal phase occurred in 61.5% of lactations, but this was unrelated to irregular luteal phase occurrence, pregnancy or DO. Irregular luteal phases occurred in 22% of lactations. The irregularities were: prolonged luteal phase (11%); cessation of luteal activity (5%); erratic luteal activity (6%). Early OLA was associated with prolonged luteal phases. DO was positively correlated with irregular luteal phases and negatively correlated with calf 200-d weight. This study demonstrates that irregular luteal phases negatively affect reproductive performance in purebred beef

  4. Accuracy of predicting genomic breeding values for residual feed intake in Angus and Charolais beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Schenkel, F; Vinsky, M; Crews, D H; Li, C

    2013-10-01

    In beef cattle, phenotypic data that are difficult and/or costly to measure, such as feed efficiency, and DNA marker genotypes are usually available on a small number of animals of different breeds or populations. To achieve a maximal accuracy of genomic prediction using the phenotype and genotype data, strategies for forming a training population to predict genomic breeding values (GEBV) of the selection candidates need to be evaluated. In this study, we examined the accuracy of predicting GEBV for residual feed intake (RFI) based on 522 Angus and 395 Charolais steers genotyped on SNP with the Illumina Bovine SNP50 Beadchip for 3 training population forming strategies: within breed, across breed, and by pooling data from the 2 breeds (i.e., combined). Two other scenarios with the training and validation data split by birth year and by sire family within a breed were also investigated to assess the impact of genetic relationships on the accuracy of genomic prediction. Three statistical methods including the best linear unbiased prediction with the relationship matrix defined based on the pedigree (PBLUP), based on the SNP genotypes (GBLUP), and a Bayesian method (BayesB) were used to predict the GEBV. The results showed that the accuracy of the GEBV prediction was the highest when the prediction was within breed and when the validation population had greater genetic relationships with the training population, with a maximum of 0.58 for Angus and 0.64 for Charolais. The within-breed prediction accuracies dropped to 0.29 and 0.38, respectively, when the validation populations had a minimal pedigree link with the training population. When the training population of a different breed was used to predict the GEBV of the validation population, that is, across-breed genomic prediction, the accuracies were further reduced to 0.10 to 0.22, depending on the prediction method used. Pooling data from the 2 breeds to form the training population resulted in accuracies increased

  5. Genome-wide association study for behavior, type traits, and muscular development in Charolais beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Vallée, A; Daures, J; van Arendonk, J A M; Bovenhuis, H

    2016-06-01

    Behavior, type traits, and muscular development are of interest for beef cattle breeding. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) enable the identification of candidate genes, which enables gene-based selection and provides insight in the genetic architecture of these traits. The objective of the current study was to perform a GWAS for 3 behavior traits, 12 type traits, and muscular development in Charolais cattle. Behavior traits, including aggressiveness at parturition, aggressiveness during gestation period, and maternal care, were scored by farmers. Type traits, including udder conformation, teat, feet and legs, and locomotion, were scored by trained classifiers. Data used in the GWAS consisted of 3,274 cows with phenotypic records and genotyping information for 44,930 SNP. When SNP had a false discovery rate (FDR) smaller than 0.05, they were referred to as significant. When SNP had a FDR between 0.05 and 0.20, they were referred to as suggestive. Four significant and 12 suggestive regions were detected for aggressiveness during gestation, maternal care, udder balance, teat thinness, teat length, foot angle, foot depth, and locomotion. These 4 significant and 12 suggestive regions were not supported by other significant SNP in close proximity. No SNP with major effects were detected for behavior and type traits, and SNP associations for these traits were spread across the genome, suggesting that behavior and type traits were influenced by many genes, each explaining a small part of genetic variance. The GWAS identified 1 region on chromosome 2 significantly associated with muscular development, which included the myostatin gene (), which is known to affect muscularity. No other regions associated with muscular development were found. Results showed that the myostatin region associated with muscular development had pleiotropic effects on udder volume, teat thinness, rear leg, and leg angle.

  6. Genetic structure of the European Charolais and Limousin cattle metapopulations using pedigree analyses.

    PubMed

    Bouquet, A; Venot, E; Laloë, D; Forabosco, F; Fogh, A; Pabiou, T; Moore, K; Eriksson, J-Å; Renand, G; Phocas, F

    2011-06-01

    Pedigree collected by the Interbeef service allowed genetic diversity to be assessed by using pedigree analyses for the European Charolais (CHA) and Limousin (LIM) cattle populations registered in national herdbooks in Denmark (DNK), France (FRA), Ireland (IRL), Sweden (SWE), and, solely for the LIM breed, the United Kingdom (UK). The CHA data set included 2,563,189 calves with weaning performance, of which 96.1% were recorded in FRA, 3.0% in SWE, 0.5% in IRL, and 0.4% in DNK. The LIM data set included 1,652,734 calves with weaning performance, of which 91.9% were recorded in FRA, 4.9% in UK, 1.8% in DNK, 0.9% SWE, and 0.5% in IRL. Pedigree files included 3,191,132 CHA and 2,409,659 LIM animals. Gene flows were rather limited between populations, except from FRA toward other countries. Pedigree completeness was good in all subpopulations for both breeds and allowed the pedigree to be traced back to the French population. A relatively high level of genetic diversity was assessed in each CHA and LIM subpopulation by estimating either effective population sizes (N(e) >244 and N(e) >345 in the CHA and LIM subpopulations, respectively), relationship coefficients within subpopulations (<1.3% in both breeds), or probability of gene origins. However, in each subpopulation, it was shown that founders and also ancestors had unbalanced genetic contributions, leading to a moderate but continuous reduction in genetic diversity. Analyses between populations suggested that all European CHA and LIM populations were differentiated very little. The Swedish CHA population was assessed as genetically more distant from the other CHA populations because of fewer gene flows from other countries and because of the use of North American sires to introgress the polled phenotype. In each European subpopulation, most of the main ancestors, which explained 50% of gene origin, were born in FRA. However, those main ancestors were different between countries. Moreover, in both breeds, the main

  7. Specific fibre composition and metabolism of the rectus abdominis muscle of bovine Charolais cattle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important variability of contractile and metabolic properties between muscles has been highlighted. In the literature, the majority of studies on beef sensorial quality concerns M. longissimus thoracis. M. rectus abdominis (RA) is easy to sample without huge carcass depreciation and may appear as an alternative to M. longissimus thoracis for fast and routine physicochemical analysis. It was considered interesting to assess the muscle fibres of M. rectus abdominis in comparison with M. longissimus thoracis (LT) and M. triceps brachii (TB) on the basis of metabolic and contractile properties, area and myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHC) proportions. Immuno-histochemical, histochemical, histological and enzymological techniques were used. This research concerned two populations of Charolais cattle: RA was compared to TB in a population of 19 steers while RA was compared to LT in a population of 153 heifers. Results RA muscle had higher mean fibre areas (3350 μm2 vs 2142 to 2639 μm2) than the two other muscles. In RA muscle, the slow-oxidative fibres were the largest (3957 μm2) and the fast-glycolytic the smallest (2868 μm2). The reverse was observed in TB muscle (1725 and 2436 μm2 respectively). In RA muscle, the distinction between fast-oxidative-glycolytic and fast-glycolytic fibres appeared difficult or impossible to establish, unlike in the other muscles. Consequently the classification based on ATPase and SDH activities seemed inappropriate, since the FOG fibres presented rather low SDH activity in this muscle in comparison to the other muscles of the carcass. RA muscle had a higher proportion of I fibres than TB and LT muscles, balanced by a lower proportion either of IIX fibres (in comparison to TB muscle) or of IIA fibres (in comparison to LT muscle). However, both oxidative and glycolytic enzyme activities were lower in RA than in TB muscle, although the LDH/ICDH ratio was higher in RA muscle (522 vs 340). Oxidative enzyme activities were

  8. Accuracy of predicting genomic breeding values for carcass merit traits in Angus and Charolais beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Vinsky, M; Li, C

    2015-02-01

    Accuracy of predicting genomic breeding values for carcass merit traits including hot carcass weight, longissimus muscle area (REA), carcass average backfat thickness (AFAT), lean meat yield (LMY) and carcass marbling score (CMAR) was evaluated based on 543 Angus and 400 Charolais steers genotyped on the Illumina BovineSNP50 Beadchip. For the genomic prediction within Angus, the average accuracy was 0.35 with a range from 0.32 (LMY) to 0.37 (CMAR) across different training/validation data-splitting strategies and statistical methods. The within-breed genomic prediction for Charolais yielded an average accuracy of 0.36 with a range from 0.24 (REA) to 0.46 (AFAT). The across-breed prediction had the lowest accuracy, which was on average near zero. When the data from the two breeds were combined to predict the breeding values of either breed, the prediction accuracy averaged 0.35 for Angus with a range from 0.33 (REA) to 0.39 (CMAR) and averaged 0.33 for Charolais with a range from 0.18 (REA) to 0.46 (AFAT). The prediction accuracy was slightly higher on average when the data were split by animal's birth year than when the data were split by sire family. These results demonstrate that the genetic relationship or relatedness of selection candidates with the training population has a great impact on the accuracy of predicting genomic breeding values under the density of the marker panel used in this study. © 2014 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Animal Genetics © 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  9. Genetic and phenotypic parameters and annual trends for growth and fertility traits of Charolais and Hereford beef cattle breeds in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Orenge, J S K; Ilatsia, E D; Kosgey, I S; Kahi, A K

    2009-06-01

    This study estimated genetic and phenotypic parameters and annual trends for growth and fertility traits of Charolais and Hereford cattle in Kenya. Traits considered were birth weight (BW, kg), pre-weaning average daily gain (ADG, kg/day) and weaning weight (WW, kg); calving interval (CI, days) and age at first calving (AFC, days). Direct heritability estimates for growth traits were 0.36 and 0.21; 0.25 and 0.10; 0.23 and 0.13 for BW, ADG and WW in Charolais and Hereford, respectively. Maternal heritability estimates were 0.11 and 0.01; 0.18 and 0.00; 0.17 and 0.17 for BW, ADG and WW in Charolais and Hereford, respectively. Direct-maternal genetic correlations ranged between -0.46 and 1.00; -0.51 and -1.00; -0.47 and -0.39 for BW, ADG and WW in Charolais and Hereford, respectively. Genetic correlations ranged from -0.99 to unity and -1.00 to unity for growth and fertility traits respectively. Prospects for improvement of growth and fertility traits exist.

  10. Genetic parameters for calving ease, gestation length, and birth weight in Charolais cattle.

    PubMed

    Mujibi, F D N; Crews, D H

    2009-09-01

    In this study, a 3-trait linear model was used to obtain genetic parameters for direct and maternal components of calving ease (CE), gestation length (GEST), and birth weight (BWT). Calving ease scores were transformed into Snell scores and expressed as percent unassisted calving (SC), ranging from 0 to 100% (least to greatest ease). A total of 40,420 records (n = 14,403 for CE) were obtained from the Canadian Charolais Association field database. The animal model included fixed effects of contemporary group (herd x year of birth combinations), age of heifer, and sex of calf (only for CE), whereas random effects included direct and maternal genetic effects, residual error, and permanent environmental effects (for CE). The BWT and GEST were preadjusted for age of dam and sex of calf effects. Variance components were estimated using REML. Mean SC was 83.31% (SD = 23.30) and ranged from 3.44 to 100%. Mean BWT was 46.54 kg (SD = 4.79), whereas mean GEST was 286.48 d (SD = 4.93). Direct heritability estimates for SC, BWT, and GEST were 0.14 +/- 0.02, 0.46 +/- 0.03, and 0.62 +/- 0.04, respectively, and maternal heritability estimates were 0.06 +/- 0.02, 0.14 +/- 0.02, and 0.10 +/- 0.02, respectively. The permanent environmental effect as a proportion of SC phenotypic variance was 0.35 +/- 0.11, indicating a large influence on CE. Genetic correlations of direct SC with direct BWT and GEST were -0.93 +/- 0.04 and -0.38 +/- 0.08, respectively, whereas maternal correlations were -0.69 +/- 0.14 and -0.49 +/- 0.17, respectively, illustrating the importance of including both traits in CE evaluations. Within trait direct x maternal genetic correlations were substantial and negative. Regression of average direct and average maternal EBV on year of birth yielded significant genetic trends for the direct effects of BWT, GEST, and CE, whereas no trends were detected for maternal effects. Even though CE is routinely analyzed, no study has evaluated transformed CE scores with 2

  11. Rapid Communication: Variance component estimates for Charolais-sired fed cattle and relative economic impact of bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, J W; MacNeil, M D; Raymond, R C; McClain, A R; Van Eenennaam, A L

    2016-12-01

    Variance components were estimated and relative economic importance of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) was derived from 3 yr of performance, morbidity, and mortality data collected from a single beef cattle finishing operation. One thousand one hundred eighty nine of 12,812 Charolais-sired calves were treated for BRD during the finishing period. Weaning weight (WW), DMI, days to harvest (D2H), HCW, yield grade (YG), and marbling score determined by image analysis (MARB) were collected to quantify the economic impact associated with treatment for BRD. Observed means and (co)variances for carcass and production traits were used to simulate populations of 10,000 healthy and 10,000 BRD treated calves. A bio-economic model was developed to derive the economic value associated with the incidence and number of treatments for BRD during the finishing period. Carcasses from healthy calves were worth $58.28 more on average compared to calves treated at least once for BRD. Heritability estimates for BRD were 0.15 when the trait was measured as number of treatments (0 to 4), and 0.14 when measured as incidence (0 or 1). The model indicated that D2H had the lowest relative economic importance in this system, with a cost of $1.91 per head for each additional day on feed. Furthermore, the relative economic value of BRD morbidity was approximately 10.65 greater than D2H when recording the BRD phenotype as the number of BRD treatments. The economic values of HCW, WW, and DMI were 11.47, 5.15, and 3.61 times more important than D2H, respectively. This indicates BRD morbidity has the second greatest relative economic value in this system, with a one percent increase in morbidity associated with an average loss of $2.08 per head. These results indicate that BRD morbidity can have an equal or greater economic importance when compared to carcass and production traits during the finishing period. Further, this indicates the opportunity exists to increase the genetic merit for

  12. Flexibility of Suckler Cattle Farms in the Face of Uncertainty within the Beef Industry: A Proposed Definition and an Illustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingrand, Stephane; Bardey, Helene; Brossier, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study, carried out in association with beef cattle producers, was to explore the capacity of farms to adapt, from a techno-conomic point of view, to both structural changes in consumer demand for beef products and market disruptions (sudden drop in beef consumption due partly to media coverage of bovine spongiform encephalopathy…

  13. Flexibility of Suckler Cattle Farms in the Face of Uncertainty within the Beef Industry: A Proposed Definition and an Illustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingrand, Stephane; Bardey, Helene; Brossier, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study, carried out in association with beef cattle producers, was to explore the capacity of farms to adapt, from a techno-conomic point of view, to both structural changes in consumer demand for beef products and market disruptions (sudden drop in beef consumption due partly to media coverage of bovine spongiform encephalopathy…

  14. DNA-based diagnosis of rare diseases in veterinary medicine: a 4.4 kb deletion of ITGB4 is associated with epidermolysis bullosa in Charolais cattle.

    PubMed

    Peters, Martin; Reber, Irene; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Raddatz, Barbara; Wohlsein, Peter; Drögemüller, Cord

    2015-03-04

    Rare diseases in livestock animals are traditionally poorly diagnosed. Other than clinical description and pathological examination, the underlying causes have, for the most part, remained unknown. A single case of congenital skin fragility in cattle was observed, necropsy, histological and ultrastructural examinations were carried out and whole genome sequencing was utilized to identify the causative mutation. A single purebred female Charolais calf with severe skin lesions was delivered full-term and died spontaneously after birth. The clinical and pathological findings exactly matched the gross description given by previous reports on epitheliogenesis imperfecta and epidermolysis bullosa (EB) in cattle. Histological and ultrastructural changes were consistent with EB junctionalis (EBJ). Genetic analysis revealed a previously unpublished ITGB4 loss-of-function mutation; the affected calf was homozygous for a 4.4 kb deletion involving exons 17 to 22, and the dam carried a single copy of the deletion indicating recessive inheritance. The homozygous mutant genotype did not occur in healthy controls of various breeds but some heterozygous carriers were found among Charolais cattle belonging to the affected herd. The mutant allele was absent in a representative sample of unrelated sires of the German Charolais population. This is the first time in which a recessively inherited ITGB4 associated EBJ has been reported in cattle. The identification of heterozygous carriers is of importance in avoiding the transmission of this defect in future. Current DNA sequencing methods offer a powerful tool for understanding the genetic background of rare diseases in domestic animals having a reference genome sequence available.

  15. Age of dam and sex of calf adjustments and genetic parameters for gestation length in Charolais cattle.

    PubMed

    Crews, D H

    2006-01-01

    To estimate adjustment factors and genetic parameters for gestation length (GES), AI and calving date records (n = 40,356) were extracted from the Canadian Charolais Association field database. The average time from AI to calving date was 285.2 d (SD = 4.49 d) and ranged from 274 to 296 d. Fixed effects were sex of calf, age of dam (2, 3, 4, 5 to 10, > or = 11 yr), and gestation contemporary group (year of birth x herd of origin). Variance components were estimated using REML and 4 animal models (n = 84,332) containing from 0 to 3 random maternal effects. Model 1 (M1) contained only direct genetic effects. Model 2 (M2) was G1 plus maternal genetic effects with the direct x maternal genetic covariance constrained to zero, and model 3 (M3) was G2 without the covariance constraint. Model 4 (M4) extended G3 to include a random maternal permanent environmental effect. Direct heritability estimates were high and similar among all models (0.61 to 0.64), and maternal heritability estimates were low, ranging from 0.01 (M2) to 0.09 (M3). Likelihood ratio tests and parameter estimates suggested that M4 was the most appropriate (P < 0.05) model. With M4, phenotypic variance (18.35 d2) was partitioned into direct and maternal genetic, and maternal permanent environmental components (hd2 = 0.64 +/- 0.04, hm2 = 0.07 +/- 0.01, r(d,m) = -0.37 +/- 0.06, and c2 = 0.03 +/- 0.01, respectively). Linear contrasts were used to estimate that bull calves gestated 1.26 d longer (P < 0.02) than heifers, and adjustments to a mature equivalent (5 to 10 yr old) age of dam were 1.49 (P < 0.01), 0.56 (P < 0.01), 0.33 (P < 0.01), and -0.24 (P < 0.14) d for GES records of calves born to 2-, 3-, 4-, and > or = 11-yr-old cows, respectively. Bivariate animal models were used to estimate genetic parameters for GES with birth and adjusted 205-d weaning weights, and postweaning gain. Direct GES was positively correlated with direct birth weight (BWT; 0.34 +/- 0.04) but negatively correlated with maternal

  16. Factors associated with the number of calves born to Norwegian beef suckler cows.

    PubMed

    Holmøy, Ingrid H; Nelson, Sindre T; Martin, Adam D; Nødtvedt, Ane

    2017-05-01

    A retrospective cohort study was performed to evaluate factors associated with the number of calves born to Norwegian beef suckler cows. Production data from 20,541 cows in 2210 herds slaughtered over a three-year period (1st of January 2010 to 23rd of January 2013) were extracted from the national beef cattle registry. This study's inclusion criteria were met for 16,917 cows (from 1858 herds) which gave birth to 50,578 calves. The median number of calves born per cow was 2 (min 1, max 18). Two multilevel Poisson regression models with herd random effects showed that early maturing breeds (Hereford and Aberdeen Angus) gave birth to more calves than late maturing breeds (Charolais and Limousin) in four out of five areas of Norway. The significant breed-region interaction indicated that the coastal South East region of Norway, which has a relatively long growing season and gentle topography, yielded the highest number of calves born for all but one breed (Simmental). Cows that needed assistance or experienced dystocia at their first calving produced fewer calves than those that did not: incidence rate ratio 0.87 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.84-0.91) for assistance and 0.70 (95% CI: 0.66-0.75) for dystocia, respectively. Cows in larger herds (>30 cows) produced 11% more calves in their lifetime compared to cows in smaller herds (≤30 cows) (P<0.001). The herd random effects were highly significant, suggesting that unmeasured factors at the herd level were responsible for a large amount of the unexplained variation in the number of calves born. The large inter-herd variation indicate systematic differences in herd level factors influencing the number of calves born to each cow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of timing and duration of test period and diet type on intake and feed efficiency of Charolais-sired cattle.

    PubMed

    Cassady, C J; Felix, T L; Beever, J E; Shike, D W

    2016-11-01

    Objectives of this experiment were to: 1) determine appropriate test length, timing, and repeatability of DMI, ADG, and efficiency over different biological time points; 2) determine the efficacy of using decoupled performance and intake data to generate accurate feed efficiency measures; and 3) determine the relationship between forage-and grain-feed efficiency measures. Over 2 yr, Charolais crossbred heifers ( = 308) and steers ( = 320) were fed for two 70 d periods and DMI, ADG, and 12th rib fat thickness were recorded. Steers were fed grain-based diets during the growing and finishing periods to determine the effects of test period and timing on DMI and feed efficiency. Heifers were fed forage during the growing period and grain during the finishing period to test the effect of diet type on measures of DMI and feed efficiency. For each 70 d test period, individual DMI was recorded using the GrowSafe (Airdrie, AB) system. Residual feed intake (RFI) was calculated for each test period. Total feeding period ADG (FP_ADG) was calculated for steers by regressing all weights taken from feedlot arrival to final BW, which was calculated by dividing HCW by a standard dressing percentage (63%). Dry matter intake and RFI were correlated (r 0.56; < 0.01, and 0.63; < 0.01, respectively) for the growing and finishing periods of grain-fed steers. Average daily gain was not repeatable ( = 0.11; 0.06) across both test periods for steers. However, growing and finishing ADG were correlated ( = 0.58; < 0.01, and = 0.69; < 0.01, respectively) to FP_ADG. To assess the potential of shortening the intake test, DMI was analyzed in 7 d increments for grain-fed steers during the growing and finishing periods. Regardless of test length, from 7 to 70 d, DMI was strongly correlated ( ≥ 0.87; < 0.01) to total DMI during the growing period. Heifer forage DMI was correlated ( = 0.58; < 0.01) to grain DMI; subsequently, forage and grain RFI were moderately correlated ( = 0.40; < 0.01). This

  18. Evaluation of the effect of alternative measurements of body weight gain and dry matter intake for the calculation of residual feed intake in growing purebred Charolais and Red Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Kayser, W; Glaze, J B; Welch, C M; Kerley, M; Hill, R A

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of alternative-measurements of body weight and DMI used to evaluate residual feed intake (RFI). Weaning weight (WW), ADG, and DMI were recorded on 970 growing purebred Charolais bulls (n = 519) and heifers (n = 451) and 153 Red Angus growing steers (n = 69) and heifers (n = 84) using a GrowSafe (GrowSafe, Airdrie, Alberta, Canada) system. Averages of individual DMI were calculated in 10-d increments and compared to the overall DMI to identify the magnitude of the errors associated with measuring DMI. These incremental measurements were also used in calculation of RFI, computed from the linear regression of DMI on ADG and midtest body weight0.75 (MMWT). RFI_Regress was calculated using ADG_Regress (ADG calculated as the response of BW gain and DOF) and MMWT_PWG (metabolic midweight calculated throughout the postweaning gain test), considered the control in Red Angus. A similar calculation served as control for Charolais; RFI was calculated using 2-d consecutive start and finish weights (RFI_Calc). The RFI weaning weight (RFI_WW) was calculated using ADG_WW (ADG from weaning till the final out weight of the postweaning gain test) and MMWT_WW, calculated similarly. Overall average estimated DMI was highly correlated to the measurements derived over shorter periods, with 10 d being the least correlated and 60 d being the most correlated. The ADG_Calc (calculated using 2-d consecutive start and finish weight/DOF) and ADG_WW were highly correlated in Charolais. The ADG_Regress and ADG_Calc were highly correlated, and ADG_Regress and ADG_WW were moderately correlated in Red Angus. The control measures of RFI were highly correlated with the RFI_WW in Charolais and Red Angus. The outcomes of including abbreviated period DMI in the model with the weaning weight gain measurements showed that the model using 10 d of intake (RFI WW_10) was the least correlated with the control measures. The model with 60 d of intake had

  19. Nematode control in spring-born suckler beef calves using targeted selective anthelmintic treatments.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, J; Earley, B; Mee, J F; Doherty, M L; Crosson, P; Barrett, D; Macrelli, M; de Waal, T

    2014-09-15

    As anthelmintic resistance is increasingly being reported in cattle worldwide, there is a need to explore alternative approaches to gastrointestinal nematode control in cattle. A novel approach is the use of targeted selective treatments (TST) where only individual animals are treated instead of the entire group. The study objective was to determine if anthelmintic usage could be reduced using a TST-based approach in rotationally grazed first-grazing season suckler beef calves without affecting calf performance. Eighty-eight spring-born suckler beef calves, naïve to anthelmintics, with an initial mean (s.d.) age and live weight of 159 (22.4) days and 221 (42.4) kg, respectively, were used. All calves were vaccinated at pasture against dictyocaulosis at 8 and 12 weeks old. On August 9th 2013 (Week 0), when the trial began, calves were randomised by age, weight, sex, dam breed and sire breed to one of two treatments: (1) standard treatment (positive control) (n=44) and (2) TST (n=44). Samples collected one week prior to the start of the study were used as baseline covariates. Each treatment group was replicated once. All calves in the control groups were treated subcutaneously with levamisole on Week 0 and on Week 6. Individual calves in the TST groups were only eligible for treatment at pasture with the same product if predetermined thresholds were reached [plasma pepsinogen ≥ 2.0 international units of tyrosine/litre and faecal egg count ≥ 200 eggs per gram of faeces]. The trial concluded at housing on Week 13. Data were analysed using repeated measures mixed models ANOVA (PROC MIXED) (SAS 9.3). No calves in the TST groups were treated for gastrointestinal nematodes during the study period as they did not reach pre-determined treatment thresholds. Mean (sem) calf daily live weight gain for control and TST groups was 0.90 (±0.04) and 0.92 (±0.03) kg, respectively (P=0.68). Using an ELISA to detect antibodies to Dictyocaulus viviparus at Week 11, 81% of calves

  20. Genetic parameters for calving difficulty, stillbirth, and birth weight for Hereford and Charolais at first and later parities.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, S; Näisholm, A; Johansson, K; Philipsson, J

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate direct and maternal genetic parameters for calving difficulty score, stillbirth, and birth weight at first and later parities for Charolais and Hereford cattle in Sweden. Calving traits have long been recorded for pure-bred beef cattle in Sweden, but only birth weight has been used in the selection in order to avoid calving difficulties. Linear animal model analyses included records on birth weight for 60,309 Charolais and 30,789 Hereford calves born from 1980 to 1999, and calving traits for 74,538 Charolais and 37,077 Hereford calves born from 1980 to 2001. The frequencies of difficult calvings and stillbirths were approximately 6% at first and 1 to 2% at later parities for both breeds. Fewer than half the stillborn calves were born from difficult calvings. Heritabilities estimated for birth weight in different univariate and bivariate analyses for Charolais and Hereford calves born at first and later parities ranged from 0.44 to 0.51 for direct effects and 0.06 to 0.15 for maternal effects. Heritabilities on the observable scale for calving difficulty score of Charolais and Hereford, scored in three classes, ranged from 0.11 to 0.16 for direct and 0.07 to 0.12 for maternal effects at first parity, and lower at later parities. All estimated heritabilities for stillbirth were very low (0.002 to 0.016 on the observable scale). Direct-maternal genetic correlations were negative, with few exceptions. Genetic correlations between the traits and between parities within traits were generally moderate to high and positive. Calving difficulty score should be included in the genetic evaluation of beef breeds in Sweden, whereas progeny groups in Swedish beef populations are too small for stillbirth to be considered directly.

  1. Genetic parameters for calving and conformation traits in Charolais x Montbeliard and Charolais x Holstein crossbred calves.

    PubMed

    Vallée, A; van Arendonk, J A M; Bovenhuis, H

    2013-12-01

    Charolais sires can be mated to Montbéliard or Holstein dairy cows to produce crossbred calves sold for meat production. Heritabilities and correlations between traits can differ when they are calculated within Charolais × Montbéliard or within Charolais × Holstein population. Moreover, the genetic correlation between the same trait measured on Charolais × Montbéliard and on Charolais × Holstein crossbred calves is not necessarily unity. The first objective of this study was to estimate heritability and genetic correlation between traits within Charolais × Montbéliard and within Charolais × Holstein population. The second objective was to investigate if those traits are genetically identical between crossbred populations. Traits studied were calving difficulty, birth weight, height, bone thinness, and muscular development. Data included 22,852 Charolais × Montbéliard and 16,012 Charolais × Holstein crossbred calves from 391 Charolais sires. Heritabilities estimated separately within each crossbred population were similar. Stronger genetic correlations were observed in Charolais × Holstein population compared with Charolais × Montbéliard between calving difficulty and height (0.67 vs. 0.54), calving difficulty and bone thinness (0.42 vs. 0.27), birth weight and bone thinness (0.52 vs. 0.20), and birth weight and muscular development (0.41 vs. 0.18). Bivariate analysis considering observations on Charolais × Montbéliard and on Charolais × Holstein as different traits showed that genetic variances and heritabilities were similar for all traits except height. Birth weight and muscular development were genetically identical traits in each crossbred populations, with genetic correlations of 0.96 and 0.99. Genetic correlations were 0.91 for calving difficulty, 0.80 for height, and 0.70 for bone thinness and log-likelihood ratio tests indicated that they were significantly different from 1 (P ≤ 0.01). Results show evidence for reranking of Charolais

  2. An on-farm investigation of beef suckler herds using an animal welfare index (AWI).

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Mickael; Prendiville, Daniel J; Crowe, Mark A; Veissier, Isabelle; Earley, Bernadette

    2010-12-13

    Beef suckler farms (194 farms throughout 13 counties) were assessed once with housed cattle and once with cattle at grass using an animal welfare index (AWI). Twenty-three of the 194 farms were revisited a year later and re-evaluated using the AWI and the Tier-Gerechtheits-Index 35L/2000 (TGI35L/2000). Thirty-three indicators were collected in five categories: locomotion (5 indicators); social interactions (between animals) (7), flooring (5), environment (7) and Stockpersonship (9). Three indicators relating to the size of the farm were also collected.Improving animal welfare is an increasingly important aspect of livestock production systems predominantly due to increased consumer concern about the source of animal products. The objectives were (i) to evaluate animal welfare of Irish beef suckler herds using an animal welfare index (AWI), (ii) to examine correlations between parameters, how they influence the AWI and investigate the applicability of the parameters used, (iii) to investigate the impact of the activity of the farmer (full-time or part-time), the interest of the farmer and the number of animals on the AWI. The mean AWI was 65% and ranged from 54% to 83%. The grazing period represented 16.5% of the total points of the AWI. Seventy percent of the farms were rated as "Very Good" or "Excellent". There was no difference (P > 0.05) in AWI between full-time and part-time farmers. Part-time farmers had greater (P = 0.01) "social interactions": calving (P = 0.03) and weaning (P < 0.001) scores. Full-time farmers had cleaner animals (P = 0.03) and their animals had less lameness (P = 0.01). The number of animals on-farm and the interest of the Stockperson were negatively and positively correlated (P = 0.001), respectively, with the AWI. A hierarchical classification was performed to examine how the indicators influenced the AWI. The AWI was easily applicable for an on-farm evaluation of welfare. The Stockpersonship was an important factor in determining the

  3. Genetic trends for live weight traits reflect breeding strategies in registered Charolais Farms in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Parra-Bracamonte, G M; Lopez-Villalobos, N; Morris, S T; Sifuentes-Rincón, A M; Lopez-Bustamante, L A

    2016-12-01

    Genetic trends are commonly used to verify genetic improvement; however, there are few reports on beef cattle in Mexico. Data from 1998 to 2013 from four Charolais bull breeding farms were examined to verify the genetic responses to different breeding management and selection criteria. Analysis included the comparison of regression lines of breeding values for birth (BW), weaning (WW) and yearling weights (YW), and maternal weaning weight (MWW) on the year of birth of the animals. Results revealed differential genetic progress for BW and YW and indicated that the overall analysis may have diluted the perception of genetic progress from the farmer's point of view. The use of breeding values as a tool for selection is effective to achieve genetic progress, even in negatively correlated traits, such as birth weight and yearling weight.

  4. Phenotypic and genetic relationships of feed efficiency with growth performance, ultrasound, and carcass merit traits in Angus and Charolais steers.

    PubMed

    Mao, F; Chen, L; Vinsky, M; Okine, E; Wang, Z; Basarab, J; Crews, D H; Li, C

    2013-05-01

    Feed efficiency is of particular importance to the beef industry, as feed costs represent the single largest variable cost in beef production systems. Selection for more efficient cattle will lead to reduction of feed related costs, but should not have adverse impacts on quality of the carcass. In this study, we evaluated phenotypic and genetic correlations of residual feed intake (RFI), RFI adjusted for end-of-test ultrasound backfat thickness (RFIf), and RFI adjusted for ultrasound backfat thickness and LM area (RFIfr) with growth, ultrasound, and carcass merit traits in an Angus population of 551 steers and in a Charolais population of 417 steers. In the Angus steer population, the phenotypic and genetic correlation of RFI with carcass merit traits including HCW, carcass backfat, carcass LM area, lean meat yield, and carcass marbling were not significant or weak with correlations coefficients ranging from -0.0007 ± 0.05 to 0.18 ± 0.21. In the Charolais steer population, the phenotypic and genetic correlations of RFI with the carcass merit traits were also weak, with correlation coefficients ranging from -0.07 ± 0.06 to 0.19 ± 0.18, except for the genetic correlation with carcass average backfat, which was moderate with a magnitude of 0.42 ± 0.29. Inclusion of ultrasound backfat thickness in the model to predict the expected daily DMI for maintenance explained on average an additional 0.5% variation of DMI in the Angus steers and 2.3% variation of DMI in the Charolais steer population. Inclusion of both the ultrasound backfat and LM area in the model explained only 0.7% additional variance in DMI in the Angus steer population and only 0.6% in the Charolais steer population on top of the RFIf model. We concluded that RFIf adjusted for ultrasound backfat at the end of the test will lead to decreases of both the phenotypic and genetic correlations with carcass backfat and marbling score to a greater extent for late-maturing beef breeds such as Charolais than

  5. Associations between bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) seropositivity and performance indicators in beef suckler and dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Gates, M C; Humphry, R W; Gunn, G J

    2013-12-01

    Data from 255 Scottish beef suckler herds and 189 Scottish dairy herds surveyed as part of national bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) prevalence studies from October 2006 to May 2008 were examined retrospectively to determine the relationship between serological status and key performance indicators derived from national cattle movement records. On average, calf mortality rates were 1.35 percentage points higher in seropositive beef herds and 3.05 percentage points higher in seropositive dairy herds than in negative control herds. Seropositive beef herds were also more likely to show increases in calf mortality rates and culling rates between successive years. There were no discernible effects of BVDV on the average age at first calving or calving interval for either herd type. Accompanying questionnaire data revealed that only 27% of beef farmers and 25% of dairy farmers with seropositive herds thought their cattle were affected by BVDV, which suggests that the clinical effects of exposure may be inapparent under field conditions or masked by other causes of reproductive failure and culling. Beef farmers were significantly more likely to perceive a problem when their herd experienced acute changes in calf mortality rates, culling rates, and calving intervals between successive years. However, only 35% of these perceived positive herds were actually seropositive for BVDV. These findings emphasize both the importance of routinely screening herds to determine their true infection status and the potential for using national cattle movement records to identify herds that may be experiencing outbreaks from BVDV or other infectious diseases that impact herd performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Herd health status and management practices on 16 Irish suckler beef farms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There have been few studies published internationally which document herd health management practices in suckler beef herds and no published Irish studies. The study objective was to document herd health status and management practices on sixteen Irish suckler beef herds over a two year period (2009–2010). The farms used in the study were part of the Teagasc BETTER farm beef programme. The mean (s.d.) herd size, stocking rate and farm size was 68 cows (27.6), 2.0 LU/ha (0.3) and 64.3 (21.6) adjusted hectares, respectively. Two questionnaires were designed; 1) a farmer questionnaire to collect information on farm background and current herd health control practices and 2) a veterinary questionnaire to collect information on the extent of animal health advice given by veterinarians to their clients and identification of any on-farm herd health issues. Results Dystocia, calf pneumonia, and calf diarrhoea, in that order, were identified as the primary herd health issues in these Irish suckler beef herds. In addition, substantial deficiencies in biosecurity practices were also identified on these farms. Conclusions The findings of this study may serve as the focus for future research in animal health management practices in Irish suckler beef herds. PMID:24195997

  7. Genotype x Nutritional Environment Interaction in a Composite Beef Cattle Breed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental effects have been shown to influence several economically important traits in beef cattle. In this study, genetic x nutritional environment interaction has been evaluated in a composite beef cattle breed(50% Red Angus, 25% Charolais, 25% Tarentaise).Cows were randomly assigned to be fe...

  8. Associations among heat shock protein 70 genotype, forage system, and horn fly infestation of beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Horn fly infestations negatively impact economic traits of beef cattle. The impact of horn flies on beef cattle milk yield and quality was evaluated in cows sired by Bonsmara (BONS; n = 7), Brangus (BRAN; n = 13), Charolais (CHAR; n = 8), Gelbvieh (GELV; n = 5), Hereford (HERF; n = 12), and Romosin...

  9. Evaluation of rib steak colour from Friesian, Hereford and Charolais heifers pastured or overwintered prior to slaughter.

    PubMed

    Lynch, A; Buckley, D J; Galvin, K; Mullen, A M; Troy, D J; Kerry, J P

    2002-07-01

    Heifers (n=10) were randomly selected from the slaughter line of a local factory each month for a period of 21 months. Rib steak (sampled at the 10th rib) from the left side of each carcass was taken for analysis. The cattle breeds selected during this study were Friesian, Hereford and Charolais. The mean weight of the left side for all carcasses was 146.6 (S.E.M.= 1.0kg). Graded carcasses selected for sampling during this trial were classified using the EUROP scale and the specific heifer grades chosen were factory grades EO4L and EO4H. Initial Hunter 'a' values (on the day of arrival in the laboratory) of rib steak from heifers finished between November and March (overwintered) were significantly (P<0.001) higher than Hunter 'a' values from heifers finished between April and October (pastured). After storage at 4 °C under simulated retail display conditions for 6 days, the Hunter 'a' values for overwintered samples were also significantly (P<0.001) greater than those for pastured samples. Breed also had an effect on the colour of the meat. After storage for 6 days, Hunter 'a' values of rib steak from Charolais were significantly (P<0.05) higher than either Friesian or Hereford. Pastured heifers had significantly (P<0.05) higher levels of the monounsaturated fatty acid C16.1 in the total lipid fraction of rib steak (neutral and polar) than samples taken from overwintered heifers. Pastured heifers had significantly (P<0.01) higher levels of the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) C18.3 in the phospholipid fraction than those from overwintered cattle. However, Hereford had significantly (P<0.05) higher levels of C14.0, C16.1 and C18.0 in the phospholipid fraction than those found in Friesian and Charolais. The level of α-tocopherol in the muscle was not affected by either pasturing/overwintering or breed. However, Continental breeds had significantly (P<0.05) higher levels of α-tocopherol in adipose tissue than Friesian.

  10. Genomic signatures reveal geographic adaption and human selection in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We investigated geographic adaptation and human selection using high-density SNP data of five diverse cattle breeds. Based on allele frequency differences, we detected hundreds of candidate regions under positive selection across Holstein, Angus, Charolais, Brahman, and N'Dama. In addition to well-k...

  11. Association of SNPs in dopamine and serotonin pathway genes and their interacting genes with temperament traits in Charolais cows.

    PubMed

    Garza-Brenner, E; Sifuentes-Rincón, A M; Randel, R D; Paredes-Sánchez, F A; Parra-Bracamonte, G M; Arellano Vera, W; Rodríguez Almeida, F A; Segura Cabrera, A

    2017-08-01

    Cattle temperament is a complex trait, and molecular studies aimed at defining this trait are scarce. We used an interaction networks approach to identify new genes (interacting genes) and to estimate their effects and those of 19 dopamine- and serotonin-related genes on the temperament traits of Charolais cattle. The genes proopiomelanocortin (POMC), neuropeptide Y (NPY), solute carrier family 18, member 2 (SLC18A2) and FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homologue (FOSFBJ) were identified as new candidates. Their potential to be associated with temperament was estimated according to their reported biological activities, which included interactions with neural activity, receptor function, targeting or synthesis of neurotransmitters and association with behaviour. Pen score (PS) and exit velocity (EV) measures were determined from 412 Charolais cows to calculate their temperament score (TS). Based on the TS, calm (n = 55; TS, 1.09 ± 0.33) and temperamental (n = 58; TS, 2.27 ± 0.639) cows were selected and genotyped using a 248 single-nucleotide variation (SNV) panel. Of the 248 variations in the panel, only 151 were confirmed to be polymorphic (single-nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) in the tested population. Single-marker association analyses between genotypes and temperament measures (EV, PS and/or TS) indicated significant associations of six SNPs from four candidate genes. The markers rs109576799 and rs43696138, located in the DRD3 and HTR2A genes, respectively, were significantly associated with both EV and TS traits. Four markers, rs110365063 and rs137756569 from the POMC gene and rs110365063 and rs135155082 located in SLC18A2 and DRD2, respectively, were associated with PS. The variant rs110365063 located in bovine SLC18A2 causes a change in the amino acid sequence from Ala to Thr. Further studies are needed to confirm the association of genetic profile with cattle temperament; however, our study represents important progress in

  12. An integrated approach to assessing the viability of eradicating BVD in Scottish beef suckler herds.

    PubMed

    McCormick, B J J; Stott, A W; Brülisauer, F; Vosough Ahmadi, B; Gunn, G J

    2010-04-21

    The viability of eradicating bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) in Scottish suckler herds is dependent on the continued compliance with eradication schemes. At the farm level, the costs of BVD have been identified in previous studies and show a substantial financial imperative to avoid infection. At a regional level the incentives of BVD eradication to individuals are unclear, for example the requirement for vaccination strategies despite achieving disease-free status. Ensuring farmer compliance with an eradication scheme is therefore difficult. Experience of eradicating BVD from beef-dominated areas is limited and theoretical models have tended to focus on the dairy sector. Here we present a stochastic epidemiological model of a typical beef suckler herd to explore the interaction of a farm with a regional pool of replacements, utilising information from a BVD virus seroprevalence survey of Scottish beef suckler herds. Our epidemiological model is then used to assess the relative costs to individuals assuming different regional endemic prevalences, which are used to represent the likelihood of BVD re-introduction. We explore the relative cost of BVD, taken as likelihood and consequence, at an endemic steady state in contrast to previous models that have assumed the introduction or control of BVD in an epidemic state (e.g. a closed and mostly susceptible population). Where endemic, BVD is unlikely to affect all farms evenly and will cost most farmers very little due to herd immunity or self-clearance of the virus. Compliance is likely to be boosted by pump-priming to initiate and complete eradication schemes with cost-sharing.

  13. Phenotypic and genetic relationships of feeding behavior with feed intake, growth performance, feed efficiency, and carcass merit traits in Angus and Charolais steers.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Mao, F; Crews, D H; Vinsky, M; Li, C

    2014-03-01

    Feeding behavior traits including daily feeding duration (FD), daily feeding head down time (HD), average feeding duration per feeding event (FD_AVE), average feeding head down time per feeding event (HD_AVE), feeding frequency (FF), and meal eating rate (ER) were analyzed to estimate their phenotypic and genetic correlations with feed intake, growth performance, residual feed intake (RFI), ultrasound, and carcass merit traits in Angus and Charolais finishing steers. Heritability estimates for FD, HD, FD_AVE, HD_AVE, FF, and ER were 0.27 ± 0.09 (SE), 0.25 ± 0.09, 0.19 ± 0.06, 0.11 ± 0.05, 0.24 ± 0.08, and 0.38 ± 0.10, respectively, in the Angus population and 0.49 ± 0.12, 0.38 ± 0.11, 0.31 ± 0.09, 0.29 ± 0.10, 0.43 ± 0.11, and 0.56 ± 0.13, respectively, in the Charolais population. In both the Angus and Charolais steer populations, FD and HD had relatively stronger phenotypic (0.17 ± 0.06 to 0.32 ± 0.04) and genetic (0.29 ± 0.17 to 0.54 ± 0.18) correlations with RFI in comparison to other feeding behavior traits investigated, suggesting the potential of FD and HD as indicators in assessing variation of RFI. In general, feeding behavior traits had weak phenotypic correlations with most of the ultrasound and carcass merit traits; however, estimated genetic correlations of the feeding behavior traits with some fat deposition related traits were moderate to moderately strong but differed in magnitude or sign between the Angus and Charolais steer populations, likely reflecting their different biological types. Genetic parameter estimation studies involving feeding behavior traits in beef cattle are lacking and more research is needed to better characterize the relationships between feeding behavior and feed intake, growth, feed utilization, and carcass merit traits, in particular with respect to different biological types of cattle.

  14. Association of plasma ghrelin concentrations with feed intake in beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Active ghrelin is an acylated peptide produced in the gastrointestinal tract of animals that is thought to stimulate appetite. Cattle used in this experiment were sired by bulls representing five breeds in the U.S. including: Hereford, Angus, Limousin, Charolais, and Gelbvieh. Steers (n=128) and hei...

  15. Estimation of the maintenance energy requirements, methane emissions and nitrogen utilization efficiency of two suckler cow genotypes.

    PubMed

    Zou, C X; Lively, F O; Wylie, A R G; Yan, T

    2016-04-01

    Seventeen non-lactating dairy-bred suckler cows (LF; Limousin×Holstein-Friesian) and 17 non-lactating beef composite breed suckler cows (ST; Stabiliser) were used to study enteric methane emissions and energy and nitrogen (N) utilization from grass silage diets. Cows were housed in cubicle accommodation for 17 days, and then moved to individual tie-stalls for an 8-day digestibility balance including a 2-day adaption followed by immediate transfer to an indirect, open-circuit, respiration calorimeters for 3 days with gaseous exchange recorded over the last two of these days. Grass silage was offered ad libitum once daily at 0900 h throughout the study. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) between the genotypes for energy intakes, energy outputs or energy use efficiency, or for methane emission rates (methane emissions per unit of dry matter intake or energy intake), or for N metabolism characteristics (N intake or N output in faeces or urine). Accordingly, the data for both cow genotypes were pooled and used to develop relationships between inputs and outputs. Regression of energy retention against ME intake (r 2=0.52; P<0.001) indicated values for net energy requirements for maintenance of 0.386, 0.392 and 0.375 MJ/kg0.75 for LF+ST, LF and ST respectively. Methane energy output was 0.066 of gross energy intake when the intercept was omitted from the linear equation (r 2=0.59; P<0.001). There were positive linear relationships between N intake and N outputs in manure, and manure N accounted for 0.923 of the N intake. The present results provide approaches to predict maintenance energy requirement, methane emission and manure N output for suckler cows and further information is required to evaluate their application in a wide range of suckler production systems.

  16. Relationship of lactate dehydrogenase activity with body measeurements of Angus x Charolais cows and calves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Angus x Charolais cows (n = 87) and their Angus-sired, spring-born calves (n = 86) were utilized to examine relationships between lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and body measurements of beef cows; and the relationship between maternal LDH activity in late gestation and subsequent calf birth we...

  17. Changes in feed intake, growth, feed efficiency, and body composition of beef cattle fed forage then concentrate diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this experiment was to determine changes in production traits and body composition of beef steers and heifers when fed a forage-based ration followed by a concentrate-based ration. Cattle were progeny of composite breed cows bred to Charolais, Simmental, and Red Angus bulls. Appro...

  18. Bacterial species and their associations with acute and chronic mastitis in suckler ewes.

    PubMed

    Smith, E M; Willis, Z N; Blakeley, M; Lovatt, F; Purdy, K J; Green, L E

    2015-10-01

    Acute mastitis in suckler ewes is often detected because of systemic signs such as anorexia or lameness, whereas chronic mastitis, characterized by intramammary abscesses with no systemic disease, is typically detected when ewes are inspected before mating. The aims of the current study were to identify the species and strains of culturable bacteria associated with acutely diseased, chronically diseased, and unaffected mammary glands to investigate whether species and strains vary by state. To investigate acute mastitis, 28 milk samples were obtained from both glands of 14 ewes with acute mastitis in one gland only. To investigate chronic mastitis, 16 ovine udders were obtained from 2 abattoirs; milk was aspirated from the 32 glands where possible, and the udders were sectioned to expose intramammary abscesses, which were swab sampled. All milk and swab samples were cultured aerobically. In total, 37 bacterial species were identified, 4 from acute mastitis, 26 from chronic mastitis, and 8 from apparently healthy glands. In chronic mastitis, the overall coincidence index of overlap of species detected in intramammary abscesses and milk was 0.60, reducing to 0.36 within individual glands, indicating a high degree of species overlap in milk and abscesses overall, but less overlap within specific glands. Staphylococcus aureus was detected frequently in all sample types; it was isolated from 10/14 glands with acute mastitis. In 5 ewes, closely related strains were present in both affected and unaffected glands. In chronic mastitis, closely related Staphylococcus aureus strains were detected in milk and abscesses from the same gland.

  19. Comparison of organoleptic quality and composition of beef from suckler bulls from different production systems.

    PubMed

    Mezgebo, G B; Moloney, A P; O'Riordan, E G; McGee, M; Richardson, R I; Monahan, F J

    2017-03-01

    Bull beef production is traditionally based on high concentrate rations fed indoors. Inclusion of grazed grass, which is generally a cheaper feed, would decrease the cost of bull beef production, but may affect beef quality. Accordingly, the organoleptic quality and composition of beef from continental-sired suckler bulls (n=126) assigned to either ad libitum concentrates to slaughter (C), grass silage (GS) ad libitum for 120 days followed by C (GSC) or GS followed by 100 days at pasture and then C (GSPC) and slaughtered at target carcass weights (CW) of 360, 410 or 460 kg was examined. Tenderness, flavour liking and overall liking were lower (P<0.05) for GSPC than for C and GSC. Intramuscular fat content and soluble collagen proportion were lower (P<0.05) for GSPC than GSC which was lower (P<0.05) than C. Soluble collagen proportion was lower (P<0.05) for 460 kg than 410 kg CW, which was lower (P<0.05) than 360 kg CW. Inclusion of a grazing period decreased the ratings of tenderness, flavour liking and overall liking, but age of the bulls at slaughter had no clear influence on sensory characteristics.

  20. Relative associations of cattle movements, local spread, and biosecurity with bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) seropositivity in beef and dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Gates, M C; Woolhouse, M E J; Gunn, G J; Humphry, R W

    2013-11-01

    The success of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) eradication campaigns can be undermined by spread through local transmission pathways and poor farmer compliance with biosecurity recommendations. This work combines recent survey data with cattle movement data to explore the issues likely to impact on the success of BVDV control in Scotland. In this analysis, data from 249 beef suckler herds and 185 dairy herds in Scotland were studied retrospectively to determine the relative influence of cattle movements, local spread, and biosecurity on BVDV seropositivity. Multivariable logistic regression models revealed that cattle movement risk factors had approximately 3 times greater explanatory power than risk factors for local spread amongst beef suckler herds, but approximately the same explanatory power as risk factors for local spread amongst dairy herds. These findings are most likely related to differences in cattle husbandry practices and suggest that where financial prioritization is required, focusing on reducing movement-based risk is likely to be of greatest benefit when applied to beef suckler herds. The reported use of biosecurity measures such as purchasing cattle from BVDV accredited herds only, performing diagnostic screening at the time of sale, implementing isolation periods for purchased cattle, and installing double fencing on shared field boundaries had minimal impact on the risk of beef or dairy herds being seropositive for BVDV. Only 28% of beef farmers and 24% of dairy farmers with seropositive herds recognized that their cattle were affected by BVDV and those that did perceive a problem were no less likely to sell animals as replacement breeding stock and no more likely to implement biosecurity measures against local spread than farmers with no perceived problems. In relation to the current legislative framework for BVDV control in Scotland, these findings emphasize the importance of requiring infected herds take appropriate biosecurity measures

  1. Diagnosis and management of venereal campylobacteriosis in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Truyers, Isabelle; Luke, Tim; Wilson, David; Sargison, Neil

    2014-11-27

    Bovine venereal campylobacteriosis is caused by Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis and its glycerine-tolerant variant Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis biovars intermedius. The disease can be economically important when present in cattle herds, causing poor reproductive performance, embryo mortality and abortion. Sensitive and specific diagnostic tests are required in the diagnosis of infection and to inform and monitor disease control. Current tests include bacterial culture and fluorescent antibody testing of preputial sheath washings and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an agglutination test on vaginal mucus, although the predictive values of these tests can be inadequate in field investigations. Artificial insemination is often considered as a simple control method for bovine venereal campylobacteriosis, but is impractical for many beef suckler herds where breeding takes place at pasture. Commercial vaccines are unavailable in the UK, while the efficacy of autogenous vaccines using a bacterial isolate from infected animals on a specific farm is at best unproven. Hence, for some infected herds, the development of an alternative control strategy based on segregation of potentially infected and uninfected animals in combination with culling or treatment would be desirable. This approach requires meticulous records and herd health management. In this paper we highlight difficulties in diagnosing bovine venereal campylobacteriosis and demonstrate the benefits of good record keeping when investigating poor reproductive performance in a beef suckler herd and establishing a herd-specific approach to bio-containment of the infectious cause. Bovine venereal campylobacteriosis is an economically important disease that should be considered in investigations of suckler herd subfertility problems. Control of the disease based on segregation of potentially infected and uninfected animals in combination with extensive culling can be achieved without the use of

  2. Does diverse grazing behavior of suckler cows have an impact on predicted methane emissions?

    PubMed

    Ricci, P; Umstätter, C; Holland, J P; Waterhouse, A

    2014-03-01

    A modeling study based on a dataset from a large-scale grazing study was used to identify the potential impact of grazing behavior and performance of diverse cow genotypes on predicted methane (CH4) emissions. Lactating cows grazing extensive seminatural grassland and heath vegetation were monitored with Global Positioning System collars and activity sensors. The diet selected by cows of 3 different genotypes, Aberdeen Angus cross Limousin (AxL), Charolais (CHA), and Luing (LUI), was simulated by matching their locations during active periods with hill vegetation maps. Measured performance and activity were used to predict energy requirements, DMI, and CH4 output. The cumulative effect of actual performance, diet selection, and actual physical activity on potential CH4 output and yield was estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed for the digestibility of intake, energy cost of activity, proportion of milk consumed by calves, and reproductive efficiency. Although with a better performance (P < 0.05), LUI required less total energy than the other genotypes (P < 0.001) as the other 2 spent more energy for maintenance (P < 0.001) and activity (P < 0.001). By selecting a better quality diet (P < 0.03), estimated CH4 of CHA cow-calf pairs was lower than AxL (P = 0.001) and slightly lower than LUI (P = 0.08). Energy lost as CH4 was 0.17 and 0.58% lower for LUI than AxL and CHA (P < 0.002). This study suggests for the first time that measured activity has a major impact on estimated CH4 outputs. A 15% difference of the cow-calf pair CH4 was estimated when using different coefficients to convert actual activity into energy. Predicted CH4 was highly sensitive to small changes in diet quality, suggesting the relative importance of diet selection on heterogeneous rangelands. Extending these results to a farm systems scale, CH4 outputs were also highly sensitive to reductions in weaning rates, illustrating the impact on CH4 at the farm-system level of using poorly adapted

  3. Productivity and technical efficiency of suckler beef production systems: trends for the period 1990 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Veysset, P; Lherm, M; Roulenc, M; Troquier, C; Bébin, D

    2015-12-01

    Over the past 23 years (1990 to 2012), French beef cattle farms have expanded in size and increased labour productivity by over 60%, chiefly, though not exclusively, through capital intensification (labour-capital substitution) and simplifying herd feeding practices (more concentrates used). The technical efficiency of beef sector production systems, as measured by the ratio of the volume value (in constant euros) of farm output excluding aids to volume of intermediate consumption, has fallen by nearly 20% while income per worker has held stable thanks to subsidies and the labour productivity gains made. This aggregate technical efficiency of beef cattle systems is positively correlated to feed self-sufficiency, which is in turn negatively correlated to farm and herd size. While volume of farm output per hectare of agricultural area has not changed, forage feed self-sufficiency decreased by 6 percentage points. The continual increase in farm size and labour productivity has come at a cost of lower production-system efficiency - a loss of technical efficiency that 20 years of genetic, technical, technological and knowledge-driven progress has barely managed to offset.

  4. Genetic variation and differentiation in parent-descendant cattle and bison populations.

    PubMed

    Cronin, M A; Leesburg, V L R

    2016-11-01

    Genetic variation and differentiation at 32 microsatellite loci was quantified for parent-descendant cattle populations and parent-descendant bison () populations. We compared heterozygosity () and allelic richness () for 587 cattle of four breeds and three lines derived from them, and 188 bison in three pairs of parent-descendant populations. and were less in the Line 1 Hereford inbred cattle population than in the parent Hereford breed. and were intermediate in a composite population (CGC, derived from crossing Red Angus, Charolais, and Tarentaise) compared to the three parent breeds. Crossbreeding of Line 1 with CGC resulted in an F generation with increased and relative to Line 1 and CGC, followed by decreased and in 2 backcross generations to Line1. Three transplanted wild bison populations had smaller and than their respective parent populations. These data demonstrate that genetic variation reduced from founder effects or inbreeding can be restored with crossbreeding and gene flow.

