Science.gov

Sample records for chemical absorption-biological reduction

  1. A Biophysicochemical Model for NO Removal by the Chemical Absorption-Biological Reduction Integrated Process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingkai; Xia, Yinfeng; Li, Meifang; Li, Sujing; Li, Wei; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-08-16

    The chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process is regarded as a promising technology for NOx removal from flue gas. To advance the scale-up of the CABR process, a mathematic model based on mass transfer with reaction in the gas, liquid, and biofilm was developed to simulate and predict the NOx removal by the CABR system in a biotrickling filter. The developed model was validated by the experimental results and subsequently was used to predict the system performance under different operating conditions, such as NO and O2 concentration and gas and liquid flow rate. NO distribution in the gas phase along the biotrickling filter was also modeled and predicted. On the basis of the modeling results, the liquid flow rate and total iron concentration were optimized to achieve >90% NO removal efficiency. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis of the model revealed that the performance of the CABR process was controlled by the bioreduction activity of Fe(III)EDTA. This work will provide the guideline for the design and operation of the CABR process in the industrial application.

  2. Evaluation of microbial reduction of Fe(III)EDTA in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated NOx removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Li; Cheng-Zhi Wu; Shi-Han Zhang; Ke Shao; Yao Shi

    2007-01-15

    A chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process can be used to remove nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas. In such a process, nitric oxide (NO) can be effectively absorbed by the ferrous chelate of ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) to form Fe(II)EDTA-NO, which can be biologically regenerated by denitrifying bacteria. However, in the course of these processes, part of the Fe(II)EDTA is also oxidized to Fe(III)EDTA. The reduction of Fe(III)EDTA to Fe(II)EDTA depends on the activity of iron-reducing bacteria in the system. Therefore, the effectiveness of the system relies on how to effectively bioreduce Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO in the system. In this paper, a strain identified as Escherichia coli FR-2 (iron-reducing bacterium) was used to investigate the reduction rate of Fe(III)EDTA. The experimental results indicate that Fe(II)EDTA-NO and Fe(II)EDTA in the system can inhibit both the FR-2 cell growth and thus affect the Fe(III)EDTA reduction. The FR-2 cell growth rate and Fe(III)EDTA reduction rate decreased with increasing Fe(II)EDTA-NO and Fe(II)EDTA concentration in the solution. When the concentration of Fe(II)EDTA-NO reached 3.7 mM, the FR-2 cell growth almost stopped. A mathematical model was developed to explain the cell growth and inhibition kinetics. The predicted results are close to the experimental data and provide a preliminary evaluation of the kinetics of the biologically mediated reactions necessary to regenerate the spent scrubber solution. 33 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Pathway of FeEDTA transformation and its impact on performance of NOx removal in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Jingkai; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Yinfeng; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-01-01

    A novel chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process, employing ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) as a solvent, is deemed as a potential option for NOx removal from the flue gas. Previous work showed that the Fe(II)EDTA concentration was critical for the NOx removal in the CABR process. In this work, the pathway of FeEDTA (Fe(III)/Fe(II)-EDTA) transformation was investigated to assess its impact on the NOx removal in a biofilter. Experimental results revealed that the FeEDTA transformation involved iron precipitation and EDTA degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the iron was precipitated in the form of Fe(OH)3. The iron mass balance analysis showed 44.2% of the added iron was precipitated. The EDTA degradation facilitated the iron precipitation. Besides chemical oxidation, EDTA biodegradation occurred in the biofilter. The addition of extra EDTA helped recover the iron from the precipitation. The transformation of FeEDTA did not retard the NO removal. In addition, EDTA rather than the iron concentration determined the NO removal efficiency.

  4. Pathway of FeEDTA transformation and its impact on performance of NOx removal in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Jingkai; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Yinfeng; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-01-01

    A novel chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process, employing ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) as a solvent, is deemed as a potential option for NOx removal from the flue gas. Previous work showed that the Fe(II)EDTA concentration was critical for the NOx removal in the CABR process. In this work, the pathway of FeEDTA (Fe(III)/Fe(II)-EDTA) transformation was investigated to assess its impact on the NOx removal in a biofilter. Experimental results revealed that the FeEDTA transformation involved iron precipitation and EDTA degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the iron was precipitated in the form of Fe(OH)3. The iron mass balance analysis showed 44.2% of the added iron was precipitated. The EDTA degradation facilitated the iron precipitation. Besides chemical oxidation, EDTA biodegradation occurred in the biofilter. The addition of extra EDTA helped recover the iron from the precipitation. The transformation of FeEDTA did not retard the NO removal. In addition, EDTA rather than the iron concentration determined the NO removal efficiency. PMID:26743930

  5. Pathway of FeEDTA transformation and its impact on performance of NOx removal in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Jingkai; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Yinfeng; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-01-08

    A novel chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process, employing ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) as a solvent, is deemed as a potential option for NOx removal from the flue gas. Previous work showed that the Fe(II)EDTA concentration was critical for the NOx removal in the CABR process. In this work, the pathway of FeEDTA (Fe(III)/Fe(II)-EDTA) transformation was investigated to assess its impact on the NOx removal in a biofilter. Experimental results revealed that the FeEDTA transformation involved iron precipitation and EDTA degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the iron was precipitated in the form of Fe(OH)3. The iron mass balance analysis showed 44.2% of the added iron was precipitated. The EDTA degradation facilitated the iron precipitation. Besides chemical oxidation, EDTA biodegradation occurred in the biofilter. The addition of extra EDTA helped recover the iron from the precipitation. The transformation of FeEDTA did not retard the NO removal. In addition, EDTA rather than the iron concentration determined the NO removal efficiency.

  6. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  7. Current Chemical Risk Reduction Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's existing chemicals programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and/or characterization, and risk management for chemicals substances in commercial use.

  8. Current advances of integrated processes combining chemical absorption and biological reduction for NO x removal from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Han; Xia, Yinfeng; Liu, Nan; Lu, Bi-Hong; Li, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emitted from the fossil-fuel-fired power plants cause adverse environmental issues such as acid rain, urban ozone smoke, and photochemical smog. A novel chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process under development is regarded as a promising alternative to the conventional selective catalytic reduction processes for NO x removal from the flue gas because it is economic and environmentally friendly. CABR process employs ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate [Fe(II)EDTA] as a solvent to absorb the NO x following microbial denitrification of NO x to harmless nitrogen gas. Meanwhile, the absorbent Fe(II)EDTA is biologically regenerated to sustain the adequate NO x removal. Compared with conventional denitrification process, CABR not only enhances the mass transfer of NO from gas to liquid phase but also minimize the impact of oxygen on the microorganisms. This review provides the current advances of the development of the CABR process for NO x removal from the flue gas.

  9. Chemical Reduction Synthesis of Iron Aluminum Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurita-Méndez, N. N.; la Torre, G. Carbajal-De; Ballesteros-Almanza, L.; Villagómez-Galindo, M.; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Espinosa-Medina, M. A.

    In this study, a chemical reduction synthesis method of iron aluminum (FeAl) nano-dimensional intermetallic powders is described. The process has two stages: a salt reduction and solvent evaporation by a heat treatment at 1100°C. The precursors of the synthesis are ferric chloride, aluminum foil chips, a mix of Toluene/THF in a 75/25 volume relationship, and concentrated hydrochloric acid as initiator of the reaction. The reaction time was 20 days, the product obtained was dried at 60 °C for 2 h and calcined at 400, 800, and 1100 °C for 4 h each. To characterize and confirm the obtained synthesis products, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques were used. The results of morphology and chemical characterization of nano-dimensional powders obtained showed a formation of agglomerated particles of a size range of approximately 150 nm to 1.0 μm. Composition of powders was identified as corundum (Al2O3), iron aluminide (FeAl3), and iron-aluminum oxides (Fe0. 53Al0. 47)2O3 phases. The oxide phases formation were associated with the reaction of atmospheric concentration-free oxygen during synthesis and sintering steps, reducing the concentration of the iron aluminum phase.

  10. Metal reduction at bulk chemical filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Toru; Daikoku, Shusaku; Tsuzuki, Shuichi; Murakami, Tetsuya

    2017-03-01

    OK73 thinner and cyclohexanone, both of which were spiked with metals were passed through Nylon 6,6 filter, varying flow rate, which include the conditions of both point-of-use and bulk filtrations. The influent and effluent metal concentrations were measured using ICP-MS for metal removal efficiency of the filtration. As a result, removal efficiency for some metals descended depending on the flow rate, while others maintained. Slower flow rate is recommended to maintain low metal concentration in bulk filtration based on the result. Metals in cyclohexanone were reduced at higher efficiency than in OK73 thinner, agrees with a metal removal model of hydrophilic adsorbent in organic solvent, evidenced in our previous paper. Further, metal reduction on 300 mm φ Si wafer after coating organic solvents with Nylon 6,6 filtration was evidenced with TREX analysis.

  11. Monodispersive CoPt Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Chemical Reduction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Cheng-Min; Hui, Chao; Yang, Tian-Zhong; Xiao, Cong-Wen; En, Shu-Tang; Ding, Hao; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2008-04-01

    Monodispersive CoPt nanoparticles in sizes of about 2.2 nm are synthesized by superhydride reduction of CoCl2 and PtCl2 in diphenyl ether. The as-prepared nanoparticles show a chemically disordered A1 structure and are superparamagnetic. Thermal annealing transforms the A1 structure into chemically ordered L10 structure and the particles are ferromagnetic at room temperature.

  12. Chemical state mapping of heterogeneous reduction of iron ore sinter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Takeichi, Y.; Murao, R.; Obayashi, I.; Hiraoka, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Iron ore sinter constitutes the major component of the iron-bearing burden in blast furnaces, and its reduction mechanism is one of the keys to improving the productivity of ironmaking. Iron ore sinter is composed of multiple iron oxide phases and calcium ferrites (CFs), and their heterogeneous reduction was investigated in terms of changes in iron chemical state: FeIII, FeII, and Fe0 were examined macroscopically by 2D X-ray absorption and microscopically by 3D transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM). It was shown that the reduction starts at iron oxide grains rather than at calcium ferrite (CF) grains, especially those located near micropores. The heterogeneous reduction causes crack formation and deteriorates the mechanical strength of the sinter. These results help us to understand the fundamental aspects of heterogeneous reduction schemes in iron ore sinter.

  13. Source reduction from chemical plants using on-line optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Pike, R.W.; Hertwig, T.A.

    1995-12-01

    An effective approach for source reduction in chemical plants has been demonstrated using on-line optimization with flowsheeting (ASPEN PLUS) for process optimization and parameter estimation and the Tjao-Biegler algorithm implemented in a mathematical programming language (GAMS/MINOS) for data reconciliation and gross error detection. Results for a Monsanto sulfuric acid plant with a Bailey distributed control system showed a 25% reduction in the sulfur dioxide emissions and a 17% improvement in the profit over the current operating conditions. Details of the methods used are described.

  14. Reduction of chemical reaction networks through delay distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, Manuel; Leier, André; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T.

    2013-03-01

    Accurate modelling and simulation of dynamic cellular events require two main ingredients: an adequate description of key chemical reactions and simulation of such chemical events in reasonable time spans. Quite logically, posing the right model is a crucial step for any endeavour in Computational Biology. However, more often than not, it is the associated computational costs which actually limit our capabilities of representing complex cellular behaviour. In this paper, we propose a methodology aimed at representing chains of chemical reactions by much simpler, reduced models. The abridgement is achieved by generation of model-specific delay distribution functions, consecutively fed to a delay stochastic simulation algorithm. We show how such delay distributions can be analytically described whenever the system is solely composed of consecutive first-order reactions, with or without additional "backward" bypass reactions, yielding an exact reduction. For models including other types of monomolecular reactions (constitutive synthesis, degradation, or "forward" bypass reactions), we discuss why one must adopt a numerical approach for its accurate stochastic representation, and propose two alternatives for this. In these cases, the accuracy depends on the respective numerical sample size. Our model reduction methodology yields significantly lower computational costs while retaining accuracy. Quite naturally, computational costs increase alongside network size and separation of time scales. Thus, we expect our model reduction methodologies to significantly decrease computational costs in these instances. We anticipate the use of delays in model reduction will greatly alleviate some of the current restrictions in simulating large sets of chemical reactions, largely applicable in pharmaceutical and biological research.

  15. Fermentation, fractionation and purification of streptokinase by chemical reduction method

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Z; Babashamsi, M; Asgarani, E; Niakan, M; Salimi, A

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Streptokinase is used clinically as an intravenous thrombolytic agent for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and is commonly prepared from cultures of Streptococcus equisimilis strain H46A. The objective of the present study was the production of streptokinase from strain H46A and purification by chemical reduction method. Materials and Methods The rate of streptokinase production evaluated under the effect of changes on some fermentation factors. Moreover, due to the specific structure of streptokinase, a chemical reduction method employed for the purification of streptokinase from the fermentation broth. The H46A strain of group C streptococcus, was grown in a fermentor. The proper pH adjusted with NaOH under glucose feeding in an optimum temperature. The supernatant of the fermentation product was sterilized by filtration and concentrated by ultrafiltration. The pH of the concentrate was adjusted, cooled, and precipitated by methanol. Protein solution was reduced with dithiothreitol (DTT). Impurities settled down by aldrithiol-2 and the biological activity of supernatant containing streptokinase was determined. Results In the fed –batch culture, the rate of streptokinase production increased over two times as compared with the batch culture and the impurities were effectively separated from streptokinase by reduction method. Conclusion Improvements in SK production are due to a decrease in lag phase period and increase in the growth rate of logarithmic phase. The methods of purification often result in unacceptable losses of streptokinase, but the chemical reduction method give high yield of streptokinase and is easy to perform it. PMID:22347582

  16. Spontaneous Growth and Chemical Reduction Ability of Ge Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Liang, Changhao; Tian, Zhenfei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Shao, Guosheng

    2013-01-01

    Forming colloidal solutions containing semiconductor quantum-sized nanoparticles (NPs) with clean surface has been a long-standing scientific challenge. In this contribution, we report a “top-down” method for the fabrication of Ge NPs by laser ablation of a Ge target in deionized water without adding any stabilizing reagents. The initial Ge NPs in amorphous structure showed spontaneous growth behavior by aging Ge colloids in deionized water under ambient temperature, which gradually evolved into a metastable tetragonal structure as an intermediate phase and then transformed into the stable cubic structure, being consistent with the Ostwald's rule of stages for the growth in a metastable system. The laser-induced initial Ge NPs demonstrate a unique and prominent size-dependent chemical reductive ability, which is evidenced by the rapid degradation of organic molecules such as chlorinated aromatic compounds, organic dyes, and reduction of heavy metal Cr(VI) ions.

  17. Catalyst accessibility to chemical reductants in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Roy, Souvik; Pascanu, Vlad; Pullen, Sonja; González Miera, Greco; Martín-Matute, Belén; Ott, Sascha

    2017-03-18

    A molecular H2-evolving catalyst, [Fe2(cbdt)(CO)6] ([FeFe], cbdt = 3-carboxybenzene-1,2-dithiolate), has been attached covalently to an amino-functionalized MIL-101(Cr) through an amide bond. Chemical reduction experiments reveal that the MOF channels can be clogged by ion pairs that are formed between the oxidized reductant and the reduced catalyst. This effect is lessened in MIL-101-NH-[FeFe] with lower [FeFe] loadings. On longer timescales, it is shown that large proportions of the [FeFe] catalysts within the MOF engage in photochemical hydrogen production and the amount of produced hydrogen is proportional to the catalyst loading.

  18. Identifying indicators of reactivity for chemical reductants in sediments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huichun; Weber, Eric J

    2013-07-02

    To conduct site-specific exposure assessments for contaminants containing reducible functional groups, it is imperative to know the identity and reactivity of chemical reductants in natural sediments and to associate their reactivity with easily measurable sediment properties. For this purpose the reactivity, as defined by pseudofirst order reduction rate constants for p-cyanonitrobenzene (pCNB), was measured in twenty-one natural sediments of different origins that were incubated to attain both anoxic (less reducing) and anaerobic (microbially reducing) conditions. The reactivity of the anoxic sediments increased with pH and an increasing amount of Fe(II) added. A good electron balance between pCNB reduction and Fe(II) consumption was observed for anaerobic sediments of high solids loading (50 g/L), but not when solids loading was 5 g/L. Based on cluster and regression analysis, pCNB reactivity in the anaerobic sediments correlates strongly with aqueous Fe(II) concentrations for sediments with low organic carbon (OC) content (<4.2%), but with dissolved OC concentrations (DOC) for the sediments with high OC content (>6.4%). These observations indicate surface-associated Fe(II) and reduced DOC are the predominant reductants in the anaerobic sediments, and that aqueous Fe(II) and DOC will serve as readily measurable indicators of pCNB reactivity in these systems.

  19. Model reduction for chemical kinetics: An optimization approach

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, L.; Zhu, W.

    1999-04-01

    The kinetics of a detailed chemically reacting system can potentially be very complex. Although the chemist may be interested in only a few species, the reaction model almost always involves a much larger number of species. Some of those species are radicals, which are very reactive species and can be important intermediaries in the reaction scheme. A large number of elementary reactions can occur among the species; some of these reactions are fast and some are slow. The aim of simplified kinetics modeling is to derive the simplest reaction system which retains the essential features of the full system. An optimization-based method for reduction of the number of species and reactions in chemical kinetics model is described. Numerical results for several reaction mechanisms illustrate the potential of this approach.

  20. Chemical complexity in astrophysical simulations: optimization and reduction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, T.; Bovino, S.; Schleicher, D.; Gianturco, F. A.

    2013-05-01

    Chemistry plays a key role in the evolution of the interstellar medium, so it is highly important to follow its evolution in numerical simulations. However, it could easily dominate the computational cost when applied to large systems. In this paper we discuss two approaches to reduce these costs: (i) based on computational strategies, and (ii) based on the properties and on the topology of the chemical network. The first methods are more robust, while the second are meant to be giving important information on the structure of large, complex networks. We first discuss the numerical solvers for integrating the system of ordinary differential equations (ODE) associated with the chemical network, and then we propose a buffer method that decreases the computational time spent in solving the ODE system. We further discuss a flux-based method that allows one to determine and then cut on the fly the less active reactions. In addition we also present a topological approach for selecting the most probable species that will be active during the chemical evolution, thus gaining information on the chemical network that otherwise would be difficult to retrieve. This topological technique can also be used as an a priori reduction method for any size network. We implemented these methods into a 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamical code to test their effects: both classes lead to large computational speed-ups, ranging from ×2 to ×5. We have also tested some hybrid approaches finding that coupling the flux method with a buffer strategy gives the best trade-off between robustness and speed-up of calculations.

  1. A chemical reduction approach to the synthesis of copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ayesha; Rashid, Audil; Younas, Rafia; Chong, Ren

    2016-11-01

    Development of improved methods for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles is of high priority for the advancement of material science and technology. Herein, starch-protected zero-valent copper (Cu) nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by a novel facile route. The method is based on the chemical reduction in aqueous copper salt using ascorbic acid as reducing agent at low temperature (80 °C). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements were taken to investigate the size, structure and composition of synthesized Cu nanocrystals, respectively. Average crystallite size of Cu nanocrystals calculated from the major diffraction peaks using the Scherrer formula is about 28.73 nm. It is expected that the outcomes of the study take us a step closer toward designing rational strategies for the synthesis of nascent Cu nanoparticles without inert gas protection.

  2. Order Reduction of the Chemical Master Equation via Balanced Realisation

    PubMed Central

    López-Caamal, Fernando; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a Markov process in continuous time with a finite number of discrete states. The time-dependent probabilities of being in any state of the Markov chain are governed by a set of ordinary differential equations, whose dimension might be large even for trivial systems. Here, we derive a reduced ODE set that accurately approximates the probabilities of subspaces of interest with a known error bound. Our methodology is based on model reduction by balanced truncation and can be considerably more computationally efficient than solving the chemical master equation directly. We show the applicability of our method by analysing stochastic chemical reactions. First, we obtain a reduced order model for the infinitesimal generator of a Markov chain that models a reversible, monomolecular reaction. Later, we obtain a reduced order model for a catalytic conversion of substrate to a product (a so-called Michaelis-Menten mechanism), and compare its dynamics with a rapid equilibrium approximation method. For this example, we highlight the savings on the computational load obtained by means of the reduced-order model. Furthermore, we revisit the substrate catalytic conversion by obtaining a lower-order model that approximates the probability of having predefined ranges of product molecules. In such an example, we obtain an approximation of the output of a model with 5151 states by a reduced model with 16 states. Finally, we obtain a reduced-order model of the Brusselator. PMID:25121581

  3. Order reduction of the chemical master equation via balanced realisation.

    PubMed

    López-Caamal, Fernando; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T

    2014-01-01

    We consider a Markov process in continuous time with a finite number of discrete states. The time-dependent probabilities of being in any state of the Markov chain are governed by a set of ordinary differential equations, whose dimension might be large even for trivial systems. Here, we derive a reduced ODE set that accurately approximates the probabilities of subspaces of interest with a known error bound. Our methodology is based on model reduction by balanced truncation and can be considerably more computationally efficient than solving the chemical master equation directly. We show the applicability of our method by analysing stochastic chemical reactions. First, we obtain a reduced order model for the infinitesimal generator of a Markov chain that models a reversible, monomolecular reaction. Later, we obtain a reduced order model for a catalytic conversion of substrate to a product (a so-called Michaelis-Menten mechanism), and compare its dynamics with a rapid equilibrium approximation method. For this example, we highlight the savings on the computational load obtained by means of the reduced-order model. Furthermore, we revisit the substrate catalytic conversion by obtaining a lower-order model that approximates the probability of having predefined ranges of product molecules. In such an example, we obtain an approximation of the output of a model with 5151 states by a reduced model with 16 states. Finally, we obtain a reduced-order model of the Brusselator.

  4. The Use of Chemical Probes for the Characterization of the Predominant Abiotic Reductants in Anaerobic Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the predominant chemical reductants and pathways for electron transfer in anaerobic systems is paramount to the development of environmental fate models that incorporate pathways for abiotic reductive transformations. Currently, such models do not exist. In this chapt...

  5. The Use of Chemical Probes for the Characterization of the Predominant Abiotic Reductants in Anaerobic Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the predominant chemical reductants and pathways for electron transfer in anaerobic systems is paramount to the development of environmental fate models that incorporate pathways for abiotic reductive transformations. Currently, such models do not exist. In this chapt...

  6. Antibacterial activity of silver bionanocomposites synthesized by chemical reduction route

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the functions of polymers and size of nanoparticles on the antibacterial activity of silver bionanocomposites (Ag BNCs). In this research, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were incorporated into biodegradable polymers that are chitosan, gelatin and both polymers via chemical reduction method in solvent in order to produce Ag BNCs. Silver nitrate and sodium borohydride were employed as a metal precursor and reducing agent respectively. On the other hand, chitosan and gelatin were added as a polymeric matrix and stabilizer. The antibacterial activity of different sizes of silver nanoparticles was investigated against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by the disk diffusion method using Mueller-Hinton Agar. Results The properties of Ag BNCs were studied as a function of the polymer weight ratio in relation to the use of chitosan and gelatin. The morphology of the Ag BNCs films and the distribution of the Ag NPs were also characterized. The diameters of the Ag NPs were measured and their size is less than 20 nm. The antibacterial trait of silver/chitosan/gelatin bionanocomposites was investigated. The silver ions released from the Ag BNCs and their antibacterial activities were scrutinized. The antibacterial activities of the Ag BNC films were examined against Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (S. aureus and M. luteus) by diffusion method using Muller-Hinton agar. Conclusions The antibacterial activity of Ag NPs with size less than 20 nm was demonstrated and showed positive results against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The Ag NPs stabilized well in the polymers matrix. PMID:22967920

  7. Less is Better. Laboratory Chemical Management for Waste Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    An objective of the American Chemical Society is to promote alternatives to landfilling for the disposal of laboratory chemical wastes. One method is to reduce the amount of chemicals that become wastes. This is the basis for the "less is better" philosophy. This bulletin discusses various techniques involved in purchasing control,…

  8. Less is Better. Laboratory Chemical Management for Waste Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    An objective of the American Chemical Society is to promote alternatives to landfilling for the disposal of laboratory chemical wastes. One method is to reduce the amount of chemicals that become wastes. This is the basis for the "less is better" philosophy. This bulletin discusses various techniques involved in purchasing control,…

  9. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon

    2015-12-07

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems.

  10. Model reduction for stochastic chemical systems with abundant species

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stephen; Cianci, Claudia; Grima, Ramon

    2015-12-07

    Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. We first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently, we prove that, in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. This is a reduced description when compared to the conventional chemical master equation which describes the fluctuations in both abundant and non-abundant species. We show that the reduced master equation can be solved exactly for a number of biochemical networks involving gene expression and enzyme catalysis, whose conventional chemical master equation description is analytically impenetrable. We use the linear noise approximation to obtain approximate expressions for the difference between the variance of fluctuations in the non-abundant species as predicted by the hybrid approach and by the conventional chemical master equation. Furthermore, we show that surprisingly, irrespective of any separation in the mean molecule numbers of various species, the conventional and hybrid master equations exactly agree for a class of chemical systems.

  11. A POLLUTION REDUCTION METHODOLOGY FOR CHEMICAL PROCESS SIMULATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pollution minimization methodology was developed for chemical process design using computer simulation. It is based on a pollution balance that at steady state is used to define a pollution index with units of mass of pollution per mass of products. The pollution balance has be...

  12. A POLLUTION REDUCTION METHODOLOGY FOR CHEMICAL PROCESS SIMULATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pollution minimization methodology was developed for chemical process design using computer simulation. It is based on a pollution balance that at steady state is used to define a pollution index with units of mass of pollution per mass of products. The pollution balance has be...

  13. In Situ Chemical Reduction for Organic Explosives in Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Amendment • Combines solid controlled-release carbon and nutrients (aerobic) or with micro-scale ZVI (anaerobic) • Stimulates indigenous bacteria by...herbicides • organic explosives • chlorinated solvents Aerobic • wood treatment chemicals ( PAHs & PCP) • manufactured gas plant PAHs • phthalates

  14. IN-SITU CHEMICAL OXIDATION - DNAPL MASS REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a rapidly developing technology used at hazardous waste sites where oxidants and complimentary reagents are injected into the subsurface to transform organic contaminants into less toxic byproducts. This technology is being used at new sites ...

  15. A pollution reduction methodology for chemical process simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, S.K.; Cabezas, H.; Bare, J.C.; Sikdar, S.K.

    1996-11-01

    A pollution minimization methodology was developed for chemical process design using computer simulation. It is based on a pollution balance that at steady state is used to define a pollution index with units of mass of pollution per mass of products. The pollution balance has been modified by weighing the mass flowrate of each pollutant by its potential environmental impact score. This converts the mass balance into an environmental impact balance. This balance defines an impact index with units of environmental impact per mass of products. The impact index measures the potential environmental effects of process wastes. Three different schemes for chemical ranking were considered: (1) no ranking, (2) simple ranking from 0 to 3, and (3) ranking by a scientifically derived measure of human health and environmental effects. Use of the methodology is illustrated with two examples from the production of (1) methyl ethyl ketone and (2) synthetic ammonia.

  16. GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN ALTERNATIVES ARE REVEALED USING THE WASTE REDUCTION DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (WAR DSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Waste Reduction Decision Support System (WAR DSS) is a Java-based software product providing comprehensive modeling of potential adverse environmental impacts (PEI) predicted to result from newly designed or redesigned chemical manufacturing processes. The purpose of this so...

  17. TRACI - THE TOOL FOR THE REDUCTION AND ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRACI, The Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts, is described along with its history, the underlying research, methodologies, and insights within individual impact categories. TRACI facilitates the characterization of stressors that ma...

  18. GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN ALTERNATIVES ARE REVEALED USING THE WASTE REDUCTION DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (WAR DSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Waste Reduction Decision Support System (WAR DSS) is a Java-based software product providing comprehensive modeling of potential adverse environmental impacts (PEI) predicted to result from newly designed or redesigned chemical manufacturing processes. The purpose of this so...

  19. TRACI - THE TOOL FOR THE REDUCTION AND ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRACI, The Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts, is described along with its history, the underlying research, methodologies, and insights within individual impact categories. TRACI facilitates the characterization of stressors that ma...

  20. Chemical reduction of europium(III) in hydrochloric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasyants, A.G.; Gurinov, Yu.S.; Sofenina, E.V.

    1988-07-10

    The authors have devised a method for use at set pH and temperature, in which the volume of hydrogen produced is recorded and samples are taken for europium(II) analysis. The solution is poured into a glass cell with a thermostatic jacket; argon is passed through a capillary tube 2 for 0.5 h before the reduction is started, with the bubbling rate determined from the change in level in a burette. This burette is also used to record the hydrogen volume. The europium(II) concentration is determined by titration with potassium dichromate by a standard method. Europium is reduced by zinc in acid solution. The zinc consumption in hydrogen production can be reduced by operating at pH 2-3, with the precipitant introduced after the reaction starts.

  1. Multiple time scale based reduction scheme for nonlinear chemical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D.; Ray, D. S.

    2013-07-01

    A chemical reaction is often characterized by multiple time scales governing the kinetics of reactants, products and intermediates. We eliminate the fast relaxing intermediates in autocatalytic reaction by transforming the original system into a new one in which the linearized part is diagonal. This allows us to reduce the dynamical system by identifying the associated time scales and subsequent adiabatic elimination of the fast modes. It has been shown that the reduced system sustains the robust qualitative signatures of the original system and at times the generic form of the return map for the chaotic system from which complex dynamics stems out in the original system can be identified. We illustrate the scheme for a three-variable cubic autocatalytic reaction and four-variable peroxidase-oxidase reaction.

  2. In-Situ Chemical Reduction and Oxidation of VOCs in Groundwater: Groundwater Treatability Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Amy; Glasgow, Jason; McCaleh, Rececca C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's treatability studies for volatile organic compounds in groundwater. In-Situ groundwater treatment technologies include: 1) Chemical Reduction(Ferox); 2) Chemical Oxidation (Fenton Reagents, Permanganate, and Persulfate); and 3) Thermal (Dynamic Underground Stripping, Six-Phase Heating). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  3. Reduction of Microbial and Chemical Contaminants in Water Using POU/POE & Mobile Treatment Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    POU/POE may be a cost-effective option for reductions of a particular chemical to achieve water quality compliance under certain situations and given restrictions. Proactive consumers seeking to reduce exposure to potential pathogens, trace chemicals, and nanoparticles not curre...

  4. Reduction of Microbial and Chemical Contaminants in Water Using POU/POE & Mobile Treatment Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    POU/POE may be a cost-effective option for reductions of a particular chemical to achieve water quality compliance under certain situations and given restrictions. Proactive consumers seeking to reduce exposure to potential pathogens, trace chemicals, and nanoparticles not curre...

  5. Reduction of substrate dependency of chemically amplified resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Jun-Sung; Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Baik, Ki-Ho

    1996-06-01

    In the case of silicon nitride films acid pretreatment can eliminate resist scum so that we can get clean resist profiles. The acid used, called Clean D treatment for photoresist strip, normally consists of a mixture of sulfuric acid (80% water) and hydrogen peroxide (80% water). ESCA (electron spectroscopy by chemical analysis) was used to examine the surface of the films after cleaning with acid and to monitor the changes in atomic percents of the films with time. Considering all the analytical data, this acid treatment to silicon nitride makes the film surface oxide-rich resulting in forming barrier layer between substrates and protons from PAG (photo acid generator). For BPSG boro-phosphorous silicate glass) films the mechanism of the formation of resist foot is quite different from that of silicon nitride. Improved resist profiles on BPSG were obtained by the dehydration bake. Therefore it could be speculated that the formation of resist scums on silicon nitride films are due to the nitrogen in films and on the BPSG moisture. O2 plasma surface pretreatment was also reviewed. It is quite certain that these two methods, acid and O2 plasma treatments are very effective, economical and simple process. However, there are delay time effects after pretreating films unlike other conventional oxide capping layers. This problem is also discussed in detail.

  6. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory--Chemical Management: A Method for Waste Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Stanley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods for reducing or eliminating waste disposal problems in the chemistry laboratory, considering both economic and environmental aspects of the problems. Proposes inventory control, shared use, solvent recycling, zero effluent, and various means of disposing of chemicals. (JM)

  7. Photochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, D.; Eisenberg, R.; Fujita, E.

    1996-09-01

    Photochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} represents a potentially useful approach to developing a sustainable source of carbon-based chemicals, fuels, and materials. In this report the present status of photochemical CO{sub 2} reduction is assessed, areas that need to be better understood for advancement are identified, and approaches to overcoming barriers are suggested. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this field, assessments of three closely interrelated areas are given including integrated photochemical systems for catalytic CO{sub 2} reduction, thermal catalytic CO{sub 2} reactions, and electrochemical CO{sub 2} reduction. The report concludes with a summary and assessment of potential impacts of this area on chemical and energy technologies.

  8. Recovery of Cu(II) by chemical reduction using sodium dithionite.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Hsuan; Yu, Jui-Hsuan; Liang, Yang-Min; Wang, Pin-Jan; Li, Chi-Wang; Chen, Shiao-Shing

    2015-12-01

    Wastewaters containing Cu(II) along with ligands are ubiquitous in various industrial sectors. Efficacy of treatment processes for copper removal, especially precipitation, is greatly debilitated by ligands. Chemical reduction being commonly employed for production of metal nanoparticles has also been used for removing copper. Addition of ammonia was reported to be essential for improving copper reduction efficiency by increasing copper solubility at alkaline pH values. In this study, chemical reduction was employed to treat ligand-containing wastewater, exploiting the fact that ligands and metals are coexisted in many wastewaters. Result shows that copper ions were removed by either reduction or precipitation mechanisms depending on pH, type of ligands, and mixing condition. Complete copper reduction/removal was achieved under optimal condition. The lowest removal efficiency observed at pH 9.0 for ammonia system is due to formation of nano-sized particles, which are readily to pass through 0.45μm filter used for sample pretreatment before copper analysis. Instead of producing metallic copper, cuprous and copper oxide are identified in the samples collected from ammonia system and EDTA system, respectively. Re-oxidation of metallic copper particles by atmospheric oxygen during sample handling or incomplete reduction of Cu(II) ions during reduction process might be the cause. Finally, reduction process was applied to treat real wastewater, achieving complete removal of copper but only 10% of nickel.

  9. Reduction study of oxidized two-dimensional graphene-based materials by chemical and thermal reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Amber M.

    Graphene is a two-dimensional (2D) sp2-hybridized carbon-based material possessing properties which include high electrical conductivity, ballistic thermal conductivity, tensile strength exceeding that of steel, high flexural strength, optical transparency, and the ability to adsorb and desorb atoms and molecules. Due to the characteristics of said material, graphene is a candidate for applications in integrated circuits, electrochromic devices, transparent conducting electrodes, desalination, solar cells, thermal management materials, polymer nanocomposites, and biosensors. Despite the above mentioned properties and possible applications, very few technologies have been commercialized utilizing graphene due to the high cost associated with the production of graphene. Therefore, a great deal of effort and research has been performed to produce a material that provides similar properties, reduced graphene oxide due (RGO) to the ease of commercial scaling of the production processes. This material is typically prepared through the oxidation of graphite in an aqueous media to graphene oxide (GO) followed by reduction to yield RGO. Although this material has been extensively studied, there is a lack of consistency in the scientific community regarding the analysis of the resulting RGO material. In this dissertation, a study of the reduction methods for GO and an alternate 2D carbon-based material, humic acid (HA), followed by analysis of the materials using Raman spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Means of reduction will include chemical and thermal methods. Characterization of the material has been carried out on both before and after reduction.

  10. Synthesis of renewable fine-chemical building blocks by reductive coupling between furfural derivatives and terpenes.

    PubMed

    Nicklaus, Céline M; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Feringa, Ben L; de Vries, Johannes G

    2013-09-01

    Sugar and Spice…: The use of renewable resources to produce fine chemicals is an underdeveloped area. A waste-free technology will be necessary to further convert platform chemicals, readily available from biomass. We show that furfurals, which can be obtained from C5 sugars, can be coupled with terpenes in up to 95% yield through ruthenium-catalyzed reductive couplings developed by Krische et al.

  11. Iron Isotope Fractionation Reveals Structural Change upon Microbial and Chemical Reduction of Nontronite NAu-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Wu, L.; Shi, B.; Smeaton, C. M.; Li, W.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.; Roden, E. E.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Iron (Fe) isotope fractionations were determined during reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-1 biologically by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and chemically by dithionite. ~10% reduction was achieved in biological reactors, with similar reduction extents obtained by dithionite. We hypothesize that two stages occurred in our reactors. Firstly, reduction started from edge sites of clays and the produced Fe(II) partially remained in situ and partially was released into solution. Next aqueous Fe(II) adsorbed onto basal planes. The basal sorbed Fe(II) then undergoes electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) with octahedral Fe(III) in clays, with the most negative fractionation factor Δ56Febasal Fe(II)-structural Fe(III)of -1.7‰ when basal sorption reached a threshold value. Secondly, when the most reactive Fe(III) was exhausted, bioreduction significantly slowed down and chemical reduction was able to achieve 24% due to diffusion of small size dithionite. Importantly, no ETAE occurred between basal Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) due to blockage of pathways by collapsed clay layers. This two-stage process in our reduction experiments is distinctive from abiotic exchange experiments by mixing aqueous Fe(II) and NAu-1, where no structural change of clay would block ETAE between basal Fe(II) and structural Fe(III). The separation of reduction sites (clay edges) and sorption sites (basal planes) is unique to clay minerals with layered structure. In contrast, reduction and sorption occur on the same sites on the surfaces of Fe oxyhydroxides, where reduction does not induce structure change. Thus, the Fe isotope fractionations are the same for reduction and abiotic exchange experiments for Fe oxides. Our study reveals important changes in electron transfer and atom exchange pathways upon reduction of clay minerals by dissimilatory Fe reducing bacteria, which is prevalent in anoxic soils and sediments.

  12. Reduction Kinetics of a CasO4 Based Oxygen Carrier for Chemical-Looping Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, R.; Song, Q. L.; Zheng, W. G.; Deng, Z. Y.; Shen, L. H.; Zhang, M. Y.

    The CaSO4 based oxygen carrier has been proposed as an alternative low cost oxygen carrier for Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of coal. The reduction of CaSO4 to CaS is an important step for the cyclic process of reduction/oxidation in CLC of coal with CaSO4 based oxygen carrier. Thermodynamic analysis of CaSO4 oxygen carrier with CO based on the principle of Gibbs free energy minimization show that the essentially high purity of CO2 can be obtained, while the solid product is CaS instead of CaO. The intrinsic reduction kinetics of a CaSO4 based oxygen carrier with CO was investigated in a differential fixed bed reactor. The effects of gas partial pressure (20%-70%) and temperature (880-950°C) on the reduction were investigated. The reduction was described with shrinking unreacted core model. Experimental results of CO partial pressure on the solid conversion show that the reduction of fresh oxygen carriers is of first order with respect to the CO partial pressure. Both chemical reaction control and product layer diffusion control determine the reduction rate. The dependences of reaction rate constant and effective diffusivity with temperature were both obtained. The kinetic equation well predicted the experimental data.

  13. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  14. A MIXED CHEMICAL REDUCTANT FOR TREATING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A CHROMITE ORE PROCESSING SOLID WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated a method for delivering ferrous iron into the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of Cr(VI) in a chromite ore processing solid waste (COPSW). The COPSW is characterized by high pH (8.5 -11.5), high Cr(VI) concentrations in the solid phase (up to 550 mg kg-1) and...

  15. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  16. A MIXED CHEMICAL REDUCTANT FOR TREATING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A CHROMITE ORE PROCESSING SOLID WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated a method for delivering ferrous iron into the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of Cr(VI) in a chromite ore processing solid waste (COPSW). The COPSW is characterized by high pH (8.5 -11.5), high Cr(VI) concentrations in the solid phase (up to 550 mg kg-1) and...

  17. Abiotic reduction reactions of anthropogenic organic chemicals in anaerobic systems: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macalady, Donald L.; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Grundl, Timothy J.

    1986-02-01

    This review is predicated upon the need for a detailed process-level understanding of factors influencing the reduction of anthropogenic organic chemicals in natural aquatic systems. In particular, abiotic reductions of anthropogenic organic chemicals are reviewed. The most important reductive reaction is alkyl dehalogenation (replacement of chloride with hydrogen) which occurs in organisms, sediments, sewage sludge, and reduced iron porphyrin model systems. An abiotic mechanism involving a free radical intermediate has been proposed. The abstraction of vicinal dihalides (also termed dehalogenation) is another reduction that may have an abiotic component in natural systems. Reductive dehalogenation of aryl halides has recently been reported and further study of this reaction is needed. Several other degradation reactions of organohalides that occur in anaerobic environments are mentioned, the most important of which is dehydrohalogenation. The reduction of nitro groups to amines has also been thoroughly studied. The reactions can occur abiotically, and are affected by the redox conditions of the experimental system. However, a relationship between nitro-reduction rate and measured redox potential has not been clearly established. Reductive dealkylation of the N- and O-heteroatom of hydrocarbon pollutants has been observed but not investigated in detail. Azo compounds can be reduced to their hydrazo derivatives and a thorough study of this reaction indicates that it can be caused by extracellular electron transfer agents. Quinone-hydroquinone couples are important reactive groups in humic materials and similar structures in resazurin and indigo carmine make them useful as models for environmental redox conditions. The interconversion of sulfones, sulfoxides, and sulfides is a redox process and is implicated in the degradation of several pesticides though the reactions need more study. Two reductive heterocyclic cleavage reactions are also mentioned. Finally, several

  18. Anaerobic baffled reactor coupled with chemical precipitation for treatment and toxicity reduction of industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Laohaprapanona, Sawanya; Marquesa, Marcia; Hogland, William

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the reduction of soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs) and the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), formaldehyde (FA) and nitrogen from highly polluted wastewater generated during cleaning procedures in wood floor manufacturing using a laboratory-scale biological anaerobic baffled reactor followed by chemical precipitation using MgCI2 .6H20 + Na2HPO4. By increasing the hydraulic retention time from 2.5 to 3.7 and 5 days, the reduction rates of FA, DOC and CODs of nearly 100%, 90% and 83%, respectively, were achieved. When the Mg:N:P molar ratio in the chemical treatment was changed from 1:1:1 to 1.3:1:1.3 at pH 8, the NH4+ removal rate increased from 80% to 98%. Biologically and chemically treated wastewater had no toxic effects on Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina whereas chemically treated wastewater inhibited germination of Lactuca sativa owing to a high salt content. Regardless of the high conductivity of the treated wastewater, combined biological and chemical treatment was found to be effective for the removal of the organic load and nitrogen, and to be simple to operate and to maintain. A combined process such as that investigated could be useful for on-site treatment of low volumes of highly polluted wastewater generated by the wood floor and wood furniture industries, for which there is no suitable on-site treatment option available today.

  19. Reduction of risk to the marine environment from oilfield chemicals - balancing environmental and technical needs

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, J.E.; Hill, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    The study argues that the regulation of offshore use of hazardous chemicals for oilfield stimulation and Completion applications is an important but not a total solution to reduce marine pollution from offshore sources. The aim of the study is to demonstrate that for a complete solution, chemical reformulation must be considered hand-in-band with improved operational practices to provide a maximum effect on overall risk reduction. The study is directed at one major service company`s approach to the whole issue of chemical management in the 1990s, based mainly on North Sea experience in cementing, drilling fluid and stimulation activities. Oilfield chemicals are incorporated into a fluid design to solve a specific technical problem in a well, such as well completion, stimulation and damage removal. While it is desirable to replace all the harmful chemicals, the practicalities of doing so are limited if the industry is to continue to produce efficiently. Other alternatives need consideration. By their very chemistry, some chemicals have primary active ingredients which may be harmful if discharged into the environment. Improving the characteristics of chemicals to marine life requires the change of previously acceptable products, such as the elimination of banned materials as well as incorporating components with reduced toxicity and greater biodegradability. The idealistic goal is the immediate replacement of all chemicals by nontoxic, biodegrade alternatives; the practical solution is replacement reformulation where possible and the improved isolation the oilwell and marine environments through improvements in continuous-mix technology along with reduction of the chemicals by better job design.

  20. Computing minimal entropy production trajectories: an approach to model reduction in chemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lebiedz, D

    2004-04-15

    Advanced experimental techniques in chemistry and physics provide increasing access to detailed deterministic mass action models for chemical reaction kinetics. Especially in complex technical or biochemical systems the huge amount of species and reaction pathways involved in a detailed modeling approach call for efficient methods of model reduction. These should be automatic and based on a firm mathematical analysis of the ordinary differential equations underlying the chemical kinetics in deterministic models. A main purpose of model reduction is to enable accurate numerical simulations of even high dimensional and spatially extended reaction systems. The latter include physical transport mechanisms and are modeled by partial differential equations. Their numerical solution for hundreds or thousands of species within a reasonable time will exceed computer capacities available now and in a foreseeable future. The central idea of model reduction is to replace the high dimensional dynamics by a low dimensional approximation with an appropriate degree of accuracy. Here I present a global approach to model reduction based on the concept of minimal entropy production and its numerical implementation. For given values of a single species concentration in a chemical system all other species concentrations are computed under the assumption that the system is as close as possible to its attractor, the thermodynamic equilibrium, in the sense that all modes of thermodynamic forces are maximally relaxed except the one, which drives the remaining system dynamics. This relaxation is expressed in terms of minimal entropy production for single reaction steps along phase space trajectories. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Development Of Chemical Reduction And Air Stripping Processes To Remove Mercury From Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Looney, Brian B.; Craig, Robert R.; Thompson, Martha C.; Kmetz, Thomas F.

    2013-07-10

    This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

  2. Computing minimal entropy production trajectories: An approach to model reduction in chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebiedz, D.

    2004-04-01

    Advanced experimental techniques in chemistry and physics provide increasing access to detailed deterministic mass action models for chemical reaction kinetics. Especially in complex technical or biochemical systems the huge amount of species and reaction pathways involved in a detailed modeling approach call for efficient methods of model reduction. These should be automatic and based on a firm mathematical analysis of the ordinary differential equations underlying the chemical kinetics in deterministic models. A main purpose of model reduction is to enable accurate numerical simulations of even high dimensional and spatially extended reaction systems. The latter include physical transport mechanisms and are modeled by partial differential equations. Their numerical solution for hundreds or thousands of species within a reasonable time will exceed computer capacities available now and in a foreseeable future. The central idea of model reduction is to replace the high dimensional dynamics by a low dimensional approximation with an appropriate degree of accuracy. Here I present a global approach to model reduction based on the concept of minimal entropy production and its numerical implementation. For given values of a single species concentration in a chemical system all other species concentrations are computed under the assumption that the system is as close as possible to its attractor, the thermodynamic equilibrium, in the sense that all modes of thermodynamic forces are maximally relaxed except the one, which drives the remaining system dynamics. This relaxation is expressed in terms of minimal entropy production for single reaction steps along phase space trajectories.

  3. In-situ chemical reduction produced graphene paper for flexible supercapacitors with impressive capacitive performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xingke; Zhu, Yucan; Tang, Zhonghua; Wan, Zhongquan; Jia, Chunyang

    2017-08-01

    For practical applications of graphene-based materials in flexible supercapacitors, a technological breakthrough is currently required to fabricate high-performance graphene paper by a facile method. Herein, highly conductive (∼6900 S m-1) graphene paper with loose multilayered structure is produced by a high-efficiency in-situ chemical reduction process, which assembles graphite oxide suspensions into film and simultaneously conducts chemical reduction. Graphene papers with different parameters (including different types and doses of reductants, different thicknesses and areas of films) are successfully fabricated through this in-situ chemical reduction method. Meanwhile, the influences of the graphene papers with different parameters upon the supercapacitor performance are systematically investigated. Flexible supercapacitor based on the graphene paper exhibits high areal capacitance (152.4 mF cm-2 at current density of 2.0 mA cm-2 in aqueous electrolyte), and excellent rate performance (88.7% retention at 8.0 mA cm-2). Furthermore, bracelet-shaped all-solid supercapacitor with fascinating cycling stability (96.6% retention after 10 000 cycles) and electrochemical stability (an almost negligible capacity loss under different bending states and 99.6% retention after 4000 bending cycles) is established by employing the graphene paper electrode material and polymer electrolyte.

  4. Performance of two swine manure treatment systems on chemical composition and on the reduction of pathogens.

    PubMed

    Viancelli, A; Kunz, A; Steinmetz, R L R; Kich, J D; Souza, C K; Canal, C W; Coldebella, A; Esteves, P A; Barardi, C R M

    2013-01-01

    Swine effluents must be correctly handled to avoid negative environmental impacts. In this study, the profiles of two swine manure treatment systems were evaluated: a solid-liquid separation step, followed by an anaerobic reactor, and an aerobic step (System 1); and a biodigester followed by serial lagoons (System 2). Both systems were described by the assessment of chemical, bacterial and viral parameters. The results showed that in System 1, there was reduction of chemicals (COD, phosphorus, total Kjeldhal nitrogen - TKN - and NH(3)), total coliforms and Escherichia coli; however, the same reduction was not observed for Salmonella sp. Viral particles were significantly reduced but not totally eliminated from the effluent. In System 2, there was a reduction of chemicals, bacteria and viruses with no detection of Salmonella sp., circovirus, parvovirus, and torque teno virus in the effluent. The chemical results indicate that the treated effluent can be reused for cleaning swine facilities. However, the microbiological results show a need of additional treatment to achieve a complete inactivation for cases when direct contact with animals is required.

  5. Fundamental limits on gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    In the plasma, the electrons do not react directly with the NOx molecules. The electrons collide mainly with the background gas molecules like N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Electron impact on these molecules result partly in dissociation reactions that produce reactive species like N, O and OH. The NOx in the engine exhaust gas initially consist mostly of NO. The ground state nitrogen atom, N, is the only species that could lead to the chemical reduction of NO to N{sub 2}. The O radical oxidizes NO to NO{sub 2} leaving the same amount of NOx. The OH radical converts NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. Acid products in the plasma can easily get adsorbed on surfaces in the plasma reactor and in the pipes. When undetected, the absence of these oxidation products can often be mistaken for chemical reduction of NOx. In this paper the authors will examine the gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx. They will show that under the best conditions, the plasma can chemically reduce 1.6 grams of NOx per brake-horsepower-hour [g(NOx)/bhp-hr] when 5% of the engine output energy is delivered to the plasma.

  6. Co and Mn decrease chemical and biological reduction rate of iron oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noureddine, Hiba; Fakih, Mohamad; Makhour, Yolla; Zeineddine, Dana; Bousserrhine, Noureddine

    Very few studies related to the solubilization of Fe (III) oxides substituted by Mn and Co, whereas such oxides are frequent in natural environment. In this present work, goethites substituted for various Mn and Co rates were synthesized and subjected to the reducing action, first, by chemical treatment, with a the dithionite-citratebicarbonate (CBD) reagent, and secondly, by biological treatment with Clostridium butyricum a fermentative Fe (III). The comparison of two processes showed that the dissolution rates of iron decreased with substitution. The study of the bacterial fermentative balance shows that substitution, its rate and its nature, does not influence the bacterial fermentative balance (total activity and number of electron produced were unchanged). However, it decreases the percentage of electrons engaged in the reduction process. This result demonstrates the control of the bacterial reduction of iron oxides by the cristallo-chemical characteristics of the latter.

  7. Analysis of long-term bacterial vs. chemical Fe(III) oxide reduction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2004-08-01

    Data from studies of dissimilatory bacterial (10 8 cells mL -1 of Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32, pH 6.8) and ascorbate (10 mM, pH 3.0) reduction of two synthetic Fe(III) oxide coated sands and three natural Fe(III) oxide-bearing subsurface materials (all at ca. 10 mmol Fe(III) L -1) were analyzed in relation to a generalized rate law for mineral dissolution (J t/m 0 = k'(m/m 0) γ, where J t is the rate of dissolution and/or reduction at time t, m 0 is the initial mass of oxide, and m/m 0 is the unreduced or undissolved mineral fraction) in order to evaluate changes in the apparent reactivity of Fe(III) oxides during long-term biological vs. chemical reduction. The natural Fe(III) oxide assemblages demonstrated larger changes in reactivity (higher γ values in the generalized rate law) compared to the synthetic oxides during long-term abiotic reductive dissolution. No such relationship was evident in the bacterial reduction experiments, in which temporal changes in the apparent reactivity of the natural and synthetic oxides were far greater (5-10 fold higher γ values) than in the abiotic reduction experiments. Kinetic and thermodynamic considerations indicated that neither the abundance of electron donor (lactate) nor the accumulation of aqueous end-products of oxide reduction (Fe(II), acetate, dissolved inorganic carbon) are likely to have posed significant limitations on the long-term kinetics of oxide reduction. Rather, accumulation of biogenic Fe(II) on residual oxide surfaces appeared to play a dominant role in governing the long-term kinetics of bacterial crystalline Fe(III) oxide reduction. The experimental findings together with numerical simulations support a conceptual model of bacterial Fe(III) oxide reduction kinetics that differs fundamentally from established models of abiotic Fe(III) oxide reductive dissolution, and indicate that information on Fe(III) oxide reactivity gained through abiotic reductive dissolution techniques cannot be used to

  8. Sulfa drugs inhibit sepiapterin reduction and chemical redox cycling by sepiapterin reductase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaojun; Jan, Yi-Hua; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R; Hossain, Muhammad M; Heindel, Ned D; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2015-03-01

    Sepiapterin reductase (SPR) catalyzes the reduction of sepiapterin to dihydrobiopterin (BH2), the precursor for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor critical for nitric oxide biosynthesis and alkylglycerol and aromatic amino acid metabolism. SPR also mediates chemical redox cycling, catalyzing one-electron reduction of redox-active chemicals, including quinones and bipyridinium herbicides (e.g., menadione, 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, and diquat); rapid reaction of the reduced radicals with molecular oxygen generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using recombinant human SPR, sulfonamide- and sulfonylurea-based sulfa drugs were found to be potent noncompetitive inhibitors of both sepiapterin reduction and redox cycling. The most potent inhibitors of sepiapterin reduction (IC50s = 31-180 nM) were sulfasalazine, sulfathiazole, sulfapyridine, sulfamethoxazole, and chlorpropamide. Higher concentrations of the sulfa drugs (IC50s = 0.37-19.4 μM) were required to inhibit redox cycling, presumably because of distinct mechanisms of sepiapterin reduction and redox cycling. In PC12 cells, which generate catecholamine and monoamine neurotransmitters via BH4-dependent amino acid hydroxylases, sulfa drugs inhibited both BH2/BH4 biosynthesis and redox cycling mediated by SPR. Inhibition of BH2/BH4 resulted in decreased production of dopamine and dopamine metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptamine. Sulfathiazole (200 μM) markedly suppressed neurotransmitter production, an effect reversed by BH4. These data suggest that SPR and BH4-dependent enzymes, are "off-targets" of sulfa drugs, which may underlie their untoward effects. The ability of the sulfa drugs to inhibit redox cycling may ameliorate ROS-mediated toxicity generated by redox active drugs and chemicals, contributing to their anti-inflammatory activity.

  9. Prospective life cycle assessment of graphene production by ultrasonication and chemical reduction.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Rickard; Kushnir, Duncan; Sandén, Björn A; Molander, Sverker

    2014-04-15

    One promising future bulk application of graphene is as composite additive. Therefore, we compare two production routes for in-solution graphene using a cradle-to-gate lifecycle assessment focusing on potential differences in energy use, blue water footprint, human toxicity, and ecotoxicity. The data used for the assessment is based on information in scientific papers and patents. Considering the prospective nature of this study, environmental impacts from background systems such as energy production were not included. The production routes are either based on ultrasonication or chemical reduction. The results show that the ultrasonication route has lower energy and water use, but higher human and ecotoxicity impacts, compared to the chemical reduction route. However, a sensitivity analysis showed that solvent recovery in the ultrasonication process gives lower impacts for all included impact categories. The sensitivity analysis also showed that solvent recovery is important to lower the blue water footprint of the chemical reduction route as well. The results demonstrate the possibility to conduct a life cycle assessment study based mainly on information from patents and scientific articles, enabling prospective life cycle assessment studies of products at early stages of technological development.

  10. Are sulfur isotope ratios sufficient to determine the antiquity of sulfate reduction. [implications for chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashendorf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Possible limitations on the use of sulfur isotope ratios in sedimentary sulfides to infer the evolution of microbial sulfate reduction are discussed. Current knowledge of the ways in which stable sulfur isotope ratios are altered by chemical and biological processes is examined, with attention given to the marine sulfur cycle involving various microbial populations, and sulfur reduction processes, and it is noted that satisfactory explanations of sulfur isotope ratios observed in live organisms and in sediments are not yet available. It is furthermore pointed out that all members of the same genus of sulfate reducing bacteria do not always fractionate sulfur to the same extent, that the extent of sulfur fractionation by many sulfate-reducing organisms has not yet been determined, and that inorganic processes can also affect sulfur isotope fractionation values. The information currently available is thus concluded to be insufficient to determine the time of initial appearance of biological sulfate reduction.

  11. Raman chemical imaging of chromate reduction sites in a single bacterium using intracellularly grown gold nanoislands.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Sandeep P; Henne, Kristene L; Thompson, Dorothea K; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-06-28

    Imaging live molecular events within micro-organisms at single-cell resolution would deliver valuable mechanistic information much needed in understanding key biological processes. We present a surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) chemical imaging strategy as a first step toward exploring the intracellular bioreduction pockets of toxic chromate in Shewanella. In order to achieve this, we take advantage of an innate reductive mechanism in bacteria of reducing gold ions into intracellular gold nanoislands, which provide the necessary enhancement for SERS imaging. We show that SERS has the sensitivity and selectivity not only to identify but also to differentiate between the two stable valence forms of chromate in cells. The imaging platform was used to understand intracellular metal reduction activities in a ubiquitous metal-reducing organism, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, by mapping chromate reduction.

  12. Are sulfur isotope ratios sufficient to determine the antiquity of sulfate reduction. [implications for chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashendorf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Possible limitations on the use of sulfur isotope ratios in sedimentary sulfides to infer the evolution of microbial sulfate reduction are discussed. Current knowledge of the ways in which stable sulfur isotope ratios are altered by chemical and biological processes is examined, with attention given to the marine sulfur cycle involving various microbial populations, and sulfur reduction processes, and it is noted that satisfactory explanations of sulfur isotope ratios observed in live organisms and in sediments are not yet available. It is furthermore pointed out that all members of the same genus of sulfate reducing bacteria do not always fractionate sulfur to the same extent, that the extent of sulfur fractionation by many sulfate-reducing organisms has not yet been determined, and that inorganic processes can also affect sulfur isotope fractionation values. The information currently available is thus concluded to be insufficient to determine the time of initial appearance of biological sulfate reduction.

  13. Influence of physical and chemical aquifer heterogeneity on nitrate reduction processes by numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbacher, T.; Jang, E.; He, W.; Savoy, H.; Schueth, C.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reduction reactions, as one of the most important redox reactions in a subsurface system, are strongly influenced by various heterogeneity factors which influence transport of chemical species and spatial distribution of redox substances and consequently have an effect on overall nitrate reduction capacity. In this presented work, the influence of two heterogeneity factors, spatially heterogeneity of hydrological parameters versus spatial heterogeneity of geochemical reactive substances distribution, are discussed with a focus on nitrate transport and redox transformation processes. For this purpose, a coupling interface OGS#IPhreeqc is employed. This code combines Finite-Element groundwater flow and multi-species transport code of OpenGeoSys (OGS) with the IPhreeqc module of open source geochemical solver PHREEQC. The resulting coupled model is applied for simulation of nitrate reduction processes with a series of hypothetical aquifer systems, built using exponentially-correlated log-normal distributed hydraulic conductivity and reactive substances. The spatially heterogeneous aquifer system is realized by a RandomFields package using a statistical program R. Results show that the heterogeneous hydraulics conductivity field has larger impact on nitrate reduction capacity than heterogeneous reactive substances distribution. Moreover, nitrate reduction capacity can be increased by enhanced mixing in heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field however its overall reduction capacity has gradually decreased as a degree of heterogeneity has increased since accessibility of the chemical species by the reactive substances may be limited. These results support that appropriate characterization of the variance of hydraulic conductivity within the aquifer is important to predict contaminant fate and transport and quantify the impact of uncertainty on numerical groundwater simulation.

  14. Chemical and Biological Interactions during Nitrate and Goethite Reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens 200

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D. Craig; Picardal, Flynn W.; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Coby, Aaron J.

    2003-01-01

    Although previous research has demonstrated that NO3− inhibits microbial Fe(III) reduction in laboratory cultures and natural sediments, the mechanisms of this inhibition have not been fully studied in an environmentally relevant medium that utilizes solid-phase, iron oxide minerals as a Fe(III) source. To study the dynamics of Fe and NO3− biogeochemistry when ferric (hydr)oxides are used as the Fe(III) source, Shewanella putrefaciens 200 was incubated under anoxic conditions in a low-ionic-strength, artificial groundwater medium with various amounts of NO3− and synthetic, high-surface-area goethite. Results showed that the presence of NO3− inhibited microbial goethite reduction more severely than it inhibited microbial reduction of the aqueous or microcrystalline sources of Fe(III) used in other studies. More interestingly, the presence of goethite also resulted in a twofold decrease in the rate of NO3− reduction, a 10-fold decrease in the rate of NO2− reduction, and a 20-fold increase in the amounts of N2O produced. Nitrogen stable isotope experiments that utilized δ15N values of N2O to distinguish between chemical and biological reduction of NO2− revealed that the N2O produced during NO2− or NO3− reduction in the presence of goethite was primarily of abiotic origin. These results indicate that concomitant microbial Fe(III) and NO3− reduction produces NO2− and Fe(II), which then abiotically react to reduce NO2− to N2O with the subsequent oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). PMID:12788758

  15. Removal of PCBs in contaminated soils by means of chemical reduction and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Rybnikova, V; Usman, M; Hanna, K

    2016-09-01

    Although the chemical reduction and advanced oxidation processes have been widely used individually, very few studies have assessed the combined reduction/oxidation approach for soil remediation. In the present study, experiments were performed in spiked sand and historically contaminated soil by using four synthetic nanoparticles (Fe(0), Fe/Ni, Fe3O4, Fe3 - x Ni x O4). These nanoparticles were tested firstly for reductive transformation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and then employed as catalysts to promote chemical oxidation reactions (H2O2 or persulfate). Obtained results indicated that bimetallic nanoparticles Fe/Ni showed the highest efficiency in reduction of PCB28 and PCB118 in spiked sand (97 and 79 %, respectively), whereas magnetite (Fe3O4) exhibited a high catalytic stability during the combined reduction/oxidation approach. In chemical oxidation, persulfate showed higher PCB degradation extent than hydrogen peroxide. As expected, the degradation efficiency was found to be limited in historically contaminated soil, where only Fe(0) and Fe/Ni particles exhibited reductive capability towards PCBs (13 and 18 %). In oxidation step, the highest degradation extents were obtained in presence of Fe(0) and Fe/Ni (18-19 %). The increase in particle and oxidant doses improved the efficiency of treatment, but overall degradation extents did not exceed 30 %, suggesting that only a small part of PCBs in soil was available for reaction with catalyst and/or oxidant. The use of organic solvent or cyclodextrin to improve the PCB availability in soil did not enhance degradation efficiency, underscoring the strong impact of soil matrix. Moreover, a better PCB degradation was observed in sand spiked with extractable organic matter separated from contaminated soil. In contrast to fractions with higher particle size (250-500 and <500 μm), no PCB degradation was observed in the finest fraction (≤250 μm) having higher organic matter content. These findings

  16. Strategies for emission reduction of air pollutants produced from a chemical plant.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeong-Kyu; Cho, Sung-Woong

    2003-01-01

    Various air pollution control (APC) techniques were employed in order to reduce emissions of air pollutants produced from chemical plants, which have many different chemical production facilities. For an emission reduction of acid gases, this study employed a method to improve solubility of pollutants by decreasing the operating temperature of the scrubbers, increasing the surface area for effective contact of gas and liquid, and modifying processes in the acid scrubbers. To reduce emission of both amines and acid gases, pollutant gas components were first separated, then condensation and/or acid scrubbing, depending on the chemical and physical properties of pollutant components, were used. To reduce emission of solvents, condensation and activated carbon adsorption were employed. To reduce emission of a mixture gases containing acid gases and solvents, the mixed gases were passed into the first condenser, the acid scrubber, the second condenser, and the activated carbon adsorption tower in sequence. As a strategy to reduce emission of pollutants at the source, this study also employed the simple pollution prevention concept of modification of the previously operating APC control device. Finally, air emissions of pollutants produced from the chemical plants were much more reduced by applying proper APC methods, depending upon the types (physical or chemical properties) and the specific emission situations of pollutants.

  17. Efficient parametric analysis of the chemical master equation through model order reduction.

    PubMed

    Waldherr, Steffen; Haasdonk, Bernard

    2012-07-02

    Stochastic biochemical reaction networks are commonly modelled by the chemical master equation, and can be simulated as first order linear differential equations through a finite state projection. Due to the very high state space dimension of these equations, numerical simulations are computationally expensive. This is a particular problem for analysis tasks requiring repeated simulations for different parameter values. Such tasks are computationally expensive to the point of infeasibility with the chemical master equation. In this article, we apply parametric model order reduction techniques in order to construct accurate low-dimensional parametric models of the chemical master equation. These surrogate models can be used in various parametric analysis task such as identifiability analysis, parameter estimation, or sensitivity analysis. As biological examples, we consider two models for gene regulation networks, a bistable switch and a network displaying stochastic oscillations. The results show that the parametric model reduction yields efficient models of stochastic biochemical reaction networks, and that these models can be useful for systems biology applications involving parametric analysis problems such as parameter exploration, optimization, estimation or sensitivity analysis.

  18. Reduction of nitrogen oxides from combustion source emissions utilizing chemical radical species

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.M.

    1992-05-01

    Injection of plasma-induced chemical radicals of ammonia, methane, hydrogen, steam and nitrogen into post-combustion gases for the purpose of NO{sub x} reduction has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. A kinetic mechanism has been developed for the fundamental reactions of C/H/N/O interaction in post-combustion gases. Numerical modeling has defined an optimal radical formation temperature of 2500 K, at which radical concentrations are formed and survive long enough to allow interaction with the flue gas NO. Comprehensive modeling has also explored the effectiveness and selectivity of ammonia derived radicals, particularly amidogen, in NO{sub x} reduction. Plasma induced radical generation eliminates the low temperature boundary found in current ammonia injection processes. Laboratory tests utilizing a DC arc discharge plasma generator have supported these results. Reduction of NO{sub x} from the product stream of a laboratory scale 1.4 MM BTU/hr combustor has been achieved in excess of 90%. Minimal torch power was used to produce this reduction with ammonia, ammonia/methane, and ammonia/hydrogen radicals at temperatures substantially below current ammonia injection mechanisms. Plasma induced radical generation does not appear to be limited by emission of unreacted ammonia, which is a primary limitation of Thermal-DeNO{sub x} and a substantial problem in inefficient catalytic reduction. Concurrent small scale testing employing an inductively heated plasma system have produced similar results. Numerical and experimental analyses of NO{sub x} reduction by nitrogen atom injection were also performed. Kinetic modeling predicted that nitrogen atom injection would be unsuccessful at any realistic nitrogen plasma temperature in the presence of carbon dioxide and oxygen. Carbon dioxide is a particular problem at lower temperatures. Experimental verification was provided during laboratory tests using nitrogen plasma and typical post-combustion gases.

  19. Synthesis of Hierarchical Nanoporous Microstructures via the Kirkendall Effect in Chemical Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ling; Pang, Chao; He, Dafang; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2015-11-01

    A series of novel hierarchical nanoporous microstructures have been synthesized through one-step chemical reduction of micron size Cu2O and Co3O4 particles. By controlling the reduction time, non-porous Cu2O microcubes sequentially transform to nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites and hollow eightling-like Cu microparticles. The mechanism involved in the complex structural evolution is explained based on oxygen diffusion and Kirkendall effect. The nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites exhibit superior electrochemical performance as compared to solid Cu2O microcubes. The reduction of nonporous Co3O4 also exhibits a uniform sequential reduction process from nonporous Co3O4 to porous Co3O4/CoO composites, porous CoO, porous CoO/Co composites, and porous foam-like Co particles. Nanoscale channels originate from the particle surface and eventually develop inside the entire product, resulting in porous foam-like Co microparticles. The Kirkendall effect is believed to facilitate the formation of porous structures in both processes.

  20. Synthesis of Hierarchical Nanoporous Microstructures via the Kirkendall Effect in Chemical Reduction Process

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ling; Pang, Chao; He, Dafang; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel hierarchical nanoporous microstructures have been synthesized through one-step chemical reduction of micron size Cu2O and Co3O4 particles. By controlling the reduction time, non-porous Cu2O microcubes sequentially transform to nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites and hollow eightling-like Cu microparticles. The mechanism involved in the complex structural evolution is explained based on oxygen diffusion and Kirkendall effect. The nanoporous Cu/Cu2O/Cu dented cubic composites exhibit superior electrochemical performance as compared to solid Cu2O microcubes. The reduction of nonporous Co3O4 also exhibits a uniform sequential reduction process from nonporous Co3O4 to porous Co3O4/CoO composites, porous CoO, porous CoO/Co composites, and porous foam-like Co particles. Nanoscale channels originate from the particle surface and eventually develop inside the entire product, resulting in porous foam-like Co microparticles. The Kirkendall effect is believed to facilitate the formation of porous structures in both processes. PMID:26552845

  1. Oxygen reduction reaction over silver particles with various morphologies and surface chemical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohyama, Junya; Okata, Yui; Watabe, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Makoto; Nakamura, Ayaka; Arikawa, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Ueda, Wataru; Satsuma, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an alkaline solution was carried out using Ag powders having various particle morphologies and surface chemical states (Size: ca. 40-110 nm in crystalline size. Shape: spherical, worm like, and angular. Surface: smooth with easily reduced AgOx, defective with AgOx, and Ag2CO3 surface layer). The various Ag powders were well characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and stripping voltammetry of underpotential-deposited lead. Defective and oxidized surfaces enhanced the Ag active surface area during the ORR. The ORR activity was affected by the morphology and surface chemical state: Ag particles with defective and angular surfaces showed smaller electron exchange number between three and four but showed higher specific activity compared to Ag particles with smooth surfaces.

  2. Synthesis of high magnetization Fe and FeCo nanoparticles by high temperature chemical reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kandapallil, B; Colborn, RE; Bonitatibus, PJ; Johnson, F

    2015-03-15

    Fe and FeCo ferromagnetic nanoparticles in the 5-10 nm size regimes featuring high magnetization were synthesized using a modified chemical reduction method. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were confirmed by XRD and TOM analysis. These small, monodisperse and phase pure nanoparticles exhibited magnetic saturation of 210 emu/g (Fe) and 220 emu/g (Fe+Co) for Fe and FeCo nanoparticles respectively. The magnetization was found to be dependent on the temperature at which the reducing agent was introduced. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved,

  3. IF-WS{sub 2} nanoparticles size design and synthesis via chemical reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoreishi, S.M.; Meshkat, S.S.; Dadkhah, A.A.

    2010-05-15

    An innovative synthesis of inorganic fullerene-like disulfide tungsten (IF-WS{sub 2}) nanoparticles was developed using a chemical reduction reaction in a horizontal quartz reactor. In this process, first tungsten trisulfide (WS{sub 3}) was formed via a chemical reaction of tetra thiotungstate ammonium ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}WS{sub 4}), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) at ambient temperature and pressure. Subsequently, WS{sub 3} was reacted with hydrogen (H{sub 2}) at high temperature (1173-1373 K) in a quartz tube. The produced WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characterization results indicated that the high-purity (100%) IF-WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were produced. Moreover, addition of surfactant (PEG) and higher operating temperature (1173-1373 K) decreased the particles agglomeration, and consequently led to the reduction of average diameter of WS{sub 2} particles in the range of 50-78 nm. The developed method is simple, environmentally compatible, and cost-effective in contrast to the conventional techniques.

  4. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure and chemical reduction on the emulsification properties of gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fanyi; Bell, Alan E; Davis, Fred J; Chai, Yunxi

    2015-04-15

    Gum arabic is widely used in the food industry as an additive, both as a thickener and an emulsifier. This study has compared the emulsification properties of two types of gums, KLTA (Acacia senegal) and GCA (Acacia seyal), both in their native/untreated forms and after exposure to high pressure (800 MPa). Further studies were undertaken to chemically modify the disulphide linkages present and to investigate the effects of their reduction on the diffusion of the carbohydrate materials. The emulsification properties of the gum samples were examined by determining the droplet size distribution in a "model" oil-in-water system. Results showed that high pressure treatment and chemical reduction of gums changed the emulsification properties of both gums. The high molecular weight component in arabinogalactan-proteins (AGP/GP), and more "branched" carbohydrates present in gum arabic, may be responsible for the emulsification properties of GCA gum, indicating that the emulsification mechanisms for KLTA and GCA were different. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Visible light Cr(VI) reduction and organic chemical oxidation by TiO2 photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Reddy, Ettireddy P; Smirniotis, Panagiotis G

    2005-08-15

    Here we report the simultaneous Cr(VI) reduction and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) oxidation in water under visible light (wavelength > 400 nm) using commercial Degussa P25 TiO2. This remarkable observation was attributed to a synergistic effect among TiO2, Cr(VI), and 4-CP. It is well known that TiO2 alone cannot remove either 4-CP or Cr(VI) efficiently under visible light. Moreover, the interaction between Cr(VI) and 4-CP is minimal if not negligible. However, we found that the combination of TiO2, Cr(VI), and 4-CP together can enable efficient Cr(VI) reduction and 4-CP oxidation under visible light. The specific roles of the three ingredients in the synergistic system were studied parametrically. It was found that optimal concentrations of Cr(VI) and TiO2 exist for the Cr(VI) reduction and 4-CP oxidation. Cr(VI) was compared experimentally with other metals such as Cu(ll), Fe(lll), Mn(IV), Ce(IV), and V(V). Among all these metal ions, only Cr(VI) promotes the photocatalytic oxidation of 4-CP. The amount of 4-CP removed was directly related to the initial concentration of Cr(VI). The system was also tested with four other chemicals (aniline, salicylic acid, formic acid, and diethyl phosphoramidate). We found that the same phenomenon occurred for organics containing acid and/or phenolic groups. Cr(VI) was reduced at the same time as the organic chemicals being oxidized during photoreaction under visible light. The synergistic effect was also found with pure anatase TiO2 and rutile TiO2. This study demonstrates a possible economical way for environmental cleanup under visible light.

  6. Reduction of chemical oxygen demand of industrial wastes using subcritical water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.C.; Chang, C.J. )

    1992-10-01

    If wastes have strong toxicity, high organic content, and a deep hue, they are difficult to handle in the waste disposal. It is very practical that waste of this kind is treated by Subcritical Water Oxidation (SWO). In our work, caprolactum (CPL) waste, purged from a petrochemical plant, and dyeing waste, purged from a textile plant, were individually treated by a semi-batch SWO process. Within a one-hour treatment, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) reduction reached 89% for CPL waste (6.90 MPa, 260[degree]C) and 95% for dyeing waste (6.90 MPa, 240[degree]C). There is also a great improvement in hue, especially for the dyeing waste. When CPL wastewater was treated by the SWO process using a chromium metal powder as a catalyst, COD reduction improved further under the same operating conditions. A kinetic model was used to illustrate the oxidation mechanism and the effectiveness of the catalyst. The oxygen concentration in the effluent showed that oxygen consumption corresponded to COD reduction. With the monitoring of concentrations of total soluble chromium in the effluent, a suitable reaction period could be found in order to meet the standard of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Stretching-based diagnostics and reduction of chemical kinetic models with diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Adrover, A. . E-mail: alex@giona.ing.uniroma1.it; Creta, F.; Giona, M.; Valorani, M.

    2007-08-10

    A new method for diagnostics and reduction of dynamical systems and chemical kinetic models is proposed. The method makes use of the local structure of the normal stretching rates by projecting the dynamics onto the local directions of maximal stretching. The approach is computationally very simple as it implies the spectral analysis of a symmetric matrix. Notwithstanding its simplicity, stretching-based analysis derives from a geometric basis grounded on the pointwise applications of concepts of normal hyperbolicity theory. As a byproduct, a simple reduction method is derived, equivalent to a 'local embedding algorithm', which is based on the local projection of the dynamics onto the 'most unstable and/or slow modes' compared to the time scale dictated by the local tangential dynamics. This method provides excellent results in the analysis and reduction of dynamical systems displaying relaxation towards an equilibrium point, limit cycles and chaotic attractors. Several numerical examples deriving from typical models of reaction/diffusion kinetics exhibiting complex dynamics are thoroughly addressed. The application to typical combustion models is also analyzed.

  8. Reduction kinetics of iron-based oxygen carriers using methane for chemical-looping combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Shuzhong; Wang, Longfei; Lv, Mingming

    2014-12-01

    The performance of three iron-based oxygen carriers (pure Fe2O3, synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 and iron ore) in reduction process using methane as fuel is investigated in thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The reaction rate and mechanism between three oxygen carriers and methane are investigated. On the basis of reactivity in reduction process, it may be concluded that Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 has the best reactivity with methane. The reaction rate constant is found to be in the following order: Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 > pure Fe2O3 > iron ore and the activation energy varies between 49 and 184 kJ mol-1. Reduction reactions for the pure Fe2O3 and synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 are well represented by the reaction controlling mechanism, and for the iron ore the phase-boundary controlled (contracting cylinder) model dominates. The particles of iron ore and synthetic Fe2O3/MgAl2O4 have better stability than that of pure Fe2O3 when the reaction temperature is limited to lower than 1223 K. These preliminary results suggest that iron-based mixed oxygen carrier particles are potential to be used in methane chemical looping process, but the reactivity of the iron ore needs to be increased.

  9. Reduction, partial evaporation, and spattering - Possible chemical and physical processes in fluid drop chondrule formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    The major chemical differences between fluid drop chondrules and their probable parent materials may have resulted from the loss of volatiles such as S, H2O, Fe, and volatile siderophile elements by partial evaporation during the chondrule-forming process. Vertical access solar furnace experiments in vacuum and hydrogen have demonstrated such chemical fractionation trends using standard rock samples. The formation of immiscible iron droplets and spherules by in situ reduction of iron from silicate melt and the subsequent evaporation of the iron have been observed directly. During the time that the main sample bead is molten, many small spatter spherules are thrown off the main bead, thereby producing many additional chondrule-like melt spherules that cool rapidly and generate a population of spherules with size frequency distribution characteristics that closely approximate some populations of fluid drop chondrules in chondrites. It is possible that spatter-produced fluid drop chondrules dominate the meteoritic fluid drop chondrule populations. Such meteoritic chondrule populations should be chemically related by various relative amounts of iron and other volatile loss by vapor fractionation.

  10. A new method to radiolabel natural organic matter by chemical reduction with tritiated sodium borohydride.

    PubMed

    Tinnacher, Ruth M; Honeyman, Bruce D

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method for labeling NOM with the radioisotope tritium (3H) using fulvic acid (FA) as the target NOM fraction. During labeling, FA ketone groups are chemically reduced with tritiated sodium borohydride (NaBH4), while the chemical functionality of the carboxyl and phenol groups is preserved. The labeling procedure was optimized in efficiency experiments that determined the excess concentration of tritiated NaBH4 required for optimum reduction conditions. The chemical characterization of the labeled FA product using FTIR and 1H NMR spectral analysis confirms the proposed reaction mechanism and rules out any significant amounts of impurities or undesirable side reactions. Results from size exclusion chromatography indicate thatthe tritium label is distributed uniformly over the whole molecular size range of FA and that it is stable over time and under various pH conditions. Potential differences in FA sorption behavior onto mineral surfaces due to labeling were excluded based on experimental data. This method produces NOM of high specific activity (e.g., 1.9 mCi mg(-1) FA); this permits the tracing of FA at a detection limit of 0.3 microg L(-1) FA.

  11. In situ observation of reduction kinetics and 2D mapping of chemical state for heterogeneous reduction in iron-ore sinters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Murao, R.; Ohta, N.; Noami, K.; Uemura, Y.; Niwa, Y.; Kimijima, K.; Takeichi, Y.; Nitani, H.

    2016-05-01

    Iron-ore sinters constitute the major component of the iron-bearing burden in blast furnaces, and the mechanism of their reduction is one of the key processes in iron making. The heterogeneous reduction of sintered oxides was investigated by the combination of X-ray fluorescence and absorption fine structure, X-ray diffraction, and computed tomography. Two - dimensional mapping of the chemical states (CSs) was performed. The iron CSs FeIII, FeII, and Fe0 exhibited a heterogeneous distribution in a reduced sinter. The reduction started near micro pores, at iron-oxide grains rather than calcium-ferrite ones. The heterogeneous reduction among grains in a sinter may cause the formation of micro cracks. These results provide fundamental insights into heterogeneous reduction schemes for iron-ore sinters.

  12. Dimensional reduction of the master equation for stochastic chemical networks: The reduced-multiplane method.

    PubMed

    Barzel, Baruch; Biham, Ofer; Kupferman, Raz; Lipshtat, Azi; Zait, Amir

    2010-08-01

    Chemical reaction networks which exhibit strong fluctuations are common in microscopic systems in which reactants appear in low copy numbers. The analysis of these networks requires stochastic methods, which come in two forms: direct integration of the master equation and Monte Carlo simulations. The master equation becomes infeasible for large networks because the number of equations increases exponentially with the number of reactive species. Monte Carlo methods, which are more efficient in integrating over the exponentially large phase space, also become impractical due to the large amounts of noisy data that need to be stored and analyzed. The recently introduced multiplane method [A. Lipshtat and O. Biham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 170601 (2004)] is an efficient framework for the stochastic analysis of large reaction networks. It is a dimensional reduction method, based on the master equation, which provides a dramatic reduction in the number of equations without compromising the accuracy of the results. The reduction is achieved by breaking the network into a set of maximal fully connected subnetworks (maximal cliques). A separate master equation is written for the reduced probability distribution associated with each clique, with suitable coupling terms between them. This method is highly efficient in the case of sparse networks, in which the maximal cliques tend to be small. However, in dense networks some of the cliques may be rather large and the dimensional reduction is not as effective. Furthermore, the derivation of the multiplane equations from the master equation is tedious and difficult. Here we present the reduced-multiplane method in which the maximal cliques are broken down to the fundamental two-vertex cliques. The number of equations is further reduced, making the method highly efficient even for dense networks. Moreover, the equations take a simpler form, which can be easily constructed using a diagrammatic procedure, for any desired network

  13. Distinguishing solid bitumens formed by thermochemical sulfate reduction and thermal chemical alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelemen, S.R.; Walters, C.C.; Kwiatek, P.J.; Afeworki, M.; Sansone, M.; Freund, H.; Pottorf, R.J.; Machel, H.G.; Zhang, T.; Ellis, G.S.; Tang, Y.; Peters, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Insoluble solid bitumens are organic residues that can form by the thermal chemical alteration (TCA) or thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) of migrated petroleum. TCA may actually encompass several low temperature processes, such as biodegradation and asphaltene precipitation, followed by thermal alteration. TSR is an abiotic redox reaction where petroleum is oxidized by sulfate. It is difficult to distinguish solid bitumens associated with TCA of petroleum from those associated with TSR when both processes occur at relatively high temperature. The focus of the present work was to characterize solid bitumen samples associated with TCA or TSR using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS is a surface analysis conducted on either isolated or in situ (>25 ??m diameter) solid bitumen that can provide the relative abundance and chemical speciation of carbon, organic and inorganic heteroatoms (NSO). In this study, naturally occurring solid bitumens from three locations, Nisku Fm. Brazeau River area (TSR-related), LaBarge Field Madison Fm. (TSR-related), and the Alaskan Brooks range (TCA-related), are compared to organic solids generated during laboratory simulation of the TSR and TCA processes. The abundance and chemical nature of organic nitrogen and sulfur in solid bitumens can be understood in terms of the nature of (1) petroleum precursor molecules, (2) the concentration of nitrogen by way of thermal stress and (3) the mode of sulfur incorporation. TCA solid bitumens originate from polar materials that are initially rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Aromaticity and nitrogen increase as thermal stress cleaves aliphatic moieties and condensation reactions take place. Organic sulfur in TCA organic solids remains fairly constant with increasing maturation (3.5 to ???17 sulfur per 100 carbons) into aromatic structures and to the low levels of nitrogen in their hydrocarbon precursors. Hence, XPS results provide organic chemical composition information that helps to

  14. Effects of process parameters in synthesizing Sn nanoparticles via chemical reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chee, Sang-Soo; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2012-02-01

    In order to prepare solder particles for fine pitch interconnections, Sn nanoparticles were synthesized via chemical reduction methods. A number of the process parameters, i.e., injection rate of a precursor solution, application of sonication, reaction temperature, types of reaction medium and capping agent, and drying temperature, are varied in order to study their effect on this process. Using a methanol solution containing 1,10-phenathroline monohydrate, the size of Sn nanoparticles collected after the synthesis decreases as the injection rate increases. An increase in the drying temperature strengthens the degree of agglomeration between Sn nanoparticles, and, in addition, the application of sonication accelerates the process of agglomeration and aggregation between nanoparticles during synthesis. Much smaller Sn nanoparticles are synthesized in diethylene-glycol solutions containing PVP, compared to the methanol solutions with 1,10-phenathroline monohydrate. In the synthesis using diethylene-glycol solutions, the Sn nanoparticle size increases quickly with the reaction temperature.

  15. Chemical treatment of plutonium with hydrogen peroxide before nitrate anion exchange processing. [Reduction to (IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Gallegos, T.D.

    1987-05-01

    The major aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility is anion exchange in nitric acid. This process is highly selective for plutonium; however, all plutonium must be as Pu(IV) to form the strongly sorbed anionic nitrato complex. The previous ''full-reduction treatment'' used at Los Alamos to obtain Pu(IV) results in a three- to fourfold increase in the feed solution volume and the introduction of kilogram quantities of extraneous salts immediately before a process whose function is to remove such impurities. That treatment has been successfully replaced by a single reagent, hydrogen peroxide, which converts all plutonium to Pu(IV), minimally increases the feed volume, and introduces no residual impurities. Safety aspects of this revised chemical treatment are addressed.

  16. Kondo effect in CoxCu1-x granular alloys prepared by chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Susmita; Chowdhury, Rajeswari Roy; Bandyopadhyay, Bilwadal

    2015-06-01

    Nanostructured CoCu granular alloys CoxCu1-x (x ≤ 0.3) have been prepared by chemical reduction method using NaBH4 as a reducing agent. Electronic transport properties are studied in the temperature range 4-300 K. Resistance exhibits a metallic behavior below room temperature and draws a minimum near 20 K in all the samples except in Co0.3Cu0.7. This low temperature resistivity minimum diminishes with applied magnetic field. There is also a logarithmic temperature dependence of resistivity at temperatures below 20 K. This phenomenon indicates a Kondo-like scattering mechanism involving magnetic Co impurity spin clusters in Cu host.

  17. Reduction and Uncertainty Analysis of Chemical Mechanisms Based on Local and Global Sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Gaetano

    Numerical simulations of critical reacting flow phenomena in hypersonic propulsion devices require accurate representation of finite-rate chemical kinetics. The chemical kinetic models available for hydrocarbon fuel combustion are rather large, involving hundreds of species and thousands of reactions. As a consequence, they cannot be used in multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamic calculations in the foreseeable future due to the prohibitive computational cost. In addition to the computational difficulties, it is also known that some fundamental chemical kinetic parameters of detailed models have significant level of uncertainty due to limited experimental data available and to poor understanding of interactions among kinetic parameters. In the present investigation, local and global sensitivity analysis techniques are employed to develop a systematic approach of reducing and analyzing detailed chemical kinetic models. Unlike previous studies in which skeletal model reduction was based on the separate analysis of simple cases, in this work a novel strategy based on Principal Component Analysis of local sensitivity values is presented. This new approach is capable of simultaneously taking into account all the relevant canonical combustion configurations over different composition, temperature and pressure conditions. Moreover, the procedure developed in this work represents the first documented inclusion of non-premixed extinction phenomena, which is of great relevance in hypersonic combustors, in an automated reduction algorithm. The application of the skeletal reduction to a detailed kinetic model consisting of 111 species in 784 reactions is demonstrated. The resulting reduced skeletal model of 37--38 species showed that the global ignition/propagation/extinction phenomena of ethylene-air mixtures can be predicted within an accuracy of 2% of the full detailed model. The problems of both understanding non-linear interactions between kinetic parameters and

  18. Dissociative electron transfer in polychlorinated aromatics. Reduction potentials from convolution analysis and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Romańczyk, Piotr P; Rotko, Grzegorz; Kurek, Stefan S

    2016-08-10

    Formal potentials of the first reduction leading to dechlorination in dimethylformamide were obtained from convolution analysis of voltammetric data and confirmed by quantum chemical calculations for a series of polychlorinated benzenes: hexachlorobenzene (-2.02 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc), pentachloroanisole (-2.14 V), and 2,4-dichlorophenoxy- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acids (-2.35 V and -2.34 V, respectively). The key parameters required to calculate the reduction potential, electron affinity and/or C-Cl bond dissociation energy, were computed at both DFT-D and CCSD(T)-F12 levels. Comparison of the obtained gas-phase energies and redox potentials with experiment enabled us to verify the relative energetics and the performance of various implicit solvent models. Good agreement with the experiment was achieved for redox potentials computed at the DFT-D level, but only for the stepwise mechanism owing to the error compensation. For the concerted electron transfer/C-Cl bond cleavage process, the application of a high level coupled cluster method is required. Quantum chemical calculations have also demonstrated the significant role of the π*ring and σ*C-Cl orbital mixing. It brings about the stabilisation of the non-planar, C2v-symmetric C6Cl6˙(-) radical anion, explains the experimentally observed low energy barrier and the transfer coefficient close to 0.5 for C6Cl5OCH3 in an electron transfer process followed by immediate C-Cl bond cleavage in solution, and an increase in the probability of dechlorination of di- and trichlorophenoxyacetic acids due to substantial population of the vibrational excited states corresponding to the out-of-plane C-Cl bending at ambient temperatures.

  19. Phoretic drag reduction of chemically active homogeneous spheres under force fields and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud; Kaynan, Uri

    2017-01-01

    Surrounded by a spherically symmetric solute cloud, chemically active homogeneous spheres do not undergo conventional autophoresis when suspended in an unbounded liquid domain. When exposed to external flows, solute advection deforms that cloud, resulting in a generally asymmetric distribution of diffusio-osmotic slip which, in turn, modifies particle motion. Inspired by classical forced-convection analyses [Acrivos and Taylor, Phys. Fluids 5, 387 (1962), 10.1063/1.1706630; Frankel and Acrivos, Phys. Fluids 11, 1913 (1968), 10.1063/1.1692218] we illustrate this phoretic phenomenon using two prototypic configurations, one where the particle sediments under a uniform force field and one where it is subject to a simple shear flow. In addition to the Péclet number Pe associated with the imposed flow, the governing nonlinear problem also depends upon α , the intrinsic Péclet number associated with the chemical activity of the particle. As in the forced-convection problems, the small-Péclet-number limit is nonuniform, breaking down at large distances away from the particle. Calculation of the leading-order autophoretic effects thus requires use of matched asymptotic expansions, the outer region being at distances that scale inversely with Pe and Pe1 /2 in the respective sedimentation and shear problems. In the sedimentation problem we find an effective drag reduction of fractional amount α /8 ; in the shear problem we find that the magnitude of the stresslet is decreased by a fractional amount α /4 . For a dilute particle suspension the latter result is manifested by a reduction of the effective viscosity.

  20. Chemical degradation and toxicity reduction of 4-chlorophenol in different matrices by gamma-ray treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung-Wook; Shim, Seung-Bo; Park, Young-Kwon; Jung, Jinho

    2011-03-01

    Gamma-ray treatment of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in different matrices was studied in terms of both chemical degradation and toxicity reduction. Degradation of 4-CP in a complex effluent matrix was less efficient than that in ultrapure water. This is most likely due to the consumption of reactive radicals by matrix components, such as dissolved organic matter in effluents. The matrix effect caused much more profound changes in toxicity. Gamma-ray treatment of 4-CP in ultrapure water abruptly increased acute toxicity toward Daphnia magna while slightly decreased toxicity of 4-CP in effluent. In the presence of ZrO 2 catalyst, degradation of 4-CP as well as toxicity reduction was substantially improved mostly by adsorption of 4-CP onto the nanoparticles. It was found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone and 4-chlorocatechol were generated for ultrapure water sample while only 4-chlorocatechol was formed for effluent samples by gamma-ray treatment. As determined in this work, EC 50 values of benzoquinone (0.46 μM), hydroquinone (0.61 μM) and chlorocatechol (8.87 μM) were much lower than those of 4-CP (31.50 μM), explaining different toxicity changes of 4-CP in different matrices by gamma-ray treatment. The observed toxicity of gamma-ray treated 4-CP was well correlated with the one calculated from individual toxicity based on EC 50 value.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of silver/talc nanocomposites using the wet chemical reduction method.

    PubMed

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Yunus, Wan Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Darroudi, Majid

    2010-10-05

    In this study, silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were synthesized using the wet chemical reduction method on the external surface layer of talc mineral as a solid support. Silver nitrate and sodium borohydride were used as the silver precursor and reducing agent in talc. The talc was suspended in aqueous AgNO(3) solution. After the absorption of Ag(+) on the surface, the ions were reduced with NaBH(4). The interlamellar space limits were without many changes (d(s) = 9.34-9.19 A(º)); therefore, Ag-NPs formed on the exterior surface of talc, with d(ave) = 7.60-13.11 nm in diameter. The properties of Ag/talc nanocomposites (Ag/talc-NCs) and the diameters of the Ag-NPs prepared in this way depended on the primary AgNO(3) concentration. The prepared Ag-NPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared. These Ag/talc-NCs may have potential applications in the chemical and biological industries.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of silver/talc nanocomposites using the wet chemical reduction method

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Yunus, Wan Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Darroudi, Majid

    2010-01-01

    In this study, silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were synthesized using the wet chemical reduction method on the external surface layer of talc mineral as a solid support. Silver nitrate and sodium borohydride were used as the silver precursor and reducing agent in talc. The talc was suspended in aqueous AgNO3 solution. After the absorption of Ag+ on the surface, the ions were reduced with NaBH4. The interlamellar space limits were without many changes (ds = 9.34–9.19 Aº); therefore, Ag-NPs formed on the exterior surface of talc, with dave = 7.60–13.11 nm in diameter. The properties of Ag/talc nanocomposites (Ag/talc-NCs) and the diameters of the Ag-NPs prepared in this way depended on the primary AgNO3 concentration. The prepared Ag-NPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared. These Ag/talc-NCs may have potential applications in the chemical and biological industries. PMID:21042420

  3. Reduction of chemical formulas from the isotopic peak distributions of high-resolution mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Roussis, Stilianos G; Proulx, Richard

    2003-03-15

    A method has been developed for the reduction of the chemical formulas of compounds in complex mixtures from the isotopic peak distributions of high-resolution mass spectra. The method is based on the principle that the observed isotopic peak distribution of a mixture of compounds is a linear combination of the isotopic peak distributions of the individual compounds in the mixture. All possible chemical formulas that meet specific criteria (e.g., type and number of atoms in structure, limits of unsaturation, etc.) are enumerated, and theoretical isotopic peak distributions are generated for each formula. The relative amount of each formula is obtained from the accurately measured isotopic peak distribution and the calculated isotopic peak distributions of all candidate formulas. The formulas of compounds in simple spectra, where peak components are fully resolved, are rapidly determined by direct comparison of the calculated and experimental isotopic peak distributions. The singular value decomposition linear algebra method is used to determine the contributions of compounds in complex spectra containing unresolved peak components. The principles of the approach and typical application examples are presented. The method is most useful for the characterization of complex spectra containing partially resolved peaks and structures with multiisotopic elements.