  5. Interaction of MC1R and PMEL alleles on solid coat colors in Highland cattle.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Sheila M; Dreger, Dayna L

    2013-02-01

    Six solid colors occur in Highland cattle: black, dun, silver dun and red, yellow, and white. These six coat colors are explained by a non-epistatic interaction of the genotypes at the MC1R and PMEL genes. A three base pair deletion in the PMEL gene leading to the deletion of a leucine from the signal peptide is observed in dilute-colored Highland cattle (c.50_52delTTC, p.Leu18del). The mutant PMEL allele acts in a semi-dominant manner. Dun Galloway cattle also have one copy of the deletion allele, and silver dun Galloway cattle have two copies. The presence of two adjacent leucine residues at the site of this deletion is highly conserved in human, horse, mouse and chicken as well as in cattle with undiluted coat colors. Highland and Galloway cattle thus exhibit a similar dose-dependent dilution effect based on the number of PMEL :c.50_51delTTC alleles, as Charolais cattle with PMEL :c.64G>A alleles. The PMEL :c.64G>A allele was not found in Highland or Galloway cattle.

  6. Study on the introgression of beef breeds in Canchim cattle using single nucleotide polymorphism markers.

    PubMed

    Buzanskas, Marcos Eli; Ventura, Ricardo Vieira; Seleguim Chud, Tatiane Cristina; Bernardes, Priscila Arrigucci; Santos, Daniel Jordan de Abreu; Regitano, Luciana Correia de Almeida; Alencar, Maurício Mello de; Mudadu, Maurício de Alvarenga; Zanella, Ricardo; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius Gualberto Barbosa; Li, Changxi; Schenkel, Flavio Schramm; Munari, Danísio Prado

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of introgression of breeds in the Canchim (CA: 62.5% Charolais-37.5% Zebu) and MA genetic group (MA: 65.6% Charolais-34.4% Zebu) cattle using genomic information on Charolais (CH), Nelore (NE), and Indubrasil (IB) breeds. The number of animals used was 395 (CA and MA), 763 (NE), 338 (CH), and 37 (IB). The Bovine50SNP BeadChip from Illumina panel was used to estimate the levels of introgression of breeds considering the Maximum likelihood, Bayesian, and Single Regression method. After genotype quality control, 32,308 SNPs were considered in the analysis. Furthermore, three thresholds to prune out SNPs in linkage disequilibrium higher than 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01 were considered, resulting in 15,286, 7,652, and 1,582 SNPs, respectively. For k = 2, the proportion of taurine and indicine varied from the expected proportion based on pedigree for all methods studied. For k = 3, the Regression method was able to differentiate the animals in three main clusters assigned to each purebred breed, showing more reasonable according to its biological viewpoint. Analyzing the data considering k = 2 seems to be more appropriate for Canchim-MA animals due to its biological interpretation. The usage of 32,308 SNPs in the analyses resulted in similar findings between the estimated and expected breed proportions. Using the Regression approach, a contribution of Indubrasil was observed in Canchim-MA when k = 3 was considered. Genetic parameter estimation could account for this breed composition information as a source of variation in order to improve the accuracy of genetic models. Our findings may help assemble appropriate reference populations for genomic prediction for Canchim-MA in order to improve prediction accuracy. Using the information on the level of introgression in each individual could also be useful in breeding or crossing design to improve individual heterosis in crossbred cattle.

  7. A longitudinal study of factors associated with acute and chronic mastitis and their impact on lamb growth rate in 10 suckler sheep flocks in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Grant, Claire; Smith, Edward Mark; Green, Laura Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    A 2-year prospective, longitudinal study of 10 suckler sheep flocks in Great Britain was run to identify factors associated with acute mastitis (AM) and chronic mastitis, and their impact on lamb growth rate. Data were collected on AM, intramammary masses (IMM; a marker for chronic mastitis), udder and teat conformation, teat lesions, body condition, ewe nutrition, litter size, lamb weight and general flock management. Each flock was visited twice each year, approximately 4 weeks before lambing and 9 weeks into lactation, for two years and all ewes present at a visit were examined. There were 7021 examinations in total. AM was reported in 2.1-3.0% of ewes/year; this ranged from 0.0% to 37.1% by flock. IMM were detected in 4.7% of ewes in pregnancy and 10.9% of ewes in lactation. Once an IMM had been detected there was an increased risk of future IMM although IMM were not consistently present. The majority of ewes had good udder conformation to suckle lambs. Factors associated with AM, IMM in pregnant and lactating ewes, udder conformation and lamb daily live weight gain were explored using mixed effect multivariable models. An increased risk of AM was associated with underfeeding protein in pregnancy (OR 4.05), forward pointing teats (OR 2.54), downward pointing teats (OR 4.68), rearing≥2 lambs (OR 2.65), non-traumatic teat lesions (OR 2.09); and marginally associated with the presence of IMM. An increased risk of IMM in lactation was associated with AM during lactation (OR 12.39), IMM in pregnancy (OR 4.79), IMM in the previous lactation (OR 4.77), underfeeding energy in pregnancy (OR 6.66) and traumatic teat lesions (OR 2.48). An increased risk of IMM in pregnancy was associated with IMM in the previous pregnancy, IMM in the previous lactation and underfeeding energy in the previous lactation (OR 2.95). Lower lamb daily live weight gain was associated with traumatic teat lesions, IMM in lactation (-0.01kg/day) and AM (-0.04kg/day). We conclude that inadequate

  8. Reducing the environmental impact of methane emissions from dairy farms by anaerobic digestion of cattle waste.

    PubMed

    Marañón, E; Salter, A M; Castrillón, L; Heaven, S; Fernández-Nava, Y

    2011-08-01

    Four dairy cattle farms considered representative of Northern Spain milk production were studied. Cattle waste was characterised and energy consumption in the farms was inventoried. Methane emissions due to slurry/manure management and fuel consumption on the farms were calculated. The possibility of applying anaerobic digestion to the slurry to minimise emissions and of using the biogas produced to replace fossil fuels on the farm was considered. Methane emissions due to slurry management (storage and use as fertiliser) ranged from 34 to 66kg CH(4)cow(-1)year(-1) for dairy cows and from 13 to 25kg CH(4)cow(-1)year(-1) for suckler calves. Cattle on these farms are housed for most of the year, and the contribution from emissions from manure dropped in pastures is insignificant due to the very low methane conversion factors. If anaerobic digestion were implemented on the farms, the potential GHG emissions savings per livestock unit would range from 978 to 1776kg CO(2)eq year(-1), with the main savings due to avoided methane emissions during slurry management. The methane produced would be sufficient to supply digester heating needs (35-55% of the total methane produced) and on-farm fuel energy requirements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulated influence of postweaning production system on performance of different biological types of cattle: I. Estimation of model parameters.

    PubMed

    Williams, C B; Bennett, G L; Keele, J W

    1995-03-01

    Breed parameters for a computer model that simulated differences in the composition of empty-body gain of beef cattle, resulting from differences in postweaning level of nutrition that are not associated with empty BW, were estimated for 17 biological types of cattle (steers from F1 crosses of 16 sire breeds [Hereford, Angus, Jersey, South Devon, Limousin, Simmental, Charolais, Red Poll, Brown Swiss, Gelbvieh, Maine Anjou, Chianina, Brahman, Sahiwal, Pinzgauer, and Tarentaise] mated to Hereford and Angus dams). One value for the maximum fractional growth rate of fat-free matter (KMAX) was estimated and used across all breed types. Mature fat-free matter (FFMmat) was estimated from data on mature cows for each of the 17 breed types. Breed type values for a fattening parameter (THETA) were estimated from growth and composition data at slaughter on steers of the 17 breed types, using the previously estimated constant KMAX and breed values for FFMmat. For each breed type, THETA values were unique for given values of KMAX, FFMmat, and composition at slaughter. The results showed that THETA was most sensitive to KMAX and had similar sensitivity to FFMmat and composition at slaughter. Values for THETA were most sensitive for breed types with large THETA values (Chianina, Charolais, and Limousin crossbred steers) and least sensitive for breed types with small THETA values (purebred Angus, crossbred Jersey, and Red Poll steers).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Candidate gene region for control of rib eye area in Canchim beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Meirelles, S L; Gouveia, G V; Gasparin, G; Alencar, M M; Gouveia, J J S; Regitano, L C A

    2011-06-21

    Investigation of molecular marker effects on production traits is essential to define marker assisted selection strategies in beef cattle. We looked for a possible association of molecular markers and backfat thickness (BFT) and rib eye area (REA) in Canchim (5/8 Charolais + 3/8 Zebu) and MA (offspring of Charolais bulls and 1/2 Canchim + 1/2 Zebu cows) animals raised exclusively on pasture. Traits were measured on 987 individuals from seven herds from two Brazilian States (São Paulo and Goiás), in March and April from 2005 to 2007, when animals were, on average, 19 months of age. Five microsatellite markers lying in QTL regions for BFT and REA (BMS490 and ETH10 on chromosome 5, INRA133 and ILSTS090 on chromosome 6, and BMS2142 on chromosome 19) were genotyped and association analyses were performed under an animal model using the restricted maximum likelihood method. After correction for multiple tests, a significant effect of microsatellite BMS490 on REA was observed, suggesting that at least one QTL affecting carcass traits in this region of the BTA5. No significant effect on BFT was observed for these markers.

  11. Adrenocortical Expression Profiling of Cattle with Distinct Juvenile Temperament Types.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Juliane; Brand, Bodo; Graunke, Katharina Luise; Langbein, Jan; Schwerin, Manfred; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2017-01-01

    Temperament affects ease of handling, animal welfare, and economically important production traits in cattle. The use of gene expression profiles as molecular traits provides a novel means of gaining insight into behavioural genetics. In this study, differences in adrenocortical expression profiles between 60 F2 cows (Charolais × German Holstein) of distinct temperament types were analysed. The cows were assessed in a novel-human test at an age of 90 days. Most of the adrenal cortex transcripts which were differentially expressed (FDR <0.05) were found between temperament types of 'fearful/neophobic-alert' and all other temperament types. These transcripts belong to several biological functions like NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response, Glucocorticoid Receptor Signalling and Complement System. Overall, the present study provides new insight into transcriptional differences in the adrenal cortex between cows of distinct temperament types. Genetic regulations of such molecular traits facilitate uncovering positional and functional gene candidates for temperament type in cattle.

  12. Genetic relationships between feral cattle from Chirikof Island, Alaska and other breeds.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, M D; Cronin, M A; Blackburn, H D; Richards, C M; Lockwood, D R; Alexander, L J

    2007-06-01

    The origin of cattle on Chirikof Island, off the coast of Alaska, is not well documented. We assessed genetic differentiation of cattle isolated on Chirikof Island from several breeds commonly used for commercial production in North America including breeds popularly believed to have contributed to the Chirikof Island population. A set of 34 microsatellite loci was used to genotype Angus, Charolais, Hereford, Highland, Limousin, Red Angus, Salers, Shorthorn, Simmental, Tarentaise and Texas Longhorn cattle sampled from North America and the Chirikof Island population. Resulting F(ST) statistics for these loci ranged from 0.06 to 0.22 and on average, 14% of total genetic variation was between breeds. Whether population structure was modelled as a bifurcating tree or genetic network, Chirikof Island cattle appeared to be unique and strongly differentiated relative to the other breeds that were sampled. Bayesian clustering for multiple-locus assignment to genetic groups indicated low levels of admixture in the Chirikof Island population. Thus, the Chirikof Island population may be a novel genetic resource of some importance for conservation and industry.

  13. Effect of water sprinkling on incidence of zoonotic pathogens in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Morrow, J L; Mitloehner, F M; Johnson, A K; Galyean, M L; Dailey, J W; Edrington, T S; Anderson, R C; Genovese, K J; Poole, T L; Duke, S E; Callaway, T R

    2005-08-01

    Heat stress and dusty conditions are common challenges for cattle during the summer, and a typical method of alleviating these problems involves sprinkling cattle and pens with water. The effect of sprinkling water on the incidence of zoonotic pathogens has not been previously studied. Four pens of heifers (n = 41) were cooled using sprinklers, and four pens (n = 43) served as controls. Heifers were crossbred Charolais, with white and red hair coats. Sprinkling was initiated when cattle were on full concentrate feed (July). Fecal samples, hide swipes, and BW were collected on d 0, 28, 63, 95, and 98. Average daily gain, DMI, and G:F were calculated, and carcass traits were collected 36 h after processing. Performance data were analyzed as a randomized complete block design, and zoonotic pathogen data were analyzed using chi2 analysis. Sprinkling tended (P = 0.054) to increase the incidence of fecal Salmonella spp. populations on d 98, but simultaneously tended to decrease (P = 0.058) the Escherichia coli O157:H7 incidence on hides on d 98. The most prevalent Salmonella serovars in this study were Kentucky, Muenster, Meleagridis, and Cerro. Performance measures and carcass traits did not differ between treatments (P > 0.10). Under our conditions, sprinkling cattle with water did not affect the incidence of zoonotic pathogens in feces or on hides.

  14. Factors affecting the selling price of feeder cattle sold at Arkansas livestock auctions in 2005.

    PubMed

    Barham, B L; Troxel, T R

    2007-12-01

    Data were collected from 15 Arkansas livestock auctions to determine factors affecting selling price. Data included how calves were sold (single or groups), sex, breed or breed type, color, muscle thickness, horn status, frame score, fill, body condition, age, health, BW, and price. Data were randomly collected on 52,401 lots consisting of 105,542 calves. Selling prices for steers ($124.20 +/- 0.07), bulls ($117.93 +/- 0.12), and heifers ($112.81 +/- 0.07) were different from each other (P <0.001). Hereford x Charolais feeder calves sold for the highest price ($122.66 +/- 0.14) and Longhorns sold for the lowest price ($74.52 +/- 0.46). Yellow feeder cattle received the highest selling price ($96.47 +/- 0.12), and spotted or striped feeder cattle received the lowest price ($83.84 +/- 0.23). The selling price of singles was lower than the price for calves sold in groups of 6 or more ($117.26 +/- 0.06 vs. $122.61 +/- 0.21; P <0.001). For cattle classified as having muscle scores of 1, 2, 3, and 4, selling prices were $120.45 +/- 0.05, $111.31 +/- 0.09, $96.28 +/- 0.44, and $82.21 +/- 1.87, respectively. Polled feeder cattle sold for $118.57 +/- 0.05, and horned feeder cattle sold for $114.87 +/- 0.14 (P <0.001). Interactions (P <0.001) were detected between frame score and BW groups, and muscle score and BW groups on the selling price of cattle. A number of management and genetic factors affected the selling price of feeder cattle.

  15. Management- and housing-related risk factors of respiratory disorders in non-weaned French Charolais calves.

    PubMed

    Assié, Sébastien; Bareille, Nathalie; Beaudeau, François; Seegers, Henri

    2009-10-01

    Our aim was to determine at calf-batch level the management- and housing-related risk factors of respiratory disorders in non-weaned Charolais calves. Farmers recorded cases according to the definition provided i.e. the association of at least one respiratory sign and, in the same calf or another calf of the same batch, at least one general sign on the same day or the day before. During farm visits, quality of farmers' records was checked and questionnaires were applied to gather farm and herd characteristics and to describe farming practices and housing facilities. Data were suitable for analysis for 172 batches where no metaphylactic treatment was implemented. Batches had great disparity in incidence of respiratory disorders. In the 120 batches with at least one case, the quartiles of incidence rate were, respectively, 0.95, 2.15 and 3.59 cases per 1000 calf-days at-risk. For risk-factor analysis, the statistical unit was the calf-batch located in a given batch. We used a ZINB model because (i) there was significant overdispersion of incidence rates of respiratory disorders (overdispersion test statistic of O=1049 (P<0.001)), (ii) probability was high that a two-group modelling process existed (Vuong statistic of V=2.44 (P=0.0073)) and (iii) the ZINB model fit significantly better than the ZIP model (likelihood-ratio statistic of 340.14 (P<0.001)). The risk was higher in open-fronted barns or in open barns compared to closed ones (incidence-rate ratios (IRRs): 1.9 and 1.8), in barns where no annual disinfection was implemented (IRR: 1.5) and in part slope with straw/part scraped and in part straw-bedded/part scraped barns compared to completely straw-bedded barns (IRRs: 1.9 and 1.6). Larger calf-batches were more at-risk than smaller batches (OR for the effect of an increase of 10 calves on the probability of a 0 count: 0.5).

  16. Composition and quality differences between the longissimus and infraspinatus muscles for several groups of pasture-finished cattle.

    PubMed

    Purchas, R W; Zou, M

    2008-10-01

    Samples of longissimus (LT) and infraspinatus (IS) muscles from five contrasting groups of pasture-finished cattle (n=7/group) were assessed for quality and composition characteristics in order to determine whether features of pasture-finished beef reported previously apply across different muscles and different classes of cattle. The cattle were not raised together or slaughtered at the same time. Wagyu-cross steers had the highest intramuscular fat levels, particularly in the LT, followed by Angus steers, Charolais-cross steers and Belgian Blue-cross steers, with the lowest levels for Friesian bulls. Relative to the LT, the IS muscle had longer sarcomeres, higher cooking losses, higher concentrations of vitamin E, and lower myofibrillar fragmentation indexes, while its ultimate pH was slightly higher but less variable. Beef from Wagyu-cross steers had the highest chroma values and the lowest shear values, while Friesian bull beef was darkest and least tender. Intramuscular fatty acid composition and concentrations of bioactive compounds such as coenzyme Q(10) and carnosine, were similar to those reported previously for cattle finished on New Zealand pastures although taurine levels were lower. Generally concentrations of bioactive compounds differed more between muscles and groups than between cattle finished on pasture or grain as reported previously.

  17. Assessment of beef production from Brahman x Thai native and Charolais x Thai native crossbred bulls slaughtered at different weights. I: growth performance and carcass quality.

    PubMed

    Waritthitham, A; Lambertz, C; Langholz, H-J; Wicke, M; Gauly, M

    2010-05-01

    Effects of genotype and slaughter weight on growth performance and carcass quality of Brahman x Thai native (BRA) and Charolais x Thai native (CHA) crossbred bulls were studied. Thirty-four BRA and 34 CHA bulls raised under practical fattening beef farm conditions were randomly selected and slaughtered at 500, 550 and 600 kg live weight, respectively. Parameters of growth performance, carcass quality and commercial prime cuts were determined. Results showed that growth performance and carcass quality of CHA was better, since they showed higher weight gain, better body muscle score, higher carcass weight high dressing percentage, higher carcass muscle, less carcass fat and bone plus connective tissue proportions, better carcass classifications, greater loin eye area and higher commercial prime cut percentage. Slaughter weights up to 600 kg resulted in increased carcass weight, loin eye area and percentage of commercial prime cuts and can therefore be recommended. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Methane emissions from beef cattle grazing on semi-natural upland and improved lowland grasslands.

    PubMed

    Richmond, A S; Wylie, A R G; Laidlaw, A S; Lively, F O

    2015-01-01

    In ruminants, methane (CH4) is a by-product of digestion and contributes significantly to the greenhouse gas emissions attributed to agriculture. Grazed grass is a relatively cheap and nutritious feed but herbage species and nutritional quality vary between pastures, with management, land type and season all potentially impacting on animal performance and CH4 production. The objective of this study was to evaluate performance and compare CH4 emissions from cattle of dairy and beef origin grazing two grassland ecosystems: lowland improved grassland (LG) and upland semi-natural grassland (UG). Forty-eight spring-born beef cattle (24 Holstein-Friesian steers, 14 Charolais crossbred steers and 10 Charolais crossbred heifers of 407 (s.d. 29), 469 (s.d. 36) and 422 (s.d. 50) kg BW, respectively), were distributed across two balanced groups that grazed the UG and LG sites from 1 June to 29 September at stocking rates (number of animals per hectare) of 1.4 and 6.7, respectively. Methane emissions and feed dry matter (DM) intake were estimated by the SF6 tracer and n-alkane techniques, respectively, and BW was recorded across three experimental periods that reflected the progression of the grazing season. Overall, cattle grazed on UG had significantly lower (P<0.001) mean daily DM intake (8.68 v. 9.55 kg/day), CH4 emissions (176 v. 202 g/day) and BW gain (BWG; 0.73 v. 1.08 kg/day) than the cattle grazed on LG but there was no difference (P>0.05) in CH4 emissions per unit of feed intake when expressed either on a DM basis (20.7 and 21.6 g CH4 per kg DM intake for UG and LG, respectively) or as a percentage of the gross energy intake (6.0% v. 6.5% for UG and LG, respectively). However, cattle grazing UG had significantly (P<0.001) greater mean daily CH4 emissions than those grazing LG when expressed relative to BWG (261 v. 197 g CH4/kg, respectively). The greater DM intake and BWG of cattle grazing LG than UG reflected the poorer nutritive value of the UG grassland. Although

  19. Fixed-time artificial insemination in beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The study was designed to test the effect of fixed-time artificial insemination (fixed-AI) after the slightly modified Ovsynch protocol on the pregnancy rate in beef cattle in Finnish field conditions. The modification was aimed to optimize the number of offsprings per AI dose. Methods Ninety Charolais cows and heifers were entered into the program an average of 1.8 times. Thus, 164 animal cases were included. Animals were administered 10-12 μg of buserelin. Seven days later animals without a corpus luteum (CL) were rejected (20.7%) while the remaining 130 cases with a CL were administered prostaglandin F2α, followed 48 h later with a second injection of buserelin (8-10 μg). Fixed-AI was performed 16-20 hours after the last injection. Results The pregnancy rate was 51.5% (67/130). The pregnancy rate after a short interval (50-70 d) from calving to entering the program was significantly higher than that after a long interval (>70 d). Conclusion This protocol seems to give acceptable pregnancy results in beef herds and its effect on saving labour is notable. PMID:19948052

  20. Fixed-time artificial insemination in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Taponen, Juhani

    2009-11-30

    The study was designed to test the effect of fixed-time artificial insemination (fixed-AI) after the slightly modified Ovsynch protocol on the pregnancy rate in beef cattle in Finnish field conditions. The modification was aimed to optimize the number of offsprings per AI dose. Ninety Charolais cows and heifers were entered into the program an average of 1.8 times. Thus, 164 animal cases were included. Animals were administered 10-12 microg of buserelin. Seven days later animals without a corpus luteum (CL) were rejected (20.7%) while the remaining 130 cases with a CL were administered prostaglandin F2alpha, followed 48 h later with a second injection of buserelin (8-10 microg). Fixed-AI was performed 16-20 hours after the last injection. The pregnancy rate was 51.5% (67/130). The pregnancy rate after a short interval (50-70 d) from calving to entering the program was significantly higher than that after a long interval (>70 d). This protocol seems to give acceptable pregnancy results in beef herds and its effect on saving labour is notable.

  1. Cloning cattle.

    PubMed

    Oback, B; Wells, D N

    2003-01-01

    Over the past six years, hundreds of apparently normal calves have been cloned worldwide from bovine somatic donor cells. However, these surviving animals represent less than 5% of all cloned embryos transferred into recipient cows. Most of the remaining 95% die at various stages of development from a predictable pattern of placental and fetal abnormalities, collectively referred to as the "cloning-syndrome." The low efficiency seriously limits commercial applicability and ethical acceptance of somatic cloning and enforces the development of improved cloning methods. In this paper, we describe our current standard operating procedure (SOP) for cattle cloning using zona-free nuclear transfer. Following this SOP, the output of viable and healthy calves at weaning is about 9% of embryos transferred. Better standardization of cloning protocols across and within research groups is needed to separate technical from biological factors underlying low cloning efficiency.

  2. Inference of population structure of purebred dairy and beef cattle using high-density genotype data.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, M M; Berry, D P; Kearney, J F; McParland, S; Buckley, F; Purfield, D C

    2017-01-01

    Information on the genetic diversity and population structure of cattle breeds is useful when deciding the most optimal, for example, crossbreeding strategies to improve phenotypic performance by exploiting heterosis. The present study investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of the most prominent dairy and beef breeds used in Ireland. Illumina high-density genotypes (777 962 single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) were available on 4623 purebred bulls from nine breeds; Angus (n=430), Belgian Blue (n=298), Charolais (n=893), Hereford (n=327), Holstein-Friesian (n=1261), Jersey (n=75), Limousin (n=943), Montbéliarde (n=33) and Simmental (n=363). Principal component analysis revealed that Angus, Hereford, and Jersey formed non-overlapping clusters, representing distinct populations. In contrast, overlapping clusters suggested geographical proximity of origin and genetic similarity between Limousin, Simmental and Montbéliarde and to a lesser extent between Holstein, Friesian and Belgian Blue. The observed SNP heterozygosity averaged across all loci was 0.379. The Belgian Blue had the greatest mean observed heterozygosity (HO=0.389) among individuals within breed while the Holstein-Friesian and Jersey populations had the lowest mean heterozygosity (HO=0.370 and 0.376, respectively). The correlation between the genomic-based and pedigree-based inbreeding coefficients was weak (r=0.171; P<0.001). Mean genomic inbreeding estimates were greatest for Jersey (0.173) and least for Hereford (0.051). The pair-wise breed fixation index (F st) ranged from 0.049 (Limousin and Charolais) to 0.165 (Hereford and Jersey). In conclusion, substantial genetic variation exists among breeds commercially used in Ireland. Thus custom-mating strategies would be successful in maximising the exploitation of heterosis in crossbreeding strategies.

  3. Upgrading plant amino acids through cattle to improve the nutritional value for humans: effects of different production systems.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; Sonesson, U; Hessle, A

    2017-03-01

    Efficiency in animal protein production can be defined in different ways, for example the amount of human-digestible essential amino acids (HDEAA) in the feed ration relative to the amount of HDEAA in the animal products. Cattle production systems are characterised by great diversity and a wide variety of feeds and feed ration compositions, due to ruminants' ability to digest fibrous materials inedible to humans such as roughage and by-products from the food and biofuel industries. This study examined the upgrading of protein quality through cattle by determining the quantity of HDEAA in feeds and animal products and comparing different milk and beef production systems. Four different systems for milk and beef production were designed, a reference production system for milk and beef representing typical Swedish production systems today and three alternative improved systems: (i) intensive cattle production based on maize silage, (ii) intensive systems based on food industry by-products for dairy cows and high-quality forage for beef cattle, and (iii) extensive systems based on forage with only small amounts of concentrate. In all four production systems, the quantity of HDEAA in the products (milk and meat) generally exceeded the quantity of HDEAA in the feeds. The intensive production models for beef calves generally resulted in output of the same magnitude as input for most HDEAA. However, in beef production based on calves from dairy cows, the intensive rearing systems resulted in lower output than input of HDEAA. For the extensive models, the amounts of HDEAA in meat were of the same magnitude as the amounts in the feeds. The extensive models with beef calves from suckler cows resulted in higher output in meat than input in feeds for all HDEAA. It was concluded that feeding cattle plants for production of milk and meat, instead of using the plants directly as human food, generally results in an upgrading of both the quantity and quality of protein, especially

  4. Detection of selection signatures in dairy and beef cattle using high-density genomic information.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fuping; McParland, Sinead; Kearney, Francis; Du, Lixin; Berry, Donagh P

    2015-06-19

    Artificial selection for economically important traits in cattle is expected to have left distinctive selection signatures on the genome. Access to high-density genotypes facilitates the accurate identification of genomic regions that have undergone positive selection. These findings help to better elucidate the mechanisms of selection and to identify candidate genes of interest to breeding programs. Information on 705 243 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3122 dairy and beef male animals from seven cattle breeds (Angus, Belgian Blue, Charolais, Hereford, Holstein-Friesian, Limousin and Simmental) were used to detect selection signatures by applying two complementary methods, integrated haplotype score (iHS) and global fixation index (FST). To control for false positive results, we used false discovery rate (FDR) adjustment to calculate adjusted iHS within each breed and the genome-wide significance level was about 0.003. Using the iHS method, 83, 92, 91, 101, 85, 101 and 86 significant genomic regions were detected for Angus, Belgian Blue, Charolais, Hereford, Holstein-Friesian, Limousin and Simmental cattle, respectively. None of these regions was common to all seven breeds. Using the FST approach, 704 individual SNPs were detected across breeds. Annotation of the regions of the genome that showed selection signatures revealed several interesting candidate genes i.e. DGAT1, ABCG2, MSTN, CAPN3, FABP3, CHCHD7, PLAG1, JAZF1, PRKG2, ACTC1, TBC1D1, GHR, BMP2, TSG1, LYN, KIT and MC1R that play a role in milk production, reproduction, body size, muscle formation or coat color. Fifty-seven common candidate genes were found by both the iHS and global FST methods across the seven breeds. Moreover, many novel genomic regions and genes were detected within the regions that showed selection signatures; for some candidate genes, signatures of positive selection exist in the human genome. Multilevel bioinformatic analyses of the detected candidate genes

  5. Hormonal growth-promotant effects on grain-fed cattle maintained under different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaughan, J. B.; Kreikemeier, W. M.; Mader, T. L.

    2005-07-01

    Six steers (3/4 Charolais×1/4 Brahman) (mean body weight 314±27 kg) and six spayed heifers (3/5 Shorthorn×2/5 Red Angus) (mean body weight 478±30 kg) were used to determine the effects of climatic conditions and hormone growth promotants (HGP) on respiration rate (RR; breaths/min), pulse rate (beats/min), rectal temperature (RT; °C), and heat production (HP; kJ). Cattle were exposed to the following climatic conditions prior to implantation with a HGP and then again 12 days after implantation: 2 days of thermoneutral conditions (TNL) [21.9±0.9°C ambient temperature (TA) and 61.7±22.1% relative humidity (RH)] then 2 days of hot conditions [HOT; 29.2±4°C (TA) and 78.3±13.2% (RH)], then TNL for 3 days and then 2 days of cold conditions [COLD; 17.6±0.9°C (TA) and 63.4±1.8% (RH); cattle were wet during this treatment]. The HGP implants used were: estrogenic implant (E), trenbolone acetate implant (TBA), or both (ET). Both prior to and following administration of HGP, RRs were lower (P<0.05) on cold days and greater (P<0.05) on hot days compared to TNL. On hot days, RTs, were 0.62°C higher after compared to before implanting. Across all conditions, RTs were >0.5°C greater (P<0.05) for E cattle than for TBA or ET cattle. On cold days, RTs of steers were >0.8°C higher than for the heifers, while under TNL and HOT, RTs of steers were 0.2 0.35°C higher than those of heifers. Prior to implantation, HP per hour and per unit of metabolic body weight was higher (P<0.05) for cattle exposed to hot conditions, when compared to HP on cold days. After implantation, HP was greater (P<0.05) on hot days than on cold days. Under TNL, ET cattle had the lowest HP and greatest feed intake. On hot days, E cattle had the lowest HP, and the highest RT; therefore, if the potential exists for cattle death from heat episodes, the use of either TBA or ET may be preferred. Under cold conditions HP was similar among implant groups.

  6. Genetic diversity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) genes in cattle breeds

    PubMed Central

    Lourenco-Jaramillo, Diana Lelidett; Sifuentes-Rincón, Ana María; Parra-Bracamonte, Gaspar Manuel; de la Rosa-Reyna, Xochitl Fabiola; Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Arellano-Vera, Williams

    2012-01-01

    DNA from four cattle breeds was used to re-sequence all of the exons and 56% of the introns of the bovine tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene and 97% and 13% of the bovine dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) coding and non-coding sequences, respectively. Two novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a microsatellite motif were found in the TH sequences. The DBH sequences contained 62 nucleotide changes, including eight non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) that are of particular interest because they may alter protein function and therefore affect the phenotype. These DBH nsSNPs resulted in amino acid substitutions that were predicted to destabilize the protein structure. Six SNPs (one from TH and five from DBH non-synonymous SNPs) were genotyped in 140 animals; all of them were polymorphic and had a minor allele frequency of > 9%. There were significant differences in the intra- and inter-population haplotype distributions. The haplotype differences between Brahman cattle and the three B. t. taurus breeds (Charolais, Holstein and Lidia) were interesting from a behavioural point of view because of the differences in temperament between these breeds. PMID:22888292

  7. SNP-based association mapping of the polled gene in divergent cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Seichter, D; Russ, I; Rothammer, S; Eder, J; Förster, M; Medugorac, I

    2012-10-01

    Naturally, hornless cattle are called polled. Although the POLL locus could be assigned to a c. 1.36-Mb interval in the centromeric region of BTA1, the underlying genetic basis for the polled trait is still unknown. Here, an association mapping design was set up to refine the candidate region of the polled trait for subsequent high-throughput sequencing. The case group comprised 101 homozygous polled animals from nine divergent cattle breeds, the majority represented by Galloway, Angus, Fleckvieh and Holstein Friesian. Additionally, this group included some polled individuals of Blonde d'Aquitaine, Charolais, Hereford, Jersey and Limousin breeds. The control group comprised horned Belgian Blue, Fleckvieh, Holstein Friesian and Illyrian Buša cattle. A genome-wide scan using 49,163 SNPs was performed, which revealed one shared homozygous haplotype block consisting of nine neighbouring SNPs in all polled animals. This segment defines a 381-kb interval on BTA1 that we consider to be the most likely location of the POLL mutation. Our results further demonstrate that the polled-associated haplotype is also frequent in horned animals included in this study, and thus the haplotype as such cannot be used for population-wide genetic testing. The actual trait-associated haplotype may be revealed by using higher-density SNP arrays. For the final identification of the causal mutation, we suggest high-throughput sequencing of the entire candidate region, because the identification of functional candidate genes is difficult owing to the lack of a comparable model.

  8. Estimation of the intramuscular fat content of m. longissimus thoracis in crossbred beef cattle based on live animal measurements.

    PubMed

    Nogalski, Zenon; Pogorzelska-Przybyłek, Paulina; Białobrzewski, Ireneusz; Modzelewska-Kapituła, Monika; Sobczuk-Szul, Monika; Purwin, Cezary

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the usefulness of live animal measurements in estimating the intramuscular fat (IMF) content of m. longissimus thoracis (MLT) in beef cattle. Live animal measurements were performed in young crossbred bulls (96) and steers (59), the offspring of Holstein-Friesian (HF) cows and beef bulls (Limousin, Hereford and Charolais), at the end of the fattening period. The content of intramuscular fat was determined in samples from MLT by chemical analyses. A prediction model was developed by stepwise regression. In the validation model, the values of R(2)=0.74, RMSE=0.37% were determined. The results indicate that selected biometric (chest width, chest girth) ultrasound measurements (thickness of subcutaneous rump and back fat) and selected blood parameters (triglycerides) can be used to predict IMF content with satisfactory precision and accuracy. The analyzed parameters could constitute a valuable tool in the process of selecting beef quality traits and determining the slaughter value of young beef cattle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms at the thyroglobulin gene with carcass traits in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Casas, E; White, S N; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Koohmaraie, M; Bennett, G L; Smith, T P L

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the association of SNP in the thyroglobulin gene, including a previously reported marker in current industry use, with marbling score in beef cattle. Three populations, designated GPE6, GPE7, and GPE8, were studied. The GPE6 population sampled breeds that could be used as alternative germplasm sources in beef cattle production, including Wagyu, Swedish Red and White, Friesian, and Norwegian Red. The GPE7 population sampled 7 popular beef cattle breeds used in temperate climates of the United States: Angus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Hereford, Limousin, Red Angus, and Simmental. The GPE8 population sampled Bos indicus-influenced breeds used in subtropical regions of the country and subtropical and tropical regions of the world, including Beefmaster, Bonsmara, Brangus, and Romosinuano. Evaluation of 6 SNP in the thyroglobulin gene, including 5 newly described variations, showed no association (P > 0.10) with marbling score in these populations, except a tendency (P < 0.10) for an association with the previously described marker in GPE6. Closer examination of the GPE6 data revealed that the source of the tendency was an association (P < 0.02) with marbling in animals of Wagyu inheritance. Animals having Wagyu background and inheriting the TT genotype had a greater marbling score (599 +/- 20) than those inheriting the CC (540 +/- 10) or the CT (541 +/- 11) genotype. No association was detected with any other carcass trait for this marker in the 3 populations. Furthermore, none of the 5 newly described markers in the gene displayed an association with marbling score. The data indicate that markers at the thyroglobulin gene may be a useful predictor of marbling performance for producers raising Wagyu-based cattle. Although associations with marbling score in the remaining populations were not large or significant, the TT genotype had the numerically greatest marbling score in each population.

  10. Genetic parameters for carcass weight, conformation and fat in five beef cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Kause, A; Mikkola, L; Strandén, I; Sirkko, K

    2015-01-01

    Profitability of beef production can be increased by genetically improving carcass traits. To construct breeding value evaluations for carcass traits, breed-specific genetic parameters were estimated for carcass weight, carcass conformation and carcass fat in five beef cattle breeds in Finland (Hereford, Aberdeen Angus, Simmental, Charolais and Limousin). Conformation and fat were visually scored using the EUROP carcass classification. Each breed was separately analyzed using a multitrait animal model. A total of 6879-19 539 animals per breed had phenotypes. For the five breeds, heritabilities were moderate for carcass weight (h 2=0.39 to 0.48, s.e.=0.02 to 0.04) and slightly lower for conformation (h 2=0.30 to 0.44, s.e.=0.02 to 0.04) and carcass fat (h 2=0.29 to 0.44, s.e.=0.02 to 0.04). The genetic correlation between carcass weight and conformation was favorable in all breeds (r G=0.37 to 0.53, s.e.=0.04 to 0.05), heavy carcasses being genetically more conformed. The phenotypic correlation between carcass weight and carcass fat was moderately positive in all breeds (r P=0.21 to 0.32), implying that increasing carcass weight was related to increasing fat levels. The respective genetic correlation was the strongest in Hereford (r G=0.28, s.e.=0.05) and Angus (r G=0.15, s.e.=0.05), the two small body-sized British breeds with the lowest conformation and the highest fat level. The correlation was weaker in the other breeds (r G=0.08 to 0.14). For Hereford, Angus and Simmental, more conformed carcasses were phenotypically fatter (r P=0.11 to 0.15), but the respective genetic correlations were close to zero (r G=-0.05 to 0.04). In contrast, in the two large body-sized and muscular French breeds, the genetic correlation between conformation and fat was negative and the phenotypic correlation was close to zero or negative (Charolais: r G=-0.18, s.e.=0.06, r P=0.02; Limousin: r G=-0.56, s.e.=0.04, r P=-0.13). The results indicate genetic variation for the genetic

  11. Genome-Wide Association for Growth Traits in Canchim Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Buzanskas, Marcos E.; Grossi, Daniela A.; Ventura, Ricardo V.; Schenkel, Flávio S.; Sargolzaei, Mehdi; Meirelles, Sarah L. C.; Mokry, Fabiana B.; Higa, Roberto H.; Mudadu, Maurício A.; da Silva, Marcos V. G. Barbosa.; Niciura, Simone C. M.; Júnior, Roberto A. A. Torres.; Alencar, Maurício M.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Munari, Danísio P.

    2014-01-01

    Studies are being conducted on the applicability of genomic data to improve the accuracy of the selection process in livestock, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide valuable information to enhance the understanding on the genetics of complex traits. The aim of this study was to identify genomic regions and genes that play roles in birth weight (BW), weaning weight adjusted for 210 days of age (WW), and long-yearling weight adjusted for 420 days of age (LYW) in Canchim cattle. GWAS were performed by means of the Generalized Quasi-Likelihood Score (GQLS) method using genotypes from the BovineHD BeadChip and estimated breeding values for BW, WW, and LYW. Data consisted of 285 animals from the Canchim breed and 114 from the MA genetic group (derived from crossings between Charolais sires and ½ Canchim + ½ Zebu dams). After applying a false discovery rate correction at a 10% significance level, a total of 4, 12, and 10 SNPs were significantly associated with BW, WW, and LYW, respectively. These SNPs were surveyed to their corresponding genes or to surrounding genes within a distance of 250 kb. The genes DPP6 (dipeptidyl-peptidase 6) and CLEC3B (C-type lectin domain family 3 member B) were highlighted, considering its functions on the development of the brain and skeletal system, respectively. The GQLS method identified regions on chromosome associated with birth weight, weaning weight, and long-yearling weight in Canchim and MA animals. New candidate regions for body weight traits were detected and some of them have interesting biological functions, of which most have not been previously reported. The observation of QTL reports for body weight traits, covering areas surrounding the genes (SNPs) herein identified provides more evidence for these associations. Future studies targeting these areas could provide further knowledge to uncover the genetic architecture underlying growth traits in Canchim cattle. PMID:24733441

  12. Genetic correlations between visual slaughter conformation scores and growth and reproductive traits in Canchim cattle.

    PubMed

    Borba, L H F; Baldi, F; Feitosa, F L B; da Silva, L O C; Pereira, A S C; Alencar, M M

    2016-05-20

    We obtained heritability and (co)variance component estimates for slaughter conformation scores at 420 days of age (SCS420), age at calving (first, AFC; second, ASC), calving occurrence until 38 months of age (CP38), weight at 420 days of age (W420), and scrotal circumference at 420 days (SC420) in Canchim (5/8 Charolais + 3/8 Zebu) cattle. A total of 23,168 records of Canchim animals, including 12,493 females and 10,675 males, were analyzed. SCS420 indicated carcass structure, muscle development, and subcutaneous fat deposition. The slaughter conformation score of each animal was relative to the whole contemporary group; 1 corresponded to the lowest expression of the trait and 6 to the highest. Heritabilities, and genetic and residual correlation estimates between SCS420 and reproductive and weight traits, were estimated by multitrait analyses using an animal model with Bayesian inference, employing a linear model for AFC, ASC, SC420, and W420 and a threshold model for CP38 and SCS420. Heritability estimates for SCS420, AFC, ASC, CP38, W420, and SC420 were 0.11, 0.15, 0.15, 0.15, 0.30, and 0.30, respectively. Genetic correlation estimates between SCS420 and the other traits were 0.08 (AFC), 0.58 (ASC), 0.08 (CP38), 0.43 (W420), and 0.17 (SC420). Visual slaughter conformation scores respond to individual selection and can be used as selection criteria in Canchim cattle. Selection to improve sexual precocity would not be effective in improving carcass conformation and composition, and selection for animals with high breeding values for yearling weight may improve slaughter conformation at the yearling stage.

  13. Study on the introgression of beef breeds in Canchim cattle using single nucleotide polymorphism markers

    PubMed Central

    Buzanskas, Marcos Eli; Ventura, Ricardo Vieira; Seleguim Chud, Tatiane Cristina; Bernardes, Priscila Arrigucci; Santos, Daniel Jordan de Abreu; Regitano, Luciana Correia de Almeida; de Alencar, Maurício Mello; Mudadu, Maurício de Alvarenga; Zanella, Ricardo; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius Gualberto Barbosa; Li, Changxi; Schenkel, Flavio Schramm; Munari, Danísio Prado

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of introgression of breeds in the Canchim (CA: 62.5% Charolais—37.5% Zebu) and MA genetic group (MA: 65.6% Charolais—34.4% Zebu) cattle using genomic information on Charolais (CH), Nelore (NE), and Indubrasil (IB) breeds. The number of animals used was 395 (CA and MA), 763 (NE), 338 (CH), and 37 (IB). The Bovine50SNP BeadChip from Illumina panel was used to estimate the levels of introgression of breeds considering the Maximum likelihood, Bayesian, and Single Regression method. After genotype quality control, 32,308 SNPs were considered in the analysis. Furthermore, three thresholds to prune out SNPs in linkage disequilibrium higher than 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01 were considered, resulting in 15,286, 7,652, and 1,582 SNPs, respectively. For k = 2, the proportion of taurine and indicine varied from the expected proportion based on pedigree for all methods studied. For k = 3, the Regression method was able to differentiate the animals in three main clusters assigned to each purebred breed, showing more reasonable according to its biological viewpoint. Analyzing the data considering k = 2 seems to be more appropriate for Canchim-MA animals due to its biological interpretation. The usage of 32,308 SNPs in the analyses resulted in similar findings between the estimated and expected breed proportions. Using the Regression approach, a contribution of Indubrasil was observed in Canchim-MA when k = 3 was considered. Genetic parameter estimation could account for this breed composition information as a source of variation in order to improve the accuracy of genetic models. Our findings may help assemble appropriate reference populations for genomic prediction for Canchim-MA in order to improve prediction accuracy. Using the information on the level of introgression in each individual could also be useful in breeding or crossing design to improve individual heterosis in crossbred cattle. PMID:28182737

  14. Genome-wide association for growth traits in Canchim beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Buzanskas, Marcos E; Grossi, Daniela A; Ventura, Ricardo V; Schenkel, Flávio S; Sargolzaei, Mehdi; Meirelles, Sarah L C; Mokry, Fabiana B; Higa, Roberto H; Mudadu, Maurício A; da Silva, Marcos V G Barbosa; Niciura, Simone C M; Torres, Roberto A A; Alencar, Maurício M; Regitano, Luciana C A; Munari, Danísio P

    2014-01-01

    Studies are being conducted on the applicability of genomic data to improve the accuracy of the selection process in livestock, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide valuable information to enhance the understanding on the genetics of complex traits. The aim of this study was to identify genomic regions and genes that play roles in birth weight (BW), weaning weight adjusted for 210 days of age (WW), and long-yearling weight adjusted for 420 days of age (LYW) in Canchim cattle. GWAS were performed by means of the Generalized Quasi-Likelihood Score (GQLS) method using genotypes from the BovineHD BeadChip and estimated breeding values for BW, WW, and LYW. Data consisted of 285 animals from the Canchim breed and 114 from the MA genetic group (derived from crossings between Charolais sires and ½ Canchim + ½ Zebu dams). After applying a false discovery rate correction at a 10% significance level, a total of 4, 12, and 10 SNPs were significantly associated with BW, WW, and LYW, respectively. These SNPs were surveyed to their corresponding genes or to surrounding genes within a distance of 250 kb. The genes DPP6 (dipeptidyl-peptidase 6) and CLEC3B (C-type lectin domain family 3 member B) were highlighted, considering its functions on the development of the brain and skeletal system, respectively. The GQLS method identified regions on chromosome associated with birth weight, weaning weight, and long-yearling weight in Canchim and MA animals. New candidate regions for body weight traits were detected and some of them have interesting biological functions, of which most have not been previously reported. The observation of QTL reports for body weight traits, covering areas surrounding the genes (SNPs) herein identified provides more evidence for these associations. Future studies targeting these areas could provide further knowledge to uncover the genetic architecture underlying growth traits in Canchim cattle.

  15. Ostertagiosis causes illthrift and death in older cattle.

    PubMed

    2013-10-05

    Ostertagiosis diagnosed in a six-year-old suckler cow. Congenital ear deformities seen in several Ayrshire-cross calves. Border disease virus infection associated with numerous neonatal lamb deaths. Coccidiosis, PCV-2 and hepatosis dietetica implicated in piglet deaths. Spinal aspergillosis suspected in pheasant poults with lameness and paralysis. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for July from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS).

  16. A rapid and robust sequence-based genotyping method for BoLA-DRB3 alleles in large numbers of heterozygous cattle.

    PubMed

    Baxter, R; Hastings, N; Law, A; Glass, E J

    2008-10-01

    The BoLA-DRB3 gene is a highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex class II gene of cattle with over one hundred alleles reported. Most of the polymorphisms are located in exon 2, which encodes the peptide-binding cleft, and these sequence differences play a role in variability of immune responsiveness and disease resistance. However, the high degree of polymorphism in exon 2 leads to difficulty in accurately genotyping cattle, especially heterozygous animals. In this study, we have improved and simplified an earlier sequence-based typing method to easily and reliably genotype cattle for BoLA-DRB3. In contrast to the earlier method, which used a nested primer set to amplify exon 2 followed by sequencing with internal primers, the new method uses only internal primers for both amplification and sequencing, which results in high-quality sequence across the entire exon. The haplofinder software, which assigns alleles from the heterozygous sequence, now has a pre-processing step that uses a consensus of all known alleles and checks for errors in base calling, thus improving the ability to process large numbers of samples. In addition, advances in sequencing technology have reduced the requirement for manual editing and improved the clarity of heterozygous base calls, resulting in longer and clearer sequence reads. Taken together, this has resulted in a rapid and robust method for genotyping large numbers of heterozygous samples for BoLA-DRB3 polymorphisms. Over 400 Holstein-Charolais cattle have now been genotyped for BoLA-DRB3 using this approach.

  17. [Botulism in cattle].

    PubMed

    Braun, U

    2006-07-01

    Botulism is an intoxication caused by ingestion of feed or water contaminated with the toxin of Clostridium botulinum. In cattle, intoxication usually results from the ingestion of feed containing preformed type C or D toxin, either in feed which has been contaminated with toxin-containing carcasses or in feed in which there has been primary multiplication of C. botulinum and toxin production. The initial signs of botulism are progressive difficulty in chewing and swallowing, caused by paralysis of the tongue and muscles of mastication. This results in slow prehension and chewing of feed, water and feed falling out of the mouth, excessive salivation and weakness of the tongue. After 1 to 3 days, generalised paralysis occurs followed by death due to respiratory paralysis. Intravenous fluid therapy is the recommended treatment. The administration of antiserum is of limited value in advanced stages and is used mainly as a prophylactic measure in cattle herds in which an outbreak has just started. Active immunization of cattle in high-risk herds is also an option. It is critical that cattle not be fed feed contaminated with soil or carcasses.

  18. 9 CFR 78.14 - Rodeo cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rodeo cattle. 78.14 Section 78.14... Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.14 Rodeo cattle. (a) Rodeo cattle that are test... of interstate movement: Provided, however, That: The official test is not required for rodeo cattle...

  19. Methane emissions from cattle.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Johnson, D E

    1995-08-01

    Increasing atmospheric concentrations of methane have led scientists to examine its sources of origin. Ruminant livestock can produce 250 to 500 L of methane per day. This level of production results in estimates of the contribution by cattle to global warming that may occur in the next 50 to 100 yr to be a little less than 2%. Many factors influence methane emissions from cattle and include the following: level of feed intake, type of carbohydrate in the diet, feed processing, addition of lipids or ionophores to the diet, and alterations in the ruminal microflora. Manipulation of these factors can reduce methane emissions from cattle. Many techniques exist to quantify methane emissions from individual or groups of animals. Enclosure techniques are precise but require trained animals and may limit animal movement. Isotopic and nonisotopic tracer techniques may also be used effectively. Prediction equations based on fermentation balance or feed characteristics have been used to estimate methane production. These equations are useful, but the assumptions and conditions that must be met for each equation limit their ability to accurately predict methane production. Methane production from groups of animals can be measured by mass balance, micrometeorological, or tracer methods. These techniques can measure methane emissions from animals in either indoor or outdoor enclosures. Use of these techniques and knowledge of the factors that impact methane production can result in the development of mitigation strategies to reduce methane losses by cattle. Implementation of these strategies should result in enhanced animal productivity and decreased contributions by cattle to the atmospheric methane budget.

  20. Genetic trends and breed overlap derived from multiple-breed genetic evaluations of beef cattle for growth traits.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, P G; Wilton, J W; Miller, S P; Banks, L R

    1999-08-01

    Genetic evaluations for a multiple-breed population of beef cattle were used to estimate genetic trends for five breeds, and genetic differences and overlap among 14 breeds. Genetic evaluations studied were for direct contributions to birth weight, gain from birth to 200 and 365 d, and maternal contribution to gain from birth to 200 d. Almost all genetic trends were positive, but the magnitude of the trends varied among breeds. Trends were nonlinear between 1985 and 1995 for most breed and trait combinations. The rates of increase in genetic trends were generally higher for the lighter weight breeds, and lighter weight breeds had faster growth rate genetic trends at 1995 than the heavier breeds. Genetic trend estimates for yearling gain at 1995 were 2.46, 2.23, 1.73, 1.70, and 1.46 kg/yr for Angus, Hereford, Limousin, Charolais, and Simmental, respectively. Corresponding birth weight genetic trends were .130, .226, .049, .130, and .048 kg/yr. Mean genetic differences between breeds have been decreasing in magnitude due to these differences in genetic trends between heavier and lighter breeds. Genetic variation for the traits studied seemed to be greater within than between breeds for calves born and cows calving between 1993 and 1995. Genetic trends at 1995 suggest that ratios of within:between breed variation will increase and that across-breed genetic improvement initiatives for growth traits will become more important in the future.

  1. Implementation of a parentage control system in Portuguese beef-cattle with a panel of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Carolino, Inês; Sousa, Conceição O; Ferreira, Sónia; Carolino, Nuno; Silva, Fátima S; Gama, Luís T

    2009-04-01

    A study was conducted to assess the feasibility of applying a panel of 10 microsatellite markers in parentage control of beef cattle in Portugal. In the first stage, DNA samples were collected from 475 randomly selected animals of the Charolais, Limousin and Preta breeds. Across breeds and genetic markers, means for average number of alleles, effective number of alleles, expected heterozygosity and polymorphic information content, were 8.20, 4.43, 0.733 and 0.70, respectively. Enlightenment from the various markers differed among breeds, but the set of 10 markers resulted in a combined probability above 0.9995 in the ability to exclude a random putative parent. The marker-set thus developed was later used for parentage control in a group of 140 calves from several breeds, where there was the suspicion of possible faulty parentage recording. Overall, 76.4% of the calves in this group were compatible with the recorded parents, with most incompatibilities due to misidentification of the dam. Efforts must be made to improve the quality of pedigree information, with particular emphasis on information recorded at the calf's birth.

  2. Detection of genetic variants affecting cattle behaviour and their impact on milk production: a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Juliane; Brand, Bodo; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Graunke, Katharina L; Langbein, Jan; Knaust, Jacqueline; Kühn, Christa; Schwerin, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    Behaviour traits of cattle have been reported to affect important production traits, such as meat quality and milk performance as well as reproduction and health. Genetic predisposition is, together with environmental stimuli, undoubtedly involved in the development of behaviour phenotypes. Underlying molecular mechanisms affecting behaviour in general and behaviour and productions traits in particular still have to be studied in detail. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide association study in an F2 Charolais × German Holstein cross-breed population to identify genetic variants that affect behaviour-related traits assessed in an open-field and novel-object test and analysed their putative impact on milk performance. Of 37,201 tested single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs), four showed a genome-wide and 37 a chromosome-wide significant association with behaviour traits assessed in both tests. Nine of the SNPs that were associated with behaviour traits likewise showed a nominal significant association with milk performance traits. On chromosomes 14 and 29, six SNPs were identified to be associated with exploratory behaviour and inactivity during the novel-object test as well as with milk yield traits. Least squares means for behaviour and milk performance traits for these SNPs revealed that genotypes associated with higher inactivity and less exploratory behaviour promote higher milk yields. Whether these results are due to molecular mechanisms simultaneously affecting behaviour and milk performance or due to a behaviour predisposition, which causes indirect effects on milk performance by influencing individual reactivity, needs further investigation.

  3. Factors related to cattle infestation level and resistance to acaricides in Boophilus microplus tick populations in New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, M W; Barré, N; Messad, S

    2003-02-28

    Boophilus microplus, even in the absence of babesiosis, is a major disease of the cattle in New Caledonia where the particular farming system associates continental European breeds and a tropical climate tempered by the Pacific Ocean. In order to have a better understanding of the factors involved in cattle tick infestation, to decrease the possible wastage and use of chemicals and to increase the lifetime of the acaricides, the veterinary authorities investigated the conditions of the chemical treatments. A survey among 148 cattle farms of the whole of New Caledonia was carried out and factors that explain the development of tick resistance and cattle infestation have been determined. From this survey, three typologies for the main characteristics of the farms have been set up, the technical practices of the farmers and the tick control measures applied by the farmers, respectively. Some variables are significantly associated with the tick resistance to deltamethrin but their contribution to the explanation model is always moderate: farms in the south, with a positive resistance gradient from east to west, absence of bush fire and membership to a cattle farmers organization. The more the farmers have intensified their breeding-male castration, weaning, heifer separation, drenching, etc.-and pasture-high stock rate, mowing, extra feeding of the cows, many paddocks, etc.-techniques, the higher was the probability for the ticks in their farm to be resistant to deltamethrin. The technical details of the acaricide treatment had a low contribution to the explanation model. However, the use of a spray generated more resistance than a dip. Furthermore, there is a negative resistance gradient when the farmers increased the treatment interval average. Considering infestation, none of the variables from the three typologies were associated with the two infestation variables (1: semi-engorged tick females and 2: other ticks) at the herd level. However, the seven studied

  4. Mixed crop-livestock farming systems: a sustainable way to produce beef? Commercial farms results, questions and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Veysset, P; Lherm, M; Bébin, D; Roulenc, M

    2014-08-01

    Mixed crop-livestock (MC-L) farming has gained broad consensus as an economically and environmentally sustainable farming system. Working on a Charolais-area suckler cattle farms network, we subdivided the 66 farms of a constant sample, for 2 years (2010 and 2011), into four groups: (i) 'specialized conventional livestock farms' (100% grassland-based farms (GF), n=7); (ii) 'integrated conventional crop-livestock farms' (specialized farms that only market animal products but that grow cereal crops on-farm for animal feed, n=31); (iii) 'mixed conventional crop-livestock farms' (farms that sell beef and cereal crops to market, n=21); and (iv) organic farms (n=7). We analyse the differences in structure and in drivers of technical, economic and environmental performances. The figures for all the farms over 2 years (2010 and 2011) were pooled into a single sample for each group. The farms that sell crops alongside beef miss out on potential economies of scale. These farms are bigger than specialized beef farms (with or without on-farm feed crops) and all types of farms show comparable economic performances. The big MC-L farms make heavier and consequently less efficient use of inputs. This use of less efficient inputs also weakens their environmental performances. This subpopulation of suckler cattle farms appears unable to translate a MC-L strategy into economies of scope. Organic farms most efficiently exploit the diversity of herd feed resources, thus positioning organic agriculture as a prototype MC-L system meeting the core principles of agroecology.