  4. Multifunctional polymer-metal nanocomposites via direct chemical reduction by conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ping; Han, Xijiang; Zhang, Bin; Du, Yunchen; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2014-03-07

    Noble metal nanoparticles (MNPs) have attracted continuous attention due to their promising applications in chemistry, physics, bioscience, medicine and materials science. As an alternative to conventional solution chemistry routes, MNPs can be directly synthesized through a conjugated polymer (CP) mediated technique utilizing the redox chemistry of CPs to chemically reduce the metal ions and modulate the size, morphology, and structure of the MNPs. The as-prepared multifunctional CP-MNP nanocomposites have shown application potentials as highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates, effective heterogeneous catalysts for organic synthesis and electrochemistry, and key components for electronic and sensing devices. In this tutorial review, we begin with a brief introduction to the chemical nature and redox properties of CPs that enable the spontaneous reduction of noble metal ions to form MNPs. We then focus on recent progress in control over the size, morphology and structure of MNPs during the conjugated polymer mediated syntheses of CP-MNP nanocomposites. Finally, we highlight the multifunctional CP-MNP nanocomposites toward their applications in sensing, catalysis, and electronic devices.

  5. Chemical Noise Reduction via Mass Spectrometry and Ion/Ion Charge Inversion: Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, Kerry M.; LeBlanc, Yves C.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Charge inversion ion/ion reactions can provide a significant reduction in chemical noise associated with mass spectra derived from complex mixtures for species comprised of both acidic and basic sites, provided the ions derived from the matrix largely undergo neutralization. Amino acids constitute an important class of amphoteric compounds that undergo relatively efficient charge inversion. Precipitated plasma constitutes a relatively complex biological matrix that yields detectable signals at essentially every mass-to-charge value over a wide range. This chemical noise can be dramatically reduced by using multiply-charged reagent ions that can invert the charge of species amenable to the transfer of multiple charges upon a single interaction and by detecting product ions of opposite polarity. The principle is illustrated here with amino acids present in precipitated plasma subjected to ionization in the positive mode, reaction with anions derived from negative nano-electrospray ionization of poly (amido amine) dendrimer generation 3.5, and mass analysis in the negative ion mode. PMID:21456599

  6. Sequential repetitive chemical reduction technique to study size-property relationships of graphene attached Ag nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, M. Salman; Badejo, Abimbola Comfort; Shao, Godlisten N.; Imran, S. M.; Abbas, Nadir; Chai, Young Gyu; Hussain, Manwar; Kim, Hee Taik

    2015-06-01

    The present study demonstrates a novel, systematic and application route synthesis approach to develop size-property relationship and control the growth of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) embedded on reduced graphene oxide (rGO). A sequential repetitive chemical reduction technique to observe the growth of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) attached to rGO, was performed on a single solution of graphene oxide (GO) and silver nitrate solution (7 runs, R1-R7) in order to manipulate the growth and size of the AgNPs. The physical-chemical properties of the samples were examined by RAMAN, XPS, XRD, SEM-EDAX, and HRTEM analyses. It was confirmed that AgNPs with diameter varying from 4 nm in first run (R1) to 50 nm in seventh run (R7) can be obtained using this technique. A major correlation between particle size and activities was also observed. Antibacterial activities of the samples were carried out to investigate the disinfection performance of the samples on the Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli). It was suggested that the sample obtained in the third run (R3) exhibited the highest antibacterial activity as compared to other samples, toward disinfection of bacteria due to its superior properties. This study provides a unique and novel application route to synthesize and control size of AgNPs embedded on graphene for various applications.

  7. Mantle strain localisation induced by grain size reduction due to chemical unbalance between olivine and clinopyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Précigout, Jacques; Stünitz, Holger; Le Breton, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    Mantle strain localisation plays a key role for the lithosphere dynamics. Though, its origin in the viscous regime remains unknown. Based on experimental data, we show that chemical unbalance between clinopyroxene (Cpx) and olivine (Ol) can trigger viscous strain localisation in the conditions of the lithospheric mantle. Using a solid-medium Griggs-type apparatus, we performed direct shear deformation at 900°C, 1.2 GPa and 2.10-5 s-1, on mineral aggregates composed of 70% Ol (Fo91) and 30% Cpx (diopside). During deformation, the strain-stress curve is characterised by a peak of differential stress around 900 MPa, followed by a weakening of several hundred of MPa until a plateau is reached. This weakening correlates with intense strain localisation within the sample where grain size has been strongly reduced, particularly within fine-grained layers of two-phase material. The grain size in these layers is far below one micron. Microprobe analyses indicate that Ol and Cpx compose these layers, as well, but their composition differs from the starting material, and especially for Cpx. Indeed, while starting Cpx have XMg (Mg/(Mg+Fe)) between 0.970 and 0.982, the XMg of deformed CPx ranges from 0.925 to 0.970. Furthermore, the XMg in Cpx systematically decreases as strain increases. We then performed PerpleX calculations that give the theoretical compositions for Ol and Cpx considering our bulk composition at 900°C and 1.2 GPa. Our results show that the compositions of starting Cpx have significantly shifted towards the theoretical equilibrium during deformation, highlighting a chemical unbalance between Ol and Cpx at the onset of deformation. We attribute the nucleation of new Ol and Cpx to this chemical unbalance, which probably promoted strain to localise as a result of grain size reduction and coeval change of deformation mechanism from dislocation creep to diffusion creep.

  8. Implications of Arctic Sea Ice Reduction on Arctic Tropospheric Chemical Change (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.

    2009-12-01

    We examine the drastic reduction of Arctic sea ice in this decade and discuss the potential implications on bromine, ozone, and mercury change in the Arctic troposphere. We are witnessing extraordinary change in the Arctic sea ice cover. In the context of a half century change, perennial sea ice, the class of thicker and older ice important to the stability of Arctic sea ice, has been declining precipitously in this decade. Perennial ice extent declines at rate of 0.5 million km2 per decade in the 1970s-1990s while there is no discernable trend in the 1950s-1960s. Abruptly, the rate of decrease has tripled to 1.5 million km2 per decade in the 2000s. A record was set in the reduction of Arctic perennial ice extent in winter 2008. By 1 March 2008, perennial ice extent was reduced by one million km2 compared to that at the same time in 2007, which continued the precipitous declining trend observed in this decade. While the record low of total ice extent in summer 2007 is a historical mark of sea ice loss, the distribution and extent of different sea ice classes in spring (March-May) are critical information to understand the implications of sea ice reduction on photochemical processes, such as bromine explosions, ozone depletion episodes (ODEs), gaseous elementary mercury depletion episodes (MDEs), which occur at the time of polar sunrise. In this regard, the drastic reduction of perennial ice means that the Arctic becomes dominated by seasonal ice consisting of thinner ice, more leads, polynyas, frost flowers, and salty snow (due to seawater spray from open water), representing the overall saltier condition of the Arctic sea ice cover conducive to ice-mediated chemical processes leading to Arctic tropospheric ODEs and MDEs. To date (2009), the extent of perennial sea ice remains low and the extent of the thinner and saltier seasonal ice continues to dominate the Arctic sea ice cover. The shift of the state of Arctic sea ice cover to the dominance domain of seasonal

  9. Dimensional reduction of the master equation for stochastic chemical networks: The reduced-multiplane method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzel, Baruch; Biham, Ofer; Kupferman, Raz; Lipshtat, Azi; Zait, Amir

    2010-08-01

    Chemical reaction networks which exhibit strong fluctuations are common in microscopic systems in which reactants appear in low copy numbers. The analysis of these networks requires stochastic methods, which come in two forms: direct integration of the master equation and Monte Carlo simulations. The master equation becomes infeasible for large networks because the number of equations increases exponentially with the number of reactive species. Monte Carlo methods, which are more efficient in integrating over the exponentially large phase space, also become impractical due to the large amounts of noisy data that need to be stored and analyzed. The recently introduced multiplane method [A. Lipshtat and O. Biham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 170601 (2004)10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.170601] is an efficient framework for the stochastic analysis of large reaction networks. It is a dimensional reduction method, based on the master equation, which provides a dramatic reduction in the number of equations without compromising the accuracy of the results. The reduction is achieved by breaking the network into a set of maximal fully connected subnetworks (maximal cliques). A separate master equation is written for the reduced probability distribution associated with each clique, with suitable coupling terms between them. This method is highly efficient in the case of sparse networks, in which the maximal cliques tend to be small. However, in dense networks some of the cliques may be rather large and the dimensional reduction is not as effective. Furthermore, the derivation of the multiplane equations from the master equation is tedious and difficult. Here we present the reduced-multiplane method in which the maximal cliques are broken down to the fundamental two-vertex cliques. The number of equations is further reduced, making the method highly efficient even for dense networks. Moreover, the equations take a simpler form, which can be easily constructed using a diagrammatic procedure

  10. The invariant constrained equilibrium edge preimage curve method for the dimension reduction of chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhuyin; Pope, Stephen B.; Vladimirsky, Alexander; Guckenheimer, John M.

    2006-03-01

    This work addresses the construction and use of low-dimensional invariant manifolds to simplify complex chemical kinetics. Typically, chemical kinetic systems have a wide range of time scales. As a consequence, reaction trajectories rapidly approach a hierarchy of attracting manifolds of decreasing dimension in the full composition space. In previous research, several different methods have been proposed to identify these low-dimensional attracting manifolds. Here we propose a new method based on an invariant constrained equilibrium edge (ICE) manifold. This manifold (of dimension nr) is generated by the reaction trajectories emanating from its (nr-1)-dimensional edge, on which the composition is in a constrained equilibrium state. A reasonable choice of the nr represented variables (e.g., nr "major" species) ensures that there exists a unique point on the ICE manifold corresponding to each realizable value of the represented variables. The process of identifying this point is referred to as species reconstruction. A second contribution of this work is a local method of species reconstruction, called ICE-PIC, which is based on the ICE manifold and uses preimage curves (PICs). The ICE-PIC method is local in the sense that species reconstruction can be performed without generating the whole of the manifold (or a significant portion thereof). The ICE-PIC method is the first approach that locally determines points on a low-dimensional invariant manifold, and its application to high-dimensional chemical systems is straightforward. The "inputs" to the method are the detailed kinetic mechanism and the chosen reduced representation (e.g., some major species). The ICE-PIC method is illustrated and demonstrated using an idealized H2/O system with six chemical species. It is then tested and compared to three other dimension-reduction methods for the test case of a one-dimensional premixed laminar flame of stoichiometric hydrogen/air, which is described by a detailed mechanism

  11. The invariant constrained equilibrium edge preimage curve method for the dimension reduction of chemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhuyin; Pope, Stephen B; Vladimirsky, Alexander; Guckenheimer, John M

    2006-03-21

    This work addresses the construction and use of low-dimensional invariant manifolds to simplify complex chemical kinetics. Typically, chemical kinetic systems have a wide range of time scales. As a consequence, reaction trajectories rapidly approach a hierarchy of attracting manifolds of decreasing dimension in the full composition space. In previous research, several different methods have been proposed to identify these low-dimensional attracting manifolds. Here we propose a new method based on an invariant constrained equilibrium edge (ICE) manifold. This manifold (of dimension nr) is generated by the reaction trajectories emanating from its (nr-1)-dimensional edge, on which the composition is in a constrained equilibrium state. A reasonable choice of the nr represented variables (e.g., nr "major" species) ensures that there exists a unique point on the ICE manifold corresponding to each realizable value of the represented variables. The process of identifying this point is referred to as species reconstruction. A second contribution of this work is a local method of species reconstruction, called ICE-PIC, which is based on the ICE manifold and uses preimage curves (PICs). The ICE-PIC method is local in the sense that species reconstruction can be performed without generating the whole of the manifold (or a significant portion thereof). The ICE-PIC method is the first approach that locally determines points on a low-dimensional invariant manifold, and its application to high-dimensional chemical systems is straightforward. The "inputs" to the method are the detailed kinetic mechanism and the chosen reduced representation (e.g., some major species). The ICE-PIC method is illustrated and demonstrated using an idealized H2O system with six chemical species. It is then tested and compared to three other dimension-reduction methods for the test case of a one-dimensional premixed laminar flame of stoichiometric hydrogen/air, which is described by a detailed mechanism

  12. Ultrasound improves chemical reduction of natural contaminant microbiota and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica on strawberries.

    PubMed

    do Rosário, Denes Kaic Alves; da Silva Mutz, Yhan; Peixoto, Jaqueline Moreira Curtis; Oliveira, Syllas Borburema Silva; de Carvalho, Raquel Vieira; Carneiro, Joel Camilo Souza; de São José, Jackline Freitas Brilhante; Bernardes, Patrícia Campos

    2017-01-16

    New sanitization methods have been evaluated to improve food safety and food quality and to replace chlorine compounds. However, these new methods can lead to physicochemical and sensory changes in fruits and vegetables. The present study evaluated the effects of acetic acid, peracetic acid, and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate isolated or combined with 5min of ultrasound treatment (40kHz, 500W) on strawberry quality over 9days of storage at 8°C. The strawberry natural contaminant microbiota (molds and yeasts, mesophilic aerobic and lactic acid bacteria), physicochemical quality (pH, total titratable acidity, total soluble solids, vitamin C, and color), sensory quality (triangle test) and inactivation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica intentionally inoculated onto strawberries were analyzed. Ultrasound increased the effect of all chemical compounds in the reduction of aerobic mesophilic, molds and yeasts. The best treatment for those groups of microorganisms was ultrasound combined with peracetic acid (US+PA) that reduced 1.8 and 2.0logcfu/g during 9days of storage. Bactericidal effect of peracetic acid was also improved by ultrasound inactivation of S. enterica, reaching a decimal reduction of 2.1logcfu/g. Moreover, synergistic effects were observed in contaminant natural microbiota inactivation for all tested compounds during storage, without any major physicochemical or sensory alteration to the strawberries. Therefore, ultrasound treatment can improve the effect of sanitizers that are substitutes of chlorine compounds without altering the quality of strawberries during storage. Acetic acid (PubChem CID: 176); Peracetic acid (PubChem CID: 6585); Sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (PubChem CID: 18372154). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process.

    PubMed

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The association of the original OSHA chemical hazard communication standard with reductions in acute work injuries/illnesses in private industry and the industrial releases of chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Oleinick, Arthur

    2014-02-01

    OSHA predicted the original chemical Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) would cumulatively reduce the lost workday acute injury/illness rate for exposure events by 20% over 20 years and reduce exposure to chemical carcinogens. JoinPoint trend software identified changes in the rate of change of BLS rates for days away from work for acute injuries/illnesses during 1992-2009 for manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries for both chemical, noxious or allergenic injury exposure events and All other exposure events. The annual percent change in the rates was used to adjust observed numbers of cases to estimate their association with the standard. A case-control study of EPA's Toxic Release Inventory 1988-2009 data compared carcinogen and non-carcinogens' releases. The study estimates that the HCS was associated with a reduction in the number of acute injuries/illnesses due to chemical injury exposure events over the background rate in the range 107,569-459,395 (Hudson method/modified BIC model) depending on whether the HCS is treated as a marginal or sole factor in the decrease. Carcinogen releases have declined at a substantially faster rate than control non-carcinogens. The previous HCS standard was associated with significant reductions in chemical event acute injuries/illnesses and chemical carcinogen exposures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Magnetite Fe3O4 nanoparticles synthesis by wet chemical reduction and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaki, S. H.; Malek, Tasmira J.; Chaudhary, M. D.; Tailor, J. P.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    The authors report the synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles by wet chemical reduction technique at ambient temperature and its characterization. Ferric chloride hexa-hydrate (FeCl3 · 6H2O) and sodium boro-hydrate (NaBH4) were used for synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles at ambient temperature. The elemental composition of the synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles was determined by energy dispersive analysis of x-rays technique. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was used for structural characterization of the nanoparticles. The crystallite size of the nanoparticles was determined using XRD data employing Scherrer’s formula and Hall-Williamson’s plot. Surface morphology of as-synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied by scanning electron microscopy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the as-synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles showed narrow range of particles size distribution. The optical absorption of the synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique for absorption band study in the infrared region. The magnetic properties of the as-synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles were evaluated by vibrating sample magnetometer technique. The thermal stability of the as-synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied by thermogravimetric technique. The obtained results are elaborated and discussed in details in this paper.

  16. Deposition of silver nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by chemical reduction process and their antimicrobial effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Adawiya J.; Thamir, Amin D.; Ahmed, Duha S.; Mohammad, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the functionalization of raw-MWCNTs involves oxidation reaction using concentrated acid mixture of HNO3:H2SO4 (1:3), via ultrasonic bath (170 W, 50 kHz) to obtain functional groups. Then Ag nanoparticles are decorated the outside over the surface of functionalized MWCNTs using a chemical reduction process resulting in the formation of(Ag/ MWCNTs) hybrid material. The results showed that outer diameter functionalized F-MWCNTs andAg nanoparticles size was about (11-80) nm and (10 to 25) nm, respectively using TEM and HRTEM. The crystallographic structure of MWCNTs using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis proved diffraction peaks at 38.1°, 44.3°, 64.7° and 77.4° degrees namely, Ag (111), Ag (200), Ag (220), and Ag (311) of the face-centered cubic lattice of Ag, respectively, excepting the peak at 2θ =25.6°, which correspond to the (0 0 2) reflection of the MWNTs are corresponding to Ag/MWNTs. The antimicrobial activities of Ag/MWCNTs hybrid using plate count method showed that decreasing a large number of bacteria colonies of E. coli and S. aureu with increasing the hybrid concentrations after incubation for 24h in shaker incubator with percentage of inhibition approaching 100%.

  17. Studies on copper-yttria nanocomposites: high-energy ball milling versus chemical reduction method.

    PubMed

    Joshi, P B; Rehani, Bharati; Naik, Palak; Patel, Swati; Khanna, P K

    2012-03-01

    Oxide dispersion-strengthened copper-base composites are widely used for applications demanding high tensile strength, high hardness along with good electrical and thermal conductivity. Oxides of metals like aluminium, cerium, yttrium and zirconium are often used for this purpose as fine and uniformly distributed dispersoid particles in soft and ductile copper matrix. Such composites find applications as electrical contacts, resistance-welding tips, lead wires, continuous casting moulds, etc. In this investigation an attempt has been made to produce copper-yttria nanocomposites using two different morphologies of copper powder and two different processing routes namely, high-energy milling and in-situ chemical reduction. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for their phase identification and morphological study. The nanocomposite powders in each case were subsequently processed to obtain bulk solids by classical powder metallurgy route of press-sinter-repress. The resultant bulk solid compacts were subjected to property evaluation. The study revealed that the properties of Cu-Y2O3 nanocomposites depend on the processing route used and in turn on the resultant powder morphology.

  18. Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 cathode material synthesized by chemical reduction and lithiation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun-Chao; Li, Xin-Hai; Wang, Zhi-Xing; Guo, Hua-Jun; Hu, Qi-Yang; Peng, Wen-Jie

    The monoclinic-type Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 cathode material was synthesized via calcining amorphous Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 obtained by chemical reduction and lithiation of V 2O 5 using oxalic acid as reducer and lithium carbonate as lithium source in alcohol solution. The amorphous Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 precursor was characterized by using TG-DSC and XPS. The results showed that the V 5+ was reduced to V 3+ by oxalic acid at ambient temperature and pressure. The prepared Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 was characterized by XRD and SEM. The results indicated the Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 powder had good crystallinity and mesoporous morphology with an average diameter of about 30 nm. The pure Li 3V 2(PO 4) 3 exhibits a stable discharge capacity of 130.08 mAh g -1 at 0.1 C (14 mA g -1).

  19. Variation of the resistivity and chemical composition of CVD graphene under annealing in a reductive atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolochko, O. V.; Larionova, T. V.; Koltsova, T. S.; Kozlova, M. V.; Bobrynina, E. V.; Martynova, O. A.; E Gasumyants, V.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto Si/SiO2 substrates by the standard technology using PMMA, and then annealed in a reductive atmosphere have been characterized by XPS observations and measurements of the resistance temperature dependence. It was shown, that most of as-transferred samples exhibit a metallic-like resistivity dependence but some of them can demonstrate a non-metallic one. A comparative analysis of the results obtained by the XPS study and resistance measurements allowed us to conclude that the conduction process in CVD graphene is directly affected by functional groups adsorbed on the sample surface. Annealing in a mixture of H2 and Ar at T = 250-750°C is shown to result in a cleaning of the graphene surface from adsorbed contaminations and in a modification of the resistance temperature dependence which demonstrates a higher slope in case of a metallic-like behavior for as-transferred samples and a suppression of the activation-type dependence in case of a non-metallic one.

  20. Synthesis and optical properties of copper nanoparticles prepared by a chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dung Dang, Thi My; Tuyet Thu Le, Thi; Fribourg-Blanc, Eric; Chien Dang, Mau

    2011-03-01

    Copper nanoparticles, due to their interesting properties, low cost preparation and many potential applications in catalysis, cooling fluid or conductive inks, have attracted a lot of interest in recent years. In this study, copper nanoparticles were synthesized through the chemical reduction of copper sulfate with sodium borohydride in water without inert gas protection. In our synthesis route, ascorbic acid (natural vitamin C) was employed as a protective agent to prevent the nascent Cu nanoparticles from oxidation during the synthesis process and in storage. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was added and worked both as a size controller and as a capping agent. Cu nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the coordination between Cu nanoparticles and PEG. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectrometry contributed to the analysis of size and optical properties of the nanoparticles, respectively. The average crystal sizes of the particles at room temperature were less than 10 nm. It was observed that the surface plasmon resonance phenomenon can be controlled during synthesis by varying the reaction time, pH, and relative ratio of copper sulfate to the surfactant. The surface plasmon resonance peak shifts from 561 to 572 nm, while the apparent color changes from red to black, which is partly related to the change in particle size. Upon oxidation, the color of the solution changes from red to violet and ultimately a blue solution appears.

  1. Synthesis of iron nanoparticles via chemical reduction with palladium ion seeds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Ehrman, Sheryl H

    2007-01-30

    We report on the synthesis of highly monodisperse iron nanoparticles, using a chemical reduction method. Iron nanoparticles with an average diameter of 6 nm and a geometric standard deviation of 1.3 were synthesized at a pH of 9.50 from ferric chloride precursor with sodium borohydride as the reducing agent, polyacrylic acid as the dispersing agent, and palladium ions as seeds for iron nanoparticle nucleation. The resulting nanoparticles were ferromagnetic at 5 K and superparamagnetic at 350 K. The dispersing agent polyacrylic acid (PAA) was shown to prevent iron nanoparticles and possibly palladium clusters from aggregating; in the absence of PAA, only aggregated iron nanoparticles were obtained. The addition of palladium ions decreased the diameter of iron nanoparticles presumably by providing sites for heterogeneous nucleation onto palladium clusters. In the absence of palladium ions, the mean diameter of iron nanoparticles was approximately 110 nm and the standard deviation increased to 2.0. The pH of the solution also was found to have a significant effect on the particle diameter, likely by affecting PAA ionization and altering the conformation of the polymer chains. At lower pH (8.75), the PAA is less ionized and its ability to disperse palladium clusters is reduced, so the number of palladium seeds decreases. Therefore, the resulting iron nanoparticles were larger, 59 nm in diameter, versus 6 nm for nanoparticles formed at a pH of 9.50.

  2. The potential of synthetic indolylquinoline derivatives for Aβ aggregation reduction by chemical chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Chiu, Ya-Jen; Chen, Shu-Ling; Huang, Chen-Hsiang; Lin, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Te-Hsien; Lee, Chi-Mei; Ramesh, Chintakunta; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Huang, Chin-Chang; Fung, Hon-Chung; Chen, Yi-Chun; Lin, Jung-Yaw; Yao, Ching-Fa; Huang, Hei-Jen; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Lee, Ming-Chung; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia associated with progressive cognitive decline and memory loss. Extracellular β-amyloid (Aβ) is a major constituent of senile plaques, one of the pathological hallmarks of AD. Aβ deposition causes neuronal death via a number of possible mechanisms such as increasing oxidative stress. Therefore therapeutic approaches to identify novel Aβ aggregate reducers could be effective for AD treatment. Using a Trx-His-Aβ biochemical assay, we screened 11 synthetic indolylquinoline compounds, and found NC009-1, -2, -6 and -7 displaying potential to reduce Aβ aggregation. Treating Tet-On Aβ-GFP 293 cells with these compounds reduced Aβ aggregation and reactive oxygen species. These compounds also promoted neurite outgrowth in Tet-On Aβ-GFP SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, treatment with above compounds improved neuronal cell viability, neurite outgrowth, and synaptophysin expression level in mouse hippocampal primary culture under oligomeric Aβ-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, the tested NC009-1 significantly ameliorated Aβ-induced inhibition of hippocampal long-term potentiation in mouse hippocampal slices. Our results demonstrate how synthetic indolylquinoline compounds are likely to work as chemical chaperones in Aβ-aggregation reduction and neuroprotection, providing insight into the possible applications of indolylquinoline compounds in AD treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Advances of Ag, Cu, and Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles synthesized via chemical reduction route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kim Seah; Cheong, Kuan Yew

    2013-04-01

    Silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) nanoparticles have shown great potential in variety applications due to their excellent electrical and thermal properties resulting high demand in the market. Decreasing in size to nanometer scale has shown distinct improvement in these inherent properties due to larger surface-to-volume ratio. Ag and Cu nanoparticles are also shown higher surface reactivity, and therefore being used to improve interfacial and catalytic process. Their melting points have also dramatically decreased compared with bulk and thus can be processed at relatively low temperature. Besides, regularly alloying Ag into Cu to create Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles could be used to improve fast oxidizing property of Cu nanoparticles. There are varieties methods have been reported on the synthesis of Ag, Cu, and Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles. This review aims to cover chemical reduction means for synthesis of those nanoparticles. Advances of this technique utilizing different reagents namely metal salt precursors, reducing agents, and stabilizers, as well as their effects on respective nanoparticles have been systematically reviewed. Other parameters such as pH and temperature that have been considered as an important factor influencing the quality of those nanoparticles have also been reviewed thoroughly.

  4. Deposition of silver nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by chemical reduction process and their antimicrobial effects

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Adawiya J.; Thamir, Amin D.; Ahmed, Duha S.; Mohammad, M. R.

    2016-07-25

    In this paper, the functionalization of raw-MWCNTs involves oxidation reaction using concentrated acid mixture of HNO{sub 3}:H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (1:3), via ultrasonic bath (170 W, 50 kHz) to obtain functional groups. Then Ag nanoparticles are decorated the outside over the surface of functionalized MWCNTs using a chemical reduction process resulting in the formation of(Ag/ MWCNTs) hybrid material. The results showed that outer diameter functionalized F-MWCNTs andAg nanoparticles size was about (11-80) nm and (10 to 25) nm, respectively using TEM and HRTEM. The crystallographic structure of MWCNTs using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis proved diffraction peaks at 38.1°, 44.3°, 64.7° and 77.4° degrees namely, Ag (111), Ag (200), Ag (220), and Ag (311) of the face-centered cubic lattice of Ag, respectively, excepting the peak at 2θ =25.6°, which correspond to the (0 0 2) reflection of the MWNTs are corresponding to Ag/MWNTs. The antimicrobial activities of Ag/MWCNTs hybrid using plate count method showed that decreasing a large number of bacteria colonies of E. coli and S. aureu with increasing the hybrid concentrations after incubation for 24 h in shaker incubator with percentage of inhibition approaching 100%.

  5. TRACI 2.0 - The Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRACI 2.0, the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts 2.0, has been expanded and developed for sustainability metrics, life cycle impact assessment, industrial ecology, and process design impact assessment for developing increasingly sus...

  6. TRACI THE TOOL FOR THE REDUCTION AND ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS - VERSION 2 CHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI) was developed to allow the quantification of environmental impacts for a variety of impact categories which are necessary for a comprehensive impact assessment. See Figure 1. TRACI is c...

  7. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Reduction of Experimental Scale in High School and College General Chemistry Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Carole A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Notes the careful observation of chemical reactivity phenomena has been and should be an important part of the general chemistry laboratory curriculum. Stresses reduction of experimental scale will help to ensure, in times of rampant chemophobia, that it remains so. Provides several examples of the methodology. (MVL)

  8. SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS, BAY CITY, MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SITE Program funded a field demonstration to evaluate the Eco Logic Gas-Phase Chemical Reduction Process developed by ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (ELI), Ontario, Canada. The Demonstration took place at the Middleground Landfill in Bay City, Michigan using landfill wa...

  9. TRACI THE TOOL FOR THE REDUCTION AND ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS - VERSION 2 CHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI) was developed to allow the quantification of environmental impacts for a variety of impact categories which are necessary for a comprehensive impact assessment. See Figure 1. TRACI is c...

  10. Estimating the One-Electron Reduction Potential for Vanadium (V) by Chemical Techniques: An Experiment for General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, R. A. D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment which requires only qualitative observations, is suitable for general chemistry students, prompts an understanding of thermodynamic spontaneity, gives chemical meaning to electrode potentials, requires non-electrochemical equipment, and allows estimates of the standard potential for the reduction of Vanadium (V) to V (IV).…

  11. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Reduction of Experimental Scale in High School and College General Chemistry Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Carole A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Notes the careful observation of chemical reactivity phenomena has been and should be an important part of the general chemistry laboratory curriculum. Stresses reduction of experimental scale will help to ensure, in times of rampant chemophobia, that it remains so. Provides several examples of the methodology. (MVL)

  12. Estimating the One-Electron Reduction Potential for Vanadium (V) by Chemical Techniques: An Experiment for General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, R. A. D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment which requires only qualitative observations, is suitable for general chemistry students, prompts an understanding of thermodynamic spontaneity, gives chemical meaning to electrode potentials, requires non-electrochemical equipment, and allows estimates of the standard potential for the reduction of Vanadium (V) to V (IV).…

  13. TRACI 2.0 - The Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRACI 2.0, the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts 2.0, has been expanded and developed for sustainability metrics, life cycle impact assessment, industrial ecology, and process design impact assessment for developing increasingly sus...

  14. The effect of chemical treatment on reduction of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in black and white pepper during washing.

    PubMed

    Jalili, M; Jinap, S; Son, R

    2011-04-01

    The effect of 18 different chemicals, which included acidic compounds (sulfuric acid, chloridric acid, phosphoric acid, benzoic acid, citric acid, acetic acid), alkaline compounds (ammonia, sodium bicarbonate, sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, calcium hydroxide), salts (acetate ammonium, sodium bisulfite, sodium hydrosulfite, sodium chloride, sodium sulfate) and oxidising agents (hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite), on the reduction of aflatoxins B(1), B(2), G(1) and G(2) and ochratoxin A (OTA) was investigated in black and white pepper. OTA and aflatoxins were determined using HPLC after immunoaffinity column clean-up. Almost all of the applied chemicals showed a significant degree of reduction on mycotoxins (p < 0.05). The lowest and highest reduction of aflatoxin B(1), which is the most dangerous aflatoxin, was 20.5% ± 2.7% using benzoic acid and 54.5% ± 2.7% using sodium hydroxide. There was no significant difference between black and white peppers (p < 0.05).

  15. Model reduction and temperature uniformity control for rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoropoulou, Artemis-Georgia

    The consideration of Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP) in semiconductor manufacturing has recently been increasing. As a result, control of RTP systems has become of great importance since it is expected to help in addressing uniformity problems that, so far, have been obstructing the acceptance of the method. The spatial distribution appearing in RTP models necessitates the use of model reduction in order to obtain models of a size suitable for use in control algorithms. This dissertation addresses model reduction as well as control issues for RTP systems. A model of a three-zone Rapid Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (RTCVD) system is developed to study the effects of spatial wafer temperature patterns on polysilicon deposition uniformity. A sequence of simulated runs is performed, varying the lamp power profiles so that different wafer temperature modes are excited. The dominant spatial wafer thermal modes are extracted via Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and subsequently used as a set of trial functions to represent both the wafer temperature and deposition thickness. A collocation formulation of Galerkin's method is used to discretize the original modeling equations, giving a low-order model which loses little of the original, high-order model's fidelity. We make use of the excellent predictive capabilities of the reduced model to optimize power inputs to the lamp banks to achieve a desired polysilicon deposition thickness at the end of a run with minimal deposition spatial nonuniformity. Since the results illustrate that the optimization procedure benefits from the use of the reduced-order model, we further utilize the reduced order model for real time Model Based Control. The feedback controller is designed using the Internal Model Control (IMC) structure especially modified to handle systems described by ordinary differential and algebraic equations. The IMC controller is obtained using optimal control theory on singular arcs extended for multi input systems

  16. Photochemical modeling in California with two chemical mechanisms: model intercomparison and response to emission reductions.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenxia; Kelly, James T; Avise, Jeremy C; Kaduwela, Ajith P; Stockwell, William R

    2011-05-01

    An updated version of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC) chemical mechanism (SAPRC07C) was implemented into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.6. CMAQ simulations using SAPRC07C and the previously released version, SAPRC99, were performed and compared for an episode during July-August, 2000. Ozone (O3) predictions of the SAPRC07C simulation are generally lower than those of the SAPRC99 simulation in the key areas of central and southern California, especially in areas where modeled concentrations are greater than the federal 8-hr O3 standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) and/or when the volatile organic compound (VOC)/nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratio is less than 13. The relative changes of ozone production efficiency (OPE) against the VOC/NOx ratio at 46 sites indicate that the OPE is reduced in SAPRC07C compared with SAPRC99 at most sites by as much as approximately 22%. The SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C mechanisms respond similarly to 20% reductions in anthropogenic VOC emissions. The response of the mechanisms to 20% NOx emissions reductions can be grouped into three cases. In case 1, in which both mechanisms show a decrease in daily maximum 8-hr O3 concentration with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 decrease in SAPRC07C is smaller. In case 2, in which both mechanisms show an increase in O3 with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 increase is larger in SAPRC07C. In case 3, SAPRC07C simulates an increase in O3 in response to reduced NOx emissions whereas SAPRC99 simulates a decrease in O3 for the same region. As a result, the areas where NOx controls would be disbeneficial are spatially expanded in SAPRC07C. Although the results presented here are valuable for understanding differences in predictions and model response for SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C, the study did not evaluate the impact of mechanism differences in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for using numerical models in demonstrating air quality attainment

  17. Characterization of solid bitumens originating from thermal chemical alteration and thermochemical sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, Simon R.; Walters, Clifford C.; Kwiatek, Peter J.; Freund, Howard; Afeworki, Mobae; Sansone, Michael; Lamberti, William A.; Pottorf, Robert J.; Machel, Hans G.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Bolin, Trudy

    2010-09-01

    Solid bitumen can arise from several reservoir processes acting on migrated petroleum. Insoluble solid organic residues can form by oxidative processes associated with thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) as well as by thermal chemical alteration (TCA) of petroleum. TCA may follow non-thermal processes, such as biodegradation and asphaltene precipitation, that produce viscous fluids enriched in polar compounds that are then altered into solid bitumens. It is difficult to distinguish solid bitumen formed by TCA from TSR since both processes occur under relatively high temperatures. The focus of the present work is to characterize solid bitumen samples associated with TSR- or TCA-processes using a combination of solid-state X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Sulfur X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy (S-XANES), and 13C NMR. Naturally occurring solid bitumens from three locations, Nisku Formation, Brazeau River area (TSR-related); La Barge Field, Madison Formation (TSR-related); and, the Alaskan North Slope, Brooks Range (TCA-related), are compared to solid bitumens generated in laboratory simulations of TSR and TCA. The chemical nature of solid bitumens with respect to organic nitrogen and sulfur can be understood in terms of (1) the nature of hydrocarbon precursor molecules, (2) the mode of sulfur incorporation, and (3) their concentration during thermal stress. TSR-solid bitumen is highly aromatic, sulfur-rich, and nitrogen-poor. These heteroatom distributions are attributed to the ability of TSR to incorporate copious amounts of inorganic sulfur (S/C atomic ratio >0.035) into aromatic structures and to initial low levels of nitrogen in the unaltered petroleum. In contrast, TCA-solid bitumen is derived from polar materials that are initially rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Aromaticity and nitrogen increase as thermal stress cleaves aliphatic moieties and condensation reactions take place. TCA-bitumens from the Brooks Range have <75% aromatic

  18. Direct chemical reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium and calcium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Leah N.; Lessing, Paul

    2016-04-01

    A process of direct reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium metal as the reducing agent is discussed. After reduction of the oxide to metal, the metal is separated by density from the other components of the reaction mixture and can be easily removed upon cooling. The direct reduction technique consistently produces high purity (98%-99% pure) neptunium metal.

  19. Direct chemical reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium and calcium chloride

    DOE PAGES

    Squires, Leah N.; Lessing, Paul

    2016-01-13

    A process of direct reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium metal as the reducing agent is discussed. After reduction of the oxide to metal, the metal is separated by density from the other components of the reaction mixture and can easily removed upon cooling. Furthermore, the direct reduction technique consistently produces high purity (98%–99% pure) neptunium metal.

  20. Plasma chemical reduction of model corrosion brass layers prepared in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radkova, Lucie; Mikova, Petra; Prikryl, Radek; Krcma, Frantisek

    2016-08-01

    The brass plates of (50 × 10 × 1) mm3 were prepared with model corrosion layer because the real archaeological artifacts could be damaged during the method optimization. Samples corroded naturally more than 2 years in the soil. Excavated samples were treated in the low pressure (150 Pa) quartz glass plasma reactor (90 cm long and 9.5 cm in diameter) which was surrounded by two external copper electrodes supplied by radio-frequency generator (13.56 MHz). The experiments were carried out in a hydrogen-argon gas mixture at mass flows of 30 sccm for hydrogen and 20 sccm for argon for 90 min. The plasma power was 100, 200, 300 and 400 W in continuous and pulsed mode. Maximum sample temperature was set at 120 °C. The whole process was monitored by optical emission spectroscopy and the obtained data were used to calculate the relative intensity of OH radicals and rotational temperature. The results showed that the higher power had the greater maximum intensity of the OH radicals and rapidly degraded the corrosion layer. Corrosion layer was not completely removed during the reduction, but due to the reactions which occur in the plasma corrosion layer became brittle and after plasma chemical treatment can be removed easily. Finally, the SEM-EDX analysis of the surface composition confirmed removal of chlorine and oxygen from the corrosion products layers. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  1. Bacterial Disproportionation of Elemental Sulfur Coupled to Chemical Reduction of Iron or Manganese

    PubMed Central

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler; Bak, Friedhelm

    1993-01-01

    A new chemolithotrophic bacterial metabolism was discovered in anaerobic marine enrichment cultures. Cultures in defined medium with elemental sulfur (S0) and amorphous ferric hydroxide (FeOOH) as sole substrates showed intense formation of sulfate. Furthermore, precipitation of ferrous sulfide and pyrite was observed. The transformations were accompanied by growth of slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria. The quantification of the products revealed that S0 was microbially disproportionated to sulfate and sulfide, as follows: 4S0 + 4H2O → SO42- + 3H2S + 2H+. Subsequent chemical reactions between the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO3. Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO2, instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant reduction of MnO2 to Mn2+. Growth of small rod-shaped bacteria was observed. When incubated without MnO2, the culture did not grow but produced small amounts of SO42- and H2S at a ratio of 1:3, indicating again a disproportionation of S0. The observed microbial disproportionation of S0 only proceeds significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S0 disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO2 was high, > 104 cm-3 in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic sulfide oxidation to sulfate in anoxic sediments. PMID:16348835

  2. Structures of alkali metals in silica gel nanopores: new materials for chemical reductions and hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Shatnawi, Mouath; Paglia, Gianluca; Dye, James L; Cram, Kevin C; Lefenfeld, Michael; Billinge, Simon J L

    2007-02-07

    Alkali metals and their alloys can be protected from spontaneous reaction with dry air by intercalation (with subsequent heating) into the pores of silica gel (SG) at loadings up to 40 wt %. The resulting loose, black powders are convenient materials for chemical reduction of organic compounds and the production of clean hydrogen. The problem addressed in this paper is the nature of the reducing species present in these amorphous materials. The atomic pair distribution function (PDF), which considers both Bragg and diffuse scattering components, was used to examine their structures. Liquid Na-K alloys added to silica gel at room temperature (stage 0) or heated to 150 degrees C (stage I) as well as stage I Na-SG, retain the overall pattern of pure silica gel. Broad oscillations in the PDF show that added alkali metals remain in the pores as nanoscale metal clusters. 23Na MAS NMR studies confirm the presence of Na(0) and demonstrate that Na+ ions are formed as well. The relative amounts of Na(0) and Na(+) depend on both the overall metal loading and the average pore size. The results suggest that ionization occurs near or in the SiO2 walls, with neutral metal present in the larger cavities. The fate of the electrons released by ionization is uncertain, but they may add to the silica gel lattice, or form an "electride-like plasma" near the silica gel walls. A remaining mystery is why the stage I material does not show a melting endotherm of the encapsulated metal and does not react with dry oxygen. Na-SG when heated to 400 degrees C (stage II) yields a dual-phase reaction product that consists of Na(4)Si(4) and Na(2)SiO(3).

  3. Selectivity and kinetics during the chemical vapor deposition of tungsten by the hydrogen reduction and silane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desatnik, Nathan

    1997-09-01

    Tungsten is used in the semiconductor industry for via-contact filling. During tungsten CVD, WFsb6 is reduced by Hsb2, a well characterized process, or SiHsb4 which produces higher deposition rates and tends to be mass transfer limited. Tungsten can selectively deposit on the metal. Therefore, it is important to study the combined selectivity loss and deposition processes. An apparatus was developed to address the effects of different conditions on both aspects of the process. A differential LPCVD quartz reactor was used, which could produce simple laminar flows and short residence times. A model was used for experiment design on the selectivity loss during the Hsb2 reduction. The intermediate theory was used, proposing a reactive byproduct from the deposition as nuclei generator on the oxide. Hence, metallic and oxide samples were placed at different locations, and the fraction of the oxide covered with tungsten was measured. Thus, direct dependencies of nucleation on the metal size, temperature, and time were found. Nucleation was highest closest to the metal; however, the effect of flow was nonmonotonic with higher nucleation for lower flow rates near the metal, and the reversed effect further downstream. The same trends were obtained for the SiHsb4 process. Reconciliation of modeling and experimentation confirmed the theory of an intermediate characterized by a short lifetime to explain the selectivity loss. In addition, it was found that nuclei deposit forming clusters. The SiHsb4 reduction was analyzed with minimized mass transfer limitations. From film thickness measurements, the film grew without a significant incubation time. Order dependencies of 1.35 and -0.42 for SiHsb4 and WFsb6 mole fractions were measured, while the carrier gas did not affect the reaction. Higher temperatures produced higher deposition rates until 300sp°C, beyond which no more dependence was observed. Hence, a mechanism proposes the dissociative adsorption of SiHsb4, and the

  4. Chemical Kinetic and Molecular Genetic Study of Selenium Oxyanion Reduction by Enterobactor cloacae SLD1a-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,J.; Kobayashi, D.; Yee, N.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial processes play an important role in the redox transformations of toxic selenium oxyanions. In this study, we employed chemical kinetic and molecular genetic techniques to investigate the mechanisms of Se(IV) and Se(VI) reduction by the facultative anaerobe Enterobacter cloacae SLD1a-1. The rates of microbial selenium oxyanion reduction were measured as a function of initial selenium oxyanion concentration (0-1.0 mM) and temperature (10-40 C), and mutagenesis studies were performed to identify the genes involved in the selenium oxyanion reduction pathway. The results indicate that Se(IV) reduction is significantly more rapid than the reduction of Se(VI). The kinetics of the reduction reactions were successfully quantified using the Michaelis-Menten kinetic equation. Both the rates of Se(VI) and Se(IV) reduction displayed strong temperature-dependence with Ea values of 121 and 71.2 kJ/mol, respectively. X-ray absorption near-edge spectra collected for the precipitates formed by Se(VI) and Se(IV) reduction confirmed the formation of Se(0). A miniTn5 transposon mutant of E. cloacae SLD1a-1 was isolated that had lost the ability to reduce Se(VI) but was not affected in Se(IV) reduction activity. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the transposon was inserted within a tatC gene, which encodes for a central protein in the twin arginine translocation system. Complementation by the wild-type tatC sequence restored the ability of mutant strains to reduce Se(VI). The results suggest that Se(VI) reduction activity is dependent on enzyme export across the cytoplasmic membrane and that reduction of Se(VI) and Se(IV) are catalyzed by different enzymatic systems.

  5. Recovery of Cu(II) by chemical reduction using sodium dithionite: effect of pH and ligands.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Hsuan; Yu, Jui-Hsuan; Liang, Yang-Min; Wang, Pin-Jan; Li, Chi-Wang; Chen, Shiao-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Wastewaters containing Cu(II) and ligands are ubiquitous in various industrial sectors, and efficacy of copper removal processes, especially precipitation, is greatly compromised by ligands. Chemical reduction, being commonly employed for production of metal nanoparticles, is also effective for metal removal. Adjustment of pH and addition of ligands are important to control the particle size in metallic nanoparticle production. Exploiting the fact that ligands and metals coexist in many wastewaters, chemical reduction was employed to treat ligand-containing wastewater in this study. The experimental result shows that depending on pH, type of ligands, and copper:ligand molar ratio, copper could be removed by either the reduction or precipitation mechanism. Almost complete copper removal could be achieved by the reduction mechanism under optimal condition for solutions containing either EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) or citrate ligands. For solutions containing ammonia, depending on pH and Cu:ammonia molar ratio, copper was removed by both precipitation and reduction mechanisms. At pH of 9.0, formation of nano-sized particles, which readily pass through a 0.45 μm filter used for sample pretreatment before residual copper analysis, results in the lowest copper removal efficiency. Both cuprous oxide and metallic copper are identified in the solids produced, and the possible explanations are provided.

  6. Iron isotope fractionation by microbial iron reduction in modern chemically precipitated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, E. E.; Tangalos, G. E.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C. M.; Alpers, C. N.; Shelobolina, E. S.; Xu, H.; Konishi, H.