  5. Vitamin C nutrition in cattle.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T

    2012-05-01

    Domestic animals, including ruminants, can synthesize vitamin C (VC) in their liver; as such, the dietary requirement for VC has not been confirmed in these animals. The adequacy of VC has been evaluated by quantifying VC levels in plasma, but the reported values in bovine plasma have been widely variable. Plasma VC concentration is decreased by heat stress, hepatic lesions, fattening, and infectious diseases such as mastitis in cattle. Therefore, VC supplementation is potentially beneficial for cattle with low plasma VC concentration. This review discusses the methods for determination of plasma VC concentration in cattle, VC nutrition, and the efficacy of VC supplementation in calves, dairy cattle, and beef cattle. Additionally I propose a reference range for plasma VC concentration in Japanese Black cattle.

  6. Citrus pulp for cattle.

    PubMed

    Arthington, John D; Kunkle, William E; Martin, Amy M

    2002-07-01

    Citrus pulp is classified as an energy concentrate by-product feed. Citrus by-products fed to beef cattle include citrus molasses, citrus meal, wet citrus pulp, dried citrus pulp, and pelleted citrus pulp; however, in current production systems, pulp (wet, dry, and pelleted) is the only by-product commonly used. Citrus pulp production in the United States is limited to specific subtropical regions, of which south central Florida remains the largest with additional production in California and Texas.

  7. Genotype × environment interaction for long-yearling weight in Canchim cattle quantified by reaction norm analysis.

    PubMed

    Mattar, M; Silva, L O C; Alencar, M M; Cardoso, F F

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of genotype × environment interactions (G×E) for long-yearling weight in Canchim cattle (5/8 Charolais + 3/8 zebu) in Brazil using reaction norms (RN). The hierarchical RN model included the fixed effect of age of the animal (linear coefficient) and random effects of contemporary groups and additive animal genetic intercept and slope of the RN and contemporary group effects as random effects. Contemporary groups as the most elemental representation of management conditions in beef cattle were chosen to represent the environmental covariate of the RN. The deviance information criteria demonstrated that a homoskedastic residual RN model provided a better data fit compared with a heteroskedastic counterpart and with a traditional animal model, which had the worst fit. The environmental gradient for long-yearling weight based on contemporary group effects ranged from -105 to 150 kg. The additive direct variance and heritability estimates increased with increasing environmental gradient from 74.33 ± 22.32 to 1,922.59 ± 258.99 kg(2) and from 0.08 ± 0.02 to 0.68 ± 0.03, respectively. The high genetic correlation (0.90 ± 0.03) between the intercept and the slope of the RN shows that animals with the greatest breeding values best responded to environmental improvement, characterizing scale effect as the source of G×E for long-yearling weight. The phenotypic plasticity demonstrated by the slope of the RN of the animal indicates the possibility to change genotype expression along the environmental gradient through selection. The results demonstrate the importance of accounting for G×E in the genetic evaluation of this population.

  8. Economic values for health and feed efficiency traits of dual-purpose cattle in marginal areas.

    PubMed

    Krupová, Z; Krupa, E; Michaličková, M; Wolfová, M; Kasarda, R

    2016-01-01

    Economic values of clinical mastitis, claw disease, and feed efficiency traits along with 16 additional production and functional traits were estimated for the dairy population of the Slovak Pinzgau breed using a bioeconomic approach. In the cow-calf population (suckler cow population) of the same breed, the economic values of feed efficiency traits along with 15 further production and functional traits were calculated. The marginal economic values of clinical mastitis and claw disease incidence in the dairy system were -€ 70.65 and -€ 26.73 per case per cow and year, respectively. The marginal economic values for residual feed intake were -€ 55.15 and -€ 54.64/kg of dry matter per day for cows and breeding heifers in the dairy system and -€ 20.45, -€ 11.30, and -€ 6.04/kg of dry matter per day for cows, breeding heifers, and fattened animals in the cow-calf system, respectively, all expressed per cow and year. The sums of the relative economic values for the 2 new health traits in the dairy system and for residual feed intake across all cattle categories in both systems were 1.4 and 8%, respectively. Within the dairy production system, the highest relative economic values were for milk yield (20%), daily gain of calves (20%), productive lifetime (10%), and cow conception rate (8%). In the cow-calf system, the most important traits were weight gain of calves from 120 to 210 d and from birth to 120 d (19 and 14%, respectively), productive lifetime (17%), and cow conception rate (13%). Based on the calculation of economic values for traits in the dual-purpose Pinzgau breed, milk production and growth traits remain highly important in the breeding goal, but their relative importance should be adapted to new production and economic conditions. The economic importance of functional traits (especially of cow productive lifetime and fertility) was sufficiently high to make the inclusion of these traits into the breeding goal necessary. An increased interest

  9. Endoparasites in calves of beef cattle herds: management systems dependent and genetic influences.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Michael; Gauly, Matthias; Bauer, Christian; Failing, Klaus; Erhardt, Georg; Zahner, Horst

    2005-08-10

    Prevalences and intensities of excretion of faecal stages of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium parvum, Eimeria spp., Strongyloides papillosus and strongyles were determined in a German upland area in German Angus (GA) and German Simmental (GS) suckler of beef cattle herds covering two winter housing periods and the grazing season between them. Influences of the housing systems applied (maintenance on deep litter with (DL+) and without run-out (DL--), on slatted floor (SF) or by winter run-out yarding (WO)), breed differences and genetic influences by the sire were determined by statistical analyses; levels of IgG antibodies to E. bovis antigen were measured by ELISA. G. duodenalis was observed with a maximum prevalence of 38% in 4 weeks old calves, a cumulative incidence of 58% 9 weeks after birth and with generally low intensities. C. parvum infections were relatively rare with cumulative incidences of 20--25% in week 5 after birth. Highest prevalences were associated with housing system DL-- and a long-lasting calving period. Cumulative incidence of Eimeria spp. was almost 100%. E. bovis predominated by far followed by E. ellipsoidalis/zuernii. Mean maximum intensity of 1000 OpG occurred in week 7 after birth. Up to an age of the calves of 7 weeks >75% of all oocysts belonged to E. bovis. Prevalences and excretion intensities were lowest under the housing conditions SF and WO. Maternal antibodies in calves to E. bovis antigen were directly and inversely correlated with mean OpG values in GA and GS calves, respectively. S. papillosus was common with a cumulative incidence of 53% 9 weeks after birth and occurred independent of the housing system. Mean strongyle egg prevalence was 50% with 50--100 EpG by means throughout the grazing season. Egg excretion intensity in the early months of grazings was correlated with the age of the calves at turnout to pasture. Under the conditions of housing system DL-- GA calves could better control S. papillosus infections than

  10. Cattle Grazing in Delta Forests

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Johnson

    1960-01-01

    What effects do grazing cattle have on the hardwood forests of the Mississippi Delta? What is the value of the forage to the cattle? To answer such questions, grazing studies were conducted in 1957 on the Delta Experimental Forest, near Stoneville.

  11. The stocker cattle supply chain.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Lawrence L; Anderson, David P

    2006-07-01

    This article discusses supply chain management in the US beef industry and where stocker cattle procurement fits in that chain. The supply chain in the US beef industry is defined as well as grading mechanisms that signal prices used to manage the chain. Sources of stocker cattle are also described.

  12. Unilateral nephrectomy in 10 cattle.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Susan R; Desrochers, André; Babkine, Marie; Mulon, Pierre-Yves; Nichols, Sylvain

    2011-02-01

    To describe clinical and imaging findings, treatment, and long-term outcome of cattle undergoing unilateral nephrectomy. Case series. Cattle (n=10). Medical records (January 1991-August 2008) of cattle that had unilateral nephrectomy were reviewed. Follow-up data were obtained by owner telephone interview. Nephrectomy was performed without surgical complications. Transient increases in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations occurred after surgery and then returned to, or below, presurgical values in 9 cattle. Nine cows were discharged and 7 rejoined their respective herd as productive animals without long-term complications. Ultrasonography was the most useful imaging tool for presurgical diagnosis. Based on our follow-up data, unilateral nephrectomy resulted in few serious short-term or long-term complications, and cattle undergoing this procedure are capable of satisfactory growth, reproduction, and milk production after surgery. © Copyright 2011 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  13. Water intoxication in adult cattle.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Naoya; Ofuji, Sosuke; Abe, Sakae; Tanaka, Ai; Uematsu, Masami; Ogata, Yoshimi

    2016-05-01

    Water intoxication is a common disorder in calves and is usually characterized by transient hemoglobinuria. In contrast, the condition is very rare in adult cattle, with few reports on naturally occurring cases. In the present report, four female Japanese Black cattle, aged 16-25 months, showed neurological signs when they drank water following a water outage. Hemoglobinuria was not grossly observed, while severe hyponatremia was revealed by laboratory tests. Autopsy indicated cerebral edema with accumulation of serous fluid in expanded Virchow-Robin spaces. These results indicate the possibility of water intoxication associated with cerebral edema due to severe dilutional hyponatremia in adult cattle.

  14. Postweaning growth and carcass traits in crossbred cattle from Hereford, Angus, Norwegian Red, Swedish Red and White, Friesian, and Wagyu maternal grandsires.

    PubMed

    Casas, E; Cundiff, L V

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize breeds representing diverse biological types for postweaning growth and carcass composition traits in terminal crossbred cattle. Postweaning growth and carcass traits were analyzed on 434 steers and 373 heifers obtained by mating F1 cows to Charolais sires. Maternal grandsires represented Hereford, Angus, and MARC III (1/4 Hereford, 1/4 Angus, 1/4 Pinzgauer, and 1/4 Red Poll) dams to Hereford or Angus (British Breeds), Norwegian Red, Swedish Red and White, Wagyu, or Friesian breeds. Breed groups were slaughtered serially in each of 2 yr (2002 and 2003). Postweaning ADG, slaughter weight, hot carcass weight, dressing percentage, percentage Choice, LM area, marbling score, USDA yield grade, fat thickness, retail product yield (percentage), retail product weight, fat yield (percentage), fat weight, bone yield (percentage), and bone weight were analyzed. Maternal grandsire breed was significant (P < 0.05) for all traits except dressing percentage, percentage Choice, and LM area. Marbling score for animals with Norwegian Red, Wagyu, Swedish Red and White, British Breeds, and Friesian inheritance was 550, 544, 532, 530, and 515, respectively (SEM = 8). Retail product weight for these animals was 224, 211, 227, 223, and 223 kg, respectively (SEM = 2 kg). Maternal granddam breed was not significant for any of the traits analyzed. Grandsire breed effects can be optimized by selection and use of appropriate crossbreeding systems.

  15. Genetic characterization and founder effect analysis of recently introduced Salers cattle breed population.

    PubMed

    Gamarra, D; Lopez-Oceja, A; de Pancorbo, M M

    2017-01-01

    Salers are a native French breed used for beef and dairy production that has expanded to all the continents. The Salers breed was introduced to the north of Spain in 1985 with only 15 individuals from France and has successfully increased to over 20 000 animals. Although over time new animals have been imported from France for breeding, it is possible that the limiting number of founder animals could have resulted in a reduction of the genetic diversity found in Spanish Salers. Thus, the purpose of the present study has been to characterize the genetic diversity of Salers breed in Spain and evaluate a possible founder effect due to reduced number of the first reproducers. A total of 403 individuals from 12 Salers herds were analyzed using 12 microsatellite markers and compared with phylogenetically and geographically close related Blonde d'Aquitaine, Limousin and Charolais French breeds but also other 16 European breeds. Microsatellites in Salers were polymorphic, with a mean allelic richness of 5.129 and an expected heterozygosity of 0.621 across loci (0.576 to 0.736 among all breeds). Average observed heterozygosity was 0.618. All the loci fit the Hardy-Weinberg (HW) equilibrium except TGLA227 locus due to a significant deficit of heterozygotes in only one of the herds, probably attributable to a sampling effect. When all loci were combined, Salers inbreeding coefficient did not differ statistically from 0 (F IS=0.005), indicating not significant excess or deficit of heterozygotes (P=0.309). Based in allelic distribution, Salers revealed a frequency of 0.488 in BM2113-131 and 0.064 in BM2113-143 diagnostic alleles, which are specific to the African zebu. These zebu alleles are also found in some French breeds, supported by STR data previously postulated hypothesis of a migration route through Mediterranean route by which North African cattle may have left a genetic signature in southern Europe. Phylogenetic tree and population structure analyses could

  16. Wulf Cattle Depot NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit SD-0034606, the Wulf Cattle Depot is authorized to discharge and must operate their facility in accordance with effluent limitations, monitoring requirements, and other provisions set forth herein.

  17. Soil ingestion by dairy cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Darwin, R.

    1990-02-15

    Ingested soil may be a source of minerals to grazing cattle; it may also be a source of radionuclides, heavy metals, and organic toxins. The importance of soil ingestion in the milk pathway depends on the amount of soil ingested, the ratio of the mineral concentration in soil to that in herbage, and the ability of the cattle to solubilize and absorb the soil-derived minerals. The amount of soil ingested by cattle on pasture, in turn, depends upon the stocking level, the quantity of forage available, and the soil ingesting propensity of individual cows. The objective of this note is to summarize some of the information about soil ingestion by dairy cattle and to suggest methods for incorporating soil ingestion into the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Phase I milk model. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Random regression models for the prediction of days to weight, ultrasound rib eye area, and ultrasound back fat depth in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Speidel, S E; Peel, R K; Crews, D H; Enns, R M

    2016-02-01

    Genetic evaluation research designed to reduce the required days to a specified end point has received very little attention in pertinent scientific literature, given that its economic importance was first discussed in 1957. There are many production scenarios in today's beef industry, making a prediction for the required number of days to a single end point a suboptimal option. Random regression is an attractive alternative to calculate days to weight (DTW), days to ultrasound back fat (DTUBF), and days to ultrasound rib eye area (DTUREA) genetic predictions that could overcome weaknesses of a single end point prediction. The objective of this study was to develop random regression approaches for the prediction of the DTW, DTUREA, and DTUBF. Data were obtained from the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Research Centre, Lethbridge, AB, Canada. Data consisted of records on 1,324 feedlot cattle spanning 1999 to 2007. Individual animals averaged 5.77 observations with weights, ultrasound rib eye area (UREA), ultrasound back fat depth (UBF), and ages ranging from 293 to 863 kg, 73.39 to 129.54 cm, 1.53 to 30.47 mm, and 276 to 519 d, respectively. Random regression models using Legendre polynomials were used to regress age of the individual on weight, UREA, and UBF. Fixed effects in the model included an overall fixed regression of age on end point (weight, UREA, and UBF) nested within breed to account for the mean relationship between age and weight as well as a contemporary group effect consisting of breed of the animal (Angus, Charolais, and Charolais sired), feedlot pen, and year of measure. Likelihood ratio tests were used to determine the appropriate random polynomial order. Use of the quadratic polynomial did not account for any additional genetic variation in days for DTW ( > 0.11), for DTUREA ( > 0.18), and for DTUBF ( > 0.20) when compared with the linear random polynomial. Heritability estimates from the linear random regression for DTW ranged from 0.54 to 0

  19. Feedlot Processing and Arrival Cattle Management.

    PubMed

    Noffsinger, Tom; Lukasiewicz, Kip; Hyder, LeeAnn

    2015-11-01

    Acclimating newly arrived cattle in a feedlot setting can increase cattle confidence, reduce stress, improve immune function, and increase cattle well-being. Understanding cattle instincts and using low-stress handling techniques teaches cattle to trust their caregivers and work efficiently for them throughout the feeding period. These techniques should be applied with newly arrived cattle when they are unloaded, moved from the holding pen to the home pen, and handled inside the home pen. Low-stress handling during processing and a sound processing protocol based on cattle history and proper risk assessment can improve cattle health from the start of the feeding period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Endogenic nortestosterone in cattle?

    PubMed

    de Brabander, H F; van Hende, J; Batjoens, P; Hendriks, L; Raus, J; Smets, F; Pottie, G; van Ginkel, L; Stephany, R W

    1994-12-01

    When residues of nortestosterone (NT) were found in the urine of cattle, racehorses or bodybuilders, exogenic administration was thought to be proven. In previous literature, no records were found of the endogenic presence of this molecule. In the horse-racing world, Houghton and Courthot found that NT is normally present in the urine of the stallion. Belgian and Dutch researchers found that NT is also present in the urine and edible parts of the intact boar. Vandenbroeck et al. (1991) suggested the endogenous presence of NT (in the beta form) in the pregnant cow. Meyer (1992) reported the presence of NT (in the alpha form) in relatively high amounts in the urine of the cow peri-partum and the neo-natal calf. These observations may have important consequences for veterinary meat inspection in the EU. Therefore, in Belgium a large scale experiment was set up in co-operation with the EU Community Reference Laboratory (RIVM). In this paper the present state of the results in this area is presented. A large number of urine samples (> 50) of pregnant non-treated cows were collected and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in 4 different laboratories. Further samples (> 100) were taken, but only analysed in one laboratory. The results proved clearly that NT may indeed be detectable in the alpha form in the urine of pregnant cows, from at least 2 months, but most probably from 4-5 months before partus.

  1. 9 CFR 91.5 - Cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cattle. 91.5 Section 91.5 Animals and... EXPORTATION Diagnostic Tests, Treatments § 91.5 Cattle. In order to be eligible for export, cattle shall be... cattle over 1 month of age shall be negative to a caudal intradermal tuberculin test using 0.1 ml. of...

  2. 9 CFR 91.5 - Cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cattle. 91.5 Section 91.5 Animals and... EXPORTATION Diagnostic Tests, Treatments § 91.5 Cattle. In order to be eligible for export, cattle shall be... cattle over 1 month of age shall be negative to a caudal intradermal tuberculin test using 0.1 ml. of...

  3. 9 CFR 91.5 - Cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cattle. 91.5 Section 91.5 Animals and... EXPORTATION Diagnostic Tests, Treatments § 91.5 Cattle. In order to be eligible for export, cattle shall be... cattle over 1 month of age shall be negative to a caudal intradermal tuberculin test using 0.1 ml. of...

  4. 9 CFR 91.5 - Cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cattle. 91.5 Section 91.5 Animals and... EXPORTATION Diagnostic Tests, Treatments § 91.5 Cattle. In order to be eligible for export, cattle shall be... cattle over 1 month of age shall be negative to a caudal intradermal tuberculin test using 0.1 ml. of...

  5. Arthroscopy in cattle: technique and normal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Lardé, Hélène; Nichols, Sylvain

    2014-03-01

    Arthroscopy has all the advantages of minimally invasive surgery in cattle. Specialized equipment and knowledge of normal joint anatomy of cattle are mandatory for successful arthroscopy. The surgical technique is different in cattle compared with the horse. Thick skin and joint capsules complicate movement of the arthroscope within the joints. In cattle, septic arthritis and osteochondrosis are the most frequent disorders suitable for arthroscopic treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 7 CFR 1260.118 - Cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cattle. 1260.118 Section 1260.118 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.118 Cattle. Cattle means live domesticated bovine animals...

  7. 7 CFR 1260.118 - Cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cattle. 1260.118 Section 1260.118 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.118 Cattle. Cattle means live domesticated bovine animals...

  8. 7 CFR 1260.118 - Cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cattle. 1260.118 Section 1260.118 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.118 Cattle. Cattle means live domesticated bovine animals...

  9. 7 CFR 1260.118 - Cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cattle. 1260.118 Section 1260.118 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.118 Cattle. Cattle means live domesticated bovine animals...

  10. 7 CFR 1260.118 - Cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cattle. 1260.118 Section 1260.118 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.118 Cattle. Cattle means live domesticated bovine animals...

  11. Cattle are eating the forest

    SciTech Connect

    DeWalt, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    World population growth is causing a trend for less-developed countries to become food importers because of short-sighted agricultural practices and land-use policies. Honduras illustrates how population growth pushes farming onto marginal lands. The land used to grow tropical fruit for export is shifting to pasture where cattle are raised for export. Improved transportation links are accelerating this shift. The results of slash-and-mulch cultivation has been to diminish forest and fallow land. Although the short-term effects benefit the landless as well as the land owners, a new class of migrant worker is finding unemployment on the rise, and local populations must compete with cattle for food because the cattle are sold to international meat processors. 17 references. (DCK)

  12. Eosinophilic myositis in Canadian cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H J; Snowdon, K E; Finley, G G

    1991-01-01

    Musculature from 198 Canadian cattle with suspected lesions of eosinophilic myositis were examined histologically and by pepsin digestion. Sera from 51 of the 198 animals were also examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-Trichinella antibodies. Viable larvae of Trichinella were not recovered from any of the cattle but one animal from Ontario tested positive for anti-Trichinella antibodies. Histologically, focal and/or diffuse eosinophilic myositis lesions were observed in 149 (75.2%) of the animals studied. Other conditions identified were sarcocystiosis, abscesses, cysticercosis, steatosis, fibrosis, granuloma, lymphosarcoma and necrosis. Sarcocystiosis was identified in 105 of the 198 animals in both normal and affected musculature. The study indicates that trichinosis is not a primary cause of eosinophilic myositis in cattle. PMID:1884289

  13. Feeding cotton products to cattle.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Glenn M; Poore, Matthew H; Paschal, Joe C

    2002-07-01

    Despite the potential for gossypol toxicosis (particularly in pre-ruminants) and risk factors associated with impaired fertility in bulls, cottonseed products offer a safe alternative feed for cattle producers when fed at recommended levels. Beef producers seeking to lower production costs should consider using cotton byproducts in their feeding programs. If carefully incorporated, cotton byproduct feeds can reduce feed costs while maintaining or increasing the level of cattle performance. Cottonseed meal will remain a standard protein supplement for beef cattle throughout the country. Whole cottonseed has much potential for Southern producers near cotton gins if it is purchased in a timely fashion and fed according to recommendations. Cotton gin trash, cottonseed hulls, and cotton textile mill waste also have potential economic benefits, especially to producers located near cotton and cottonseed processing facilities.

  14. Exploring cattle movements in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Ensoy, Chellafe; Faes, Christel; Welby, Sarah; Van der Stede, Yves; Aerts, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Movement of animals from one farm to another is a potential risk and can lead to the spreading of livestock diseases. Therefore, in order to implement effective control measures, it is important to understand the movement network in a given area. Using the SANITEL data from 2005 to 2009, around 2 million cattle movements in Belgium were traced. Exploratory analysis revealed different spatial structures for the movement of different cattle types: fattening calves are mostly moved to the Antwerp region, adult cattle are moved to different parts in Belgium. Based on these differences, movement of cattle would more likely cause a spread of disease to a larger number of areas in Belgium as compared to the fattening calves. A closer inspection of the spatial and temporal patterns of cattle movement using a weighted negative binomial model, revealed a significant short-distance movement of bovine which could be an important factor contributing to the local spreading of a disease. The model however revealed hot spot areas of movement in Belgium; four areas in the Walloon region (Luxembourg, Hainaut, Namur and Liege) were found as hot spot areas while East and West Flanders are important "receivers" of movement. This implies that an introduction of a disease to these Walloon regions could result in a spread toward the East and West Flanders regions, as what happened in the case of Bluetongue BTV-8 outbreak in 2006. The temporal component in the model also revealed a linear trend and short- and long-term seasonality in the cattle movement with a peak around spring and autumn. The result of this explorative analysis enabled the identification of "hot spots" in time and space which is important in enhancing any existing monitoring and surveillance system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sudden death of feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Glock, R D; DeGroot, B D

    1998-01-01

    Sudden deaths or the sudden death syndrome are perceived as major concerns in cattle feedlots because most of these deaths occur in cattle near market weight. Etiology and preventive measures are poorly defined. The current literature indicates that sudden deaths are associated most commonly with digestive upsets. Death is thought to be the result of interactions between factors including acidosis, bloat, and endotoxemia. Trauma, peracute interstitial pneumonia, and other identifiable events are specifically defined but relatively uncommon. Enterotoxemia is of questionable significance as a cause of sudden deaths.

  16. The modern feedlot for finishing cattle.

    PubMed

    Wagner, John J; Archibeque, Shawn L; Feuz, Dillon M

    2014-02-01

    The modern beef feedlot has evolved into a complex system that is very dependent upon technology. Modern feedlots are organized into departments, often including the office, cattle, yard, feed milling, and feed departments, that allow for improvements in production efficiency through the specialization of management and labor. Regardless of size, feedlots must succeed at the following tasks: cattle procurement, cattle receiving, cattle processing, daily cattle observations, health treatments, cattle marketing, feed procurement, feed commodity receiving, feed commodity storage, diet formulation, diet delivery, bunk management, and environmental management. Apart from cattle ownership, feedlots create most of their gross income from feed sales, yardage, inventory gain on flaked grain, and combinations of these sources. The future of the industry is filled with economic and political challenges, including high grain prices owing to competition from the ethanol industry, environmental regulations, excess feedlot capacity, and a diminishing labor pool owing to declining rural populations.

  17. Beef Cattle: Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Designed for secondary vocational agriculture students, this text provides an overview of selecting and evaluating beef cattle in Future Farmers of America livestock judging events. The first of four major sections addresses topics such as the ideal beef animal, selecting steers, selecting breeding animals, studying the animal systematically, and…

  18. Heat Stress in Feedlot Cattle.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to determine if supplementing the diet of near-finished beef cattle with a yeast product would mitigate the negative impact of a controlled HS on the physiological and endocrine responses. Crossbred beef heifers (n=111; BW=281.07 kg) were divided into 2 pens in a comm...

  19. Climate Adaptation of Tropical Cattle.

    PubMed

    Barendse, W

    2017-02-08

    There is sustained growth in the number of tropical cattle, which represent more than half of all cattle worldwide. By and large, most research in tropical areas is still focused on breeds of cattle, their particular advantages or disadvantages in tropical areas, and the tropical forages or feeds that could be usefully fed to them. A consistent issue for adaptation to climate is the heat of tropical environments. Changing the external characteristics of the animal, such as color and coat characteristics, is one way to adapt, and there are several major genes for these traits. However, further improvement in heat tolerance and other adaptation traits will need to use the entire genome and all physical and physiological systems. Apart from the response to heat, climate forcing through methane emission identifies dry season weight loss as an important if somewhat neglected trait in climate adaptation of cattle. The use of genome-estimated breeding values in tropical areas is in its infancy and will be difficult to implement, but will be essential for rapid, coordinated genetic improvement. The difficulty of implementation cannot be exaggerated and may require major improvements in methodology.

  20. Beef Cattle: Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    Designed for secondary vocational agriculture students, this text provides an overview of selecting and evaluating beef cattle in Future Farmers of America livestock judging events. The first of four major sections addresses topics such as the ideal beef animal, selecting steers, selecting breeding animals, studying the animal systematically, and…

  1. Tuberculosis-resistant transgenic cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tuberculosis is a devastating disease that affects humans and many animal species. In humans, tuberculosis (TB) is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while most cases in cattle are caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, Mb can also cause, albeit rarely, human TB. In this issue, Wu et al. ...

  2. Intestinal surgery of adult cattle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David E; Ewoldt, Jennifer M Ivany

    2005-03-01

    Surgical disorders of the gastrointestinal tract of cattle occur occasionally, and veterinarians are challenged to determine an accurate diagnosis and treatment for these conditions. Although surgical diseases most commonly occur in the forestomachs (dislocated abomasum, reticuloperitonitis) and the colons (cecal dilation), this article focuses n lesions in the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum).

  3. Selenium in Cattle: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Youcef; Dufrasne, Isabelle

    2016-04-23

    This review article examines the role of selenium (Se) and the effects of Se supplementation especially in the bovine species. Selenium is an important trace element in cattle. Some of its roles include the participation in the antioxidant defense the cattle farms. The nutritional requirements of Se in cattle are estimated at 100 μg/kg DM (dry matter) for beef cattle and at 300 μg/kg DM for dairy cows. The rations high in fermentable carbohydrates, nitrates, sulfates, calcium or hydrogen cyanide negatively influence the organism's use of the selenium contained in the diet. The Se supplementation may reduce the incidence of metritis and ovarian cysts during the postpartum period. The increase in fertility when adding Se is attributed to the reduction of the embryonic death during the first month of gestation. A use of organic Se in feed would provide a better transfer of Se in calves relative to mineral Se supplementation. The addition of Se yeasts in the foodstuffs of cows significantly increases the Se content and the percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in milk compared to the addition of sodium selenite. The enzyme 5-iodothyronine deiodinase is a seleno-dependent selenoprotein. It is one of the last proteins to be affected in the event of Se deficiency. This delay in response could explain the fact that several studies did not show the effect of Se supplementation on growth and weight gain of calves. Enrichment of Se in the diet did not significantly affect the slaughter weight and carcass yield of bulls. The impact and results of Se supplementation in cattle depend on physiological stage, Se status of animals, type and content of Se and types of Se administration. Further studies in Se supplementation should investigate the speciation of Se in food and yeasts, as well as understanding their metabolism and absorption. This constitute a path to exploit in order to explain certain different effects of Se.

  4. Effect of heat stress on rumen temperature of three breeds of cattle.

    PubMed

    Lees, A M; Lees, J C; Lisle, A T; Sullivan, M L; Gaughan, J B

    2017-09-16

    Thirty-six steers (12 of each Angus, Charolais, and Brahman) with an initial BW of 318.5 ± 6.7 kg were used in a 130-day study. Two treatments were imposed: un-shaded and shaded (3 m(2)/animal; 90% solar block shade cloth). On day 1, steers were administered with rumen temperature boluses. Rumen temperatures (T RUM) were obtained at 10 min intervals over the duration of the study to determine differences in T RUM between Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle. Six feedlot pens (162 m(2)) were used with six steers (2/breed) per pen with three pens/treatment. Ambient dry bulb temperature (T A; °C), relative humidity (RH; %), wind speed (WS; m/s) and direction, and solar radiation (SR; W/m(2)) were recorded at 10 min intervals. Rainfall (mm) was collected daily at 0900 h. From these data, black globe temperature (BGT; °C), temperature humidity index (THI), heat load index (HLI), and accumulated heat load (AHL) were calculated. Individual T RUM were converted to an hourly average and then mean hourly T RUM were converted to a mean within hour T RUM across the 130 days. Rumen temperatures were analyzed using an autoregressive repeated measures model. The model analyzed the effect of breed (P < 0.0002), treatment (P = 0.3543), time of day (hour, h; P < 0.0001), breed × treatment (P < 0.3683), breed × h (P < 0.0001), treatment × h (P < 0.0001), breed × treatment × h (P = 0.0029), pen within treatment (P = 0.0195), and animal × breed × treatment within pen (P = 0.1041). Furthermore, there were breed × treatment × hour differences in T RUM (P = 0.0036), indicating that Bos indicus and Bos taurus regulate T RUM differently.

  5. Comparison of molecular breeding values based on within- and across-breed training in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Kachman, Stephen D; Spangler, Matthew L; Bennett, Gary L; Hanford, Kathryn J; Kuehn, Larry A; Snelling, Warren M; Thallman, R Mark; Saatchi, Mahdi; Garrick, Dorian J; Schnabel, Robert D; Taylor, Jeremy F; Pollak, E John

    2013-08-16

    Although the efficacy of genomic predictors based on within-breed training looks promising, it is necessary to develop and evaluate across-breed predictors for the technology to be fully applied in the beef industry. The efficacies of genomic predictors trained in one breed and utilized to predict genetic merit in differing breeds based on simulation studies have been reported, as have the efficacies of predictors trained using data from multiple breeds to predict the genetic merit of purebreds. However, comparable studies using beef cattle field data have not been reported. Molecular breeding values for weaning and yearling weight were derived and evaluated using a database containing BovineSNP50 genotypes for 7294 animals from 13 breeds in the training set and 2277 animals from seven breeds (Angus, Red Angus, Hereford, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Limousin, and Simmental) in the evaluation set. Six single-breed and four across-breed genomic predictors were trained using pooled data from purebred animals. Molecular breeding values were evaluated using field data, including genotypes for 2227 animals and phenotypic records of animals born in 2008 or later. Accuracies of molecular breeding values were estimated based on the genetic correlation between the molecular breeding value and trait phenotype. With one exception, the estimated genetic correlations of within-breed molecular breeding values with trait phenotype were greater than 0.28 when evaluated in the breed used for training. Most estimated genetic correlations for the across-breed trained molecular breeding values were moderate (> 0.30). When molecular breeding values were evaluated in breeds that were not in the training set, estimated genetic correlations clustered around zero. Even for closely related breeds, within- or across-breed trained molecular breeding values have limited prediction accuracy for breeds that were not in the training set. For breeds in the training set, across- and within-breed trained

  6. The anterior tooth development of cattle presented for slaughter: an analysis of age, sex and breed.

    PubMed

    Whiting, K J; Brown, S N; Browne, W J; Hadley, P J; Knowles, T G

    2013-08-01

    In a cross-sectional study, data from records of cattle slaughtered over a 1-year period at a large abattoir in South West England were analysed using an ordered category response model to investigate the inter-relationships between age, sex and breed on development of the permanent anterior (PA) teeth. Using the model, transition points at which there was a 50% probability of membership of each category of paired PA teeth were identified. Data from ∼60,000 animals were initially analysed for age and sex effect. The age transition was found to be ∼23 months moving from zero to two teeth; 30 months for two to four teeth; 37 months for four to six teeth and 42 months for six to eight teeth. Males were found to develop, on average, ∼22 days earlier than females across all stages. A reduced data set of ∼23,000 animals registered as pure-bred only was used to compare breed and type interactions and to investigate sex effects within the sub-categories. Breeds were grouped into dairy and beef-type and beef breeds split into native and continental. It was found that dairy-types moved through the transition points earlier than beef-types across all stages (interval varying between ∼8 and 12 weeks) and that collectively, native beef breeds moved through the transition points by up to 3 weeks earlier than the continental beef breeds. Interestingly, in contrast to beef animals, dairy females matured before dairy males. However, the magnitude of the difference between dairy females and males diminished at the later stages of development. Differences were found between breeds. Across the first three stages, Ayrshires and Guernseys developed between 3 and 6 weeks later than Friesian/Holsteins and Simmental, Limousin and Blonde Aquitaine 6 and 8 weeks later than Aberdeen Angus. Herefords, Charolais and South Devon developed later but by a smaller interval and Red Devon and Galloway showed the largest individual effect with transition delayed by 8 to 12 weeks.

  7. Heterosis and direct effects for Charolais-sired calf weight and growth, cow weight and weight change, and ratios of cow and calf weights and weight changes across warm season lactation in Romosinuano, Angus, and F cows in Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Riley, D G; Burke, J M; Chase, C C; Coleman, S W

    2016-01-01

    The use of Brahman in cow-calf production offers some adaptation to the harsh characteristics of endophyte-infected tall fescue. Criollo breeds, such as the Romosinuano, may have similar adaptation. The objectives were to estimate genetic effects in Romosinuano, Angus, and crossbred cows for their weights, weights of their calves, and ratios (calf weight:cow weight and cow weight change:calf weight gain) across lactation and to assess the influence of forage on traits and estimates. Cows ( = 91) were bred to Charolais bulls after their second parity. Calves ( = 214) were born from 2006 to 2009. Cows and calves were weighed in early (April and June), mid- (July), and late lactation (August and October). Animal was a random effect in analyses of calf data; sire was random in analyses of cow records and ratios. Fixed effects investigated included calf age, calf sex, cow age-year combinations, sire breed of cow, dam breed of cow, and interactions. Subsequent analyses evaluated the effect of forage grazed: endophyte-free or endophyte-infected tall fescue. Estimates of maternal heterosis for calf weight ranged from 9.3 ± 4.3 to 15.4 ± 5.7 kg from mid-lactation through weaning ( < 0.05). Romosinuano direct effects (of the cow) were -6.8 ± 3.0 and -8.9 ± 4.2 kg for weights recorded in April and June. Calf weights and weight gains from birth were greater ( < 0.05) for calves of cows grazing endophyte-free tall fescue except in mid-summer. Cow weight change from April to each time was negative for Angus cows and lower ( < 0.05) than other groups. Cows grazing endophyte-free tall fescue were heavier ( < 0.05) at all times but had more weight loss in late lactation. Angus cows had the lowest ( < 0.05) ratios (negative) of cow weight change:calf weight gain, indicating an energy-deficit condition. Cows grazing endophyte-free tall fescue had more negative ( < 0.05) values for this trait but not in early lactation ( < 0.05). Estimates of heterosis ranged from 12.8 ± 9.5 to

  8. Cattle handling technique can induce fatigued cattle syndrome in cattle not fed a beta adrenergic agonist.

    PubMed

    Frese, D A; Reinhardt, C D; Bartle, S J; Rethorst, D N; Hutcheson, J P; Nichols, W T; Depenbusch, B E; Corrigan, M E; Thomson, D U

    2016-02-01

    Angus crossbred steers (n = 40; 563 ± 44 kg) were used to examine the effects of handling method and fat thickness on the blood chemistry and physiology of market steers. Steers were blocked by backfat (BF) thickness and were randomly assigned to treatment groups: low-stress handling (LSH) and aggressive handling (AH). Cattle were then ran¬domly assigned to one of 5 blocks containing 4 steers from the LSH and AH treatments. Steers in the LSH treatment were walked and AH cattle were run through a course of 1,540 m. Blood samples were obtained via jugular venipuncture before handling (BASE), at 770 m (LAP1), at 1,540 m (LAP2), and at1 h (1H) and 2 h (2H) after finishing the course. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma lactate (LAC), creatinine kinase (CK), base excess (BE), blood pH (pH), serum cortisol (CORT) concentrations, and venous carbon dioxide (PvCO2) and oxygen (PvO2) pressures. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and rectal temperature (TEMP) were measured at the same intervals. Cattle in the AH treatment had greater ( < 0.05) LAC than those in LSH at BASE (4.1 vs. 3.0 mmol/L), LAP1 (16.5 vs. 2.3 mmol/L), LAP2 (22.3 vs. 2.4 mmol/L), 1H (7.2 vs. 2.7 mmol/L), and 2H (4.0 vs. 2.5 mmol/L), respectively. Creatinine kinase and RR were not different (P > 0.14). Blood pH in AH cattle was decreased compared with that in LSH cattle ( < 0.05) at LAP1 (7.25 vs. 7.45) and LAP2 (7.19 vs. 7.48) but was not different ( > 0.13) at BASE, 1H, or 2H. Heart rate and TEMP were increased in AH cattle compared to LSH ( > 0.01). Serum cortisol was increased ( < 0.05) in AH compared to that in LSH cattle at LAP1 (87.5 vs. 58.9 nmol/L), LAP2 (144.4 vs. 93.1 nmol/L), and 1H (113.5 vs. 53.1 nmol/L). Although RR was not differ¬ent between LSH and AH, PvCO2 was decreased in AH compared to that in LSH ( < 0.05) at LAP2 (30.6 vs. 39.3 mmHg) and PvO2 was increased at LAP1 (42.7 vs. 33.5 mmHg) and at LAP2 (51.5 vs. 36.6 mmHg). Lactate was increased in AH cattle in the thicker BF

  9. Moldy Sweetclover Poisoning in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Radostits, O. M.; Searcy, G. P.; Mitchall, K. G.

    1980-01-01

    Some selected clinical and laboratory aspects of moldy sweetclover poisoning in cattle are reviewed. The prothrombin time is preferred when the disease is suspected. The bleeding time and whole blood clotting time test are also used. Dicoumarol is not always detectable in the suspected feed which may be due to sampling technique or inaccuracy in the laboratory assay. The most effective treatment is a whole blood transfusion. Vitamin K1 (naturally occurring vitamin K) is an effective antidote but too expensive. Vitamin K3 (synthetic vitamin K) in both the injectable and oral forms are not as effective as K1 but are used extensively for treatment and prevention. Feeding the suspected feed for two weeks followed by a one week withdrawal successively or by dilution with other feeds will help to reduce the incidence of disease if other feeds are not available. Suspected feed should not be fed to cattle for at least three weeks before surgery or parturition. PMID:6159060

  10. AN INFECTIOUS OPHTHALMIA OF CATTLE

    PubMed Central

    Jones, F. S.; Little, Ralph B.

    1923-01-01

    Twenty-four cases of an acute ophthalmia of cattle have been observed. The infection is characterized by photophobia, severe congestion of the vessels of the eyeball, conjunctivitis, congestion and edema of the membrana nictitans, edema of the eyelids, accompanied by a thick, yellowish white mucus or mucopurulent exudate. In certain cases corneal ulcers and extensive corneal opacities developed. From all cases a characteristic diplobacillus was obtained. The organism was usually observed in the exudate in large numbers. The morphology, the hemolytic properties, and the proteolytic activities readily assist in its identification. Instillation of a few drops of bouillon suspensions of pure cultures beneath the eyelids of normal cattle gave rise to characteristic inflammations. The organism is not pathogenic for laboratory animals. PMID:19868779

  11. Risk factors for cattle presenting with a confirmed bTB lesion at slaughter, from herds with no evidence of within-herd transmission.

    PubMed

    Clegg, T A; Good, M; More, S J

    2016-04-01

    There has been a national bovine tuberculosis (bTB) eradication programme (BTBEP) in Ireland for many years. All cattle herds are tested at least annually using the Single Intradermal Comparative Tuberculin Test (SICTT). Further, abattoir surveillance is conducted on all animals at the time of slaughter. In the Irish BTBEP, a substantial number of confirmed bTB lesions are detected in non-reactor animals, to SICTT, from Officially Tuberculosis Free (OTF) herds at slaughter. In this study we investigate risk factors for non-reactor animals from OTF herds presenting with a confirmed bTB lesion at slaughter, but with no evidence of within-herd transmission. A case-control study was conducted, with animal as the unit of interest. The case animals were all SICTT non-reactor animals slaughtered in 2012, with a confirmed bTB lesion identified during routine abattoir surveillance and with no evidence of within-herd transmission. Control animals were selected from all SICTT non-reactor animals slaughtered in 2012 from OTF herds where no bTB lesion was found. Four controls matched by age (±1 year) and location (county) were randomly selected for each case. A conditional logistic regression model was developed for univariable and multivariable analysis. The final multivariable model included: number of movements, herd type, herd-size, inconclusive reactor status at any previous test, abattoir and time spent in a herd restricted for bTB. The odds of being a case increased with the number of times an animal had moved herds. Animals from suckler herds were significantly more likely to be a case compared to those from beef herds. The odds of being a case decreased with herd-size and increased as the time spent in a restricted herd increased. There were three key conclusions from this study. Firstly, the main risk factors for animals presenting with a confirmed bTB lesion at slaughter were: previous bTB exposure history, previous inconclusive reactor result at the SICTT, the

  12. Influence of Sire Breed on the Interplay among Rumen Microbial Populations Inhabiting the Rumen Liquid of the Progeny in Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Goonewardene, Laksiri A.; Wang, Zhiquan; Zhou, Mi; Moore, Stephen S.; Guan, Le Luo

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether the host genetic background impact the ruminal microbial communities of the progeny of sires from three different breeds under different diets. Eighty five bacterial and twenty eight methanogen phylotypes from 49 individuals of diverging sire breed (Angus, ANG; Charolais, CHA; and Hybrid, HYB), fed high energy density (HE) and low energy density (LE) diets were determined and correlated with breed, rumen fermentation and phenotypic variables, using multivariate statistical approaches. When bacterial phylotypes were compared between diets, ANG offspring showed the lowest number of diet-associated phylotypes, whereas CHA and HYB progenies had seventeen and twenty-three diet-associated phylotypes, respectively. For the methanogen phylotypes, there were no sire breed-associated phylotypes; however, seven phylotypes were significantly different among breeds on either diet (P<0.05). Sire breed did not influence the metabolic variables measured when high energy diet was fed. A correlation matrix of all pairwise comparisons among frequencies of bacterial and methanogen phylotypes uncovered their relationships with sire breed. A cluster containing methanogen phylotypes M16 (Methanobrevibacter gottschalkii) and M20 (Methanobrevibacter smithii), and bacterial phylotype B62 (Robinsoniella sp.) in Angus offspring fed low energy diet reflected the metabolic interactions among microbial consortia. The clustering of the phylotype frequencies from the three breeds indicated that phylotypes detected in CHA and HYB progenies are more similar among them, compared to ANG animals. Our results revealed that the frequency of particular microbial phylotypes in the progeny of cattle may be influenced by the sire breed when different diets are fed and ultimately further impact host metabolic functions, such as feed efficiency. PMID:23520513

  13. People on the Farm: Raising Beef Cattle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Robert L.

    This booklet provides information on raising beef cattle through profiles of two families, the Ritschards of Colorado and the Schuttes of Missouri. Through descriptions of daily life for these families, the booklet discusses the way of life on modern beef cattle farms and the problems and decisions faced by farmers. The booklet explains how…

  14. Genomic characteristics of cattle copy number variations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We performed a systematic analysis of cattle copy number variations (CNVs) using the Bovine HapMap SNP genotyping data, including 539 animals of 21 modern cattle breeds and 6 outgroups. After correcting genomic waves and considering the trio information, we identified 682 candidate CNV regions (CNVR...

  15. 59 FR- Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-02-25

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 [Docket 91-161-2] Tuberculosis in Cattle and... amending the tuberculosis regulations by adding a definition for States whose accredited-free status has been suspended due to detection of tuberculosis in any cattle or bison in those States, and by...

  16. Nitrification in Beef Cattle Feedlot Soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background and Aims: Ammonia volatilization is the primary route for nitrogen loss from cattle feedlots. An additional, but poorly studied mechanism in feedlots is aerobic nitrification. The aim of this study is to characterize nitrifier activity, abundance, and diversity for a cattle production ...

  17. Enhancement of Cellulose Degradation by Cattle Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Yasutaka; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Aburai, Kenichi; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ruike, Tatsushi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Saccharification of cellulose is a promising technique for producing alternative source of energy. However, the efficiency of conversion of cellulose into soluble sugar using any currently available methodology is too low for industrial application. Many additives, such as surfactants, have been shown to enhance the efficiency of cellulose-to-sugar conversion. In this study, we have examined first whether cattle saliva, as an additive, would enhance the cellulase-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose, and subsequently elucidated the mechanism by which cattle saliva enhanced this conversion. Although cattle saliva, by itself, did not degrade cellulose, it enhanced the cellulase-catalyzed degradation of cellulose. Thus, the amount of reducing sugar produced increased approximately 2.9-fold by the addition of cattle saliva. We also found that non-enzymatic proteins, which were present in cattle saliva, were responsible for causing the enhancement effect. Third, the mechanism of cattle saliva mediated enhancement of cellulase activity was probably similar to that of the canonical surfactants. Cattle saliva is available in large amounts easily and cheaply, and it can be used without further purification. Thus, cattle saliva could be a promising additive for efficient saccharification of cellulose on an industrial scale. PMID:26402242

  18. Enhancement of Cellulose Degradation by Cattle Saliva.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yasutaka; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Aburai, Kenichi; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ruike, Tatsushi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Saccharification of cellulose is a promising technique for producing alternative source of energy. However, the efficiency of conversion of cellulose into soluble sugar using any currently available methodology is too low for industrial application. Many additives, such as surfactants, have been shown to enhance the efficiency of cellulose-to-sugar conversion. In this study, we have examined first whether cattle saliva, as an additive, would enhance the cellulase-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose, and subsequently elucidated the mechanism by which cattle saliva enhanced this conversion. Although cattle saliva, by itself, did not degrade cellulose, it enhanced the cellulase-catalyzed degradation of cellulose. Thus, the amount of reducing sugar produced increased approximately 2.9-fold by the addition of cattle saliva. We also found that non-enzymatic proteins, which were present in cattle saliva, were responsible for causing the enhancement effect. Third, the mechanism of cattle saliva mediated enhancement of cellulase activity was probably similar to that of the canonical surfactants. Cattle saliva is available in large amounts easily and cheaply, and it can be used without further purification. Thus, cattle saliva could be a promising additive for efficient saccharification of cellulose on an industrial scale.

  19. Cases of parasitic pneumonia in Scottish cattle.

    PubMed

    2016-02-06

    Parasitic pneumonia in cattleNutritional osteodystrophy in cattleWhite liver disease in lambsErysipelas in pigsLead poisoning and atherosclerosis in an eagle These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for October 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). British Veterinary Association.

  20. Cattle phenotypes can disguise their maternal ancestry.

    PubMed

    Srirattana, Kanokwan; McCosker, Kieren; Schatz, Tim; St John, Justin C

    2017-06-26

    Cattle are bred for, amongst other factors, specific traits, including parasite resistance and adaptation to climate. However, the influence and inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are not usually considered in breeding programmes. In this study, we analysed the mtDNA profiles of cattle from Victoria (VIC), southern Australia, which is a temperate climate, and the Northern Territory (NT), the northern part of Australia, which has a tropical climate, to determine if the mtDNA profiles of these cattle are indicative of breed and phenotype, and whether these profiles are appropriate for their environments. A phylogenetic tree of the full mtDNA sequences of different breeds of cattle, which were obtained from the NCBI database, showed that the mtDNA profiles of cattle do not always reflect their phenotype as some cattle with Bos taurus phenotypes had Bos indicus mtDNA, whilst some cattle with Bos indicus phenotypes had Bos taurus mtDNA. Using D-loop sequencing, we were able to contrast the phenotypes and mtDNA profiles from different species of cattle from the 2 distinct cattle breeding regions of Australia. We found that 67 of the 121 cattle with Bos indicus phenotypes from NT (55.4%) had Bos taurus mtDNA. In VIC, 92 of the 225 cattle with Bos taurus phenotypes (40.9%) possessed Bos indicus mtDNA. When focusing on oocytes from cattle with the Bos taurus phenotype in VIC, their respective oocytes with Bos indicus mtDNA had significantly lower levels of mtDNA copy number compared with oocytes possessing Bos taurus mtDNA (P < 0.01). However, embryos derived from oocytes with Bos indicus mtDNA had the same ability to develop to the blastocyst stage and the levels of mtDNA copy number in their blastocysts were similar to blastocysts derived from oocytes harbouring Bos taurus mtDNA. Nevertheless, oocytes originating from the Bos indicus phenotype exhibited lower developmental potential due to low mtDNA copy number when compared with oocytes from cattle with a Bos

  1. Cloning cattle: the methods in the madness.

    PubMed

    Oback, Björn; Wells, David N

    2007-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is much more widely and efficiently practiced in cattle than in any other species, making this arguably the most important mammal cloned to date. While the initial objective behind cattle cloning was commercially driven--in particular to multiply genetically superior animals with desired phenotypic traits and to produce genetically modified animals-researchers have now started to use bovine SCNT as a tool to address diverse questions in developmental and cell biology. In this paper, we review current cattle cloning methodologies and their potential technical or biological pitfalls at any step of the procedure. In doing so, we focus on one methodological parameter, namely donor cell selection. We emphasize the impact of epigenetic and genetic differences between embryonic, germ, and somatic donor cell types on cloning efficiency. Lastly, we discuss adult phenotypes and fitness of cloned cattle and their offspring and illustrate some of the more imminent commercial cattle cloning applications.

  2. Eimeriosis in cattle: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Daugschies, A; Najdrowski, M

    2005-12-01

    This report addresses various aspects of the protozoan parasite Eimeria which contribute to their increasing recognition as important protozoal pathogens in cattle. Among others, questions of parasite biology and epidemiology, its impact on host physiology, and control strategies are dealt with. The tenacious oocysts are found ubiquitously in the environment making an infection of calves and young cattle, the most susceptible age group, almost inevitable. Further development, comprising of asexual multiplication, the merogony, and a subsequent sexual stage, the gamogony, takes place within cells of the small and large intestines, after which numerous unsporulated oocysts are formed and shed with the faeces. Of the more than a dozen species, Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii only are made responsible for severe clinical disease characterized by haemorrhagic diarrhoea with sometimes fatal outcome. To a lesser extent, Eimeria alabamensis also can cause clinical disease. Because of the damage inflicted on the intestinal tissue, the digestive process and overall homeostasis can become severely affected, even with absence of clinical disease, with adverse effects on animal welfare and performance. The consequent economic losses for the cattle industry are thus substantial. Active (species specific) immunity, both humoral and cellular, develops rapidly after first antigen contact, its intensity being dependent on the number of oocysts ingested. However, no absolute protection is achieved and even older animals can excrete oocysts, contributing to a state of endemic stability. For efficient control, exact diagnosis of the Eimeria species involved and the evaluation of animal management and husbandry practices are of utmost importance. Mixed infections are the rule and only an occurrence of pathogenic species, together with clinical symptoms, justifies the assumption of a coccidiosis. Proper hygiene regime and ensuring unfavourable conditions for oocyst survival in the

  3. Peanut by-products fed to cattle.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gary M

    2002-07-01

    Peanut by-products supply substantial quantities of feedstuffs to beef cattle grown in the same region where peanuts are produced. Included in the list of products fed to cattle are peanuts and peanut meal, peanut skins, peanut hulls, peanut hay, and silages. Residual peanut hay is by far the most widely used peanut by-product fed to beef cattle, and if it is properly harvested with minimal leaf shatter, it is comparable to good-quality grass hays in nutrient content. Peanut skins are often included in small quantities in cattle and pet foods, supplying both protein and energy. High tannin content of peanut skins can cause severe performance depressions in beef cattle if peanut skins are included at levels higher than 10% of the diet, unless diets contain relatively high CP (above 15% CP), or additional N sources are added such as ammonia or urea. Because dairy cattle diets are often above 16% CP in the total dietary DM, peanut skins may increase milk production when added at levels up to 16% of the dry matter. Peanut hulls are effectively used as a roughage source at levels up to 20% of beef finishing diets, for bedding in dairy cattle loafing sheds (if tested and found to contain low aflatoxin levels), and in a variety of manufactured products. Peanut hulls are economically priced because of their quantity, their inherent high fiber, and low CP content, and they should not be fed as a primary feedstuffs for beef cattle. Peanut by-products are generally priced below other by-products, and they can be incorporated into a variety of supplements and diets for cow herds, growing-finishing cattle, and dairy cattle.

  4. Cattle-related injuries and farm management practices on Kentucky beef cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Browning, S R; Westneat, S C; Sanderson, W T; Reed, D B

    2013-01-01

    While working on farms with livestock increases the risk of injury among farm workers in comparison to other commodity farms, few studies have examined the role offarm management practices in association with the risk of cattle-related injury. We examined the farm management practices of Kentucky beef cattle farms in association with self-reported rates of cattle-related injuries among workers. We conducted a mail survey of a random sample of 2,500 members of the Kentucky Cattlemen's Association. Results from 1,149 farm operators who were currently raising beef cattle and provided complete survey response are reported. During the busy season, the principal operator worked 20 hours per week on the beef operation, and among all farm employees, the beef operation required 35 hours per week (median cumulative hours). There were 157 farms that reported a cattle-related injury in the past year among the principal operator or a family member, yielding an annual cattle-related injury rate of 13.7 beef cattle farms per 100 reporting at least one cattle-related injury. The majority of these injuries were associated with transporting cattle, using cattle-related equipment (head gates, chutes, etc.), and performing medical or herd health tasks on the animal. A multivariable logistic regression analysis of cattle-related injuries indicated that the risk of injury increased with increasing herd size, increasing hours devoted to the cattle operation per week by all workers, and the number of different medical tasks or treatments performed on cattle without the presence of a veterinarian. Farms that performed 9 to 13 tasks/treatments without a veterinarian had a two-fold increased risk of a cattle-related injury (OR = 1.98; 95% Cl: 1.08-3.62) in comparison to farms that performed 0 to 4 tasks without a veterinarian. In adjusted analyses, the use of an ATV or Gator for cattle herding was associated with a significantly reduced risk of cattle-related injury (OR = 0.51; 95% CI: 0

  5. 9 CFR 78.7 - Brucellosis reactor cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor cattle. 78.7... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.7 Brucellosis reactor cattle. (a) Destination. Brucellosis reactor cattle may be moved interstate only for immediate slaughter as follows:...

  6. 9 CFR 78.12 - Cattle from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cattle from quarantined areas. 78.12... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.12 Cattle from quarantined areas. Not withstanding any provisions in the regulations to the contrary, cattle may be moved interstate from a...

  7. 9 CFR 78.7 - Brucellosis reactor cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor cattle. 78.7... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.7 Brucellosis reactor cattle. (a) Destination. Brucellosis reactor cattle may be moved interstate only for immediate slaughter as follows: (1...

  8. 9 CFR 78.12 - Cattle from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cattle from quarantined areas. 78.12... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.12 Cattle from quarantined areas. Not withstanding any provisions in the regulations to the contrary, cattle may be moved interstate from a...

  9. 9 CFR 78.12 - Cattle from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cattle from quarantined areas. 78.12... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.12 Cattle from quarantined areas. Not withstanding any provisions in the regulations to the contrary, cattle may be moved interstate from a...

  10. 9 CFR 78.8 - Brucellosis exposed cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed cattle. 78.8... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.8 Brucellosis exposed cattle. Brucellosis exposed cattle may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized slaughtering...

  11. 9 CFR 50.18 - Identification and disposal of cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Identification and disposal of cattle... DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS Dairy Cattle and Facilities in the El Paso, Texas, Region § 50.18 Identification and disposal of cattle. (a) All dairy cattle disposed of under this subpart must travel from the...

  12. 9 CFR 50.18 - Identification and disposal of cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Identification and disposal of cattle... DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS Dairy Cattle and Facilities in the El Paso, Texas, Region § 50.18 Identification and disposal of cattle. (a) All dairy cattle disposed of under this subpart must travel from the...

  13. 9 CFR 78.12 - Cattle from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cattle from quarantined areas. 78.12... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.12 Cattle from quarantined areas. Not withstanding any provisions in the regulations to the contrary, cattle may be moved interstate from a...

  14. 9 CFR 50.18 - Identification and disposal of cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Identification and disposal of cattle... DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS Dairy Cattle and Facilities in the El Paso, Texas, Region § 50.18 Identification and disposal of cattle. (a) All dairy cattle disposed of under this subpart must travel from the...

  15. 9 CFR 78.8 - Brucellosis exposed cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed cattle. 78.8... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.8 Brucellosis exposed cattle. Brucellosis exposed cattle may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized slaughtering...

  16. 9 CFR 78.12 - Cattle from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cattle from quarantined areas. 78.12... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.12 Cattle from quarantined areas. Not withstanding any provisions in the regulations to the contrary, cattle may be moved interstate from a...

  17. 9 CFR 78.8 - Brucellosis exposed cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed cattle. 78.8... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.8 Brucellosis exposed cattle. Brucellosis exposed cattle may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized slaughtering...

  18. 9 CFR 78.7 - Brucellosis reactor cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor cattle. 78.7... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.7 Brucellosis reactor cattle. (a) Destination. Brucellosis reactor cattle may be moved interstate only for immediate slaughter as follows: (1...

  19. 9 CFR 50.18 - Identification and disposal of cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Identification and disposal of cattle... DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS Dairy Cattle and Facilities in the El Paso, Texas, Region § 50.18 Identification and disposal of cattle. (a) All dairy cattle disposed of under this subpart must travel from the...

  20. 9 CFR 78.7 - Brucellosis reactor cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor cattle. 78.7... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.7 Brucellosis reactor cattle. (a) Destination. Brucellosis reactor cattle may be moved interstate only for immediate slaughter as follows: (1...

  1. 9 CFR 78.8 - Brucellosis exposed cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed cattle. 78.8... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.8 Brucellosis exposed cattle. Brucellosis exposed cattle may be moved interstate only as follows: (a) Movement to recognized slaughtering...

  2. 9 CFR 78.7 - Brucellosis reactor cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor cattle. 78.7... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.7 Brucellosis reactor cattle. (a) Destination. Brucellosis reactor cattle may be moved interstate only for immediate slaughter as follows: (1...

  3. 9 CFR 93.418 - Cattle from Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... (1) Cattle from Canada from a herd in which any cattle have been determined to have tuberculosis... from a tuberculosis-free herd; or (B) The date and place the cattle were last tested for tuberculosis; that the cattle were found negative for tuberculosis on such test; and that such test was...

  4. Pathogenesis of Influenza D Virus in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Alicia K.; Genova, Suzanne; Epperson, William B.; Smith, David R.; Schneider, Liesel; Barton, Kathleen; McCuan, Katlin; Webby, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cattle have been proposed as the natural reservoir of a novel member of the virus family Orthomyxoviridae, which has been tentatively classified as influenza D virus (IDV). Although isolated from sick animals, it is unclear whether IDV causes any clinical disease in cattle. To address this aspect of Koch's postulates, three dairy calves (treatment animals) held in individual pens were inoculated intranasally with IDV strain D/bovine/Mississippi/C00046N/2014. At 1 day postinoculation, a seronegative calf (contact animal) was added to each of the treatment animal pens. The cattle in both treatment and contact groups seroconverted, and virus was detected in their respiratory tracts. Histologically, there was a significant increase in neutrophil tracking in tracheal epithelia of the treatment calves compared to control animals. While infected and contact animals demonstrated various symptoms of respiratory tract infection, they were mild, and the calves in the treatment group did not differ from the controls in terms of heart rate, respiratory rate, or rectal temperature. To mimic zoonotic transmission, two ferrets were exposed to a plastic toy fomite soaked with infected nasal discharge from the treatment calves. These ferrets did not shed the virus or seroconvert. In summary, this study demonstrates that IDV causes a mild respiratory disease upon experimental infection of cattle and can be transmitted effectively among cattle by in-pen contact, but not from cattle to ferrets through fomite exposure. These findings support the hypothesis that cattle are a natural reservoir for the virus. IMPORTANCE A novel influenza virus, tentatively classified as influenza D virus (IDV), was identified in swine, cattle, sheep, and goats. Among these hosts, cattle have been proposed as the natural reservoir. In this study, we show that cattle experimentally infected with IDV can shed virus and transmit it to other cattle through direct contact, but not to ferrets through

  5. Genome edited sheep and cattle.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Chris; Carlson, Daniel F; Huddart, Rachel; Long, Charles R; Pryor, Jane H; King, Tim J; Lillico, Simon G; Mileham, Alan J; McLaren, David G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2015-02-01

    Genome editing tools enable efficient and accurate genome manipulation. An enhanced ability to modify the genomes of livestock species could be utilized to improve disease resistance, productivity or breeding capability as well as the generation of new biomedical models. To date, with respect to the direct injection of genome editor mRNA into livestock zygotes, this technology has been limited to the generation of pigs with edited genomes. To capture the far-reaching applications of gene-editing, from disease modelling to agricultural improvement, the technology must be easily applied to a number of species using a variety of approaches. In this study, we demonstrate zygote injection of TALEN mRNA can also produce gene-edited cattle and sheep. In both species we have targeted the myostatin (MSTN) gene. In addition, we report a critical innovation for application of gene-editing to the cattle industry whereby gene-edited calves can be produced with specified genetics by ovum pickup, in vitro fertilization and zygote microinjection (OPU-IVF-ZM). This provides a practical alternative to somatic cell nuclear transfer for gene knockout or introgression of desirable alleles into a target breed/genetic line.

  6. Eradication of Lice in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Nafstad, O; Grønstøl, H

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this field study was to develop and evaluate eradication as a strategy to control lice in cattle. Thirty-three herds of cattle were selected and observed during a period of two and a half years. Before eradication, biting lice (Damalinia bovis) were present in 94% of the herds and 27% of the animals. Sucking lice (Linognathus vituli) were present in 42% of the herds and 5% of the animals. These levels were very similar to those reported from other countries in Northern Europe. The eradication strategy was successful in 28 of 33 herds, but lice were still present in 5 herds 3 to 6 months after treatment. Biting lice were present in all these 5 herds, sucking lice were present in 3 herds. During the next 12 months, nine of the 28 herds were reinfected with lice. Six herds were reinfected with just biting lice, 2 herds with just sucking lice and one herd was reinfected with both. There was no significant difference between the 2 louse species regarding the risk of unsuccessful eradication or reinfection. The only significant risk factor for reinfection was either purchase of livestock or use of common pasture, combined with failure in pre-treatment of newly introduced animals. PMID:11455904

  7. Pulmonary venous sphincters in cattle.

    PubMed

    Aharinejad, S; Egerbacher, M; Nourani, F; Böck, P; Friederici, C; Schraufnagel, D E

    1996-11-01

    The pulmonary veins of rats have regular focal narrowing by tufts of smooth muscle (sphincters) that can contract in response to a variety of stimuli, but these structures are not well studied in other species, and there is little information about their innervation and control. The pulmonary veins of 21 cattle were cast with methacrylate, and the casts were studied by scanning electron microscopy, or the fixed tissue was studied by light microscopy with immunocytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Constrictions occurred in series along the course of veins (9.6/500 microns), giving the cast veins a string-of-pearl look, with narrowing of 33-81% of the outer diameter. No resin appeared beyond the most narrowed veins. The percentage of contraction did not correlate with the diameter of the veins. With immunohistochemistry using antibodies to S-100, protein gene peptide 9.5, neuron-specific enolase, neurofilament 200, and glial fibrillary acidic protein and with transmission electron microscopy, we could identify no neuronal elements associated with the venous smooth muscle tufts. Bronchial smooth muscle bundles in the same sections stained positively. The veins of cattle are unlike the rat because the focal venous smooth muscle protrudes deeply into the venous lumen and may completely obstruct perfusion. If the focal venous muscle has no innervation (this study) and can constrict without blood flow (as shown previously), then the venous constriction and, hence, local blood flow regulation must be controlled by local mediators.

  8. Genome engineering in cattle: recent technological advancements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongde

    2015-02-01

    Great strides in technological advancements have been made in the past decade in cattle genome engineering. First, the success of cloning cattle by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) or chromatin transfer (CT) is a significant advancement that has made obsolete the need for using embryonic stem (ES) cells to conduct cell-mediated genome engineering, whereby site-specific genetic modifications can be conducted in bovine somatic cells via DNA homologous recombination (HR) and whereby genetically engineered cattle can subsequently be produced by animal cloning from the genetically modified cells. With this approach, a chosen bovine genomic locus can be precisely modified in somatic cells, such as to knock out (KO) or knock in (KI) a gene via HR, a gene-targeting strategy that had almost exclusively been used in mouse ES cells. Furthermore, by the creative application of embryonic cloning to rejuvenate somatic cells, cattle genome can be sequentially modified in the same line of somatic cells and complex genetic modifications have been achieved in cattle. Very recently, the development of designer nucleases-such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-has enabled highly efficient and more facile genome engineering in cattle. Most notably, by employing such designer nucleases, genomes can be engineered at single-nucleotide precision; this process is now often referred to as genome or gene editing. The above achievements are a drastic departure from the traditional methods of creating genetically modified cattle, where foreign DNAs are randomly integrated into the animal genome, most often along with the integrations of bacterial or viral DNAs. Here, I review the most recent technological developments in cattle genome engineering by highlighting some of the major achievements in creating genetically engineered

  9. Hybanthus calceolaria poisoning in cattle.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fabricio K L; Nascimento, Eduardo M; Rocha, Brena P; Mendonça, Fábio S; Veschi, Josir L A; Silva, Silvana M M S; Medeiros, Rosane M T; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2014-09-01

    Hybanthus calceolaria, also known as "papaconha" or "ipepacuanha," is a herbaceous plant found in northeastern Brazil, which is often implicated by farmers as the cause of neurological signs in livestock grazing. Several poisoning outbreaks associated with the ingestion of this plant were observed in cattle in the municipalities of Colônia de Gurguéia in the state of Piauí and Sirinhaém in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. The main clinical signs were ataxia, recumbency, and myokymia. No significant lesions were observed during necropsy or on histological examination. The disease was experimentally reproduced by the administration of 2 daily doses of 40 g/kg/body weight of the fresh green plant containing fruits. The plants without fruits were nontoxic, which is in accordance with the farmers' information, as it was stated that the poisoning only occurs when the plant is fruiting. © 2014 The Author(s).

  10. [Botulism in cattle, a review].

    PubMed

    Haagsma, J

    1991-07-01

    Botulism in cattle is reviewed in the present paper. General information concerning the aetiology and symptomatology of the disease is followed by a discussion of the epidemiological situation in the Netherlands. Since 1975 several outbreaks of botulism type C or D have occurred. Poultry litter in which toxic carcasses were present, was the most important source of the toxin. An increasing number of cases of botulism type D was reported in recent years, which was probably due to the fact that poultry is not susceptible to toxin type D and therefore the presence of type D toxin is difficult to recognise timely. In addition, atypical cases of type B botulism occurred in the Netherlands during the period from 1977 to 1978, which were caused by supplementary feeding of brewer's grains. Finally, the diagnostic problems, differential diagnosis, prevention, treatment and public health aspects are discussed.

  11. International genomic evaluation methods for dairy cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background Genomic evaluations are rapidly replacing traditional evaluation systems used for dairy cattle selection. Economies of scale in genomics promote cooperation across country borders. Genomic information can be transferred across countries using simple conversion equations, by modifying mult...

  12. Biological control of cattle fever ticks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle fever ticks (CFT) Rhipicephalus microplus and Rhipicephalus annulatus are invasive livestock pests that are endemic to Mexico and invasive along the Texas – Mexico border. Acaricide resistance, alternate wildlife hosts, and pathogenic landscape forming weeds present challenges for sustainable...

  13. Models of bovine babesiosis including juvenile cattle.

    PubMed

    Saad-Roy, C M; Shuai, Zhisheng; van den Driessche, P

    2015-03-01

    Bovine Babesiosis in cattle is caused by the transmission of protozoa of Babesia spp. by ticks as vectors. Juvenile cattle (<9 months of age) have resistance to Bovine Babesiosis, rarely show symptoms, and acquire immunity upon recovery. Susceptibility to the disease varies between breeds of cattle. Models of the dynamics of Bovine Babesiosis transmitted by the cattle tick that include these factors are formulated as systems of ordinary differential equations. Basic reproduction numbers are calculated, and it is proved that if these numbers are below the threshold value of one, then Bovine Babesiosis dies out. However, above the threshold number of one, the disease may approach an endemic state. In this case, control measures are suggested by determining target reproduction numbers. The percentage of a particular population (for example, the adult bovine population) needed to be controlled to eradicate the disease is evaluated numerically using Columbia data from the literature.

  14. Thermal balance of Nellore cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo Costa, Cíntia Carol; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Nascimento, Sheila Tavares; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; Neto, Marcos Chiquitelli; de França Carvalho Fonsêca, Vinícius

    2017-04-01

    This work aimed at characterizing the thermal balance of Nellore cattle from the system of indirect calorimetry using a facial mask. The study was conducted at the Animal Biometeorology Laboratory of the São Paulo State University, Jaboticabal, Brazil. Five male Nellore weighing 750 ± 62 kg, at similar ages and body conditions were distributed in four 5 × 5 Latin squares (5 days of records and five schedules) during 20 days. Physiological and environmental measurements were obtained from the indirect calorimetry system using a facial mask. Respiratory parameters, hair coat, skin, and rectal temperature were continuously recorded. From this, metabolic heat production, sensible and latent ways of heat transfer were calculated. Metabolic heat production had an average value of 146.7 ± 0.49 W m-2 and did not change (P > 0.05) over the range of air temperature (24 to 35 °C). Sensible heat flow reached 60.08 ± 0.81 W m-2 when air temperature ranged from 24 to 25 °C, being negligible in conditions of temperature above 33 °C. Most of the heat produced by metabolism was dissipated by cutaneous evaporation when air temperature was greater than 30 °C. Respiratory parameters like respiratory rate and ventilation remained stable (P > 0.05) in the range of temperature studied. Under shade conditions and air temperature range from 24 to 35 °C, metabolic heat production, respiratory rate, and ventilation of mature Nellore cattle remain stable, which is indicative of low energetic cost to the thermoregulation.

  15. Genetic and phenotypic relationships of feed intake and measures of efficiency with growth and carcass merit of beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Nkrumah, J D; Basarab, J A; Wang, Z; Li, C; Price, M A; Okine, E K; Crews, D H; Moore, S S

    2007-10-01

    Feed intake and efficiency of growth are economically important traits of beef cattle. This study determined the relationships of daily DMI, feed:gain ratio [F:G, which is the reciprocal of the efficiency of gain (G:F) and therefore increases as the efficiency of gain decreases and vice versa, residual feed intake (RFI), and partial efficiency of growth (efficiency of ADG, PEG) with growth and carcass merit of beef cattle. Residual feed intake was calculated from phenotypic regression (RFIp) or genetic regression (RFIg) of ADG and metabolic BW on DMI. An F1 half-sib pedigree file containing 28 sires, 321 dams, and 464 progeny produced from crosses between Alberta Hybrid cows and Angus, Charolais, or Alberta Hybrid bulls was used. Families averaged 20 progeny per sire (range = 3 to 56). Performance, ultrasound, and DMI data was available on all progeny, of which 381 had carcass data. Phenotypic and genetic parameters were obtained using SAS and ASREML software, respectively. Differences in RFIp and RFIg, respectively, between the most and least efficient steers (i.e., steers with the lowest PEG) were 5.59 and 6.84 kg of DM/d. Heritabilities for DMI, F:G, PEG, RFIp, and RFIg were 0.54 +/- 0.15, 0.41 +/- 0.15, 0.56 +/- 0.16, 0.21 +/- 0.12, and 0.42 +/- 0.15, respectively. The genetic (r = 0.92) and phenotypic (r = 0.97) correlations between RFIp and RFIg indicated that the 2 indices are very similar. Both indices of RFI were favorably correlated phenotypically (P < 0.001) and genetically with DMI, F:G, and PEG. Residual feed intake was tendentiously genetically correlated with ADG (r = 0.46 +/- 0.45) and metabolic BW (r = 0.27 +/- 0.33), albeit with high SE. Genetically, RFIg was independent of ADG and BW but showed a phenotypic correlation with ADG (r = -0.21; P < 0.05). Daily DMI was correlated genetically (r = 0.28) and phenotypically (r = 0.30) with F:G. Both DMI and F:G were strongly correlated with ADG (r > 0.50), but only DMI had strong genetic (r = 0.87 +/- 0

  16. Validation of Deleterious Mutations in Vorderwald Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Reinartz, Sina; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    In Montbéliarde cattle two candidate mutations on bovine chromosomes 19 and 29 responsible for embryonic lethality have been detected. Montbéliarde bulls have been introduced into Vorderwald cattle to improve milk and fattening performance. Due to the small population size of Vorderwald cattle and the wide use of a few Montbéliarde bulls through artificial insemination, inbreeding on Montbéliarde bulls in later generations was increasing. Therefore, we genotyped an aborted fetus which was inbred on Montbéliarde as well as Vorderwald x Montbéliarde crossbred bulls for both deleterious mutations. The abortion was observed in an experimental herd of Vorderwald cattle. The objectives of the present study were to prove if one or both lethal mutations may be assumed to have caused this abortion and to show whether these deleterious mutations have been introduced into the Vorderwald cattle population through Montbéliarde bulls. The aborted fetus was homozygous for the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation (ss2019324563) on BTA29 and both parents as well as the paternal and maternal grandsire were heterozygous for this mutation. In addition, the parents and the paternal grandsire were carriers of the MH2-haplotype linked with the T-allele of the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation. For the SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation (rs38377500) on BTA19 (MH1), the aborted fetus and its sire were heterozygous. Among all further 341 Vorderwald cattle genotyped we found 27 SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T heterozygous animals resulting in an allele frequency of 0.0396. Among the 120 male Vorderwald cattle, there were 12 heterozygous with an allele frequency of 0.05. The SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation could not be found in further nine cattle breeds nor in Vorderwald cattle with contributions from Ayrshire bulls. In 69 Vorderwald cattle without genes from Montbéliarde bulls the mutated allele of SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T could not be detected. The SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation appeared unlikely to be responsible

  17. Validation of Deleterious Mutations in Vorderwald Cattle.

    PubMed

    Reinartz, Sina; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    In Montbéliarde cattle two candidate mutations on bovine chromosomes 19 and 29 responsible for embryonic lethality have been detected. Montbéliarde bulls have been introduced into Vorderwald cattle to improve milk and fattening performance. Due to the small population size of Vorderwald cattle and the wide use of a few Montbéliarde bulls through artificial insemination, inbreeding on Montbéliarde bulls in later generations was increasing. Therefore, we genotyped an aborted fetus which was inbred on Montbéliarde as well as Vorderwald x Montbéliarde crossbred bulls for both deleterious mutations. The abortion was observed in an experimental herd of Vorderwald cattle. The objectives of the present study were to prove if one or both lethal mutations may be assumed to have caused this abortion and to show whether these deleterious mutations have been introduced into the Vorderwald cattle population through Montbéliarde bulls. The aborted fetus was homozygous for the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation (ss2019324563) on BTA29 and both parents as well as the paternal and maternal grandsire were heterozygous for this mutation. In addition, the parents and the paternal grandsire were carriers of the MH2-haplotype linked with the T-allele of the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation. For the SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation (rs38377500) on BTA19 (MH1), the aborted fetus and its sire were heterozygous. Among all further 341 Vorderwald cattle genotyped we found 27 SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T heterozygous animals resulting in an allele frequency of 0.0396. Among the 120 male Vorderwald cattle, there were 12 heterozygous with an allele frequency of 0.05. The SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation could not be found in further nine cattle breeds nor in Vorderwald cattle with contributions from Ayrshire bulls. In 69 Vorderwald cattle without genes from Montbéliarde bulls the mutated allele of SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T could not be detected. The SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation appeared unlikely to be responsible

  18. Cattle temperament influences metabolism: 1. Metabolic response to a glucose tolerance test in beef steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Temperamental cattle are behaviorally, physiologically, and immunologically different in comparison to calm cattle. Recently, the metabolic differences between temperamental and calm cattle have begun to be explored; temperamental cattle maintain greater circulating concentrations of non-esterified ...

  19. A cross-sectional study of factors associated with birth weights of Norwegian beef calves.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Sindre T; Martin, Adam D; Holmøy, Ingrid H; Karlberg, Knut; Nødtvedt, Ane

    2016-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate factors which influence birth weights of beef suckler calves in Norway. Data were from a national beef cattle registry, and lifetime production data of cows slaughtered between January 2010 and January 2013 were included in the study population. The study population consisted of 20,541 cows and 53,819 calves. The analysis was performed on the subset of singleton calvings from which birth weights were recorded. The study sample consisted of 9903 cows with birth weights available for 29,294 calves. The mean birth weight was 43.47kg (95% CI 43.40; 43.53). Two multilevel linear regression models were built; the first was for all calves and included parity of dam as one of the explanatory variables (with herd and cow as random effects), the second model was for calves born to primiparous dams only where age of first calving was included as an explanatory variable (with a random herd effect). The multilevel regression models estimated that female calves were 2.3kg lighter than males (95% CI 2.2-2.4, P<0.001), that calves of Norwegian Red, Charolais, Aberdeen Angus and "Other" born in the western part of Norway were lighter than from all other regions, and that calving in the autumn yielded lighter offspring than calving other parts of the year. Furthermore, calves born from primiparous cows were heavier than calves from older cows. Herd explained a large proportion of the variation in birth weights (40% and 37%, in the full and heifer models, respectively), and both the herd and cow random effects were highly significant. In conclusion, birth weights of beef calves in the Norwegian Beef Cattle Recording System were influenced by sex of the calf, breed of the dam, parity, age at first calving, calving season, cow, herd and region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of tendon disorders in cattle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David E; Desrochers, André; St Jean, Guy

    2008-11-01

    This article describes tendon disorders in cattle and treatments for such disorders. Tendon injuries causing loss of a production animal or a decreased level of production result in significant economic loss to the cattle producer. Tendon disorders may be congenital or acquired. Congenital abnormalities may include tendon laxity, contracted tendons, or tendon displacement. Acquired tendon disorders may include tendon laxity, contracture, luxation, tendinitis, laceration, avulsion, rupture, and tenosynovitis.

  1. Decision analysis for fracture management in cattle.

    PubMed

    St Jean, Guy; Anderson, David E

    2014-03-01

    Bovine fractures are common and each bovine patient is unique, presents innumerable challenges, and requires careful judgment. In cattle the fracture repair usually should be of acceptable quality to not cause a decrease in milk or meat production or interfere with natural breeding. The decision to treat a fracture in cattle is made by evaluating the cost and success rates of the treatment, the value of the animal, and the location and type of fracture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Optic pathway degeneration in Japanese black cattle.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Shiori; Funato, Shingo; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2015-02-01

    Degeneration of the optic pathway has been reported in various animal species including cattle. We experienced a case of bilateral optic tract degeneration characterized by severe gliosis in a Japanese black cattle without any obvious visual defects. To evaluate the significance, pathological nature and pathogenesis of the lesions, we examined the optic pathway in 60 cattle (41 Japanese black, 13 Holstein and 6 crossbreed) with or without ocular abnormalities. None of these animals had optic canal stenosis. Degenerative changes with severe gliosis in the optic pathway, which includes the optic nerve, optic chiasm and optic tract, were only observed in 8 Japanese black cattle with or without ocular abnormalities. Furthermore, strong immunoreactivity of glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the retinal stratum opticum and ganglion cell layer in all 5 cattle in which the optic pathway lesions could be examined. As etiological research, we also examined whether the concentrations of vitamin A and vitamin B12 or bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection was associated with optic pathway degeneration. However, our results suggested that the observed optic pathway degeneration was probably not caused by these factors. These facts indicate the presence of optic pathway degeneration characterized by severe gliosis that has never been reported in cattle without bilateral compressive lesions in the optic pathway or bilateral severe retinal atrophy.

  3. Optic pathway degeneration in Japanese black cattle

    PubMed Central

    CHIBA, Shiori; FUNATO, Shingo; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; MATSUMOTO, Kotaro; INOKUMA, Hisashi; FURUOKA, Hidefumi; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of the optic pathway has been reported in various animal species including cattle. We experienced a case of bilateral optic tract degeneration characterized by severe gliosis in a Japanese black cattle without any obvious visual defects. To evaluate the significance, pathological nature and pathogenesis of the lesions, we examined the optic pathway in 60 cattle (41 Japanese black, 13 Holstein and 6 crossbreed) with or without ocular abnormalities. None of these animals had optic canal stenosis. Degenerative changes with severe gliosis in the optic pathway, which includes the optic nerve, optic chiasm and optic tract, were only observed in 8 Japanese black cattle with or without ocular abnormalities. Furthermore, strong immunoreactivity of glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the retinal stratum opticum and ganglion cell layer in all 5 cattle in which the optic pathway lesions could be examined. As etiological research, we also examined whether the concentrations of vitamin A and vitamin B12 or bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection was associated with optic pathway degeneration. However, our results suggested that the observed optic pathway degeneration was probably not caused by these factors. These facts indicate the presence of optic pathway degeneration characterized by severe gliosis that has never been reported in cattle without bilateral compressive lesions in the optic pathway or bilateral severe retinal atrophy. PMID:25421501

  4. Apparent thiamin status of cattle and its relationship to polioencephalomalacia.

    PubMed Central

    Loew, F M; Bettany, J M; Halifax, C E

    1975-01-01

    The thiamin status (thiamin concentration in whole blood, plasma, and erythrocytes; erythrocyte transketolase activity) of normal cattle consuming varying diets did not differ from that of cattle with polioencephalomalacia or lead poisoning. Dairy cattle had higher ruminal content of thiamin and lower thiamin destroying activity than did beef cattle. Renal oxalosis was no more frequent in cattle which had polioencephalomalacia than in postnatal calves. In normal beef cattle, approximately 75% of total blood thiamin is in erythrocytes and the remainder in plasma. PMID:237625

  5. Investigating Outbreaks of Disease or Impaired Productivity in Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Smith, David R

    2015-11-01

    Most cattle move through cattle feeding and finishing systems without health problems or impairment of productivity, but some cattle do become ill or unproductive. When cattle get sick, understanding what has gone wrong and how to remedy the situation is important. An orderly, systematic approach to investigating disease outbreaks is more likely to lead to a solution. The solution may come from identifying and modifying human decisions or behaviors that may be far removed in time or place from the immediate problem. Veterinarians can help cattle feeders recognize and correct the system dynamics factors affecting cattle health and performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Feeding in relation to suckler cow management and fertility.

    PubMed

    Lowman, B G

    1985-07-27

    Profitable suckled calf production, like any other business, depends on the balance between costs and output (Fig 1). The major costs incurred in suckled calf production are feed costs to the cow. Output is simply the weight of weaned calf sold per cow put to the bull, coupled with planned marketing of good quality, cull cows. To maintain this balance at an optimum level requires correct herd management. This can only be achieved with all cows in the herd being at a similar stage of production--a compact two-month calving period. In the long term, a compact two month calving period can only be maintained with correct management of bulling and first-calved heifers. Day-to-day management decisions must be based on the current condition of the cows in relation to the target condition scores set for the system. Understanding this model allows a simple management system to be implemented and achieve the high levels of fertility and suckled calf output required for a profitable enterprise in today's economic climate.

  7. Genetic and phenotypic parameter estimates for feed intake and other traits in growing beef cattle, and opportunities for selection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Growth, feed intake, and temperament indicator data, collected over 5 yr on a total of 1,141 to 1,183 mixed-breed steers, were used to estimate genetic and phenotypic parameters. All steers had a portion of either Hereford or Angus or both plus varying percentages also of Simmental, Charolais, Limo...

  8. Design and Formative Evaluation of an Information Kiosk on Cattle Health for Landless Cattle Owners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramkumar, S.; Garforth, C.; Rao, S. V. N.; Heffernan, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the experience of designing, installing and evaluating a farmer-usable touch screen information kiosk on cattle health in a veterinary institution in Pondicherry. The contents of the kiosk were prepared based on identified demands for information on cattle health, arrived at through various stakeholders meetings.…

  9. Ticks on Deer and Cattle in the Cattle Fever Tick Permanent Quarantine Zone, 2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ticks were sampled from hosts in the cattle fever tick permanent quarantine zone along the Texas-Mexico border on five occasions in 2012. Three sample events involved white-tailed deer populations in Zapata and Starr Counties and two were from a cattle herd in Kinney County. Six species of ticks (n ...

  10. Worker Injuries Involving the Interaction of Cattle, Cattle Handlers, and Farm Structures or Equipment.

    PubMed

    Fox, Shannon; Ricketts, Mitch; Minton, J Ernest

    2015-01-01

    Cattle have been identified as leading sources of injuries to agricultural workers. The present study focused on worker injuries that involved the interaction of cattle, cattle handlers, and farm structures or equipment. The goal of the study was to identify opportunities for injury prevention. We examined 221 reports of injury to cattle handlers from the Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). Expected interactions led to many of the cattle-handling injuries reported in the NEISS database. In almost 30% of cases, cattle pushed workers into structures such as fences, gates, posts, and walls. In another 16% to 19% of injuries, cattle struck gates and other objects, propelling them at the victims. The present research makes several important contributions to the study of cattle-handling injuries. First, the research supports an increased emphasis on the development of safer gate designs (e.g., gates that are remotely operated or that absorb energy to limit the speed at which they may be propelled by animals). Second, the research suggests a need for additional study of energy-absorbing fence and wall structures. We view these two points to be of significance because gates and associated structures (e.g., posts, fences, and walls) accounted for 45% of the injuries in the dataset, based on the associated injury narrative. Finally, the research identifies a previously unexplored source of agricultural injury data, namely the NEISS database.

  11. Design and Formative Evaluation of an Information Kiosk on Cattle Health for Landless Cattle Owners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramkumar, S.; Garforth, C.; Rao, S. V. N.; Heffernan, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the experience of designing, installing and evaluating a farmer-usable touch screen information kiosk on cattle health in a veterinary institution in Pondicherry. The contents of the kiosk were prepared based on identified demands for information on cattle health, arrived at through various stakeholders meetings.…

  12. Cattle genomics and its implications for future nutritional strategies for dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Seo, S; Larkin, D M; Loor, J J

    2013-03-01

    The recently sequenced cattle (Bos taurus) genome unraveled the unique genomic features of the species and provided the molecular basis for applying a systemic approach to systematically link genomic information to metabolic traits. Comparative analysis has identified a variety of evolutionary adaptive features in the cattle genome, such as an expansion of the gene families related to the rumen function, large number of chromosomal rearrangements affecting regulation of genes for lactation, and chromosomal rearrangements that are associated with segmental duplications and copy number variations. Metabolic reconstruction of the cattle genome has revealed that core metabolic pathways are highly conserved among mammals although five metabolic genes are deleted or highly diverged and seven metabolic genes are present in duplicate in the cattle genome compared to their human counter parts. The evolutionary loss and gain of metabolic genes in the cattle genome may reflect metabolic adaptations of cattle. Metabolic reconstruction also provides a platform for better understanding of metabolic regulation in cattle and ruminants. A substantial body of transcriptomics data from dairy and beef cattle under different nutritional management and across different stages of growth and lactation are already available and will aid in linking the genome with metabolism and nutritional physiology of cattle. Application of cattle genomics has great potential for future development of nutritional strategies to improve efficiency and sustainability of beef and milk production. One of the biggest challenges is to integrate genomic and phenotypic data and interpret them in a biological and practical platform. Systems biology, a holistic and systemic approach, will be very useful in overcoming this challenge.

  13. Pasture-scale measurement of methane emissions of grazing cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantifying methane emission of cattle grazing on southern Great Plains pastures using micrometeorology presents several challenges. Cattle are elevated, mobile point sources of methane, so that knowing their location in relation to atmospheric methane concentration measurements becomes critical. St...

  14. 9. Detail of viaduct's structural system with cattle pens beneath. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail of viaduct's structural system with cattle pens beneath. View to northeast. - South Omaha Union Stock Yards, Buckingham Road Viaduct, Twenty-ninth Street spanning Stockyard Cattle Pens, Omaha, Douglas County, NE

  15. 9 CFR 93.427 - Cattle from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Mexico 10 § 93.427 Cattle from Mexico. (a) Cattle and other ruminants imported from Mexico, except animals being transported in bond for immediate return to Mexico...

  16. 9 CFR 93.427 - Cattle from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Mexico 10 § 93.427 Cattle from Mexico. (a) Cattle and other ruminants imported from Mexico, except animals being transported in bond for immediate return to Mexico...

  17. 9 CFR 93.427 - Cattle from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Mexico 10 § 93.427 Cattle from Mexico. (a) Cattle and other ruminants imported from Mexico, except animals being transported in bond for immediate return to Mexico...

  18. Influence of cattle temperament on blood serum fatty acid content

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle temperament has been reported to influence blood metabolites. Specifically, temperament was related with increased circulation of serum NEFA, decreased blood urea nitrogen, and reduced insulin sensitivity. Metabolic alterations such as these may impact cattle immune function, performance trai...

  19. Postpartum uterine health in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, I M; Dobson, H

    2004-07-01

    Uterine health is often compromised in cattle because postpartum contamination of the uterine lumen by bacteria is ubiquitous, and pathogenic bacteria frequently persist causing clinical disease. The subfertility associated with uterine infection involves perturbation of the hypothalamus, pituitary and ovary, in addition to the direct effects on the uterus, and appears to persist even after clinical resolution of the disease. Absorption of bacterial components from the uterus can prevent the follicular phase LH surge and ovulation. In addition, the first postpartum dominant follicle has a slower growth rate and secretes less estradiol at the end of the growth phase. There are also localised ovarian effects of high uterine bacterial growth density, because fewer first dominant follicles are selected in the ovary ipsilateral than contralateral to the previously gravid uterine horn. Thus, it is important to diagnose and treat uterine disease promptly and effectively. Examination of the contents of the vagina for the presence of pus is the most useful method for diagnosis of endometritis. The character and odor of the vaginal mucus can be scored and this endometritis score is correlated with the growth density of pathogenic bacteria in the uterus, and is prognostic for the likely success of treatment. The challenge for the future is to design prevention and control programs to reduce the incidence of disease, and understand how the immune and endocrine systems are integrated.

  20. Papillomas and cancer in cattle.

    PubMed

    Campo, M S

    1987-01-01

    Papillomaviruses induce hyperproliferation of epithelial cells of the skin or mucosa (papillomas), and certain types can also infect fibroblasts. They are a very heterogeneous group of viruses, and individual types are associated with specific lesions. The papillomas are mostly benign but some tumours may eventually undergo malignant conversion when genetic or environmental factors are involved. In cattle, bovine papillomavirus type 4 (BPV-4) is the causative agent of papillomas of the alimentary canal, which can become the focus for the development of carcinomas in animals feeding on the bracken fern. These animals are immunosuppressed and are often affected also by adenocarcinomas of the lower bowel and by carcinomas and haemangiosarcomas of the urinary bladder. Persistent, widespread papillomatosis and cancers of both the alimentary tract and the urinary bladder have been experimentally reproduced in animals either kept on a diet of bracken or immunosuppressed with azathioprine. As is the case for the naturally occurring cancers, no viral DNA was detected in the experimental cancers of the upper alimentary canal or of the lower bowel, indicating that the viral genome is not required for the maintenance of the malignant state. On the contrary, BPV-2 DNA was detected in several bladder cancers, both natural and experimental, suggesting that this virus can be present in a latent form and can be involved in malignant transformation. Further evidence of latent infection was provided by the onset of BPV-1 or BPV-2 skin warts in papillomatosis-free animals. These findings are obviously relevant to the human disease.

  1. Laparoscopic surgery in adult cattle.

    PubMed

    Babkine, Marie; Desrochers, André

    2005-03-01

    Laparoscopy in cattle is a promising tool for clinical diagnosis and treatment. The lower cost of the materials available in addition to the possibility of an intervention on an animal that is sedated does not entail more costs than an exploratory laparotomy. The application of this tool during abdominal explorations and biopsies allows the avoidance of invasive and often useless surgical interventions and even with the diagnosis and prognosis of certain conditions. Surgical techniques currently are limited to abomasopexies; however, never-ceasing progress and improvements in human surgery are expected to affect the future of bovine surgery. With the advancements in the multimedia technology used by universities, the use of laparoscopy as a pedagogic tool definitely has a promising future. Endoscopic exploration of the thorax is possible using the same material as for laparoscopy. In addition, diagnostic and biopsy applications are useful. The use of the laparoscope in different body cavities and for different applications would make the purchase of the required materials more cost-effective.

  2. Seroprevalence of Anaplasma marginale in Texas cattle.

    PubMed

    Hairgrove, Thomas B; Craig, Thomas M; Budke, Christine M; Rodgers, Sandy J; Gill, Ronald J

    2014-09-01

    To our knowledge the seroprevalence of Anaplasma marginale in Texas has not been reported. The objective of this study was to estimate the point seroprevalence and spatial distribution of Texas cattle persistently infected with A. marginale. This was a cross-sectional observational study examining serum collected from 12,000 adult cattle marketed in 23 selected Texas auction markets during the second week of July 2011. A random subset of those cattle comprising 1835 individuals was evaluated for persistent infection with A. marginale using a commercial cELISA for antibody detection. The pooled apparent seroprevalence for cattle tested at auction markets across the state was 15.02% (95% CI: 11.02-19.53%), with markets in the western portion of the state demonstrating prevalence ⇒ 30%. The winter tick, Dermacentor albipictus is involved in the biological transfer of A. marginale and is prevalent in west Texas. Producers in endemic and non-endemic areas should be encouraged to determine the infection status of replacement cattle in order to implement effective management strategies for the control bovine anaplasmosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurotuberculosis in cattle in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Konradt, Guilherme; Bassuino, Daniele Mariath; Bianchi, Matheus Viezzer; Bandinelli, Marcele Bettim; Driemeier, David; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis in cattle is a chronic infectious-contagious disease characterized by the development of nodular lesions (granulomas) in mainly the lungs and regional lymph nodes. It is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, an acid-fast bacillus (AFB). Tuberculosis in the central nervous system is a rare condition in cattle. Herein, we describe the clinical and pathological findings of six neurotuberculosis cases in cattle diagnosed in Southern Brazil. The average age of the cattle affected was 12 months, and they varied in breed and sex. The clinical history ranged from 5 to 30 days and was characterized by motor incoordination, opisthotonus, blindness, and progression to recumbency. The cattle were euthanized, and grossly, the leptomeninges at the basilar brain showed marked and diffuse expansion, with nodular yellowish lesions ranging in size. On microscopic examination, there were multifocal granulomas located mainly in the meninges, though sometimes extending to adjacent neuropil or existing as isolated granulomas in neuropil. AFBs were observed in the cytoplasm of epithelioid macrophages and multinucleated giant cells through Ziehl-Neelsen histochemical staining and identified as Mycobacterium sp. through immunohistochemistry.

  4. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sacco, R E; McGill, J L; Pillatzki, A E; Palmer, M V; Ackermann, M R

    2014-03-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a cause of respiratory disease in cattle worldwide. It has an integral role in enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bovine RSV infection can predispose calves to secondary bacterial infection by organisms such as Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni, resulting in bovine respiratory disease complex, the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among feedlot cattle. Even in cases where animals do not succumb to bovine respiratory disease complex, there can be long-term losses in production performance. This includes reductions in feed efficiency and rate of gain in the feedlot, as well as reproductive performance, milk production, and longevity in the breeding herd. As a result, economic costs to the cattle industry from bovine respiratory disease have been estimated to approach $1 billion annually due to death losses, reduced performance, and costs of vaccinations and treatment modalities. Human and bovine RSV are closely related viruses with similarities in histopathologic lesions and mechanisms of immune modulation induced following infection. Therefore, where appropriate, we provide comparisons between RSV infections in humans and cattle. This review article discusses key aspects of RSV infection of cattle, including epidemiology and strain variability, clinical signs and diagnosis, experimental infection, gross and microscopic lesions, innate and adaptive immune responses, and vaccination strategies.

  5. The genome landscape of indigenous African cattle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaemin; Hanotte, Olivier; Mwai, Okeyo Ally; Dessie, Tadelle; Bashir, Salim; Diallo, Boubacar; Agaba, Morris; Kim, Kwondo; Kwak, Woori; Sung, Samsun; Seo, Minseok; Jeong, Hyeonsoo; Kwon, Taehyung; Taye, Mengistie; Song, Ki-Duk; Lim, Dajeong; Cho, Seoae; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Yoon, Duhak; Oh, Sung Jong; Kemp, Stephen; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Kim, Heebal

    2017-02-20

    The history of African indigenous cattle and their adaptation to environmental and human selection pressure is at the root of their remarkable diversity. Characterization of this diversity is an essential step towards understanding the genomic basis of productivity and adaptation to survival under African farming systems. We analyze patterns of African cattle genetic variation by sequencing 48 genomes from five indigenous populations and comparing them to the genomes of 53 commercial taurine breeds. We find the highest genetic diversity among African zebu and sanga cattle. Our search for genomic regions under selection reveals signatures of selection for environmental adaptive traits. In particular, we identify signatures of selection including genes and/or pathways controlling anemia and feeding behavior in the trypanotolerant N'Dama, coat color and horn development in Ankole, and heat tolerance and tick resistance across African cattle especially in zebu breeds. Our findings unravel at the genome-wide level, the unique adaptive diversity of African cattle while emphasizing the opportunities for sustainable improvement of livestock productivity on the continent.

  6. Therapeutic management of botulism in dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Pandian, S. Jegaveera; Subramanian, M.; Vijayakumar, G.; Balasubramaniam, G. A.; Sukumar, K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To report the successful recovery of few dairy cattle from botulism in response to a modified therapeutic strategy. Materials and Methods: Seventy four naturally-occurring clinical cases of bovine botulism encountered during the period of 2012-2014 which were confirmed by mouse lethality test became material for this study. Affected animals were made into three groups based on the treatment modifications made during the course of study. Results and Discussion: With the modified therapeutic regimen, 17 animals recovered after 7-10 days of treatment. Clinical recovery took 2-30 days. Animals which were not given intravenous fluid and calcium recovered uneventfully. Cattle which were already treated with intravenous fluids, calcium borogluconate, and antibiotics did not recover. They were either died or slaughtered for salvage. Conclusion: In cattle with botulism, administration of Vitamin AD3E and activated charcoal aid the clinical recovery. Besides, strictly avoiding anti-clostridial antibiotics, fluid therapy, and calcium therapy may facilitate the clinical recovery. Upon fluid administration, the pulmonary congestion existed in the ailing cattle might have worsened the anoxia. Administration of antibiotics like penicillin, aminoglycosides, and tetracyclines further worsen the neuronal paralysis by increasing the availability of botulinum neurotoxin. Cattle in early botulism have fair chances of recovery with the modified therapy. PMID:27047034

  7. Ageratum houstonianum toxicosis in zebu cattle.

    PubMed

    Noa, Mario; Sánchez, Luz María; Durand, Reina

    2004-08-01

    Ageratum houstonianum (Ageratum, flossflower, blue billygoat weed) is an annual plant that tends to become a pest in gardens and pastures. Clinical signs for A. houstonianum toxicosis in cattle are characterized by either an acute hemorrhagic course or sub-acute photodynamic dermatitis. The toxicosis has often been associated with Holstein-Friesian or crossbreed Holstein cattle less resistant to tropical climate conditions. During a recent especially dry spring about 40 adult Zebu cattle were found dead, while another 40/800 animals were sacrificed. The animals had been relocated to the problem area about 4 mo before, where due to the prolonged drought, A. houstonianum was almost exclusively the only pasture available. The intoxicated cattle did not show the characteristic toxic dermatitis reported for A. houstonianum acute toxicosis; but post-mortem examination revealed bloody serous fluid in coccyx-femoral joints and hemorrhages in the large muscle tissues, while liver, kidney and heart also had hemorrhages. To confirm the toxic plant as cause of the toxicosis, phytochemical Qualitative screening and a novel thin-layer chromatographic characterization of plant extracts were done. The chromatographic profiles of coumarin compounds, alkaloids and triterpens in ruminal and intestinal contents were similar to those obtained from A. houstonianum plants from the same area, confirming ingestion of A. houstonianum as cause of the toxicosis. The coincidence of adverse nutritional conditions together with the cattle's ignorance of the grazing area predisposed the plant toxicosis.

  8. Identification of Different Bartonella Species in the Cattle Tail Louse (Haematopinus quadripertusus) and in Cattle Blood

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Cohen, Liron; Morick, Danny; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y.; Harrus, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    Bartonella spp. are worldwide-distributed facultative intracellular bacteria that exhibit an immense genomic diversity across mammal and arthropod hosts. The occurrence of cattle-associated Bartonella species was investigated in the cattle tail louse Haematopinus quadripertusus and in dairy cattle blood from Israel. Lice were collected from cattle from two dairy farms during summer 2011, and both lice and cow blood samples were collected from additional seven farms during the successive winter. The lice were identified morphologically and molecularly using 18S rRNA sequencing. Thereafter, they were screened for Bartonella DNA by conventional and real-time PCR assays using four partial genetic loci (gltA, rpoB, ssrA, and internal transcribed spacer [ITS]). A potentially novel Bartonella variant, closely related to other ruminant bartonellae, was identified in 11 of 13 louse pools collected in summer. In the cattle blood, the prevalence of Bartonella infection was 38%, identified as B. bovis and B. henselae (24 and 12%, respectively). A third genotype, closely related to Bartonella melophagi and Bartonella chomelii (based on the ssrA gene) and to B. bovis (based on the ITS sequence) was identified in a single cow. The relatively high prevalence of these Bartonella species in cattle and the occurrence of phylogenetically diverse Bartonella variants in both cattle and their lice suggest the potential role of this animal system in the generation of Bartonella species diversity. PMID:24973066

  9. [Analysis of POU1F1 gene polymorphisms in Qinchuan cattle and Chinese Holstein cattle].

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin-Jun; Liu, Bo; Fang, Xin-Tang; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Run-Feng; Bao, Bin; Zhang, Hai-Jun

    2006-11-01

    PCR-RFLP was applied to analyze the polymorphisms of POU1F1 gene in 218 Qinchuan cattle (QQ) and Chinese Holstein cattle (HC). Results demonstrated Hinf I polymorphisms in the 451 bp PCR product in the two populations. The frequencies of alleles A/B in QQ and HC populations were 0.232/0.768 and 0.132/0.868, respectively. The frequencies of three genotypes AA, AB and BB were 0.030/0.403/0.567 and 0.007/0.251/0.742, respectively. Qinchuan cattle population was at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at this locus, but Chinese Holstein cattle population was not. The gene heterozygosity/effective allele gene number/Shannon information entropy/polymorphism information content of Qinchuan cattle and Chinese Holstein cattle populations were listed for 0.356/1.553/0.541/0.292 and 0.229/1.297/0.390/0.203, respectively. All indices were higher in the Qinchuan cattle population.

  10. New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events.

    PubMed

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Decker, Jared E; Schnabel, Robert D; Taylor, Jeremy F; Hillis, David M

    2013-04-09

    Previous archeological and genetic research has shown that modern cattle breeds are descended from multiple independent domestication events of the wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) ∼10,000 y ago. Two primary areas of domestication in the Middle East/Europe and the Indian subcontinent resulted in taurine and indicine lines of cattle, respectively. American descendants of cattle brought by European explorers to the New World beginning in 1493 generally have been considered to belong to the taurine lineage. Our analyses of 47,506 single nucleotide polymorphisms show that these New World cattle breeds, as well as many related breeds of cattle in southern Europe, actually exhibit ancestry from both the taurine and indicine lineages. In this study, we show that, although European cattle are largely descended from the taurine lineage, gene flow from African cattle (partially of indicine origin) contributed substantial genomic components to both southern European cattle breeds and their New World descendants. New World cattle breeds, such as Texas Longhorns, provide an opportunity to study global population structure and domestication in cattle. Following their introduction into the Americas in the late 1400s, semiferal herds of cattle underwent between 80 and 200 generations of predominantly natural selection, as opposed to the human-mediated artificial selection of Old World breeding programs. Our analyses of global cattle breed population history show that the hybrid ancestry of New World breeds contributed genetic variation that likely facilitated the adaptation of these breeds to a novel environment.

  11. 9 CFR 72.2 - Restrictions on movement of cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Restrictions on movement of cattle. 72... § 72.2 Restrictions on movement of cattle. Notice is hereby given that the contagious, infectious, and communicable disease known as bovine piroplasmosis, bovine babesiosis, redwater, or splenetic, southern, cattle...

  12. Pasture-scale methane emissions of grazing cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grazing cattle are mobile point sources of methane and present challenges to quantify emissions using noninterfering micrometeorological methods. Stocking density is low and cattle can bunch up or disperse over a wide area, so knowing cattle locations is critical. The methane concentration downwind ...

  13. 66 FR 20187 - Tuberculosis Testing for Imported Cattle

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2001-04-20

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 Tuberculosis Testing for Imported Cattle AGENCY... tuberculosis prior to exportation to the United States, except cattle imported for immediate slaughter. The additional testing requirements will help us to better ensure that imported cattle are free of...

  14. 68 FR 35529 - Tuberculosis Testing for Imported Cattle

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-06-16

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 Tuberculosis Testing for Imported Cattle AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health...; to require certification regarding the tuberculosis history of the herds from which a group of cattle... necessary to help us better ensure that imported cattle are free of tuberculosis, thereby protecting...

  15. 62 FR 3445 - Cattle Exportations; Tuberculosis and Brucellosis Test Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-01-23

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 91 Cattle Exportations; Tuberculosis and Brucellosis Test... requirements for pre- export diagnostic tests for tuberculosis and brucellosis in certain cattle being exported... tuberculosis and brucellosis test requirements for slaughter cattle exported from States free of brucellosis...

  16. BCVA: Can recycled manure make a safe bed for cattle?

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Suzanne

    2014-11-15

    The use of recycled manure solids for cattle bedding was among the subjects considered at the British Cattle Veterinary Association's congress last month. Both cattle and sheep vets gathered in Hinckley, Leicestershire, from October 16 to 18 to discuss a range of clinical and political issues. Suzanne Jarvis reports.

  17. New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events

    PubMed Central

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Decker, Jared E.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Hillis, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous archeological and genetic research has shown that modern cattle breeds are descended from multiple independent domestication events of the wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) ∼10,000 y ago. Two primary areas of domestication in the Middle East/Europe and the Indian subcontinent resulted in taurine and indicine lines of cattle, respectively. American descendants of cattle brought by European explorers to the New World beginning in 1493 generally have been considered to belong to the taurine lineage. Our analyses of 47,506 single nucleotide polymorphisms show that these New World cattle breeds, as well as many related breeds of cattle in southern Europe, actually exhibit ancestry from both the taurine and indicine lineages. In this study, we show that, although European cattle are largely descended from the taurine lineage, gene flow from African cattle (partially of indicine origin) contributed substantial genomic components to both southern European cattle breeds and their New World descendants. New World cattle breeds, such as Texas Longhorns, provide an opportunity to study global population structure and domestication in cattle. Following their introduction into the Americas in the late 1400s, semiferal herds of cattle underwent between 80 and 200 generations of predominantly natural selection, as opposed to the human-mediated artificial selection of Old World breeding programs. Our analyses of global cattle breed population history show that the hybrid ancestry of New World breeds contributed genetic variation that likely facilitated the adaptation of these breeds to a novel environment. PMID:23530234

  18. Diquat poisoning of dairy cattle by topical application.

    PubMed

    Whiting, T L; Smyrl, T; Spearman, J G; Kernatz, S

    2001-10-01

    This case report describes poisoning of dairy cattle from a dermal challenge of 50 to 100 mg/kg body weight diquat. Five of 36 cattle exposed, demonstrated clinical signs of intoxication, dehydration, and death over 5 days. Diquat poisoning of cattle by the dermal route has not previously been reported.

  19. Diquat poisoning of dairy cattle by topical application.

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, T L; Smyrl, T; Spearman, J G; Kernatz, S

    2001-01-01

    This case report describes poisoning of dairy cattle from a dermal challenge of 50 to 100 mg/kg body weight diquat. Five of 36 cattle exposed, demonstrated clinical signs of intoxication, dehydration, and death over 5 days. Diquat poisoning of cattle by the dermal route has not previously been reported. PMID:11665429

  20. [Clinical application of computed tomography in cattle].

    PubMed

    Nuss, K; Schnetzler, C; Hagen, R; Schwarz, A; Kircher, P

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography involves the use of x-rays to produce cross-sectional images of body regions. It provides non-overlapping, two-dimensional images of all desired planes as well as three-dimensional reconstruction of regions of interest. There are few reports on the clinical use of computed tomography in farm animals. Its use in cattle is limited by high cost, the application of off-label drugs and the need for general anaesthesia. In cattle computed tomography is indicated primarily for diseases of the head, e.g. dental diseases and otitis media, and neurological disorders. Less often it is used for diseases of the vertebrae and limbs. In valuable cattle, the results of computed tomography can be an important part of preoperative planning or be used to avoid unnecessary surgery when the prognosis is poor.

  1. Genetics of Prion Disease in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Brenda M.; Murdoch, Gordon K.

    2015-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a prion disease that is invariably fatal in cattle and has been implicated as a significant human health risk. As a transmissible disease of livestock, it has impacted food safety, production practices, global trade, and profitability. Genetic polymorphisms that alter the prion protein in humans and sheep are associated with transmissible spongiform encephalopathy susceptibility or resistance. In contrast, there is no strong evidence that nonsynonymous mutations in the bovine prion gene (PRNP) are associated with classical BSE (C-BSE) disease susceptibility, though two bovine PRNP insertion/deletion polymorphisms, in the putative region, are associated with susceptibility to C-BSE. However, these associations do not explain the full extent of BSE susceptibility, and loci outside of PRNP appear to be associated with disease incidence in some cattle populations. This article provides a review of the current state of genetic knowledge regarding prion diseases in cattle. PMID:26462233

  2. Cestrum parqui (green cestrum) poisoning in cattle.

    PubMed

    McLennan, M W; Kelly, W R

    1984-09-01

    Naturally occurring cases of poisoning of cattle by Cestrum parqui were characterised by ataxia, depression, recumbency, convulsions and death. Three cattle were dosed experimentally by intrarumenal administration of fresh plant material. One calf died 48 h after receiving 30 g (wet weight) of plant/kg bodyweight. Doses of 11 and 17 g/kg caused only mild intoxication, with dullness and anorexia lasting 2 days. In natural and experimental cases the main lesion was hepatic periacinar necrosis. Elevated levels of plasma aspartate transaminase and prolonged prothrombin times were demonstrated in experimental cases. Haemorrhage beneath the serosa and into the intestinal lumen occurred in field cases, but not in the experimental. It is concluded that C. parqui poisoning in cattle is a primary hepatotoxicity.

  3. NEOSPORA CANINUM INFECTIONS IN CATTLE IN INDIA SEROPREVALENCE OF NEOSPORA CANINUM ANTIBODIES IN CATTLE AND WATER BUFFAOES IN INDIA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neospora caninum is now recognized as a major cause of abortion in cattle worldwide, but there is no report of N. caninum infection in cattle in India. Serum samples from 427 dairy cattle and 32 dairy water buffaloes from 7 organized dairy farms located in Punjab, India, were tested for N. caninum a...

  4. Coxofemoral joint radiography in standing cattle.

    PubMed

    Wenzinger, Beatrice; Hagen, Regine; Schmid, Tanja; Nuss, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a technique for radiographic examination of the coxofemoral joint and adjacent bony structures in standing cattle. Left (or right) 30° dorsal-right (or left) ventral radiographic views of the coxofemoral joint region of standing cattle (n = 10) with hind limb lameness were evaluated retrospectively. In addition, an experimental study of oblique laterolateral views of the coxofemoral joint region of a bovine skeleton at angles of 15-45° was carried out to determine the optimal position for visualization of the hip region. In the 10 clinical patients, the bodies of the ilium and ischium, the acetabulum and proximal third of the femur could be assessed. Six of these cattle had fractures of the body of the ilium and body of the ischium, five with and one without involvement of the acetabulum, two had craniodorsal and one caudoventral luxation of the femur and one had a femoral neck fracture. The described laterodorsal-lateroventral radiographs of the hip region in standing cattle were suitable for assessing the coxofemoral joint, the proximal aspect of the femur and parts of the ischium, ilium and pubis. After testing the optimal angle on the skeleton, it was seen that distortion and superimposition were minimized by positioning the X-ray beam at an angle of 25° to the horizontal plane. It can be concluded that the described technique improves the evaluation of injuries of the coxofemoral region in cattle. With the appropriate angle, the technique can also be applied in recumbent cattle. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  5. Analysis of cattle movements in Argentina, 2005.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M N; Stevenson, M A; Zarich, L; León, E A

    2011-02-01

    We describe the movement of cattle throughout Argentina in 2005. Details of farm-to-farm and farm-to-slaughter movements of cattle were obtained from the Sanitary Management System database (Sistema de Gestión Sanitaria, SGS), maintained by the National Service for Agrifood Health and Quality (SENASA). Movements were described at the regional and district level in terms of frequency, the number of stock transported, the district of origin and destination and Euclidean distance traveled. Social network analysis was used to characterize the connections made between regions and districts as a result of cattle movement transactions, and to show how these characteristics might influence disease spread. Throughout 2005 a total of 1.3 million movement events involving 32 million head of cattle (equivalent to approximately 57% of the national herd) were recorded in the SGS database. The greatest number of farm-to-farm movements occurred from April to June whereas numbers of farm-to-slaughter movement events were relatively constant throughout the year. Throughout 2005 there was a 1.1-1.6-fold increase in the number of farm-to-farm movements of cattle during April-June, compared with other times of the year. District in-degree and out-degree scores varied by season, with higher maximum scores during the autumn and winter compared with summer and spring. Districts with high in-degree scores were concentrated in the Finishing region of the country whereas districts with high out-degree scores were concentrated not only in the Finishing region but also in Mesopotamia, eastern Border and southern Central regions. Although movements of cattle from the Border region tended not to be mediated via markets, the small number of districts in this area with relatively high out-degree scores is a cause for concern as they have the potential to distribute infectious disease widely, in the event of an incursion.