    2008-12-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that dissimilatory microbial iron oxide reduction (DIR) can produce Fe(II) phases that have low 56Fe/54Fe ratios similar to those found in Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic banded iron formations (BIFs) and shales. Direct application of these experiments to BIF formation has been hindered by the lack of Fe isotope data from modern environments that are analogous to BIFs. Here we report Fe inventories and isotopic compositions for chemically precipitated sediments in the Spring Creek Arm of Keswick Reservoir (SCAKR) downstream of the Iron Mountain acid mine drainage site in northern California, USA. The high concentration of reactive Fe(III) (ca. 50-100 mmol of amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxides per liter of bulk sediment) allows dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) to predominate over dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria in sediment carbon metabolism, making the SCAKR a better analog for BIFs compared to modern marine environments. DIR has generated millimolar concentrations of aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) in SCAKR sediments. The Fe(II)aq has lower 56Fe/54Fe values than bulk HCl-extractable Fe; δ56Fe values for bulk HCl-extractable Fe fall within the range previously defined for mafic- to intermediate-composition terrestrial igneous rocks, modern marine sediments, suspended river sediments, Proterozoic-Phanerozoic shales, loess, aerosols, and soils. After removal of pore fluid, sediment was reacted for 1 hr with 0.1M HCl to isolate solid-phase Fe(II) (Fe(II)s), which was likely a mixture of sorbed Fe(II) and amorphous surface-precipitated Fe(II) hydroxide. Subsequent 24-hr extraction with 0.5M HCl recovered amorphous Fe(III) oxide (Fe(III)am). Sediment incubation experiments with SCAKR sediment produced trends in in Fe isotopic fractionations between Fe(II)aq, Fe(II)s, and Fe(III)am analogous to those observed in situ. Collectively the data suggest an equilibrium 56Fe/54Fe isotope fractionation between Fe(II)aq and Fe

  7. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles by chemical reduction at various fraction of MSA and their structure characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Diantoro, Markus Fitrianingsih, Rina Mufti, Nandang Fuad, Abdulloh

    2014-03-24

    Nanosilver is currently one of the most common engineered nanomaterials and is used in many applications that lead to the release of silver nanoparticles and silver ions into aqueous systems. Nanosilver also possesses enhanced antimicrobial activity and bioavailability that may less environmental risk compared with other manufactured nanomaterials. Described in this research are the synthesis of silver nanoparticle produced by chemical reduction from silver nitrate (AgNO{sub 3}) solution. As a reducing agent, Sodium Borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) was used and mercaptosuccinic Acid (MSA) as stabilizer to prevent the nanoparticle from aglomerating. It was also used two kinds of solvent, they are water and methanol. In typical experiment MSA was dissolve in methanol with a number of variation of molarity i.e. 0,03 M, 0,06 M, 0,12 M, 0,15 M, and the mixture was kept under vigorous stirring in an ice bath. A solution of silver nitrate of 340 mg in 6,792 ml water was added. A freshly prepared aqueous solution of sodium borohydride (756,6 mL in 100 mL of water) was added drop wisely. The solution was kept for half an hour for stirring and were allowed to settle down in methanol. The obtained samples then characterized by means of x-ray diffractometer, and scanning electron microscopy, as well as transmission electron microscopy to obtain their structures of silver nanoparticles, morphology, and sizes. It is shown that diameter of silver nanoparticle sized about 24.3 nm (Ag@MSA 0.03 M), 20.4 nm (Ag@MSA 0.06 M), 16.8 nm (Ag@MSA 0.12 M), 16.9 nm (Ag@MSA 0.15 M) which was calculated by Scherrer formula by taking the FWHM from fitting to Gaussian. The phases and lattice parameter showed that there is no significant change in its volume by increasing molarity of stabilizer. In contrast, the size of particles is decreasing.

  8. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles by chemical reduction at various fraction of MSA and their structure characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diantoro, Markus; Fitrianingsih, Rina; Mufti, Nandang; Fuad, Abdulloh

    2014-03-01

    Nanosilver is currently one of the most common engineered nanomaterials and is used in many applications that lead to the release of silver nanoparticles and silver ions into aqueous systems. Nanosilver also possesses enhanced antimicrobial activity and bioavailability that may less environmental risk compared with other manufactured nanomaterials. Described in this research are the synthesis of silver nanoparticle produced by chemical reduction from silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution. As a reducing agent, Sodium Borohydride (NaBH4) was used and mercaptosuccinic Acid (MSA) as stabilizer to prevent the nanoparticle from aglomerating. It was also used two kinds of solvent, they are water and methanol. In typical experiment MSA was dissolve in methanol with a number of variation of molarity i.e. 0,03 M, 0,06 M, 0,12 M, 0,15 M, and the mixture was kept under vigorous stirring in an ice bath. A solution of silver nitrate of 340 mg in 6,792 ml water was added. A freshly prepared aqueous solution of sodium borohydride (756,6 mL in 100 mL of water) was added drop wisely. The solution was kept for half an hour for stirring and were allowed to settle down in methanol. The obtained samples then characterized by means of x-ray diffractometer, and scanning electron microscopy, as well as transmission electron microscopy to obtain their structures of silver nanoparticles, morphology, and sizes. It is shown that diameter of silver nanoparticle sized about 24.3 nm (Ag@MSA 0.03 M), 20.4 nm (Ag@MSA 0.06 M), 16.8 nm (Ag@MSA 0.12 M), 16.9 nm (Ag@MSA 0.15 M) which was calculated by Scherrer formula by taking the FWHM from fitting to Gaussian. The phases and lattice parameter showed that there is no significant change in its volume by increasing molarity of stabilizer. In contrast, the size of particles is decreasing.

  9. Fast variance reduction for steady-state simulation and sensitivity analysis of stochastic chemical systems using shadow function estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Lygeros, John; Khammash, Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    We address the problem of estimating steady-state quantities associated to systems of stochastic chemical kinetics. In most cases of interest, these systems are analytically intractable, and one has to resort to computational methods to estimate stationary values of cost functions. In this work, we introduce a novel variance reduction algorithm for stochastic chemical kinetics, inspired by related methods in queueing theory, in particular the use of shadow functions. Using two numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method for the calculation of steady-state parametric sensitivities and evaluate its performance in comparison to other estimation methods.

  10. A quantum chemical based toxicity study of estimated reduction potential and hydrophobicity in series of nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gooch, A; Sizochenko, N; Sviatenko, L; Gorb, L; Leszczynski, J

    2017-02-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds and the products of their degradation are toxic to bacteria, cells and animals. Various studies have been carried out to better understand the mechanism of toxicity of aromatic nitrocompounds and their relationship to humans and the environment. Recent data relate cytotoxicity of nitroaromatic compounds to their single- or two-electron enzymatic reduction. However, mechanisms of animal toxicity could be more complex. This work investigates the estimated reduction and oxidation potentials of 34 nitroaromatic compounds using quantum chemical approaches. All geometries were optimized with density functional theory (DFT) using the solvation model based on density (SMD) and polarizable continuum model (PCM) solvent model protocols. Quantitative structure-activity/property (QSAR/QSPR) models were developed using descriptors obtained from quantum chemical optimizations as well as the DRAGON software program. The QSAR/QSPR equations developed consist of two to four descriptors. Correlations have been identified between electron affinity (ELUMO) and hydrophobicity (log P).

  11. New chemical insights using weakly supported voltammetry: the reductive cleavage of Aryl-Br bonds is reversible.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijun; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G

    2012-10-22

    Cyclic voltammetry carried out at a wide range of supporting electrolyte concentrations and compositions can elucidate additional kinetic and mechanistic details of the electrochemical reduction of aryl halides. The cleavage of the C-Br bond is reversible, driven by H abstraction and the second electron transfer. This is a new chemical insight, as the cleavage of such bonds has usually been regarded as irreversible.

  12. Novel Catalytic Mechanisms For The Chemical Reduction Of Carbon Dioxide To Energy-Dense Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-14

    two-electron reduction wave under nitrogen, with no evidence for dimerization. In previously reported Mn(bpy-R)(CO)3X complexes, two irreversible...lower potential. We used infrared- spectroelectrochemistry (IR-SEC) to gain insight into this unusual “ over -reduction” that was necessary to push...catalysis forward. Furthermore, the Mg2+ has successfully been used as a lewis acid in order to eliminate the need for this “ over -reduction.” In the

  13. Reduction of Salmonella on chicken meat and chicken skin by combined or sequential application of lytic bacteriophage with chemical antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, Anuraj T; Nannapaneni, Rama; Kiess, Aaron; Sharma, Chander Shekhar

    2015-08-17

    The effectiveness of recently approved Salmonella lytic bacteriophage preparation (SalmoFresh™) in reducing Salmonella in vitro and on chicken breast fillets was examined in combination with lauric arginate (LAE) or cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). In another experiment, a sequential spray application of this bacteriophage (phage) solution on Salmonella inoculated chicken skin after a 20s dip in chemical antimicrobials (LAE, CPC, peracetic acid, or chlorine) was also examined in reducing Salmonella counts on chicken skin. The application of phage in combination with CPC or LAE reduced S. Typhimurium, S. Heidelberg, and S. Enteritidis up to 5 log units in vitro at 4 °C. On chicken breast fillets, phage in combination with CPC or LAE resulted in significant (p<0.05) reductions of Salmonella ranging from 0.5 to 1.3 log CFU/g as compared to control up to 7 days of refrigerated storage. When phage was applied sequentially with chemical antimicrobials, all the treatments resulted in significant reductions of Salmonella. The application of chlorine (30 ppm) and PAA (400 ppm) followed by phage spray (10(9)PFU/ml) resulted in highest Salmonella reductions of 1.6-1.7 and 2.2-2.5l og CFU/cm(2), respectively. In conclusion, the surface applications of phage in combination with LAE or CPC significantly reduced Salmonella counts on chicken breast fillets. However, higher reductions in Salmonella counts were achieved on chicken skin by the sequential application of chemical antimicrobials followed by phage spray. The sequential application of chlorine, PAA, and phage can provide additional hurdles to reduce Salmonella on fresh poultry carcasses or cut up parts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An adaptive reduction algorithm for efficient chemical calculations in global atmospheric chemistry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillana, Mauricio; Le Sager, Philippe; Jacob, Daniel J.; Brenner, Michael P.

    2010-11-01

    We present a computationally efficient adaptive method for calculating the time evolution of the concentrations of chemical species in global 3-D models of atmospheric chemistry. Our strategy consists of partitioning the computational domain into fast and slow regions for each chemical species at every time step. In each grid box, we group the fast species and solve for their concentration in a coupled fashion. Concentrations of the slow species are calculated using a simple semi-implicit formula. Separation of species between fast and slow is done on the fly based on their local production and loss rates. This allows for example to exclude short-lived volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their oxidation products from chemical calculations in the remote troposphere where their concentrations are negligible, letting the simulation determine the exclusion domain and allowing species to drop out individually from the coupled chemical calculation as their production/loss rates decline. We applied our method to a 1-year simulation of global tropospheric ozone-NO x-VOC-aerosol chemistry using the GEOS-Chem model. Results show a 50% improvement in computational performance for the chemical solver, with no significant added error.

  15. Synthesis of graphene nanosheets via oxalic acid-induced chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Mingxun; Cui, Xiao-Li; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-01

    Preparing high-quality graphene through reduction of graphene oxide (GO) by oxalic acid is demonstrated in this paper. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometry were taken to confirm the reduction of GO and the formation of graphene under these mild conditions. Thermogravimetric analysis and conductivity measurements further testify the excellent thermal stability and conductivity of the obtained graphene. A possible mechanism for the reduction process was also proposed. Furthermore, a Pt-graphene composite was fabricated on a glassy carbon electrode and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation was observed. With advantages of low toxicity, simple purification process and high quality of the product, oxalic acid provides a feasible route to prepare graphene from GO under mild conditions, thus facilitating the use of graphene-based materials for large-scale applications.

  16. Integration of polyelectrolyte enhanced ultrafiltration and chemical reduction for metal-containing wastewater treatment and metal recovery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jui-Hsuan; Chou, Yi-Hsuan; Liang, Yang-Min; Li, Chi-Wang

    2015-01-01

    Chemical reduction was firstly employed to treat synthetic wastewaters of various compositions prepared to simulate the retentate stream of polyelectrolyte enhanced ultrafiltration (PEUF). With fixed Cu:polyethylenimine (PEI) monomer:dithionite molar ratio, increasing copper concentration increases copper removal efficiency. Under fixed Cu:dithionite molar ratio and fixed Cu concentration, increasing PEI monomer:copper molar ratio decreases copper removal efficiency. The formation of nano-sized copper particles, which readily pass through 0.45 μm filter used for sample pretreatment before residual copper analysis, might be the reason behind the decreasing copper removal efficiency observed. Particle size analysis shows that the size of copper particles, which are formed through reduction reaction, increases with decreasing pH value and increasing reaction time. As ultrafiltration is capable of removing these nano-sized particles, integration of chemical reduction and PEUF is proposed to simultaneously achieve regeneration of polyelectrolyte and recovery of copper in one process. Results show that the proposed process could achieve almost complete copper removal without being affected by reaction pH.

  17. Highly Stable and Tunable Chemical Doping of Multilayer WS2 Field Effect Transistor: Reduction in Contact Resistance.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hafiz M W; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Eom, Jonghwa; Noh, Hwayong

    2015-10-28

    The development of low resistance contacts to 2D transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is still a big challenge for the future generation field effect transistors (FETs) and optoelectronic devices. Here, we report a chemical doping technique to achieve low contact resistance by keeping the intrinsic properties of few layers WS2. The transfer length method has been used to investigate the effect of chemical doping on contact resistance. After doping, the contact resistance (Rc) of multilayer (ML) WS2 has been reduced to 0.9 kΩ·μm. The significant reduction of the Rc is mainly due to the high electron doping density, thus a reduction in Schottky barrier height, which limits the device performance. The threshold voltage of ML-WS2 FETs confirms a negative shift upon the chemical doping, as further confirmed from the positions of E(1)2g and A1g peaks in Raman spectra. The n-doped samples possess a high drain current of 65 μA/μm, with an on/off ratio of 1.05 × 10(6) and a field effect mobility of 34.7 cm(2)/(V·s) at room temperature. Furthermore, the photoelectric properties of doped WS2 flakes were also measured under deep ultraviolet light. The potential of using LiF doping in contact engineering of TMDs opens new ways to improve the device performance.

  18. Applying the Philosophical Concept of Reduction to the Chemistry of Water: Implications for Chemical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erduran, Sibel

    2005-01-01

    Even though philosophical themes in science education have been advocated for several decades, little attention has been paid to how these themes can be contextualized in the teaching of a particular domain of science. The purpose of this paper is to provide an example theoretical framework for applying a philosophical theme, reduction, in…

  19. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS FOR CHEMICAL REDUCTIONS OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sufficient kinetic data on abiotic reduction reactions involving organic contaminants are now available that quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for these reactions can be developed. Over 50 QSARs have been reported, most in just the last few years, and they ar...

  20. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION - ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The patented Eco Logic Process employs a gas-phase reduction reaction of hydrogen with organic and chlorinated organic compounds at elevated temperatures to convert aqueous and oily hazardous contaminants into a hydrocarbon-rich gas product. After passing through a scrubber, the ...

  1. Chemical reduction of three-dimensional silica micro-assemblies into microporous silicon replicas.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhihao; Weatherspoon, Michael R; Shian, Samuel; Cai, Ye; Graham, Phillip D; Allan, Shawn M; Ahmad, Gul; Dickerson, Matthew B; Church, Benjamin C; Kang, Zhitao; Abernathy, Harry W; Summers, Christopher J; Liu, Meilin; Sandhage, Kenneth H

    2007-03-08

    The carbothermal reduction of silica into silicon requires the use of temperatures well above the silicon melting point (> or =2,000 degrees C). Solid silicon has recently been generated directly from silica at much lower temperatures (< or =850 degrees C) via electrochemical reduction in molten salts. However, the silicon products of such electrochemical reduction did not retain the microscale morphology of the starting silica reactants. Here we demonstrate a low-temperature (650 degrees C) magnesiothermic reduction process for converting three-dimensional nanostructured silica micro-assemblies into microporous nanocrystalline silicon replicas. The intricate nanostructured silica microshells (frustules) of diatoms (unicellular algae) were converted into co-continuous, nanocrystalline mixtures of silicon and magnesia by reaction with magnesium gas. Selective magnesia dissolution then yielded an interconnected network of silicon nanocrystals that retained the starting three-dimensional frustule morphology. The silicon replicas possessed a high specific surface area (>500 m(2) g(-1)), and contained a significant population of micropores (< or =20 A). The silicon replicas were photoluminescent, and exhibited rapid changes in impedance upon exposure to gaseous nitric oxide (suggesting a possible application in microscale gas sensing). This process enables the syntheses of microporous nanocrystalline silicon micro-assemblies with multifarious three-dimensional shapes inherited from biological or synthetic silica templates for sensor, electronic, optical or biomedical applications.

  2. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION - ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The patented Eco Logic Process employs a gas-phase reduction reaction of hydrogen with organic and chlorinated organic compounds at elevated temperatures to convert aqueous and oily hazardous contaminants into a hydrocarbon-rich gas product. After passing through a scrubber, the ...

  3. Applying the Philosophical Concept of Reduction to the Chemistry of Water: Implications for Chemical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erduran, Sibel

    2005-01-01

    Even though philosophical themes in science education have been advocated for several decades, little attention has been paid to how these themes can be contextualized in the teaching of a particular domain of science. The purpose of this paper is to provide an example theoretical framework for applying a philosophical theme, reduction, in…

  4. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (Eco Logic) process thermally separates organics, then chemically reduces them in a hydrogen atmosphere, converting them to a reformed gas that consists of light hydrocarbons and water. A scrubber treats the reformed gas to remove hydrogen chl...

  5. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (Eco Logic) process thermally separates organics, then chemically reduces them in a hydrogen atmosphere, converting them to a reformed gas that consists of light hydrocarbons and water. A scrubber treats the reformed gas to remove hydrogen chl...

  6. The Reduction of Microbial and Chemical Contaminants with Selected POU/POE Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Centralized drinking water treatment and distribution alone may not always be the most practical or cost-effective option. Also, some consumers seeking a proactive measure to reduce exposure to pathogens and chemicals not currently monitored or regulated might consider employing...

  7. Reduction of Allowed Inventory When Chemicals are Located in Close Proximity with Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Y P; Nguyen, S N

    2006-09-27

    The objective of this report is to determine the allowed inventory of chemicals stored in the same bay, building or magazine, i.e., in close proximity, with high explosives (HE) that would, in the event of an accident, result in acceptable risks to colocated workers and the public.

  8. The Reduction of Microbial and Chemical Contaminants with Selected POU/POE Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Centralized drinking water treatment and distribution alone may not always be the most practical or cost-effective option. Also, some consumers seeking a proactive measure to reduce exposure to pathogens and chemicals not currently monitored or regulated might consider employing...

  9. Moisture-induced solid state instabilities in α-chymotrypsin and their reduction through chemical glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein instability remains the main factor limiting the development of protein therapeutics. The fragile nature (structurally and chemically) of proteins makes them susceptible to detrimental events during processing, storage, and delivery. To overcome this, proteins are often formulated in the solid-state which combines superior stability properties with reduced operational costs. Nevertheless, solid protein pharmaceuticals can also suffer from instability problems due to moisture sorption. Chemical protein glycosylation has evolved into an important tool to overcome several instability issues associated with proteins. Herein, we employed chemical glycosylation to stabilize a solid-state protein formulation against moisture-induced deterioration in the lyophilized state. Results First, we investigated the consequences of moisture sorption on the stability and structural conformation of the model enzyme α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) under controlled humidity conditions. Results showed that α-CT aggregates and inactivates as a function of increased relative humidity (RH). Furthermore, α-CT loses its native secondary and tertiary structure rapidly at increasing RH. In addition, H/D exchange studies revealed that α-CT structural dynamics increased at increasing RH. The magnitude of the structural changes in tendency parallels the solid-state instability data (i.e., formation of buffer-insoluble aggregates, inactivation, and loss of native conformation upon reconstitution). To determine if these moisture-induced instability issues could be ameliorated by chemical glycosylation we proceeded to modify our model protein with chemically activated glycans of differing lengths (lactose and dextran (10 kDa)). The various glycoconjugates showed a marked decrease in aggregation and an increase in residual activity after incubation. These stabilization effects were found to be independent of the glycan size. Conclusion Water sorption leads to aggregation, inactivation

  10. Features in chemical kinetics. I. Signatures of self-emerging dimensional reduction from a general format of the evolution law.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Paolo; Frezzato, Diego

    2013-06-21

    Simplification of chemical kinetics description through dimensional reduction is particularly important to achieve an accurate numerical treatment of complex reacting systems, especially when stiff kinetics are considered and a comprehensive picture of the evolving system is required. To this aim several tools have been proposed in the past decades, such as sensitivity analysis, lumping approaches, and exploitation of time scales separation. In addition, there are methods based on the existence of the so-called slow manifolds, which are hyper-surfaces of lower dimension than the one of the whole phase-space and in whose neighborhood the slow evolution occurs after an initial fast transient. On the other hand, all tools contain to some extent a degree of subjectivity which seems to be irremovable. With reference to macroscopic and spatially homogeneous reacting systems under isothermal conditions, in this work we shall adopt a phenomenological approach to let self-emerge the dimensional reduction from the mathematical structure of the evolution law. By transforming the original system of polynomial differential equations, which describes the chemical evolution, into a universal quadratic format, and making a direct inspection of the high-order time-derivatives of the new dynamic variables, we then formulate a conjecture which leads to the concept of an "attractiveness" region in the phase-space where a well-defined state-dependent rate function ω has the simple evolution ω[over dot]=-ω(2) along any trajectory up to the stationary state. This constitutes, by itself, a drastic dimensional reduction from a system of N-dimensional equations (being N the number of chemical species) to a one-dimensional and universal evolution law for such a characteristic rate. Step-by-step numerical inspections on model kinetic schemes are presented. In the companion paper [P. Nicolini and D. Frezzato, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234102 (2013)] this outcome will be naturally related to the

  11. Features in chemical kinetics. I. Signatures of self-emerging dimensional reduction from a general format of the evolution law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolini, Paolo; Frezzato, Diego

    2013-06-01

    Simplification of chemical kinetics description through dimensional reduction is particularly important to achieve an accurate numerical treatment of complex reacting systems, especially when stiff kinetics are considered and a comprehensive picture of the evolving system is required. To this aim several tools have been proposed in the past decades, such as sensitivity analysis, lumping approaches, and exploitation of time scales separation. In addition, there are methods based on the existence of the so-called slow manifolds, which are hyper-surfaces of lower dimension than the one of the whole phase-space and in whose neighborhood the slow evolution occurs after an initial fast transient. On the other hand, all tools contain to some extent a degree of subjectivity which seems to be irremovable. With reference to macroscopic and spatially homogeneous reacting systems under isothermal conditions, in this work we shall adopt a phenomenological approach to let self-emerge the dimensional reduction from the mathematical structure of the evolution law. By transforming the original system of polynomial differential equations, which describes the chemical evolution, into a universal quadratic format, and making a direct inspection of the high-order time-derivatives of the new dynamic variables, we then formulate a conjecture which leads to the concept of an "attractiveness" region in the phase-space where a well-defined state-dependent rate function ω has the simple evolution dot{ω }= - ω ^2 along any trajectory up to the stationary state. This constitutes, by itself, a drastic dimensional reduction from a system of N-dimensional equations (being N the number of chemical species) to a one-dimensional and universal evolution law for such a characteristic rate. Step-by-step numerical inspections on model kinetic schemes are presented. In the companion paper [P. Nicolini and D. Frezzato, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234102 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4809593 this outcome will be naturally

  12. Chemical reduction of FD&C yellow No. 5 to determine combined benzidine.

    PubMed

    Davis, V M; Bailey, J E

    1993-04-09

    Data are presented suggesting the presence of the aromatic amine benzidine as a combined impurity in the regulated color additive FD&C Yellow No. 5. The benzidine exists as an azo-dye constituent that forms from free benzidine impurities introduced during the manufacture of the color additive. The presence of combined benzidine is ascertained by sodium dithionite reduction of the azo bonds in the commercial color additive. The resulting reduction products are extracted with chloroform, and the liberated benzidine is determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The levels of benzidine determined by HPLC exceed those levels of benzidine accounted for by direct determination of free aromatic amines in the unreduced color.

  13. Chemical reduction kinetics of nitrate in aqueous solution by Mg/Cu bimetallic particles.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S B; Ramavandi, B; Moussavi, G

    2011-01-01

    Synthesized magnesium/copper (Mg/Cu) bimetallic particles have shown good potential for use in the reduction of nitrate from aqueous solutions. This study was conducted to investigate the main factors affecting the kinetics of nitrate reduction by Mg/Cu particles (<100 microm) in uncontrolled reaction conditions. The Mg/Cu bimetallic particles removed the majority of the various nitrate concentrations tested (50, 100, 150, 200 and 300 mg L(-1)) within a short period. The time required for the removal of 90.6% of the NO3(-) from a 100 mg L(-1) solution was about 20 min using 2 gL(-1) bimetallic Mg/Cu at an initial solution pH of 6. The activation energy (Ea) for nitrate reduction by Mg/Cu over the temperature range of 5 to 60 degrees C was 14.21 kJ mol(-1). The experimental results of the kinetic analysis from batch studies indicated that a higher initial nitrate concentration yielded a greater reaction-rate constant and the denitrification rate increased with increase Mg/Cu dosage.

  14. Discovery of face-centered-cubic ruthenium nanoparticles: facile size-controlled synthesis using the chemical reduction method.

    PubMed

    Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Sumi, Naoya; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2013-04-17

    We report the first discovery of pure face-centered-cubic (fcc) Ru nanoparticles. Although the fcc structure does not exist in the bulk Ru phase diagram, fcc Ru was obtained at room temperature because of the nanosize effect. We succeeded in separately synthesizing uniformly sized nanoparticles of both fcc and hcp Ru having diameters of 2-5.5 nm by simple chemical reduction methods with different metal precursors. The prepared fcc and hcp nanoparticles were both supported on γ-Al2O3, and their catalytic activities in CO oxidation were investigated and found to depend on their structure and size.

  15. Determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) using ultrasound digestion and oxidation-reduction potential-based titration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunook; Lim, Honglae; Colosimo, Mark F

    2007-09-01

    A new method for determining wastewater chemical oxygen demand (COD) using ultrasonic digestion and titration based on oxidation reduction potential (ORP) was developed. COD values of potassium hydrogen phthalate solution obtained by ultrasonic digestion were well matched with those obtained using Standard Methods. When applied to determine COD of real wastewater collected from a local treatment plant, results from the new method were within 80% to 90% of those obtained using Standard Methods. Nonetheless, the proposed strategy has the potential to be implemented into an online COD analyzing system.

  16. Chemical Kinetics Mechanism Reduction Based on Principal Component Analysis: Development and Testing of Some New Implementations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    prediction of propulsion system performance. In addition, programs employed in this study for screening the merit of reduced mechanisms were...development of system -specific gas-phase finite-rate chemical kinetics mechanisms is a significant part of these efforts (Anderson et al., 2010; Chen and...employed to model other combustion systems . The final step involves producing a “reduced” (or skeletal) mechanism from the detailed/full one

  17. Impact of chemical kinetic model reduction on premixed turbulent flame characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillo, Aaron; Niemeyer, Kyle

    2016-11-01

    The use of detailed chemical kinetic models for direct numerical simulations (DNS) is prohibitively expensive. Current best practice for the development of reduced models is to match laminar burning parameters such as flame speed, thickness, and ignition delay time to predictions of the detailed chemical kinetic models. Prior studies using reduced models implicitly assumed that matching the homogeneous and laminar properties of the detailed model will result in similar behavior in a turbulent environment. However, this assumption has not been tested. Fillo et al. recently demonstrated experimentally that real jet fuels with similar chemistry and laminar burning parameters exhibit different turbulent flame speeds under the same flow conditions. This result raises questions about the validity of current best practices for the development of reduced chemical kinetic models for turbulent DNS. This study will investigate the validity of current best practices. Turbulent burning parameters, including flame speed, thickness, and stretch rate, will be compared for three skeletal mechanisms of the Princeton POSF 4658 mechanism, reduced using current best practice methods. DNS calculations of premixed, high-Karlovitz flames will be compared to determine if these methods are valid. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1314109-DGE.

  18. Removal efficiency and toxicity reduction of 4-chlorophenol with physical, chemical and biochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M; Murcia, M D; Dams, R; Christofi, N; Gómez, E; Gómez, J L

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophenols are well-known priority pollutants and many different treatments have been assessed to facilitate their removal from industrial wastewater. However, an absolute and optimum solution still has to be practically implemented in an industrial setting. In this work, a series ofphysical, chemical and biochemical treatments have been systematically tested for the removal of 4-chlorophenol, and their results have been compared in order to determine the most effective treatment based on removal efficiency and residual by-product formation. Chemical treatments based on advanced oxidation processes (AOP) produced the best results on rate and extent of pollutant removal. The non-chemical technologies showed advantages in terms of complete (in the case of adsorption) or easy (enzymatic treatments) removal of toxic treatment by-products. The AOP methods led to the production of different photoproducts depending on the chosen treatment. Toxic products remained in most cases following treatment, though the toxicity level is significantly reduced with combination treatments. Among the treatments, a photochemical method combining UV, produced with a KrCl excilamp, and hydrogen peroxide achieved total removal of chlorophenol and all by-products and is considered the best treatment for chlorophenol removal.

  19. Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and Other Environmental Impacts (TRACI) TRACI version 2.1 User’s Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRACI 2.1 (the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts) has been developed for sustainability metrics, life cycle impact assessment, industrial ecology, and process design impact assessment for developing increasingly sustainable products...

  20. Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and Other Environmental Impacts (TRACI) TRACI version 2.1 User’s Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRACI 2.1 (the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts) has been developed for sustainability metrics, life cycle impact assessment, industrial ecology, and process design impact assessment for developing increasingly sustainable products...

  1. New chemical additive to enhance reduction of oil carryover in gas

    SciTech Connect

    Khatib, Z.I.

    1998-12-31

    Foaming and fouling in glycol contactors and/or in amine treating systems are frequent problems in gas treatment processes due to the entrainment of liquid and solid aerosols in the gas stream. Entrainment of these aerosols leads also to mechanical damage of turbines and/or unscheduled shutdown of compressor units. A new chemical additive was developed and applied in the gas stream. The additive was successful in preventing the dissemination of the oil and/or condensate carryover into aerosol sizes, thereby enhancing the performance of coalescer filters and scrubbers.

  2. Reductions in body temperature and spontaneous activity in rats exposed to horizontal rotation: abolition following chemical labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    Ossenkopp, K P; Rabi, Y J; Eckel, L A; Hargreaves, E L

    1994-08-01

    The effect of horizontal rotation of male rats (70 rpm) on core temperature and spontaneous motor activity levels was examined. In Experiment 1, subjects were chemically labyrinthectomized (VNX) by intratympanic (IT) injections of sodium arsanilate and control rats (VNS) received IT injections of saline. Half of the rats in each group were subsequently rotated and the other half sham rotated. Measurement of body temperature prior to, immediately after, and 20 min following rotation revealed significant (all p < 0.01) reductions in temperature immediately after treatment, and 20 min later, in VNS rats. Sham-rotated VNS and all VNX rats failed to exhibit any significant changes in temperature following treatment. In Experiment 2, motor activity level was monitored in chemically labyrinthectomized (VNX) and control (VNS) rats prior to, and following, horizontal rotation. The VNS rats exhibited large (all p < 0.01) depressions in measures of horizontal and vertical spontaneous motor activity following rotation treatment, whereas VNX rats exhibited similar levels of activity in the pre- and postrotation period. These experiments show that, as in humans, exposing rats to horizontal rotation results in reduction of body temperature and motor activity, and that these physiological and behavioral changes require a functional vestibular system.

  3. Chemical Fouling Reduction of a Submersible Steel Spectrophotometer in Estuarine Environments Using a Sacrificial Zinc Anode.

    PubMed

    Tait, Zachary S; Thompson, Megan; Stubbins, Aron

    2015-07-01

    The availability of in situ spectrophotometers, such as the S::CAN spectro::lyser, has expanded the possibilities for high-frequency water quality data collection. However, biological and chemical fouling can degrade the performance of in situ spectrophotometers, especially in saline environments with rapid flow rates. A complex freshwater washing system has been previously designed to reduce chemical fouling for the S::CAN spectro::lyser spectrophotometer. In the current study, we present a simpler, cheaper alternative: the attachment of a sacrificial zinc anode. Results are presented detailing the S::CAN spectro::lyser performance with and without the addition of the sacrificial anode. Attachment of the zinc anode provided efficient corrosion protection during 2-wk deployments in a highly dynamic (average tidal range, 2.5 m) saline tidal saltmarsh creek at Groves Creek, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Dramatic reduction of chemical sputtering of graphite under intercalation of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, H.; Toyoda, H.; Sugai, H.

    2003-03-01

    In previous studies, in situ deposition of a lithium thin layer onto graphite was found to considerably suppress physical sputtering of graphite, owing to rapid diffusion of Li into graphite bulk (so-called intercalation). This paper reports that the Li intercalation dramatically reduces graphite chemical sputtering as well, once the Li-deposited surface is cleaned by hydrogen plasma. This is evidenced in a small-scale plasma experiment on the Li-deposited graphite in hydrogen glow, comparing with an ultra-high-vacuum beam experiment. In the latter experiment, energy-controlled H 2+ beam is irradiated on a Li-deposited graphite sample where methane yield is measured together with in situ surface analysis of graphite by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Both the plasma experiment and the beam experiment showed similar temporal variations of methane yield after the hydrogen exposure of the Li-deposited graphite. Namely, the methane yield gradually decreases down to a negligible level compared with the pure graphite case. The XPS analysis of surface atoms (O, C, Li) suggests that the hydrogen plasma exposure gives rise to removal of Li-containing impurities on the graphite surface. As a consequence, the hydrogen glow conditioning results in an almost complete suppression of chemical erosion of graphite below 500 K.

  5. Reduction of the chemical master equation for gene regulatory networks using proper generalized decompositions.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Amine; Cueto, Elías; Chinesta, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    The numerical solution of the chemical master equation (CME) governing gene regulatory networks and cell signaling processes remains a challenging task owing to its complexity, exponentially growing with the number of species involved. Although most of the existing techniques rely on the use of Monte Carlo-like techniques, we present here a new technique based on the approximation of the unknown variable (the probability of having a particular chemical state) in terms of a finite sum of separable functions. In this framework, the complexity of the CME grows only linearly with the number of state space dimensions. This technique generalizes the so-called Hartree approximation, by using terms as needed in the finite sums decomposition for ensuring convergence. But noteworthy, the ease of the approximation allows for an easy treatment of unknown parameters (as is frequently the case when modeling gene regulatory networks, for instance). These unknown parameters can be considered as new space dimensions. In this way, the proposed method provides solutions for any value of the unknown parameters (within some interval of arbitrary size) in one execution of the program.

  6. Act on the Registration and Evaluation of Chemicals (K-REACH) and replacement, reduction or refinement best practices

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Korea’s Act on the Registration and Evaluation of Chemicals (K-REACH) was enacted for the protection of human health and the environment in 2015. Considering that about 2000 new substances are introduced annually across the globe, the extent of animal testing requirement could be overwhelming unless regulators and companies work proactively to institute and enforce global best practices to replace, reduce or refine animal use. In this review, the way to reduce the animal use for K-REACH is discussed. Methods Background of the enforcement of the K-REACH and its details was reviewed along with the papers and regulatory documents regarding the limitation of animal experiments and its alternatives in order to discuss the regulatory adoption of alternative tests. Results Depending on the tonnage of the chemical used, the data required ranges from acute and other short-term studies for a single exposure route to testing via multiple exposure routes and costly, longer-term studies such as a full two-generation reproducibility toxicity. The European Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals regulation provides for mandatory sharing of vertebrate test data to avoid unnecessary duplication of animal use and test costs, and obligation to revise data requirements and test guidelines “as soon as possible” after relevant, validated replacement, reduction or refinement (3R) methods become available. Furthermore, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development actively accepts alternative animal tests and 3R to chemical toxicity tests. Conclusions Alternative tests which are more ethical and efficient than animal experiments should be widely used to assess the toxicity of chemicals for K-REACH registration. The relevant regulatory agencies will have to make efforts to actively adopt and uptake new alternative tests and 3R to K-REACH. PMID:28118702

  7. Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on strawberry fruit and reduction of the pathogen population by chemical agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, K; Newman, M C; Archbold, D D; Hamilton-Kemp, T R

    2001-09-01

    Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was studied on strawberry, a fruit that is not usually washed during production, harvest, or postharvest handling. Two strains of the bacteria were tested separately on the fruit surface or injected into the fruit. Both strains of E. coli O157:H7 survived externally and internally at 23 degrees C for 24 h and at 10, 5, and -20 degrees C for 3 days. The largest reduction in bacterial population occurred at -20 degrees C and on the fruit surface during refrigeration. In all experiments, the bacteria inside the fruit either survived as well as or better than bacteria on the surface, and ATCC 43895 frequently exhibited greater survival than did ATCC 35150. Two strains of E. coli also survived at 23 degrees C on the surface and particularly inside strawberry fruit. Chemical agents in aqueous solution comprising NaOCl (100 and 200 ppm), Tween 80 (100 and 200 ppm), acetic acid (2 and 5%), Na3PO4 (2 and 5%), and H2O2 (1 and 3%) were studied for their effects on reduction of surface-inoculated (10(8) CFU/ml) E. coli O157:H7 populations on strawberry fruit. Dipping the inoculated fruit in water alone reduced the pathogen population about 0.8 log unit. None of the compounds with the exception of H2O2 exhibited more than a 2-log CFU/g reduction of the bacteria on the fruit surface. Three percent H202, the most effective chemical treatment, reduced the bacterial population on strawberries by about 2.2 log CFU/g.

  8. Wet chemical method for synthesizing 3D graphene/gold nanocomposite: catalytic reduction of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiliang; Yang, Xujie; Xu, Xingyou

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a simple and environmentally-friendly approach was reported to synthesize a novel 3D composite of graphene/gold nanoparticles (3DG/Au NPs) in one step. A 3D interlaced framework of graphene, which exhibited hierarchically porous structures, generated directly through the distinct driving force during the hydrothermal growth. Meanwhile, Au NPs with high dispersity, which displayed tunable morphologies, were immobilized on the framework, where the as-prepared graphene was employed as the endogenous reducing agent. Compared with AuNPs, the obtained 3DG/Au NPs exhibited remarkably convenient recyclability and high activity for the reduction of methylene blue which is a kind of organic dye.

  9. Reduction of hole doping of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene by photoresist selection and thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Sul, Onejae; Kim, Kyumin; Choi, Eunseok; Kil, Joonpyo; Park, Wanjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-12-16

    The doping effect on graphene by photoresists were studied in this article. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the usual choice for graphene transfer, but it is known to leave a significant amount of residue. PMMA results in strong hole doping and reduction of mobility of the graphene devices. Not only PMMA, but photoresists also leave residues during the lithographic steps and dope the graphene in strong hole-doping states along with water and oxygen molecules. In this article, we tested three types of photoresists for their effects on graphene's electrical properties. It was found that a specific photoresist can significantly reduce the amount of hole-doping of the graphene transistor more than other photoresists. The use of hydrophobic substrates and additional thermal treatment can help reducing the hole-doping further.

  10. Reduction of hole doping of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene by photoresist selection and thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sul, Onejae; Kim, Kyumin; Choi, Eunseok; Kil, Joonpyo; Park, Wanjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-12-01

    The doping effect on graphene by photoresists were studied in this article. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the usual choice for graphene transfer, but it is known to leave a significant amount of residue. PMMA results in strong hole doping and reduction of mobility of the graphene devices. Not only PMMA, but photoresists also leave residues during the lithographic steps and dope the graphene in strong hole-doping states along with water and oxygen molecules. In this article, we tested three types of photoresists for their effects on graphene’s electrical properties. It was found that a specific photoresist can significantly reduce the amount of hole-doping of the graphene transistor more than other photoresists. The use of hydrophobic substrates and additional thermal treatment can help reducing the hole-doping further.

  11. Key factors in chemical reduction by hydrazine for recovery of precious metals.

    PubMed

    Chen, J Paul; Lim, L L

    2002-10-01

    Most of the commonly used metal waste treatment approaches only allow removal of metals which are ultimately discarded as sludge and do not permit the reuse of the metals, resulting in a waste of raw materials. In this study, the recovery of precious metals of sliver and copper in a synthesized wastewater in batch reactors was investigated using a reduction method by hydrazine as the reducing agent. Recovery of metal ions was greatest at pH > 11. The presence of humic acid did not have negative effects on the recovery process. Varying dissolved oxygen levels in the hydrazine solution did not significantly affect the recovery of both metals while seeding and ageing processes resulted in an increase in the particle size of the solid obtained. Under competitive conditions between Cu2+ and Ag+ ions, the recovery of silver remained the same, while that of copper was enhanced.

  12. Electrochemical and Structural Study of a Chemically Dealloyed PtCu Oxygen Reduction Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Indrajit; Carpenter, Michael K.; Balogh, Michael P.; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.; Moylan, Thomas E.; Atwan, Mohammed H.; Irish, Nicholas P.

    2010-10-22

    A carbon-supported, dealloyed platinum-copper (Pt-Cu) oxygen reduction catalyst was prepared using a multistep synthetic procedure. Material produced at each step was characterized using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy mapping, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and cyclic voltammetry, and its oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was measured by a thin-film rotating disk electrode technique. The initial synthetic step, a coreduction of metal salts, produced a range of poorly crystalline Pt, Cu, and Pt-Cu alloy nanoparticles that nevertheless exhibited good ORR activity. Annealing this material alloyed the metals and increased particle size and crystallinity. Transmission electron microscopy shows the annealed catalyst to include particles of various sizes, large (>25 nm), medium (12-25 nm), and small (<12 nm). Most of the small and medium-sized particles exhibited a partial or complete core-shell (Cu-rich core and Pt shell) structure with the smaller particles typically having more complete shells. The appearance of Pt shells after annealing indicates that they are formed by a thermal diffusion mechanism. Although the specific activity of the catalyst material was more than doubled by annealing, the concomitant decrease in Pt surface area resulted in a drop in its mass activity. Subsequent dealloying of the catalyst by acid treatment to partially remove the copper increased the Pt surface area by changing the morphology of the large and some medium particles to a 'Swiss cheese' type structure having many voids. The smaller particles retained their core-shell structure. The specific activity of the catalyst material was little reduced by dealloying, but its mass activity was more than doubled due to the increase in surface area. The possible origins of these results are discussed in this report.

  13. Functional fixedness and functional reduction as common sense reasonings in chemical equilibrium and in geometry and polarity of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furió, C.; Calatayud, M. L.; Bárcenas, S. L.; Padilla, O. M.

    2000-09-01

    Many of the learning difficulties in the specific domain of chemistry are found not only in the ideas already possessed by students but in the strategic and procedural knowledge that is characteristic of everyday thinking. These defects in procedural knowledge have been described as functional fixedness and functional reduction. This article assesses the procedural difficulties of students (grade 12 and first and third year of university) based on common sense reasoning in two areas of chemistry: chemical equilibrium and geometry and polarity of molecules. In the first area, the theme of external factors affecting equilibria (temperature and concentration change) was selected because the explanations given by the students could be analyzed easily. The existence of a functional fixedness where Le Chatelier's principle was almost exclusively applied by rote could be observed, with this being the cause of the incorrect responses given to the proposed items. Functional fixedness of the Lewis structure also led to an incorrect prediction of molecular geometry. When molecular geometry was correctly determined by the students, it seemed that other methodological or procedural difficulties appeared when the task was to determine molecular polarity. The students showed a tendency, in many cases, to reduce the factors affecting molecular polarity in two possible ways: (a) assuming that polarity depends only on shape (geometric functional reduction) or (b) assuming that molecular polarity depends only on the polarity of bonds (bonding functional reduction).

  14. Dietary glucarate-mediated reduction of sensitivity of murine strains to chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Walaszek, Z; Hanausek-Walaszek, M; Webb, T E

    1986-10-01

    Serum beta-glucuronidase activity is shown to differ quantitatively in the following strains of mice, listed in order of increasing activity: C3H, C57BL/6 less than BALB/c, DBA/2, ICR less than SENCAR, A/He. The level of the enzyme in the murine strains is shown to correlate with the urinary excretion of 17-ketosteroids, which in turn reflects the endogenous level of androgens. Dietary calcium D-glucarate, an in vivo beta-glucuronidase inhibitor, reduced the steady state level of both beta-glucuronidase and 17-ketosteroid excretion in the highly susceptible A/He and SENCAR strains to that of strains known to be resistant to chemical carcinogenesis. Sensitivity of the A/He strain is significantly reduced by dietary calcium glucarate, which is shown to inhibit DNA binding and the induction of pulmonary adenomas by benzo[a]pyrene.

  15. IN-SITU CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH ENHANCED ANAEROBIC REDUCTIVE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Lutes; Angela Frizzell, PG; Todd A. Thornton; James M. Harrington

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this NETL sponsored bench-scale study was to demonstrate the efficacy of enhanced anaerobic reductive precipitation (EARP) technology for precipitating uranium using samples from contaminated groundwater at the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) in Cincinnati, Ohio. EARP enhances the natural biological reactions in the groundwater through addition of food grade substrates (typically molasses) to drive the oxidative-reductive potential of the groundwater to a lower, more reduced state, thereby precipitating uranium from solution. In order for this in-situ technology to be successful in the long term, the precipitated uranium must not be re-dissolved at an unacceptable rate once groundwater geochemical conditions return to their pretreatment, aerobic state. The approach for this study is based on the premise that redissolution of precipitated uranium will be slowed by several mechanisms including the presence of iron sulfide precipitates and coatings, and sorption onto fresh iron oxides. A bench-scale study of the technology was performed using columns packed with site soil and subjected to a continuous flow of uranium-contaminated site groundwater (476 {micro}g/L). The ''treated'' column received a steady stream of dilute food grade molasses injected into the contaminated influent. Upon attainment of a consistently reducing environment and demonstrated removal of uranium, an iron sulfate amendment was added along with the molasses in the influent solution. After a month long period of iron addition, the treatments were halted, and uncontaminated, aerobic, unamended water was introduced to the treated column to assess rebound of uranium concentrations. In the first two months of treatment, the uranium concentration in the treated column decreased to the clean-up level (30 {micro}g/L) or below, and remained there for the remainder of the treatment period. A brief period of resolubilization of uranium was observed as the treated column returned to aerobic

  16. Quantifying the value of information for uncertainty reduction in chemical EOR modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leray, Sarah; Yeates, Christopher; Douarche, Frédéric; Roggero, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Reservoir modeling is a powerful tool to assess the technical and economic feasibility of chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery methods such as the joint injection of surfactant and polymer. Laboratory recovery experiments are usually undertaken on cores to understand recovery mechanisms and to estimate properties, that will be further used to build large scale models. To capture the different processes involved in chemical EOR, models are described by a large number of parameters which are basically only partially constrained by recovery experiments and additional characterizations, mainly because of cost and time restrictions or limited representativeness. Among the most uncertain properties, features the surfactant adsorption which cannot be straightforwardly derived from bulk or simplified dynamic measurements (e.g. single phase dynamic adsorption experiments). It is unfortunately critical for the economics of the process. Identifying the most informative observations (e.g. saturation scans, pressure differential, surfactant production, oil recovery) is of primary interest to compensate deficiency of some characterizations and improve models robustness and their predictive capability. Building a consistent set of recovery experiments that will allow to seize recovery mechanisms is critical as well. To address these inverse methodology issues, we create a synthetic numerical model with a well-defined set of parameter values, considered to be our reference case. This choice of model is based on a similar real data set and a broad literature review. It consists of a water-wet sandstone subject to typical surfactant-polymer injections. We first study the effect of a salinity gradient injected after a surfactant-polymer slug, as it is known to significantly improve oil recovery. We show that reaching optimal conditions of salinity gradient is a fragile balance between surfactant desorption and interfacial tension increase. This high dependence on surfactant adsorption

  17. Dry-plasma-free chemical etch technique for variability reduction in multi-patterning (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kal, Subhadeep; Mohanty, Nihar; Farrell, Richard A.; Franke, Elliott; Raley, Angelique; Thibaut, Sophie; Pereira, Cheryl; Pillai, Karthik; Ko, Akiteru; Mosden, Aelan; Biolsi, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Scaling beyond the 7nm technology node demands significant control over the variability down to a few angstroms, in order to achieve reasonable yield. For example, to meet the current scaling targets it is highly desirable to achieve sub 30nm pitch line/space features at back-end of the line (BEOL) or front end of line (FEOL); uniform and precise contact/hole patterning at middle of line (MOL). One of the quintessential requirements for such precise and possibly self-aligned patterning strategies is superior etch selectivity between the target films while other masks/films are exposed. The need to achieve high etch selectivity becomes more evident for unit process development at MOL and BEOL, as a result of low density films choices (compared to FEOL film choices) due to lower temperature budget. Low etch selectivity with conventional plasma and wet chemical etch techniques, causes significant gouging (un-intended etching of etch stop layer, as shown in Fig 1), high line edge roughness (LER)/line width roughness (LWR), non-uniformity, etc. In certain circumstances this may lead to added downstream process stochastics. Furthermore, conventional plasma etches may also have the added disadvantage of plasma VUV damage and corner rounding (Fig. 1). Finally, the above mentioned factors can potentially compromise edge placement error (EPE) and/or yield. Therefore a process flow enabled with extremely high selective etches inherent to film properties and/or etch chemistries is a significant advantage. To improve this etch selectivity for certain etch steps during a process flow, we have to implement alternate highly selective, plasma free techniques in conjunction with conventional plasma etches (Fig 2.). In this article, we will present our plasma free, chemical gas phase etch technique using chemistries that have high selectivity towards a spectrum of films owing to the reaction mechanism ( as shown Fig 1). Gas phase etches also help eliminate plasma damage to the

  18. Photomask defect tracing, analysis, and reduction with chemically amplified resist process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-ming; Lai, Rick; Huang, W. H.; Wang, B. C.; Chen, C. Y.; Kung, C. H.; Yoo, Chue-San; Chen, Jieh-Jang; Lee, Sheng-Cha

    2003-08-01

    The features of optical proximity correction are becoming very aggressive as production technology migrates into 90nm/130 nm regime. The complicated optical proximity correction (OPC) patterns often result in un-repairable defects, a major yield loss mechanisms in a mask production line. Defect control is increasingly important. A methodology for identifying defect sources and reduction is demonstrated in this paper. The mechanisms and causes of defect formation could be determined with corresponding process step on the strength of sequence inspections. The cause of half-etched opaque defect on negative CAR process was found from PR fragment contamination of e-beam exposure step. After clean-up of e-beam chamber, yield was increased over 20%. Big pinhole defect and contact of AttPSM positive process was found on ADI step. The possible cause was poor CAR adhesion. These two type defects were decreased by modification of developing recipe, special on rinse step. Design experiment with Taguchi method was used to optimize the interactive recipe of plasma descum and rinse step on developing step of implanted layer. Average defect density was decreased from 0.99 to 0.27, and percentage of zero defect rate has been increased from 29.5 to 63.3%.