  6. Magnesium Oxide Induced Metabolic Alkalosis in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, T.H.; Butler, D.G.; Gartley, C.J.; Dohoo, I.R.

    1983-01-01

    A study was designed to compare the metabolic alkalosis produced in cattle from the use of an antacid (magnesium oxide) and a saline cathartic (magnesium sulphate). Six, mature, normal cattle were treated orally with a magnesium oxide (MgO) product and one week later given a comparable cathartic dose of magnesium sulphate (MgSO4). The mean percent dry matter content of the cattle feces changed significantly (P<0.001) following administration of both MgO (15.6-8.1) and MgSO4 (17.0-8.7) but there was no significant difference between treatments. The mean rumen pH values changed significantly (P<0.001) following administration of both MgO (7.-8.7) and MgSO4 (7.3-8.3) but there was no significant difference between treatments. However, use of the MgO product caused a more severe (P<0.001) metabolic alkalosis as determined by base excess values. The base excess values remained elevated for 24 hours in the MgO treated group compared to only 12 hours after MgSO4 administration. Following MgO administration, mean hydrogen ion concentration (pH), bicarbonate ion concentration ([HCO3-]) and base excess were 7.44, 33.3 mmol/L and +8.0 respectively compared to 7.38, 27 mmol/L and +3.0 after MgSO4. Since the oral use of MgO in normal cattle causes a greater and more prolonged metabolic alkalosis compared to MgSO4, MgO is contraindicated as a cathartic in normal cattle or in cattle with abomasal abnormalities characterized by pyloric obstruction and metabolic alkalosis. PMID:6883181

  7. Molecular identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sweetline Anne, N; Ronald, B S M; Kumar, T M A Senthil; Kannan, P; Thangavelu, A

    2017-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis continued to be a re-emerging problem in some countries especially in endemic areas due to the fact that human and animal health surveillance system is not adopted to diagnose the infection. This crisis can be attributed due to sharing of the same habitat especially in rural areas. In the present study, a total of 148 samples were collected from cattle for isolation over a period of 3 years from cattle with and without lesions, of which 67 isolates were obtained by culture. Fifty one isolates were identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) by IS6110 PCR of which 43 (84.3%) were identified as M. tuberculosis and 08 (15.6%) were identified as M. bovis by using 12.7kb fragment multiplex PCR. Among this, 31 isolates which were positive for IS6110 PCR were subjected to spoligotyping and revealed 28 isolates belonging to MANU1 strain of M. tuberculosis. This study clearly indicates that high prevalence of M. tuberculosis than M. bovis in bovine was identified by means of culture and by molecular methods M. tuberculosis can affect cattle producing lesion in contradiction to the earlier thoughts. This study speculates that M. tuberculosis MANU1 strain infection in cattle could be due to spill over from human or other non specific hosts in tuberculosis endemic areas. Though bovine tuberculosis due to M. tuberculosis in cattle is not considered a serious threat worldwide, in countries where human TB is endemic, M. tuberculosis infection of cattle needs to be considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tritrichomonas foetus Prevention and Control in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Ondrak, Jeff D

    2016-07-01

    Bovine trichomoniasis has been recognized as a pathogen of the bovine reproductive tract for nearly 100 years. Although characteristics of the causative organism, Tritrichomonas foetus lend to control and there are examples of disease eradication, cattle producers are still faced with this disease. This article highlights the clinical presentation, magnitude of effect, risk factors, epidemiology, and sample collection and suggests applications in developing herd-level control measures for beef cattle producers including testing strategies for control, testing strategies for surveillance, strategies to eliminate trichomoniasis from infected herds, and strategies for prevention in uninfected herds.

  9. Kappa-casein polymorphisms among cattle breeds and bison herds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, M.A.; Cockett, N.

    1993-01-01

    We identified the HindIII restriction site polymorphism Of kappa-casein in cattle reported by Pinder et al. (Animal Genetics 22, 11, 1991) and found an additonal polymorphism (RsaI) in cattle and bison. The Hin dIII and Rsa I restriction sites were mapped and three haplotypes (alleles) were identified. Preliminary screening of 39 cattle and 71 bison revealed one allele restricted to cattle, one restricted to bison, and one shared by the species. No fixed allelic differences were observed among cattle breeds or among bison herds or subspecies.

  10. Association of Temperament and Acute Stress Responsiveness with Productivity, Feed Efficiency, and Methane Emissions in Beef Cattle: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Llonch, Pol; Somarriba, Miguel; Duthie, Carol-Anne; Haskell, Marie J; Rooke, John A; Troy, Shane; Roehe, Rainer; Turner, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess individual differences in temperament and stress response and quantify their impact on feed efficiency, performance, and methane (CH4) emissions in beef cattle. Eighty-four steers (castrated males) (Charolais or Luing) were used. Temperament was assessed using two standardized tests: restlessness when restrained [crush score (CS)] and flight speed (FS) on release from restraint. Over a 56-day period individual animal dry matter intake (DMI) and weekly body weight was measured. Ultrasound fat depth was measured at the end of 56 days. Average daily gain (ADG), feed conversion ratio (FCR), and residual feed intake (RFI) were calculated. After the 56-day test period, animals were transported in groups of six/week to respiration chamber facilities. Blood samples were taken before and 0, 3, 6, and 9 h after transport. Plasma cortisol, creatine kinase (CK), glucose, and free fatty acids (FFA) were determined to assess physiological stress response. Subsequently, CH4 emissions were measured over a 3-day period in individual respiration chambers. CS (1.7 ± 0.09) and FS (1.6 ± 0.60 m/s) were repeatable (0.63 and 0.51, respectively) and correlated (r = 0.36, P < 0.001). Plasma cortisol, CK, and FFA concentrations increased after transport (P = 0.038, P = 0.006, and P < 0.001, respectively). Temperament (CS) and CK concentration were correlated (r = 0.29; P = 0.015). The extreme group analysis reveals that excitable animals (FS; P = 0.032) and higher stress response (cortisol, P = 0.007; FFA, P = 0.007; and CK, P = 0.003) were associated with lower DMI. ADG was lower in more temperamental animals (CS, P = 0.097, and FS, P = 0.030). Fat depth was greater in steers showing calmer CS (P = 0.026) and lower plasma CK (P = 0.058). Temperament did not show any relationship with RFI or CH4 emissions. However, steers with higher cortisol showed improved feed efficiency (lower

  11. Association of Temperament and Acute Stress Responsiveness with Productivity, Feed Efficiency, and Methane Emissions in Beef Cattle: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Llonch, Pol; Somarriba, Miguel; Duthie, Carol-Anne; Haskell, Marie J.; Rooke, John A.; Troy, Shane; Roehe, Rainer; Turner, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess individual differences in temperament and stress response and quantify their impact on feed efficiency, performance, and methane (CH4) emissions in beef cattle. Eighty-four steers (castrated males) (Charolais or Luing) were used. Temperament was assessed using two standardized tests: restlessness when restrained [crush score (CS)] and flight speed (FS) on release from restraint. Over a 56-day period individual animal dry matter intake (DMI) and weekly body weight was measured. Ultrasound fat depth was measured at the end of 56 days. Average daily gain (ADG), feed conversion ratio (FCR), and residual feed intake (RFI) were calculated. After the 56-day test period, animals were transported in groups of six/week to respiration chamber facilities. Blood samples were taken before and 0, 3, 6, and 9 h after transport. Plasma cortisol, creatine kinase (CK), glucose, and free fatty acids (FFA) were determined to assess physiological stress response. Subsequently, CH4 emissions were measured over a 3-day period in individual respiration chambers. CS (1.7 ± 0.09) and FS (1.6 ± 0.60 m/s) were repeatable (0.63 and 0.51, respectively) and correlated (r = 0.36, P < 0.001). Plasma cortisol, CK, and FFA concentrations increased after transport (P = 0.038, P = 0.006, and P < 0.001, respectively). Temperament (CS) and CK concentration were correlated (r = 0.29; P = 0.015). The extreme group analysis reveals that excitable animals (FS; P = 0.032) and higher stress response (cortisol, P = 0.007; FFA, P = 0.007; and CK, P = 0.003) were associated with lower DMI. ADG was lower in more temperamental animals (CS, P = 0.097, and FS, P = 0.030). Fat depth was greater in steers showing calmer CS (P = 0.026) and lower plasma CK (P = 0.058). Temperament did not show any relationship with RFI or CH4 emissions. However, steers with higher cortisol showed improved feed efficiency (lower

  12. Rooms for genetic improvement in Indonesian Bali cattle population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyas, N.; Nugroho, T.; Prastowo, S.

    2017-04-01

    Bali cattle is a species of Bos javanicus d’Alton, a local cattle in Indonesia. They are loaded with potential as meat producer and well adapted to tropical climate and limited feed resources. Studies have been made to characterize the species. This paper presents a rough estimate of the opportunity to improve the Bali cattle population genetically. Our aim is to endorse that the Bali cattle could be both superior and efficient as tropical meat producer cattle. Results shows that Bali cattle population size is decreasing for the last years with a possibility to be accompanied by genetic quality decline. However, there is hope in improving Bali cattle genetically by a proper breeding strategy. This could also be an answer to the challenge of climate change which leads to global warming; where species adaptable to such environment is more beneficial in the future.

  13. Badgers prefer cattle pasture but avoid cattle: implications for bovine tuberculosis control.

    PubMed

    Woodroffe, Rosie; Donnelly, Christl A; Ham, Cally; Jackson, Seth Y B; Moyes, Kelly; Chapman, Kayna; Stratton, Naomi G; Cartwright, Samantha J

    2016-10-01

    Effective management of infectious disease relies upon understanding mechanisms of pathogen transmission. In particular, while models of disease dynamics usually assume transmission through direct contact, transmission through environmental contamination can cause different dynamics. We used Global Positioning System (GPS) collars and proximity-sensing contact-collars to explore opportunities for transmission of Mycobacterium bovis [causal agent of bovine tuberculosis] between cattle and badgers (Meles meles). Cattle pasture was badgers' most preferred habitat. Nevertheless, although collared cattle spent 2914 collar-nights in the home ranges of contact-collared badgers, and 5380 collar-nights in the home ranges of GPS-collared badgers, we detected no direct contacts between the two species. Simultaneous GPS-tracking revealed that badgers preferred land > 50 m from cattle. Very infrequent direct contact indicates that badger-to-cattle and cattle-to-badger M. bovis transmission may typically occur through contamination of the two species' shared environment. This information should help to inform tuberculosis control by guiding both modelling and farm management. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  14. Host resistance in cattle to infestation with the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, N N; Piper, E K; Constantinoiu, C C

    2014-11-01

    Resistance to Rhipicephalus microplus infestation in cattle has many effector mechanisms, each of which is likely to be modulated by complex, interacting factors. Some of the mechanisms of host resistance and their modulating factors have been identified and quantified, although much remains to be explained. The variation in resistance to tick infestation is most marked between Bos taurus and Bos indicus cattle, taurine cattle given the same exposure carrying between five and 10 times as many ticks as indicine cattle. Tick resistance is mostly manifest against attaching larvae, which attempt to feed often and without success, death occurring mostly within 24 h of finding a host. There is evidence of innate and adaptive immune response to tick infestation, and it appears that the relative importance of each differs between indicine and taurine cattle. There is conflicting information regarding the role of humoral immunity in tick resistance, and recent studies indicate that strong IgG responses to tick antigens are not protective. A strong T-cell-mediated response directed against larval stages, as mounted by indicine cattle, seems to be protective. Variation in the extracellular matrix of skin (epidermal growth factors, collagens and other matrix components such as lumican) also contributes to variation in host resistance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Genotype imputation efficiency in Nelore Cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genotype imputation efficiency in Nelore cattle was evaluated in different scenarios of lower density (LD) chips, imputation methods and sets of animals to have their genotypes imputed. Twelve commercial and virtual custom LD chips with densities varying from 7K to 75K SNPs were tested. Customized L...

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (bRSV) is a cause of respiratory disease in cattle world-wide. It has an integral role in enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bRSV infection can predispose calves to secondary bacterial infection by org...

  17. Mastitis associated transcriptomic disruptions in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mastitis is ranked as the top disease for dairy cattle based on traditional cost analysis. Greater than 100 organisms from a broad phylogenetic spectrum are able to cause bovine mastitis. Transcriptomic characterization facilitates our understanding of host-pathogen relations and provides mechanisti...

  18. Genetic relationships among breeds of beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective was to estimate genetic distance among 16 populations of beef cattle from within the U.S. Thirty-three microsatellite markers representing 26 autosomes were used. MicroSatellite Analyzer 3.15 (MSA) program was used to quantify number of alleles per marker, and observed and expected het...

  19. Are methane production and cattle performance related?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methane is a product of fermentation of feed in ruminant animals. Approximately 2 -12% of the gross energy consumed by cattle is released through enteric methane production. There are three primary components that contribute to the enteric methane footprint of an animal. Those components are dry ...

  20. Linear Classification of Dairy Cattle. Slide Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipiorski, James; Spike, Peter

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with principles of the linear classification of dairy cattle. Included in the guide are narrations for use with 63 slides, which illustrate the following areas that are considered in the linear classification system: stature, strength,…

  1. Production of cattle lacking prion protein.

    PubMed

    Richt, Jürgen A; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Hamir, Amir N; Castilla, Joaquin; Sathiyaseelan, Thillai; Vargas, Francisco; Sathiyaseelan, Janaki; Wu, Hua; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Koster, Julie; Kato, Shinichiro; Ishida, Isao; Soto, Claudio; Robl, James M; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2007-01-01

    Prion diseases are caused by propagation of misfolded forms of the normal cellular prion protein PrP(C), such as PrP(BSE) in bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle and PrP(CJD) in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. Disruption of PrP(C) expression in mice, a species that does not naturally contract prion diseases, results in no apparent developmental abnormalities. However, the impact of ablating PrP(C) function in natural host species of prion diseases is unknown. Here we report the generation and characterization of PrP(C)-deficient cattle produced by a sequential gene-targeting system. At over 20 months of age, the cattle are clinically, physiologically, histopathologically, immunologically and reproductively normal. Brain tissue homogenates are resistant to prion propagation in vitro as assessed by protein misfolding cyclic amplification. PrP(C)-deficient cattle may be a useful model for prion research and could provide industrial bovine products free of prion proteins.

  2. Enhance beef cattle improvement by embryo biotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Wu, B; Zan, L

    2012-10-01

    Embryo biotechnology has become one of the prominent high businesses worldwide. This technology has evolved through three major changes, that is, traditional embryo transfer (in vivo embryo production by donor superovulation), in vitro embryo production by ovum pick up with in vitro fertilization and notably current cloning technique by somatic cell nuclear transfer and transgenic animal production. Embryo biotechnology has widely been used in dairy and beef cattle industry and commercial bovine embryo transfer has become a large international business. Currently, many developed biotechnologies during the period from early oocyte stage to pre-implantation embryos can be used to create new animal breeds and accelerate genetic progression. Based on recent advances in embryo biotechnologies and authors current studies, this review will focus on a description of the application of this technology to beef cattle improvement and discuss how to use this technology to accelerate beef cattle breeding and production. The main topics of this presentation include the following: (i) how to increase calf production numbers from gametes including sperm and oocyte; (ii) multiple ovulation and embryo transfer breeding schemes; (iii) in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasm sperm injection in bovine; (iv) pronuclear development and transgenic animals; (v) sex selection from sperm and embryos; (vi) cloning and androgenesis; (vii) blastocyst development and embryonic stem cells; (viii) preservation of beef cattle genetic resources; and (ix) conclusions. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Cattle site preference in northeastern Oregon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Free-roaming beef cattle naturally gravitate to locations on the landscape that provide them food, water, shelter, and security. In mountainous environments, animals are also sensitive to land physiography, generally preferring level terrain near established trails and travel routes. Our study was...

  4. Beef cattle in the year 2050.

    PubMed

    Seidel, George E

    2014-01-01

    In 2050, beef likely will be produced much as occurs currently, as (1) a by-product of dairying-cull cows and calves not needed as replacements; (2) intensively managed cattle in environments rich in feed resources; or (3) extensively managed cattle grazing land unsuitable for tillage, with calves often moving to richer feed environments. Genetic progress will continue to depend on information such as weaning weights, but in addition, genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic information will be obtained from blood, hair, semen, and/or biopsies of embryos.Most cattle will be genetically modified for efficient growth, desirable carcass traits, and management traits such as disease resistance. Some strains of cattle will have Y-chromosome-dependent terminal cross traits; sexed semen thus will automatically result in males with terminal cross characteristics and females with maternally desirable traits. In most cases, mother cows will have shorter gestations and smaller frame sizes than currently to decrease nutrient requirements for maintenance. The cow herd may disappear with some intensively managed systems; with sexed semen, each female can replace herself with a female calf and then be fattened for slaughter. The flexibility of being a ruminant will continue to be exploited by using a variety of feedstuffs, some of which are otherwise of little value.

  5. Valuing Fed Cattle Using Objective Tenderness Measures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beef tenderness is critical in consumer satisfaction with beef steak products. Current fed cattle valuation systems do not differentiate carcasses based upon tenderness variation. However, considerable research indicates consumers are willing to pay more for tender relative to tough beef steak. T...

  6. Novel Orthobunyavirus in Cattle, Europe, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Scheuch, Matthias; Höper, Dirk; Jungblut, Ralf; Holsteg, Mark; Schirrmeier, Horst; Eschbaumer, Michael; Goller, Katja V.; Wernike, Kerstin; Fischer, Melina; Breithaupt, Angele; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, an unidentified disease in cattle was reported in Germany and the Netherlands. Clinical signs included fever, decreased milk production, and diarrhea. Metagenomic analysis identified a novel orthobunyavirus, which subsequently was isolated from blood of affected animals. Surveillance was initiated to test malformed newborn animals in the affected region. PMID:22376991

  7. Energy and nutrient recovery from cattle feedlots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selective harvesting of manure can benefit cattle producers by creating a product of value. A tool that identifies locations of manure accumulation has been developed using a sub-surface sensor (Dualem-1S, Milton, ON) and software designed for salt mapping (ESAP, Riverside, CA). The combination al...

  8. Epigenetics and environmental impacts in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter reviews the major advances in the field of epigenetics as well as the environmental impacts of cattle. Many findings from our own research endeavors related to the topic of this chapter are also introduced. The phenotypic characterization of an animal can be changed through epigenetic ...

  9. Cattle veterinary services in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Statham, Jonathan; Green, Martin

    2015-03-14

    In the first of a series of feature articles in Veterinary Record discussing the state of different sectors of the veterinary profession in the UK and what the future might hold, Jonathan Statham and Martin Green give their perspective on developments affecting the provision of cattle veterinary services.

  10. Predicting forage intake by grazing beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Voluntary intake by cattle is controlled by a complex mix of physical and physiological factors that interact with a variety of environmental, geo-spatial, and experiential influences external to the animal. These factors are intensified in grazing ruminants, where selective grazing and variability...

  11. Elk, deer, and cattle: the Starkey Project.

    Treesearch

    Valerie. Rapp

    2006-01-01

    Definitive results from the Starkey Project’s first decade (1989–99) have given managers defensible options for managing roads, timber production, and range allotments in relation to elk, deer, and cattle. Study results have prompted changes in policies, management standards and guidelines, hunting regulations, and timber sale planning throughout western North America...

  12. Goats, sheep, and cattle: some basics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasture-based finishing systems for meat goats, sheep and cattle are growing rapidly in the eastern USA. Increasing demand for pasture-raised meat and dairy products requires renewed efforts to communicate the best practical information in order to initiate mixed grazing with goats, sheep, and beef...

  13. Arrested larval development in cattle nematodes.

    PubMed

    Armour, J; Duncan, M

    1987-06-01

    Most economically important cattle nematodes are able to arrest their larval development within the host - entering a period of dormancy or hypobiosis. Arrested larvae have a low death rate, and large numbers can accumulate in infected cattle during the grazing season. Because of this, outbreaks of disease caused by such nematodes can occur at times when recent infection with the parasites could not have occurred, for example during winter in temperature northern climates when cattle are normally housed. The capacity to arrest is a heritable trait. It is seen as an adaptation by the parasite to avoid further development to its free-living stages during times when the climate is unsuitable for free-living survival. But levels of arrestment can vary markedly in different regions, in different cattle, and under different management regimes. Climatic factors, previous conditioning, host immune status, and farm management all seem to affect arrestment levels. In this article, James Armour and Mary Duncan review the biological basis of the phenomenon, and discuss the apparently conflicting views on how it is controlled.

  14. Dairy cattle genomics evaluation program update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Implementation of genomic evaluation has caused profound changes in dairy cattle breeding. All young bulls bought by major artificial-insemination organizations now are selected based on these evaluation. Evaluation reliability can reach ~75% for yield traits, which is adequate for marketing semen o...

  15. Pregnancy establishment and maintenance in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    GnRH-induced ovulation of a small dominant follicle reduced pregnancy success in cattle. A reciprocal embryo transfer study was conducted at Fort Keogh from 2007 to 2009 in order to differentiate between follicular effects on pregnancy mediated through oocyte quality or uterine environment. Estrou...

  16. Reactive N emissions from beef cattle feedlots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Large amounts of nitrogen (N) are fed to meet the nutritional needs of beef cattle in feedlots. However, only from 10 to 15% of fed N is retained in animals. Most N is excreted. Chemical and biological processes transform manure N into ammonia, nitrous oxide and nitrate. These reactive forms of ...

  17. Vaccination of cattle animals against tuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine TB (bTB), mainly caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a significant economic burden to the agricultural industries worldwide. It has been estimated that 50 million cattle are infected with M. bovis worldwide resulting in around US $3 billion losses annually and this is despite attempts to contro...

  18. External skeletal fixation of fractures in cattle.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Susan R; Anderson, David E

    2014-03-01

    External skeletal fixation (ESF) is a versatile method for rigid immobilization of long bone fractures in cattle. Traditional ESF devices may be used in young calves for clinical management of open fractures. Transfixation pinning and casting is an adaptation of ESF principles to improve versatility and clinical management of selected fractures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Botulism in cattle and meat inspection].

    PubMed

    Smit, M P

    1991-04-01

    Three animals suspected of the presence of botulism, which were found to be infected with Clostridium botulinum type D were slaughtered in a special slaughter-house. The presence of C. botulinum in cattle and the decision reached by the meat inspection are discussed. Central registration of all cases of botulism observed in The Netherlands is advocated.

  20. Clostridium botulinum in cattle and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Miia; Myllykoski, Jan; Sivelä, Seppo; Korkeala, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    The use of plastic-wrapped and nonacidified silage as cattle feed has led to an increasing number of botulism outbreaks due to Clostridium botulinum Groups I-III in dairy cattle. The involvement of Groups I and II organisms in cattle botulism has raised concern of human botulism risk associated with the consumption of dairy products. Multiplication of C. botulinum in silage and in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle with botulism has been reported, thus contamination of the farm environment and raw milk, and further transmission through the dairy chain, are possible. The standard milk pasteurization treatment does not eliminate spores, and the intrinsic factors of many dairy products allow botulinal growth and toxin production. Although rare, several large botulism outbreaks due to both commercial and home-prepared dairy products have been reported. Factors explaining these outbreaks include most importantly temperature abuse, but also unsafe formulation, inadequate fermentation, insufficient thermal processing, post-process contamination, and lack of adequate quality control for adjunct ingredients were involved. The small number of outbreaks is probably explained by a low incidence of spores in milk, the presence of competitive bacteria in pasteurized milk and other dairy products, and growth-inhibitory combinations of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in cultured and processed dairy products.

  1. Energy and nutrient recovery from cattle feedlots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selective harvesting of manure can benefit cattle producers by creating a product of value. A tool that identifies locations of manure accumulation has been developed and demonstrated. A dual geometry sub-surface sensor (Dualem-1S, Milton, ON) was used with software designed for salt mapping (ESAP...

  2. Whole genome linkage disequilibrium maps in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine whole genome linkage disequilibrium maps were constructed for eight breeds of cattle. These data provide fundamental information concerning bovine genome organization which will allow the design of studies to associate genetic variation with economically important traits and also provides bac...

  3. Criollo cattle: Heritage genetics for arid landscapes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty cows and three bulls from the Chinipas region in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico, were introduced onto the US Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service’s Jornada Experimental Range (JER) in 2005. Since then behavioral research has revealed these cattle, most accurately referre...

  4. Multibreed Genomic Evaluations in Dairy Cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multibreed models are currently used in traditional USDA dairy cattle genetic evaluations of yield and health traits, but within-breed models are used in genomic evaluations. Multibreed genomic evaluation models were developed and tested using 19,686 genotyped bulls included in the official August 2...

  5. Immunopathogenesis of Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aerosol and intratracheal inoculation routes are commonly used for experimental biology purposes to infect cattle with virulent Mycobacterium bovis, each resulting primarily in a respiratory tract infection including lungs and lung-associated lymph nodes. Disease severity is dose and time dependent...

  6. Reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets in healthy Korean native cattle (Hanwoo) and Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Mi; Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Bong-Joo; Suh, Guk-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    There are no accurate reference ranges for hematology parameters and lymphocyte subsets in Korean native beef cattle (Hanwoo). This study was performed to establish reliable reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets using a large number of Hanwoo cattle (n = 350) and to compare differences between Hanwoo and Holstein dairy cattle (n = 334). Additionally, age-related changes in lymphocyte subsets were studied. Bovine leukocyte subpopulation analysis was performed using mono or dual color flow cytometry. The leukocyte subpopulations investigated in healthy cattle included: CD2(+) cells, sIgM(+) cells, MHC class II(+) cells, CD3(+) CD4(+) cells, CD3(+) CD8(+) cells, and WC1(+) cells. Although Hanwoo and Holstein cattle are the same species, results showed several differences in hematology and lymphocyte subsets between Hanwoo and Holstein cattle. This study is the first report to establish reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets in adult Hanwoo cattle. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  7. Cattle and climate in Africa: How climate variability has influenced national cattle holdings from 1961–2008

    PubMed Central

    Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2013-01-01

    The role of cattle in developing countries is as a source of high-quality food, as draft animals, and as a source of manure and fuel. Cattle represent important contribution to household incomes, and in drought prone areas they can act as an insurance against weather risk. So far, no studies have addressed how historical variations in temperature and rainfall have influenced cattle populations in Africa. The focus of this study is to assess the historical impact of climate variability on national cattle holdings. We reconstruct the cattle density and distribution for two time periods; 1955–1960 and 2000–2005. Based on estimates from FAO and official numbers, we generated a time series of cattle densities from 1961–2008, and compared these data with precipitation and temperature anomalies for the same period. We show that from 1961–2008 rainfall and temperature have been modulating, and occasionally controlling, the number of cattle in Africa. PMID:23638393

  8. Use of cattle farm resources by badgers (Meles meles) and risk of bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) transmission to cattle.

    PubMed

    Garnett, B T; Delahay, R J; Roper, T J

    2002-07-22

    Nocturnal observations, radio telemetry and time-lapse camera surveillance were used to investigate visits by badgers (Meles meles L.) to two cattle farms. During 59 half-nights (ca. 295 h) of observation and 17 nights (ca. 154 h) of camera surveillance, 139 separate visits to farm buildings, by at least 26 individually identifiable badgers from two social groups, were recorded. The badgers, which included three individuals infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis), used cowsheds, feedsheds, barns, haystacks, slurry pits, cattle troughs and farmyards to exploit a range of food resources, including cattle feed and silage. Cattle feed was contaminated with badger faeces and badgers also came into close contact with cattle. The minimum number of badgers visiting farm buildings per night was negatively correlated with local 24 h rainfall. We conclude that exploitation by badgers of resources provided by cattle farms constitutes a potentially important mechanism for tuberculosis transmission from badgers to cattle.

  9. Use of cattle farm resources by badgers (Meles meles) and risk of bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) transmission to cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, B T; Delahay, R J; Roper, T J

    2002-01-01

    Nocturnal observations, radio telemetry and time-lapse camera surveillance were used to investigate visits by badgers (Meles meles L.) to two cattle farms. During 59 half-nights (ca. 295 h) of observation and 17 nights (ca. 154 h) of camera surveillance, 139 separate visits to farm buildings, by at least 26 individually identifiable badgers from two social groups, were recorded. The badgers, which included three individuals infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis), used cowsheds, feedsheds, barns, haystacks, slurry pits, cattle troughs and farmyards to exploit a range of food resources, including cattle feed and silage. Cattle feed was contaminated with badger faeces and badgers also came into close contact with cattle. The minimum number of badgers visiting farm buildings per night was negatively correlated with local 24 h rainfall. We conclude that exploitation by badgers of resources provided by cattle farms constitutes a potentially important mechanism for tuberculosis transmission from badgers to cattle. PMID:12137579

  10. 9 CFR 73.8 - Cattle infected or exposed during transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cattle infected or exposed during... SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.8 Cattle infected or exposed during transit. (a) Healthy cattle from unquarantined State exposed en route. Should healthy cattle in transit from a State not quarantined by the Secretary...

  11. 9 CFR 73.8 - Cattle infected or exposed during transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cattle infected or exposed during... SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.8 Cattle infected or exposed during transit. (a) Healthy cattle from unquarantined State exposed en route. Should healthy cattle in transit from a State not quarantined by the Secretary...

  12. 9 CFR 73.8 - Cattle infected or exposed during transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cattle infected or exposed during... SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.8 Cattle infected or exposed during transit. (a) Healthy cattle from unquarantined State exposed en route. Should healthy cattle in transit from a State not quarantined by the Secretary...

  13. 9 CFR 73.8 - Cattle infected or exposed during transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cattle infected or exposed during... SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.8 Cattle infected or exposed during transit. (a) Healthy cattle from unquarantined State exposed en route. Should healthy cattle in transit from a State not quarantined by the Secretary...

  14. 9 CFR 73.8 - Cattle infected or exposed during transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cattle infected or exposed during... SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.8 Cattle infected or exposed during transit. (a) Healthy cattle from unquarantined State exposed en route. Should healthy cattle in transit from a State not quarantined by the Secretary...

  15. The US experience of eradicating and preventing re-infestation with cattle fever ticks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, and the cattle tick, R. annulatus, are obligate ectoparasites and the vectors of pathogens causing bovine babesiosis, or “Cattle Fever”, and anaplasmosis in cattle. These cattle fever tick (CFT) species were declared eradicated from the U.S. in 1943...

  16. Agro-economic impact of cattle cloning.

    PubMed

    Faber, D C; Ferre, L B; Metzger, J; Robl, J M; Kasinathan, P

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the economic and social implications of cloned cattle, their products, and their offspring as related to production agriculture. Cloning technology in cattle has several applications outside of traditional production agriculture. These applications can include bio-medical applications, such as the production of pharmaceuticals in the blood or milk of transgenic cattle. Cloning may also be useful in the production of research models. These models may or may not include genetic modifications. Uses in agriculture include many applications of the technology. These include making genetic copies of elite seed stock and prize winning show cattle. Other purposes may range from "insurance" to making copies of cattle that have sentimental value, similar to cloning of pets. Increased selection opportunities available with cloning may provide for improvement in genetic gain. The ultimate goal of cloning has often been envisioned as a system for producing quantity and uniformity of the perfect dairy cow. However, only if heritability were 100%, would clone mates have complete uniformity. Changes in the environment may have significant impact on the productivity and longevity of the resulting clones. Changes in consumer preferences and economic input costs may all change the definition of the perfect cow. The cost of producing such animals via cloning must be economically feasible to meet the intended applications. Present inefficiencies limit cloning opportunities to highly valued animals. Improvements are necessary to move the applications toward commercial application. Cloning has additional obstacles to conquer. Social and regulatory acceptance of cloning is paramount to its utilization in production agriculture. Regulatory acceptance will need to address the animal, its products, and its offspring. In summary, cloning is another tool in the animal biotechnology toolbox, which includes artificial insemination, sexing of semen, embryo

  17. Immunocontraception for Managing Feral Cattle in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Massei, Giovanna; Koon, Ka-Kei; Benton, Steven; Brown, Richard; Gomm, Matt; Orahood, Darcy S.; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Eckery, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts between human interests and feral cattle in Hong Kong derive from growing numbers of free-roaming cattle. Public antipathy towards lethal population control led the local authorities to consider fertility control to reduce cattle numbers. This study assessed the potential side effects of the immunocontraceptive GonaCon on individual female cattle and established the effectiveness of GonaCon to induce infertility. We evaluated GonaCon in 34 captive cattle assigned to four groups: Control administered a sham solution; Webbed (surgically sterilized through removal of the oviducts), administered one dose of GonaCon; Webbed, administered one dose of GonaCon and a booster dose three months later, and Treated, administered one dose of GonaCon. The side effects of GonaCon were assessed by monitoring injection site, body weight, body condition, size of lymph nodes, body temperature, and feeding behaviour 1 week and 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after vaccination and by haematological and biochemical variables at vaccination and three months post-vaccination. The effectiveness of GonaCon to cause infertility was monitored by quantifying anti-GnRH antibody titres and by using kits to detect cycling and pregnancy. GonaCon-treated cattle showed no injection site reaction, limping, or abnormal behaviour. No differences were observed in all physiological and welfare indicators between control and vaccinated cattle. All control cattle and 4 of the 12 cattle in the Treated group became pregnant. Cattle administered a booster dose had higher anti-GnRH antibody titres than cattle that received one dose. We concluded that GonaCon does not compromise the animals’ welfare and is effective in reducing fertility in cattle. A booster dose is likely to increase the duration of infertility. Further studies are required to assess the feasibility and costs of immunocontraception for controlling free-roaming cattle populations. PMID:25856283

  18. Recycled poultry bedding as cattle feed.

    PubMed

    Rankins, Darrell L; Poore, Matthew H; Capucille, Dawn J; Rogers, Glenn M

    2002-07-01

    Since the 1950s, recycled poultry bedding has been used as an economical feedstuff for beef cattle. It has been extensively studied at several experiment stations around the world with regard to its safety and nutritional aspects. It will continue to be closely scrutinized as the public increases its awareness of agricultural issues. As this study was being prepared, the news media was "spotlighting" bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Currently, in the United States there is a ban on incorporation of mammalian-derived protein feeds into ruminant diets. This has led to a requirement of beef cattle producers signing affidavits indicating that they had met this obligation. Some poultry companies use ruminant meat and bone meal in broiler diets when least-cost formulation indicates that it is economically desirable. This then poses the question of whether feeding RPB to beef cattle should be permitted if the birds had been fed ruminant meat and bone meal. It also raises the question of whether cattle grazing pastures fertilized with RPB are exposed to ruminant meat and bone meal. Because of the importance of pasture fertilization as a waste disposal solution for the poultry industry, it seems that the issue will be quickly resolved by omitting the ruminant meat and bone meal from poultry diets should concerns increase. Use of RPB, like many byproduct feeds, requires a higher level of management expertise than traditional feeds. Despite the potential problems discussed in this study, an informed beef cattle producer can gain a financially competitive edge by using RPB. A simple processing method, deep-stacking under polyethylene sheeting, can produce a safe product that will provide a complete diet when blended with an energy source and supplemented with some long-stem fiber. The diets can be used for both brood cows and stocker calves for extended periods of time, and the practice of feeding RPB is safe for both cattle and consumers [45]. Economic parameters will

  19. Cattle temperament influences metabolism:3. Metabolic response to a feed restriction challenge in beef steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent studies have demonstrated metabolic differences between calm and temperamental cattle. Specifically, Temperamental cattle exhibit greater concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), decreased blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and decreased insulin sensitivity compared to Calm cattle. It is...

  20. Are cattle dangerous to walkers? A scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Fraser-Williams, Angharad P; McIntyre, K Marie; Westgarth, Carri

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that people coming into contact with cattle while participating in outdoor pursuits can sustain severe, even fatal injuries. This has negative implications for farmers, cattle and the public. This study outlines findings from a review of published literature, UK media reports and internet guidelines currently available to the UK public for walking near cattle. A total of 54 cattle attacks were reported in the UK media from 1 January 1993 to 31 May 2013; approximately one-quarter resulted in fatality and two-thirds involved dogs. Walking with dogs among cows, particularly with calves present, was a problematic context. Twenty pieces of commonly occurring advice were found within various guidelines. However, there are no definitive approved guidelines, no published studies describing the prevalence of cattle attacks on members of the public and no system in place to document them. Attacks by cattle are underinvestigated and further work should assess their public health impact. PMID:26759346

  1. Cattle and pastoralism: survival and production in arid lands

    SciTech Connect

    Western, D.; Finch, V.

    1986-03-01

    Traditional subsistence pastoralists in East Africa tend to keep large herds, milk cattle in preference to eating them, and subject them to long foraging treks. Such practices are widely considered ill-suited to arid lands and are believed to arise because cattle are raised more for social prestige than food production. Whether this is true can only be judged by considering the responses of cattle to arid zones and, given the herder's goals and options, his management practices. In considering these factors, we show that indigenous East African cattle demonstrate energy-sparing capabilities during drought. Pastoralists can therefore herd cattle at great distances from water at little more cost than animals on the normal maintenance diet and watered more frequently. The physiological response of cattle to drought, the ecological constraints imposed by livestock and wildlife competition, and the energetic efficiency of mixed milk and meat pastoralism explain why herders traditionally select their characteristic management practices.

  2. Comparative genome map of human and cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas-Toldo, S.; Fries, R.; Lengauer, C.

    1995-06-10

    Chromosomal homologies between individual human chromosomes and the bovine karyotype have been established by using a new approach termed Zoo-FISH. Labeled DNA libraries from flow-sorted human chromosomes were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization on cattle chromosomes. All human DNA libraries, except the Y chromosome library, hybridized to one or more cattle chromosomes, identifying and delineating 50 segments of homology, most of them corresponding to the regions of homology as identified by the previous mapping of individual conserved loci. However, Zoo-FISH refines the comparative maps constructed by molecular gene mapping of individual loci by providing information on the boundaries of conserved regions in the absence of obvious cytogenetic homologies of human and bovine chromosomes. It allows study of karyotypic evolution and opens new avenues for genomic analysis by facilitating the extrapolation of results from the human genome initiative. 50 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Management of water quality for beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cody L

    2007-03-01

    Drinking water is the primary source of water for most cattle. Unfortunately, water frequently contains various solutes and suspended particulate matter that can influence its appearance, odor, taste, and physical and chemical properties. Animals often react to such water impurities by decreasing water intake, and therefore feed intake, which diminishes animal performance. Thus, water quality can have a profound impact on animal health and performance. Routine monitoring of water sources and appropriate intervention can provide beef producers with a desirable return on investment. Careful thought should be incorporated into any capital improvements. This article discusses some of the most common factors that impact water quality for beef cattle and the methods of monitoring water quality, and proposes management solutions to address water quality concerns.

  4. A Genetic Linkage Map for Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, M. D.; Kappes, S. M.; Keele, J. W.; Stone, R. T.; Sunden, SLF.; Hawkins, G. A.; Toldo, S. S.; Fries, R.; Grosz, M. D.; Yoo, J.; Beattie, C. W.

    1994-01-01

    We report the most extensive physically anchored linkage map for cattle produced to date. Three-hundred thirteen genetic markers ordered in 30 linkage groups, anchored to 24 autosomal chromosomes (n = 29), the X and Y chromosomes, four unanchored syntenic groups and two unassigned linkage groups spanning 2464 cM of the bovine genome are summarized. The map also assigns 19 type I loci to specific chromosomes and/or syntenic groups and four cosmid clones containing informative microsatellites to chromosomes 13, 25 and 29 anchoring syntenic groups U11, U7 and U8, respectively. This map provides the skeletal framework prerequisite to development of a comprehensive genetic map for cattle and analysis of economic trait loci (ETL). PMID:7908653

  5. Endemic cattle diseases: comparative epidemiology and governance.

    PubMed

    Carslake, David; Grant, Wyn; Green, Laura E; Cave, Jonathan; Greaves, Justin; Keeling, Matt; McEldowney, John; Weldegebriel, Habtu; Medley, Graham F

    2011-07-12

    Cattle are infected by a community of endemic pathogens with different epidemiological properties that invoke different managerial and governmental responses. We present characteristics of pathogens that influence their ability to persist in the UK, and describe a qualitative framework of factors that influence the political response to a livestock disease. We develop simple transmission models for three pathogens (bovine viral diarrhoea virus, bovine herpesvirus and Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis) using observed cattle movements, and compare the outcomes to an extensive dataset. The results demonstrate that the epidemiology of the three pathogens is determined by different aspects of within- and between-farm processes, which has economic, legal and political implications for control. We consider how these pathogens, and Mycobacterium bovis (the agent of bovine tuberculosis), may be classified by the process by which they persist and by their political profile. We further consider the dynamic interaction of these classifications with pathogen prevalence and with the action taken by the government.

  6. Vampire bat-transmitted rabies in cattle.

    PubMed

    Arellano-Sota, C

    1988-01-01

    A short history of bovine paralytic rabies in the Americas is given. Based on information from the Animal Health Yearbook--a cooperative publication of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the International Office of Epizootics (OIE)--a comparison is made of the epidemiology of the disease in 1968, 1978, and 1985. An important reduction in the number of cases of rabies was observed in some countries (Bolivia, Brazil, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama), mainly as a result of the use of effective vaccines that are now available and of the application of new technology to reduce the vampire bat population, the vector of the disease in cattle. The trials performed in Argentina and Mexico in the 1960s and 1970s provide enough evidence that many vaccines will protect cattle against bovine paralytic rabies. Results of these trials are presented.

  7. Sequence analysis of myostatin promoter in cattle.

    PubMed

    Crisà, A; Marchitelli, C; Savarese, M C; Valentini, A

    2003-01-01

    Myostatin (GDF8) acts as a negative regulator of muscle growth. Mutations in the gene are responsible for the double muscling phenotype in several European cattle breeds. Here we describe the sequence of the upstream 5' region of the myostatin gene. The sequence analysis was carried out on three animals of nine European cattle breeds, with the aim to search for polymorphisms. A T/A polymorphism at -371 and a G/C polymorphism at -805 (relative to ATG) were found. PCR- RFLP was used to further screen 353 animals of the nine breeds studied and to assess the frequencies of the SNPs. The promoter region of the gene contains several binding sites for transcription factors found also in other myogenic genes. This may play an important role in the regulation of the protein and consequently on muscular development.

  8. Beef cattle growing and backgrounding programs.

    PubMed

    Peel, Derrell S

    2003-07-01

    The stocker industry is one of many diverse production and marketing activities that make up the United States beef industry. The stocker industry is probably the least understood industry sector and yet it plays a vital role in helping the industry exploit its competitive advantage of using forage resources and providing an economical means of adjusting the timing and volume of cattle and meat in a complex market environment.

  9. Applications of sexed semen in cattle production.

    PubMed

    Hohenboken, W D

    1999-12-01

    Sexed semen will contribute to increased profitability of dairy and beef cattle production in a variety of ways. It could be used to produce offspring of the desired sex from a particular mating to take advantage of differences in value of males and females for specific marketing purposes. Commercial dairy farmers, those who produce and market milk, could use sexed semen to produce replacement daughters from genetically superior cows and beef crossbred sons from the remainder of their cow population. To increase the rate of response to selection, seedstock dairy cattle breeders could produce bulls for progeny testing from a smaller number of elite dams by using sexed semen to ensure that all of them produced a son. Using sexed semen could then reduce the cost of progeny testing those bulls, because fewer matings would be necessary to produce any required number of daughters. Commercial beef cattle farmers, producing animals for eventual slaughter, could use sexed semen to capitalize on the higher value of male than female offspring for meat production. They could also use sexed semen to produce specialized, genetically superior replacement heifers from as small a proportion of the herd as possible. This would allow the remainder of the herd to produce male calves from bulls or breeds with superior genetic merit for growth, feed conversion efficiency, and carcass merit. Single-sex, bred-heifer systems, in which each female is sold for slaughter soon after weaning her replacement daughter, would be possible with the use of X-chromosome-sorted semen. Use of sexed semen would make terminal crossbreeding systems more efficient and sustainable in beef cattle. Fewer females would be required to produce specialized maternal crossbred daughters, and more could be devoted to producing highly efficient, terminal crossbred sons.

  10. Earwax: A clue to discover fluoroacetate intoxication in cattle.

    PubMed

    Shokry, Engy; Dos Santos, Fabrício Carrião; da Cunha, Paulo Henrique Jorge; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda Soares; Noronha Filho, Antônio Dionísio Feitosa; Pereira, Naiara Zedes; Antoniosi Filho, Nelson Roberto

    2017-10-01

    An innovative method was developed to detect fluoroacetate poisoning in cattle by headspace/gas chromatographic analysis of earwax samples of intoxicated cattle. Samples were collected from 2 groups of cattle subjected to induced fluoroacetate intoxication, each group receiving a different dose of acetamide (antidote). Monofluoroacetic acid was detected in samples of intoxicated cattle in concentrations inversely proportional to the dose of acetamide. Thus, earwax analysis represents a successful approach for detection and monitoring of fluoroacetate poisoning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bovine tuberculosis in cattle and badgers in localized culling areas.

    PubMed

    Woodroffe, Rosie; Donnelly, Christl A; Cox, D R; Gilks, Peter; Jenkins, Helen E; Johnston, W Thomas; Le Fevre, Andrea M; Bourne, F John; Cheeseman, C L; Clifton-Hadley, Richard S; Gettinby, George; Hewinson, R Glyn; McInerney, John P; Mitchell, A P; Morrison, W Ivan; Watkins, Gavin H

    2009-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (TB) is a zoonotic disease that can have serious consequences for cattle farming and, potentially, for public health. In Britain, failure to control bovine TB has been linked to persistent infection of European badger (Meles meles) populations. However, culling of badgers in the vicinity of recent TB outbreaks in cattle has failed to reduce the overall incidence of cattle TB. Using data from a large-scale study conducted in 1998-2005, we show that badgers collected on such localized culls had elevated prevalence of Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine TB, suggesting that infections in cattle and badgers were indeed associated. Moreover, there was a high degree of similarity in the M. bovis strain types isolated from cattle and associated badgers. This similarity between strain types appeared to be unaffected by time lags between the detection of infection in cattle and culling of badgers, or by the presence of purchased cattle that might have acquired infection elsewhere. However, localized culling appeared to prompt an increase in the prevalence of M. bovis infection in badgers, probably by disrupting ranging and territorial behavior and hence increasing intraspecific transmission rates. This elevated prevalence among badgers could offset the benefits, for cattle, of reduced badger densities and may help to explain the failure of localized culling to reduce cattle TB incidence.

  12. Dental pathology in conventionally fed and pasture managed dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Fadden, A N; Poulsen, K P; Vanegas, J; Mecham, J; Bildfell, R; Stieger-Vanegas, S M

    2016-01-02

    Healthy teeth are important in the first stages of digestion for dairy cattle, yet little is known about bovine dental disease. This study aimed to investigate dental pathology of dairy cattle in two parts. First dairy cattle cadaver heads (n=11) were examined at the time of culling. Second, the authors performed oral exams in cattle fed a total mixed ration (TMR) (n=200) and pasture-based (n=71) grazing cattle. Cadaver heads were imaged using radiography and computed tomography before gross dissection to study dental anatomy and pathology. The most prevalent dental abnormalities were excessive transverse ridging of the occlusal surface, the presence of diastemas and third molar dental overgrowths (M3DO) in cadaver heads. Average thickness of subocclusal dentine ranged from 3.5 mm to 5.8 mm in cheek teeth but was >10 mm in maxillary teeth with M3DO. Radiographic findings were compared with oral examinations in live cattle. Prevalence of M3DO upon oral examination was 19 per cent and 28 per cent in herds of cattle fed a TMR diet and 0 per cent in a herd of grazing cattle. Dental abnormalities are prevalent in dairy cattle but due to thin subocclusal dentine in the cheek teeth, established equine dental treatment methodology is not appropriate for bovine cheek teeth with the exception of those that have developed M3DO. British Veterinary Association.

  13. Dynamics of Cattle Production in Brazil.

    PubMed

    McManus, Concepta; Barcellos, Júlio Otávio Jardim; Formenton, Bruna Krummenauer; Hermuche, Potira Meirelles; Carvalho, Osmar Abílio de; Guimarães, RenatoFontes; Gianezini, Miguelangelo; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Lampert, Vinícius do Nascimento; Zago, Daniele; Neto, José Braccini

    2016-01-01

    Movement of livestock production within a country or region has implications for genetics, adaptation, well-being, nutrition, and production logistics, particularly in continental-sized countries, such as Brazil. Cattle production in Brazil from 1977 to 2011 was spatialized, and the annual midpoint of production was calculated. Changes in the relative production and acceleration of production were calculated and spatialized using ARCGIS®. Cluster and canonical discriminant analyses were performed to further highlight differences between regions in terms of cattle production. The mean production point has moved from the Center of Minas Gerais State (in the southeast region) to the North of Goiás State (in the Midwest region). This reflects changes in environmental factors, such as pasture type, temperature and humidity. Acceleration in production in the northern region of Brazil has remained strong over the years. More recently, "traditional" cattle-rearing regions, such as the south and southeast, showed a reduction in growth rates as well as a reduction in herd size or internal migration over the period studied. These maps showed that this movement tends to be gradual, with few regions showing high acceleration or deceleration rates.

  14. Developmental and epigenetic anomalies in cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Smith, L C; Suzuki, J; Goff, A K; Filion, F; Therrien, J; Murphy, B D; Kohan-Ghadr, H R; Lefebvre, R; Brisville, A C; Buczinski, S; Fecteau, G; Perecin, F; Meirelles, F V

    2012-08-01

    Many of the developmental anomalies observed in cloned animals are related to foetal and placental overgrowth, a phenomenon known as the 'large offspring syndrome' (LOS) in ruminants. It has been hypothesized that the epigenetic control of imprinted genes, that is, genes that are expressed in a parental-specific manner, is at the root of LOS. Our recent research has focused on understanding epigenetic alterations to imprinted genes that are associated with assisted reproductive technologies (ART), such as early embryo in vitro culture (IVC) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in cattle. We have sought and identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in Bos indicus DNA useful for the analysis of parental-specific alleles and their respective transcripts in tissues from hybrid embryos derived by crossing Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle. By analysing differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes SNRPN, H19 and the IGF2R in cattle, we demonstrated that there is a generalized hypomethylation of the imprinted allele and the biallelic expression of embryos produced by SCNT when compared to the methylation patterns observed in vivo (artificially inseminated). Together, these results indicate that imprinting marks are erased during the reprogramming of the somatic cell nucleus during early development, indicating that such epigenetic anomalies may play a key role in mortality and morbidity of cloned animals.

  15. [Intersuckling by cattle: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Rutgers, L J; Grommers, F J

    1988-04-15

    The literature on intersucking in cattle is reviewed. The following features are described: incidence, moments of appearance, relationship between herd mates, environmental factors (housing system, size of herd, area per animal, feeding places available, feed ration, nutrient deficiencies, housing and feeding practices during the rearing period), animal factors (genetic predisposition, social bonds, imitation), consequences (pathological changes, milk loss), and forms of symptomatic treatment (mechanical devices, surgery). It is concluded that rearing methods (bucket feeding of milk, early group housing) and genetic predisposition are likely to be the most important factors in the aetiology of intersucking in mature dairy cattle. As methods of symptomatic treatment are not successful in every case and are subject to ethical dispute, it is advisable not to treat intersucking cattle regardless of the symptomatic approach. This is the more important because there is clear evidence of genetic predisposition. The mode of inheritance is still unknown, but is likely to act through sucking motivation or drive at an early age. In problem herds more attention should be paid to rearing methods and selection of (A.I.) bulls. There also is a need for further research into the aetiology, particularly by longitudinal studies in which a large number of animals are studied from birth to first lactation.

  16. Update on sexed semen technology in cattle.

    PubMed

    Seidel, G E

    2014-05-01

    The technology in current use for sexing sperm represents remarkable feats of engineering. These flow cytometer/cell sorters can make over 30 000 consecutive evaluations of individual sperm each second for each nozzle and sort the sperm into three containers: X-sperm, Y-sperm and unsexable plus dead sperm. Even at these speeds it is not economical to package sperm at standard numbers per inseminate. However, with excellent management, pregnancy rates in cattle with 2 million sexed sperm per insemination dose are about 80% of those with conventional semen at normal sperm doses. This lowered fertility, in part due to damage to sperm during sorting, plus the extra cost of sexed semen limits the applications that are economically feasible. Even so, on the order of 2 million doses of bovine semen are sexed annually in the United States. The main application is for dairy heifers to have heifer calves, either for herd expansion or for sale as replacements, often for eventual export. Breeders of purebred cattle often use sexed semen for specific matings; thawing and then sexing frozen semen and immediately using the few resulting sexed sperm for in vitro fertilization is done with increasing frequency. Beef cattle producers are starting to use sexed semen to produce crossbred female replacements. Proprietary improvements in sperm sexing procedures, implemented in 2013, are claimed to improve fertility between 4 and 6 percentage points, or about 10%.

  17. [Epizootiologic studies of trichophytosis in cattle].

    PubMed

    Kamyszek, F

    1975-01-01

    Investigations were carried out during the years 1964 to 1973. The investigated material included 34 134 heads of cattle in 227 industrial farms, and 80 per cent of them were young animals, from 5 days to 22 months old. The aim of the study was to observe the intensity of skin mycosis in cattle in the Poznań Province, to determine the pathogenic factor causing the disease in individual years, and to search for a possible relation between the occurrence of this disease and the presence of ectoparasites. The clinical observations on cattle were continued for 9 years, 1932 samples of scrapings were taken from skin with mycotic changes and investigated from the points of view of mycology and parasitology. Basing on the observations and analyses performed, it was found that trichophytosis occurred during the whole year, but was more intensive in autumn and winter and in the wet period of summer. Young animals were more frequently affected with this disease. In individual groups of animals, in 10.9 to 21.1% of cases, trichophytosis occurred together with invasion of ectoparasites (lice, mallophagans, itch mites).

  18. Swelling of cattle heel horn by urine.

    PubMed

    Gregory, N G

    2004-03-01

    To understand the likely mechanisms responsible for heel horn softening when cattle stand in their own effluent. To examine the effectiveness of some footbath chemicals in preventing heel horn softening. Shavings from the heels of cattle were used in a laboratory test to examine the swelling effects of cow urine, urea, sulphide and ammonia. Formalin, glutaraldehyde, glyoxal, zinc sulphate, copper sulphate, alum, tannic acid and a compound containing nitrocellulose plus nylon, were compared for their ability to prevent swelling in heel shavings induced by urea plus 2-mercaptoethanol. Cow urine caused heel horn to swell. Urea caused swelling at concentrations normally found in cow urine. Sulphide caused swelling at concentrations normally found in cow slurry. Low concentrations of ammonia solution also resulted in swelling. Formalin and glutaraldehyde prevented swelling induced by high concentrations of urea plus 2-mercaptoethanol. Copper sulphate had a moderate anti-swelling effect. Zinc sulphate, alum, tannic acid, and nitrocellulose plus nylon were relatively ineffective in preventing swelling. Cow urine can cause degradation of heel horn in cattle feet. The chemical agents that cause this could be urea, sulphide anions and ammonia. Degradation by urine can be prevented by pretreating heel horn with formalin. Glutaraldehyde may be an effective noncarcinogenic alternative to formalin.