  19. Chemical reduction synthesis and ac field effect of iron based core-shell magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Srinivasan; Bonder, Michael J.; Hadjipanayis, George C.

    2009-12-01

    High magnetization nanoparticles coated with a biocompatible polymer have attracted considerable interest in recent times as potential materials for biomedical applications associated with targeted drug delivery, detection and the treatment of cancer. This paper considers the use of sodium borohydride reduction of metal salts to form Fe based nanoparticles coated with carboxyl terminated polyethylene glycol (cPEG). By mixing the reactants in a Y-junction, the synthesis produces uniform nanoparticles in the size range 10-20 nm with a core-shell structure. The particles are subsequently coated with a 1-3 nm thick layer of cPEG. These nanoparticles are soft ferromagnets with Hc = 400 Oe. Exciting these nanoparticles with a 4 Oe, 500 kHz alternating magnetic field leads to particle heating with a maximal increase in the saturation temperature as the particle size is decreased. For the largest particles considered here, the temperature reaches 35 °C with a 10 mg sample mass whilst for the smallest nanoparticles considered the temperature exceeds 40 °C.

  20. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via chemical reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Alpana Rangra, V. S.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-05-15

    Natural flake Graphite was used as the starting material for the graphene synthesis. In the first step flake graphite was treated with oxidizing agents under vigorous conditions to obtain graphite oxide. Layered graphite oxide decorated with oxygen has large inter-layer distance leading easy exfoliation into single sheets by ultrasonication giving graphene oxide. In the last step exfoliated graphene oxide sheets were reduced slowly with the help of reducing agent to obtain fine powder which is labeled as reduced graphene oxide (rGO). This rGO was further characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman Spectroscopy techniques. XRD pattern shows peaks corresponding to (002) graphitic lattice planes indicating the formation of network of sp{sup 2} like carbon structure. SEM images show the ultrathin, wrinkled, paper-like morphology of graphene sheets. IR study shows that the graphite has been oxidized to graphite oxide with the presence of various absorption bands confirming the presence of oxidizing groups. The FTIR spectrum of rGO shows no sharp peaks confirming the efficient reduction of rGO. The Raman spectrum shows disorder in the graphene sheets.

  1. Chemical input reduction in the arabinoxylan and lignocellulose alkaline extraction and xylooligosaccharides production.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, Franciane Cristina; Carvalho, Ana Flavia Azevedo; Brienzo, Michel; Campioni, Tania Sila; de Oliva-Neto, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    Lignocellulosic material breakdown by hydrolysis is an important step to open new perspectives for bioenergy and special foods production like prebiotic xylooligosaccharides. Improvement of lignocellulose and arabinoxylan alkaline extraction from sugarcane bagasse and enzymatic hydrolysis were performed. Treatments 1 (10% KOH at 70°C), 3 (5% KOH at 121°C) and ZD method (24% KOH at 35°C) showed solid lignocellulose recovery of respectively 75.2%, 74.2% and 73%. A range of 24.8-27% extracted material with high arabinoxylan content (72.1-76.3%) was obtained with these treatments. Treatment 1 and 3 exhibited great KOH reduction in the method reaction, 54.1% and 76.2%, respectively. Likewise, in treatment 3 there was a decrease in ethanol consumption (40.9%) when compared to ZD method. The extracted arabinoxylan showed susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis with high solid loading (7%) since Trichoderma reesei xylanases were advantageous for xylose production (54.9%), while Aspergillus fumigatus xylanases achieved better XOS production (27.1%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemically Driven Enhancement of Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysis in Supported Perovskite Oxides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daehee; Tan, Jeiwan; Chae, Keun Hwa; Jeong, Beomgyun; Soon, Aloysius; Ahn, Sung-Jin; Kim, Joosun; Moon, Jooho

    2017-01-05

    Perovskite oxides have the capacity to efficiently catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is of fundamental importance for electrochemical energy conversion. While the perovskite catalysts have been generally utilized with a support, the role of the supports, regarded as inert toward the ORR, has been emphasized mostly in terms of the thermal stability of the catalyst system and as an ancillary transport channel for oxygen ions during the ORR. We demonstrate a novel approach to improving the catalytic activity of perovskite oxides for solid oxide fuel cells by controlling the oxygen-ion conducting oxide supports. Catalytic activities of (La0.8Sr0.2)0.95MnO3 perovskite thin-film placed on different oxide supports are characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These analyses confirm that the strong atomic orbital interactions between the support and the perovskite catalyst enhance the surface exchange kinetics by ∼2.4 times, in turn, improving the overall ORR activity.

  3. Chemical reduction of odour in fresh sewage sludge in the presence of ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Su, Lianghu; Zhao, Youcai

    2013-01-01

    To assess the potential of ferric hydroxide (FH) to reduce odour emission from dewatered sewage sludge with a moisture of approximately 86%, odour reduction was evaluated using an electronic nose and measurements of odorous compounds (hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and volatile fatty acids (VFAs)). The sulphur species including sulphate, acid-volatile sulphide (AVS), Cr(II)-reducible sulphide (CRS) and elemental sulphur (ES), were analysed by a modified cold diffusion sequential extraction method before and after anaerobic incubation. Within 32 days, 69.3, 83.8 and 88.6% of the odour (or 81.3, 93.7 and 97.5% of hydrogen sulphide) were eliminated, respectively, at the rates of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.25% (wt) of FH. The sulphur species analysis indicated that FeS, FeS2 and a small portion of S0 were formed by FH-sulphide reaction. This study also found that the relationship between odour and H2S concentrations could be well expressed by Steven's law. We believe that FH can be a cost-effective reagent for sludge odour control in sewage treatment processes.

  4. Reduction of Contaminants (Physical, Chemical, and Microbial) in Domestic Wastewater through Hybrid Constructed Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Sehar, Shama; Aamir, Rabia; Naz, Iffat; Ali, Naeem; Ahmed, Safia

    2013-01-01

    The current research was focused mainly on the designing and construction of efficient laboratory scale hybrid constructed wetland (HCW) for the treatment of domestic wastewater. Parameters like COD, BOD5, PO4, SO4, NO3, NO2, and pathogenic indicator microbes were monitored after hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 days. Treatment efficiency of HCW kept on increasing with the increase in hydraulic retention time. Maximum efficiency of HCW was observed with a 20-day HRT, that is, 97.55, 97.5, 89.35, 80.75, 96.04, 91.52, and 98.6% reduction from the zero time value for COD, BOD5, PO4, SO4, NO3, NO2, and fecal coliforms, respectively. After 20 days' time, the treated water was free of almost all nutrients and microbial pollutants. Hence, increasing hydraulic retention time was found to ameliorate the operational competence of HCW. Thus HCW can serve as a promising technology for wastewater treatment and can be scaled up for small communities in the developing countries. PMID:23724336

  5. Chemical studies on polyaniline titanotungstate and its uses to reduction cesium from solutions and polluted milk.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, I M; Zakaria, E S; Ali, I M; Khalil, M; El-Shahat, M F

    2012-10-01

    Polyaniline titanotungstate (PATiW) was synthesized by the sol-gel method. Adsorption isotherm studies of Cs(+) from aqueous solution are described. Elemental Composition, chemical solubility, ion-exchange capacity (IEC) and pH-titration curve are studied. Distribution coefficients (K(d)) for 10 metal ions were determined. It was found that the polyaniline titanotungstate is highly selective to Cs(+) and the selectivity order is Cs(+)>Zr(4+)>Mo(6+)>V(5+)>As(5+)>Cr(3+)>Co(2+)>Cu(2+)>Zn(2+)>Cd(2+). The adsorbent capacity was determined using the Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherm models. The Cs(+) adsorption isotherm data fit best to the Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum Cs(+) uptake of polyaniline titanotungstate was found to be 217 mg g(-1). Column tests were performed to determine the breakthrough curves with varying bed depths and flow rates in different solutions. The results showed that the half breakthrough time increases proportionally with increasing bed depths. Kinetic studies for removal of cesium from milk were also investigated using a scintillation detector head (NaI). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis and magnetic properties of cobalt nickel nanoparticles prepared by chemical reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Jalpa Dipesh

    The purpose of this work was to prepare and characterise CoxNii.x/CoNiO core-shell magnetic nanoparticles which showed magnetic exchange bias. The particles were synthesised using a variety of stabilising surfactants and nucleating seeds, via the polyol reduction method. The surfactants were used to coat nanoparticles of various diameters, to prevent agglomeration and oxidation. A mixture of 1:1 oleic acid: oleylamine was found to be the best stabilising agent for the particles as it protected against complete oxidation whilst allowing a partial oxide shell to form. Phosphine-based surfactants yielded particles with spherical morphologies. However, these particles were too small to support oxide-shell growth, and oxidised fully to antiferromagnetic phases. The nucleation of particles was probed using homogeneous and heterogeneous methods. Homogeneous nucleation resulted in particles which had predominantly oxidised to the core, and therefore did not yield pronounced exchange bias effects. Heterogeneous nucleation was attempted using various seeding techniques and seed materials. Platinum seeds were found to be the most effective in controlling the size of CoxNii_x nanoparticles. They yielded larger particles with core-shell morphology. Following optimisation of the synthesis conditions, a compositional series of CoxNii.x nanoparticulate composite alloys were made. All samples were analysed using TEM to determine the size and structure of the individual particles. A number of other techniques including X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Electron energy loss spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric magnetic analysis, were also used to fully characterise the phase, crystallinity, composition and oxidation in individual particles. The magnetic properties of the particles, made using the various reaction conditions, were measured using the SQUID technique. Exchange bias has been observed in several of the alloyed samples in

  7. Determination of decimal reduction time (D value) of chemical agents used in hospitals for disinfection purposes

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, Priscila Gava; Penna, Thereza Christina Vessoni; da S Martins, Alzira M

    2003-01-01

    Background Prior to the selection of disinfectants for low, intermediate and high (sterilizing) levels, the decimal reduction time, D-value, for the most common and persistent bacteria identified at a health care facility should be determined. Methods The D-value was determined by inoculating 100 mL of disinfecting solution with 1 mL of a bacterial suspension (104 – 105 CFU/mL for vegetative and spore forms). At regular intervals, 1 mL aliquots of this mixture were transferred to 8 mL of growth media containing a neutralizing agent, and incubated at optimal conditions for the microorganism. Results The highest D-values for various bacteria were determined for the following solutions: (i) 0.1% sodium dichloroisocyanurate (pH 7.0) – E. coli and A. calcoaceticus (D = 5.9 min); (ii) sodium hypochlorite (pH 7.0) at 0.025% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 24 min), E. coli and E. cloacae (D = 7.5 min); at 0.05% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.4 min) and E. coli (D = 6.1 min) and 0.1% for B. stearothermophilus (D = 3.5 min) and B. subtilis (D = 3.2 min); (iii) 2.0% glutaraldehyde (pH 7.4) – B. stearothermophilus, B. subtilis (D = 25 min) and E. coli (D = 7.1 min); (iv) 0.5% formaldehyde (pH 6.5) – B. subtilis (D = 11.8 min), B. stearothermophilus (D = 10.9 min) and A. calcoaceticus (D = 5.2 min); (v) 2.0% chlorhexidine (pH 6.2) – B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.1 min), and at 0.4% for E. cloacae (D = 8.3 min); (vi) 1.0% Minncare® (peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, pH 2.3) – B. stearothermophilus (D = 9.1 min) and E. coli (D = 6.7 min). Conclusions The suspension studies were an indication of the disinfectant efficacy on a surface. The data in this study reflect the formulations used and may vary from product to product. The expected effectiveness from the studied formulations showed that the tested agents can be recommended for surface disinfection as stated in present guidelines and emphasizes the importance and need to develop routine and novel programs to

  8. Efficiency of some soil bacteria for chemical oxygen demand reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agiated culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Erguven, G O; Yildirim, N

    2016-05-30

    This study searches the efficiency of certain soil bacteria on chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agitated culture conditions. It also aims to determine the turbidity of liquid culture medium with chlorsulfuron during bacterial incubation for 120 hours. As a result the highest and lowest COD removal efficiency of bacteria was determined for Bacillus simplex as 94% and for Micrococcus luteus as 70%, respectively at the end of the 96th hour. It was found that COD removal efficiency showed certain differences depend on the bacterial species. It was also observed that B. simplex had the highest COD removal efficiency and it was a suitable bacterium species for bioremediation of a chlorsulfuron contaminated soils.

  9. Kondo effect in Co{sub x}Cu{sub 1-x} granular alloys prepared by chemical reduction method

    SciTech Connect

    Dhara, Susmita Chowdhury, Rajeswari Roy; Bandyopadhyay, Bilwadal

    2015-06-24

    Nanostructured CoCu granular alloys Co{sub x}Cu{sub 1-x} (x ≤ 0.3) have been prepared by chemical reduction method using NaBH{sub 4} as a reducing agent. Electronic transport properties are studied in the temperature range 4-300 K. Resistance exhibits a metallic behavior below room temperature and draws a minimum near 20 K in all the samples except in Co{sub 0.3}Cu{sub 0.7}. This low temperature resistivity minimum diminishes with applied magnetic field. There is also a logarithmic temperature dependence of resistivity at temperatures below 20 K. This phenomenon indicates a Kondo-like scattering mechanism involving magnetic Co impurity spin clusters in Cu host.

  10. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work

  11. Synthesis and characterization of silver/montmorillonite/chitosan bionanocomposites by chemical reduction method and their antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Zargar, Mohsen; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Shabanzadeh, Parvaneh; Moghaddam, Mansour Ghaffari

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of a small size were successfully synthesized using the wet chemical reduction method into the lamellar space layer of montmorillonite/chitosan (MMT/Cts) as an organomodified mineral solid support in the absence of any heat treatment. AgNO3, MMT, Cts, and NaBH4 were used as the silver precursor, the solid support, the natural polymeric stabilizer, and the chemical reduction agent, respectively. MMT was suspended in aqueous AgNO3/Cts solution. The interlamellar space limits were changed (d-spacing = 1.24–1.54 nm); therefore, AgNPs formed on the interlayer and external surface of MMT/Cts with d-average = 6.28–9.84 nm diameter. Characterizations were done using different methods, ie, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Silver/montmorillonite/chitosan bionanocomposite (Ag/MMT/Cts BNC) systems were examined. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs in MMT/Cts was investigated against Gram-positive bacteria, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria, ie, Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the disc diffusion method using Mueller Hinton agar at different sizes of AgNPs. All of the synthesized Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs were found to have high antibacterial activity. These results show that Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs can be useful in different biological research and biomedical applications, including surgical devices and drug delivery vehicles. PMID:21499424

  12. Poly(methyl methacrylate) coating of soft magnetic amorphous and crystalline Fe,Co-B nanoparticles by chemical reduction.

    PubMed

    Fernández Barquín, L; Yedra Martínez, A; Rodríguez Fernández, L; Rojas, D P; Murphy, F J; Alba Venero, D; Ruiz González, L; González-Calbet, J; Fdez-Gubieda, M L; Pankhurst, Q A

    2012-03-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of a collection of nanoparticles coated by Poly(methyl methacrylate) through a wet chemical synthesis have been investigated. The particles display either an amorphous (M = Fe, Co) M-B arrangement or a mixed structure bcc-Fe and fcc-Co + amorphous M-B. Both show the presence of a metal oxi-hydroxide formed in aqueous reduction. The organic coating facilitates technological handling. The cost-effective synthesis involves a reduction in a Poly(methyl methacrylate) aqueous solution of iron(II) or cobalt(II) sulphates (< 0.5 M) by sodium borohydride (< 0.5 M). The particles present an oxidized component, as deduced from X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer and Fe- and Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy. For the ferrous alloys, this Fe-oxide is alpha-goethite, favoured by the aqueous solution. The Poly(methyl methacrylate) coating is confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In pure amorphous core alloys there is a drastic change of the coercivity from bulk to around 30 Oe in the nanoparticles. The mixed structured alloys also lie in the soft magnetic regime. Magnetisation values at room temperature range around 100 emu/g. The coercivity stems from multidomain particles and their agglomeration, triggering the dipolar interactions.

  13. Facile preparation of graphene-copper nanoparticle composite by in situ chemical reduction for electrochemical sensing of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiwen; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2012-01-03

    A novel graphene-copper nanoparticle composite was prepared by the in situ chemical reduction of a mixture containing graphene oxide and copper(II) ions using potassium borohydride as a reductant. It was mixed with paraffin oil and packed into one end of a fused capillary to fabricate microdisc electrodes for sensing carbohydrates. The morphology and structure of the graphene-copper nanoparticle composite were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy. The results indicated that copper nanoparticles with an average diameter of 20.8 nm were successfully deposited on graphene nanosheets to form a well interconnected hybrid network. The analytical performance of these unique graphene-copper nanoparticle composite paste electrodes was demonstrated by sensing five carbohydrates in combination with cyclic voltammetry and capillary electrophoresis (CE). The advantages of the composite detectors include higher sensitivity, satisfactory stability, surface renewability, bulk modification, and low expense of fabrication. They should find applications in microchip CE, flowing-injection analysis, and other microfluidic analysis systems.

  14. Intermediate added salt levels as sodium reduction strategy: Effects on chemical, microbial, textural and sensory quality of polony.

    PubMed

    Cluff, M; Kobane, I A; Bothma, C; Hugo, C J; Hugo, A

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of intermediate added salt levels (1.33% w/w and 1.84% w/w) as a strategy for reducing the total sodium content of polony, an emulsified, heat-treated meat product, which is reliant on the various functions of salt normally included at a 2.5% (w/w) level. Chemical, microbial, and textural stability over 180days as well as sensory quality were evaluated. At 1.84% (w/w) added salt content, the product was indistinguishable from the positive control except for a slightly wetter cutting surface. A level of 1.33% (w/w) added salt showed similar results, except for a slight variation in initial moisture content and a much wetter cutting surface. The hardest texture was achieved at 1.33% (w/w) added salt up to 90days of shelf-life. Consumers had a slight preference for a lower salt content. From this research it can be recommended that salt reduction as sole approach in sodium reduction should be evaluated for meat products in limiting the possibly costly and negatively perceived use of sodium replacers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. One-Step Synthesis and Magnetic Phase Transformation of Ln-TM-B Alloy by Chemical Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Woo; Kim, Young Hwan; Cha, Hyun Gil; Lee, Don Keun; Kang, Young Soo

    2007-04-11

    Binary and ternary intermetallic alloy systems are of interest for a variety of academic and technological applications. Despite recent advances in synthesizing binary alloy, there are very few reports of ternary alloy related to lanthanide series. The purpose of this work is to contribute to ternary alloy systems such as lanthanide-transition metal-boron with a simple chemical method and analysis of its magnetic behavior. Ternary Nd-Fe-B amorphous alloy was successfully synthesized with borohydride. The magnetic behavior in the process of formation of ternary Nd-Fe-B alloy and Nd2Fe14B from amorphous phase alloy is reported. Compared with the synthesis of a transition metal, the existence of a lanthanide ion makes aggregates-like particles with a diameter of 2 nm possible in the formation of a nanosphere, which is a significantly important result in terms of acceleration of the reduction-diffusion reaction for the formation of ternary alloy. In the process of reduction and diffusion, the Nd phase is diffused into the Fe-based phase, and then the ternary Nd2Fe14B intermetallic compound is fabricated.

  16. Enhanced chemical oxygen demand removal and flux reduction in pulp and paper wastewater treatment using laccase-polymerized membrane filtration.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chun-Han; Fan, Chihhao

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this present study is to investigate the removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) from pulp and paper wastewater using laccase-polymerized membrane filtration process. The membranes with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) of 5000 and 10,000, 30,000 and 54,000 were used in a cross-flow module to treat the pulp and paper wastewater containing high phenolic constituents and COD. With 2.98 IU/L of activated laccase applied at room temperature for 180 min, the contaminants in raw wastewater and second effluent were polymerized to form larger molecules with average molecular weight of 1300 and 900 Da (Dalton), respectively. With laccase polymerization prior to filtration, over 60% removals of COD by the four investigated membranes were observed, compared with low COD removal without laccase polymerization. Moreover, the addition of laccase resulted in 4-14% reduction of membrane permeability during the first 180 min filtration operation due to gel layer formation by the polymerization. No further flux decline was observed afterwards indicating the steady state was reached and the membranes could be used to remove the polymerized pollutants without significant fouling. The maximum apparent resistance occurrence for raw wastewater treated with laccase also supported the effectiveness for COD removal with laccase polymerization before membrane filtration. Additionally, pretreatment by inactivated laccase only caused further flux reduction without additional removal of COD.

  17. Effects of regional reductions in sulphur deposition on the chemical and biological recovery of lakes within Killarney Park, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Snucins, E; Gunn, J; Keller, B; Dixit, S; Hindar, A; Henriksen, A

    2001-01-01

    The lakes in Killarney Provincial Park, located 40-60 km southwest of Sudbury, Ontario, were some of the first lakes in North America to be acidified by atmospheric pollutants. Acidification affected thousands of fish and invertebrate populations in dozens of lakes. Since the 1970's, water quality has improved in response to atmospheric pollution reductions and some lakes have already recovered to approximately their pre-industrial pH levels, as inferred from diatom microfossils in lake sediments. Since the 1970's, fish species richness has not changed substantially, but zooplankton species richness has increased in acidified lakes. The critical sulphur load, the amount of SO2-derived acid deposition that can occur while still maintaining suitable water quality, was estimated to be exceeded in 38% of the park area in 1997. Depending on which of four possible North American emission control scenarios (CLR = currently legislated reduction; CLR + 25%; CLR + 50%; CLR + 75%) is achieved by 2010, the projected critical loads will be exceeded in about 0-30% of the park area in the future. There are many factors that can affect biological recovery rates of damaged lakes, but it is expected that biological recovery will lag considerably behind observed chemical recovery rates.

  18. Extracellular synthesis of cuprous selenide nanospheres by a biological-chemical coupling reduction process in an anaerobic microbial system.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lei; Wang, Jia; Qi, Shiyue; Xin, Baoping

    2016-09-01

    Biosynthesis of metal nanoparticles represents a clean, eco-friendly and sustainable "green chemistry" engineering. Lately, a number of metal selenides were successfully synthesized by biological methods. Here, cuprous selenide (Cu2 Se) nanospheres were prepared under mild conditions by a novel biological-chemical coupling reduction process. The simple process takes place between EDTA-Cu and Na2 SeO3 in presence of an alkaline solution containing NaBH4 and a selenite-reducing bacteria, Pantoea agglomerans. It is noteworthy that the isolated Pantoea agglomerans and Cu(+) ions, where the latter are obtained from reducing Cu(2+) ions by NaBH4 , play a key role, and Cu(+) ions not only can promote the generation of Se(2-) ions as a catalyst, but also can react with Se(2-) ions to form Cu2 Se. XRD pattern, SEM, and TEM images indicated that Cu2 Se nanoparticles were tetragonal crystal structure and the nanospheres diameter were about 100 nm. EDX, UV-vis, and FTIR spectra show that the biosynthesized Cu2 Se nanospheres are wrapped by protein and have a better stability. This work first proposes a new biosynthesis mechanism, and has important reference value for biological preparation of metal selenide nanomaterials. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1264-1270, 2016.

  19. An investigation to define the physical/chemical constraints which limit NO sub x emission reduction achievable by reburning

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J. M.; Moller, E. C.; Chen, S. L.

    1988-07-01

    Reburning is a combustion modification technique which removes NO{sub x} from combustion products by using fuel as a reducing agent. Previous studies have shown that natural gas is more effective than coal as a reburning fuel. Objectives of this program are to define the chemical and physical constraints which prevent the attainment of 80% NO{sub x} reduction with reburning and to test improved configurations for reburning as an advanced NO{sub x} control technique for coal-fired boilers. Bench scale studies are designed to screen the chemical and physical means for enhancing reburning efficiency. Pilot studies will evaluate the impacts of finite rate mixing on the effectiveness of the various concepts. The program consists of the following: bench scale studies of N{sub 2} formation in reburning zone and XN conversion in burnout zone; pilot scale studies; interpretation and generalization, and a final report. This report documents the experimental results obtained in the bench scale studies. The focus is on the chemistry of N{sub 2} formation in the reburning zone. Experiments were conducted in the bench scale Control Temperature Tower (CTT).

  20. Study of Impacts of Arctic Sea Ice Reduction on Atmospheric Chemical Processes - The BROMEX 2012 Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.

    2012-12-01

    Arctic perennial sea ice has decreased drastically in the last decade and still remained low in spring 2012 as observed from scatterometer datasets acquired by QuikSCAT and Oceansat-2 satellites. In particular, the thinner, weaker, and saltier seasonal sea ice has dominated over the perennial ice in the Chukchi Sea and Beaufort Sea. To investigate impacts of sea ice reduction on atmospheric chemical processes, we conducted the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment in (BROMEX) in March-April 2012 around Barrow, extending out to a large region offshore and inland. Here we present overview results from BROMEX, which was successfully carried out by about 30 scientists, researchers, and field workers from multiple international institutions. For BROMEX, we coordinated and collected satellite data, including a number of near-real-time products, from multiple satellite instruments including MODIS, AMSR-E, GOME-2, SCIAMACHY, OMI, RADARSAT-2, Envisat ASAR, TanDEM-X, SMOS, CryoSat-2, and Oceansat-2. Over the BROMEX field region, we made measurements and collected sea ice, snow, ocean, and air samples for physical, meteorological, chemical, biological, and acoustic studies. A helicopter was used to deploy chemical and meteorological buoys in the Chukchi Sea and the Beaufort Sea. Measurements were also made with airborne sensors across sea ice, leads, lagoon, and tundra along various flight patterns of the ALAR aircraft. Furthermore, we coordinated with the NASA IceBridge P3 aircraft to collect surface temperature, surface height, snow depth, and ice thickness measurements. We set up and maintained field sites on sea ice and in the tundra to measure bromine, ozone, mercury, and other chemical species. Moreover, we obtained temperature data from many different types of temperature sensors for temperature accuracy assessment to identify potential issues that might cause errors or biases in temperature measurements. An enormous amount of in-situ snow and ice data was collected

  1. Organic reactions for the electrochemical and photochemical production of chemical fuels from CO2--The reduction chemistry of carboxylic acids and derivatives as bent CO2 surrogates.

    PubMed

    Luca, Oana R; Fenwick, Aidan Q

    2015-11-01

    The present review covers organic transformations involved in the reduction of CO2 to chemical fuels. In particular, we focus on reactions of CO2 with organic molecules to yield carboxylic acid derivatives as a first step in CO2 reduction reaction sequences. These biomimetic initial steps create opportunities for tandem electrochemical/chemical reductions. We draw parallels between long-standing knowledge of CO2 reactivity from organic chemistry, organocatalysis, surface science and electrocatalysis. We point out some possible non-faradaic chemical reactions that may contribute to product distributions in the production of solar fuels from CO2. These reactions may be accelerated by thermal effects such as resistive heating and illumination.

  2. Improving subjective pattern recognition in chemical senses through reduction of nonlinear effects in evaluation of sparse data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, Amir H.; Rasouli, Firooz; Wrenn, Susan E.; Subbiah, M.

    2002-11-01

    Artificial neural network models are typically useful in pattern recognition and extraction of important features in large data sets. These models are implemented in a wide variety of contexts and with diverse type of input-output data. The underlying mathematics of supervised training of neural networks is ultimately tied to the ability to approximate the nonlinearities that are inherent in network"s generalization ability. The quality and availability of sufficient data points for training and validation play a key role in the generalization ability of the network. A potential domain of applications of neural networks is in analysis of subjective data, such as in consumer science, affective neuroscience and perception of chemical senses. In applications of ANN to subjective data, it is common to rely on knowledge of the science and context for data acquisition, for instance as a priori probabilities in the Bayesian framework. In this paper, we discuss the circumstances that create challenges for success of neural network models for subjective data analysis, such as sparseness of data and cost of acquisition of additional samples. In particular, in the case of affect and perception of chemical senses, we suggest that inherent ambiguity of subjective responses could be offset by a combination of human-machine expert. We propose a method of pre- and post-processing for blind analysis of data that that relies on heuristics from human performance in interpretation of data. In particular, we offer an information-theoretic smoothing (ITS) algorithm that optimizes that geometric visualization of multi-dimensional data and improves human interpretation of the input-output view of neural network implementations. The pre- and post-processing algorithms and ITS are unsupervised. Finally, we discuss the details of an example of blind data analysis from actual taste-smell subjective data, and demonstrate the usefulness of PCA in reduction of dimensionality, as well as ITS.

  3. Solution phase synthesis of aluminum-doped silicon nanoparticles via room-temperature, solvent based chemical reduction of silicon tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowbray, Andrew James

    We present a method of wet chemical synthesis of aluminum-doped silicon nanoparticles (Al-doped Si NPs), encompassing the solution-phase co-reduction of silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) and aluminum chloride (AlCl 3) by sodium naphthalide (Na[NAP]) in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME). The development of this method was inspired by the work of Baldwin et al. at the University of California, Davis, and was adapted for our research through some noteworthy procedural modifications. Centrifugation and solvent-based extraction techniques were used throughout various stages of the synthesis procedure to achieve efficient and well-controlled separation of the Si NP product from the reaction media. In addition, the development of a non-aqueous, formamide-based wash solution facilitated simultaneous removal of the NaCl byproduct and Si NP surface passivation via attachment of 1-octanol to the particle surface. As synthesized, the Si NPs were typically 3-15 nm in diameter, and were mainly amorphous, as opposed to crystalline, as concluded from SAED and XRD diffraction pattern analysis. Aluminum doping at various concentrations was accomplished via the inclusion of aluminum chloride (AlCl3); which was in small quantities dissolved into the synthesis solution to be reduced alongside the SiCl4 precursor. The introduction of Al into the chemically-reduced Si NP precipitate was not found to adversely affect the formation of the Si NPs, but was found to influence aspects such as particle stability and dispersibility throughout various stages of the procedure. Analytical techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FTIR spectroscopy, and ICP-optical emission spectroscopy were used to comprehensively characterize the product NPs. These methods confirm both the presence of Al and surface-bound 1-octanol in the newly formed Si NPs.

  4. Red blood cells donate electrons to methylene blue mediated chemical reduction of methemoglobin compartmentalized in liposomes in blood.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiromi; Li, Bing; Lim, Wei Lee; Iga, Yumika

    2014-07-16

    Electron-energy-rich coenzymes in cells, NADH and NADPH, are re-energized repeatedly through the Embden-Meyerhof and pentose-phosphate glycolytic pathways, respectively. This study demonstrates extraction of their electron energies in red blood cells (RBCs) for in vivo extracellular chemical reactions using an electron mediator shuttling across the biomembrane. Hemoglobin-vesicles (HbVs) are an artificial oxygen carrier encapsulating purified and concentrated Hb solution in liposomes. Because of the absence of a metHb-reducing enzymatic system in HbV, HbO2 gradually autoxidizes to form metHb. Wistar rats received HbV suspension (10 mL/kg body weight) intravenously. At the metHb level of around 50%, methylene blue [MB(+); 3,7-bis(dimethylamino)phenothiazinium chloride] was injected. The level of metHb quickly decreased to around 16% in 40 min, remaining for more than 5 h. In vitro mixing of HbV/MB(+) with RBCs recreated the in vivo metHb reduction, but not with plasma. NAD(P)H levels in RBCs decreased after metHb reduction. The addition of glucose facilitated metHb reduction. Liposome-encapsulated NAD(P)H, a model of RBC, reduced metHb in HbV in the presence of MB(+). These results indicate that (i) NAD(P)H in RBCs reacts with MB(+) to convert it to leukomethylene blue (MBH); (ii) MB(+) and MBH shuttle freely between RBC and HbV across the hydrophobic lipid membranes; and (iii) MBH is transferred into HbV and reduces metHb in HbV. Four other electron mediators with appropriate redox potentials appeared to be as effective as MB(+) was, indicating the possibility for further optimization of electron mediators. We established an indirect enzymatic metHb reducing system for HbV using unlimited endogenous electrons created in RBCs in combination with an effective electron mediator that prolongs the functional lifespan of HbV in blood circulation.

  5. Influence of Sn on the magnetic ordering of Ni-Sn alloy synthesized using chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanapal, K.; Narayanan, V.; Stephen, A.

    2016-05-01

    The Ni-Sn alloy was synthesized using borohydride assisted chemical reduction method. The composition of the synthesized alloy was determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy which revealed that the observed composition of Sn is high when compared to the initial composition. The ultrafine particles are clearly observed from field emission scanning electron microscope for all the sample. The X-ray diffraction measurement confirmed that the as-synthesized samples are of amorphous like nature while the samples annealed at 773 K showed crystalline nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed metallic bond stretching in the alloy samples. The crystallization and phase transition temperature was observed from differential scanning calorimetry. The shift in the crystallization temperature of Ni with increasing percentage of Sn was observed. The vibrating sample magnetometer was employed to understand the magnetic behavior of the Ni-Sn alloy. As-synthesized alloy samples showed paramagnetic nature while the annealed ones exhibit the soft ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic nature. The saturation magnetization value and magnetic ordering in the Ni-Sn alloys depend on the percentage of Sn present in the alloy.

  6. Microwave-assisted chemical reduction routes for direct synthesis of (fct) L1 phase of Fe-Pt.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Smita; Singh, Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical reduction route has been explored for the direct synthesis of fct L1(0) - phase of Fe-Pt nanoparticles in the present work. Effects of microwave power and irradiation time on the growth process are systematically studied. Using this facile and high yield technique we could tune particle size from 7 to 17 nm. Prepared Fe-Pt NPs exhibited ordered face centered tetragonal (fct) L1(0) phase without any post-synthesis treatment. The particle size and magnetic properties of the prepared Fe-Pt were found to be very sensitive to the microwave irradiation power, while influence of exposure time was insignificant. The hysteresis measurements were performed at 300 K to study magnetic properties of the synthesized Fe-Pt as a function of crystallite size. Coercivity and saturation magnetization were observed to be decreasing with diminishing particle size. The microwave-assisted route is found to be a simple technique for direct synthesis of metal alloys and may prove to be a potential tool of high density data storage materials such as Fe-Pt.

  7. Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. . Coal Preparation Div.); Jacobsen, P.S. )

    1991-02-01

    This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 184 raw coal channel samples, including anthracite, bituminous and lignite coals, collected from the Central Region of the United States. This is the second of a three volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in-depth characterization of each sample are presented alphabetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Central Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, section and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Large-scale synthesis of copper nanoparticles by chemically controlled reduction for applications of inkjet-printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngil; Choi, Jun-rak; Jong Lee, Kwi; Stott, Nathan E.; Kim, Donghoon

    2008-10-01

    Copper nanoparticles are being given considerable attention as of late due to their interesting properties and potential applications in many areas of industry. One such exploitable use is as the major constituent of conductive inks and pastes used for printing various electronic components. In this study, copper nanoparticles were synthesized through a relatively large-scale (5 l), high-throughput (0.2 M) process. This facile method occurs through the chemical reduction of copper sulfate with sodium hypophosphite in ethylene glycol within the presence of a polymer surfactant (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation and give dispersion stability to the resulting colloidal nanoparticles. Reaction yields were determined to be quantitative while particle dispersion yields were between 68 and 73%. The size of the copper nanoparticles could be controlled between 30 and 65 nm by varying the reaction time, reaction temperature, and relative ratio of copper sulfate to the surfactant. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of the particles revealed a spherical shape within the reported size regime, and x-ray analysis confirmed the formation of face-centered cubic (FCC) metallic copper. Furthermore, inkjet printing nanocopper inks prepared from the polymer-stabilized copper nanoparticles onto polyimide substrates resulted in metallic copper traces with low electrical resistivities (>=3.6 µΩ cm, or >=2.2 times the resistivity of bulk copper) after a relatively low-temperature sintering process (200 °C for up to 60 min).

  9. Improved magnetic and electrical properties of Cu doped Fe-Ni invar alloys synthesized by chemical reduction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sajjad; Ziya, Amer Bashir; Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem; Ibrahim, Ather; Atiq, Shabbar; Ahmad, Naseeb; Shakeel, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Azhar

    2016-12-01

    Fe-Ni-Cu invar alloys of various compositions (Fe65Ni35-xCux, x=0, 0.2, 0.6, 1, 1.4 and 1.8) were synthesized via chemical reduction route. These alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) techniques. The XRD analysis revealed the formation of face centered cubic (fcc) structure. The lattice parameter and the crystallite size of the investigated alloys were calculated and the line broadening indicated the nano-crystallites size of alloy powder. The particle size was estimated from SEM and it decreases by the incorporation of Cu and found to be in the range of 24-40 nm. The addition of Cu in these alloys appreciably enhances the saturation magnetization and it increases from 99 to 123 emu/g. Electrical conductivity has been improved with Cu addition. The thermal conductivity was calculated using the Wiedemann-Franz law.

  10. Application of integrated ozone and granular activated carbon for decolorization and chemical oxygen demand reduction of vinasse from alcohol distilleries.

    PubMed

    Hadavifar, Mojtaba; Younesi, Habibollah; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar; Mahdad, Faezeh; Li, Qin; Ghasemi, Zahra

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the treatment of the distilleries vinasse using a hybrid process integrating ozone oxidation and granular activated carbons (GAC) in both batch and continuous operation mode. The batch-process studies have been carried out to optimize initial influent pH, GAC doses, the effect of the ozone (O3) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color removal of the distilleries vinasse. The continuous process was carried out on GAC and ozone treatment alone as well as the hybrid process comb both methods to investigate the synergism effectiveness of the two methods for distilleries vinasse COD reduction and color removal. In a continuous process, the Yan model described the experimental data better than the Thomas model. The efficiency of ozonation of the distilleries vinasse was more effective for color removal (74.4%) than COD removal (25%). O3/H2O2 process was not considerably more effective on COD and color removal. Moreover, O3/GAC process affected negatively on the removal efficiency by reducing COD and color from distilleries vinasse. The negative effect decreased by increasing pH value of the influent.

  11. Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. ); Jacobsen, P.S. )

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 543 raw coal samples collected from the Eastern Region of the United States. This is the first volume of a three-volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in- depth characterization of each sample are presented alphbetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties, and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Eastern Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, section, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 14 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 on Cu-faujasite catalysts: an experimental and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Delahay, Gérard; Villagomez, Enrique Ayala; Ducere, Jean-Marie; Berthomieu, Dorothée; Goursot, Annick; Coq, Bernard

    2002-08-16

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3 in the presence of O2 on Cu-faujasite (Cu-FAU) has been studied. Substitution of some Cu2+ with H+ and Na+ cations, compensating for the negative charge of the zeolite framework, forms the various CuHNa-FAU studied. The amount of Cu was held constant and the proportion of H+ and Na+ varied in the sample. The substitution of Na+ for H+ increases sharply the SCR rate by lowering the temperature of reaction by about 150 K. It is proposed that the rate increase mainly comes from an unhindered migration of Cu from hidden to active sites and a modification of the redox properties of Cu species. The former was demonstrated by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy of adsorbed CO. The change in redox properties was demonstrated by a faster oxidation of Cu+ to Cu2+ (rate-determining step). Quantum chemical calculations on model clusters of CuHNa-FAU indicate that the faster rate of oxidation can be explained by a higher lability of protons in the absence of Na, which can be then removed from the catalyst more easily to yield H2O during the oxidation process.

  13. Effects of Ni content on nanocrystalline Fe-Co-Ni ternary alloys synthesized by a chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokprasombat, Komkrich; Pinitsoontorn, Supree; Maensiri, Santi

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic properties of Fe-Co-Ni ternary alloys could be altered by changing of the particle size, elemental compositions, and crystalline structures. In this work, Fe50Co50-xNix nanoparticles (x=10, 20, 40, and 50) were prepared by the novel chemical reduction process. Hydrazine monohydrate was used as a reducing agent under the concentrated basic condition with the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone). We found that the nanoparticles were composed of Fe, Co and Ni with compositions according to the molar ratio of the metal sources. Interestingly, the particles were well-crystalline at the as-prepared state without post-annealing at high temperature. Increasing Ni content resulted in phase transformation from body centered cubic (bcc) to face centered cubic (fcc). For the fcc phase, the average particle size decreased when increased the Ni content; the Fe50Ni50 nanoparticles had the smallest average size with the narrowest size distribution. In additions, the particles exhibited ferromagnetic properties at room temperature with the coercivities higher than 300 Oe, and the saturation magnetiation decreased with increasing Ni content. These results suggest that the structural and magnetic properties of Fe-Co-Ni alloys could be adjusted by varying the Ni content.

  14. Reduction of Fe(III) chelated with citrate in an NOx scrubber solution by Enterococcus sp. FR-3.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liu, Nan; Cai, Ling-Lin; Jiang, Jin-Lin; Chen, Jian-Meng

    2011-02-01

    Biological reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) is a key step in nitrogen oxide (NO(x)) removal by the integrated chemical absorption-biological reduction process. NO(x) removal efficiency strongly depends on the concentration of Fe(II) in the scrubbing liquid. In this study, a newly isolated strain, Enterococcus sp. FR-3, was used to reduce Fe(III) chelated with citrate to Fe(II). Strain FR-3 reduced citrate-chelated Fe(III) with an efficiency of up to 86.9% and an average reduction rate of 0.21 mM h(-1). SO(4)(2-) was not inhibitory whereas NO(2)(-) and SO(3)(2-) inhibited cell growth and thus affected Fe(III) reduction. Models based on the Logistic equation were used to describe the relationship between growth and Fe(III) reduction. These findings provide some useful data for Fe(III) reduction, scrubber solution regeneration and NO(x) removal process design.

  15. Electrically conductive graphene/polyacrylamide hydrogels produced by mild chemical reduction for enhanced myoblast growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyerim; Sim, Myeongbu; Kim, Semin; Yang, Sumi; Yoo, Youngjae; Park, Jin-Ho; Yoon, Tae Ho; Kim, Min-Gon; Lee, Jae Young

    2017-01-15

    Graphene and graphene derivatives, such as graphene oxide (GO) and reduced GO (rGO), have been extensively employed as novel components of biomaterials because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties. These materials have also been used to fabricate electrically conductive biomaterials that can effectively deliver electrical signals to biological systems. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to electrically conductive hydrogels that have both electrical activity and a tissue-like softness. In this study, we synthesized conductive graphene hydrogels by mild chemical reduction of graphene oxide/polyacrylamide (GO/PAAm) composite hydrogels to obtain conductive hydrogels. The reduced hydrogel, r(GO/PAAm), exhibited muscle tissue-like stiffness with a Young's modulus of approximately 50kPa. The electrochemical impedance of r(GO/PAAm) could be decreased by more than ten times compared to that of PAAm and unreduced GO/PAAm. In vitro studies with C2C12 myoblasts revealed that r(GO/PAAm) significantly enhanced proliferation and myogenic differentiation compared with unreduced GO/PAAm and PAAm. Moreover, electrical stimulation of myoblasts growing on r(GO/PAAm) graphene hydrogels for 7days significantly enhanced the myogenic gene expression compared to unstimulated controls. As results, our graphene-based conductive and soft hydrogels will be useful as skeletal muscle tissue scaffolds and can serve as a multifunctional platform that can simultaneously deliver electrical and mechanical cues to biological systems. Graphene-based conductive hydrogels presenting electrical conductance and a soft tissue-like modulus were successfully fabricated via mild reduction of graphene oxide/polyacrylamide composite hydrogels to study their potential to skeletal tissue scaffold applications. Significantly promoted myoblast proliferation and differentiation were obtained on our hydrogels. Additionally, electrical stimulation of myoblasts via the graphene hydrogels could

  16. Chemical diagenesis, porosity reduction, and rock strength, IODP Site U1480: Influences on great earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Insun; Milliken, Kitty; Dugan, Brandon; Bourlange, Sylvain; Colson, Tobias; Frederik, Marina; Jeppson, Tamara; Kuranaga, Mebae; Nair, Nisha; Henstock, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 362 drilled two sites, U1480 and U1481, on the Indian oceanic plate ˜250 km west of the Sunda subduction zone to a maximum depth of 1500 meters below seafloor (mbsf). One of the primary objectives was to understand the mechanism of great earthquakes such as the 2004 Sumatra earthquake (Mw 9.0) which showed unexpectedly shallow megathrust slip by establishing the initial and evolving properties of the North Sumatran incoming sedimentary section. Core sampling and logging from the complete sedimentary section at U1480 indicates a distinct change in sedimentation rate from a slowly deposited pelagic system to a rapidly deposited submarine fan system at late Miocene. Following burial, sediments of the Nicobar Fan underwent compaction leading to porosity reduction from 66±9% near seafloor to ˜30% at the base of the sampled Nicobar Fan section (˜1250 mbsf), representing a normal consolidation behavior. Rock strength gradually increases with depth as the sediments are mechanically compacted. Below the fan (1250-1415 mbsf), the pelagic sediments are composed of tuffaceous, calcareous, and siliceous sediments/rocks and their porosity is dependent upon lithology more than upon depth. Tuffaceous materials exhibit high porosity ranging from ˜30-60%, even higher than that of overlying layers. However, porosity of most calcareous samples is lower than 20% at the same depth. The large variation in porosity depends on the degree of cementation, which in turn is controlled by grain assemblage composition and environmental conditions such as slow sedimentation rates and locally high temperatures related to igneous activity as documented by local igneous intrusives and extrusives. The minor cementation in tuffaceous sandy sediments has retained high porosity, but strengthened their skeleton so as to bear the overburden. The low porosity in calcareous rocks is considered to come from extensive cementation rather than

  17. Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Its Effects on Psychoimmunological Factors of Chemically Pulmonary Injured Veterans.

    PubMed

    Arefnasab, Zahra; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza; Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Noorbala, Ahmad Ali; Alipour, Ahmad; Panahi, Yunes; Shams, Jamal; Riazi Rad, Farhad; Khaze, Vahid; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2016-12-01

    Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a treatment program for relieving stress and coping with chronic illnesses. In recent three decades, studies have shown that MBSR has a positive effect on physical and psychological dimensions of chronic illnesses. Chemically pulmonary injured veterans have chronic pulmonary and psychological problems due to mustard gas exposure and complications of Iran-Iraq war. These stresses have negative effects on their general health and immune system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study conducted on psychoneuroimmunology and MBSR in these patients. Forty male pulmonary injured veterans were randomly divided in two groups with 20 participants (MBSR and wait-list control). Then MBSR group received 8 weekly sessions of intervention. We tested mental health based on general health questionnaire (GHQ)-28 questionnaire, health-related quality of life (based on St. George respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ) ) and immunity in MBSR groups; before and after intervention "mixed factorial analyses of variance" test was used for analyzing data fpr each dependent variable and appropriate t-tests were done in The necessary condition. Results showed that mental health and health- related quality of life, in MBSR group compared to wait-list control improved [F (1,38)=26.46, p<0.001; F (1,38)=49.52, p<0.001 respectively] significantly.  Moreover, a significant increase was reported in the lymphocyte proliferation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) [F (1,38)=16.24, p<0.001], and peripheral blood IL-17 [F (1,38)=56.71, p<0.001] However, lymphocyte (CD4+, CD8+, and NK-cell) percentages were not affected significantly [F (1,38)=2.21, p=0.14] ,[F (1,38)=0.90, p=0.78] and [F (1,38)=1.79, p=0.18], respectively. This study suggests that MBSR may be a new treatment approach for improving immunity and overall health in chemically pulmonary injured veterans.

  18. Large-scale synthesis of copper nanoparticles by chemically controlled reduction for applications of inkjet-printed electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngil; Choi, Jun-Rak; Lee, Kwi Jong; Stott, Nathan E; Kim, Donghoon

    2008-10-15

    Copper nanoparticles are being given considerable attention as of late due to their interesting properties and potential applications in many areas of industry. One such exploitable use is as the major constituent of conductive inks and pastes used for printing various electronic components. In this study, copper nanoparticles were synthesized through a relatively large-scale (5 l), high-throughput (0.2 M) process. This facile method occurs through the chemical reduction of copper sulfate with sodium hypophosphite in ethylene glycol within the presence of a polymer surfactant (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation and give dispersion stability to the resulting colloidal nanoparticles. Reaction yields were determined to be quantitative while particle dispersion yields were between 68 and 73%. The size of the copper nanoparticles could be controlled between 30 and 65 nm by varying the reaction time, reaction temperature, and relative ratio of copper sulfate to the surfactant. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of the particles revealed a spherical shape within the reported size regime, and x-ray analysis confirmed the formation of face-centered cubic (FCC) metallic copper. Furthermore, inkjet printing nanocopper inks prepared from the polymer-stabilized copper nanoparticles onto polyimide substrates resulted in metallic copper traces with low electrical resistivities (≥3.6 µΩ cm, or ≥2.2 times the resistivity of bulk copper) after a relatively low-temperature sintering process (200 °C for up to 60 min).

  19. Effect of temperature on reduction of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier in chemical-looping combustion of simulated coal gas in a fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Q.L.; Xiao, R.; Deng, Z.Y.; Shen, L.H.; Xiao, J.; Zhang, M.Y.

    2008-12-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a promising combustion technology for gaseous and solid fuel with efficient use of energy and inherent separation of CO{sub 2}. The concept of a coal-fueled CLC system using, calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) as oxygen carrier is proposed in this study. Reduction tests of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier with simulated coal gas were performed in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed reactor in the temperature range of 890-950{degree}C. A high concentration of CO{sub 2} was obtained at the initial reduction period. CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier exhibited high reactivity initially and decreased gradually at the late period of reduction. The sulfur release during the reduction of CaSO{sub 4} as oxygen carrier was also observed and analyzed. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} conversions were greatly influenced by reduction temperature. The oxygen carrier conversion and mass-based reaction rates during the reduction at typical temperatures were compared. Higher temperatures would enhance reaction rates and result in high conversion of oxygen carrier. An XRD patterns study indicated that CaS was the dominant product of reduction and the variation of relative intensity with temperature is in agreement with the solid conversion. ESEM analysis indicated that the surface structure of oxygen carrier particles changed significantly from impervious to porous after reduction. EDS analysis also demonstrated the transfer of oxygen from the oxygen carrier to the fuel gas and a certain amount of sulfur loss and CaO formation on the surface at higher temperatures. The reduction kinetics of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier was explored with the shrinking unreacted-core model. The apparent kinetic parameters were obtained, and the kinetic equation well predicted the experimental data. Finally, some basic considerations on the use of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier in a CLC system for solid fuels were discussed.

  20. Wet chemical synthesis of intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals via weak reduction reaction together with UPD process and their excellent electrocatalytic performances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiaoli; Zhang, Jiawei; Jia, Yanyan; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2014-06-21

    Platinum based alloy nanocrystals are promising catalysts for a variety of important practical process. However, it remains a great challenge to synthesize platinum-based intermetallic compound nanocrystals with well-defined surface structures. In this communication, taking the synthesis of concave cubic intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals with {hk0} facets as an example, we proposed a new synthesis strategy for intermetallic compounds by reduction of noble metal precursors via a slow reduction process and reduction of transition metal ions via an underpotential deposition (UPD) process in wet chemical synthesis. The as-prepared intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals exhibited superior CO poisoning tolerance and high electro-catalytic activity in both methanol and formic acid oxidation reactions in comparison with solid solution Pt3Zn nanocrystals and Pt/C.

  1. A Facile Chemical Reduction of Graphene-Oxide Using p-Toluene Sulfonic Acid and Fabrication of Reduced Graphene-Oxide Film.

    PubMed

    Vengatesan, M R; Shen, Tian-Zi; Alagar, M; Song, Jang-Kun

    2016-01-01

    We report a cost effective and easy chemical reduction method for exfoliated individual graphene oxide (GO) and GO paper using p-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA) under mild conditions. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were performed to investigate the quality of GO reduction. Data resulting from the spectral analysis suggest that the reduction method using PTSA is an efficient method to remove oxygen functionalities in the GO and also as an alternative to commonly used reducing agents. We also fabricated chemically reduced GO (RGO) film from GO film using this method. The RGO film exhibits an electrical conductivity of about 10587 Sm⁻¹. These results suggest that this method is very useful for the reduction of GO and GO film or paper using PTSA in a solution process for flexible electronics due to its facile, efficient and cost-effective features.

  2. Wet chemical synthesis of intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals via weak reduction reaction together with UPD process and their excellent electrocatalytic performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiaoli; Zhang, Jiawei; Jia, Yanyan; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2014-05-01

    Platinum based alloy nanocrystals are promising catalysts for a variety of important practical process. However, it remains a great challenge to synthesize platinum-based intermetallic compound nanocrystals with well-defined surface structures. In this communication, taking the synthesis of concave cubic intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals with {hk0} facets as an example, we proposed a new synthesis strategy for intermetallic compounds by reduction of noble metal precursors via a slow reduction process and reduction of transition metal ions via an underpotential deposition (UPD) process in wet chemical synthesis. The as-prepared intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals exhibited superior CO poisoning tolerance and high electro-catalytic activity in both methanol and formic acid oxidation reactions in comparison with solid solution Pt3Zn nanocrystals and Pt/C.Platinum based alloy nanocrystals are promising catalysts for a variety of important practical process. However, it remains a great challenge to synthesize platinum-based intermetallic compound nanocrystals with well-defined surface structures. In this communication, taking the synthesis of concave cubic intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals with {hk0} facets as an example, we proposed a new synthesis strategy for intermetallic compounds by reduction of noble metal precursors via a slow reduction process and reduction of transition metal ions via an underpotential deposition (UPD) process in wet chemical synthesis. The as-prepared intermetallic Pt3Zn nanocrystals exhibited superior CO poisoning tolerance and high electro-catalytic activity in both methanol and formic acid oxidation reactions in comparison with solid solution Pt3Zn nanocrystals and Pt/C. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional characterization data. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00313f

  3. THE SECOND GENERATION OF THE WASTE REDUCTION (WAR) ALGORITHM: A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    chemical process designers using simulation software generate alternative designs for one process. One criterion for evaluating these designs is their potential for adverse environmental impacts due to waste generated, energy consumed, and possibilities for fugitive emissions. Co...

  4. Chemical and biological reduction of Mn (III)-pyrophosphate complexes: Potential importance of dissolved Mn (III) as an environmental oxidant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostka, Joel E.; Luther, George W., III; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1995-03-01

    Dissolved Mn (III) is a strong oxidant which could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of aquatic environments, but little is known about this form of Mn. Mn(III) was shown to form a stable complex with pyrophosphate which is easily measured by uv-vis spectrophotometry. The Mn(III)-pyrophosphate complex was produced at concentrations of 5 μM to 10 mM Mn at neutral pH. Inorganic electron donors, Fe(II) and sulfide, abiotically reduced Mn(III)-pyrophosphate in seconds with a stoichiometry of 1:1 and near 1:2 reductant:Mn (III), respectively. Shewanella putrefaciens strain MR-1 catalyzed the reduction of Mn(III)-pyrophosphate with formate or lactate as electron donors. Reduction of Mn(III) catalyzed by MR-1 was inhibited under aerobic conditions but only slightly under anaerobic conditions upon addition of the alternate electron acceptor, nitrate. MR-1 catalyzed reduction was also inhibited by metabolic inhibitors including formaldehyde, tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), 2- n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO), but not antimycin A. When formate or lactate served as electron donor for Mn(III) reduction, carbon oxidation to CO 2 was coupled to the respiration of Mn (III). Using the incorporation of 3H-leucine into the TCA-insoluble fraction of culture extracts, it was shown that Mn (III) reduction was coupled to protein synthesis in MR-1. These data indicate that Mn (III) complexes may be produced under conditions found in aquatic environments and that the reduction of Mn(III) can be coupled to the cycling of Fe, S, and C.

  5. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes.

    PubMed

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11kg/m(3) of copper and 1.35kg/m(3) of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100-500nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process.

  6. Reduction of Fe(II)EDTA-NO by a newly isolated Pseudomonas sp. strain DN-2 in NOx scrubber solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Han; Li, Wei; Wu, Cheng-Zhi; Chen, Han; Shi, Yao

    2007-10-01

    Biological reduction of nitric oxide (NO) chelated by ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) to N2 is one of the core processes in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated technique for nitrogen oxide (NOx) removal from flue gases. A new isolate, identified as Pseudomonas sp. DN-2 by 16S rRNA sequence analysis, was able to reduce Fe(II)EDTA-NO. The specific reduction capacity as measured by NO was up to 4.17 mmol g DCW(-1) h(-1). Strain DN-2 can simultaneously use glucose and Fe(II)EDTA as electron donors for Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction. Fe(III)EDTA, the oxidation of Fe(II)EDTA by oxygen, can also serve as electron acceptor by strain DN-2. The interdependency between various chemical species, e.g., Fe(II)EDTA-NO, Fe(II)EDTA, or Fe (III)EDTA, was investigated. Though each complex, e.g., Fe(II)EDTA-NO or Fe(III)EDTA, can be reduced by its own dedicated bacterial strain, strain DN-2 capable of reducing Fe(III)EDTA can enhance the regeneration of Fe(II)EDTA, hence can enlarge NO elimination capacity. Additionally, the inhibition of Fe(II)EDTA-NO on the Fe(III)EDTA reduction has been explored previously. Strain DN-2 is probably one of the major contributors for the continual removal of NOx due to the high Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate and the ability of Fe(III)EDTA reduction.

  7. Reduction of chlorine radical chemical etching of GaN under simultaneous plasma-emitted photon irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zecheng; Imamura, Masato; Asano, Atsuki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Oda, Osamu; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2017-08-01

    Surface chemical reactions on the GaN surface with Cl radicals are thermally enhanced in the high-temperature Cl2 plasma etching of GaN, resulting in the formation of etch pits and thereby, a roughened surface. Simultaneous irradiation of ultraviolet (UV) photons in Cl2 plasma emissions with wavelengths of 258 and 306 nm reduces the surface chemical reactions because of the photodissociation of both Ga and N chlorides, which leads to a suppression of the increase in surface roughness. Compared with Si-related materials, we point out that photon-induced reactions should be taken into account during the plasma processing of wide-bandgap semiconductors.

  8. Functional Fixedness and Functional Reduction as Common Sense Reasonings in Chemical Equilibrium and in Geometry and Polarity of Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furio, C.; Calatayud, M. L.; Barcenas, S. L.; Padilla, O. M.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on learning difficulties in procedural knowledge, and assesses the procedural difficulties of grade 12 and first- and third-year university students based on common sense reasoning in two areas of chemistry--chemical equilibrium and geometry, and polarity of molecules. (Contains 55 references.) (Author/YDS)

  9. Functional Fixedness and Functional Reduction as Common Sense Reasonings in Chemical Equilibrium and in Geometry and Polarity of Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furio, C.; Calatayud, M. L.; Barcenas, S. L.; Padilla, O. M.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on learning difficulties in procedural knowledge, and assesses the procedural difficulties of grade 12 and first- and third-year university students based on common sense reasoning in two areas of chemistry--chemical equilibrium and geometry, and polarity of molecules. (Contains 55 references.) (Author/YDS)

  10. How China achieved its 11th Five-Year Plan emissions reduction target: A structural decomposition analysis of industrial SO2 and chemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiaoling; Wang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    To curb the increasing pollutant emissions that have accompanied rapid economic growth, China implemented a mandatory emissions control system since the 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) period, and the emission reduction targets have been met and even exceeded. This article explores how China achieved its emissions reduction targets by systematically identifying the main emission reduction pathways, including both the environmental and economic factors, and evaluates the contribution of each factor using structure decomposition analysis. A study of the two key controlled pollutants, industrial sulfur dioxide (SO2) and chemical oxygen demand (COD), during the 11th FYP period showed that (i) changes in the end-of-pipe treatment and pollutant generation coefficient were the dominant contributors to emissions reduction. The power and metal smelting sectors played important roles in SO2 abatement, while the paper products and food products sectors were important in COD reduction; (ii) changes to the input coefficient increased overall emissions although there was a decrease in SO2 emissions in 2007-2010 mainly due to input structure improvements in the construction sector; (iii) the trade effect largely offset the domestic emission reduction effects, although the trade effect declined during the study period; (iv) domestic demand was the main factor increasing domestic emissions; domestic investment changes (especially in the construction sector) were the major contributor to increases in SO2 emissions, and final consumption changes (especially consumption in the food production sector) were the main contributor to the increase in COD emissions. The results yield important implications for China's pollution emissions control policies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. On the Theory of Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Involving Electron Transfer. V. Comparison and Properties of Electrochemical and Chemical Rate Constants

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.

    1962-01-01

    Using a theory of electron transfers which takes cognizance of reorganization of the medium outside the inner coordination shell and of changes of bond lengths inside it, relations between electrochemical and related chemical rate constants are deduced and compared with the experimental data. A correlation is found, without the use of arbitrary parameters. Effects of weak complexes with added electrolytes are included under specified conditions. The deductions offer a way of coordinating a variety of data in the two fields, internally as well as with each those in another. For example, the rate of oxidation or reduction of a series of related reactants by one reagent is correlated with that of another and with that of the corresponding electrochemical oxidation-reduction reaction, under certain specified conditions. These correlations may also provide a test for distinguishing an electron from an atom transfer mechanism. (auth)

  12. Reduction of Large Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for Autoignition Using Joint Analyses of Reaction Rates and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Saylam, A; Ribaucour, M; Pitz, W J; Minetti, R

    2006-11-29

    A new technique of reduction of detailed mechanisms for autoignition, which is based on two analysis methods is described. An analysis of reaction rates is coupled to an analysis of reaction sensitivity for the detection of redundant reactions. Thresholds associated with the two analyses have a great influence on the size and efficiency of the reduced mechanism. Rules of selection of the thresholds are defined. The reduction technique has been successfully applied to detailed autoignition mechanisms of two reference hydrocarbons: n-heptane and iso-octane. The efficiency of the technique and the ability of the reduced mechanisms to reproduce well the results generated by the full mechanism are discussed. A speedup of calculations by a factor of 5.9 for n-heptane mechanism and by a factor of 16.7 for iso-octane mechanism is obtained without losing accuracy of the prediction of autoignition delay times and concentrations of intermediate species.

  13. Single-step treatment of 2,4-dinitrotoluene via zero-valent metal reduction and chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J Mathew; Hernandez, Rafael; Kuo, Chiang-Hai

    2008-06-30

    Many nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) are considered toxic and potential carcinogens. The purpose of this study was to develop an integrated reductive/oxidative process for treating NACs contaminated waters. The process consists of the combination of zero-valent iron and an ozonation based treatment technique. Corrosion promoters are added to the contaminated water to minimize passivation of the metallic species. Water contaminated with 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) was treated with the integrated process using a recirculated batch reactor. It was demonstrated that addition of corrosion promoters to the contaminated water enhances the reduction of 2,4-DNT with zero-valent iron. The addition of corrosion promoters resulted in 62% decrease in 2,4-DNT concentration to 2,4-diaminotoluene. The data shows that iron reduced the 2,4-DNT and ozone oxidized these products resulting in a 73% removal of TOC and a 96% decrease in 2,4-DNT concentration.

  14. Influence of chemical and physical properties of activated carbon powders on oxygen reduction and microbial fuel cell performance.

    PubMed

    Watson, Valerie J; Nieto Delgado, Cesar; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-06-18

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders made from different precursor materials (coal, peat, coconut shell, hardwood, and phenolic resin) were electrochemically evaluated as oxygen reduction catalysts and tested as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). AC powders were characterized in terms of surface chemistry and porosity, and their kinetic activities were compared to carbon black and platinum catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) tests. Cathodes using the coal-derived AC had the highest power densities in MFCs (1620 ± 10 mW m(-2)). Peat-based AC performed similarly in MFC tests (1610 ± 100 mW m(-2)) and had the best catalyst performance, with an onset potential of E(onset) = 0.17 V, and n = 3.6 electrons used for oxygen reduction. Hardwood based AC had the highest number of acidic surface functional groups and the poorest performance in MFC and catalysis tests (630 ± 10 mW m(-2), E(onset) = -0.01 V, n = 2.1). There was an inverse relationship between onset potential and quantity of strong acid (pKa < 8) functional groups, and a larger fraction of microporosity was negatively correlated with power production in MFCs. Surface area alone was a poor predictor of catalyst performance, and a high quantity of acidic surface functional groups was determined to be detrimental to oxygen reduction and cathode performance.

  15. One-pot wet-chemical co-reduction synthesis of bimetallic gold-platinum nanochains supported on reduced graphene oxide with enhanced electrocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, De-Jun; Zhang, Qian-Li; Feng, Jin-Xia; Ju, Ke-Jian; Wang, Ai-Jun; Wei, Jie; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2015-08-01

    In this work, a simple, rapid and facile one-pot wet-chemical co-reduction method is developed for synthesis of bimetallic Au-Pt alloyed nanochains supported on reduced graphene oxide (Au-Pt NCs/RGO), in which caffeine is acted as a capping agent and a structure-directing agent, while no any seed, template, surfactant or polymer involved. The as-prepared nanocomposites display enlarged electrochemical active surface area, significantly enhanced catalytic activity and better stability for methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation, compared with commercial Pt-C (Pt 50 wt%), PtRu-C (Pt 30 wt% and Ru 15 wt%) and Pt black.

  16. Solutia: Massachusetts Chemical Manufacturer Uses SECURE Methodology to Identify Potential Reductions in Utility and Process Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect

    2005-07-01

    This case study prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program describes a plant-wide energy assessment conducted at the Solutia Inc. chemical production facility in Springfield, Massachusetts. Solutia manufactures polymers, intermediates, and chemicals for a variety of products. The assessment focused on finding ways to reduce the plant's use of steam, electricity, compressed air, and water. If the company were to implement all the recommendations that came out of the assessment, its total annual energy savings could be about 9.6 million kWh for electricity and more than 338,000 MBtu for natural gas. Annual cost savings could amount to nearly $3.3 million.

  17. Reduction on the anaerobic biological activity inhibition caused by heavy metals and sulphates in effluents through chemical precipitation with soda and lime.

    PubMed

    Alves, L de Carvalho; Cammarota, M C; De França, F P

    2006-12-01

    The School of Chemistry Environmental Technology Laboratory generates 43.4 1 of effluent with low pH (0.7) and high contents of COD (1908 mgO2 l(-1)), phenol (132.1 mg l(-1)), sulfate (36700 mg l(-1)) and heavy metals (28.2 mg Hg l(-1); 82.1 mg Cr(total) l(-1); 30.8 mg Cu l(-1); 57.4 mg Fe(total) l(-1); 16.2 mg Al l(-1)) weekly. These data show that this effluent presents high toxicity for biological treatment, with a physical-chemical step being necessary before a biological step. Preliminary studies showed that the most toxic constituents of the effluent were sulfate, phenol and total chromium. In this work, a chemical precipitation step with sodium hydroxide or lime was evaluated for the toxicity reduction on anaerobic microbial consortium. These experiments were carried out with increasing concentrations of alkalis in the effluent in order to obtain pH initial values of 8-12. Similar results were obtained for COD (15-28%), turbidity (95-98%), phenol (13-24%) and total chromium (99.8-99.9%) removals in each condition studied with soda or lime. Sulfate was only removed by precipitation with lime, obtaining reductions from 84 to 88%. The toxicity on the anaerobic sludge was studied employing specific methanogenic activity (SMA) analysis of raw and treated effluent (after chemical precipitation step). The SMA experiments showed that chemical precipitation at pH 8 reduces the toxic effect of the effluent on anaerobic microbial consortium three times (with soda) and thirteen times (with lime). These results indicate that precipitation with lime is more efficient at toxicity removal, however the produced sludge volume is around two times higher than that produced with soda.

  18. Controlled trial of chemical disinfection of urinary drainage bags. Reduction in hospital-acquired catheter-associated infection.

    PubMed

    Holliman, R; Seal, D V; Archer, H; Doman, S

    1987-11-01

    A controlled, prospective trial was conducted on an orthopaedic ward to test the use of peroxide disinfection of drainage bags as the only measure taken to affect the rate of hospital-acquired, catheter-associated urinary tract infection (UTI). A significant reduction (P less than 0.05) in the number of patients with catheter-associated UTI occurred with the use of bag disinfectant when compared with patients in whom this technique was not used. We consider this technique to be suitable for the management of catheterised patients on general hospital wards to reduce catheter-associated UTI and environmental spread of their bacteria.

  19. Flow processes in overexpanded chemical rocket nozzles. Part 3: Methods for the aimed flow separation and side load reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmucker, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Methods aimed at reduction of overexpansion and side load resulting from asymmetric flow separation for rocket nozzles with a high opening ratio are described. The methods employ additional measures for nozzles with a fixed opening ratio. The flow separation can be controlled by several types of nozzle inserts, the properties of which are discussed. Side loads and overexpansion can be reduced by adapting the shape of the nozzle and taking other additional measures for controlled separation of the boundary layer, such as trip wires.

  20. Preparation of nitrogen-doped graphene sheets by a combined chemical and hydrothermal reduction of graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Long, Donghui; Li, Wei; Ling, Licheng; Miyawaki, Jin; Mochida, Isao; Yoon, Seong-Ho

    2010-10-19

    Nitrogen-doped graphene sheets were prepared through a hydrothermal reduction of colloidal dispersions of graphite oxide in the presence of hydrazine and ammonia at pH of 10. The effect of hydrothermal temperature on the structure, morphology, and surface chemistry of as-prepared graphene sheets were investigated though XRD, N(2) adsorption, solid-state (13)C NMR, SEM, TEM, and XPS characterizations. Oxygen reduction and nitrogen doping were achieved simultaneously under the hydrothermal reaction. Up to 5% nitrogen-doped graphene sheets with slightly wrinkled and folded feature were obtained at the relative low hydrothermal temperature. With the increase of hydrothermal temperature, the nitrogen content decreased slightly and more pyridinic N incorporated into the graphene network. Meanwhile, a jellyfish-like graphene structure was formed by self-organization of graphene sheets at the hydrothermal temperature of 160 °C. Further increase of the temperature to 200 °C, graphene sheets could self-aggregate into agglomerate particles but still contained doping level of 4 wt % N. The unique hydrothermal environment should play an important role in the nitrogen doping and the jellyfish-like graphene formation. This simple hydrothermal method could provide the synthesis of nitrogen-doped graphene sheets in large scale for various practical applications.

  1. Photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2 into chemicals using Pt-modified reduced graphene oxide combined with Pt-modified TiO2 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Meng; Wu, Gai; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2014-06-17

    The photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) reduction of CO2 into high-value chemicals is beneficial in alleviating global warming and advancing a low-carbon economy. In this work, Pt-modified reduced graphene oxide (Pt-RGO) and Pt-modified TiO2 nanotubes (Pt-TNT) were combined as cathode and photoanode catalysts, respectively, to form a PEC reactor for converting CO2 into valuable chemicals. XRD, XPS, TEM, AFM, and SEM were employed to characterize the microstructures of the Pt-RGO and Pt-TNT catalysts. Reduction products, such as C2H5OH and CH3COOH, were obtained from CO2 under band gap illumination and biased voltage. A combined liquid product generation rate (CH3OH, C2H5OH, HCOOH, and CH3COOH) of approximately 600 nmol/(h·cm(2)) was observed. Carbon atom conversion rate reached 1,130 nmol/(h·cm(2)), which were much higher than those achieved using Pt-modified carbon nanotubes and platinum carbon as cathode catalysts.

  2. Capacity of a newly isolated fungus Pleurotus eryngii from Tunceli, Ovacik for chemical oxygen demand reduction and biodecolorization of Azo-Dye Congo Red.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, N; Gonen, U

    2015-06-07

    Biodecolorization of Congo red dye in both agar—plate and agitated liquid culture mediums by newly isolated white rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii has been studied. This fungus isolated from Tunceli—Ovacik province of Turkey. We have also examined the chemical oxygen demand reduction after decolorization under agitated liquid culture medium. For agar plate screening the decolorization capacity of P. eryngii, growth and decolorization halos were determined on saboroud dextrose agar (SDA) plates containing 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 g/l of Congo red. P. eryngii showed certain decolorization capacities and was able to decolorize all studied concentrations of Congo red, but not to the same extent. Our results indicated that the new isolate P. eryngii had maximum decolorization (87% at 100 mg/l initial dye concentration) and chemical oxygen demand reduction (82% at 25 mg/l initial dye concentration) activities after 7 days under agitated submerged culture conditions. This new isolate could be an effective bioremediation tool for treatment of Congo red containing textile wastewater.

  3. Evaluation of sludge reduction by an environmentally friendly chemical uncoupler in a pilot-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic process.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuesong; Yang, Jianming; Liang, Yuan; Liu, Junxin; Xiao, Benyi

    2014-03-01

    An environmentally friendly chemical, tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulfate (THPS), was used as a metabolic uncoupler to reduce sludge production in a pilot-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic process. The results show that the addition of THPS (1.08-1.86 mL/m(3) influent) in the sludge return section could reduce waste activated sludge by about 22.5 %, and decrease the sludge yield by about 14.7 % at the end of a run. At the same time, the addition of THPS slightly lowered the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), soluble COD and NH4 (+)-N, and slightly improved removal of total nitrogen. The effects of THPS addition on two characteristics of activated sludge in oxic tank are discussed in detail and the results suggest that the settleability of sludge was reduced by addition of THPS, while the specific oxygen uptake rate was increased. Molecular biology analysis shows that the addition of THPS had little effect on the microbial communities of sludge.

  4. Chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon and colour reduction in slaughterhouse wastewater by unmodified and iron-modified clinoptilolite-rich tuff.

    PubMed

    Torres-Pérez, J; Solache-Ríos, M; Martínez-Miranda, V

    2014-01-01

    In this study, reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD), colour, and total organic carbon in effluents from a slaughterhouse in central Mexico was performed using clinoptilolite-rich tuff. The experimental parameters considered were initial concentration of the adsorbate, pH, adsorbent dosage, and contact time. Surface morphology of the materials was tested by using scanning electron microscopy. Specific surface area was analysed by using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and phase composition was analysed by using X-ray diffraction. The experimental adsorption data were fitted to the first- and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The highest COD removal was observed in slightly acidic pH conditions. The maximum reduction efficiency of COD was accomplished with unmodified clinoptilolite-rich tuff at a contact time of 1440 min. In these conditions, the adsorbent was efficient for treating wastewater from a slaughterhouse. Moreover, after several regeneration cycles with Fenton reagent or hydrogen peroxide, the regenerated zeolite with H2O2 (3%) showed the best reduction efficiencies.

  5. Reduction of the copper ion to its metal and clusters in alcoholic media: A radiation chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, G. R.

    2005-10-01

    Reduction of Cu 2+ ions with and without I - as a ligand was studied in N 2-purged alcoholic solutions by pulse radiolysis. In the absence of iodide ion, the initial rate constant for e -sol reaction with Cu 2+ was determined following the decay of solvated electrons in different alcohols; kbimol values are in the range of 0.8-1.1×10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1. In the presence of 10 -3 mol dm -3 KI, the respective kbimol remained almost same. Generally, on reduction, Cu(II) ion changes to Cu(I) ion initially and later it produces metallic copper (Cu°), and the stability of these intermediates depends on the conditions of the matrix. In the presence of I -, Copper ions such as Cu(II) or Cu(I) ions get reduced to metallic copper (Cu°) having initial absorption around 740 and below 400 nm. Later, at 100 μs time after the electron pulse, it gets transformed into a nanoparticle with an absorption band at 580 nm. Such formation of copper nanoparticle was observed only in 2-propanolic medium in the presence of iodide ions. During γ-radiolysis of N 2-purged 1.5×10 -4 CuSO 4 solutions in 2-propanol, reddish pink colored copper nanoparticles were formed, which are quite similar to those reported earlier in aqueous solution. But, in the presence of I - (2-propanolic solutions), such phenomenon was not noticed on γ-radiolysis. Interestingly, the formation of copper nanoparticle was observed also in the reactions of copper (II) ions with alcohol radicals formed during γ-radiolysis in N 2O-purged system, where e -sol were scavenged by N 2O. The nanoparticles generated both in N 2 and N 2O-purged alcoholic systems, viz. methanol, ethanol and 2-propanol, were found to be oxygen sensitive. The contradictory results from pulse and γ-radiolysis studies in the presence and absence of iodide ions are explained to account for the nanoparticle generation.

  6. Preparation of a carbon-based solid acid catalyst by sulfonating activated carbon in a chemical reduction process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Miao; Ma, Hai-Long; Zhang, Zeng-Qiang; Gao, Jin-Ming; Zhu, Yu-Lei; Han, Xiao-Jin; Guo, Xiang-Yun

    2010-10-18

    Sulfonated (SO(3)H-bearing) activated carbon (AC-SO(3)H) was synthesized by an aryl diazonium salt reduction process. The obtained material had a SO(3)H density of 0.64 mmol·g-1 and a specific surface area of 602 m2·g-1. The catalytic properties of AC-SO(3)H were compared with that of two commercial solid acid catalysts, Nafion NR50 and Amberlyst-15. In a 10-h esterification reaction of acetic acid with ethanol, the acid conversion with AC-SO(3)H (78%) was lower than that of Amberlyst-15 (86%), which could be attributed to the fact that the SO(3)H density of the sulfonated carbon was lower than that of Amberlyst-15 (4.60 mmol·g-1). However, AC-SO(3)H exhibited comparable and even much higher catalytic activities than the commercial catalysts in the esterification of aliphatic acids with longer carbon chains such as hexanoic acid and decanoic acid, which may be due to the large specific surface area and mesoporous structures of the activated carbon. The disadvantage of AC-SO(3)H is the leaching of SO(3)H group during the reactions.

  7. Anaerobic stabilization of waste activated sludge at different temperatures and solid retention times: Evaluation by sludge reduction, soluble chemical oxygen demand release and dehydration capability.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiyao; Peng, Yongzhen; He, Yuelan; Wang, Shuying; Guo, Siyu; Li, Lukai

    2017-03-01

    Anaerobic treatment is the most widely used method of waste activated sludge (WAS) stabilization. Using a semi-continuous stirring tank with condensed WAS, we investigated effects of decreasing the solid retention time (SRT) from 32days to 6.4days on sludge reduction, soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) release and dehydration capability, along with anaerobic digestion operated at medium temperature (MT-AD) or anaerobic digestion operated at room temperature (RT-AD). Results showed that effects of temperature on SCOD release were greater at SRT of 32d and 6.4d. When SRT was less than 8d, total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS) and capillary suction time (CST) did not change significantly. CST was lowest at SRT of 10.7days, indicating best condition for sludge dehydration. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the most optimum SRT was higher than 10.7d both in MT-AD or RT-AD.

  8. Formation of colloidal silver nanoparticles stabilized by Na+-poly(gamma-glutamic acid)-silver nitrate complex via chemical reduction process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da-Guang

    2007-10-01

    Macromolecular and polyanionic Na(+)-poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (PGA) silver nitrate complex acted as both a metal ion provider and a particle protector to fabricate nanosized silver colloids under chemical reduction by dextrose. The formation and size of particles have been characterized from transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering analysis and UV-vis spectrophotometer. The results showed that the average particle size was 17.2+/-3.4 to 37.3+/-5.5 nm, apparently depending on the complex concentration. It was found that the rate constant and conversion of silver nanoparticles were proportional to the concentration of PGA. The growth mechanism of nanosized silver colloid was fully discussed. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity evaluated by L929 fibroblasts proliferation and antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strain (methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative strain (P. aeruginosa) bacteria have been assessed.

  9. Reduction of carbon dioxide gas formation at the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell using chemically enhanced solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Michael D.; McCready, Mark J.

    The production of CO 2 gas at the DMFC anode leads to dramatic increases in pumping power requirements and reduced power output because of mass transfer limitations as bubble trains form in the channels of larger stacks. Experimental observations taken in a 5 cm 2 DMFC test cell operated at 60 °C, 1 atm, and with a methanol/water fuel flow rates of 5-10 cm 3 min -1 indicate that the rate of bubble formation can be reduced by increasing the fuel flow because more liquid is available for the CO 2 to dissolve in. Further observations indicate that KOH and LiOH added to the fuel eliminates CO 2 gas formation in situ at low concentrations because of the greatly increased solubility that results. A mathematical model for the volumetric rate of CO 2 gas production that includes effects of temperature and solubility is developed and extended to include the effects of hydroxide ions in solution. The model is used to predict the onset location of gas formation in the flow field as well as the void fraction at any point in the flow field. Predictions from the model agree very well with our experiments. Model predictions explain differences in the initial location of bubble formation for fuel solutions pre-saturated with CO 2 as opposed to CO 2-free solutions. Experiments with KOH and LiOH added to fuel solutions confirm the validity of the model extension that includes solubility that is enhanced by chemical reaction. Experiments with LiOH, KOH, and ammonium hydroxide show that the long-term durability of standard Pt-Ru/Nafion ®/Pt membrane electrode assemblies is compromised because of the presence of lithium, potassium, and ammonium cations that interact with the Nafion ® membrane and result in increasing the ohmic limitations of the polymer electrolyte membrane. Experiments with Ca(OH) 2, while reducing gas formation, precipitate the product CaCO 3 out of solution too rapidly for downstream filtering, blocking channels in the flow field.

  10. ISSA (iterative screening and structure analysis)—a new reduction method and its application to the tropospheric cloud chemical mechanism RACM/CAPRAM2.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauersberger, G.

    An automated reduction method ISSA (iterative screening and structure analysis) has been developed. It is aimed at the analysis of complex atmospheric chemical multiphase mechanisms and produces reduced mechanisms for specifiable application purposes. Cyclic and non-cyclic reactions identified by a structure analysis are separately evaluated. The normalized valuation coefficients are calculated in a box model framework by using time-averaged reaction rates. Starting with a set of target species, important reactions and species are selected together in an iteration procedure. So, only one threshold value fixed for all box model scenarios is necessary. For every scenario a specific reduced mechanism is obtained. The sum of reactions and species included in the specific reduced mechanisms generates then the ISSA-reduced mechanism. All reactants in the reduced mechanism are included in the verification procedure where the concentrations simulated with the full and the reduced mechanism are compared. The maximum relative deviation of daily maxima was found to be a suitable deviation measure for atmospheric trace species concentrations. An application of the ISSA method to the large cloud chemical mechanism RACM/CAPRAM2.4 resulted in reduction rates of 55% for reactions (46% gas phase, 60% liquid phase), 23% for species, and 23% for phase transfers. The deviation between full and reduced mechanism averaged over all scenarios and reactants was 2.5%. The liquid-phase part of this application was compared with a condensed version of the CAPARAM2.4 mechanism developed simultaneously with the full version. It was found that these two reduced versions of CAPRAM2.4 differ significantly. Whereas the condensed version achieves good verification results only for the target species, the ISSA-reduced version reproduce very well the complete full mechanism results and should be useful for future large-scale models, which will include both detailed microphysics and complex (reduced

  11. Photo and Chemical Reduction of Copper onto Anatase-Type TiO2 Nanoparticles with Enhanced Surface Hydroxyl Groups as Efficient Visible Light Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Eskandarloo, Hamed; Badiei, Alireza; Behnajady, Mohammad A; Mohammadi Ziarani, Ghodsi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the photocatalytic efficiency of anatase-type TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized using the sol-gel low-temperature method, were enhanced by a combined process of copper reduction and surface hydroxyl groups enhancement. UV-light-assisted photo and NaBH4 -assisted chemical reduction methods were used for deposition of copper onto TiO2. The surface hydroxyl groups of TiO2 were enhanced with the assistance of NaOH modification. The prepared catalysts were immobilized on glass plates and used as the fixed-bed systems for the removal of phenazopyridine as a model drug contaminant under visible light irradiation. NaOH-modified Cu/TiO2 nanoparticles demonstrated higher photocatalytic efficiency than that of pure TiO2 due to the extending of the charge carriers lifetime and enhancement of the adsorption capacity of TiO2 toward phenazopyridine. The relationship of structure and performance of prepared nanoparticles has been established by using various techniques, such as XRD, XPS, TEM, EDX, XRF, TGA, DRS and PL. The effects of preparation variables, including copper content, reducing agents rate (NaBH4 concentration and UV light intensity) and NaOH concentration were investigated on the photocatalytic efficiency of NaOH-modified Cu/TiO2 nanoparticles.

  12. Removal of pollutants and reduction of bio-toxicity in a full scale chemical coagulation and reverse osmosis leachate treatment system.

    PubMed

    Theepharaksapan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Yamamoto, K

    2011-05-01

    Removals of pollutants and toxic organic compounds and reduction in bio-toxicity of leachate along an operating full-scale leachate treatment system utilizing chemical coagulation, sand filtration, microfiltration (MF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane were evaluated. High pollutant removals were achieved mainly by coagulation and sand filtration. Major toxic organic pollutants, i.e. DEHP, DBP and bisphenol A were removed by 100%, 99.6% and 98.0%. Acute toxicity test using water flea, Nile Tilapia and common carp and genotoxicity (Comet assay) were conducted to determine toxicity reduction in leachate along the treatment. Ammonia was found to be the main acute toxic compounds in leachate as determined by LC(50) but the effect of organic substances was also observed. DNA damage in fish exposed to diluted raw leachate (10% of LC(50)) was found to be 8.9-24.3% and it was subsequently decreased along the treatment. Correlation between pollutants and its bio-toxicity was established using multivariable analyses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microbial reduction by two chemical-mechanical protocols in primary teeth with pulp necrosis and periradicular lesion - an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Triches, Thaisa Cezária; de Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Feres, Magda; de Freitas, Sérgio Fernando Torres; Zimmermann, Gláucia Santos; Cordeiro, Mabel Mariela Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of chemical-mechanical procedures of two endodontic protocols for septic content reduction of root canals from primary teeth with pulp necrosis and periradicular lesion. Twenty-four primary root canals with pulp necrosis and periradicular lesion were divided into two treatment groups (n=12): multiple-visit and single-visit protocols. Samples were collected using sterile paper points before and after endodontic cleaning followed by microbiological identification through checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Statistical analysis was performed using Proportion Test for score=0 comparing the findings before and after treatment for each group (Wilcoxon's test) as well as the differences in scores between protocols (Mann-Whitney's test) (p<0.05). Data were expressed as prevalence (presence or absence) and estimate of the average count (x10(5) cells) of each species. Differences in proportions of score=0 prior to treatment were non-significant (p=0.415), demonstrating equivalence between groups. A significant increase in score=0 was detected after treatment for both groups (p<0.0001). Single-visit protocol achieved a significantly greater reduction in mean scoring following endodontic treatment (p=0.024). Both protocols were capable of significantly reducing septic content in root canals of primary teeth with periradicular lesion. Moreover, single-visit protocol showed greater efficacy in reducing endodontic infection.

  14. Chemical-free fabrication of N, P dual-doped honeycomb-like carbon as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lianwen; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Qiao; Li, Xiangkui; Li, Yiming; Cao, Xuebo

    2017-08-23

    Heteroatom-doped nanoporous carbons are now emerging as alternatives to platinum and its alloys as electrocatalysts to facilitate oxygen reduction reaction in metal-air batteries and fuel cells. However, the synthesis of nanoporous carbons usually involve in complicated procedures and intensive chemicals, which may dramatically raise their manufacture cost that even surpasses that of precious platinum. Herein, we demonstrate the single-step, chemical-free fabrication of N, P dualdoped honeycomb carbon that has hierarchically porous structure and oxygen electrocatalysis activity close to the benchmark Pt/C. This material was fabricated through the direct pyrolysis of popcorn in a static, semi-opened environment. With this strategy, nitrous and phosphoric groups from proteins and phosphates within the popcorn are condensed with graphitic matrix to form NC and PC bonds, and pyrolysis byproducts (such as H2O and CO2) can etch disordered carbon domains to form hierarchical pores and edge carbons. Practical test of this honeycomb carbon as air electrode of a primary Zn-air battery shows an open-circuit potential of 1.44V and peak power density of 36.6mWcm(-2) that is even better than Pt/C. The impact of this work is that it will facilitate the targeted design and cost-saved fabrication of metal-free catalysts for electrocatalytic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Split-Face Evaluation to Assess the Efficacy of a Hydrolyzed Roe Cream in the Reduction of Erythema Following Chemical Peel

    PubMed Central

    Narurkar, Vic A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate a hydrolyzed roe cream in the reduction of facial erythema following a chemical peel treatment. Edema was also assessed. Design:The facial cream was applied to one side of the face of 30 healthy female subjects (average age = 54.9 years, range 33–65 years) immediately following 4 to 15 minutes peel treatment. The opposite side remained untreated. Visia-CR digital photographs were taken at baseline and 8 and 24 hours post facial peel. Objective dermal irritation assessments were done by a blinded investigator, graded on severity of facial erythema and edema on a 5-point scoring scale; 0=none, 1 =slight,2=mild, 3=moderate, 4=severe. Subjects completed a perception questionnaire. Results: Reduction in erythema was greater (P≤0.05) for the treated side of the face compared to the untreated side at both 8 and 24 hours post-peel. Both sides showed reduction in erythema compared to immediate post-peel. No edema was observed. At eight hours, more than 50 percent of subjects agreed on the five attributes, and at 24 hours, 57 percent (17/30) of subjects agreed. At eight hours, ≥80 percent of subjects strongly agreed or agreed that the treated skin feels hydrated and moisturized immediately after application. At 24 hours, more than 90 percent of subjects strongly agreed or agreed that treated skin feels perfectly hydrated and moisturized. When asked about their overall impression of the product, 60 percent (18 subjects) of subjects responded”! love it.”All subjects completed the study. No adverse events were reported. Conclusion: Applying the facial lotion directly on post-procedure skin reduces redness after 8 and 24 hours significantly better compared to no treatment. PMID:27847550

  16. A Split-Face Evaluation to Assess the Efficacy of a Hydrolyzed Roe Cream in the Reduction of Erythema Following Chemical Peel.

    PubMed

    Narurkar, Vic A

    2016-10-01

    Objective:To evaluate a hydrolyzed roe cream in the reduction of facial erythema following a chemical peel treatment. Edema was also assessed. Design:The facial cream was applied to one side of the face of 30 healthy female subjects (average age = 54.9 years, range 33-65 years) immediately following 4 to 15 minutes peel treatment. The opposite side remained untreated. Visia-CR digital photographs were taken at baseline and 8 and 24 hours post facial peel. Objective dermal irritation assessments were done by a blinded investigator, graded on severity of facial erythema and edema on a 5-point scoring scale; 0=none, 1 =slight,2=mild, 3=moderate, 4=severe. Subjects completed a perception questionnaire. Results: Reduction in erythema was greater (P≤0.05) for the treated side of the face compared to the untreated side at both 8 and 24 hours post-peel. Both sides showed reduction in erythema compared to immediate post-peel. No edema was observed. At eight hours, more than 50 percent of subjects agreed on the five attributes, and at 24 hours, 57 percent (17/30) of subjects agreed. At eight hours, ≥80 percent of subjects strongly agreed or agreed that the treated skin feels hydrated and moisturized immediately after application. At 24 hours, more than 90 percent of subjects strongly agreed or agreed that treated skin feels perfectly hydrated and moisturized. When asked about their overall impression of the product, 60 percent (18 subjects) of subjects responded"! love it."All subjects completed the study. No adverse events were reported. Conclusion: Applying the facial lotion directly on post-procedure skin reduces redness after 8 and 24 hours significantly better compared to no treatment.

  17. Kinetics of the reduction of hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) by methane (CH{sub 4}) during chemical looping combustion: A global mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Monazam, Esmail R; Breault, Ronald W; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Richards, George; Carpenter, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as a promising technology for fossil fuel combustion which produces a sequestration ready concentrated CO{sub 2} stream in power production. A CLC system is composed with two reactors, an air and a fuel reactor. An oxygen carrier such as hematite (94%Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) circulates between the reactors, which transfers the oxygen necessary for the fuel combustion from the air to the fuel. An important issue for the CLC process is the selection of metal oxide as oxygen carrier, since it must retain its reactivity through many cycles. The primary objective of this work is to develop a global mechanism with respective kinetics rate parameters such that CFD simulations can be performed for large systems. In this study, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the reduction of hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in a continuous stream of CH{sub 4} (15, 20, and 35%) was conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 825{degrees}C over ten reduction cycles. The mass spectroscopy analysis of product gas indicated the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O at the early stage of reaction and H{sub 2} and CO at the final stage of reactions. A kinetic model based on two parallel reactions, 1) first-order irreversible rate kinetics and 2) Avrami equation describing nucleation and growth processes, was applied to the reduction data. It was found, that the reaction rates for both reactions increase with, both, temperature and the methane concentration in inlet gas.

  18. Chemically induced reduction: A viable process for synthesizing {gamma}-TiAl based intermetallic matrix composite powders containing nanocrystalline TiC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.Y.; Chang, K.; Kumta, P.N.