  19. Dynamics of Cattle Production in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Concepta; Barcellos, Júlio Otávio Jardim; Formenton, Bruna Krummenauer; Hermuche, Potira Meirelles; de Carvalho, Osmar Abílio; Guimarães, RenatoFontes; Gianezini, Miguelangelo; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Lampert, Vinícius do Nascimento; Zago, Daniele; Neto, José Braccini

    2016-01-01

    Movement of livestock production within a country or region has implications for genetics, adaptation, well-being, nutrition, and production logistics, particularly in continental-sized countries, such as Brazil. Cattle production in Brazil from 1977 to 2011 was spatialized, and the annual midpoint of production was calculated. Changes in the relative production and acceleration of production were calculated and spatialized using ARCGIS®. Cluster and canonical discriminant analyses were performed to further highlight differences between regions in terms of cattle production. The mean production point has moved from the Center of Minas Gerais State (in the southeast region) to the North of Goiás State (in the Midwest region). This reflects changes in environmental factors, such as pasture type, temperature and humidity. Acceleration in production in the northern region of Brazil has remained strong over the years. More recently, “traditional” cattle-rearing regions, such as the south and southeast, showed a reduction in growth rates as well as a reduction in herd size or internal migration over the period studied. These maps showed that this movement tends to be gradual, with few regions showing high acceleration or deceleration rates. PMID:26814797

  20. Cellular thermotolerance is inheritable from Holstein cattle cloned with ooplasts of Taiwan native yellow cattle.

    PubMed

    Kesorn, Piyawit; Lee, Jai-Wei; Wu, Hung-Yi; Ju, Jyh-Cherng; Peng, Shao-Yu; Liu, Shyh-Shyan; Wu, Hsi-Hsun; Shen, Perng-Chih

    2017-01-15

    We have previously demonstrated that the somatic cells from cattle cloned with Holstein (H) donor cells and Taiwan native yellow cattle (Y) ooplasm (Yo-Hd) had better thermotolerance than those from cattle cloned with both Holstein donor cells and ooplasm (Ho-Hd). The present study aimed to investigate whether the cellular thermotolerance of these cloned cattle is transmissible to their offspring (Ho-Hd-F1 and Yo-Hd-F1). Thermotolerance of ear fibroblasts derived from these cloned cattle and their offspring were analyzed. Polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop of ear fibroblasts derived from Yo-Hd and Yo-Hd-F1 indicated that the cytoplasm is originated from Bos indicus (Y). After heat shock, the apoptotic rates, B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein/B-cell lymphoma 2 ratios, and relative expression levels of cysteine-aspartic proteases (caspases)-3, -8, and -9 of ear fibroblasts with Y-originated cytoplasm (including Y, Yo-Hd, and Yo-Hd-F1) were lower (P < 0.05) than those of ear fibroblasts with H-originated cytoplasm (including H, Ho-Hd, and Ho-Hd-F1). In contrast, the relative level of HSP-70 was higher (P < 0.05) in ear fibroblasts with Y-originated cytoplasm than that of with H-originated cytoplasm. Based on our results, thermotolerance of ear fibroblasts derived from Yo-Hd and Yo-Hd-F1 cattle is better and can be transmitted, at least at the cellular level, to their offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and multilocus genotyping of Cryptosporidium andersoni in dairy cattle and He cattle in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Qi, Meng; Wang, Rongjun; Jing, Bo; Jian, Fuchun; Ning, Changshen; Zhang, Longxian

    2016-10-01

    Cryptosporidium andersoni is the predominant species in post-weaned and adult cattle in China. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and understand the transmission of cattle cryptosporidiosis in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, China, a total of 1827 fecal samples (436 from He cattle and 1391 from dairy cattle) were examined for the presence of C. andersoni-like oocysts by microscopy after Sheather's sugar flotation technique. The overall prevalence of C. andersoni-like was 3.8% (70/1827) and all the C. andersoni-like isolates were identified as C. andersoni at the SSU rRNA locus. Among the C. andersoni isolates, a total of 60 isolates were successfully characterized into eight multilocus sequence typing (MLST) subtypes using MLST analysis at the four microsatellite/minisatellite loci (MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16), and three new subtypes were identified. The MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 showed a predominance and a wide distribution among the eight MLST subtypes obtained in the investigated areas. The MLST subtypes A2,A4,A2,A1 and A4,A5,A2,A1 showed a unique distribution in the investigated areas. A linkage disequilibrium analysis showed the presence of an epidemic population genetic structure of C. andersoni isolated from dairy and He cattle in Xinjiang. These findings provide new insights into the genetic structure of C. andersoni isolates and are also helpful to explore the infection source of C. andersoni in cattle in Xinjiang, China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Brain emboli in the lungs of cattle].

    PubMed

    Horlacher, Sabine; Lücker, E; Eigenbrodt, E; Wenisch, Sabine

    2002-01-01

    There is no information whether the BSE agent is introduced into the human food chain through contamination of the lungs of cattle with central nervous system tissue (CNS). Studies in the United Kingdom and in the USA showed that CNS tissue could contaminate the lungs after using pneumatic powered air injection stunners (e.g. "The Knocker") or after pithing. Thus, pithing was forbidden in the European Union since January 2001. In German abattoirs conventional cartridge-fired stunners (e.g. model by Schermer) are usually applied. Pithing was used up to December 2000 in approx. 75% of the German abattoirs. In the present study 323 lungs of cattle were analysed for CNS. The lungs were derived from cattle exclusive stunned by use of the knocker from Schermer. 60% of the lungs contained emboli which were tested with immuno chemistry as well as immuno histochemistry to detect CNS. Two of 108 pooled samples showed a faint immuno reaction in the anti-NSE and anti-GFAP immunoblot. Further two particles showed a faint reaction for NSE and GFAP in immuno histochemistry, thus suggesting the presence of CNS. Even though CNS tissue could not be shown in the histological investigation, we used our findings to estimate the worst case scenario for human BSE exposure risk (HER) by lung contaminated by CNS emboli. The content of CNS in the samples was estimated to be about 0.11% when the respective immuno reactions were calibrated against standards containing known brain concentrations. Under the assumption that only one lung in the pooled samples was contaminated with BSE-infected central nervous tissue, the HER was calculated to reach a maximum of 2.2 x 10(-5) CoID50/consumer after consumption of a sausage with a portion of 10% lung. The results of our study suggest that the contamination of the lung with CNS after using a conventional cartridge-fired stunner cannot be excluded, however, the incidence appears to be very low. In addition, presumed CNS emboli, if at all, are

  3. Thelazia rhodesii infection on cattle in Kupang district.

    PubMed

    Djungu, D F L; Retnani, E B; Ridwan, Y

    2014-12-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence, the intensity, infection, clinical sign, to identify species and to investigate associated risk factors of thelaziosis in cattle in Kupang district, Nusa Tenggara Timur Province. A total of 385 head of cattle were randomly selected from 96 farms in three subdistricts of Kupang District and observed for thelaziosis. The nematode present in the eye of cattle were collected with a forcep after administering local anesthesia (10% Xylocaine). The potential risk factors related to age of cattle, human resources and farm management were obtained by interviewing the farmers. Logistic regression was applied to analyze related risk factor of thelaziosis. The result showed that of the total 385 cattle observed, 23 (5.96%) were infected by Thelazia spp., of which 22 cattle showed apparent clinical signs namely excessive lacrimation and conjunctivitis that led to keratoconjunctivitis, while one cattle showed ulceration. A total of 357 worms (157 males and 210 female) were collected from 23 infected cattle with the mean number of worms in infected cattle being 32.92 ± 21.03. Observations on morphological characteristics using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) helped to identify the nematode species as Thelazia rhodesii. The infection was more prevalent in older cattle (≥ 6-12 month old) than calves (0-6 month old) (P<0.05). Significant risk factors of animal husbandry practices affecting the prevalence of thelaziosis in cattle were anthelmintic treatment, grazing management, barn cleaning, and manure management. Our results highlight that significant risk factors of the disease should be considered in designing strategic control programs for thelaziosis.

  4. Effectiveness of nitrate addition and increased oil content as methane mitigation strategies for beef cattle fed two contrasting basal diets.

    PubMed

    Troy, S M; Duthie, C-A; Hyslop, J J; Roehe, R; Ross, D W; Wallace, R J; Waterhouse, A; Rooke, J A

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of (1) the addition of nitrate and (2) an increase in dietary oil on methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) emissions from 2 breeds (cross-bred Charolais and purebred Luing) of finishing beef cattle receiving 2 contrasting basal diets consisting (grams per kilogram DM) of 500:500 (Mixed) and 80:920 (Concentrate) forage to concentrate ratios. Within each basal diet there were 3 treatments: (i) control treatments (mixed-CTL and concentrate-CTL) contained rapeseed meal as the protein source, which was replaced with either (ii) calcium nitrate (mixed-NIT and concentrate-NIT) supplying 21.5 g nitrate/kg DM, or (iii) rapeseed cake (mixed-RSC and concentrate-RSC) to increase dietary oil from 27 (CTL) to 53 g/kg DM (RSC). Following adaption to diets, CH4 and H2 emissions were measured on 1 occasion from each of the 76 steers over a 13-wk period. Dry matter intakes tended (P = 0.051) to be greater for the concentrate diet than the mixed diet; however, when expressed as grams DMI per kilogram BW, there was no difference between diets (P = 0.41). Dry matter intakes for NIT or RSC did not differ from CTL. Steers fed a concentrate diet produced less CH4 and H2 than those fed a mixed diet (P < 0.001). Molar proportions of acetate (P < 0.001) and butyrate (P < 0.01) were lower and propionate (P < 0.001) and valerate (P < 0.05) higher in the rumen fluid from steers fed the concentrate diet. For the mixed diet, CH4 yield (grams per kilogram DMI) was decreased by 17% when nitrate was added (P < 0.01), while H2 yield increased by 160% (P < 0.001). The addition of RSC to the mixed diet decreased CH4 yield by 7.5% (P = 0.18). However, for the concentrate diet neither addition of nitrate (P = 0.65) nor increasing dietary oil content (P = 0.46) decreased CH4 yield compared to concentrate-CTL. Molar proportions of acetate were higher (P < 0.001) and those of propionate lower (P < 0.01) in rumen fluid from NIT treatments compared to

  5. Identification of Cryptosporidium from Dairy Cattle in Pahang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hisamuddin, Nur Hazirah; Hashim, Najat; Soffian, Sharmeen Nellisa; Amin, Mohd Hishammfariz Mohd; Wahab, Ridhwan Abdul; Mohammad, Mardhiah; Isa, Muhammad Lokman Md; Yusof, Afzan Mat

    2016-04-01

    Cryptosporidium, a protozoan parasite, can cause cryptosporidiosis which is a gastrointestinal disease that can infect humans and livestock. Cattle are the most common livestock that can be infected with this protozoan. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle in Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia and to find out the association between the occurrence of infection and 3 different ages of cattle (calves less than 1 year, yearling, and adult cattle). The samples were processed by using formol-ether concentration technique and stained by modified Ziehl Neelsen. The results showed that 15.9% (24/151) of cattle were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts. The occurrence of Cryptosporidium in calves less than 1 year was the highest with the percentage of 20.0% (11/55) followed by yearling and adult cattle, with the percentage occurrence of 15.6 % (7/45) and 11.8% (6/51), respectively. There was no significant association between the occurrence and age of cattle and presence of diarrhea. Good management practices and proper hygiene management must be taken in order to reduce the infection. It is highly important to control the infection since infected cattle may serve as potential reservoirs of the infection to other animals and humans, especially animal handlers.

  6. 21 CFR 189.5 - Prohibited cattle materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES PROHIBITED FROM USE IN HUMAN FOOD Prohibited Cattle Materials § 189.5 Prohibited cattle materials... section. (2) Inspected and passed means that the product has been inspected and passed for...

  7. Genomewide association study of liver abscess in beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fourteen percent of U.S. cattle slaughtered in 2011 had liver abscesses. As a result, these cattle have reduced carcass weight and poor carcass quality resulting in reduced value. Liver abscess can result from a common bacterial cause Fusobacterium necrophorum, which inhabits rumen lesions caused ...

  8. Characterization of microbiomes related to respiratory disease in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Respiratory disease is the single largest disease-related issue for the beef cattle industry in the United States, estimated to be responsible for up to 75% of morbidity in beef cattle feedlots. Despite decades of research into this problem, incidence of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) h...

  9. Influenza D Virus in Cattle, France, 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Claire; Meyer, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    A new influenza virus, genus D, isolated in US pigs and cattle, has also been circulating in cattle in France. It was first identified there in 2011, and an increase was detected in 2014. The virus genome in France is 94%–99% identical to its US counterpart, which suggests intercontinental spillover. PMID:25628038

  10. Genomic selection in multi-breed dairy cattle populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomic selection has been a valuable tool for increasing the rate of genetic improvement in purebred dairy cattle populations. However, there also are many large populations of crossbred dairy cattle in the world, and multi-breed genomic evaluations may be a valuable tool for improving rates of gen...

  11. Epidemiology of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle in China: a review

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chao; Cao, Xue-Feng; Deng, Lei; Li, Wei; Huang, Xiang-Ming; Lan, Jing-Chao; Xiao, Qi-Cheng; Zhong, Zhi-Jun; Feng, Fan; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Wen-Bo; Guo, Ping; Wu, Kong-Ju; Peng, Guang-Neng

    2017-01-01

    The present review discusses the findings of cryptosporidiosis research conducted in cattle in China and highlights the currently available information on Cryptosporidium epidemiology, genetic diversity, and distribution in China, which is critical to understanding the economic and public health importance of cryptosporidiosis transmission in cattle. To date, 10 Cryptosporidium species have been detected in cattle in China, with an overall infection rate of 11.9%. The highest rate of infection (19.5%) was observed in preweaned calves, followed by that in juveniles (10.69%), postweaned juveniles (9.0%), and adult cattle (4.94%). The dominant species were C. parvum in preweaned calves and C. andersoni in postweaned, juvenile, and adult cattle. Zoonotic Cryptosporidium species (C. parvum and C. hominis) were found in cattle, indicating the possibility of transmission between humans and cattle. Different cattle breeds had significant differences in the prevalence rate and species of Cryptosporidium. This review demonstrates an age-associated, breed-associated, and geographic-related occurrence of Cryptosporidium and provides references for further understanding of the epidemiological characteristics, and for preventing and controlling the disease. PMID:28098070

  12. 9 CFR 93.427 - Cattle from Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Mexico 10 § 93.427 Cattle from Mexico. (a) Cattle and other ruminants imported from Mexico, except animals being transported in bond for immediate return to Mexico or... date determined by APHIS to be the date of effective enforcement of a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban...

  13. Poop and pedometers: What cattle really do on the range

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle serve as energy brokers between cellulose in plant biomass and energy and protein available for human consumption. Despite the global significance of cattle to society for livelihood, culture and meat production, a key question remains for nutrition of these ruminants: does grazing management...

  14. Genomic and evolutionary characteristics of cattle copy number variations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We performed a systematic analysis of cattle copy number variations (CNVs) using the Bovine HapMap SNP genotyping data, including 539 animals of 21 modern cattle breeds and 6 outgroups. After correcting genomic waves and considering the trio information, we identified 682 candidate CNV regions (CNVR...

  15. 60 FR 62988 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-12-08

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State... comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of...) State. This change is necessary to prevent the spread of tuberculosis in cattle and bison....

  16. 62 FR 13293 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-03-20

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State... tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of cattle and bison by raising the designation of... tuberculosis regulations in 9 CFR part 77 by removing Oklahoma from the list of modified accredited States...

  17. 60 FR 48882 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-09-21

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State... tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of cattle and bison by raising the designation of... (60 FR 33100-33101, Docket No. 93-058-1), we amended the tuberculosis regulations in 9 CFR part 77...

  18. 61 FR 6917 - Cattle Exportations; Tuberculosis and Brucellosis Test Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-02-23

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 91 Cattle Exportations; Tuberculosis and Brucellosis Test... requirements for pre-export diagnostic tests for tuberculosis and brucellosis in certain cattle being exported... States free of brucellosis or tuberculosis and those exported to countries that have a...

  19. 60 FR 18728 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-04-13

    ... CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of cattle and bison by raising the designation of...-1231, (301) 734-7727. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Bovine tuberculosis is the...

  20. 62 FR 42044 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-08-05

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State... tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of cattle and bison by raising the designation of...-093-1), we amended the tuberculosis regulations in 9 CFR part 77 by removing Wisconsin from the...

  1. Worldwide patterns of ancestry, divergence, and admixture in domesticated cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The domestication and development of cattle has considerably impacted human societies, but the histories of cattle breeds have been poorly understood especially for African, Asian, and American breeds. Using genotypes from 43,043 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 1,543 anima...

  2. Nitrous oxide emissions from a commerical cattle feedlot in Kansas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emission of greenhouse gases, including nitrous oxide (N2O), from open beef cattle feedlots is becoming a concern. Research measuring emission rates of N2O from open beef cattle feedlots, however, has been limited. This study was conducted to quantify the N2O emission rate from pen surfaces in a com...

  3. Concentrations of particulate matter in large cattle feedlots in Kansas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Air quality in communities surrounding cattle feedlots is a growing public concern. Our objective was to quantify emission patterns and weather effects on particulate matter (PM) transport upwind and downwind from two large cattle feedlots (KS1, KS2) in Kansas. The concentrations of PM2.5 (particles...

  4. Emigrant Creek cattle allotment: lessons from 30 years of photomonitoring.

    Treesearch

    Frederick C. Hall

    2005-01-01

    Emigrant Creek cattle allotment is located 48 km northwest of Burns, Oregon. It was photo sampled at nine original sites, starting in 1975. Photos were taken three times per year: June 15 prior to cattle grazing, August 1 at pasture rotation, and October 1 at the end of grazing. An additional four photopoints were established following disturbance from flooding and...

  5. Age-dependent patterns of bovine tuberculosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Brooks-Pollock, Ellen; Conlan, Andrew J K; Mitchell, Andy P; Blackwell, Ruth; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Wood, James L N

    2013-10-16

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is an important livestock disease, seriously impacting cattle industries in both industrialised and pre-industrialised countries. Like TB in other mammals, infection is life long and, if undiagnosed, may progress to disease years after exposure. The risk of disease in humans is highly age-dependent, however in cattle, age-dependent risks have yet to be quantified, largely due to insufficient data and limited diagnostics. Here, we estimate age-specific reactor rates in Great Britain by combining herd-level testing data with spatial movement data from the Cattle Tracing System (CTS). Using a catalytic model, we find strong age dependencies in infection risk and that the probability of detecting infection increases with age. Between 2004 and 2009, infection incidence in cattle fluctuated around 1%. Age-specific incidence increased monotonically until 24-36 months, with cattle aged between 12 and 36 months experiencing the highest rates of infection. Beef and dairy cattle under 24 months experienced similar infection risks, however major differences occurred in older ages. The average reproductive number in cattle was greater than 1 for the years 2004-2009. These methods reveal a consistent pattern of BTB rates with age, across different population structures and testing patterns. The results provide practical insights into BTB epidemiology and control, suggesting that targeting a mass control programme at cattle between 12 and 36 months could be beneficial.

  6. Phenotypic characteristics of local cattle in Madura Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maylinda, Sucik; Nugroho, H.; Busono, W.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the research is to (1) analyze phenotypic variance both qualitative and quantitative characters in Madura cattle, (2) to analyze the relationship between that characters and body weight. Cattle studied were located in Waru and Pademawu subdistrict, Pamekasan district, Indonesia. The sampling technique was accidental sampling. Subject animals were 8-20 month-old cows, grouped into 2 age groups of <1 and >1 years old. Both qualitative and quantitative phenotypic characteristics were recorded. Qualitative characteristics were the color of the body, white color in bottom and leg, black color at the back, and the presence of horns. Quantitative characteristics were the head index, body weight, chest girth (CG), body height (BH), body length (BL), and body condition score (BCS). Data were analyzed with correlation and regression analyses. Results showed that qualitative characteristics of the Madura local cattle were all those of the reference Madura cattle standard, such as the white color of leg and bottom, with small head indexes. We found that (1) most of Madura Local cattle had the standard Madura cattle characteristics in both sexes, and (2) the best cattle, in terms of body weight, can be selected based on chest girth rather than other measurements, which is advantageous because measuring the chest circumference is quicker and easier than directly measuring cattle weight in rural villages.

  7. Discovery, Validation and Characterization of 1039 Cattle Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We identified approximately 13000 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by comparison of repeat-masked BAC-end sequences from the cattle RPCI-42 BAC library with whole-genome shotgun contigs of cattle genome assembly Btau 1.0. Genotyping of a subset of these SNPs was performed on a panel ...

  8. Cattle grazing and vegetation succession on burned sagebrush steppe

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is limited information on the effects of cattle grazing to longer-term plant community composition and productivity following fire in big sagebrush steppe. This study evaluated vegetation response to cattle grazing over seven years (2007-2013) on burned Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia triden...

  9. Evaluation of wolf impacts on cattle productivity and behavior

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have initiated and employed an Adaptive Management System (AMS) to document the effects of gray wolves on cattle production systems in Oregon and Idaho. The project has collected information on cattle movement on land in both wolf common and wolf rare areas with GPS collars that record positions ...

  10. Identification of Cryptosporidium from Dairy Cattle in Pahang, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Hisamuddin, Nur Hazirah; Hashim, Najat; Soffian, Sharmeen Nellisa; Amin, Mohd Hishammfariz Mohd; Wahab, Ridhwan Abdul; Mohammad, Mardhiah; Isa, Muhammad Lokman Md; Yusof, Afzan Mat

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium, a protozoan parasite, can cause cryptosporidiosis which is a gastrointestinal disease that can infect humans and livestock. Cattle are the most common livestock that can be infected with this protozoan. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle in Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia and to find out the association between the occurrence of infection and 3 different ages of cattle (calves less than 1 year, yearling, and adult cattle). The samples were processed by using formol-ether concentration technique and stained by modified Ziehl Neelsen. The results showed that 15.9% (24/151) of cattle were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts. The occurrence of Cryptosporidium in calves less than 1 year was the highest with the percentage of 20.0% (11/55) followed by yearling and adult cattle, with the percentage occurrence of 15.6 % (7/45) and 11.8% (6/51), respectively. There was no significant association between the occurrence and age of cattle and presence of diarrhea. Good management practices and proper hygiene management must be taken in order to reduce the infection. It is highly important to control the infection since infected cattle may serve as potential reservoirs of the infection to other animals and humans, especially animal handlers. PMID:27180579

  11. Age-dependent patterns of bovine tuberculosis in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is an important livestock disease, seriously impacting cattle industries in both industrialised and pre-industrialised countries. Like TB in other mammals, infection is life long and, if undiagnosed, may progress to disease years after exposure. The risk of disease in humans is highly age-dependent, however in cattle, age-dependent risks have yet to be quantified, largely due to insufficient data and limited diagnostics. Here, we estimate age-specific reactor rates in Great Britain by combining herd-level testing data with spatial movement data from the Cattle Tracing System (CTS). Using a catalytic model, we find strong age dependencies in infection risk and that the probability of detecting infection increases with age. Between 2004 and 2009, infection incidence in cattle fluctuated around 1%. Age-specific incidence increased monotonically until 24–36 months, with cattle aged between 12 and 36 months experiencing the highest rates of infection. Beef and dairy cattle under 24 months experienced similar infection risks, however major differences occurred in older ages. The average reproductive number in cattle was greater than 1 for the years 2004–2009. These methods reveal a consistent pattern of BTB rates with age, across different population structures and testing patterns. The results provide practical insights into BTB epidemiology and control, suggesting that targeting a mass control programme at cattle between 12 and 36 months could be beneficial. PMID:24131703

  12. Salmonella in lymph nodes of cattle presented for harvest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of Salmonella in the subiliac lymph nodes (LN) of cattle. Lymph node samples were obtained from carcasses of cull and feedlot cattle at commercial packing plants. Lymph nodes were trimmed of all fat, surface sterilized by submersion in boiling ...

  13. Shade material evaluation based on physiological response of cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle produced in open feedlots are vulnerable to a variety of weather events; under certain conditions heat events can be especially detrimental. Shade structures are often considered as one method of reducing cattle stress. A variety of shading materials are available; selection of a suitable m...

  14. Methane emissions from a beef cattle feedyard: measurements and models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methane (CH4) emissions from enteric fermentation by livestock account for about 2% of U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, with beef and dairy cattle the most significant sources. Most current approaches to estimate the contribution of cattle to GHG emissions use emission factors based on productio...

  15. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle housing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beef cattle are potential sources of greenhouse gases (GHG). These emissions include methane produced by fermentation within the gut (enteric), and methane and nitrous oxide emissions from manure. Life Cycle Analysis of North American (NA) beef cattle production systems consistently indicate that...

  16. A live vaccine against Neospora caninum abortions in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    N. caninum has emerged as a major cause of abortion in dairy and beef cattle and it is estimated to be responsible for losses in excess of a billion dollars annually, in cattle industries worldwide. Yet, after more than 25 years of research on this parasite, the control options for this disease appe...

  17. Spatiotemporal cattle data - a plea for protocol standardization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It was not until the end of the 1990’s that animal born satellite receiver’s catapulted range cattle ecology into the 21st century world of microchip technology with all of its opportunities and challenges. With the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) insight into how cattle use a landscape i...

  18. Calculation and delivery of US genomic evaluations for dairy cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In April 2013, the responsibility for calculation and distribution of genomic evaluations for dairy cattle was transferred from the USDA to the US dairy industry’s Council on Dairy Cattle Breeding; the responsibility for development of evaluation methodology remained with the USDA. The Council on Da...

  19. Relationship between cattle temperament as determined by exit velocity carcass merit in beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this trial was to use cattle temperament, as determined by exit velocity only, as a means to evaluate the impact of temperament on carcass merit and the possible utilization of exit velocity alone as a sorting tool within the feedlot. At the time of processing, exit velocity and bod...

  20. Liver copper concentrations in cull cattle in the UK: are cattle being copper loaded?

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, N. R.; Holmes-Pavord, H. R.; Bone, P. A.; Ander, E. L.; Young, S. D.

    2015-01-01

    With the release of the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs/Advisory Committee on Animal Feed Guidance Note for Supplementing Copper to Bovines it was noted that the current copper status of the national herd was not known. Liver samples were recovered from 510 cull cattle at a single abattoir across a period of three days. The samples were wet-ashed and liver copper concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. Breed, age and previous location information were obtained from the British Cattle Movement Service. Dairy breeds had higher liver copper concentrations than beef breeds. Holstein-Friesian and ‘other’ dairy breeds had 38.3 per cent and 40 per cent of cattle above the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA) reference range (8000 µmol/kg dry matter), respectively, whereas only 16.9 per cent of animals in the combined beef breeds exceeded this value. It was found that underlying topsoil copper concentration was not related to liver copper content and that age of the animal also had little effect on liver concentration. In conclusion, over 50 per cent of the liver samples tested had greater-than-normal concentrations of copper with almost 40 per cent of the female dairy cattle having liver copper concentrations above the AHVLA reference range, indicating that a significant proportion of the UK herd is at risk of chronic copper toxicity. PMID:26489996

  1. Infectivity of sarcocystis spp. from bison, elk, moose, and cattle for cattle via sporocysts from coyotes.

    PubMed

    Fayer, R; Dubey, J P; Leek, R G

    1982-08-01

    Bison bison (bison), Cervus canadensis (elk), Alces alces (moose), and Bos taurus (cattle) musculature containing Sarcocystis spp. cysts was fed to laboratory raised Canis latrans (coyotes), Sporocysts collected from the feces of coyotes fed musculature of each of the ruminant species were fed to four groups of three laboratory-raised domestic calves, respectively, to determine if Sarcocystis spp. was transmissible from wild to domestic ruminants and if so, to compare clinical signs of infection and morphologic features of cysts with those resulting from infection with Sarcocystis bovicanis. All calves fed sporocysts of Sarcocystis from coyotes that ate bison or cattle muscle had similar clinical signs and harbored morphologically similar parasites, suggesting that both bison and cattle are intermediate hosts for S. bovicanis and that this species is transmissible between the two ruminant species. All calves fed sporocysts from coyotes that ate elk muscle or moose muscle remained asymptomatic but one calf in each group had intramuscular cysts. The finding of relatively large numbers of intramuscular cysts in one calf fed sporocysts of elk origin and smaller numbers in one calf fed sporocysts of moose origin could represent either spurious natural infections or indicate low infectivity of Sarcocystis spp. from elk and moose to cattle.

  2. [Therapeutic efficacy of buparvaquone (buparvon) in cattle with theileriosis].

    PubMed

    Saruhan, Bariş; Paşa, Serdar

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of buparvaquone (Buparvon, ALKE, Istanbul) in the treatment of theileriosis in cattle. The causative agent T. annulata causes direct and indirect gross economical loss in Turkey. Theileriosis was microscopically diagnosed by determining the presence of piroplasms in erythrocytes in thin blood smears stained with Giemsa stain. Buparvaquone was administered intramuscularly to the cattle with theileriosis using a single dose of 2.5 mg/kg. Clinical and laboratory examinations in cattle with theileriosis were carried out before and on the first, third and seventh days after treatment. As a result, it was concluded that a single deep intramuscular dose of 2.5 mg/kg buparvaquone was effective in the treatment of cattle which are naturally infected with T. annulata. However, further studies are needed using control groups of the same breed and age including suitable numbers of naturally infected and experimentally infected cattle.

  3. Milestones in beef cattle genetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Golden, B L; Garrick, D J; Benyshek, L L

    2009-04-01

    National beef cattle genetic evaluation programs have evolved in the United States over the last 35 yr to create important tools that are part of sustainable breeding programs. The history of national beef cattle genetic evaluation programs has lessons to offer the next generation of researchers as new approaches in molecular genetics and decision support are developed. Through a series of complex and intricate pressures from technology and organizational challenges, national cattle evaluation programs continue to grow in importance and impact. Development of enabling technologies and the interface of the disciplines of computer science, numerical methods, statistics, and quantitative genetics have created an example of how academics, government, and industry can work together to create more effective solutions to technical problems. The advent of mixed model procedures was complemented by a series of breakthrough discoveries that made what was previously considered intractable a reality. The creation of modern genetic evaluation procedures has followed a path characterized by a steady and constant approach to identification and solution for each technical problem encountered. At its core, the driving force for the evolution has been the need to constantly improve the accuracy of the predictions of genetic merit for breeding stock, especially young animals. Sensible approaches, such as the principle of economically relevant traits, were developed that created the rules to be followed as the programs grew. However, the current systems are far from complete or perfect. Modern genetic evaluation programs have a long way to go, and a great deal of improvement in the accuracy of prediction is still possible. But the greatest challenge remains: the need to understand that genetic predictions are only parameters for decision support procedures and not an end in themselves.

  4. Genomic characteristics of cattle copy number variations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Copy number variation (CNV) represents another important source of genetic variation complementary to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). High-density SNP array data have been routinely used to detect human CNVs, many of which have significant functional effects on gene expression and human diseases. In the dairy industry, a large quantity of SNP genotyping results are becoming available and can be used for CNV discovery to understand and accelerate genetic improvement for complex traits. Results We performed a systematic analysis of CNV using the Bovine HapMap SNP genotyping data, including 539 animals of 21 modern cattle breeds and 6 outgroups. After correcting genomic waves and considering the pedigree information, we identified 682 candidate CNV regions, which represent 139.8 megabases (~4.60%) of the genome. Selected CNVs were further experimentally validated and we found that copy number "gain" CNVs were predominantly clustered in tandem rather than existing as interspersed duplications. Many CNV regions (~56%) overlap with cattle genes (1,263), which are significantly enriched for immunity, lactation, reproduction and rumination. The overlap of this new dataset and other published CNV studies was less than 40%; however, our discovery of large, high frequency (> 5% of animals surveyed) CNV regions showed 90% agreement with other studies. These results highlight the differences and commonalities between technical platforms. Conclusions We present a comprehensive genomic analysis of cattle CNVs derived from SNP data which will be a valuable genomic variation resource. Combined with SNP detection assays, gene-containing CNV regions may help identify genes undergoing artificial selection in domesticated animals. PMID:21345189

  5. Evaluation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for detection of cattle in the Cattle Fever Tick Permanent Quarantine Zone

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An unmanned aerial vehicle was used to capture videos of cattle in pastures to determine the efficiency of this technology for use by Mounted Inspectors in the Permanent Quarantine zone (PQZ) of the Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program in south Texas along the U.S.-Mexico Border. These videos were ...

  6. Antibodies to Shiga toxins in Brazilian cattle.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Bruno B; Luz, Daniela; Abreu, Patrícia A E; Gotti, Tatiana B; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Piazza, Roxane M F; Horton, Denise S P Q

    2017-07-01

    Cattle are considered a reservoir of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). There is no information about the presence of antibodies against Shiga toxins in Brazilian bovine serum. Using ELISA, all sera tested showed antibodies against the two main STEC virulence factors; Stx1 and Stx2. Neutralizing antibodies against Stx1 and/or Stx2 were detected in all but one serum. In conclusion, our results indicated that these animals had been exposed to STEC producing both toxins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Dermatophytes transmitted by pets and cattle].

    PubMed

    Monod, M; Fratti, M; Mignon, B; Baudraz-Rosselet, F

    2014-04-02

    Most inflammatory skin and hair dermatophytoses are caused by one of four zoophilic dermatophyte species: Microsporum canis (from cats and dogs), Trichophyton verrucosum (from cattle), Arthroderma benhamiae (from Guinea-pigs) and Arthrodermna vanbreuseghemii (generally from cats and dogs). In cases of highly inflammatory tinea corporis, tinea faciae and tinea capitis in humans, it is important to identify with certainty the precise etiologic agent and to examine pets as the possible source of infection. The recurrence of infections or new infections can be prevented by adequately treating incriminated domestic animals and their environments. Cooperation between the medical and veterinary professions is required in this situation.

  8. Epizootic botulism of cattle in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Döbereiner, J; Tokarnia, C H; Langenegger, J; Dutra, I S

    1992-05-01

    The first diagnosis of botulism in cattle in Brazil and its epizootiology are reviewed. The high prevalence of the disease raised on phosphorus deficient pastures in Savanna regions has caused severe economic losses in the past. The temperature induced microcomplement fixation test (TIMCF) confirmed the clinical-pathological diagnosis in all of the 24 cases studied by this method. The most important reason why botulism has not been controlled satisfactorily in Brazil is the lack of an available effective vaccine (type C and D). Additional prophylactic measures are phosphorus supplementation and removal of carcasses from the pasture.

  9. Indigenous Bali cattle is most suitable for sustainable small farming in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Martojo, H

    2012-01-01

    Livestock husbandry is essential for Indonesia. This study reviews cattle characteristics and husbandry methods in the country with special interest in describing the importance of indigenous breeds of cattle. As a conclusion, the Bali cattle ought to be considered the most suitable indigenous cattle breed for the low-input, high stress production system still practised by millions of families in Indonesia.

  10. 9 CFR 72.6 - Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.6 Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks. Cattle in quarantined areas where tick eradication is not being conducted 3...

  11. 9 CFR 72.7 - Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States. 72.7 Section 72.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.7 Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States. Cattle in areas...

  12. 9 CFR 78.9 - Cattle from herds not known to be affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cattle from herds not known to be... BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.9 Cattle from herds not known to be affected. Male cattle which are not test eligible and are from herds not known to be...

  13. 9 CFR 72.6 - Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.6 Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks. Cattle in quarantined areas where tick eradication is not being conducted 3...

  14. 9 CFR 72.12 - Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cattle; exposure to tick infestation... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.12 Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection prohibited. The cattle shall not be exposed to tick infestation...

  15. 9 CFR 72.6 - Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.6 Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks. Cattle in quarantined areas where tick eradication is not being conducted 3...

  16. 9 CFR 73.5 - Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. 73.5 Section 73.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.5 Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. Cattle of any herd in any quarantined area, which herd is not...

  17. 9 CFR 72.7 - Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States. 72.7 Section 72.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.7 Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States. Cattle in areas...

  18. 9 CFR 72.12 - Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cattle; exposure to tick infestation... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.12 Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection prohibited. The cattle shall not be exposed to tick infestation...

  19. 9 CFR 72.6 - Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.6 Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks. Cattle in quarantined areas where tick eradication is not being conducted 3...

  20. 9 CFR 73.5 - Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. 73.5 Section 73.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.5 Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. Cattle of any herd in any quarantined area, which herd is not...

  1. 9 CFR 73.5 - Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. 73.5 Section 73.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.5 Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. Cattle of any herd in any quarantined area, which herd is not...

  2. 9 CFR 78.9 - Cattle from herds not known to be affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cattle from herds not known to be... BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.9 Cattle from herds not known to be affected. Male cattle which are not test eligible and are from herds not known to be...

  3. 9 CFR 78.9 - Cattle from herds not known to be affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cattle from herds not known to be... BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.9 Cattle from herds not known to be affected. Male cattle which are not test eligible and are from herds not known to be...

  4. 9 CFR 78.9 - Cattle from herds not known to be affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cattle from herds not known to be... BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.9 Cattle from herds not known to be affected. Male cattle which are not test eligible and are from herds not known to be...

  5. 9 CFR 73.5 - Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. 73.5 Section 73.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.5 Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. Cattle of any herd in any quarantined area, which herd is not...

  6. 9 CFR 73.5 - Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. 73.5 Section 73.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.5 Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. Cattle of any herd in any quarantined area, which herd is not...

  7. 9 CFR 72.7 - Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States. 72.7 Section 72.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.7 Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States. Cattle in areas...

  8. 9 CFR 72.12 - Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cattle; exposure to tick infestation... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.12 Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection prohibited. The cattle shall not be exposed to tick infestation...

  9. 9 CFR 72.12 - Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cattle; exposure to tick infestation... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.12 Cattle; exposure to tick infestation after treatment or inspection prohibited. The cattle shall not be exposed to tick infestation...

  10. Distribution and Diversity of Escherichia and Salmonella isolates obtained from beef cattle concentrated animal feeding operations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Southern High Plains are home to numerous cattle feedlots containing approximately 3.5 million beef cattle that account for nearly 30% of the United States fed beef cattle operations. The high density of beef cattle results in a concentration of nutrients (C, N, and P) due to the generation of m...

  11. Pharmacological characterization of a tyramine receptor from the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The southern cattle fever tick (Rhipicephalus microplus) is a hematophagous external parasite that vectors the causative agents (Babesia spp.), which results in cattle fever or red water fever. The southern cattle fever tick is a threat to the cattle industry in many locations throughout the world. ...

  12. Peste des Petits Ruminants Infection among Cattle and Wildlife in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Lembo, Tiziana; Oura, Christopher; Parida, Satya; Hoare, Richard; Frost, Lorraine; Fyumagwa, Robert; Kivaria, Fredrick; Chubwa, Chobi; Kock, Richard; Batten, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    We investigated peste des petits ruminants (PPR) infection in cattle and wildlife in northern Tanzania. No wildlife from protected ecosystems were seropositive. However, cattle from villages where an outbreak had occurred among small ruminants showed high PPR seropositivity, indicating that spillover infection affects cattle. Thus, cattle could be of value for PPR serosurveillance. PMID:24274684

  13. 9 CFR 72.7 - Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States. 72.7 Section 72.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.7 Interstate movement of cattle from cooperating States. Cattle in areas...

  14. The productivity effects of cattle tick (Boophilus microplus) infestation on cattle, with particular reference to Bos indicus cattle and their crosses.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, N N

    2006-04-15

    In response to uncertainty among cattle producers in Australia regarding the need to treat Bos indicus and B. indicus crossbreeds, the scientific literature relating to the productivity effects of Boophilus microplus on cattle of all breeds was reviewed. Estimates of the mean effect of each engorging tick (damage coefficient, d) were made from a simple analysis of the reported data. On average, each engorging female tick is responsible for the loss of 1.37 +/- 0.25 g bodyweight in B. taurus cattle. The comparable value for B. taurusxB. indicus cattle is 1.18 +/- 0.21 g/engorging tick. These values were not statistically significantly different, indicating that if a threshold approach to tick control were taken, then the threshold number of standard ticks would be the same regardless of cattle genotype. No studies provided useable estimates of the effect of tick infestation on pure B. indicus cattle. An economic threshold for treatment, below which acaricide application is not beneficial, can be predicted, using known values for the cost of acaricide application and the price of beef. However, the application of a threshold approach to control has not been embraced by government advisers and runs contrary to the accepted principals of strategic control programs.

  15. Jimson weed seed toxicity in cattle.

    PubMed

    Nelson, P D; Mercer, H D; Essig, H W; Minyard, J P

    1982-10-01

    A subacute experiment was undertaken for 14 days. The results obtained from these studies suggest that: 1) unless a highly Jimson weed seed contaminated feed is ingested (greater than 0.09% of body weight) or force fed, death should be a rare consequence of Jimson weed seed contamination; 2) Jimson weed seed toxicity in cattle as a result of feed contamination appears a self-limiting problem (rumen atony and anorexia prevent further intoxication until the blood levels of alkaloids are reduced to allow normal ruminant intestinal function); 3) cattle may exhibit signs of atropine toxicity at contamination levels of 881 seed/kg of feed or higher; 4) rumen fluid from heifers fed diet containing 4,408 Jimson weed seed had the greatest VFA concentration change from day 0 to 7; 5) in vitro fermentation of diets resulted in no difference in IVDMD values, but VFA concentration values tended to increase with increased concentrations of Jimson weed seed in the diet.

  16. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-12-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed.

  17. Biogas and energy production from cattle waste

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthi, J.

    1997-12-31

    Biomass is one of the longest used energy sources employed in human activity. The bioconversion of organic matter to biogas is a complex anaerobic fermentation process involving the action of microorganisms such as methane producing bacteria. In this paper, biogas and energy production from cattle waste is investigated. There are two significant reasons that motivate this study. First, treating animal waste with the technology of anaerobic digestion can reduce environmental pollution and generate a relatively cheap and easily available source of energy in dairy farms. The gas produced can be used for space and water heating of farm houses, cooking, lighting, grain drying and as a fuel for heating greenhouses during cold weather. It also has the potential to run other small industries. Second, it is an effective way of managing cattle waste as well as producing a quick acting, non-toxic fertilizer for agricultural use. A working model of biogas plant is studied in this paper and its economic value as an alternative energy source is examined. An alternative to direct generation of electricity, is to convert the methane from the biomass to methanol. Methanol is an excellent fuel for internal combustion engines and can easily compete with gasoline in many nations where gasoline costs over $4 per US gallon.

  18. Ameloblastic fibromas and related tumors in cattle.

    PubMed

    Gardner, D G

    1996-03-01

    This article concerns rare odontogenic tumors that occur predominantly in the mandibular incisor region of young cattle and which have often in the past been referred to as ameloblastomas, or as the outdated synonym, adamantinoma. Twenty-two examples from the literature and two new ones were studied. Six consisted of epithelial islands which resembled those of ameloblastoma but which were located within a cellular fibrous connective tissue that was the second component of the tumor; these mixed odontogenic tumors therefore represented ameloblastic fibromas, not ameloblastomas. Eight consisted of a combination of ameloblastic fibroma and odontoma and therefore were ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and one was apparently malignant (ameloblastic fibro-odontosarcoma). Excluding this last lesion, these tumors should respond well to enucleation, like their human counterparts but, to confirm this hypothesis, the margins of future examples should be carefully examined to determine that they are well-demarcated, not invasive. The microscopic features of the remaining 9 tumours could not be evaluated adequately, while another 17 tumors in cattle and water buffalo reported briefly could not be studied to any extent because of insufficient information.

  19. Energy and protein utilization in growing cattle.

    PubMed

    Geay, Y

    1984-03-01

    Limited data are available to describe the different phases of dietary protein and energy utilization in growing cattle as compared with those in adult cattle or in growing nonruminants. The European data on this topic are summarized to indicate application in appropriate feeding standards. Net protein requirements are widely variable with breed and sex. They are lower in steers than in bulls and lower in early maturing than in late maturing breeds. They are clearly defined for growing and fattening bulls where they are influenced by breed, live weight and live weight gain. New systems have been proposed to express the protein allowances. They provide a great step towards a concept explaining N supply to ruminants. However, protein degradability in the rumen, efficiency of microbial protein synthesis, intestinal digestibility and metabolic efficiency of amino acid absorption in the intestine need to be described more accurately. Even if body energy retention measured by the slaughter technique is systematically lower than when measured by calorimetric balance, both techniques can correctly describe the effect of breed sex, weight, or daily gain on energy retained, in relative value, and its distribution between protein and fat deposition. But further research is needed to confirm the distribution of metabolizable energy between maintenance and growth and the efficiency of metabolizable energy utilization for growth. Thus, different authors have preferred to calculate the energy allowances, not by a factorial method, but by regression between energy intake and the corresponding weight and daily gain of animals measured during feeding trials.

  20. Lipomatous muscular 'dystrophy' of Piedmontese cattle.

    PubMed

    Biasibetti, E; Amedeo, S; Brugiapaglia, A; Destefanis, G; Di Stasio, L; Valenza, F; Capucchio, M T

    2012-11-01

    Lipomatous myopathy is a degenerative muscle pathology characterized by the substitution of muscle cells with adipose tissue, sporadically reported in cattle, pigs, and rarely in sheep, horses and dogs. This study investigated the pathology of this myopathy in 40 muscle samples collected from regularly slaughtered Piedmontese cattle living in Piedmont region (Italy). None of the animals showed clinical signs of muscular disease. Muscle specimens were submitted to histological and enzymatic investigations. Gross pathology revealed a different grade of infiltration of adipose tissue, involving multiple or single muscles. The most affected regions were the ventral abdomen and the shoulders, especially the cutaneous muscles and the muscles of the thoracic group. Morphological staining revealed an infiltration of adipose tissue varying in distribution and severity, changes in muscle fibre size and increased number of fibres with centrally located nuclei, suggesting muscle degeneration-regeneration. Necrosis and non-suppurative inflammatory cells were also seen. Furthermore, proliferation of connective tissue and non-specific myopathic changes were present. Chemical and physical characteristics of the affected tissue were also evaluated. The authors discuss about the aetiopathogenesis and classification of this muscle disorder whose histological lesions were similar to those reported in human dystrophies.

  1. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed. PMID:28096620

  2. Nutritional strategies to optimize dairy cattle immunity.

    PubMed

    Sordillo, L M

    2016-06-01

    Dairy cattle are susceptible to increased incidence and severity of both metabolic and infectious diseases during the periparturient period. A major contributing factor to increased health disorders is alterations in bovine immune mechanisms. Indeed, uncontrolled inflammation is a major contributing factor and a common link among several economically important infectious and metabolic diseases including mastitis, retained placenta, metritis, displaced abomasum, and ketosis. The nutritional status of dairy cows and the metabolism of specific nutrients are critical regulators of immune cell function. There is now a greater appreciation that certain mediators of the immune system can have a reciprocal effect on the metabolism of nutrients. Thus, any disturbances in nutritional or immunological homeostasis can provide deleterious feedback loops that can further enhance health disorders, increase production losses, and decrease the availability of safe and nutritious dairy foods for a growing global population. This review will discuss the complex interactions between nutrient metabolism and immune functions in periparturient dairy cattle. Details of how either deficiencies or overexposure to macro- and micronutrients can contribute to immune dysfunction and the subsequent development of health disorders will be presented. Specifically, the ways in which altered nutrient metabolism and oxidative stress can interact to compromise the immune system in transition cows will be discussed. A better understanding of the linkages between nutrition and immunity may facilitate the design of nutritional regimens that will reduce disease susceptibility in early lactation cows.

  3. [Inheritance of notched ears in Highland cattle].

    PubMed

    Scheider, A; Schmidt, P; Distl, O

    1994-10-01

    The present study describes an anomaly of the pinna of the ear and its distribution in Highland Cattle. The investigation is based on a questionnaire survey in farms in Bavaria keeping robust breeds and on registering data in 15 selected farms. In the year 1991, there were registered 548 Highland stud book cows in 108 farms. In four herds animals of the breed Highland Cattle were observed which showed crop ears. Always both ears were affected and this ear defect could be already observed in newborn calves. Crop ears appeared in very different forms. In some cases only small changes of the external ear could be recognized, in more severe cases, grooves in the external ear could be found and in the most severe case, the external ear was totally deformed and drastically reduced in size. In one herd, 45 animals out of the progeny of 46 of one affected breeding bull showed crop ears. The pedigrees indicated that this defect of the ear pinna is inherited and a single autosomal gene with nearly additive (incomplete dominant) action may be involved. Homozygote recessive animals are free from crop ears, animals homozygote for the mutated allele carry totally deformed external ears and heterozygote animals do not show as severe forms of crop ears as homozygote ones.

  4. Conservation genetics of cattle, sheep, and goats.

    PubMed

    Taberlet, Pierre; Coissac, Eric; Pansu, Johan; Pompanon, François

    2011-03-01

    Cattle, sheep and goats were domesticated about 10,000 years ago, spread out of the domestication centers in Europe, Asia, and Africa during the next few thousands years, and gave many populations locally adapted. After a very long period of soft selection, the situation changed dramatically 200 years ago with the emergence of the breed concept. The selection pressure strongly increased, and the reproduction among breeds was seriously reduced, leading to the fragmentation of the initial gene pool. More recently, the selection pressure was increased again via the use of artificial insemination, leading to a few industrial breeds with very high performances, but with low effective population sizes. Beside this performance improvement of industrial breeds, genetic resources are being lost, because of the replacement of traditional breeds by high performance industrial breeds at the worldwide level, and because of the loss of genetic diversity in these industrial breeds. Many breeds are already extinct, and genetic resources in cattle, sheep, and goats are thus highly endangered, particularly in developed countries. The recent development of next generation sequencing technologies opens new avenues for properly characterizing the genetic resources, not only in the very diverse domestic breeds, but also in their wild relatives. Based on sound genetic characterization, urgent conservation measures must be taken to avoid an irremediable loss of farm animal genetic resources, integrating economical, sociological, and political parameters.

  5. Chemical classification of cattle. 1. Breed groups.

    PubMed

    Baker, C M; Manwell, C

    1980-01-01

    From approximately 1000 papers with data on protein polymorphism in some 216 breeds of cattle, 10 polymorphic proteins were compared in means and variances of gene frequencies (arcsin p 1/2) for ten well-recognized breed groups for 196 of the breeds. The polymorphic proteins were alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, caseins (alpha s1, beta and chi), serum albumin, transferrin, haemoglobin, amylase I and carbonic anhydrase II. The breed groups were North European, Pied Lowland, European Red brachyceros, Channel Island brachyceros, Upland brachyceros, primigenius-brachyceros mixed, primigenius, Indian Zebu, African Humped (with Zebu admixture), and African Humped (Sanga). The coherence within groups and the differences between groups are often impressive. Only carbonic anhydrase II fails to differentiate at least some of the major breed groups. In some cases paradoxical distributions of rare genetic variants can be explained by a more detailed inspection of breed history. The chemical data support the morphological and geographical divisions of cattle into major breed groups. There are three distinct but related brachyceros groups; for some polymorphisms the two Channel Island breeds, the Jersey and the Guernsey, are quite divergent. Although some authorities have considered the Pied Lowland as primigenius, it is a very distinct breed group.

  6. Evidence for two independent domestications of cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, R T; MacHugh, D E; Bradley, D G; Sharp, P M; Cunningham, P

    1994-01-01

    The origin and taxonomic status of domesticated cattle are controversial. Zebu and taurine breeds are differentiated primarily by the presence or absence of a hump and have been recognized as separate species (Bos indicus and Bos taurus). However, the most widely held view is that both types of cattle derive from a single domestication event 8000-10,000 years ago. We have examined mtDNA sequences from representatives of six European (taurine) breeds, three Indian (zebu) breeds, and four African (three zebu, one taurine) breeds. Similar levels of average sequence divergence were observed among animals within each of the major continental groups: 0.41% (European), 0.38% (African), and 0.42% (Indian). However, the sequences fell into two very distinct geographic lineages that do not correspond with the taurine-zebu dichotomy: all European and African breeds are in one lineage, and all Indian breeds are in the other. There was little indication of breed clustering within either lineage. Application of a molecular clock suggests that the two major mtDNA clades diverged at least 200,000, and possibly as much as 1 million, years ago. This relatively large divergence is interpreted most simply as evidence for two separate domestication events, presumably of different subspecies of the aurochs, Bos primigenius. The clustering of all African zebu mtDNA sequences within the taurine lineage is attributed to ancestral crossbreeding with the earlier B. taurus inhabitants of the continent. Images PMID:8146187

  7. Thermal balance of cattle grazing winter range: model application.

    PubMed

    Keren, E N; Olson, B E

    2006-05-01

    Beef cattle grazing semiarid foothill rangeland of the Northern Rockies during winter may be exposed to cold temperatures and high winds while grazing pastures with low nutritional value. Cattle can physiologically and behaviorally respond to the changing environment to lower their metabolic requirements and reduce the effects of cold exposure. Requirements of grazing cattle may be overpredicted with models developed in controlled settings that do not account for energy-conserving behaviors. We refined a simple thermal balance equation to model heat exchange of free-ranging cattle. We accounted for the complex interactions between animal behavior and the changing natural environment by applying the insulation characteristics of the cattle's tissue and coat to a simple geometric shape of an asymmetric ellipsoid at different orientations to the sun and wind. We compared the model predictions with heat production measured in 3 studies, and in all cases the model predictions were similar to those reported. Model simulations indicate behaviors, such as lying and orientation to the sun, mitigated the effects of extreme weather. For many combinations of winter weather variables, metabolic requirements increased only slightly due to cold exposure of mature beef cattle in a near-maintenance state. The results indicate that solar radiation contributes strongly to the thermal balance of a cow. Thus, previous models that do not account for the irradiative environment may overestimate metabolic requirements of cattle acclimated to grazing winter range.

  8. Serious injuries to Australian veterinarians working with cattle.

    PubMed

    Lucas, M; Day, L; Fritschi, L

    2013-01-01

    To describe the factors associated with serious injuries sustained during cattle-associated activities by veterinarians responding to the Health Risks of Australian Veterinarians (HRAV) survey. Responses from the HRAV survey were reviewed and the factors associated with serious injuries reported by veterinarians while working with cattle were analysed. All veterinarians who had graduated from Australian veterinary schools between 1960 and 2000 were eligible for inclusion in the survey. The survey identified 474 serious injuries sustained while undertaking cattle-associated activities. Most cattle-associated injuries (82%) were sustained in stock or handling yards and 57% of reported injuries were sustained while undertaking pregnancy testing or undertaking examinations. Nearly 80% of all cattle-associated injuries were sustained as a result of the veterinarian being kicked or struck (49%) or pushed against or stepped on (30%). The part of the body most commonly injured was the upper limbs. Fractures were the most common type of serious injury sustained. The use of safety precautions at the time of the injury was reported by 62% of those veterinarians reporting injury. This study describes factors associated with serious injuries while working with cattle, as reported by veterinarians responding to the HRAV survey. Findings from this study will facilitate discussions aimed at addressing injury prevention for cattle veterinarians, including improving the awareness of safe handling practices and safety precautions. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2012 Australian Veterinary Association.

  9. Acute phase response in cattle infected with Anaplasma marginale.

    PubMed

    Nazifi, S; Razavi, S M; Kaviani, F; Rakhshandehroo, E

    2012-03-23

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the acute phase responses via the assessment of the concentration of serum sialic acids (total, lipid bound and protein bound), inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and acute phase proteins (Hp and SAA) in 20 adult crossbred cattle naturally infected by Anaplasma marginale. The infected animals were divided into 2 subgroups on the basis of parasitemia rate (<20% and >20%). Also, as a control group, 10 clinically healthy cattle from the same farms were sampled. Our data revealed significant decreases in red blood cell count (RBC), hematocrite (PCV) and hemoglobine (Hb) in infected cattle compared to healthy ones. Conversely, the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, serum sialic acids and the circulatory IFN-γ and TNF-α were increased in the diseased cattle (P<0.05). In addition, it was evident that the progression of parasitemia in infected cattle did not induce any significant alterations in the hematological indices (RBCs, PCV and Hb) and the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin and fibrinogen. SAA was the most sensitive factor to change in the diseased cattle. Therefore, increase in SAA concentration may be a good indicator of inflammatory process in cattle naturally infected with Anaplasma marginale.

  10. Toxicology of oil field pollutants in cattle: a review.

    PubMed

    Coppock, R W; Mostrom, M S; Khan, A A; Semalulu, S S

    1995-12-01

    Cattle are poisoned by petroleum and substances used in drilling and operating oil and gas wells. The most common reported route of exposure for non-gaseous material is oral. Exposures occur when the petroleum or chemicals used in oil and gas field activities are available to cattle and when water and feed-stuffs are contaminated. Cattle, as a leisure activity, explore and ingest crude oil. Based on morbidity patterns in cattle herds, the amount of toxic substance ingested is variable. When water and feedstuffs are contaminated, a larger number in a herd generally are affected. Cattle have been poisoned by a wide variety of chemical mixtures. For substances high in volatile hydrocarbons, the lung is a target organ. Hydrocarbons also target the kidney, liver and brain. Exposure-linked abortions have been reported in cattle. Diethylene glycol targets the brain, liver and kidney. The reported threshold dose of unweathered oil for cattle ranges from 2.5 to 5.0 ml/kg bw, and the reported threshold dose for weathered oil is 8.0 ml/kg.

  11. Ticks infesting cattle in Central Equatoria region of South Sudan.

    PubMed

    Marcellino, Wani L; Julla, Ibrahim I; Salih, Diaeldin A; El Hussein, Abdel R M

    2011-11-15

    Ticks infesting cattle represent a serious problem for improvement of cattle productivity in South Sudan. There has been limited information on ticks and tick-borne diseases in southern Sudan. This study was initiated to update the current distribution of ticks infesting cattle in the Central Equatoria region of South Sudan. The surveys for the present study were conducted at various cattle camps in Juba, Mangalla and Terekeka between December 2004 and June 2005. A total of 2322 ticks were collected from the bodies of 88 randomly selected cattle. Ticks were preserved in 70% ethanol for later identification. Seven ixodid tick species were found to infest cattle in Juba whilst six species were recorded in Mangalla and only four species in Terekeka. Amblyomma variegatum was the most common and widely distributed species found on cattle across all the study locations. Amblyomma lepidum was not found during this study. Based on these findings, it would be advisable to preempt the situation and institute containment procedures before possible East Coast fever outbreaks occur.

  12. Technical note: validation of rumination collars for beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Goldhawk, C; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K; Beauchemin, K A

    2013-06-01

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate a wireless rumination monitoring system (Hi-Tag; SCR Engineers Ltd., Netanya, Israel) for recording rumination in beef cattle. The system operates based on acoustics of rumination and has been used previously for monitoring rumination in both young and adult dairy cattle. Study 1 consisted of beef cattle in tie-stall housing with 72 observations for 4 cattle fed a high forage backgrounding diet and 47 observations for 3 cattle fed a high grain finishing diet. Study 2 consisted of 44 observations for 6 beef cattle fed a high forage diet in a loose-housing feedlot pen. Each observation consisted of the rumination time during a 2-h period as estimated by visual observations made by trained observers (inter-observer correlation r = 0.97) and the Hi-Tag system. The mean difference between visual and Hi-Tag rumination times was 9.8 ± 18.7 min/2 h. The rumination times from the Hi-Tag system were only moderately correlated with visual observations (r = 0.41, P < 0.001). The difference between visual and Hi-Tag rumination times was not correlated with head posture during the 2 h period (r = -0.02, P = 0.89). Physical and dietary differences between dairy and beef cattle may have resulted in the inaccuracy of the Hi-Tag system when used in beef cattle fed typical backgrounding and finishing diets. More work is required to improve the accuracy of this automated system for rumination monitoring before it can be used reliably with beef cattle.