    2000-02-01

    A chemically induced reduction process has been developed for synthesizing intermetallic matrix composites (IMCs) consisting of titanium aluminide and titanium carbide. The process involves the reduction of metal chlorides (TiCl{sub 4} and AlCl{sub 3}) with metallic lithium in polar organic solvents such as acetonitrile (MeCN) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) to form a colloidal precursor. The as-prepared precursors have been either directly heat treated in ultra-high-purity argon (UHP-Ar) or pretreated in hydrogen (H{sub 2}) followed by further heat treatment in UHP-Ar. The powders have been characterized primarily using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results of the structural analyses conducted on the heat-treated precursors derived using MeCN as a solvent indicate the formation of either single-phase titanium carbide (TiC) or a composite mixture of {gamma}-TiAl and nanocrystalline TiC, depending on the heat-treatment conditions. The formation of TiC is related to the strong interaction between TiCl{sub 4} and the polar organic solvents resulting in the formation of adducts which contain primary Ti-C linkages. Pretreatment of the precursors derived using MeCN as a solvent in H{sub 2} promotes the removal of carbon and results in the formation of the composite mixture of {gamma}-TiAl and TiC after subsequent Ar treatment at 1200 C. At this stage, washing the pretreated powders in water helps to minimize and even eliminate any impurity phases to a large extent, leaving behind phase-pure composites containing {gamma}-TiAl and TiC after the final Ar treatment. However, extended pretreatment in H{sub 2} appears to be ineffective toward removal of additional carbon and leads to formation of hydride-phase impurities. On the other hand, the reductive reaction conducted using THF as a solvent results in minimizing the amount of carbon while inducing the formation of {gamma}-TiAl during direct Ar treatment

  19. Low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 over nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes in situ prepared via a chemical bath deposition route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Cheng; Zhang, Dengsong; Cai, Sixiang; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Lei; Li, Hongrui; Maitarad, Phornphimon; Shi, Liyi; Gao, Ruihua; Zhang, Jianping

    2013-09-01

    Nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes (nf-MnOx@CNTs) was in situ synthesized by a facile chemical bath deposition route for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3. This catalyst was mainly characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). The SEM, TEM, XRD results and N2 adsorption-desorption analysis indicated that the CNTs were surrounded by nanoflaky MnOx and the obtained catalyst exhibited a large surface area as well. Compared with the MnOx/CNT and MnOx/TiO2 catalysts prepared by an impregnation method, the nf-MnOx@CNTs presented better NH3-SCR activity at low temperature and a more extensive operating temperature window. The XPS results showed that a higher atomic concentration of Mn4+ and more chemisorbed oxygen species existed on the surface of CNTs for nf-MnOx@CNTs. The H2-TPR and NH3-TPD results demonstrated that the nf-MnOx@CNTs possessed stronger reducing ability, more acid sites and stronger acid strength than the other two catalysts. Based on the above mentioned favourable properties, the nf-MnOx@CNT catalyst has an excellent performance in the low-temperature SCR of NO to N2 with NH3. In addition, the nf-MnOx@CNT catalyst also presented favourable stability and H2O resistance.Nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes (nf-MnOx@CNTs) was in situ synthesized by a facile chemical bath deposition route for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3. This catalyst was mainly characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and NH3 temperature

  20. Reduction kinetics of Cu-, Ni-, and Fe-based oxygen carriers using syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) for chemical-looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Alberto Abad; Francisco Garcia-Labiano; Luis F. de Diego; Pilar Gayn; Juan Adnez

    2007-08-15

    The reactivity of three Cu-, Fe-, and Ni-based oxygen carriers to be used in a chemical-looping combustion (CLC) system using syngas as fuel has been analyzed. The oxygen carriers exhibited high reactivity during reduction with fuel gases present in syngas (H{sub 2} and CO), with average values in the range 8-30% min{sup -1}. No effect of the gas products (H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}) on the reduction reaction rate was detected. The kinetic parameters of reaction with H{sub 2} and CO have been determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The grain model with spherical or platelike geometry in the grain was used for the kinetic determination, in which the chemical reaction controlled the global reaction rate. The activation energies determined for these reactions were low, with values ranging from 14 to 33 kJ mol{sup -1}. The reaction order depended on the reacting gas, and values from 0.5 to 1 were found. Moreover, the reactivity of the oxygen carriers when both H{sub 2} and CO are simultaneously present in the reacting gases has been analyzed, both at atmospheric and pressurized conditions. For the Cu- and Fe-based oxygen carriers, the reaction rate of the oxygen carrier with syngas corresponded to the addition of the reaction rates for the individual fuel gases, H{sub 2} and CO. For the Ni-based oxygen carrier, the reaction rate was that corresponding to the fuel gas that reacted faster with the oxygen carrier at the reacting conditions (fuel concentration, temperature, and pressure). The consequences of the behavior of the reaction of syngas and the water-gas shift (WGS) equilibrium on the design of the fuel reactor of a CLC system have been analyzed. A preliminary estimation of the solids inventory for the use of syngas in the fuel reactor of a CLC system gave values in the range of 19-34 kg MW{sup -1} when the WGS equilibrium was considered to be instantaneous. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Evidence of chemical stimulation of hepatic metabolism by an experimental acetanilide (FOE 5043) indirectly mediating reductions in circulating thyroid hormone levels in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Christenson, W R; Becker, B D; Wahle, B S; Moore, K D; Dass, P D; Lake, S G; Van Goethem, D L; Stuart, B P; Sangha, G K; Thyssen, J H

    1996-02-01

    N-(4-Fluorophenyl)-N-(1-methylethyl)-2-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-1,3, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl]oxy]acetamide (FOE 5043) is a new acetanilide-type herbicide undergoing regulatory testing. Previous work in this laboratory suggested that FOE 5043-induced reductions in serum thyroxine (T4) levels were mediated via an extrathyroidal site of action. The possibility that the alterations in circulating T4 levels were due to chemical induction of hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism was investigated. Treatment with FOE 5043 at a rate of 1000 ppm as a dietary admixture was found to significantly increase the clearance of [125I]T4 from the serum, suggesting an enhanced excretion of the hormone. In the liver, the activity of hepatic uridine glucuronosyl transferase, a major pathway of thyroid hormone biotransformation in the rat, increased in a statistically significant and dose-dependent manner; conversely, hepatic 5'-monodeiodinase activity trended downward with dose. Bile flow as well as the hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of [125I]T4 were increased following exposure to FOE 5043. Thyroidal function, as measured by the discharge of iodide ion in response to perchlorate, and pituitary function, as measured by the capacity of the pituitary to secrete thyrotropin in response to an exogenous challenge by hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone, were both unchanged from the controlled response. These data suggest that the functional status of the thyroid and pituitary glands has not been altered by treatment with FOE 5043 and that reductions in circulating levels of T4 are being mediated indirectly through an increase in the biotransformation and excretion of thyroid hormone in the liver.

  2. Low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH₃ over nanoflaky MnOx on carbon nanotubes in situ prepared via a chemical bath deposition route.

    PubMed

    Fang, Cheng; Zhang, Dengsong; Cai, Sixiang; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Lei; Li, Hongrui; Maitarad, Phornphimon; Shi, Liyi; Gao, Ruihua; Zhang, Jianping

    2013-10-07

    Nanoflaky MnO(x) on carbon nanotubes (nf-MnO(x)@CNTs) was in situ synthesized by a facile chemical bath deposition route for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH₃. This catalyst was mainly characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N₂ adsorption-desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H₂ temperature-programmed reduction (H₂-TPR) and NH₃ temperature-programmed desorption (NH₃-TPD). The SEM, TEM, XRD results and N₂ adsorption-desorption analysis indicated that the CNTs were surrounded by nanoflaky MnO(x) and the obtained catalyst exhibited a large surface area as well. Compared with the MnO(x)/CNT and MnO(x)/TiO₂ catalysts prepared by an impregnation method, the nf-MnO(x)@CNTs presented better NH₃-SCR activity at low temperature and a more extensive operating temperature window. The XPS results showed that a higher atomic concentration of Mn(4+) and more chemisorbed oxygen species existed on the surface of CNTs for nf-MnO(x)@CNTs. The H₂-TPR and NH₃-TPD results demonstrated that the nf-MnO(x)@CNTs possessed stronger reducing ability, more acid sites and stronger acid strength than the other two catalysts. Based on the above mentioned favourable properties, the nf-MnO(x)@CNT catalyst has an excellent performance in the low-temperature SCR of NO to N₂ with NH₃. In addition, the nf-MnO(x)@CNT catalyst also presented favourable stability and H₂O resistance.

  3. One-electron reduction of tris(2,2 prime -bipyrimidine)ruthenium(2+) ion in aqueous solution. A photochemical, radiation chemical, and electrochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Neshvad, G.; Hoffman, M.Z. ); Mulazzani, Q.G.; Ciano, M.; D'Angelantonio, M. ); Venturi, M. Univ. di Bologna )

    1989-08-10

    The reduction of Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+} in aqueous solution has been investigated by use of photochemical, radiation chemical, and electrochemical techniques. The luminescent excited state of the substrate, *Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+}, has a lifetime ({tau}{sub 0}) of 0.081 {mu}s and a standard reduction potential of {approximately} 1.2 V; it is quenched by electron donors (D) such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), triethanolamine (TEOA), ascorbate ion, deprotonated cysteine, and reduced glutathione with values of k{sub q} that depend on the pH of the solution and the reducing ability of the quencher. The one-electron-reduced species, Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup +}, is formed in the quenching reaction; it is also produced electrochemically and from the reaction of radiolytically generated CO{sub 2}{sup {center dot}{minus}} with Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+} (k = 6.7 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}). Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup +} is a good reducing agent (E{sub ox}{sup 0} = 0.73 V) and reduces MV{sup 2+} (methylviologen) to MV{sup {center dot}+} (k = 1.0 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}). Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup +} also undergoes protonation; its acidic form (pK{sub a} 6.3) is a milder reducing agent (E{sub ox}{sup 0} = 0.50 V) but is still capable of reducing MV{sup 2+} (k = 1.0 {times} 10{sup 6} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}). Both forms of Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup +} are unstable with respect to long-term storage; it is likely they engage in disproportionation and/or reaction with the solvent. The continuous photolysis of a solution containing Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+}, MV{sup 2+}, and a sacrificial reductive quencher (EDTA, TEOA) generates MV{sup {center dot}+}. Values of {eta}{sub ce} of 0.64 and {approximately}0.7 for TEOA and EDTA, respectively, in alkaline solution have been obtained.

  4. Characterization and study of reduction and sulfurization processing in phase transition from molybdenum oxide (MoO2) to molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) chalcogenide semiconductor nanoparticles prepared by one-stage chemical reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shomalian, K.; Bagheri-Mohagheghi, M.-M.; Ardyanian, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction method using MoO3 and thiourea as a precursor. The physical properties of the synthesized MoO2-MoS2 nanoparticles annealed at different temperatures of 200, 300, 750 °C have been investigated, before and after exposure to sulfur vapor. The nanostructure of nanoparticles has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) analyses and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of MoS2 single phase at annealing temperature of 750 °C in the presence of sulfur vapor. The Raman spectrum of the nanoparticles revealed that the formation of MoS2 at 750 °C after annealing in sulfur vapor. The values of band gap were obtained in the range of 3.64-3.17 eV and 3.47-1.95 eV for MoS2 nanoparticles before and after exposure to sulfur vapor, respectively. According to SEM images, the grain size decreases with increasing annealing temperature up to 750 °C. Also, nanoplate-nanoparticles of MoS2 are formed at annealing temperature of 200-750 °C. The TEM images of MoS2 nanoparticles at T a = 750 °C confirm that the nanoparticles have a homogeneous distribution with a hexagonal structure. The FTIR spectra of the MoS2 nanoparticles showed the peaks at about 467 cm-1 belong to the characteristic bands of Mo-S.

  5. Two dechlorinated chlordecone derivatives formed by in situ chemical reduction are devoid of genotoxicity and mutagenicity and have lower proangiogenic properties compared to the parent compound.

    PubMed

    Legeay, Samuel; Billat, Pierre-André; Clere, Nicolas; Nesslany, Fabrice; Bristeau, Sébastien; Faure, Sébastien; Mouvet, Christophe

    2017-02-16

    Chlordecone (CLD) is a chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticide, now classified as a persistent organic pollutant. Several studies have previously reported that chronic exposure to CLD leads to hepatotoxicity, neurotoxicity, raises early child development and pregnancy complications, and increases the risk of liver and prostate cancer. In situ chemical reduction (ISCR) has been identified as a possible way for the remediation of soils contaminated by CLD. In the present study, the objectives were (i) to evaluate the genotoxicity and the mutagenicity of two CLD metabolites formed by ISCR, CLD-5a-hydro, or CLD-5-hydro (5a- or 5- according to CAS nomenclature; CLD-1Cl) and tri-hydroCLD (CLD-3Cl), and (ii) to explore the angiogenic properties of these molecules. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity were investigated using the Ames's technique on Salmonella typhimurium and the in vitro micronucleus micromethod with TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells. The proangiogenic properties were evaluated on the in vitro capillary network formation of human primary endothelial cells. Like CLD, the dechlorinated derivatives of CLD studied were devoid of genotoxic and mutagenic activity. In the assay targeting angiogenic properties, significantly lower microvessel lengths formed by endothelial cells were observed for the CLD-3Cl-treated cells compared to the CLD-treated cells for two of the three tested concentrations. These results suggest that dechlorinated CLD derivatives are devoid of mutagenicity and genotoxicity and have lower proangiogenic properties than CLD.

  6. Reactivity of electrophilic chlorine atoms due to σ-holes: a mechanistic assessment of the chemical reduction of a trichloromethyl group by sulfur nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Caballero-García, Guillermo; Romero-Ortega, Moisés; Barroso-Flores, Joaquín

    2016-10-05

    σ-Holes are shown to promote the electrophilic behavior of chlorine atoms in a trichloromethyl group when bound to an electron-withdrawing moiety. A halogen bond-type non-covalent interaction between a chlorine atom and a negatively charged sulfur atom takes place, causing the abstraction of such a chlorine atom while leaving a carbanion, subsequently driving the chemical reduction of the trichloromethyl group to a sulfide in a stepwise process. The mechanism for the model reaction of trichloromethyl pyrimidine 1 with thiophenolate and thiophenol to yield phenylsulfide 4 was followed through (1)H-NMR and studied using DFT transition state calculations, and the energy profile for this transformation is fully discussed. MP2 calculations of the electrostatic potential were performed for a series of trichloromethyl compounds in order to assess the presence of σ-holes and quantify them by means of the maximum surface electrostatic potential. Such calculations showed that the chlorine atoms behave as electrophilic leaving groups toward a nucleophilic attack, opening a new possibility in the synthetic chemistry of the trichloromethyl group.

  7. The evaluation of combined chemical and physical treatments on the reduction of resident microorganisms and Salmonella Typhimurium attached to chicken skin.

    PubMed

    Lee, N Y; Park, S Y; Kang, I S; Ha, S D

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, 0-200 mg/kg), thiamine dilauryl sulfate (TDS, 1,000 mg/kg), and ultrasound (37 kHz, 380 W) on reducing Salmonella Typhimurim, mesophilic aerobic bacteria (MAB), and coliforms on chicken skin. Chemical and physical treatments were applied for 5 min either singly or jointly, and Salmonella previously inoculated on chicken skin were quantitatively assessed using brilliant green agar, and the populations of MAB and coliforms in the native flora were enumerated using plate count agar and violet red bile agar, respectively. In the evaluation of bacterial attachment/detachment, chicken skin was quantitatively assessed for loosely, intermediately, and tightly attached bacteria. The treatment effects on bacteria detachment were also visualized using field emission scanning electron microscopy. In addition, color and textural properties of the skin after treatments were evaluated using a color difference meter and texture analyzer. Antimicrobial activity of NaOCl increased as the NaOCl concentration was increased, especially for loosely attached cells. The combination of 200 mg/kg NaOCl and ultrasound (NaOCl/ultrasound) significant reduced loosely, intermediately, and tightly attached bacteria populations by 0.75 to 0.47, 0.43 to 0.41, and 0.83 to 0.54 log cfu/g for MAB, coliforms, and Salmonella Typhimurium, respectively. However, the combination of NaOCl and TDS (NaOCl/TDS) did not sufficiently reduce those cells on chicken skins, except for loosely attached MAB and coliforms. The NaOCl/ultrasound combination produced a higher reduction in numbers of inoculated and native bacteria flora than any single application, with no negative effect on skin color or texture. Generally, the loosely attached bacteria were less resistant to the chemical and physical treatments than the intermediately and tightly attached bacteria in chicken skin, presumably due to their location in deeper skin layer and

  8. Use of HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry for detection of formazan in in vitro Reconstructed human Tissue (RhT)-based test methods employing the MTT-reduction assay to expand their applicability to strongly coloured test chemicals.

    PubMed

    Alépée, N; Barroso, J; De Smedt, A; De Wever, B; Hibatallah, J; Klaric, M; Mewes, K R; Millet, M; Pfannenbecker, U; Tailhardat, M; Templier, M; McNamee, P

    2015-06-01

    A number of in vitro test methods using Reconstructed human Tissues (RhT) are regulatory accepted for evaluation of skin corrosion/irritation. In such methods, test chemical corrosion/irritation potential is determined by measuring tissue viability using the photometric MTT-reduction assay. A known limitation of this assay is possible interference of strongly coloured test chemicals with measurement of formazan by absorbance (OD). To address this, Cosmetics Europe evaluated use of HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry as an alternative formazan measurement system. Using the approach recommended by the FDA guidance for validation of bio-analytical methods, three independent laboratories established and qualified their HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry systems to reproducibly measure formazan from tissue extracts. Up to 26 chemicals were then tested in RhT test systems for eye/skin irritation and skin corrosion. Results support that: (1) HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry formazan measurement is highly reproducible; (2) formazan measurement by HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry and OD gave almost identical tissue viabilities for test chemicals not exhibiting colour interference nor direct MTT reduction; (3) independent of the test system used, HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry can measure formazan for strongly coloured test chemicals when this is not possible by absorbance only. It is therefore recommended that HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry to measure formazan be included in the procedures of in vitro RhT-based test methods, irrespective of the test system used and the toxicity endpoint evaluated to extend the applicability of these test methods to strongly coloured chemicals.

  9. IN SITU CHEMICAL REDUCTION OF CR(VI) IN GROUNDWATER USING A COMBINATION OF FERROUS SULFATE AND SODIUM DITHIONITE: A FIELD INVESTIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot test was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a FeSO4 + Na2S2O4 reductant solution blend for in situ saturated zone treatment of dissolved-phase Cr(VI) at the former Macalloy Corporation site in Charleston, SC. The reductant blend was injected into the path o...

  10. IN SITU CHEMICAL REDUCTION OF CR(VI) IN GROUNDWATER USING A COMBINATION OF FERROUS SULFATE AND SODIUM DITHIONITE: A FIELD INVESTIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot test was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a FeSO4 + Na2S2O4 reductant solution blend for in situ saturated zone treatment of dissolved-phase Cr(VI) at the former Macalloy Corporation site in Charleston, SC. The reductant blend was injected into the path o...

  11. Impact of reaction parameters on the chemical profile of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine synthesized via reductive amination: target analysis based on GC-qMS compared to non-targeted analysis based on GC×GC-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, M; Dieckmann, S; Pütz, M; Kohles, T; Pyell, U; Zimmermann, R

    2013-12-10

    The most common clandestine manufacturing procedure for the ecstasy derivative 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), is the reductive amination of piperonylmethylketone (PMK) via platinum(IV) oxide/hydrogen. Deviations of the reaction conditions during the synthesis may result in different chemical profiles of the products. The chemical analysis of these profiles is an important objective for forensic drug intelligence. In this work we studied the impact of a systematic variation of the hydrogenation time, the reaction temperature and the precursor batch on the resulting organic chemical profiles of the MDMA bases and MDMA hydrochlorides. Target analysis was based on a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method which was harmonized during the European project CHAMP.(2) In addition, samples were analyzed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) and subjected to non-targeted data analysis for a comprehensive analysis of the complete profiles. The reaction temperature, followed by the used precursor batch, revealed the highest impact on the chemical profile. The effect on individual impurity compounds is discussed in detail. With respect to the interpretation of the data, the profiles were compared to the profiles of MDMA samples obtained by reductive amination using sodium borohydride ("cold method") and aluminium/mercury amalgam as alternative reducing agents. Non-targeted analysis revealed that the discrimination according to the synthetic route and the batch of precursor used for the synthesis strongly depends on the selected target compounds.

  12. "Self-activating" chemical nuclease: ferrocenyl cyclen Cu(II) complexes act as efficient DNA cleavage reagents in the absence of reductant.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Zhou, Li-Hong; Zhang, Ji; Chen, Shan-Yong; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Lin, Hong-Hui; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2009-04-01

    The interactions of cyclen Cu(II) complexes functionalized by ferrocenyl group with plasmid DNA indicated that these complexes have high cleavage efficiency via an oxidative mechanism in the absence of any reductant or oxidant.

  13. A COMPARATIVE RISK REDUCTION ANALYSIS OF THE OFFICE OF SOLID WASTE'S WASTE MINIMIZATION PRIORITY CHEMICALS INITIATIVE USING THE 3MRA MULTIMEDIA MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was initiated by the EPA/ORD National Exposure Research Lab (NERL) in FY05 to quantify risk reduction resulting from this national EPA initiative to reduce WMPC disposal. Using the 3MRA modeling system, which was recommended for use by the EPA Science Advisory Board for ...

  14. A COMPARATIVE RISK REDUCTION ANALYSIS OF THE OFFICE OF SOLID WASTE'S WASTE MINIMIZATION PRIORITY CHEMICALS INITIATIVE USING THE 3MRA MULTIMEDIA MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was initiated by the EPA/ORD National Exposure Research Lab (NERL) in FY05 to quantify risk reduction resulting from this national EPA initiative to reduce WMPC disposal. Using the 3MRA modeling system, which was recommended for use by the EPA Science Advisory Board for ...

  15. Screening of the chemical reactivity of three different graphite sources using the formation of reductively alkylated graphene as a model reaction.

    PubMed

    Knirsch, Kathrin C; Englert, Jan M; Dotzer, Christoph; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2013-11-28

    Reductive alkylation of three graphite starting materials G(flake), G(powder), and G(spherical) reveals pronounced differences in the obtained covalently functionalized graphene with respect to the degree of functionalization, exfoliation efficiency and product homogeneity, as demonstrated by statistical Raman microscopy (SRM), TGA/MS, IR-spectroscopy and solubility behavior.

  16. Chemical reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) at the solid-water interface using natural and synthetic Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byong-Hun; Dempsey, Brian A; Burgos, William D; Barnett, Mark O; Roden, Eric E

    2005-08-01

    Abiotic reduction of 0.1 mM U(VI) by Fe(II) in the presence of synthetic iron oxides (biogenic magnetite, goethite, and hematite) and natural Fe(III) oxide-containing solids was investigated in pH 6.8 artificial groundwater containing 10 mM NaHCO3. In most experiments, more than 95% of added U(VI) was sorbed to solids. U(VI) was rapidly and extensively (> or = 80%) reduced in the presence of synthetic Fe(III) oxides and highly Fe(II) oxide-enriched (18-35 wt % Fe) Atlantic coastal plain sediments. In contrast, long-term (20-60 d) U(VI) reduction was less than 30% in suspensions of six other natural solids with relatively low Fe(III) oxide content (1-5 wt % Fe). Fe(II) sorption site density was severalfold lower on these natural solids (0.2-1.1 Fe(II) nm(-2)) compared tothe synthetic Fe(lII) oxides (1.6-3.2 Fe(II) nm(-2)), which may explain the poor U(VI) reduction in the natural solid-containing systems. Addition of the reduced form of the electron shuttling compound anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS; final concentration 2.5 mM) to the natural solid suspensions enhanced the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction, suggesting that AH2DS reduced U(VI) at surface sites where reaction of U(VI) with sorbed Fe(II) was limited. This study demonstrates that abiotic, Fe(II)-driven U(VI) reduction is likely to be less efficient in natural soils and sediments than would be inferred from studies with synthetic Fe(III) oxides.

  17. Effect of natural Bayah zeolite particle size reduction to physico-chemical properties and absortion against potassium permanganate (KMnO4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayanti, Siti Mariana; Syamsu, Khaswar; Warsiki, Endang; Yuliani, Sri

    2016-02-01

    Recently, researches on nanotechnology have been developed very rapid, as well as the utilization of nano-zeolites. Nano-sized material has several advantages which are expanding absorptive surfaces so it will enhance the material absorption and shorten the absorption time. Zeolite as a KMnO4 binder, has been widely recognized for its ability to extend the shelf life of vegetables and fruits. This study was conducted to determine zeolites physico-chemical characters from different particle size and the effect on KMnO4 absorption. Potassium permanganate (KMnO4) is a strong oxidizer for reducing the quantity of ethylene in storage process of fresh horticultural products. The treatment consisted of (1) different length of milling time (10, 20, 30, 40, and 60 minutes) and (2) the duration of chemical activation with 1 N KOH solution. Physical and chemical characters of zeolite were analyzed using BET, PSA, XRD and SEM. The research design was randomized design. The result implied that milling time was significantly affecting the zeolite particle size, material surface area, and the size of pore diameter and volume. Milling treatment for 40 minutes produced higher zeolite surface area and pore volume than other treatments. While the duration of chemical activation using 1 N KOH solution gives different effect on zeolite absorption to KMnO4 solution. Milling time for 60 minutes and activated for 48 hours has higher initial adsorption than other treatments.

  18. N2O production in the Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO reduction process: the effects of carbon source and pH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Ji; Chen, Jianmeng

    2015-07-01

    Chemical absorption-biological reduction (BioDeNOx), which uses Fe(II)(EDTA) as a complexing agent for promoting the mass transfer efficiency of NO from gas to water, is a promising technology for removing nitric oxide (NO) from flue gases. The carbon source and pH are important parameters for Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO (the production of absorption) reduction and N2O emissions from BioDeNOx systems. Batch tests were performed to evaluate the effects of four different carbon sources (i.e., methanol, ethanol, sodium acetate, and glucose) on Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO reduction and N2O emissions at an initial pH of 7.2 ± 0.2. The removal efficiency of Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO was 93.9%, with a theoretical rate of 0.77 mmol L(-1) h(-1) after 24 h of operation. The highest N2O production was 0.025 mmol L(-1) after 3 h when glucose was used as the carbon source. The capacities of the carbon sources to enhance the activity of the Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO reductase enzyme decreased in the following order based on the C/N ratio: glucose > ethanol > sodium acetate > methanol. Over the investigated pH range of 5.5-8.5, the Fe(II)(EDTA)-NO removal efficiency was highest at a pH of 7.5, with a theoretical rate of 0.88 mmol L(-1) h(-1). However, the N2O production was lowest at a pH of 8.5. The primary effect of pH on denitrification resulted from the inhibition of nosZ in acidic conditions.

  19. Studies of chemical reduction of Fe(III)*EDTA in an SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} aqueous scrubber system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Keener, T.C.; Mendelsohn, M.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Livengood, C.D.

    1996-03-01

    Ferrous*EDTA has been found to be an effective scrubbing agent for nitric oxide gas. A major process problem is oxidation of the iron to the ferric species, leading to a significant decrease in NO{sub x}-removal capability. Argonne National Laboratory discovered a class of organic compounds that, when used with ferrous*EDTA in a sodium carbonate chemistry, could maintain high levels of NO{sub x} removal. However, those antioxidant/reducing agents (A/R) are not effective in a lime-based chemistry. In recent reports, it has been found that ascorbic acid and related compounds are capable of maintaining stable NO{sub x} removals of about 50% (compared with about 15% without the agent) in a lime-based FGD chemistry with Fe(II)*EDTA. It is believed that the improved performance of Fe(II)*EDTA is due to the catalytic action of ascorbate in the Fe(III)*EDTA reduction system, where Fe(III)*EDTA is reduced by ascorbate and oxidized ascorbate is then reduced back to the ascorbate by sulfite/bisulfite anions, which come from the dissolution of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas. In the present work, the kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbate and reduction of oxidized ascorbate by sulfite/bisulfite anions at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ({approximately}55 C) have been determined.

  20. Chemical Reduction of Nd 1.85 Ce 0.15 CuO 4− δ Powders in Supercritical Sodium Ammonia Solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Dias, Yasmin; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Haiqing; ...

    2015-01-01

    Nd 1.85 Ce 0.15 CuO 4− δ powders are chemically reduced in supercritical sodium ammonia solutions from room temperature to 350°C. The crystallographic structure of the reduced powders is investigated from Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction. The atomic positions are maintained constant within experimental errors while temperature factors of all atoms increase significantly after the chemical treatments, especially of Nd/Ce atoms. The ammonothermally reduced Nd 1.85 Ce 0.15 CuO 4− δ powders show diamagnetic below 24 K which is contributed to the lower oxygen content and higher temperature factors of atoms in the treated compound.more » The ammonothermal method paves a new way to reduce oxides in supercritical solutions near room temperature.« less

  1. Assessment of the reduction methods used to develop chemical schemes: building of a new chemical scheme for VOC oxidation suited to three-dimensional multiscale HOx-NOx-VOC chemistry simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, S.; Aumont, B.; Madronich, S.

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and assess an automatic procedure to write reduced chemical schemes for modeling gaseous photooxidant pollution at different scales. The method is based on (i) the development of a tool for writing the fully explicit schemes 5 for VOC oxidation and (ii) the assessment of reduced schemes using the fully explicit scheme as a reference. The reference scheme contained ca. seventy emitted VOCs chosen to be representative of both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and their atmospheric degradation chemistry involving more than two million reactions and 350 000 species was written using an expert system generator approach. 10 Three methods were applied to reduce the size of chemical schemes: (i) use of operators, based on the redundancy of the reaction sequences involved in the VOC oxidation, (ii) lumping of primary species having similar reactivities and (iii) lumping of secondary products into surrogate species. The number of species in the final reduced scheme is 150, i.e. low enough for 3-D modeling purposes using CTMs. Comparisons 15 between the fully explicit and reduced schemes, carried out with a box model for several typical tropospheric conditions, showed that the reduced chemical scheme accurately predicts ozone concentrations and some other aspects of oxidant chemistry for both polluted and clean tropospheric conditions.

  2. Reductive de-polymerization of kraft lignin for chemicals and fuels using formic acid as an in-situ hydrogen source.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shanhua; Mahmood, Nubla; Tymchyshyn, Matthew; Yuan, Zhongshun; Xu, Chunbao Charles

    2014-11-01

    In this study, formic acid (FA) was employed as an in-situ hydrogen donor for the reductive de-polymerization of kraft lignin (KL). Under the optimum operating conditions, i.e., 300 °C, 1 h, 18.6 wt.% substrate concentration, 50/50 (v/v) water-ethanol medium with FA at a FA-to-lignin mass ratio of 0.7, KL (Mw∼10,000 g/mol) was effectively de-polymerized, producing de-polymerized lignin (DL, Mw 1270 g/mol) at a yield of ∼90 wt.% and <1 wt.% yield of solid residue (SR). The MW of the DL products decreased with increasing reaction temperature, time and FA-to-lignin mass ratio. The sulfur contents of all DL products were remarkably lower than that in the original KL. It was also demonstrated that FA is a more reactive hydrogen source than external hydrogen for reductive de-polymerization of KL.

  3. Evolution of the Structure and Chemical State of Pd Nanoparticles During the in Situ Catalytic Reduction of NO with H2

    SciTech Connect

    K Paredis; L Ono; F Behafarid; Z Zhang; J Yang; A Frenkel; B Roldan Cuenya

    2011-12-31

    An in-depth understanding of the fundamental structure of catalysts during operation is indispensable for tailoring future efficient and selective catalysts. We report the evolution of the structure and oxidation state of ZrO{sub 2}-supported Pd nanocatalysts (5 nm) during the in situ reduction of NO with H{sub 2} using X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Prior to the onset of the reaction ({le}120 C), a NO-induced redispersion of our initial metallic Pd nanoparticles over the ZrO{sub 2} support was observed, and Pd{sup {delta}+} species were detected. This process parallels the high production of N{sub 2}O observed at the onset of the reaction (>120 C), while at higher temperatures ({ge}150 C) the selectivity shifts mainly toward N{sub 2} ({approx}80%). Concomitant with the onset of N{sub 2} production, the Pd atoms aggregate again into large (6.5 nm) metallic Pd nanoparticles, which were found to constitute the active phase for the H{sub 2}-reduction of NO. Throughout the entire reaction cycle, the formation and stabilization of PdO{sub x} was not detected. Our results highlight the importance of in situ reactivity studies to unravel the microscopic processes governing catalytic reactivity.

  4. Development and Application of Computational/In Vitro Toxicological Methods for Chemical Hazard Risk Reduction of New Materials for Advanced Weapon Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, John M.; Mattie, D. R.; Hussain, Saber; Pachter, Ruth; Boatz, Jerry; Hawkins, T. W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is essential for reducing the chemical hazards of new weapon systems. The current collaboration between HEST (toxicology research and testing), MLPJ (computational chemistry) and PRS (computational chemistry, new propellant synthesis) is focusing R&D efforts on basic research goals that will rapidly transition to useful products for propellant development. Computational methods are being investigated that will assist in forecasting cellular toxicological end-points. Models developed from these chemical structure-toxicity relationships are useful for the prediction of the toxicological endpoints of new related compounds. Research is focusing on the evaluation tools to be used for the discovery of such relationships and the development of models of the mechanisms of action. Combinations of computational chemistry techniques, in vitro toxicity methods, and statistical correlations, will be employed to develop and explore potential predictive relationships; results for series of molecular systems that demonstrate the viability of this approach are reported. A number of hydrazine salts have been synthesized for evaluation. Computational chemistry methods are being used to elucidate the mechanism of action of these salts. Toxicity endpoints such as viability (LDH) and changes in enzyme activity (glutahoione peroxidase and catalase) are being experimentally measured as indicators of cellular damage. Extrapolation from computational/in vitro studies to human toxicity, is the ultimate goal. The product of this program will be a predictive tool to assist in the development of new, less toxic propellants.

  5. Development and Application of Computational/In Vitro Toxicological Methods for Chemical Hazard Risk Reduction of New Materials for Advanced Weapon Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, John M.; Mattie, D. R.; Hussain, Saber; Pachter, Ruth; Boatz, Jerry; Hawkins, T. W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is essential for reducing the chemical hazards of new weapon systems. The current collaboration between HEST (toxicology research and testing), MLPJ (computational chemistry) and PRS (computational chemistry, new propellant synthesis) is focusing R&D efforts on basic research goals that will rapidly transition to useful products for propellant development. Computational methods are being investigated that will assist in forecasting cellular toxicological end-points. Models developed from these chemical structure-toxicity relationships are useful for the prediction of the toxicological endpoints of new related compounds. Research is focusing on the evaluation tools to be used for the discovery of such relationships and the development of models of the mechanisms of action. Combinations of computational chemistry techniques, in vitro toxicity methods, and statistical correlations, will be employed to develop and explore potential predictive relationships; results for series of molecular systems that demonstrate the viability of this approach are reported. A number of hydrazine salts have been synthesized for evaluation. Computational chemistry methods are being used to elucidate the mechanism of action of these salts. Toxicity endpoints such as viability (LDH) and changes in enzyme activity (glutahoione peroxidase and catalase) are being experimentally measured as indicators of cellular damage. Extrapolation from computational/in vitro studies to human toxicity, is the ultimate goal. The product of this program will be a predictive tool to assist in the development of new, less toxic propellants.

  6. Synergetic effect of ZrO2 on the oxidation-reduction reaction of Fe2O3 during chemical looping combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qinliang; Qin, Wu; Chen, Qiuluan; Dong, Changqing; Li, Wenyan; Yang, Yongping

    2012-10-01

    Fe2O3/ZrO2 model oxygen carrier is constructed at atomic-level precision under ultra-high-vacuum conditions. Based on density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamical simulations, structure and energy analysis suggests that the complex Fe2O3/ZrO2 is stable and more chemically active than the pure Fe2O3, ZrO2 promotes the adsorption of CO, which is chemisorption rather than physisorption on the pure Fe2O3 surface. Interface electronic interaction of Fe2O3/ZrO2 makes Fe2O3 positive to accept electron from CO easily and hence promoting the chemisorption of CO and the formation of carbonate species, while such electronic interaction makes it relatively more difficult in oxidizing Fe2O2 supported on ZrO2. However, all reaction barrier energies are small enough for Fe2O2 oxidation to happen under high temperature in the CLC system. Both CO oxidation by Fe2O3/ZrO2 related to the fuel reactor in the chemical looping combustion (CLC) system and Fe2O2/ZrO2 oxidation by O2 related to the air reactor in CLC system illustrate the synergetic effect of ZrO2 on the CO oxidation and Fe2O2 oxidation.

  7. Hydrogen production from the steam-iron process with direct reduction of iron oxide by chemical looping combustion of coal char

    SciTech Connect

    Jing-biao Yang; Ning-sheng Cai; Zhen-shan Li

    2008-07-15

    Experimental results performed with a fluidized-bed reactor supported the feasibility of the three processes including direct reduction of iron oxide by char, H{sub 2} production by the steam-iron process, and the oxidation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} resulting from the steam-iron process to the original Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by air. Chars resulting from a Chinese lignite loaded with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were used successfully as a reducing material, leading to the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to FeO and Fe for the steam-iron process, which was confirmed by both the off-gases concentrations and X-ray diffractometer analysis. The reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by K-10-char at 1073 K is desirable from the perspective of the carbon conversion rate and high concentration of CO{sub 2}. The carbon in char was completely converted to CO{sub 2} when the mass ratio of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/K-10-char was increased to 10/0.3. The oxidation rate of K-10-char by Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} without a gasifying agent was comparable to the K-10-char steam gasification rate. The fractions of FeO and Fe in the reduced residue were 43 and 57%, respectively, in the case of 3 g of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 0.5 g of K-10-char, which was verified by the total H{sub 2} yield equaling 1000 mL/g K-10-char from the steam-iron process. The time that it took to achieve complete oxidation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by air with an 8.7% O{sub 2} concentration at 1073 K was about 15 min. 53 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations.

  9. Defects reduction in a-plane AlGaN epi-layers grown on r-plane sapphire substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiong; Dai, Qian; Wang, Nan; Wu, Zili; Wang, Shuchang; Cui, Yiping

    2017-01-01

    Nonpolar a-plane AlGaN epi-layers were grown on a semi-polar r-plane sapphire substrate with an innovative two-way pulsed-flows metal organic chemical vapor deposition growth technology. A root-mean-square value of 1.79 nm was achieved, and the relative light transmittance of the a-plane AlGaN epi-layer was enhanced by 36.9%. These results reveal that the innovative growth method is able to improve the surface morphology and reduce the defect density in nonpolar a-plane Al x Ga1- x N epi-layers, particularly those with an Al composition greater than 0.5, which are key materials for the fabrication of nonpolar AlGaN-based high light emission efficiency deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

  10. Highly dynamic PVP-coated silver nanoparticles in aquatic environments: chemical and morphology change induced by oxidation of Ag(0) and reduction of Ag(+).

    PubMed

    Yu, Su-Juan; Yin, Yong-Guang; Chao, Jing-Bo; Shen, Mo-Hai; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2014-01-01

    The fast growing and abundant use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in commercial products alerts us to be cautious of their unknown health and environmental risks. Because of the inherent redox instability of silver, AgNPs are highly dynamic in the aquatic system, and the cycle of chemical oxidation of AgNPs to release Ag(+) and reconstitution to form AgNPs is expected to occur in aquatic environments. This study investigated how inevitable environmentally relevant factors like sunlight, dissolved organic matter (DOM), pH, Ca(2+)/Mg(2+), Cl(-), and S(2-) individually or in combination affect the chemical transformation of AgNPs. It was demonstrated that simulated sunlight induced the aggregation of AgNPs, causing particle fusion or self-assembly to form larger structures and aggregates. Meanwhile, AgNPs were significantly stabilized by DOM, indicating that AgNPs may exist as single particles and be suspended in natural water for a long time or delivered far distances. Dissolution (ion release) kinetics of AgNPs in sunlit DOM-rich water showed that dissolved Ag concentration increased gradually first and then suddenly decreased with external light irradiation, along with the regeneration of new tiny AgNPs. pH variation and addition of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) within environmental levels did not affect the tendency, showing that this phenomenon was general in real aquatic systems. Given that a great number of studies have proven the toxicity of dissolved Ag (commonly regarded as the source of AgNP toxicity) to many aquatic organisms, our finding that the effect of DOM and sunlight on AgNP dissolution can regulate AgNP toxicity under these conditions is important. The fact that the release of Ag(+) and regeneration of AgNPs could both happen in sunlit DOM-rich water implies that previous results of toxicity studies gained by focusing on the original nature of AgNPs should be reconsidered and highlights the necessity to monitor the fate and toxicity of AgNPs under more

  11. Drastic reduction in the surface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon passivated with catalytic chemical vapor deposited SiNx films by introducing phosphorous catalytic-doped layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, Trinh Cham; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2014-07-01

    We improve the passivation property of n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivated with a catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) Si nitride (SiNx) film by inserting a phosphorous (P)-doped layer formed by exposing c-Si surface to P radicals generated by the catalytic cracking of PH3 molecules (Cat-doping). An extremely low surface recombination velocity (SRV) of 2 cm/s can be achieved for 2.5 Ω cm n-type (100) floating-zone Si wafers passivated with SiNx/P Cat-doped layers, both prepared in Cat-CVD systems. Compared with the case of only SiNx passivated layers, SRV decreases from 5 cm/s to 2 cm/s. The decrease in SRV is the result of field effect created by activated P atoms (donors) in a shallow P Cat-doped layer. Annealing process plays an important role in improving the passivation quality of SiNx films. The outstanding results obtained imply that SiNx/P Cat-doped layers can be used as promising passivation layers in high-efficiency n-type c-Si solar cells.

  12. Length Scale Discontinuities Between Non-Crystalline And Nano-Crystalline Thin Films: Chemical Bonding Self-Organization, Broken Constraints And Reductions of Macroscopic Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.; Phillips, J.C.

    2009-05-19

    This paper identifies different length scales, {lambda}{sub s}, for strain-reducing chemical bonding self-organizations in non-crystalline and nano-crystalline thin films. Length scales have been identified through spectroscopic studies, thermal heat flow measurements, and are analyzed by semi-empirical bond-constraint theory (SE-BCT) and symmetry adapted linear combinations (SALC) of atomic states. In both instances, strain-reducing self-organizations result in reduced defect densities that are minimized and enabling for device applications. The length scale for non-crystalline solids extends to at most 1 nm, and more generally to 0.5-0.8 nm; however, there are two different length scales for nano-crystalline films: one is <2.5 nm and is characterized by suppression of longer range ordering required for complex unit cells based on more than one primitive unit cell and the second is >3-3.5 nm and defines a regime where complex unit cells, comprised of two or more primitive unit cells are stabilized and the electronic structure is changed.

  13. Direct determination of arsenic in soil samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation using sodium formate as a reductant followed by nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Zhang, Jingya; Bu, Fanlong

    2015-09-01

    This new study shows for the first time that sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via fast pyrolysis - chemical vapor generation. We found that the presence of thiourea greatly enhanced the generation efficiency and eliminated the interference of copper. We studied the reaction temperature, the volume of sodium formate, the reaction acidity, and the carried argon rate using nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under optimal conditions of T = 500 °C, the volumes of 30% sodium formate and 10% thiourea were 0.2 ml and 0.05 ml, respectively. The carrier argon rate was 300 ml min- 1 and the detection limit and precision of arsenic were 0.39 ng and 3.25%, respectively. The amount of arsenic in soil can be directly determined by adding trace amount of hydrochloric acid as a decomposition reagent without any sample pretreatment. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amount of arsenic in two soil-certified reference materials (GBW07453 and GBW07450), and the results were found to be in agreement with certified reference values.

  14. Chemical Strategies for Enhancing Activity and Charge Transfer in Ultrathin Pt Nanowires Immobilized onto Nanotube Supports for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Luyao; Liu, Haiqing; Wang, Lei; ...

    2016-12-12

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) represent a promising support medium for electrocatalysts, especially Pt nanoparticles (NPs). The advantages of using MWNTs include their large surface area, high conductivity, as well as long-term stability. Surface functionalization of MWNTs with various terminal groups, such as -COOH, -SH, and -NH2, allows for rational electronic tuning of catalyst–support interactions. But, several issues still need to be addressed for such systems. Over the course of an electrochemical run, catalyst durability can decrease, due in part to metal NP dissolution, a process facilitated by the inherently high surface defect concentration within the support. Second, the covalent functionalizationmore » treatment of MWNTs adopted by most groups tends to lead to a loss of structural integrity of the nanotubes (NTs). In order to mitigate for all of these issues, we have utilized two different attachment approaches (i.e., covalent versus noncovalent) to functionalize the outer walls of pristine MWNTs and compared the catalytic performance of as-deposited ultrathin (<2 nm) 1D Pt nanowires with that of conventional Pt NPs toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our results demonstrated that the electrochemical activity of Pt nanostructures immobilized onto functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) supports could be dramatically improved by using ultrathin Pt nanowires (instead of NPs) with noncovalently (as opposed to covalently) functionalized CNT supports. Spectroscopic evidence corroborated the definitive presence of charge transfer between the metal catalysts and the underlying NT support, whose direction and magnitude are a direct function of (i) the terminal chemistry as well as (ii) the attachment methodology, both of which simultaneously impact upon the observed electrocatalytic performance. Specifically, the use of a noncovalent π–π stacking method coupled with a -COOH terminal moiety yielded the highest performance results, reported to

  15. Chemical Strategies for Enhancing Activity and Charge Transfer in Ultrathin Pt Nanowires Immobilized onto Nanotube Supports for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Luyao; Liu, Haiqing; Wang, Lei; Yue, Shiyu; Tong, Xiao; Zaliznyak, Tatiana; Taylor, Gordon T.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2016-12-12

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) represent a promising support medium for electrocatalysts, especially Pt nanoparticles (NPs). The advantages of using MWNTs include their large surface area, high conductivity, as well as long-term stability. Surface functionalization of MWNTs with various terminal groups, such as -COOH, -SH, and -NH2, allows for rational electronic tuning of catalyst–support interactions. But, several issues still need to be addressed for such systems. Over the course of an electrochemical run, catalyst durability can decrease, due in part to metal NP dissolution, a process facilitated by the inherently high surface defect concentration within the support. Second, the covalent functionalization treatment of MWNTs adopted by most groups tends to lead to a loss of structural integrity of the nanotubes (NTs). In order to mitigate for all of these issues, we have utilized two different attachment approaches (i.e., covalent versus noncovalent) to functionalize the outer walls of pristine MWNTs and compared the catalytic performance of as-deposited ultrathin (<2 nm) 1D Pt nanowires with that of conventional Pt NPs toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our results demonstrated that the electrochemical activity of Pt nanostructures immobilized onto functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) supports could be dramatically improved by using ultrathin Pt nanowires (instead of NPs) with noncovalently (as opposed to covalently) functionalized CNT supports. Spectroscopic evidence corroborated the definitive presence of charge transfer between the metal catalysts and the underlying NT support, whose direction and magnitude are a direct function of (i) the terminal chemistry as well as (ii) the attachment methodology, both of which simultaneously impact upon the observed electrocatalytic performance. Specifically, the use of a noncovalent π–π stacking method coupled with a -COOH terminal moiety yielded the highest performance results, reported

  16. Study of the chemical reduction of the fumonisins toxicity using allyl, benzyl and phenyl isothiocyanate in model solution and in food products.