  13. Grazing Affects Exosomal Circulating MicroRNAs in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Muroya, Susumu; Ogasawara, Hideki; Hojito, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs (c-miRNAs) are associated with physiological adaptation to acute and chronic aerobic exercise in humans. To investigate the potential effect of grazing movement on miRNA circulation in cattle, here we profiled miRNA expression in centrifugally prepared exosomes from the plasma of both grazing and housed Japanese Shorthorn cattle. Microarray analysis of the c-miRNAs resulted in detection of a total of 231 bovine exosomal miRNAs in the plasma, with a constant expression level of let-7g across the duration and cattle groups. Expression of muscle-specific miRNAs such as miR-1, miR-133a, miR-206, miR-208a/b, and miR-499 were undetectable, suggesting the mildness of grazing movement as exercise. According to validation by quantitative RT-PCR, the circulating miR-150 level in the grazing cattle normalized by the endogenous let-7g level was down-regulated after 2 and 4 months of grazing (P < 0.05), and then its levels in housed and grazing cattle equalized when the grazing cattle were returned to a housed situation. Likewise, the levels of miR-19b, miR-148a, miR-221, miR-223, miR-320a, miR-361, and miR-486 were temporarily lowered in the cattle at 1 and/or 2 month of grazing compared to those of the housed cattle (P < 0.05). In contrast, the miR-451 level was up-regulated in the grazing cattle at 2 months of grazing (P = 0.044). The elevation of miR-451 level in the plasma was coincident with that in the biceps femoris muscle of the grazing cattle (P = 0.008), which suggests the secretion or intake of miR-451 between skeletal muscle cells and circulation during grazing. These results revealed that exosomal c-miRNAs in cattle were affected by grazing, suggesting their usefulness as molecular grazing markers and functions in physiological adaptation of grazing cattle associated with endocytosis, focal adhesion, axon guidance, and a variety of intracellular signaling, as predicted by bioinformatic analysis. PMID:26308447

  14. The origin of Indonesian cattle and conservation genetics of the Bali cattle breed.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, K; Olsson, M; Andersson, G; Purwantara, B; van Tol, H T A; Rodriguez-Martinez, H; Colenbrander, B; Lenstra, J A

    2012-01-01

    Both Bos indicus (zebu) and Bos javanicus (banteng) contribute to the Indonesian indigenous livestock, which is supposedly of a mixed species origin, not by direct breeding but by secondary cross-breeding. Here, the analysis of mitochondrial, Y-chromosomal and microsatellite DNA showed banteng introgression of 10-16% in Indonesian zebu breeds with East-Javanese Madura and Galekan cattle having higher levels of autosomal banteng introgression (20-30%) and combine a zebu paternal lineage with a predominant (Madura) or even complete (Galekan) maternal banteng origin. Two Madura bulls carried taurine Y-chromosomal haplotypes, presumably of French Limousin origin. There was no evidence for zebu introgression in five populations of the Bali cattle, a domestic form of the banteng.

  15. 9 CFR 73.6 - Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to scabies. 73.6 Section 73.6... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.6 Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to...

  16. 9 CFR 73.6 - Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to scabies. 73.6 Section 73.6... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.6 Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to...

  17. 9 CFR 73.6 - Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to scabies. 73.6 Section 73.6... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.6 Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to...

  18. 9 CFR 73.6 - Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to scabies. 73.6 Section 73.6... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.6 Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to...

  19. 9 CFR 73.6 - Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to scabies. 73.6 Section 73.6... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.6 Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to...

  20. Carcass quality and meat tenderness of Hawaii pasture-finished cattle and Hawaii-originated, mainland feedlot-finished cattle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Soo; Fukumoto, Glen Kazumi; Kim, Sunae

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the carcass quality and meat tenderness of Hawaii cattle finished on subtropical pasture with those of mainland US feedlot-finished cattle that were shipped from Hawaii after weaning. Rib-eye steak samples were collected from 30 feedlot-finished cattle harvested at a slaughter house in Washington State, USA and from 13 subtropical pasture-finished cattle harvested at a local slaughter house in Hawaii, then shipped to meat science laboratory at the University of Hawaii, Manoa. Samples were aged for 2 weeks at 4°C and frozen for later proximate analysis and meat tenderness measurement. Feedlot-finished cattle had significantly heavier carcass weight (353 vs 290 kg) and thicker backfat (13.5 vs 6.6 mm), but no significant difference was observed in rib-eye area between the two groups. Marbling score (Small) and United States Department of Agriculture quality grade (Choice) of the pasture-finished beef were not significantly (P < 0.05) different from those of feedlot-finished beef. The shear force value of pasture-finished beef (5.18 kg) was not statistically different (P < 0.05) from that of feedlot-finished beef (4.40 kg). In conclusion, results of this study suggest that Hawaii cattle finished on subtropical pasture produced as tender beef as mainland feedlot-finished cattle with less intramuscular fat.

  1. Associations between prior management of cattle and risk of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Hay, K E; Morton, J M; Schibrowski, M L; Clements, A C A; Mahony, T J; Barnes, T S

    2016-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the major cause of clinical disease and death in feedlot populations worldwide. A longitudinal study was conducted to assess associations between risk factors related to on-farm management prior to transport to the feedlot and risk of BRD in a population of feedlot beef cattle sourced from throughout the cattle producing regions of Australia. Exposure variables were derived from questionnaire data provided by farmers supplying cattle (N=10,721) that were a subset of the population included in a nationwide prospective study investigating numerous putative risk factors for BRD. Causal diagrams were used to inform model building to allow estimation of effects of interest. Multilevel mixed effects logistic regression models were fitted within the Bayesian framework. Animals that were yard weaned were at reduced risk (OR: 0.7, 95% credible interval: 0.5-1.0) of BRD at the feedlot compared to animals immediately returned to pasture after weaning. Animals that had previously been fed grain (OR: 0.6, 95% credible interval: 0.3-1.1) were probably at reduced risk of BRD at the feedlot compared to animals not previously fed grain. Animals that received prior vaccinations against Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (OR: 0.8, 95% credible interval: 0.5-1.1) or Mannheimia haemolytica (OR: 0.8, 95% credible interval: 0.6-1.0) were also probably at reduced risk compared to non-vaccinated animals. The results of this study confirm that on-farm management before feedlot entry can alter risk of BRD after beef cattle enter feedlots.

  2. Occurrence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in dairy cattle, beef cattle and water buffaloes in China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingbo; Li, Pei; Zhao, Xiaoping; Xu, Hailing; Wu, Wenxian; Wang, Yuanfei; Guo, Yaqiong; Wang, Lin; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2015-01-30

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi are important protists in a wide range of vertebrate hosts, causing diarrheal diseases. Cattle are considered potential reservoirs of Cryptosporidium infection in humans, although their role in the transmission of E. bieneusi is not clear. In the present work, 793 fecal specimens from dairy cattle, native beef cattle, and water buffaloes on 11 farms in China were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi using nested PCR targeting the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium spp. and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of E. bieneusi. For Cryptosporidium, 144/446 (32.3%) dairy cattle, 44/166 (26.5%) beef cattle, and 43/181 (23.8%) water buffaloes were PCR-positive. Sequence analysis was successful for 213 of the 231 Cryptosporidium-positive isolates; among them 94 had Cryptosporidium andersoni, 61 had Cryptosporidium bovis, 54 had Cryptosporidium ryanae, 2 had a Cryptosporidium suis-like genotype, and 2 had mixed infections of C. bovis and C. ryanae. In dairy and beef cattle, C. andersoni and C. bovis were the most common species, whereas C. ryanae was the dominant species in water buffaloes. The latter species produced SSU rRNA sequences different between cattle and water buffaloes. For E. bieneusi, the infection rate of E. bieneusi in dairy cattle, beef cattle and water buffaloes was 4.9%, 5.4% and 2.2%, respectively. All 35 E. bieneusi-positive specimens were successfully sequenced, revealing the presence of four genotypes: three Group 2 genotypes previously reported in cattle as well as humans (I, J and BEB4) and one Group 1 genotype recently reported in yaks (CHN11). Genotypes I and J were the most common genotypes in dairy and beef cattle, while genotype CHN11 was the only genotype seen in water buffaloes. Thus, the distribution of Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi in water buffaloes might be different from in dairy and beef cattle in China. These findings indicate that some

  3. Are white-tailed deer compromising efforts to maintain eradication of cattle fever ticks from cattle herds in the U.S.?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    From 1907 when the fever tick eradication campaign began until 1933, the two tick eradication methods of either dipping cattle in an acaricide or “pasture vacation” were enormously successful in eradicating cattle ticks [CT, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus (Say)] and southern cattle ticks [SCT, ...

  4. Milk Production and Fertility in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Berry, D P; Friggens, N C; Lucy, M; Roche, J R

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary biology provides reasons for why the intensive selection for milk production reduces reproductive success rates. There is considerable exploitable genetic variation in reproductive performance in both dairy and beef cattle, and examination of national genetic trends demonstrates that genetic gain for both reproductive performance and milk production is possible in a well-structured breeding program. Reproductive failure is often postulated to be a consequence of the greater negative energy balance associated with the genetic selection for increased milk production. However, experimental results indicate that the majority of the decline in reproductive performance cannot be attributed to early lactation energy balance, per se; reproductive success will, therefore, not be greatly improved by nutritional interventions aimed at reducing the extent of negative energy balance. Modeling can aid in better pinpointing the key physiological components governing reproductive success and, also, the impact of individual improvements on overall fertility, helping to prioritize variables for inclusion in breeding programs.

  5. Toxocara vitulorum infection in German beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Venjakob, Peter L; Thiele, Gerhard; Clausen, Peter-Henning; Nijhof, Ard M

    2017-03-01

    Toxocara vitulorum is an ascarid that is frequently found in sub-tropical regions but little is known about infections in more temperate climates. In this study, we report the occurrence of this parasite in a beef cattle herd in eastern Germany. In June 2016, large (14-20 cm) cream-colored worms identified as adult T. vitulorum were observed in the feces of 2- to 3-month-old calves. Eggs of this parasite were subsequently detected in pooled fecal samples collected on all three farm sites. The morphological identification was supported by analysis of partial cytochrome c oxidase I and internal transcribed spacer 1 gene sequences. Clinical signs of toxocariasis, such as diarrhea and loss of body weight were not apparent.

  6. An odor flux model for cattle feedlots

    SciTech Connect

    Ormerod, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Odor nuisance associated with cattle feedlots has been an issue of major interest and concern to regulators, rural communities and the beef industry in Australia over the past decade. Methods of assessing the likely impacts of new feedlots on community odor exposure are still being developed, but in the past few years much has been learnt about the processes of odor generation, flux and dispersion as well as the acceptability of feedlot odor to exposed communities. This paper outlines a model which simulates the complex physical and chemical processes leading to odor emissions in a simple and practical framework. The model, named BULSMEL, has been developed as a response to regulatory requirements for quantitative assessments of odor impact. It will continue to be refined as more data are gathered.

  7. Haemoprotozoa of cattle in Northern Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Nair, A S; Ravindran, R; Lakshmanan, B; Kumar, S S; Tresamol, P V; Saseendranath, M R; Senthilvel, K; Rao, J R; Tewari, A K; Ghosh, S

    2011-04-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted using 150 blood samples collected from apparently normal / healthy crossbred cattle of Northern Kerala, South India, for detection of haemoprotozoan infections using staining techniques (Giemsa and Acridine Orange) and specific PCR. Theileria like piroplasms and Babesia bigemina were the only protozoan organisms detected in blood smears. Polymerase chain reaction using specific primers revealed amplification of products specific for Trypanosoma evansi (34.6%), Theileria sp. other than T. annulata (16%) and B. bigemina (0.6%). The higher prevalence rate of Trypanosoma evansi indicated that the subclinical parasitism can be due to higher prevalence of tabanid flies. The study also revealed the presence of a theilerial piroplasm other than T. annulata in North Kerala, which needs further investigation.

  8. [Interlocus associations and their variability in cattle].

    PubMed

    Oblap, R V; Zhuravel', E V; Glazko, G V

    1997-01-01

    The results of analysis of interloci associations between two pairs of syntenic loci (transferrin and ceruloplasmin, receptor for vitamin D and kappa-casein) and two non-syntenic ones (amylase-1 and post-transferrin 2) in two cattle groups of Red Steppe breed (infected and uninfected by bovine leukosis virus) and in two groups of Black-and-White Holsteins (from relatively "pure" zone and from the 10 km zone of Chernobyl NPP) were presented. It is found that "linkage disequilibrium" between loci is observed independent of their synteny. The data obtained allowed the authors to suppose, that the interloci associations are rather controlled by different factors of artificial and natural selection than by the genetic linkages between genes.

  9. WILD CATTLE MOUNTAIN AND HEART LAKE ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muffler, L.J. Patrick; Denton, David K.

    1984-01-01

    The results of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical surveys in Wild Cattle Mountain and Heart Lake Roadless Areas in California indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic, nonmetallic, or fossil fuel resources. However, Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area and part of Heart Lake Roadless Area lie in Lassen Known Geothermal Resources Area, and noncompetitive geothermal lease applications have been filed on much of the rest of Heart Lake Roadless Area. Both areas are adjacent to Lassen Volcanic National Park. Geochemical and geologic data indicate that the thermal manifestations in the Park and at Growler and Morgan Hot Springs just southwest of Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area are part of the same large geothermal system. Consequently, the entire Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area and part of the Heart Lake Roadless Area have a substantiated geothermal resource potential; the rest of the Heart Lake Roadless Area has a probable geothermal resource potential.

  10. 6. East rear, cattle auction arena below in background, Omaha ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. East rear, cattle auction arena below in background, Omaha livestock market offices above. View to west. - South Omaha Union Stock Yards, Stock Yards Autopark, 2900 "O" Plaza, Omaha, Douglas County, NE

  11. Use of water troughs by badgers and cattle.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, D T

    2014-12-01

    The frequency of visits by badgers and cattle to five water troughs was examined using motion-activated infra-red cameras in a farming landscape in Northern Ireland between May and July 2013. Cattle visit rates varied significantly across troughs, were greatest during daylight periods, and more frequent during dry weather. Badgers were recorded visiting only one of the five water troughs. These visits were recorded on 14 different nights between midnight and 0300 h and were mainly by individual badgers. Water troughs were not used concurrently by badgers and cattle and the minimum period between badger and cattle use was 3 days. Although badgers used water troughs rarely during the study there remains the potential for indirect transmission of a bacterium such as Mycobacterium bovis that may merit further investigation.

  12. 9 CFR 93.418 - Cattle from Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Canada 8 § 93.418 Cattle from Canada. (a) Health certificates..., 1999, the date determined by APHIS to be the date of effective enforcement of a ruminant-to-ruminant...

  13. Cattle tick vaccine researchers join forces in CATVAC.

    PubMed

    Schetters, Theo; Bishop, Richard; Crampton, Michael; Kopáček, Petr; Lew-Tabor, Alicja; Maritz-Olivier, Christine; Miller, Robert; Mosqueda, Juan; Patarroyo, Joaquín; Rodriguez-Valle, Manuel; Scoles, Glen A; de la Fuente, José

    2016-02-24

    A meeting sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation was held at the Avanti Hotel, Mohammedia, Morocco, July 14-15, 2015. The meeting resulted in the formation of the Cattle Tick Vaccine Consortium (CATVAC).

  14. Cattle cults of the Arabian Neolithic and early territorial societies.

    PubMed

    McCorriston, Joy; Harrower, Michael; Martin, Louise; Oches, Eric

    2012-01-01

    At the cusp of food production, Near Eastern societies adopted new territorial practices, including archaeologically visible sedentism and nonsedentary social defenses more challenging to identify archaeologically. New archaeological and paleoenvironmental evidence for Arabia's earliest-known sacrifices points to territorial maintenance in arid highland southern Yemen. Here sedentism was not an option prior to agriculture. Seasonally mobile pastoralists developed alternate practices to reify cohesive identities, maintain alliances, and defend territories. Archaeological and paleoenvironmental evidence implies cattle sacrifices were commemorated with a ring of more than 42 cattle skulls and a stone platform buried by 6,400-year-old floodplain sediments. Associated with numerous hearths, these cattle rites suggest feasting by a large gathering, with important sociopolitical ramifications for territories. A GIS analysis of the early Holocene landscape indicates constrained pasturage supporting small resident human populations. Cattle sacrifice in southern Arabia suggests a model of mid-Holocene Neolithic territorial pastoralism under environmental and cultural conditions that made sedentism unsusta

  15. Cattle practice: ready to adapt to a changing world?

    PubMed

    Huxley, Jon

    2016-10-15

    How well placed is UK cattle practice to meet future challenges? This question was addressed at a recent meeting of the Nottingham Dairy Health Innovation Forum. Forum member, Jon Huxley, reports on the outcome.

  16. Apparent predation by cattle at grassland bird nests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nack, J.L.; Ribic, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    We document the first cases of cattle behaving as avian predators, removing nestlings and eggs from three active ground nests in continuously grazed pastures in southwestern Wisconsin, 2000-2001. Cows removed three of four Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) eggs from one nest (the fourth egg was damaged), all four Eastern Meadowlark (Sturnella magna) nestlings from another, and all three Savannah Sparrow nestlings from a third. We found only two of three missing eggs (intact) and one of seven missing nestlings (dead) near two of the nests. Cows may have eaten the egg and nestlings we were unable to account for; alternatively, the egg and nestlings may have been scavenged by predators or removed from the area by the adult birds. Without videotape documentation, we would have attributed nest failure to traditional predators and cattle would not have been implicated. We may be underestimating the impact of cattle on ground nests by not considering cattle as potential predators.

  17. View of EPA Farm cattle shelter (featuring horse trailer), facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of EPA Farm cattle shelter (featuring horse trailer), facing northwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Shelter Unit Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  18. Closeup view of EPA Farm cattle shelter lamp, facing west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of EPA Farm cattle shelter lamp, facing west - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Shelter Unit Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  19. 6. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing cattle shelter, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing cattle shelter, facing southeast. - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  20. View of EPA Farm cattle shelters (Building 1506 in background), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of EPA Farm cattle shelters (Building 15-06 in background), facing southeast - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Shelter Unit Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  1. Cattle tick vaccine researchers join forces in CATVAC

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A meeting sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation was held at the Avanti Hotel, Mohammedia, Morocco, July 14–15, 2015. The meeting resulted in the formation of the Cattle Tick Vaccine Consortium (CATVAC)....

  2. Regional environmental simulation of African cattle herding societies

    SciTech Connect

    Krummel, J.R.; Markin, J.B.; O'Neill, R.V.

    1986-03-01

    Regional analyses of the interaction between human populations and natural resources must integrate landscape scale environmental problems. An approach that considers human culture, environmental processes, and resource needs offers an appropriate methodology. With this methodology, we analyze problems of food availability in African cattle-keeping societies. The analysis interrelates cattle biomass, forage availability, milk and blood production, crop yields, gathering, food subsidies, population, and variable precipitation. While an excess of cattle leads to overgrazing, cattle also serve as valuable food storage mechanisms during low rainfall periods. Food subsidies support higher population levels but do not alter drought-induced population fluctuations. Variable precipitation patterns require solutions that stabilize year-to-year food production and also address problems of overpopulation.

  3. 9 CFR 93.418 - Cattle from Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... after such test was performed. (c) Brucellosis test or vaccination certificates. (1) Cattle from Canada...; the date of such vaccination; the dosage of vaccine used; and the age of each animal on the date of vaccination. ...

  4. North American cattle marketing and bovine respiratory disease (BRD).

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A

    2009-12-01

    The risk of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) has a significant effect on the value of cattle in the marketplace. Calves sold in larger groups have $6.37/45.45 kg more value than those sold as singles or in small groups. Morbidity is higher in unweaned commingled calves than those marketed in groups more than 45 days following weaning. Calves with an aggressive disposition have significantly less value than docile calves, due largely to depressed performance and less carcass value. The value of cattle in the marketplace can be improved by offering larger, uniform lots of cattle that have been weaned at least 45 days. Cattle that suffer BRD in the feedlot have from $23.23 to $151.18 less value than those remaining healthy.

  5. Methane emission factors from cattle manure in Mexico.

    PubMed

    González-Avalos, E; Ruiz-Suárez, L G

    2001-10-01

    Factors responsible for methane emission from cattle manure representing diverse climates, systems and functions of cattle production are presented. These factors were obtained by means of an experimental methodology developed for this project. It was considered that the temperature, moisture, handling of manure and the animals' feed ration affect methane production. Drying conditions and fermentation of manure in cool, temperate and warm climates were simulated in the laboratory. Cattle manure was obtained from animals in intensive, semi-intensive and extensive production systems; for dairy, non-dairy and double purpose cattle production functions. Also handling of manure in dry lot, pasture and solid storage was considered. Results suggest that the dominant factor in methane emissions is the feed ration, followed by fermentation temperature and the excreta moisture content. The emission factors obtained in this work are at least a factor of five smaller than those proposed in the revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories for countries like Mexico.

  6. 7. General view of stockyards showing cattle pens in foreground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. General view of stockyards showing cattle pens in foreground, south Omaha in background, and livestock exchange building to right. View to east. - South Omaha Union Stock Yards, 2900 "O" Plaza, Omaha, Douglas County, NE

  7. Syndrome of arachnomelia in Simmental cattle

    PubMed Central

    Buitkamp, Johannes; Luntz, Bernhard; Emmerling, Reiner; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Weppert, Myriam; Schade, Benjamin; Meier, Norbert; Götz, Kay-Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Background The syndrome of arachnomelia is an inherited malformation mainly of limbs, back and head in cattle. At present the arachnomelia syndrome has been well known mainly in Brown Swiss cattle. Nevertheless, the arachnomelia syndrome had been observed in the Hessian Simmental population during the decade 1964–1974. Recently, stillborn Simmental calves were observed having a morphology similar to the arachnomelia syndrome. The goal of this work was the characterization of the morphology and genealogy of the syndrome in Simmental to establish the basis for an effective management of the disease. Results The first pathologically confirmed arachnomelia syndrome-cases in the current Simmental population appeared in the year 2005. By 2007, an additional 140 calves with the arachnomelia syndrome were identified. The major pathological findings were malformed bones affecting the head, long bones of the legs and the vertebral column. It could be shown that, with the exception of two cases that were considered as phenocopies, all of the paternal and about two-third of the maternal pedigrees of the affected calves could be traced back to one common founder. Together with the data from experimental matings, the pedigree data support an autosomal recessive mutation being the etiology of the arachnomelia syndrome. The frequency of the mutation in the current population was estimated to be 3.32%. Conclusion We describe the repeated occurrence of the arachnomelia syndrome in Simmental calves. It resembles completely the same defect occurring in the Brown Swiss breed. The mutation became relatively widespread amongst the current population. Therefore, a control system has to be established and it is highly desirable to map the disease and develop a genetic test system. PMID:18828914

  8. Experimental intoxication by Myoporum laetum in cattle.

    PubMed

    Raposo, J B; Mendez, M C; de Andrade, G B; Riet-Correa, F

    1998-10-01

    Myoporum laetum was collected in the counties of Rio Grande and Capao do Leao in winter and in Santa Vitoria in summer, autumn, winter and spring, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul and in the Department of Rocha, Uruguay, in winter and spring. The fresh green leaves were fed to 16 calves. Two calves that ingested the plant from Capao do Leao at 40 and 44 g/kg bw did not develop clinical signs. The other 14 calves had depression, abdominal pain, ruminal atony, ocular and nasal serous discharge, and dry feces with blood and mucus. Four calves developed icterus. First signs appeared 24-72 h after ingestion, and clinical period varied from 2 to 7 d. One animal had mild photosensitization. Calves dosed with 20 g/kg of plant from Santa Vitoria and 40 g/kg of plant from Uruguay had less severe clinical signs. All cattle recovered except 1 dosed with 40 g/kg of plant collected in winter in Santa Vitoria; it died 70 h after ingestion. Histologic lesions in the liver of this animal and in biopsies obtained 48 h after dosing other calves had centrilobular necrosis, sometimes extending to the midzonal region. Clinical signs and hepatic lesions were also observed in a calf dosed with 5 daily doses at 8 g/kg. Serum AST, GGT and bilirubin were increased. M laetum from Santa Vitoria was the most toxic for cattle, and the plant from Uruguay was the least toxic, suggesting variations in toxicity among plants from different regions.

  9. Prediction of enteric methane emissions from cattle.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Luis E; Strathe, Anders B; Fadel, James G; Casper, David P; Kebreab, Ermias

    2014-07-01

    Agriculture has a key role in food production worldwide and it is a major component of the gross domestic product of several countries. Livestock production is essential for the generation of high quality protein foods and the delivery of foods in regions where animal products are the main food source. Environmental impacts of livestock production have been examined for decades, but recently emission of methane from enteric fermentation has been targeted as a substantial greenhouse gas source. The quantification of methane emissions from livestock on a global scale relies on prediction models because measurements require specialized equipment and may be expensive. The predictive ability of current methane emission models remains poor. Moreover, the availability of information on livestock production systems has increased substantially over the years enabling the development of more detailed methane prediction models. In this study, we have developed and evaluated prediction models based on a large database of enteric methane emissions from North American dairy and beef cattle. Most probable models of various complexity levels were identified using a Bayesian model selection procedure and were fitted under a hierarchical setting. Energy intake, dietary fiber and lipid proportions, animal body weight and milk fat proportion were identified as key explanatory variables for predicting emissions. Models here developed substantially outperformed models currently used in national greenhouse gas inventories. Additionally, estimates of repeatability of methane emissions were lower than the ones from the literature and multicollinearity diagnostics suggested that prediction models are stable. In this context, we propose various enteric methane prediction models which require different levels of information availability and can be readily implemented in national greenhouse gas inventories of different complexity levels. The utilization of such models may reduce errors

  10. History of commercializing sexed semen for cattle.

    PubMed

    Garner, D L; Seidel, G E

    2008-04-15

    Although the basic principles controlling the sex of mammalian offspring have been known for a relatively long time, recent application of certain modern cellular methodologies has led to development of a flow cytometric system capable of differentiating and separating living X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm in amounts suitable for AI and therefore, commercialization of this sexing technology. After a very long history of unsuccessful attempts to differentiate between mammalian sperm that produce males from those that produce females, a breakthrough came in 1981 when it was demonstrated that precise DNA content could be measured. Although these initial measurements of DNA content killed the sperm in the process, they led to the ultimate development of a sperm sorting system that was capable, not only of differentiating between live X- and Y-sperm, but of sorting them into relatively pure X- and Y-sperm populations without obvious cellular damage. Initial efforts to predetermine the sex of mammalian offspring in 1989 required surgical insemination, but later enhancements provided sex-sorted sperm in quantities suitable for use with IVF. Subsequent advances in flow sorting provided minimal numbers of sperm sufficient for use in AI. It was not until the flow cytometric sorting system was improved greatly and successful cryopreservation of sex-sorted bull sperm was developed that efficacious approaches to commercialization of sexed semen could be implemented worldwide in cattle. A number of companies now offer sex-sorted bovine sperm. Innovative approaches by a diverse group of scientists along with advances in computer science, biophysics, cell biology, instrumentation, and applied reproductive physiology provided the basis for commercializing sexed semen in cattle.

  11. Chronic arsenicosis in cattle: possible mitigation with Zn and Se.

    PubMed

    Dash, Jeevan R; Datta, Bakul K; Sarkar, Samar; Mandal, Tapan K

    2013-06-01

    Supply of arsenic free water in the arsenic endemic zone of West Bengal since a long time could not prevent arsenicosis in human completely. So exploration of arsenic contamination at all levels of food chain may be important. The report on arsenicosis in cattle of arsenic affected zone is scarcely available. In the present study, cattle from villages of two arsenic endemic blocks (Chakdah and Haringhata) in Nadia district of West Bengal were selected. The cattle affected with arsenicosis were identified and isolated. They were divided into two groups: untreated control group and treated group-was treated with mixture of zinc oxide (10mg/kg) and sodium selenite (0.1mg/kg) orally once daily for 180 days. Milk, faeces and hair samples were collected at different time intervals from those cattle for analysis of arsenic. Drinking water and straw of those areas were also collected for analysis of arsenic. Serum ALT and AST were estimated in collected blood samples of the cattle. The untreated control group had shown gradual accumulation of total arsenic in hair while the treated group showed a non-significant but declined accumulation of arsenic in hair from 90th day onwards and a significant increase (p<0.05) in total arsenic in faeces from 90th day onwards. The arsenic load considerably but non-significantly decreased in milk from 60th day onwards in the treated group. Serum AST and ALT activities were also decreased in treated cattle. It is concluded that straw is also a major source of arsenic contamination in cattle apart from drinking water and arsenic may enter into human through consumption of contaminated milk. But zinc and selenium mixture may be used to reduce arsenic load in cattle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The cattle farming activities in Aǧrı province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahinler, Zeki; Demir, Yücel

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to present the current data in the existing situation and potential of the cattle breeding. East Anatolia has an important place in Turkey's cattle breeding sector. Thus, Aǧrı is one of the key cities in the region and livestock breeding is a major resource of income for the population. According to Turkish Statistical Institute's data, the city of Aǧrı has the 8th place with its 321 710 head of cattle currently. In cattle gene types, with 170 583 head in local breeds it is in the first place, while it is in the 10thplace with a total of 131 195 head in crossbreeding and it stands in 63th place with 19 932 head culture race. Once again, according to the Turkish Statistical Institute's data, cattle farming brought in 382 987 750 TL as a result of 259 011 tons of the milk, 5 665 tons of meat and 8 887 skins. In 2014, Turkish Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock subsidized cattle farming in the city by paying 20 551 816 TL. Therefore, it is important to determine the existing conditions of livestock sector of the city, especially cattle farming, with regard to its potential and problems. Consequently, it would be possible to develop short term, mid-term, long term goals and solutions for the problems. As a conclusion, the city has a remarkable place in the region with its cattle population, characteristics of animal production and its position in the employment. Aǧrı represents a small model in local level for Turkey's overall livestock farming.

  13. [Electrical stunning of cattle--experiences in New Zealand].

    PubMed

    Pleiter, H

    2004-03-01

    Ever since the middle of the nineteen-eighties electrical stunning of cattle is used in industrial slaughter plants in New Zealand. Today electrical stun boxes operate in export slaughter plants throughout New Zealand. The reversible stun is utilised on the vast majority of slaughtered cattle. The electrical stunning (head only) immediately followed by bleeding is an alternative to ritual slaughter without prior stunning. Throughout the world's islamic community this alternative is widely accepted as Halal.

  14. [Pharmacology of licensed antibiotics for use in cattle].

    PubMed

    Bäumer, W

    2012-10-17

    There is an ongoing public debate about the use of antibiotics in farm animals. In this context it is reasonable to provide an update of the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of antibiotics currently licensed for cattle. The key pharmacologic data of β-lactam-antibiotics, sulfonamide/trimethoprim combinations, tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, macrolide antibiotics, phenicoles, lincosamides and polypeptide antibiotics are presented with particular focus on their use in cattle.

  15. Reconstruction of metabolic pathways for the cattle genome.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seongwon; Lewin, Harris A

    2009-03-12

    Metabolic reconstruction of microbial, plant and animal genomes is a necessary step toward understanding the evolutionary origins of metabolism and species-specific adaptive traits. The aims of this study were to reconstruct conserved metabolic pathways in the cattle genome and to identify metabolic pathways with missing genes and proteins. The MetaCyc database and PathwayTools software suite were chosen for this work because they are widely used and easy to implement. An amalgamated cattle genome database was created using the NCBI and Ensembl cattle genome databases (based on build 3.1) as data sources. PathwayTools was used to create a cattle-specific pathway genome database, which was followed by comprehensive manual curation for the reconstruction of metabolic pathways. The curated database, CattleCyc 1.0, consists of 217 metabolic pathways. A total of 64 mammalian-specific metabolic pathways were modified from the reference pathways in MetaCyc, and two pathways previously identified but missing from MetaCyc were added. Comparative analysis of metabolic pathways revealed the absence of mammalian genes for 22 metabolic enzymes whose activity was reported in the literature. We also identified six human metabolic protein-coding genes for which the cattle ortholog is missing from the sequence assembly. CattleCyc is a powerful tool for understanding the biology of ruminants and other cetartiodactyl species. In addition, the approach used to develop CattleCyc provides a framework for the metabolic reconstruction of other newly sequenced mammalian genomes. It is clear that metabolic pathway analysis strongly reflects the quality of the underlying genome annotations. Thus, having well-annotated genomes from many mammalian species hosted in BioCyc will facilitate the comparative analysis of metabolic pathways among different species and a systems approach to comparative physiology.

  16. Diagnostic considerations for evaluating nutritional problems in cattle.

    PubMed

    Maas, John

    2007-11-01

    The advances in testing methodology and in our understanding of the normal nutritional physiology of cattle have given veterinarians valuable tools to assess the nutritional status of cattle. By taking a representative number of appropriate samples, it is now relatively easy and inexpensive to determine the nutritional status of an individual or a group of animals. Also, the effectiveness of supplementation programs can be measured over time as part of an overall preventive medicine program.

  17. Clinical findings and treatment in cattle with caecal dilatation.

    PubMed

    Braun, Ueli; Beckmann, Christine; Gerspach, Christian; Hässig, Michael; Muggli, Evelyne; Knubben-Schweizer, Gabriela; Nuss, Karl

    2012-07-09

    This retrospective study describes the clinical and laboratory findings, treatment and outcome of 461 cattle with caecal dilatation. The general condition and demeanor were abnormal in 93.1% of cases, and 32.1% of the patients had colic. Ruminal motility was reduced or absent in 78.3% of cattle. In 82.6% of cases, swinging and/or percussion auscultation were positive on the right side, and 82.4% had little or no faeces in the rectum. Caecal dilatation could be diagnosed via rectal palpation in 405 (88.0%) cattle. There was caudal displacement of the dilated caecum in 291 patients, torsion around the longitudinal axis in 20 and retroflexion in 94. The most important laboratory finding was hypocalcaemia, which occurred in 85.1% of cases. Of the 461 cattle, 122 (26.5%) initially received conservative therapy (intravenous fluids, neostigmine, calcium borogluconate) and 329 (71.4%) underwent surgical treatment. Ten patients were slaughtered or euthanased after the initial physical examination. Of the 122 cattle that received conservative treatment, 42 did not respond after one to two days of therapy and required surgical treatment. The final number of cattle that were operated was 371 (80.5%). Because of a grave prognosis, 24 cases were euthanased or slaughtered intraoperatively. Another 24 cattle did not respond to one or more operations and were euthanased or slaughtered. Of the 461 patients, 403 (87.4%) responded to either conservative or surgical treatment and were cured, and 58 were euthanased or slaughtered. Caecal dilatation can usually be diagnosed based on clinical findings and treated conservatively or surgically. Swinging and percussion auscultation as well as rectal examination are important diagnostic tools. Conservative treatment is not rewarding in cattle considered surgical candidates with suspected caecal torsion or retroflexion and surgery should not be delayed in these patients.

  18. Clinical findings and treatment in cattle with caecal dilatation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This retrospective study describes the clinical and laboratory findings, treatment and outcome of 461 cattle with caecal dilatation. Results The general condition and demeanor were abnormal in 93.1% of cases, and 32.1% of the patients had colic. Ruminal motility was reduced or absent in 78.3% of cattle. In 82.6% of cases, swinging and/or percussion auscultation were positive on the right side, and 82.4% had little or no faeces in the rectum. Caecal dilatation could be diagnosed via rectal palpation in 405 (88.0%) cattle. There was caudal displacement of the dilated caecum in 291 patients, torsion around the longitudinal axis in 20 and retroflexion in 94. The most important laboratory finding was hypocalcaemia, which occurred in 85.1% of cases. Of the 461 cattle, 122 (26.5%) initially received conservative therapy (intravenous fluids, neostigmine, calcium borogluconate) and 329 (71.4%) underwent surgical treatment. Ten patients were slaughtered or euthanased after the initial physical examination. Of the 122 cattle that received conservative treatment, 42 did not respond after one to two days of therapy and required surgical treatment. The final number of cattle that were operated was 371 (80.5%). Because of a grave prognosis, 24 cases were euthanased or slaughtered intraoperatively. Another 24 cattle did not respond to one or more operations and were euthanased or slaughtered. Of the 461 patients, 403 (87.4%) responded to either conservative or surgical treatment and were cured, and 58 were euthanased or slaughtered. Conclusions Caecal dilatation can usually be diagnosed based on clinical findings and treated conservatively or surgically. Swinging and percussion auscultation as well as rectal examination are important diagnostic tools. Conservative treatment is not rewarding in cattle considered surgical candidates with suspected caecal torsion or retroflexion and surgery should not be delayed in these patients. PMID:22656369

  19. Secretory pattern and regulatory mechanism of growth hormone in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Etsuko

    2016-02-01

    The ultradian rhythm of growth hormone (GH) secretion has been known in several animal species for years and has recently been observed in cattle. Although the physiological significance of the rhythm is not yet fully understood, it appears essential for normal growth. In this review, previous studies concerning the GH secretory pattern in cattle, including its ultradian rhythm, are introduced and the regulatory mechanism is discussed on the basis of recent findings.

  20. Kinetic model development for biogas production from cattle dung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, Manjula Das; Mahanta, P.

    2017-07-01

    Biogas is a mixture of methane, carbon dioxide and traces of numerous trace of elements. It is produced by anaerobic digestion of organic matters including cattle dung which depend upon various factors affecting the population and activity of microorganisms producing biogas. Among the various factors temperature is one of them which play a significant role in biogas production from cattle dung. Biogas production from cattle dung was studied at temperatures 35°C to 55°C at a step of 5°C to study the effect of temperature on biogas production from cattle dung. In this work a mathematical model is developed for evaluating the effect of temperature on the rate of biogas production from cattle dung. The new mathematical model is derived by adding the effect of temperature on the modified Gompertz model. The new model is found to be suitable for predicting the biogas production from cattle dung in the temperature range 35°C to 55°C. The results from the new model are found to be highly correlated to the experimental data of present study.

  1. Genetic variability of Wagyu cattle estimated by statistical approaches.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kenji

    2011-06-01

    The genetic evaluation of economically important traits utilizes estimates of genetic variability, which are represented by heritability. This review summarizes the published heritabilities of traits estimated in Wagyu cattle. Two different mean heritabilities, unweighted and weighted by standard errors, were calculated. In Japanese Black cattle, the average unweighted and weighted direct heritabilities of birth weight were 0.35 and 0.28, respectively, whereas the respective maternal heritabilities were 0.17 and 0.07. The mean unweighted heritability of calf market weight was estimated to be 0.30 in Japanese Black cattle. The mean unweighted heritability of daily gain during performance testing was 0.29 in Japanese Black and 0.40 in Japanese Shorthorn cattle. In Japanese Black cattle, the unweighted mean heritability was 0.48 for carcass weight, 0.46 for rib-eye area, 0.38 for rib thickness, 0.39 for subcutaneous fat thickness, and 0.55 for marbling. The mean weighted heritability of the calving interval was low, and estimated to be 0.05. In general, the heritabilities estimated in Wagyu cattle were similar to those estimated in other beef breeds. © 2011 The Author; Animal Science Journal © 2011 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  2. Seroepidemiology of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis infection in unvaccinated cattle

    PubMed Central

    Saravanajayam, M.; Kumanan, K.; Balasubramaniam, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the seroepidemiology of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) infection in the non-vaccinated cattle population in northern part of Tamil Nadu, India. Materials and Methods: A total of 255 sera samples were collected from cattle having the history of respiratory and reproductive disorder from cattle of different age, breeds, and sex. All the sera samples were subjected to indirect ELISA for the diagnosis of IBR antibodies. Results: Results revealed that the seroprevalence of IBR infection among non-vaccinated cattle population was of 65.88%. No significant difference was noticed in the prevalence of IBR infection between cattle showing respiratory (63.64%) and reproductive form (70.89%) (p≥0.05). A higher prevalence was noticed in animals above 3 years of age (59.60%) and in crossbred animals (71.26%) than young and non-descript animals. This study showed the higher prevalence of IBR infection in female (67.92%) than in male (33.33%). Conclusion: Cattle population in this part can better be protected with vaccination than leaving them unvaccinated and sero-monitoring shall have to be stressed with regular attempts to isolate and characterize the causative agent for IBR. PMID:27047054

  3. Culling and cattle controls influence tuberculosis risk for badgers.

    PubMed

    Woodroffe, Rosie; Donnelly, Christl A; Jenkins, Helen E; Johnston, W Thomas; Cox, David R; Bourne, F John; Cheeseman, Chris L; Delahay, Richard J; Clifton-Hadley, Richard S; Gettinby, George; Gilks, Peter; Hewinson, R Glyn; McInerney, John P; Morrison, W Ivan

    2006-10-03

    Human and livestock diseases can be difficult to control where infection persists in wildlife populations. In Britain, European badgers (Meles meles) are implicated in transmitting Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (TB), to cattle. Badger culling has therefore been a component of British TB control policy for many years. However, large-scale field trials have recently shown that badger culling has the capacity to cause both increases and decreases in cattle TB incidence. Here, we show that repeated badger culling in the same area is associated with increasing prevalence of M. bovis infection in badgers, especially where landscape features allow badgers from neighboring land to recolonize culled areas. This impact on prevalence in badgers might reduce the beneficial effects of culling on cattle TB incidence, and could contribute to the detrimental effects that have been observed. Additionally, we show that suspension of cattle TB controls during a nationwide epidemic of foot and mouth disease, which substantially delayed removal of TB-affected cattle, was associated with a widespread increase in the prevalence of M. bovis infection in badgers. This pattern suggests that infection may be transmitted from cattle to badgers, as well as vice versa. Clearly, disease control measures aimed at either host species may have unintended consequences for transmission, both within and between species. Our findings highlight the need for policymakers to consider multiple transmission routes when managing multihost pathogens.

  4. [Differences in the selenium supply of cattle across Europe].

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Bertram, A; Freude, B

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of differences in the selenium supply of cattle across Europe. A total of 35,722 serum samples from cattle throughout Europe (unknown clinical status), which had been sent by veterinarians to the IDEXX Vet Med Lab Ludwigsburg, Germany between January 1st, 2006, and June 30th, 2013, were analyzed routinely for the selenium concentration using ICP-analysis. The collective data of the selenium concentration in cattle serum display seasonal variations, with a lower concentration during summer when compared to the winter. In recent years, the selenium supply has decreased. The farm size, husbandry conditions, economic situation, soil selenium concentration and the countries' specific feeding together play a key role in the selenium supply of the herd. Hungary and the Scandinavian countries Sweden and Denmark show the best selenium supply in Europe. A very poor situation exists in France and Luxembourg (> 50% of the cattle samples are undersupplied). An optimal selenium supply for cattle is very important; a trace element deficiency can cause negative health effects and impair herd performance. The selenium concentration varies considerably, depending upon feeding and husbandry conditions. Therefore, a serum selenium analysis in cattle is essential and should be performed annually.

  5. Disclosing the origin and diversity of Omani cattle.

    PubMed

    Mahgoub, Osman; Babiker, Hamza A; Kadim, I T; Al-Kindi, Mohammed; Hassan, Salwa; Al-Marzooqi, W; Eltahir, Yasmin E; Al-Abri, M A; Al-Khayat, Aisha; Al-Sinani, Kareema R; Hilal Al-Khanjari, Homoud; Costa, Vânia; Chen, Shanyuan; Beja-Pereira, Albano

    2013-06-01

    Among all livestock species, cattle have a prominent status as they have contributed greatly to the economy, nutrition and culture from the beginning of farming societies until the present time. The origins and diversity of local cattle breeds have been widely assessed. However, there are still some regions for which very little of their local genetic resources is known. The present work aimed to estimate the genetic diversity and the origins of Omani cattle. Located in the south-eastern corner of the Arabian Peninsula, close to the Near East, East Africa and the Indian subcontinent, the Sultanate of Oman occupies a key position, which may enable understanding cattle dispersal around the Indian Ocean. To disclose the origin of this cattle population, we used a set of 11 polymorphic microsatellites and 113 samples representing the European, African and Indian ancestry to compare with cattle from Oman. This study found a very heterogenic population with a markedly Bos indicus ancestry and with some degree of admixture with Bos taurus of African and Near East origin. © 2012 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2012 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  6. Husbandry risk factors associated with subclinical coccidiosis in young cattle.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, E S E; Smith, R P; Ellis-Iversen, J

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes an observational longitudinal study of cattle farms in England and Wales, which aimed to identify management practices associated with the presence of Eimeria spp. infection in young cattle. Thirty cattle farms situated in England and Wales were selected and one group of more than 20 young cattle aged 5-18 months of age was monitored on each farm. Three variables were identified as significantly associated with status in a multivariable model. The odds of finding Eimeria spp. were lower on farms that kept sheep on the same premises as the cattle, as was an increase in the maximum age within the sampled group. The latter probably reflects the development of post-infection immunity within the sampled animals. Good water-trough hygiene protected against Eimeria spp. oocyst excretion, with the odds of detection being higher on farms where it was reported that the water troughs were not cleaned and emptied more than once per month. The value of frequent emptying and cleaning of water troughs in reducing the exposure of calves to Eimeria spp. and thus lowering the impact of coccidiosis, both clinical and subclinical should be communicated to cattle farmers.

  7. Predator and heterospecific stimuli alter behaviour in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kluever, Bryan M; Howery, Larry D; Breck, Stewart W; Bergman, David L

    2009-05-01

    Wild and domestic ungulates modify their behaviour in the presence of olfactory and visual cues of predators but investigations have not exposed a domestic species to a series of cues representing various predators and other ungulate herbivores. We used wolf (Canis lupus), mountain lion (Puma concolor), and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) stimuli (olfactory and visual), and a control (no stimuli) to experimentally test for differences in behaviour of cattle (Bos taurus) raised in Arizona. We measured (1) vigilance, (2) foraging rates, (3) giving up density (GUD) of high quality foods and (4) time spent in high quality forage locations in response to location of stimuli treatments. In general, we found a consistent pattern in that wolf and deer treatments caused disparate results in all 4 response variables. Wolf stimuli significantly increased cattle vigilance and decreased cattle foraging rates; conversely, deer stimuli significantly increased cattle foraging rate and increased cattle use of high quality forage areas containing stimuli. Mountain lion stimuli did not significantly impact any of the 4 response variables. Our findings suggest that domestic herbivores react to predatory stimuli, can differentiate between stimuli representing two predatory species, and suggest that cattle may reduce antipredatory behaviour when near heterospecifics.

  8. Acute pit gas (hydrogen sulfide) poisoning in confinement cattle.

    PubMed

    Hooser, S B; Van Alstine, W; Kiupel, M; Sojka, J

    2000-05-01

    Rapid deaths in confinement cattle caused by exposure to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas from manure pits has not been reported in the USA. In 1997, 158 cattle in 2 confinement pens were exposed to H2S gas as the manure in the pits under a slatted floor was agitated prior to pumping. Approximately 35 of the cattle were lying on the floor when the upper agitator was turned on. Within 5 minutes, many these cattle were down on their sides and paddling. Of these, 26 died within a few minutes. The survivors were treated and sent to slaughter. Cattle that did not show immediate signs of toxicosis remained clinically unaffected. Two steers that were near death were brought to the Purdue Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for clinical evaluation, euthanasia, and necropsy. They were recumbent and unresponsive to visual and auditory stimuli. Necropsy examination yielded no significant gross lesions. No evidence of viral or bacterial infection was found. Ocular fluid nitrate concentrations were within normal limits, and no lead was detected in either animal. Microscopic examination revealed lesions consistent with H2S-induced central nervous system anoxia. Histologically, sections of brain demonstrated massive, diffuse cerebral cortical laminar necrosis and edema. Portions of the outer lamina contained hypereosinophilic and shrunken neurons. The subcortical white matter was vacuolated in some areas. The history, clinical signs, and histologic lesion of cerebral laminar necrosis led to a diagnosis of H2S toxicosis in these cattle.

  9. Femoral diaphysis fractures in cattle: 26 cases (1994-2005).

    PubMed

    Nichols, S; Anderson, D E; Miesner, M D; Newman, K D

    2010-01-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the outcome for cattle with diaphyseal fractures of the femur, but not including capital physeal injuries. Sources of information were medical records of cattle having a definitive diagnosis of diaphyseal femoral fractures and telephone survey of owners. Medical records for 26 cattle with femoral fracture were found; of the 20 aged less than 2 months, 15 were treated surgically, 4 conservatively (stall rest) and 1 was euthanased without treatment. The surgical treatment varied according to the configuration of the fracture and the surgeon's experience. Surgery for mid-diaphyseal fractures had a significantly better surgical outcome then distal diaphyseal fractures (P < 0.05), as there were significantly fewer postoperative complications. Of the 15 calves treated surgically, 10 were discharged from hospital and 5 were retained in the herd without noticeable lameness. Of the 4 calves treated conservatively, 3 were alive at follow-up, but 2 were still lame. Of the 6 older cattle, 3 were euthanased without treatment and 3 were treated conservatively, 2 of which were alive at follow-up but 1 was still lame. Conservative treatment of femur fracture in cattle is possible but associated with complications during the convalescence. Continued research is needed to optimise distal diaphyseal fracture stabilisation in young cattle.

  10. When and how did Bos indicus introgress into Mongolian cattle?

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiangpeng; Li, Ran; Liu, Li; Zhang, Yunsheng; Huang, Jieping; Chang, Zhenhua; Dang, Ruihua; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Lei, Chuzhao

    2014-03-10

    The Mongolian cattle are one of the most widespread breeds with strictly Bos taurus morphological features in northern China. In our current study, we presented a diversity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region and Y chromosome SNP markers in 25 male and 8 female samples of Mongolian cattle from the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region in Western China, and detected 21 B. taurus and four Bos indicus (zebu) mtDNA haplotypes. Among four B. indicus mtDNA haplotypes, two haplotypes belonged to I1 haplogroup and the remaining two haplotypes belonged to I2 haplogroup. In contrast, all 25 male Mongolian cattle samples revealed B. taurus Y chromosome haplotype and no B. indicus haplotypes were found. Historical and archeological records indicate that B. taurus was introduced to Xinjiang during the second millennium BC and B. indicus appeared in this region by the second century AD. The two types of cattle coexisted for many centuries in Xinjiang, as depicted in clay and wooden figurines unearthed in the Astana cemetery in Turfan (3rd-8th century AD). Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the earliest B. indicus introgression in the Mongolian cattle may have occurred during the 2nd-7th centuries AD through the Silk Road around the Xinjiang region. This conclusion differs from the previous hypothesis that zebu introgression to Mongolian cattle happened during the Mongol Empire era in the 13th century.

  11. Mycobacteria in Terrestrial Small Mammals on Cattle Farms in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Durnez, Lies; Katakweba, Abdul; Sadiki, Harrison; Katholi, Charles R.; Kazwala, Rudovick R.; Machang'u, Robert R.; Portaels, Françoise; Leirs, Herwig

    2011-01-01

    The control of bovine tuberculosis and atypical mycobacterioses in cattle in developing countries is important but difficult because of the existence of wildlife reservoirs. In cattle farms in Tanzania, mycobacteria were detected in 7.3% of 645 small mammals and in cow's milk. The cattle farms were divided into “reacting” and “nonreacting” farms, based on tuberculin tests, and more mycobacteria were present in insectivores collected in reacting farms as compared to nonreacting farms. More mycobacteria were also present in insectivores as compared to rodents. All mycobacteria detected by culture and PCR in the small mammals were atypical mycobacteria. Analysis of the presence of mycobacteria in relation to the reactor status of the cattle farms does not exclude transmission between small mammals and cattle but indicates that transmission to cattle from another source of infection is more likely. However, because of the high prevalence of mycobacteria in some small mammal species, these infected animals can pose a risk to humans, especially in areas with a high HIV-prevalence as is the case in Tanzania. PMID:21785686

  12. Cattle cruelty and risks of meat contamination at Akinyele cattle market and slaughter slab in Oyo State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeyemo, Olanike K; Adeyemi, Isaac G; Awosanya, Emmanuel J

    2009-12-01

    Cattle transported to the government-run cattle market and slaughter slab in Akinyele, Oyo State, Nigeria on their final voyage are facing a disturbingly cruel, filthy and unsafe environment that is also raising the risk of contamination of meat sold for human consumption. This report gives a picture of what the cattle have to go through before they are slaughtered. This study also reveals cattle awaiting slaughter in abysmal health conditions, cows pulled with extreme force towards lairage and slaughter slab. Equally disturbing is the filthy situation inside the abattoir where the risk of contamination of meat is significant. Also, poor meat handling, transportation and sales practices subject meat to contamination leading to poor quality and exposure of human consumers to health risk. Development of hygienic slaughter slab operations, improved transportation system for both livestock and meat is therefore recommended; not only for Akinyele, but all abattoirs and slaughter slabs in Nigeria.

  13. Genetic parameters for carcass cut weight in Irish beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Pabiou, T; Fikse, W F; Näsholm, A; Cromie, A R; Drennan, M J; Keane, M G; Berry, D P

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for the weights of different wholesale cuts, using an experimental and a commercial data set. The experimental and commercial data sets included 413 and 635 crossbred Belgian Blue, Charolais, Limousin, Angus, Holstein, and Simmental animals, respectively. Univariate analyses using a mixed linear animal model with relationships were undertaken to estimate the heritability of cold carcass weight, carcass conformation and fat, and the cut weights, whereas a series of bivariate analyses was used to estimate the phenotypic and genetic correlations between carcass weight, carcass conformation, carcass fat, and the major primal cuts. Heritability estimates for cold carcass weight in both data sets were moderate (>0.48), whereas heritability estimates for carcass conformation and fat grading were greater in the commercial data set (>0.63) than in the experimental study (>0.33). Across both data sets, heritability estimates for wholesale cut weight in the forequarter varied from 0.03 to 0.79, whereas heritability estimates of carcass cut weight in the hindquarter varied from 0.14 to 0.86. Heritability estimates for cut weights expressed as a proportion of the entire carcass weight varied from 0.04 to 0.91. Genetic correlations were strong among the different carcass cut weights within the experimental and the commercial studies. Genetic correlations between the weights of selected carcass cuts and carcass weight were moderate to high (minimum 0.45; maximum 0.88) in both data sets. Positive genetic correlations were observed in the commercial data set between the different wholesale cut weights and carcass conformation, whereas these were positive and negative in the experimental data set. Selection for increased carcass weight will, on average, increase the weight of each cut. However, the genetic correlations were less than unity, suggesting a benefit of more direct selection on high value cuts.

  14. Modeling methane emissions by cattle production systems in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelan-Ortega, O. A.; Ku Vera, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Methane emissions from livestock is one of the largest sources of methane in Mexico. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a realistic estimate of the national inventory of methane produced by the enteric fermentation of cattle, based on an integrated simulation model, and to provide estimates of CH4 produced by cattle fed typical diets from the tropical and temperate climates of Mexico. The Mexican cattle population of 23.3 million heads was divided in two groups. The first group (7.8 million heads), represents cattle of the tropical climate regions. The second group (15.5 million heads), are the cattle in the temperate climate regions. This approach allows incorporating the effect of diet on CH4 production into the analysis because the quality of forages is lower in the tropics than in temperate regions. Cattle population in every group was subdivided into two categories: cows (COW) and other type of cattle (OTHE), which included calves, heifers, steers and bulls. The daily CH4 production by each category of animal along an average production cycle of 365 days was simulated, instead of using a default emission factor as in Tier 1 approach. Daily milk yield, live weight changes associated with the lactation, and dry matter intake, were simulated for the entire production cycle. The Moe and Tyrrell (1979) model was used to simulate CH4 production for the COW category, the linear model of Mills et al. (2003) for the OTHE category in temperate regions and the Kurihara et al. (1999) model for the OTHE category in the tropical regions as it has been developed for cattle fed tropical diets. All models were integrated with a cow submodel to form an Integrated Simulation Model (ISM). The AFRC (1993) equations and the lactation curve model of Morant and Gnanasakthy (1989) were used to construct the cow submodel. The ISM simulates on a daily basis the CH4 production, milk yield, live weight changes associated with lactation and dry matter intake. The total daily CH

  15. Prevalence of Antibodies Against Coxiella burnetii in Korean Native Cattle, Dairy Cattle, and Dogs in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lyoo, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Doo; Jang, Hyung Gwan; Lee, Seung-Joon; Park, Mi Yeoun; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2017-03-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a zoonotic agent and causes coxiellosis, which is a cause of reproductive failure in a range of animal species, including abortion and stillbirth and Q fever, which is most often characterized by an acute flu-like illness, mild pneumonia, and/or hepatitis in humans. While livestock are well recognized worldwide as a source of infection, the zoonotic risk of C. burnetii infection in companion animals such as dogs may be overlooked. For serological diagnosis, indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are generally considered good methods for prevalence surveys of coxiellosis. In this study, we conducted a nationwide survey of the seroprevalence of previous exposure to C. burnetii in dogs, dairy cattle, and Korean native cattle (a primarily beef breed) in South Korea. Serum samples obtained from 3087 Korean native cattle, 1224 dairy cattle, and 1023 dogs were collected from eight provinces in South Korea, and IFA and ELISA were performed to test for seropositivity. The prevalence of C. burnetii was 1.7% in Korean native cattle, 10.5% in dairy cattle, and 2.9% in dogs. This is the first report identifying previous exposure to C. burnetii in South Korean dogs. Furthermore, the presence of C. burnetii antibodies in companion and feral dogs indicates that dogs can be a potential reservoir species for zoonotic risk of C. burnetii infection in South Korea. Therefore, more detailed studies aiming to clarify epidemiological factors should be performed in the future.

  16. Influence of Diet Composition on Cattle Rumen Methanogenesis: A Comparative Metagenomic Analysis in Indian and Exotic Cattle.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Nidhi R; Pandit, Prabhakar D; Purohit, Hemant J; Nirmal Kumar, J I; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2017-06-01

    Comparative metagenomics approach has been used in this study to discriminate colonization of methanogenic population in different breeds of cattle. We compared two Indian cattle breeds (Gir and Kankrej) and two exotic cattle (Holstein and Jersey) breeds. Using a defined dietary plan for selected Indian varieties, the diet dependent shifts in microbial community and abundance of the enzymes associated with methanogenesis were studied. This data has been compared with the available rumen metagenome data from Holstein and Jersey dairy cattle. The abundance of genes for methanogenesis in Holstein and Jersey cattle came from Methanobacteriales order whereas, majority of the enzymes for methanogenesis in Gir and Kankrej cattle came from Methanomicrobiales order. The study suggested that by using slow/less digestible feed, the propionate levels could be controlled in rumen; and in turn, this would also help in further reducing the hydrogenotrophic production of methane. The study proposes that with the designed diet plan the overall methanogenic microbial pool or the individual methanogens could be targeted for development of methane mitigation strategies.

  17. Evaluation of Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Relationship Between Legendary Vechur Cattle and Crossbred Cattle of Kerala State, India.

    PubMed

    Radhika, G; Aravindakshan, T V; Jinty, S; Ramya, K

    2017-03-30

    The legendary Vechur cattle of Kerala, described as a very short breed, and the crossbred (CB) Sunandini cattle population exhibited great phenotypic variation; hence, the present study attempted to analyze the genetic diversity existing between them. A set of 14 polymorphic microsatellites were chosen from FAO-ISAG panel and amplified from genomic DNA isolated from blood samples of 30 Vechur and 64 unrelated crossbred cattle, using fluorescent labeled primers. Both populations revealed high genetic diversity as evidenced from high observed number of alleles, Polymorphic Information Content and expected heterozygosity. Observed heterozygosity was lesser (0.699) than expected (0.752) in Vechur population which was further supported by positive FIS value of 0.1149, indicating slight level of inbreeding in Vechur population. Overall, FST value was 0.065, which means genetic differentiation between crossbred and Vechur population was 6.5%, indicating that the crossbred cattle must have differentiated into a definite population that is different from the indigenous Vechur cows. Structure analysis indicated that the two populations showed distinct differences, with two underlying clusters. The present study supports the separation between Taurine and Zebu cattle and throws light onto the genetic diversity and relationship between native Vechur and crossbred cattle populations in Kerala state.

  18. Acute phase response in lame crossbred dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, A.; Randhawa, Swaran Singh; Sharma, S.; Bansal, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was undertaken to study acute phase response based on acute phase proteins (APPs) such as C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), and fibrinogen in lame crossbred dairy cattle. Materials and Methods: Lame animals (n=30) were selected within 3-7 days of being noticed as lame by the farm veterinarian, from a local dairy farm in southeast Ludhiana over a period of 6 months, stratified proportionately with respect to stage of lactation with non-lame healthy cows (n=10). All the cows were otherwise healthy and did not have any other inflammatory problems such as pneumonia, enteritis, mastitis, or any kind of acute uterine inflammation. Blood samples were collected from all the animals; serum and plasma samples were separated and stored at −20°C. The levels of CRP, Hp, and SAA were estimated using Sandwich ELISA, whereas fibrinogen was estimated by heat precipitation method. Results: SAA levels in lame cows were significantly higher (22.19±0.85 µg/ml), approximately 3 times as compared to non-lame cows (8.89±0.72 µg/ml), whereas serum Hp concentration was approximately 20 times higher in the lame cattle (21.71±3.32 mg/dl) as compared to non-lame cows (1.17±0.07 mg/dl). Fibrinogen also increased in the lame cattle (3.97±0.22 g/L) as compared to non-lame group (1.40±0.17 g/L). Serum CRP levels analyzed in the lame cattle for the first time in the present study, and significant high concentration was appreciated in lame cattle (4.41±0.33 mg/L) as compared to non-lame cattle (0.61±0.14 mg/L). Lame cattle were having more of sole hemorrhages, sole ulcers, and white line lesions as compared to non-lame cattle. Conclusion: It can be concluded that lame cattle exhibit high levels of APPs including CRP, Hp, SAA, and fibrinogen as compared to non-lame cattle. PMID:27956769

  19. Global Metabolic Reconstruction and Metabolic Gene Evolution in the Cattle Genome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woonsu; Park, Hyesun; Seo, Seongwon

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of cattle genome provided a valuable opportunity to systematically link genetic and metabolic traits of cattle. The objectives of this study were 1) to reconstruct genome-scale cattle-specific metabolic pathways based on the most recent and updated cattle genome build and 2) to identify duplicated metabolic genes in the cattle genome for better understanding of metabolic adaptations in cattle. A bioinformatic pipeline of an organism for amalgamating genomic annotations from multiple sources was updated. Using this, an amalgamated cattle genome database based on UMD_3.1, was created. The amalgamated cattle genome database is composed of a total of 33,292 genes: 19,123 consensus genes between NCBI and Ensembl databases, 8,410 and 5,493 genes only found in NCBI or Ensembl, respectively, and 266 genes from NCBI scaffolds. A metabolic reconstruction of the cattle genome and cattle pathway genome database (PGDB) was also developed using Pathway Tools, followed by an intensive manual curation. The manual curation filled or revised 68 pathway holes, deleted 36 metabolic pathways, and added 23 metabolic pathways. Consequently, the curated cattle PGDB contains 304 metabolic pathways, 2,460 reactions including 2,371 enzymatic reactions, and 4,012 enzymes. Furthermore, this study identified eight duplicated genes in 12 metabolic pathways in the cattle genome compared to human and mouse. Some of these duplicated genes are related with specific hormone biosynthesis and detoxifications. The updated genome-scale metabolic reconstruction is a useful tool for understanding biology and metabolic characteristics in cattle. There has been significant improvements in the quality of cattle genome annotations and the MetaCyc database. The duplicated metabolic genes in the cattle genome compared to human and mouse implies evolutionary changes in the cattle genome and provides a useful information for further research on understanding metabolic adaptations of cattle.

  20. Global Metabolic Reconstruction and Metabolic Gene Evolution in the Cattle Genome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woonsu; Park, Hyesun; Seo, Seongwon

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of cattle genome provided a valuable opportunity to systematically link genetic and metabolic traits of cattle. The objectives of this study were 1) to reconstruct genome-scale cattle-specific metabolic pathways based on the most recent and updated cattle genome build and 2) to identify duplicated metabolic genes in the cattle genome for better understanding of metabolic adaptations in cattle. A bioinformatic pipeline of an organism for amalgamating genomic annotations from multiple sources was updated. Using this, an amalgamated cattle genome database based on UMD_3.1, was created. The amalgamated cattle genome database is composed of a total of 33,292 genes: 19,123 consensus genes between NCBI and Ensembl databases, 8,410 and 5,493 genes only found in NCBI or Ensembl, respectively, and 266 genes from NCBI scaffolds. A metabolic reconstruction of the cattle genome and cattle pathway genome database (PGDB) was also developed using Pathway Tools, followed by an intensive manual curation. The manual curation filled or revised 68 pathway holes, deleted 36 metabolic pathways, and added 23 metabolic pathways. Consequently, the curated cattle PGDB contains 304 metabolic pathways, 2,460 reactions including 2,371 enzymatic reactions, and 4,012 enzymes. Furthermore, this study identified eight duplicated genes in 12 metabolic pathways in the cattle genome compared to human and mouse. Some of these duplicated genes are related with specific hormone biosynthesis and detoxifications. The updated genome-scale metabolic reconstruction is a useful tool for understanding biology and metabolic characteristics in cattle. There has been significant improvements in the quality of cattle genome annotations and the MetaCyc database. The duplicated metabolic genes in the cattle genome compared to human and mouse implies evolutionary changes in the cattle genome and provides a useful information for further research on understanding metabolic adaptations of cattle. PMID

  1. Cooperia punctata: effect on cattle productivity?

    PubMed

    Stromberg, Bert E; Gasbarre, Louis C; Waite, Audie; Bechtol, David T; Brown, Michael S; Robinson, Nicholas A; Olson, Erik J; Newcomb, Harold

    2012-02-10

    Cooperia spp. have become the most prevalent parasites in United States cow/calf operations as observed in the USDA NAHMS (National Animal Health Monitoring System) Beef Cow/Calf survey in 2008. This is at least in part due to the widespread use of macrocyclic lactones that have recently been shown to have a reduced activity against these parasites. The effects of Cooperia spp. on cattle productivity are largely unknown. This study was conducted to assess their effect upon cattle housed under conditions found in American feedlots. Two hundred yearling calves (average weight 460 lb/209 kg) were acquired from northwestern Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma and were vaccinated and dewormed upon arrival at the feedlot. Animals were comingled and preconditioned for approximately one month, and were fed a standard growing ration throughout the study. Calves were randomly divided into two groups (n=80, infected and control) and each group was further divided into two replicate pens (n=40). Calves from the two infected pens were orally inoculated with a gavage of 1 × 10(5) and 0.825 × 10(5) infective larvae of a recent isolate of Cooperia punctata on day 0 and 14, respectively, with the two control pens receiving a similar volume of tap water. Data collected included biweekly fecal egg counts, daily individual feed consumption and weight gain over the 60-day test period. The presence of C. punctata (>99% of recovered worms) was confirmed by necropsy and recovery from the small intestine on days 35 and 60 post infection (PI) in a subset of animals. Egg counts were positive by day 14 PI and remained at numbers similar to values seen in field studies. The control group gained weight 7.5% more rapidly (p=0.02) than infected animals (3.24 lb/1.47 kg per day vs. 3.0 lb/1.36 kg per day, respectively). The Cooperia-infected calves also consumed 1.5 lb (0.68 kg) less dry feed per day than the control animals (p=0.02). These data suggest that C. punctata has a deleterious effect

  2. Thermophilic methane production from cattle waste.

    PubMed Central

    Varel, V H; Isaacson, H R; Bryant, M P

    1977-01-01

    Methane production from waste of cattle fed a finishing diet was investigated, using four 3-liter-working volume anaerobic digestors at 60 degrees C. At 55 degrees C a start-up culture, in which waste was the only source of bacteria, was generated within 8 days and readily adapted to 60 degrees C, where efficiency of methanogenesis was greater. Increasing the temperature from 60 to 65 degrees C tended to drastically lower efficiency. When feed concentrations of volatile solids (VS, organic matter) were increased in steps of 2% after holding for 1 months at a given concentration, the maximum concentrations for efficient fermentation were 8.2, 10.0, 11.6, and 11.6% for the retention times (RT) of 3, 6, 9, and 12 days, respectively. The VS destructions for these and lower feed concentrations were 31 to 37, 36 to 40, 47 to 49 and 51 to 53% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-day RT digestors, respectively, and the corresponding methane production rates were about 0.16, 0.18, 0.20, and 0.22 liters/day per g of VS in the feed. Gas contained 52 to 57% methane. At the above RT and feed concentrations, alkalinity rose to 5,000 to 7,700 mg of CaCo3 per liter (pH to 7.5 to 7.8), NH3 plus NH4+ to 64 to 90 mM, and total volatile acids to 850 to 2,050 mg/liter as acetate. The 3-day RT digestor was quite stable up to 8.2% feed VS and at this feed concentration produced methane at the very high rate of 4.5 liters/day per liter of digestor. Increasing the percentage of feed VS beyond those values indicated above resulted in greatly decreased organic matter destruction and methane production, variable decrease in pH, and increased alkalinity, ammonia, and total volatile acid concentrations, with propionate being the first to accumulate in large amounts. In a second experiment with another lot of waste, the results were similar. These studies indicate that loading rates can be much higher than those previously thought useful for maximizing methanogenesis from cattle waste. PMID:557954

  3. Pregnancy losses in cattle: potential for improvement.

    PubMed

    Diskin, M G; Waters, S M; Parr, M H; Kenny, D A

    2016-01-01

    For heifers, beef and moderate-yielding dairy cows, it appears that the fertilisation rate generally lies between 90% and 100%. For high-producing dairy cows, there is a less substantive body of literature, but it would appear that the fertilisation rate is somewhat lower and possibly more variable. In cattle, the major component of embryo loss occurs in the first 16 days following breeding (Day 0), with emerging evidence of greater losses before Day 8 in high-producing dairy cows. In cattle, late embryo mortality causes serious economic losses because it is often recognised too late to rebreed females. Systemic concentrations of progesterone during both the cycle preceding and following insemination affect embryo survival, with evidence of either excessive or insufficient concentrations being negatively associated with survival rate. The application of direct progesterone supplementation or treatments to increase endogenous output of progesterone to increase embryo survival cannot be recommended at this time. Energy balance and dry matter intake during the first 4 weeks after calving are critically important in determining pregnancies per AI when cows are inseminated at 70-100 days after calving. Level of concentrate supplementation of cows at pasture during the breeding period has minimal effects on conception rates, although sudden reductions in dietary intake should be avoided. For all systems of milk production, more balanced breeding strategies with greater emphasis on fertility and feed intake and/or energy must be developed. There is genetic variability within the Holstein breed for fertility traits, which can be exploited. Genomic technology will not only provide scientists with an improved understanding of the underlying biological processes involved in fertilisation and the establishment of pregnancy, but also, in the future, could identify genes responsible for improved embryo survival. Such information could be incorporated into breeding objectives in

  4. Major advances in applied dairy cattle nutrition.

    PubMed

    Eastridge, M L

    2006-04-01

    Milk yield per cow continues to increase with a slower rate of increase in dry matter intake; thus, efficiency of ruminal fermentation and digestibility of the dietary components are key factors in improving the efficiency of feed use. Over the past 25 yr, at least 2,567 articles relating to ruminant or dairy nutrition have been published in the Journal of Dairy Science. These studies have provided important advancements in improving feed efficiency and animal health by improving quality of feeds, increasing feedstuff and overall diet digestibility, better defining interactions among feedstuffs in diets, identifying alternative feed ingredients, better defining nutrient requirements, and improving efficiency of ruminal fermentation. The publications are vital in continuing to make advancements in providing adequate nutrition to dairy cattle and for facilitating exchange of knowledge among scientists. Forages have been studied more extensively than any other type of feed. Cereal grains continue to be the primary contributors of starch to diets, and thus are very important in meeting the energy needs of dairy cattle. Processing of cereal grains has improved their use. Feeding by-products contributes valuable nutrients to diets and allows feedstuffs to be used that would otherwise be handled as wastes in landfills. Many of these by-products provide a considerable amount of protein, nonforage fiber, fat, and minerals (sometimes a detriment as in the case of P) to diets. The primary feeding system today is the total mixed ration, with still considerable use of the pasture system. Major improvements have occurred in the use of protein, carbohydrates, and fats in diets. Although advancements have been made in feeding practices to minimize the risk of metabolic diseases, the periparturient period continues to present some of the greatest challenges in animal health. Computers are a must today for diet formulation and evaluation, but fewer software programs are developed by

  5. Worldwide Patterns of Ancestry, Divergence, and Admixture in Domesticated Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Jared E.; McKay, Stephanie D.; Rolf, Megan M.; Kim, JaeWoo; Molina Alcalá, Antonio; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Hanotte, Olivier; Götherström, Anders; Seabury, Christopher M.; Praharani, Lisa; Babar, Masroor Ellahi; Correia de Almeida Regitano, Luciana; Yildiz, Mehmet Ali; Heaton, Michael P.; Liu, Wan-Sheng; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Reecy, James M.; Saif-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Schnabel, Robert D.; Taylor, Jeremy F.

    2014-01-01

    The domestication and development of cattle has considerably impacted human societies, but the histories of cattle breeds and populations have been poorly understood especially for African, Asian, and American breeds. Using genotypes from 43,043 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 1,543 animals, we evaluate the population structure of 134 domesticated bovid breeds. Regardless of the analytical method or sample subset, the three major groups of Asian indicine, Eurasian taurine, and African taurine were consistently observed. Patterns of geographic dispersal resulting from co-migration with humans and exportation are recognizable in phylogenetic networks. All analytical methods reveal patterns of hybridization which occurred after divergence. Using 19 breeds, we map the cline of indicine introgression into Africa. We infer that African taurine possess a large portion of wild African auroch ancestry, causing their divergence from Eurasian taurine. We detect exportation patterns in Asia and identify a cline of Eurasian taurine/indicine hybridization in Asia. We also identify the influence of species other than Bos taurus taurus and B. t. indicus in the formation of Asian breeds. We detect the pronounced influence of Shorthorn cattle in the formation of European breeds. Iberian and Italian cattle possess introgression from African taurine. American Criollo cattle originate from Iberia, and not directly from Africa with African ancestry inherited via Iberian ancestors. Indicine introgression into American cattle occurred in the Americas, and not Europe. We argue that cattle migration, movement and trading followed by admixture have been important forces in shaping modern bovine genomic variation. PMID:24675901

  6. Demographics of cattle movements in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The United Kingdom (UK) government has been recording the births, deaths, and movements of cattle for the last decade. Despite reservations about the accuracy of these data, they represent a large and valuable body of information about the demographics of the UK cattle herd and its contact structure. In this article, a range of demographic data about UK cattle, and particularly their movements, are presented, as well as yearly trends in the patterns of movements. Results A clear seasonal pattern is evident in the number of movements of cattle, as are the reductions in movement volume due to foot and mouth disease outbreaks in 2001 and 2007. The distribution of ages of cattle at their time of death is multimodal, and the impact of the over thirty months rule is marked. Most movements occur between agricultural holdings, markets, and slaughterhouses, and there is a non-random pattern to the types of holdings movements occur between. Most animals move only a short distance and a few times in their life. Most movements between any given pair of holdings only occurred once in the last 10 years, but about a third occurred between 2 and 10 times in that period. There is no clear trend to movement patterns in the UK since 2002. Conclusions Despite a substantial number of regulatory interventions during the last decade, movement patterns show no clear trend since 2002. The observed patterns in the repeatability of movements, the types of holdings involved in movements, the distances and frequencies of cattle movements, and the batch sizes involved give an insight into the structure of the UK cattle industry, and could act as the basis for a predictive model of livestock movements in the UK. PMID:21711520

  7. 77 FR 16661 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State and Zone Designations; NM; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State and Zone Designations; NM... document corrects that error. List of Subjects in 9 CFR Part 77 Animal diseases, Bison, Cattle, Reporting...

  8. Challenges with the southern cattle fever tick in Puerto Rico: Then and now

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis are deadly cattle diseases caused by microorganisms transmitted by the southern cattle fever tick (SCFT), Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, which is considered the most economically important ectoparasite of livestock worldwide. Humans brought animals infested w...

  9. The effect of western juniper on the estrous cycle in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Welch, Kevin D; Stonecipher, Clint A; Gardner, Dale R; Panter, Kip E; Parsons, Cory; Deboodt, Tim; Johnson, Bryan

    2015-02-01

    Numerous evergreen trees and shrubs contain labdane acids, including isocupressic acid, which can cause late-term abortions in cattle. Recent research has shown that the bark from western juniper trees can also cause late-term abortions in cattle. Additionally, ranchers have observed that cattle in western juniper-infested rangelands tend to have decreased conception rates. The objective of this study was to determine if western juniper alters the estrous cycle of cattle. Fourteen heifers (10 treated and 4 control) were monitored for 74 days for signs of normal estrous behavior, with a 21 day feeding trial with western juniper bark from days 28-48, after which the cattle were bred naturally with a bull. The cattle were checked for pregnancy 30 days after all cattle had been bred. The data from this study indicate that exposure to western juniper bark does not affect normal estrus, estrous cycle or conception rates of cattle. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Antibiotic resistance genes and residual antimicrobials in cattle feedlot surface soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotic residues and resistant bacteria in cattle feedlot manure may impact antibiotic resistance in the environment. This study investigated common antimicrobials (tetracyclines and monensin) and associated resistance genes in cattle feedlot soils over time. Animal diets and other feedlot soil...

  11. Infection of cattle with Border disease virus by sheep on communal alpine pastures.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Bachofen, C; Büchi, R; Hässig, M; Peterhans, E

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether sheep grazing communal alpine pastures with cattle can transmit Border disease virus (BDV) to cattle. A total of 1170 sheep and 923 cattle were tested for BDV using RT-PCR (sheep) and for pestivirus antibodies using an ELISA (cattle), respectively, before being moved to one of 4 pastures (A, B, C and D). Eight sheep from pasture C were viraemic. 396 of 923 cattle examined before the pasture season were seronegative. The latter were re-examined after the pasture season and 99 were seropositive or indeterminate. Antibody specificity was determined in 25 of these using a serum neutralization test (SNT). BDV infection was confirmed in 10 cattle and was considered likely in 8 others. BVDV infection was confirmed in 4 cattle and considered likely in 3 after pasturing. The study has shown that the transmission of BDV from sheep to cattle is possible on communal alpine pastures.

  12. [Laminitis in cattle: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Lischer, C; Ossent, P

    1994-10-01

    Worldwide afflictions of the claws belong to the economically important diseases in dairy cattle. The significance of laminitis has gained importance in the last years since the condition is regarded as the most important predisposing factor for the development of lesions such as sole ulcer, white line disease and heel horn erosion. Apart from the clinical stages (acute, subacute, chronic, chronic-recurrent) there is also a subclinical form of laminitis which does not cause lameness. It is characterized by soft yellowish sole and heel horn with haemorrhages in the sole and along the white line. Laminitis is a multifactorial event in which nutrition, genetic disposition and the perinatal period, combined with the associated diseases of high-yielding cows, have a particular significance. Currently, two principally different hypotheses on the pathogenesis are discussed. The generally accepted theory bases on a disturbance in the microcirculation of the corium. According to the other theory the circulatory disturbances are secondary to changes which occur in the horn producing cells of the stratum basale of the epidermis. The predisposing factors and the pathogenesis of laminitis are discussed in the light of possible therapeutic and prophylactic measures.

  13. Oestrous cycles in Bos taurus cattle.

    PubMed

    Forde, N; Beltman, M E; Lonergan, P; Diskin, M; Roche, J F; Crowe, M A

    2011-04-01

    The oestrous cycle in cattle lasts for 18-24 days. It consists of a luteal phase (14-18 days) and a follicular phase (4-6 days). During the cycle there are generally two (dairy cows) or three (heifers and beef cows) waves of ovarian follicle growth. Each wave of follicle growth consists of a period of emergence of a cohort of follicles, selection of a dominant follicle and either atresia or ovulation of the dominant follicle. These waves of follicle growth, initially established during the early pre-pubertal period of development occur throughout the entire cycle, with only the dominant follicle (DF) of the final wave coinciding with the follicular phase that undergoes final maturation and ovulation. Ovarian functions (follicle growth, ovulation, luteinisation and luteolysis) are regulated by the endocrine hormones of the hypothalamus (gonadotrophin-releasing hormone), anterior pituitary (follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone), ovaries (progesterone, oestradiol and inhibins) and the uterus (prostaglandin F2α). In postpartum cows resumption of regular oestrous cycles (in addition to uterine involution) is fundamental for re-establishment of pregnancy.

  14. Histopathological effects of boldenone in cattle.

    PubMed

    Groot, M J; Biolatti, B

    2004-03-01

    Histopathology of male cattle previously found positive for béta-boldenone in urine in the Netherlands and in Italy was studied. The animals were derived from practice and several weeks had passed after the finding of béta-boldenone before the animals were examined. The animals consisted of 34 male veal calves and one finishing bull. In the prostate gland hypersecretion, cyst formation (45%) and hyperplasia of the urethral epithelium was observed, in the bulbo-urethral gland similar alterations were present. The testis showed reduced development and degeneration of the germinal epithelium (70%), leading to debris and syncytial cell formation in the lumina. Stromal proliferation was evident. In some animals the liver was sampled and showed periportal fibrosis, bile duct proliferation and sometimes necrosis. The bull also showed degeneration of the germinal epithelium of the testis and absence of sperm production, the prostate gland showed some secretion and had an atrophic appearance. It is concluded that béta-boldenone may lead to degeneration of the germinal epithelium of the testis and hypersecretion and cyst formation in the prostate and bulbo-urethral gland, which alterations may heal in time.

  15. Dynamical patterns of cattle trade movements.

    PubMed

    Bajardi, Paolo; Barrat, Alain; Natale, Fabrizio; Savini, Lara; Colizza, Vittoria

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance for the spread of zoonotic diseases, our understanding of the dynamical aspects characterizing the movements of farmed animal populations remains limited as these systems are traditionally studied as static objects and through simplified approximations. By leveraging on the network science approach, here we are able for the first time to fully analyze the longitudinal dataset of Italian cattle movements that reports the mobility of individual animals among farms on a daily basis. The complexity and inter-relations between topology, function and dynamical nature of the system are characterized at different spatial and time resolutions, in order to uncover patterns and vulnerabilities fundamental for the definition of targeted prevention and control measures for zoonotic diseases. Results show how the stationarity of statistical distributions coexists with a strong and non-trivial evolutionary dynamics at the node and link levels, on all timescales. Traditional static views of the displacement network hide important patterns of structural changes affecting nodes' centrality and farms' spreading potential, thus limiting the efficiency of interventions based on partial longitudinal information. By fully taking into account the longitudinal dimension, we propose a novel definition of dynamical motifs that is able to uncover the presence of a temporal arrow describing the evolution of the system and the causality patterns of its displacements, shedding light on mechanisms that may play a crucial role in the definition of preventive actions.

  16. Genomic analysis of stayability in Nellore cattle.

    PubMed

    Barreto Amaral Teixeira, Daniela; Alves Fernandes Júnior, Gerardo; Beraldo Dos Santos Silva, Danielly; Bermal Costa, Raphael; Takada, Luciana; Gustavo Mansan Gordo, Daniel; Bresolin, Tiago; Carvalheiro, Roberto; Baldi, Fernando; Galvão de Albuquerque, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Stayability, which can be defined as the probability of a cow calving at a certain age when given the opportunity, is an important reproductive trait in beef cattle because it is directly related to herd profitability. The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters and to identify possible genomic regions associated with the phenotypic expression of stayability in Nellore cows. The variance components were estimated by Bayesian inference using a threshold animal model that included the systematic effects of contemporary group and sexual precocity and the random effects of animal and residual. The SNP effects were estimated by the single-step genomic BLUP method using information of 2,838 animals (2,020 females and 930 sires) genotyped with the Illumina High-Density BeadChip Array (San Diego, CA, USA). The variance explained by windows formed by 200 consecutive SNPs was used to identify genomic regions of largest effect on the expression of stayability. The heritability was 0.11 ± 0.01 when A matrix (pedigree) was used and 0.14 ± 0.01 when H matrix (relationship matrix that combines pedigree information and SNP data) was used. A total of 147 candidate genes for stayability were identified on chromosomes 1, 2, 5, 6, 9 and 20 and on the X chromosome. New candidate regions for stayability were detected, most of them related to reproductive, immunological and central nervous system functions.

  17. Dynamical Patterns of Cattle Trade Movements

    PubMed Central

    Bajardi, Paolo; Barrat, Alain; Natale, Fabrizio; Savini, Lara; Colizza, Vittoria

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance for the spread of zoonotic diseases, our understanding of the dynamical aspects characterizing the movements of farmed animal populations remains limited as these systems are traditionally studied as static objects and through simplified approximations. By leveraging on the network science approach, here we are able for the first time to fully analyze the longitudinal dataset of Italian cattle movements that reports the mobility of individual animals among farms on a daily basis. The complexity and inter-relations between topology, function and dynamical nature of the system are characterized at different spatial and time resolutions, in order to uncover patterns and vulnerabilities fundamental for the definition of targeted prevention and control measures for zoonotic diseases. Results show how the stationarity of statistical distributions coexists with a strong and non-trivial evolutionary dynamics at the node and link levels, on all timescales. Traditional static views of the displacement network hide important patterns of structural changes affecting nodes' centrality and farms' spreading potential, thus limiting the efficiency of interventions based on partial longitudinal information. By fully taking into account the longitudinal dimension, we propose a novel definition of dynamical motifs that is able to uncover the presence of a temporal arrow describing the evolution of the system and the causality patterns of its displacements, shedding light on mechanisms that may play a crucial role in the definition of preventive actions. PMID:21625633

  18. Genomic analysis of stayability in Nellore cattle

    PubMed Central

    Barreto Amaral Teixeira, Daniela; Beraldo dos Santos Silva, Danielly; Bermal Costa, Raphael; Takada, Luciana; Gustavo Mansan Gordo, Daniel; Bresolin, Tiago; Carvalheiro, Roberto; Baldi, Fernando; Galvão de Albuquerque, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Stayability, which can be defined as the probability of a cow calving at a certain age when given the opportunity, is an important reproductive trait in beef cattle because it is directly related to herd profitability. The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters and to identify possible genomic regions associated with the phenotypic expression of stayability in Nellore cows. The variance components were estimated by Bayesian inference using a threshold animal model that included the systematic effects of contemporary group and sexual precocity and the random effects of animal and residual. The SNP effects were estimated by the single-step genomic BLUP method using information of 2,838 animals (2,020 females and 930 sires) genotyped with the Illumina High-Density BeadChip Array (San Diego, CA, USA). The variance explained by windows formed by 200 consecutive SNPs was used to identify genomic regions of largest effect on the expression of stayability. The heritability was 0.11 ± 0.01 when A matrix (pedigree) was used and 0.14 ± 0.01 when H matrix (relationship matrix that combines pedigree information and SNP data) was used. A total of 147 candidate genes for stayability were identified on chromosomes 1, 2, 5, 6, 9 and 20 and on the X chromosome. New candidate regions for stayability were detected, most of them related to reproductive, immunological and central nervous system functions. PMID:28591167

  19. Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in Israeli dairy cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Yeruham, I.; Elad, D.; Friedman, S.; Perl, S.

    2003-01-01

    Two forms of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in Israeli dairy cattle herds during a survey period of 13 years (1989-2001) are described. The more common form, which was diagnosed in 45 herds, was characterized by ulcerative granulomatous lesions which occurred either sporadically--in 26 herds (with a morbidity rate of up to 5%)--or in an epidemic course in 19 herds. Most (80.6%) of the affected animals were cows; the rest were first-calving cows (16.2%) and heifers (3.2%). The morbidity occurred mostly during the summer months. The ulcerative granulomatous lesions appeared in three clinical forms: cutaneous, mastitic and visceral. Mixed forms were also observed. The morbidity rate was 6.4% and the culling rate reached 16.3% of the affected animals. Most of the strains of C. pseudotuberculosis which were isolated from the abscesses in the cutaneous form of the disease and from milk samples failed to reduce nitrate. A decrease in milk production (6%) and an increase in bulk-milk somatic cell count were noted. Necrotic and ulcerative dermatitis on the heel of the foot occurred in an epidemic course in heifers in only two herds during the winter months, with morbidity rates of 7.5 and 76.2%, respectively. C. pseudotuberculosis isolates from skin lesions and from the soil did reduce nitrate. Clinical, epizootiological and microbiological aspects of the infection are described. PMID:14596537

  20. Zinc deficiency in molybdenum poisoned cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Parada, R.

    1981-02-01

    Clinical signs ascribable to zinc deficiency were noted in a group of Friesian cows industrially poisoned with molybdenum. Zinc, copper, and molybdenum were determined in blood serum and black hair, and in the contaminated alfalfa pasture the group grazed on. Hematological parameters, and serum calcium and alkaline phosphatase activity, were also determined. Pooled samples of alfalfa from 2 uncontaminated pastures, and of blood, serum and black hair of clinically normal Friesian cattle grazing on these were used as controls. A mixed contamination of the polluted pasture with molybdenum and copper was found, both metals being inversely correlated with he distance to the polluting chimney. Zinc concentrations were normal and not significantly correlated with the distance to the chimney very high molybdenum was found in serum and hair of the poisoned animals; copper was normal in serum and hair. Low calcium and Alkaline phosphatase activity were found in serum, both variables being significantly correlated with serum zinc. Reduced red blood cell number, packed cell volumes and hemoglobin concentrations were also found, but no significant correlation of these parameters with any of the trace metals in serum or hair was found. Signs ascribed to zinc deficiency were consistent with the reduction of zinc in serum and hair and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity in serum. A zinc deficiency conditioned by a simultaneous increased intake of molybdenum and copper is proposed.

  1. Invasive Teat Surgery in Dairy Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Norm G.; Arighi, Mimi; Horney, F. Donald; Livesey, Michael A.; Hurtig, Mark H.; Pennock, Paul

    1987-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to identify the nature and management of teat abnormalities in cows presented to a referral teaching hospital during a three year period. All cattle (n = 60) admitted to the Ontario Veterinary College for teat problems were evaluated by physical examination; in 53 teats, contrast radiography or xeroradiography were obtained. Surgery was performed on 52 teats from 51 cows and a prosthesis was implanted in 27 teats. Short term (under two weeks) complications included intraoperative bleeding (n = 6), milk leakage through the incision (n = 4), and failure to milk by machine in 26 cases. Histopathological diagnosis of sections taken from obstructive lesions included fibrous tissue (n = 8), normal mammary tissue (n = 3), fibropapilloma, mammary polyps, and inflamed mucosa (one each). The lesion could be classified into five types: 1) focal teat cistern obstruction, 2) diffuse teat cistern obstruction, 3) membranous obstruction, 4) diffuse teat and gland cistern obstruction, or 5) leakage of milk through an abnormal route (i.e. teat fistula, webbed teat, or lacerations). ImagesFigure 1.Figure 4. PMID:17422937

  2. Condensed tannins act against cattle nematodes.

    PubMed

    Novobilský, Adam; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan

    2011-12-15

    The use of natural plant anthelmintics was suggested as a possible alternative control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in ruminants. Direct anthelmintic effects of tannin-containing plants have already been shown in sheep and goat GIN. These anthelmintic properties are mainly associated with condensed tannins. In the present study, we evaluated possible in vitro effects of three tannin-containing plants against bovine GIN. Effects of Onobrychis viciifolia, Lotus pedunculatus and Lotus corniculatus condensed tannin (CT) extracts on Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi were determined by a larval feeding inhibition assay (LFIA) and a larval exsheathment assay (LEA). In the LFIA, all three plant extracts significantly inhibited larval feeding behaviour of both C. oncophora and O. ostertagi first stage larvae in a dose-dependent manner. The L. pedunculatus extract, based on EC(50) (effective concentration for 50% inhibition), was the most effective against both nematodes, followed by O. viciifolia and L. corniculatus. The effect of CT extracts upon larval feeding behaviour correlates with CT content and procyanidin/prodelphidin ratio. Larval exsheathment of C. oncophora and O. ostertagi L3 larvae (third stage larvae) was also affected by CT extracts from all three plants. In both in vitro assays, extracts with added polyvinylpolypyrrolidone, an inhibitor of tannins, generated almost the same values as the negative control; this confirms the role of CT in the anthelmintic effect of these plant extracts. Our results, therefore, indicated that tannin-containing plants could act against cattle nematodes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bovine papillomaviruses, papillomas and cancer in cattle.

    PubMed

    Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Roperto, Franco

    2008-01-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPV) are DNA oncogenic viruses inducing hyperplastic benign lesions of both cutaneous and mucosal epithelia in cattle. Ten (BPV 1-10) different viral genotypes have been characterised so far. BPV 1-10 are all strictly species-specific but BPV 1/2 may also infect equids inducing fibroblastic tumours. These benign lesions generally regress but may also occasionally persist, leading to a high risk of evolving into cancer, particularly in the presence of environmental carcinogenic co-factors. Among these, bracken fern is the most extensively studied. The synergism between immunosuppressants and carcinogenic principles from bracken fern and the virus has been experimentally demonstrated for both urinary bladder and alimentary canal cancer in cows whose diets were based on this plant. BPV associated tumours have veterinary and agricultural relevance in their own right, although they have also been studied as a relevant model of Human papillomavirus (HPV). Recent insights into BPV biology have paved the way to new fields of speculation on the role of these viruses in neoplastic transformation of cells other than epithelial ones. This review will briefly summarise BPV genome organization, will describe in greater detail the functions of viral oncoproteins, the interaction between the virus and co-carcinogens in tumour development; relevant aspects of immunity and vaccines will also be discussed.

  4. Immune exhaustion during chronic infections in cattle

    PubMed Central

    KONNAI, Satoru; MURATA, Shiro; OHASHI, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Recently, dysfunction of antigen-specific T cells is well documented as T-cell exhaustion and has been defined by the loss of effector functions during chronic infections and cancer in human. The exhausted T cells are characterized phenotypically by the surface expression of immunoinhibitory receptors, such as programmed death 1 (PD-1), lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3), T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing protein 3 (Tim-3) and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). However, there is still a fundamental lack of knowledge about the immunoinhibitory receptors in the fields of veterinary medicine. In particular, very little is known about mechanism of T cell dysfunction in chronic infection in cattle. Recent our studies have revealed that immunoinhibitory molecules including PD-1/ programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) play critical roles in immune exhaustion and disease progression in case of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection, Johne’s disease and bovine anaplasmosis. This review includes some recent data from us. PMID:27725355

  5. Estimation of the time of divergence between Japanese Mishima Island cattle and other cattle populations using microsatellite DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Yoshitaka; Nirasawa, Keijiro; Takahashi, Hideaki; Sasaki, Osamu; Ishii, Kazuo; Minezawa, Mitsuru; Oda, Senichi; Visscher, Peter M; Furukawa, Tsutomu

    2008-01-01

    We applied the theory of random genetic drift to determine the divergence history of a closed cattle population over the relatively short timescale of several hundred years. The divergence history of the closed population of Mishima Island cattle, a national natural treasure of Japan, was examined, and the results were compared with historical documents. Inbreeding depression in the isolated population was investigated for body size and fertility. Twenty-one DNA microsatellite markers in Mishima Island cattle and 3 major breeds from the mainland were genotyped. For the mainland breeds, all 21 or 20 markers were segregating. However, nearly half the number of loci (9 of 21) was fixed in the Island cattle. The average number of alleles per locus of Island cattle was markedly lower than that in the mainland breeds. These results support the theory that Island cattle have been isolated for a considerable period of time. The number of generations of isolation was estimated as 14.1-22.6, and the year of divergence was calculated as 1778-1846. In view of these findings, we propose that Island cattle diverged from the mainland population at around 1800 and were isolated for about 200 years. These estimates are in agreement with historical documents showing that divergence occurred between 1672 and 1880. The total inbreeding coefficient of the present population was predicted to be in the range of 0.51-0.60. However, historical reports dated over 100 years do not support changes in fertility, so that there is no evidence for inbreeding depression.

  6. Assessing the heat tolerance of 17 beef cattle genotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaughan, J. B.; Mader, T. L.; Holt, S. M.; Sullivan, M. L.; Hahn, G. L.

    2010-11-01

    Cattle production plays a significant role in terms of world food production. Nearly 82% of the world's 1.2 billion cattle can be found in developing countries. An increasing demand for meat in developing countries has seen an increase in intensification of animal industries, and a move to cross-bred animals. Heat tolerance is considered to be one of the most important adaptive aspects for cattle, and the lack of thermally-tolerant breeds is a major constraint on cattle production in many countries. There is a need to not only identify heat tolerant breeds, but also heat tolerant animals within a non-tolerant breed. Identification of heat tolerant animals is not easy under field conditions. In this study, panting score (0 to 4.5 scale where 0 = no stress and 4.5 = extreme stress) and the heat load index (HLI) [HLIBG<25°C = 10.66 + 0.28 × rh + 1.30 × BG - WS; and, HLI BG> 25°C = 8.62 + 0.38 × rh + 1.55 × BG - 0.5 × WS + e(2.4 - WS), where BG = black globe temperature (oC), rh = relative humidity (decimal form), WS = wind speed (m/s) and e is the base of the natural logarithm] were used to assess the heat tolerance of 17 genotypes (12,757 steers) within 13 Australian feedlots over three summers. The cattle were assessed under natural climatic conditions in which HLI ranged from thermonuetral (HLI < 70) to extreme (HLI > 96; black globe temperature = 40.2°C, relative humidity = 64%, wind speed = 1.58 m/s). When HLI > 96 a greater number ( P < 0.001) of pure bred Bos taurus and crosses of Bos taurus cattle had a panting score ≥ 2 compared to Brahman cattle, and Brahman-cross cattle. The heat tolerance of the assessed breeds was verified using panting scores and the HLI. Heat tolerance of cattle can be assessed under field conditions by using panting score and HLI.

  7. Assessing the heat tolerance of 17 beef cattle genotypes.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, J B; Mader, T L; Holt, S M; Sullivan, M L; Hahn, G L

    2010-11-01

    Cattle production plays a significant role in terms of world food production. Nearly 82% of the world's 1.2 billion cattle can be found in developing countries. An increasing demand for meat in developing countries has seen an increase in intensification of animal industries, and a move to cross-bred animals. Heat tolerance is considered to be one of the most important adaptive aspects for cattle, and the lack of thermally-tolerant breeds is a major constraint on cattle production in many countries. There is a need to not only identify heat tolerant breeds, but also heat tolerant animals within a non-tolerant breed. Identification of heat tolerant animals is not easy under field conditions. In this study, panting score (0 to 4.5 scale where 0 = no stress and 4.5 = extreme stress) and the heat load index (HLI) [HLI(BG<25°C) = 10.66 + 0.28 × rh + 1.30 × BG - WS; and, HLI (BG> 25°C) = 8.62 + 0.38 × rh + 1.55 × BG - 0.5 × WS + e((2.4 - WS)), where BG = black globe temperature ((o)C), rh = relative humidity (decimal form), WS = wind speed (m/s) and e is the base of the natural logarithm] were used to assess the heat tolerance of 17 genotypes (12,757 steers) within 13 Australian feedlots over three summers. The cattle were assessed under natural climatic conditions in which HLI ranged from thermonuetral (HLI < 70) to extreme (HLI > 96; black globe temperature = 40.2°C, relative humidity = 64%, wind speed = 1.58 m/s). When HLI > 96 a greater number (P < 0.001) of pure bred Bos taurus and crosses of Bos taurus cattle had a panting score ≥ 2 compared to Brahman cattle, and Brahman-cross cattle. The heat tolerance of the assessed breeds was verified using panting scores and the HLI. Heat tolerance of cattle can be assessed under field conditions by using panting score and HLI.

  8. Sewage sludge or cattle slurry as pasture fertilisers: comparative cysticercosis and trichostrongylosis risk for grazing cattle.

    PubMed

    Moussavou-Boussougou, Marie-Noelle; Geerts, Stanny; Madeline, Maryline; Ballandonne, Cèline; Barbier, Dominique; Cabaret, Jacques

    2005-08-01

    Sewage sludge and slurry are used as fertilisers on pastures grazed by ruminants. The former may be a source of Taenia saginata, which causes cysticercosis in cattle and taeniosis in man. The latter is a source of digestive tract-strongyles, a major helminth infection in cattle. The interest of application on pastures of these two biowastes is environmental (optimal recycling of biowastes) and agronomic (fertilisation). The parasitic risk and the fertilisation value of such applications on pastures were evaluated during one grazing season. Liquid sewage sludge did induce higher herbage biomass, which corresponded to higher liveweight gains during the first 2 months of grazing, compared to slurry spread pastures and calves grazing them. The sludge group of calves did not acquire live cysticerci and thus the risk was nil under the conditions of the study (delay of 6 weeks between application and grazing). The slurry group of calves did become lightly infected with digestive-tract strongyles, mostly Ostertagia ostertagi. Under the conditions of this experiment, a 6-week delay between application and grazing strongly reduced the risk of infection: it renders compatible the agronomic use and requirements of public or animal health.

  9. Preliminary observations on Mycobacterium spp. in dairy cattle in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Proaño-Perez, Freddy; Rigouts, Leen; Brandt, Jef; Dorny, Pierre; Ron, Jorge; Chavez, Maria-Augusta; Rodriguez, Richar; Fissette, Krista; Van Aerde, Anita; Portaels, Françoise; Benitez-Ortiz, Washington

    2006-08-01

    This study evaluated bovine tuberculosis in Mejia canton, a major dairy cattle production region in Ecuador. Randomly selected cattle (1,012 from 59 farms) classified according to herd size were tested by the single tuberculin test (STT). Sixty days later, positive reactors were tested again by the comparative tuberculin test (CTT). In addition, tissue samples from two STT-CTT-positive reactors detected on a farm were obtained in a local slaughterhouse and analyzed bacteriologically. A total of 4.24% of the cattle were positive in the STT and 3.85% were positive in the CTT, with the highest number (7.95%) in large herds versus 3.4% in medium herds and 0.3% in small herds. Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes and lungs of one animal. A 16S ribosomal RNA-based polymerase chain reaction confirmed culture results and differentiated mycobacteria other than M. tuberculosis. This study confirms the zoonotic importance of tuberculosis in Ecuadorian dairy cattle with herd size likely to be a crucial parameter in the prevalence of the disease. The implementation of a national control program is necessary and should be based on the detection of positive cattle by STT in combination with CTT.

  10. Postpartum ovarian activity in South Asian zebu cattle.

    PubMed

    Brar, P S; Nanda, A S

    2008-07-01

    Timely onset of postpartum ovarian activity is vital for optimal reproductive performance of dairy cows. Much depends upon genetic constitution of an animal although several factors interplay to govern the onset of postpartum ovarian activity. South Asian zebu cattle have much longer service period when compared with other exotic or crossbred cattle reared in the same Asian environment, which suggests differences in their genetic makeup. However, the cows with same genetic configuration expressed better reproductive potential when reared under different environment, such as in Brazil and Mexico, which suggests the role of extrinsic factors such as management, nutrition, environment and disease conditions. Better management of animals (provision of proper shade, water and housing, efficient oestrous detection and timely insemination), good quality nutrition supplemented with appropriate minerals and vitamins, prevention of diseases (vaccination, deworming, suitable therapeutic interventions) and application of biotechnology have helped in improving postpartum ovarian activity and, therefore, reproductive performance of zebu cattle in Asia. No comprehensive study appears to have been carried out on the various aspects of reproduction in zebu cattle reared under South Asian socio-agro-climatic conditions. This paper is a modest effort to collect what ever information available and to critically review the postpartum ovarian activity in zebu cattle with special reference to the effect of the various managemental practices and pharmacological interventions.

  11. Genetics of animal health and disease in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There have been considerable recent advancements in animal breeding and genetics relevant to disease control in cattle, which can now be utilised as part of an overall programme for improved cattle health. This review summarises the contribution of genetic makeup to differences in resistance to many diseases affecting cattle. Significant genetic variation in susceptibility to disease does exist among cattle suggesting that genetic selection for improved resistance to disease will be fruitful. Deficiencies in accurately recorded data on individual animal susceptibility to disease are, however, currently hindering the inclusion of health and disease resistance traits in national breeding goals. Developments in 'omics' technologies, such as genomic selection, may help overcome some of the limitations of traditional breeding programmes and will be especially beneficial in breeding for lowly heritable disease traits that only manifest themselves following exposure to pathogens or environmental stressors in adulthood. However, access to large databases of phenotypes on health and disease will still be necessary. This review clearly shows that genetics make a significant contribution to the overall health and resistance to disease in cattle. Therefore, breeding programmes for improved animal health and disease resistance should be seen as an integral part of any overall national disease control strategy. PMID:21777492

  12. Escherichia coli, cattle and the propagation of disease.

    PubMed

    Stein, Richard A; Katz, David E

    2017-03-01

    Several early models describing host-pathogen interaction have assumed that each individual host has approximately the same likelihood of becoming infected or of infecting others. More recently, a concept that has been increasingly emphasized in many studies is that for many infectious diseases, transmission is not homogeneous but highly skewed at the level of populations. In what became known as the '20/80 rule', about 20% of the hosts in a population were found to contribute to about 80% of the transmission potential. These heterogeneities have been described for the interaction between many microorganisms and their human or animal hosts. Several epidemiological studies have reported transmission heterogeneities for Escherichia coli by cattle, a phenomenon with far-reaching agricultural, medical and public health implications. Focusing on E. coli as a case study, this paper will describe super-spreading and super-shedding by cattle, review the main factors that shape these transmission heterogeneities and examine the interface with human health. Escherichia coli super-shedding and super-spreading by cattle are shaped by microorganism-specific, cattle-specific and environmental factors. Understanding the factors that shape heterogeneities in E. coli dispersion by cattle and the implications for human health represent key components that are critical for targeted infection control initiatives. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of bovine astrovirus in Korean cattle.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; An, Dong-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Bovine astrovirus (BAstV) belongs to a genetically divergent lineage within the genus Mamastrovirus. The present study showed that BAstV was associated with the gastroenteric tracts of cattle in nine positive fecal samples from 115 cattle, whereas no positive samples were found in the brain tissues of 14 downer cattle. Interestingly, the positive diarrheal samples were obtained mainly from calves aged 14 days-3 months. Bayesian inference tree analysis of the partial ORF1ab and capsid (ORF2) gene sequences of BAstVs identified four divergent groups. Eleven BAstVs, four porcine astroviruses, and two deer astroviruses (DAstVs; CcAstV-1 and -2) belonged to group 1; group 2 contained two BAstVs (BAstK08-51 and BAstK10-96) with another two in group 3 (BAstK08-2 and BAstK08-53); and group 4 comprised the BAstV-NeuroS1 strain derived from a cattle brain tissue sample and an ovine astrovirus. The same divergent groups were obtained when the pairwise alignments were produced using both amino acid and nucleotide sequences. The Korean BAstVs isolated from infected cattle had a nationwide distribution and they belonged to groups 1, 2, and 3.

  14. Origins of movements following stunning and during bleeding in cattle.

    PubMed

    Terlouw, E M Claudia; Bourguet, Cécile; Deiss, Véronique; Mallet, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    At slaughter, after stunning, the absence of certain physical signs such as eye movements/reflexes or rhythmic breathing helps determine whether the loss of consciousness was actually achieved. Cattle frequently show movements of neck and/or legs during the post-stun period. We evaluated 1) the origins of these movements in stunned unconscious cattle and 2) relationships with presence of ocular signs or breathing and shot characteristics. In stunned unconscious cattle, movements appear to be reflex-like, generated in the brain stem and/or spinal cord. First, in stunned unconscious cattle, movements could continue until 3 min after the start of bleeding. Second, severing the spinal cord in stunned unconscious cattle did not influence amount of movements. Third, in reaction to the skin cut and sticking, some unconscious animals showed a nociceptive withdrawal reflex. In bulls, following longer stun-stick delays, this response was weaker. Shot placement, post-stun movements and initial bleeding efficiency seemed related but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated.

  15. Characteristics of replacement breeding cattle trade in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Gates, M C

    2014-07-19

    The movements of replacement breeding cattle have been implicated in the spread of many economically important cattle diseases. In this analysis, records from the Cattle Tracing System database were used to investigate the frequency and characteristics of replacement breeding cattle trade in Great Britain. During the 2006 calendar year, an estimated 48.7 per cent of beef herds and 47.8 per cent of dairy herds purchased at least one replacement breeding animal. Open beef herds purchased an average of 7.2 replacement animals (median: 4, range: 1-819) from 3.6 source herds (median: 2, range: 1-114), while open dairy herds purchased an average of 13.7 replacement animals (median: 7, range: 1-827) from 5.2 source herds (median: 3, range: 1-146). The most common animal types purchased by beef and dairy herds were open heifers and open lactating cows, respectively. Although the movements of purchased replacement breeding cattle accounted for only 13 per cent of individual movements in the between-herd contact network, they had a disproportionately strong influence on the risk of disease spreading through the industry as evidenced by their high betweenness centrality scores. These results emphasise the importance of ensuring that good biosecurity programmes are in place to prevent disease transmission.

  16. Immunological and biochemical studies of fascioliasis in goats and cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Reddington, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Using the goat as a susceptible host and cattle as a resistant species to Fasciola hepatica infections, the humoral response of these animals to the surface of the newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) fluke was examined. Tegumental proteins of the NEJ were labeled with /sup 125/I by lactoperoxidase and analyzed after immunoprecipitation using a double antibody system. In addition, a comparison was made between the infected sera's capacity to immunoprecipitate surface antigens and their in vitro cytotoxic activity against the NEJ. In both goats and cattle the levels of NEJ surface antigens precipitated increased during the first 4 weeks PI. The peak immunoprecipitation of NEJ surface antigens by cattle sera (58%) was significantly higher than that of infected goat sera (33%). Immunoprecipitation of the available radiolabeled NEJ surface proteins by the infected cattle sera remained consistently higher than goat sera until the 16th week PI. The cytotoxic effects of these same caprine sera on NEJs in vitro was limited, while the cytotoxicity of the infected bovine sera closely approximated the sera's ability to precipitate NEJ surface antigens. There was also a qualitative difference between the species in their recognition of /sup 35/S and /sup 125/I radiolabeled NEJ surface antigens. Uninfected goat or cattle sera failed to precipitate any /sup 125/I or /sup 35/S-labeled surface proteins.

  17. Multiple free-radical scavenging (MULTIS) capacity in cattle serum

    PubMed Central

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Kamogawa, Erisa; Kimura, Anna; Kitahara, Go; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Asanuma, Taketoshi; Oowada, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Multiple free-radical scavenging (MULTIS) activity in cattle and human sera was evaluated with electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Scavenging rates against six active species, namely hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion, alkoxyl radical, alkylperoxyl radical, methyl radical, and singlet oxygen were quantified. The difference in the electron spin resonance signal intensity in the presence and absence of the serum was converted into the scavenging rates. Comparative MULTIS measurements were made in sera from eight beef cattle, three fetal calves and fifteen healthy human volunteers. Further, we determined the MULTIS value of albumin, the most abundant component in serum. MULTIS values in cattle sera indicated higher scavenging activity against most free radical species tested than human sera. In particular, cattle serum scavenging activities against superoxide and methyl radical were higher than human serum by 2.6 and 3.7 fold, respectively. In cattle serum, albumin appears to play a dominant role in MULTIS activity, but in human serum that is not the case. Previous data indicated that the abundance of uric acid in bovine blood is nearly 80% less than humans; however, this difference does not explain the deviation in MULTIS profile. PMID:28163386

  18. Morphological and immunohistochemical features of Cryptosporidium andersoni in cattle.

    PubMed

    Masuno, K; Yanai, T; Hirata, A; Yonemaru, K; Sakai, H; Satoh, M; Masegi, T; Nakai, Y

    2006-03-01

    Light and electron microscopic features and immunohistochemical features of Cryptosporidium andersoni (C. andersoni) and host reaction in the mucosa were studied. Although the affected cattle demonstrated no apparent clinical signs, a severe infection of C. andersoni was observed in the abomasum. C. andersoni were round in shape, measured 6-8 microm in size and were mainly observed to be freely located in the gastric pits, being attached in occasional cases to the surface of the abomasum epithelium. Frequent inflammatory cells had infiltrated the lamina propria of the affected mucosa, and frequent mitotic figures were observed in epithelial cells at the dilated isthmus. To access the cell kinetics, the number of epithelial cells infected with C. andersoni were counted and compared with noninfected cattle. The number of gastric pit cells in infected cattle was significantly higher than that in the controls. The number of proliferative cells determined by the Ki-67 antigen in C. andersoni infected cattle was also significantly higher than that in the controls. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the morphology of the C. andersoni organism was common to those of other Cryptosporidium spp. Immunohistochemically, several commercial antibodies against Cryptosporidium spp. showed positive reactions at the wall of these oocysts or parasitophorous vacuoles. This report is possibly the first to discuss the prominent hyperplasia of the abomasum mucosa, as well as morphologic features of C. andersoni in cattle.

  19. The Genetic Architecture of Climatic Adaptation of Tropical Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Porto-Neto, Laercio R.; Reverter, Antonio; Prayaga, Kishore C.; Chan, Eva K. F.; Johnston, David J.; Hawken, Rachel J.; Fordyce, Geoffry; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Goddard, Michael E.; Burrow, Heather M.; Henshall, John M.; Lehnert, Sigrid A.; Barendse, William

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation of global food systems to climate change is essential to feed the world. Tropical cattle production, a mainstay of profitability for farmers in the developing world, is dominated by heat, lack of water, poor quality feedstuffs, parasites, and tropical diseases. In these systems European cattle suffer significant stock loss, and the cross breeding of taurine x indicine cattle is unpredictable due to the dilution of adaptation to heat and tropical diseases. We explored the genetic architecture of ten traits of tropical cattle production using genome wide association studies of 4,662 animals varying from 0% to 100% indicine. We show that nine of the ten have genetic architectures that include genes of major effect, and in one case, a single location that accounted for more than 71% of the genetic variation. One genetic region in particular had effects on parasite resistance, yearling weight, body condition score, coat colour and penile sheath score. This region, extending 20 Mb on BTA5, appeared to be under genetic selection possibly through maintenance of haplotypes by breeders. We found that the amount of genetic variation and the genetic correlations between traits did not depend upon the degree of indicine content in the animals. Climate change is expected to expand some conditions of the tropics to more temperate environments, which may impact negatively on global livestock health and production. Our results point to several important genes that have large effects on adaptation that could be introduced into more temperate cattle without detrimental effects on productivity. PMID:25419663

  20. Physiological and endrocine parameters in beef cattle: breed, sex and year differences.

    PubMed

    Doornenbal, H

    1977-01-01

    Plasma corticoids, potassium and sodium, thyroid activity and hemoglobin and hematocrit values were determined at slaughter over a period of four years in 1612 animals representing the following sire groups: Short-horn, Charolais, Simmental, Limousin, Red Angus, Beefmaster, Brown Swiss, Chianina and Jersey. Differences among years and among breeds of sire were significant for all the parameters studied. Hematocrit values were the highest in females and the lowest for entire males, while hemoglobin levels were the lowest in females and the highest for bulls. Plasma corticoid levels were lower for entire males as compared to steers and heifers. Plasma sodium and potassium levels were the highest for females and the lowest entire males. The values reported in this study for several blood components, based on a large number of animals, could serve as clinical guides and as a basis for further research.