    PubMed

    Azaiez, I; Meca, G; Manyes, L; Luciano, F B; Fernández-Franzón, M

    2013-03-01

    Fumonisins (FBs) are bioactive compounds produced by several strains of Fusarium spp. which contain a polyketide structure similar to sphinganine. These mycotoxins contain a free amino group that could work as an electron donor and react with the electrophile carbon present within the isothiocyanate (ITC) group. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of ITCs (allyl, benzyl and phenyl) on the stability of FB(1), FB(2) and FB(3). Firstly, PBS solutions at three pH levels (4, 7 and 9) were prepared and added with pairs of one FB (1 mg/L) plus one ITC (1 mg/L). Then, gaseous ITC was used to fumigate corn kernels and corn flour contaminated with FBs produced by Gibberella moniliformis CECT 2987 in situ. Mycotoxin levels were evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in tandem (LC-MS/MS), while products formed from the reaction of FBs and ITCs were examined by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-linear ion trap (LC-MS-LIT). The reduction of FB(1) and FB(2) in solution ranged from 42 to 100% on a time-dependent manner. This variance was greatly influenced by pH. In general, lower pH levels eased the reaction between ITCs and FBs. ITC fumigation treatment (50, 100 and 500 μL/L) was able to reduce 53-96% of FB(1) levels, 29-91% of FB(2) and 29-96% of FB(3). Four reaction products between the bioactive compounds employed in this study were identified, corresponding to FB + ITC conjugates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Scrubbing ions with molecules: kinetic studies of chemical noise reduction in mass spectrometry using ion-molecule reactions with dimethyl disulfide.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Michael J Y; Koyanagi, Gregory K; Zhao, Xiang; Covey, Thomas R; Bohme, Diethard K

    2007-06-01

    The kinetics and product distributions of the reactions of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) have been investigated with a group of chemical background ions commonly observed in atmospheric pressure ionization (API) mass spectrometry (MS) in order to assess the value of this molecule in filtering (or "scrubbing") these ions by changing their mass/charge (m/z) ratio. The measurements were taken with a novel electrospray ionization/selected ion flow tube/QqQ tandem mass spectrometer. The background ions studied include those with m/z 42 (protonated acetonitrile, ACN), 83 (protonated ACN dimer), 99 (protonated phosphoric acid), 117 (water cluster of m/z 99), 131 (methanol cluster of m/z 99), 149 (protonated phthalic anhydride, formed from the phthalates), and 327 (protonated triphenyl phosphate). In addition, reactions of DMDS have been studied with two model analytes--protonated caffeine and doubly protonated bradykinin--in order to assess the selectivity of DMDS reactivity. All the measurements were taken at 295 +/- 2 K in helium buffer gas at a pressure of 0.35 +/- 0.01 Torr. DMDS was observed to react efficiently with m/z 42 (ACNH+), 149 (from phthalates), and 99 (protonated phosphoric acid), with k/kc=0.91, 0.47, and 0.38, respectively. Only proton transfer was observed with ACNH+, followed by the secondary reaction of [DMDSH]+ with DMDS to yield [CH3S-S(CH3)-SCH3]+. Ligation of DMDS was the dominant primary channel observed for the reaction of the m/z 149 background ion; however, some proton transfer also was observed. Both of these primary product ions react further with DMDS to yield [CH3S-S(CH3)-SCH3]+, the structure of which we have determined computationally using DFT calculations. Only the sequential ligation with two DMDS molecules was observed for the reaction of the m/z 99 ion. Reactions of DMDS with m/z 117 [H3PO4 + H + H2O]+ and m/z 131 [H3PO4 + H + MeOH]+ were observed to proceed with k/kc=0.71 and 0.058, respectively. Ligand substitution of DMDS for H2O

  18. Physical and photoelectrochemical properties of Sb-doped SnO2 thin films deposited by chemical vapor deposition: application to chromate reduction under solar light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outemzabet, R.; Doulache, M.; Trari, M.

    2015-05-01

    Sb-doped SnO2 thin films (Sb-SnO2) are prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The X-ray diffraction indicates a rutile phase, and the SEM analysis shows pyramidal grains whose size extends up to 200 nm. The variation of the film thickness shows that the elaboration technique needs to be optimized to give reproducible layers. The films are transparent over the visible region. The dispersion of the optical indices is evaluated by fitting the diffuse reflectance data with the Drude-Lorentz model. The refractive index ( n) and absorption coefficient ( k) depend on both the conditions of preparation and of the doping concentration and vary between 1.4 and 2.0 and 0.2 and 0.01, respectively. Tin oxide is nominally non-stoichiometric, and the conduction is dominated by thermally electrons jump with an electron mobility of 12 cm2 V-1 s-1 for Sb-SnO2 (1 %). The ( C 2- V) characteristic in aqueous electrolyte exhibits a linear behavior from which an electrons density of 4.15 × 1018 cm-3 and a flat-band potential of -0.83 V SCE are determined. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows a semicircle attributed to a capacitive behavior with a low density of surface states. The center lies below the real axis with a depletion angle (12°), due to a constant phase element, i.e., a deviation from a pure capacitive behavior, presumably attributed to the roughness and porosity of the film. The straight line at low frequencies is attributed to the Warburg diffusion. The energy diagram reveals the photocatalytic feasibility of Sb-SnO2. As application, 90 % of the chromate concentration (20 mg L-1, pH ~3) disappears after 6 h of exposure to solar light.

  19. Theoretical study of oxidation-reduction reaction of Fe2O3 supported on MgO during chemical looping combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wu; Chen, Qiuluan; Wang, Yang; Dong, Changqing; Zhang, Junjiao; Li, Wenyan; Yang, Yongping

    2013-02-01

    We applied density-functional theory (DFT) in periodic system to investigate the two reactions (CO + Fe2O3/MgO → CO2 + Fe2O2/MgO, O2 + Fe2O2/MgO → O + Fe2O3/MgO) in chemical looping combustion system. While Fe2O3 was supported on MgO(1 0 0) surface Fe2O3 gathered together to form a cluster shape on MgO(1 0 0), denoted as Fe2O3/MgO, where the Fe2O3 was activated by MgO(1 0 0). Then CO interacted with Fe2O3/MgO and carbonate generated during a stepwise reaction with the calculated maximum barrier energy of 0.95 eV, far less than that of the reaction between CO and the pure Fe2O3 cluster (2.59 eV). CO was oxidized by Fe2O3/MgO and then Fe2O3/MgO transformed into the reduced state Fe2O2/MgO, corresponding to the reaction in the fuel reactor in the CLC system. Then the breaking of the adsorbed O2 molecule on Fe2O2/MgO made an O atom bind to a Fe site with the barrier energy of 0. 20 eV, which played as the key step for the oxidizing of Fe2O2/MgO by O2 into Fe2O3/MgO, corresponding to the reaction in the air reactor in the CLC system.

  20. C-Fos expression in trigeminal nucleus neurons after chemical irritation of the cornea: reduction by selective blockade of nociceptor chemosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Martinez, S; Belmonte, C

    1996-04-01

    The distribution and number of trigeminal brainstem and higher order sensory neurons expressing the protein product of the proto-oncogene c-fos after noxious stimulation of the cornea was studied in the rat using immunocytochemistry. The possibility that attenuation of nociceptive messages from the cornea by diltiazem reduced Fos-like immunoreactivity of spinal trigeminal neurons was also examined. A group of animals were killed 2-3 h after corneal stimulation. One cornea was stimulated with: a drop of 10 mM acetic acid; with acid plus mechanical scratching of the corneal epithelium; or with a drop of saline of 56 degrees C. Half of the animals treated with acid had been pretreated ipsilaterally with topical diltiazem (10 mM). Control rats received either saline in one eye or no treatment. Another group of animals were killed 7-8 h after stimulation with acetic acid. Fos-like immunoreactive neurons were counted in serial brainstem sections using an anti-Fos primary antiserum and processed according to the avidin-biotin complex method. In rats killed 2-3 h after corneal stimulation with acid, heat, or acid plus mechanical injury, labelled neurons were found in laminae I and II of the intermediate zone between caudalis and interpolaris subnuclei of the ipsilateral spinal trigeminal nucleus and, in a reduced number, in the symmetrical zones of the contralateral side. In animals stimulated with noxious heat or combined mechanical and chemical injury, a few scattered cells were also labelled in the ipsilateral junction between the cervical spinal cord and the caudalmost part of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis. In rats killed 7 h after stimulation with acid, stained neurons were observed in the same areas of the trigeminal nucleus as in rats killed at shorter times, but in lower numbers; in these animals, no immunoreactive cells were found in deeper laminae or in higher sensory relay nuclei. Pretreatment with diltiazem significantly reduced the number of cells of the

  1. Chemical Domino Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. Dale

    1998-04-01

    The Chemical Domino Demonstration is both educational and entertaining. It provides an excellent means for a review of chemical concepts at the conclusion of a general chemistry course. This demonstration consists of a number of different chemical reactions occurring in sequence in a Rube Goldberg-type apparatus. These reactions include the reduction of water by an active metal, the oxidation of a moderately active metal by an acid, reduction of metallic ions by a metal of greater activity, acid-base neutralization reactions in solution monitored with indicators, a gas-phase acid-base neutralization reaction, decomposition of a compound, precipitation of an insoluble salt, substitution reactions of coordination complexes, and pyrotechnic oxidation-reduction reactions including a hypergolic oxidation-reduction reaction, an intramolecular oxidation-reduction reaction, and the combustion of a flammable gas.

  2. Oxidation, Reduction, and Deoxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Robert

    In this chapter, methods for oxidation, reduction, and deoxygenation of carbohydrates are presented. In most cases, the reactions have been used on aldoses and their derivatives including glycosides, uronic acids, glycals, and other unsaturated monosaccharides. A number of reactions have also been applied to aldonolactones. The methods include both chemical and enzymatic procedures and some of these can be applied for regioselective transformation of unprotected or partially protected carbohydrates.

  3. Examination of surface phenomena of V₂O₅ loaded on new nanostructured TiO₂ prepared by chemical vapor condensation for enhanced NH₃-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Cha, Woojoon; Yun, Seong-Taek; Jurng, Jongsoo

    2014-09-07

    In this article, we describe the investigation and surface characterization of a chemical vapor condensation (CVC)-TiO2 support material used in a V2O5/TiO2 catalyst for enhanced selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity and confirm the mechanism of surface reactions. On the basis of previous studies and comparison with a commercial TiO2 catalyst, we examine four fundamental questions: first, the reason for increased surface V(4+) ion concentrations; second, the origin of the increase in surface acid sites; third, a basis for synergistic influences on improvements in SCR activity; and fourth, a reason for improved catalytic activity at low reaction temperatures. In this study, we have cited the result of SCR with NH3 activity for removing NOx and analyzed data using the reported result and data from previous studies on V2O5/CVC-TiO2 for the SCR catalyst. In order to determine the properties of suitable CVC-TiO2 surfaces for efficient SCR catalysis at low temperatures, CVC-TiO2 specimens were prepared and characterized using techniques such as XRD, BET, HR-TEM, XPS, FT-IR, NH3-TPD, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, H2-TPR, and cyclic voltammetry. The results obtained for the CVC-TiO2 materials were also compared with those of commercial TiO2.

  4. Harm reduction

    PubMed Central

    Normand, Jacques; Li, Jih-Heng; Thomson, Nicholas; Jarlais, Don Des

    2014-01-01

    The “Harm Reduction” session was chaired by Dr. Jacques Normand, Director of the AIDS Research Program of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse. The three presenters (and their presentation topics) were: Dr. Don Des Jarlais (High Coverage Needle/Syringe Programs for People Who Inject Drugs in Low and Middle Income Countries: A Systematic Review), Dr. Nicholas Thomson (Harm Reduction History, Response, and Current Trends in Asia), and Dr. Jih-Heng Li (Harm Reduction Strategies in Taiwan). PMID:25278732

  5. Waste Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Marilyn; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that focus on waste reduction in the school and community. The ideas are divided into grade level categories. Sample activities include Techno-Trash, where children use tools to take apart broken appliances or car parts, then reassemble them or build new creations. Activities are suggested for areas including language arts and…

  6. Reduction Corporoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hakky, Tariq S.; Martinez, Daniel; Yang, Christopher; Carrion, Rafael E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Here we present the first video demonstration of reduction corporoplasty in the management of phallic disfigurement in a 17 year old man with a history sickle cell disease and priapism. Introduction Surgical management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora has yet to be defined in the literature. Materials and Methods: We preformed bilateral elliptical incisions over the lateral corpora as management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora to correct phallic disfigurement. Results The patient tolerated the procedure well and has resolution of his corporal disfigurement. Conclusions Reduction corporoplasty using bilateral lateral elliptical incisions in the management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora is a safe an feasible operation in the management of phallic disfigurement. PMID:26005988

  7. Efficacy studies of Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion, M291 Skin Decontamination Kit, 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents, part 2: guinea pigs challenged with soman.

    PubMed

    Braue, Ernest H; Smith, Kelly H; Doxzon, Bryce F; Lumpkin, Horace L; Clarkson, Edward D

    2011-03-01

    This report, the second in a series of five, directly compares the efficacy of Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), the M291 Skin Decontamination Kit (SDK), 0.5% bleach (sodium or calcium hypochlorite solution), 1% soapy water, and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents (SERPACWA) in the haired guinea pig model following exposure to soman (GD). In all experiments, guinea pigs were close-clipped and given anesthesia. In the decontamination experiments, the animals were challenged with GD and decontaminated after a 2-minute delay for the standard procedure or at longer times for the delayed-decontamination experiments. Positive control animals were challenged with GD in the same manner as the treated animals, except that they received no treatment. All animals were observed during the first 4 hours and again at 24 hours after exposure for signs of toxicity and death. The protective ratio (PR, defined as the median lethal dose [LD(50)] of the treatment group divided by the LD(50) of the untreated positive control animals) was calculated from the derived probit dose-response curves established for each treatment group and nontreated control animals. SERPACWA was applied as a thin coating (0.1 mm thick), allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and challenged with GD. After a 2-hour challenge, any remaining GD was blotted off the animal, but no additional decontamination was done. Significance in this report is defined as p <.05. Neat (undiluted) GD was used to challenge all animals in these studies. In the standard 2-minute GD decontamination experiments, the calculated PRs for RSDL, 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and M291 SDK were 14, 2.7, 2.2, and 2.6, respectively. RSDL was by far the most effective decontamination product tested and significantly better than any of the other products. Bleach, soapy water, and the M291 SDK provided equivalent and modest protection. Since only RSDL provided at least good protection (PR > 5), it was the only

  8. Efficacy studies of Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion, M291 Skin Decontamination Kit, 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents, part 1: guinea pigs challenged with VX.

    PubMed

    Braue, Ernest H; Smith, Kelly H; Doxzon, Bryce F; Lumpkin, Horace L; Clarkson, Edward D

    2011-03-01

    This report, first in a series of five, directly compares the efficacy of 4 decontamination products and Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents (SERPACWA) in the haired guinea pig model following exposure to VX. In all experiments, guinea pigs were close-clipped and given anesthesia. In the decontamination experiments, the animals were challenged with VX and decontaminated after a 2-minute delay for the standard procedure or at longer times for the delayed-decontamination experiments. Skin Exposure Reduction Paste Against Chemical Warfare Agents was applied as a thin coating (0.1 mm thick), allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and challenged with VX. After a 2-hour challenge, any remaining VX was blotted off the animal, but no additional decontamination was done. Positive control animals were challenged with VX in the same manner as the treated animals, except that they received no treatment. In addition, the positive control animals were always challenged with 5% VX in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) solution, whereas the treatment animals received either neat (undiluted) VX or 5% VX in IPA solution. All animals were observed during the first 4 hours and again at 24 hours after exposure for signs of toxicity and death. The protective ratio (PR, defined as the median lethal dose [LD(50)] of the treatment group divided by the LD(50) of the untreated positive control animals) was calculated from the probit dose-response curves established for each treatment group and nontreated control animals. Significance in this report was defined as p < .05. In the standard 2-minute neat VX decontamination experiments, the calculated PRs for Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), 0.5% bleach, 1% soapy water, and the M291 Skin Decontamination Kit (SDK) were 66, 17, 16, and 1.1, respectively. Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion was by far the most effective decontamination product tested and was significantly better than any of the other products. Bleach and

  9. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  10. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L., Ed.; Chapman, Kenneth, Ed.

    This volume contains chapters 26-31 for the American Chemical Society (ACS) "Modern Chemical Technology" (ChemTeC) instructional material intended to prepare chemical technologists. Chapter 26 reviews oxidation and reduction, including applications in titrations with potassium permanganate and iodometry. Coordination compounds are…

  11. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L., Ed.; Chapman, Kenneth, Ed.

    This volume contains chapters 26-31 for the American Chemical Society (ACS) "Modern Chemical Technology" (ChemTeC) instructional material intended to prepare chemical technologists. Chapter 26 reviews oxidation and reduction, including applications in titrations with potassium permanganate and iodometry. Coordination compounds are…

  12. Chemical exchange program analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Waffelaert, Pascale

    2007-09-01

    unneeded chemicals and the amount spent on new purchases, but will also avoid disposal costs. If SNL/NM were to realize a 5 percent reduction in chemical inventory and a 10 percent reduction in disposal of unused chemicals the total savings would be $189, 200 per year.

  13. Chemical Peel

    MedlinePlus

    ... be done at different depths — light, medium or deep — depending on your desired results. Each type of ... chemical peel after 12 months to maintain results. Deep chemical peel. A deep chemical peel removes skin ...

  14. Some Early Usages of Chemical Terms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldroyd, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the origins of such chemical terms as substance, element, analysis, synthesis, compounds, mixture, organic,'' affinity, oxidation, reduction, acid, base, and salt for the purpose of providing a background to facilitate student's understanding of chemical terminology. (CC)

  15. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  16. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  17. RESEARCH ON ELECTRIC ARC REDUCTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CARBON DIOXIDE , REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), ELECTRIC ARCS, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, HEAT OF REACTION, GAS FLOW, OXYGEN, CARBON COMPOUNDS, MONOXIDES, ELECTRODES, LABORATORY EQUIPMENT, HIGH TEMPERATURE, PLASMAS(PHYSICS), ENERGY.

  18. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone: reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu, Haiying; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 10(8) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10-1000 μmol dm(-3)) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid.

  19. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone: reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu, Haiying; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 108 dm3 mol−1 s−1 and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–1000 μmol dm−3) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid. PMID:25212600

  20. Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product ofChemical and Electrochemical Reduction of EC in EC:EMC/1.2M LiPF6Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Guorong V.; Xu, Kang; Yang, Hui; Jow, T. Richard; RossJr., Philip N.

    2005-05-11

    Lithium ethylene dicarbonate (CH2OCO2Li)2 was chemically synthesized and its Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum was obtained and compared with that of surface films formed on Ni after cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 1.2M lithium hexafluorophosphate(LiPF6)/ethylene carbonate (EC): ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (3:7, w/w) electrolyte and on metallic lithium cleaved in-situ in the same electrolyte. By comparison of IR experimental spectra with that of the synthesized compound, we established that the title compound is the predominant surface species in both instances. Detailed analysis of the IR spectrum utilizing quantum chemical (Hartree-Fock) calculations indicates that intermolecular association through O...Li...O interactions is very important in this compound. It is likely that the title compound in passivation layer has a highly associated structure, but the exact intermolecular conformation could not be established based on analysis of the IR spectrum.

  1. Thermodynamics of lunar ilmenite reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenberg, B. H.; Franklin, H. A.; Jones, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    With the prospect of returning to the moon, the development of a lunar occupation would fulfill one of the goals of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) of the late 1980's. Processing lunar resources into useful products, such as liquid oxygen for fuel and life support, would be one of many aspects of an active lunar base. ilmenite (FeTiO3) is found on the lunar surface and can be used as a feed stock to produce oxygen. Understanding the various ilmenite-reduction reactions elucidates many processing options. Defining the thermodynamic chemical behavior at equilibrium under various conditions of temperature and pressures can be helpful in specifying optimal operating conditions. Differences between a previous theoretical analysis and experimentally determined results has sparked interest in trying to understand the effect of operating pressure on the hydrogen-reduction-of-ilmenite reaction. Various aspects of this reduction reaction are discussed.

  2. Thermodynamics of lunar ilmenite reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenberg, B. H.; Franklin, H. A.; Jones, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    With the prospect of returning to the moon, the development of a lunar occupation would fulfill one of the goals of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) of the late 1980's. Processing lunar resources into useful products, such as liquid oxygen for fuel and life support, would be one of many aspects of an active lunar base. ilmenite (FeTiO3) is found on the lunar surface and can be used as a feed stock to produce oxygen. Understanding the various ilmenite-reduction reactions elucidates many processing options. Defining the thermodynamic chemical behavior at equilibrium under various conditions of temperature and pressures can be helpful in specifying optimal operating conditions. Differences between a previous theoretical analysis and experimentally determined results has sparked interest in trying to understand the effect of operating pressure on the hydrogen-reduction-of-ilmenite reaction. Various aspects of this reduction reaction are discussed.

  3. Chemical Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  4. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Anand T; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C; Tokuda, Joshua M; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W; Crane, Brian R

    2013-12-17

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation.

  5. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C.; Tokuda, Joshua M.; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation. PMID:24297896

  6. Interactions between Biological and Abiotic Pathways in the Reduction of Chlorinated Solvents

    EPA Science Inventory

    While biologically mediated reductive dechlorination continues to be a significant focus of chlorinated solvent remediation, there has been an increased interest in abiotic reductive processes for the remediation of chlorinated solvents. In situ chemical reduction (ISCR) uses zer...

  7. Interactions between Biological and Abiotic Pathways in the Reduction of Chlorinated Solvents

    EPA Science Inventory

    While biologically mediated reductive dechlorination continues to be a significant focus of chlorinated solvent remediation, there has been an increased interest in abiotic reductive processes for the remediation of chlorinated solvents. In situ chemical reduction (ISCR) uses zer...

  8. Chemical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  9. Chemically rechargeable battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, James E. (Inventor); Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Batteries (50) containing oxidized, discharged metal electrodes such as an iron-air battery are charged by removing and storing electrolyte in a reservoir (98), pumping fluid reductant such as formalin (aqueous formaldehyde) from a storage tank (106) into the battery in contact with the surfaces of the electrodes. After sufficient iron hydroxide has been reduced to iron, the spent reductant is drained, the electrodes rinsed with water from rinse tank (102) and then the electrolyte in the reservoir (106) is returned to the battery. The battery can be slowly electrically charged when in overnight storage but can be quickly charged in about 10 minutes by the chemical procedure of the invention.

  10. Breast Reduction Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... considering breast reduction surgery, consult a board-certified plastic surgeon. It's important to understand what breast reduction ... risk of complications from breast reduction surgery. Your plastic surgeon will likely: Evaluate your medical history and ...

  11. Room temperature reduction and hydrolysis of FeCl3ṡ6H2O on self-sacrifice microscale Cu2O octahedron template: A mild chemical synthesis of pseudocapacitor electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mu; Peng, Xiaoyang; Chen, Xu; Chen, Kunfeng; Sun, Xudong; Xue, Dongfeng

    2015-03-01

    Fe(OH)x (x = 2, 3) colloidal aggregations were synthesized at room temperature via a reduction and hydrolysis of FeCl3ṡ6H2O on microscale Cu2O octahedron, which functions as a self-sacrifice template. We herein proposed the growth of Fe(OH)x colloidal aggregation by redox etching Cu2O octahedron while two critical reactions of both redox and precipitation were well employed in this work. As-synthesized Fe(OH)x samples exhibited high specific capacitance of 242.7 F/g, which was higher than those available data of iron oxides and hydroxides.

  12. Dissolution and reduction of magnetite by bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostka, J. E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an iron oxide of mixed oxidation state [Fe(II), Fe(III)] that contributes largely to geomagnetism and plays a significant role in diagenesis in marine and freshwater sediments. Magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading and accurate interpretation of the sedimentary magnetic record depends on an understanding of the conditions under which magnetite is stable. Though chemical reduction of magnetite by dissolved sulfide is well known, biological reduction has not been considered likely based upon thermodynamic considerations. This study shows that marine and freshwater strains of the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens are capable of the rapid dissolution and reduction of magnetite, converting millimolar amounts to soluble Fe(II)in a few days at room temperature. Conditions under which magnetite reduction is optimal (pH 5-6, 22-37 degrees C) are consistent with an enzymatic process and not with simple chemical reduction. Magnetite reduction requires viable cells and cell contact, and it appears to be coupled to electron transport and growth. In a minimal medium with formate or lactate as the electron donor, more than 10 times the amount of magnetite was reduced over no carbon controls. These data suggest that magnetite reduction is coupled to carbon metabolism in S. putrefaciens. Bacterial reduction rates of magnetite are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated for reduction by sulfide. If such remobilization of magnetite occurs in nature, it could have a major impact on sediment magnetism and diagenesis.

  13. Dissolution and reduction of magnetite by bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostka, J. E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an iron oxide of mixed oxidation state [Fe(II), Fe(III)] that contributes largely to geomagnetism and plays a significant role in diagenesis in marine and freshwater sediments. Magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading and accurate interpretation of the sedimentary magnetic record depends on an understanding of the conditions under which magnetite is stable. Though chemical reduction of magnetite by dissolved sulfide is well known, biological reduction has not been considered likely based upon thermodynamic considerations. This study shows that marine and freshwater strains of the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens are capable of the rapid dissolution and reduction of magnetite, converting millimolar amounts to soluble Fe(II)in a few days at room temperature. Conditions under which magnetite reduction is optimal (pH 5-6, 22-37 degrees C) are consistent with an enzymatic process and not with simple chemical reduction. Magnetite reduction requires viable cells and cell contact, and it appears to be coupled to electron transport and growth. In a minimal medium with formate or lactate as the electron donor, more than 10 times the amount of magnetite was reduced over no carbon controls. These data suggest that magnetite reduction is coupled to carbon metabolism in S. putrefaciens. Bacterial reduction rates of magnetite are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated for reduction by sulfide. If such remobilization of magnetite occurs in nature, it could have a major impact on sediment magnetism and diagenesis.

  14. Dissolution and reduction of magnetite by bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kostka, J E; Nealson, K H

    1995-10-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an iron oxide of mixed oxidation state [Fe(II), Fe(III)] that contributes largely to geomagnetism and plays a significant role in diagenesis in marine and freshwater sediments. Magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading and accurate interpretation of the sedimentary magnetic record depends on an understanding of the conditions under which magnetite is stable. Though chemical reduction of magnetite by dissolved sulfide is well known, biological reduction has not been considered likely based upon thermodynamic considerations. This study shows that marine and freshwater strains of the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens are capable of the rapid dissolution and reduction of magnetite, converting millimolar amounts to soluble Fe(II)in a few days at room temperature. Conditions under which magnetite reduction is optimal (pH 5-6, 22-37 degrees C) are consistent with an enzymatic process and not with simple chemical reduction. Magnetite reduction requires viable cells and cell contact, and it appears to be coupled to electron transport and growth. In a minimal medium with formate or lactate as the electron donor, more than 10 times the amount of magnetite was reduced over no carbon controls. These data suggest that magnetite reduction is coupled to carbon metabolism in S. putrefaciens. Bacterial reduction rates of magnetite are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated for reduction by sulfide. If such remobilization of magnetite occurs in nature, it could have a major impact on sediment magnetism and diagenesis.

  15. A Virtual Aluminum Reduction Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhou, Chenn Q.; Wu, Bing; Li, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The most important component in the aluminum industry is the aluminum reduction cell; it has received considerable interests and resources to conduct research to improve its productivity and energy efficiency. The current study focused on the integration of numerical simulation data and virtual reality technology to create a scientifically and practically realistic virtual aluminum reduction cell by presenting complex cell structures and physical-chemical phenomena. The multiphysical field simulation models were first built and solved in ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA). Then, the methodology of combining the simulation results with virtual reality was introduced, and a virtual aluminum reduction cell was created. The demonstration showed that a computer-based world could be created in which people who are not analysis experts can see the detailed cell structure in a context that they can understand easily. With the application of the virtual aluminum reduction cell, even people who are familiar with aluminum reduction cell operations can gain insights that make it possible to understand the root causes of observed problems and plan design changes in much less time.

  16. Chemical burns

    PubMed Central

    Cartotto, Robert C.; Peters, Walter J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Douglas, Leith G.; Beeston, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To report a burn unit’s experience with chemical burns and to discuss the fundamental principles in managing chemical burns. Design A chart review. Setting A burn centre at a major university-affiliated hospital. Patients Twenty-four patients with chemical burns, representing 2.6% of all burn admissions over an 8-year period at the Ross Tilley Regional Adult Burn Centre. Seventy-five percent of the burn injuries were work-related accidents. Chemicals involved included hydrofluoric acid, sulfuric acid, black liquor, various lyes, potassium permanganate and phenol. Results Fourteen patients required excision and skin grafting. Complications were frequent and included ocular chemical contacts, wound infections, tendon exposures, toe amputation and systemic reactions from absorption of chemical. One patient died from a chemical scald burn to 98% of the body surface area. Conclusions The key principles in the management of chemical burns include removal of the chemical, copious irrigation, limited use of antidotes, correct estimation of the extent of injury, identification of systemic toxicity, treatment of ocular contacts and management of chemical inhalation injury. Individualized treatment is emphasized. PMID:8640619

  17. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary.

  18. 40 CFR 414.63 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.63 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  19. 40 CFR 414.61 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.61 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction...

  20. 40 CFR 414.62 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.62 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  1. 40 CFR 414.81 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.81 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction...

  2. 40 CFR 414.63 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.63 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  3. 40 CFR 414.71 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Bulk Organic Chemicals § 414.71 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  4. 40 CFR 414.62 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.62 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  5. 40 CFR 414.82 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.82 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  6. 40 CFR 414.61 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.61 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction...

  7. 40 CFR 414.82 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.82 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  8. 40 CFR 414.83 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.83 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  9. 40 CFR 414.62 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.62 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  10. 40 CFR 414.82 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.82 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  11. 40 CFR 414.81 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.81 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction...

  12. 40 CFR 414.81 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.81 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction...

  13. 40 CFR 414.71 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Bulk Organic Chemicals § 414.71 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  14. 40 CFR 414.83 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.83 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  15. 40 CFR 414.61 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.61 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction...

  16. 40 CFR 414.71 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Bulk Organic Chemicals § 414.71 Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by...

  17. Chemical microsensors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

  18. Chemical Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Willie; Cavanagh, Richard; Turk, Gregory; Winchester, Michael; Travis, John; Smith, Melody; Derose, Paul; Choquette, Steven; Kramer, Gary; Sieber, John; Greenberg, Robert; Lindstrom, Richard; Lamaze, George; Zeisler, Rolf; Schantz, Michele; Sander, Lane; Phinney, Karen; Welch, Michael; Vetter, Thomas; Pratt, Kenneth; Scott, John; Small, John; Wight, Scott; Stranick, Stephan

    Measurements of the chemical compositions of materials and the levels of certain substances in them are vital when assessing and improving public health, safety and the environment, are necessary to ensure trade equity, and are required when monitoring and improving industrial products and services. Chemical measurements play a crucial role in most areas of the economy, including healthcare, food and nutrition, agriculture, environmental technologies, chemicals and materials, instrumentation, electronics, forensics, energy, and transportation.

  19. Evolution was chemically constrained.

    PubMed

    Williams, R J P; Fraústo Da Silva, J J R

    2003-02-07

    The objective of this paper is to present a systems view of the major features of biological evolution based upon changes in internal chemistry and uses of cellular space, both of which it will be stated were dependent on the changing chemical environment. The account concerns the major developments from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, to multi-cellular organisms, to animals with nervous systems and a brain, and finally to human beings and their uses of chemical elements in space outside themselves. It will be stated that the changes were in an inevitable progression, and were not just due to blind chance, so that "random searching" by a coded system to give species had a fixed overall route. The chemical sequence is from a reducing to an ever-increasingly oxidizing environment, while organisms retained reduced chemicals. The process was furthered recently by human beings who have also increased the range of reduced products trapped on Earth in novel forms. All the developments are brought about from the nature of the chemicals which organisms accumulate using the environment and its changes. The relationship to the manner in which particular species (gene sequences) were coincidentally changed, the molecular view of evolution, is left for additional examination. There is a further issue in that the changes of the chemistry of the environment developed largely at equilibrium due to the relatively fast reactions there of the available inorganic chemicals. Inside cells, some of these same chemicals also came to equilibrium within compounds. All such equilibria reduced the variance (degrees of freedom) of the total environmental/biological system and its possible development. However, the more sophisticated organic chemistry, almost totally inside cells until humans evolved, is kinetically controlled and limited by the demands of cellular reduction necessary to produce essential chemicals and by the availability of certain elements and energy. Hence the variability of

  20. Chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2001-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

  1. Chemical pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemicals. Alternative Names Aspiration pneumonia - chemical Images Lungs Respiratory system References Blanc PD. Acute responses to toxic exposures. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  2. Chemical modification

    Treesearch

    R. M. Rowell

    2004-01-01

    Wood is a hygroscopic resource that was designed to perform, in nature, in a wet environment. Nature is programmed to recycle wood in a timely way through biological, thermal, aqueous, photochemical, chemical, and mechanical degradations. In simple terms, nature builds wood from carbon dioxide and water and has all the tools to recycle it back to the starting chemicals...

  3. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  4. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

  5. Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... agents such as sarin and VX. Many hazardous chemicals are used in industry - for example, chlorine, ammonia, and benzene. Some can be made from everyday items such as household cleaners. Although there are no guarantees of safety during a chemical emergency, you can take actions to protect yourself. ...

  6. Drastic reduction in the surface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon passivated with catalytic chemical vapor deposited SiN{sub x} films by introducing phosphorous catalytic-doped layer

    SciTech Connect

    Thi, Trinh Cham Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2014-07-28

    We improve the passivation property of n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivated with a catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) Si nitride (SiN{sub x}) film by inserting a phosphorous (P)-doped layer formed by exposing c-Si surface to P radicals generated by the catalytic cracking of PH{sub 3} molecules (Cat-doping). An extremely low surface recombination velocity (SRV) of 2 cm/s can be achieved for 2.5 Ω cm n-type (100) floating-zone Si wafers passivated with SiN{sub x}/P Cat-doped layers, both prepared in Cat-CVD systems. Compared with the case of only SiN{sub x} passivated layers, SRV decreases from 5 cm/s to 2 cm/s. The decrease in SRV is the result of field effect created by activated P atoms (donors) in a shallow P Cat-doped layer. Annealing process plays an important role in improving the passivation quality of SiN{sub x} films. The outstanding results obtained imply that SiN{sub x}/P Cat-doped layers can be used as promising passivation layers in high-efficiency n-type c-Si solar cells.

  7. Reductive dissolution of goethite by phenolic reductants

    SciTech Connect

    LaKind, J.S.; Stone, A.T. )

    1989-05-01

    The reductive dissolution of goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) by phenolic reductants has been examined in order to improve the understanding of iron transformations in soils, sediments and aquifers. Rates of goethite reductive dissolution by hydroquinone increased as the pH was increased from pH 1.8 to 4.65, and the following reaction stoichiometry was obeyed: 2{alpha}-FeOOH + QH{sub 2} = 2Fe{sup 2+} + Q + 4OH{sup {minus}}. As the pH was increased from pH 4.5 to 6.0, the reductive dissolution rate decreased to below the detection limit. At pH 3.4, the reductive dissolution of hematite was two orders of magnitude slower than goethite. The relationship between structure and reactivity was examined for a series of mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxybenzene reductants. Rates of reductive dissolution decreased in the following order: catechol {approx equal} hydroquinone > 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid > resorcinol-phenol-4-hydroxybenzoic acid.

  8. Local reduction in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosaler, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    A conventional wisdom about the progress of physics holds that successive theories wholly encompass the domains of their predecessors through a process that is often called "reduction." While certain influential accounts of inter-theory reduction in physics take reduction to require a single "global" derivation of one theory's laws from those of another, I show that global reductions are not available in all cases where the conventional wisdom requires reduction to hold. However, I argue that a weaker "local" form of reduction, which defines reduction between theories in terms of a more fundamental notion of reduction between models of a single fixed system, is available in such cases and moreover suffices to uphold the conventional wisdom. To illustrate the sort of fixed-system, inter-model reduction that grounds inter-theoretic reduction on this picture, I specialize to a particular class of cases in which both models are dynamical systems. I show that reduction in these cases is underwritten by a mathematical relationship that follows a certain liberalized construal of Nagel/Schaffner reduction, and support this claim with several examples. Moreover, I show that this broadly Nagelian analysis of inter-model reduction encompasses several cases that are sometimes cited as instances of the "physicist's" limit-based notion of reduction.

  9. Reduction Mechanisms in Manganese Ore Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coetsee, Theresa; Reinke, Christian; Nell, Johannes; Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan

    2015-12-01

    Manganese ores are highly heterogeneous and contain various minerals with different levels of contained manganese and iron and therefore the ore reduction behavior is not uniform. Both phase chemistry and phase morphology at the reaction interface, at micron scale, must be investigated to understand the reaction mechanism effects in manganese ore reduction. This approach is applied here to reacted material mixture samples taken from the AlloyStream pilot plant furnace over a period of 4 months. The mineralogical features are reported and discussed. Deductions are made on the likely dominant reduction mechanism in this reaction system, given the phase morphology observations presented.

  10. Breast reduction (mammoplasty) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100189.htm Breast reduction (mammoplasty) - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Breast reduction is usually performed for enlarged breasts (macromastia), but ...

  11. Revisiting the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Bradley, A S; Leavitt, W D; Johnston, D T

    2011-09-01

    Sulfur isotopes in the geological record integrate a combination of biological and diagenetic influences, but a key control on the ratio of sulfur isotopes in sedimentary materials is the magnitude of isotope fractionation imparted during dissimilatory sulfate reduction. This fractionation is controlled by the flux of sulfur through the network of chemical reactions involved in sulfate reduction and by the isotope effect associated with each of these chemical reactions. Despite its importance, the network of reactions constituting sulfate reduction is not fully understood, with two principle networks underpinning most isotope models. In this study, we build on biochemical data and recently solved crystal structures of enzymes to propose a revised network topology for the flow of sulfur through the sulfate reduction metabolism. This network is highly branched and under certain conditions produces results consistent with the observations that motivated previous sulfate reduction models. Our revised network suggests that there are two main paths to sulfide production: one that involves the production of thionate intermediates, and one that does not. We suggest that a key factor in determining sulfur isotope fractionation associated with sulfate reduction is the ratio of the rate at which electrons are supplied to subunits of Dsr vs. the rate of sulfite delivery to the active site of Dsr. This reaction network may help geochemists to better understand the relationship between the physiology of sulfate reduction and the isotopic record it produces.

  12. Unnecessary Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  13. Unnecessary Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  14. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  15. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

  16. Solving Problems Reductively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoni, Michal; Gal-Ezer, Judith; Tirosh, Dina

    2005-01-01

    Solving problems by reduction is an important issue in mathematics and science education in general (both in high school and in college or university) and particularly in computer science education. Developing reductive thinking patterns is an important goal in any scientific discipline, yet reduction is not an easy subject to cope with. Still,…

  17. Chemical simulation of greywater.

    PubMed

    Abed, Suhail Najem; Scholz, Miklas

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable water resources management attracts considerable attention in today's world. Recycling and reuse of both wastewater and greywater are becoming more attractive. The strategy is to protect ecosystem services by balancing the withdrawal of water and the disposal of wastewater. In the present study, a timely and novel synthetic greywater composition has been proposed with respect to the composition of heavy metals, nutrients and organic matter. The change in water quality of the synthetic greywater due to increasing storage time was monitored to evaluate the stability of the proposed chemical formula. The new greywater is prepared artificially using analytical-grade chemicals to simulate either low (LC) or high (HC) pollutant concentrations. The characteristics of the synthetic greywater were tested (just before starting the experiment, after two days and a week of storage under real weather conditions) and compared to those reported for real greywater. Test results for both synthetic greywater types showed great similarities with the physiochemical properties of published findings concerning real greywater. Furthermore, the synthetic greywater is relatively stable in terms of its characteristics for different storage periods. However, there was a significant (p < .05) reduction in 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) for both low (LC) and high (HC) concentrations of greywater after two days of storage with reductions of 62% and 55%, respectively. A significant (p < .05) change was also noted for the reduction (70%) of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concerning HC greywater after seven days of storage.

  18. Chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Paula A; Colaço, Aura; Chaves, Raquel; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; De-La-Cruz P, Luis F; Lopes, Carlos

    2007-12-01

    The use of chemical compounds benefits society in a number of ways. Pesticides, for instance, enable foodstuffs to be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs of millions of people, a condition that has led to an increase in levels of life expectancy. Yet, at times, these benefits are offset by certain disadvantages, notably the toxic side effects of the chemical compounds used. Exposure to these compounds can have varying effects, ranging from instant death to a gradual process of chemical carcinogenesis. There are three stages involved in chemical carcinogenesis. These are defined as initiation, promotion and progression. Each of these stages is characterised by morphological and biochemical modifications and result from genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. These genetic modifications include: mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, cell death and DNA repair--i.e. mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressing genes. The epigenetic factors, also considered as being non-genetic in character, can also contribute to carcinogenesis via epigenetic mechanisms which silence gene expression. The control of responses to carcinogenesis through the application of several chemical, biochemical and biological techniques facilitates the identification of those basic mechanisms involved in neoplasic development. Experimental assays with laboratory animals, epidemiological studies and quick tests enable the identification of carcinogenic compounds, the dissection of many aspects of carcinogenesis, and the establishment of effective strategies to prevent the cancer which results from exposure to chemicals.

  19. Chemical processing of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper highlights recent work on the general problem of processing lunar materials. The discussion covers lunar source materials, refined products, motivations for using lunar materials, and general considerations for a lunar or space processing plant. Attention is given to chemical processing through various techniques, including electrolysis of molten silicates, carbothermic/silicothermic reduction, carbo-chlorination process, NaOH basic-leach process, and HF acid-leach process. Several options for chemical processing of lunar materials are well within the state of the art of applied chemistry and chemical engineering to begin development based on the extensive knowledge of lunar materials.

  20. Chemical processing of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper highlights recent work on the general problem of processing lunar materials. The discussion covers lunar source materials, refined products, motivations for using lunar materials, and general considerations for a lunar or space processing plant. Attention is given to chemical processing through various techniques, including electrolysis of molten silicates, carbothermic/silicothermic reduction, carbo-chlorination process, NaOH basic-leach process, and HF acid-leach process. Several options for chemical processing of lunar materials are well within the state of the art of applied chemistry and chemical engineering to begin development based on the extensive knowledge of lunar materials.

  1. Cost Reduction Incentive Awards. 1981 Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    Brief descriptions of 47 college programs recognized for awards in the National Association of College and University Officers/U. S. Steel Foundation Cost Reduction Incentive Awards Program are given. They include awards for: shower stall repair; chemical waste exchange; vibrating alarms for hearing-imparied; self-funding insurance consortium;…

  2. Drift reduction with drift control adjuvants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Five new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  3. Drift reduction with drift control adjuvants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Four new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  4. Cost Reduction Incentive Awards. 1981 Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    Brief descriptions of 47 college programs recognized for awards in the National Association of College and University Officers/U. S. Steel Foundation Cost Reduction Incentive Awards Program are given. They include awards for: shower stall repair; chemical waste exchange; vibrating alarms for hearing-imparied; self-funding insurance consortium;…

  5. Hazardous waste reduction in the metal finishing industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This study identifies opportunities for waste reduction available to the metal finishing industry and develops a generic audit protocol that can be used by metal finishers to assess their own waste reduction opportunities. The study emphasizes technologies available to metal finishing plants of various sizes. Typically, these shops operate a variety of physical, chemical and electrochemical processes. Chemical processes include degreasing, cleaning, pickling, etching, coating, and electroless plating. Electrochemical processes include plating and anodizing. The study identifies three categories of waste reduction technologies that are available to metal finishers: source reduction, recycling and resource recovery, and alternative treatment.

  6. Regeneration of anion exchange resins by catalyzed electrochemical reduction

    DOEpatents

    Gu, Baohua; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2002-01-01

    Anion exchange resins sorbed with perchlorate may be regenerated by a combination of chemical reduction of perchlorate to chloride using a reducing agent and an electrochemical reduction of the oxidized reducing agent. Transitional metals including Ti, Re, and V are preferred chemical reagents for the reduction of perchlorate to chloride. Complexing agents such as oxalate are used to prevent the precipitation of the oxidized Ti(IV) species, and ethyl alcohol may be added to accelerate the reduction kinetics of perchlorate. The regeneration may be performed by continuously recycling the regenerating solution through the resin bed and an electrochemical cell so that the secondary waste generation is minimized.

  7. Collaborating for Multi-Scale Chemical Science

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Green

    2006-07-14

    Advanced model reduction methods were developed and integrated into the CMCS multiscale chemical science simulation software. The new technologies were used to simulate HCCI engines and burner flames with exceptional fidelity.

  8. Chemical Glycoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Krishnan K; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2016-12-14

    Chemical tools have accelerated progress in glycoscience, reducing experimental barriers to studying protein glycosylation, the most widespread and complex form of posttranslational modification. For example, chemical glycoproteomics technologies have enabled the identification of specific glycosylation sites and glycan structures that modulate protein function in a number of biological processes. This field is now entering a stage of logarithmic growth, during which chemical innovations combined with mass spectrometry advances could make it possible to fully characterize the human glycoproteome. In this review, we describe the important role that chemical glycoproteomics methods are playing in such efforts. We summarize developments in four key areas: enrichment of glycoproteins and glycopeptides from complex mixtures, emphasizing methods that exploit unique chemical properties of glycans or introduce unnatural functional groups through metabolic labeling and chemoenzymatic tagging; identification of sites of protein glycosylation; targeted glycoproteomics; and functional glycoproteomics, with a focus on probing interactions between glycoproteins and glycan-binding proteins. Our goal with this survey is to provide a foundation on which continued technological advancements can be made to promote further explorations of protein glycosylation.

  9. Voltage-induced reduction of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucett, Austin C.

    Graphene Oxide (GO) is being widely researched as a precursor for the mass production of graphene, and as a versatile material in its own right for flexible electronics, chemical sensors, and energy harvesting applications. Reduction of GO, an electrically insulating material, into reduced graphene oxide (rGO) restores electrical conductivity via removal of oxygen-containing functional groups. Here, a reduction method using an applied electrical bias, known as voltage-induced reduction, is explored. Voltage-induced reduction can be performed under ambient conditions and avoids the use of hazardous chemicals or high temperatures common with standard methods, but little is known about the reduction mechanisms and the quality of rGO produced with this method. This work performs extensive structural and electrical characterization of voltage-reduced GO (V-rGO) and shows that it is competitive with standard methods. Beyond its potential use as a facile and eco-friendly processing approach, V-rGO reduction also offers record high-resolution patterning capabilities. In this work, the spatial resolution limits of voltage-induced reduction, performed using a conductive atomic force microscope probe, are explored. It is shown that arbitrary V-rGO conductive features can be patterned into insulating GO with nanoscale resolution. The localization of voltage-induced reduction to length scales < 10 nm allows studies of reduction reaction kinetics, using electrical current obtained in-situ, with statistical robustness. Methods for patterning V-rGO nanoribbons are then developed. After presenting sub-10nm patterning of V-rGO nanoribbons in GO single sheets and films, the performance of V-rGO nanoribbon field effect transistors (FETs) are demonstrated. Preliminary measurements show an increase in electrical current on/off ratios as compared to large-area rGO FETs, indicating transport gap modulation that is possibly due to quantum confinement effects.

  10. Chemical Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Rebecca

    2005-11-01

    Beginning with the Big Bang, most of the 115 or so chemical elements of the periodic table were formed by the chemical processes of nature. The three lightest elements of hydrogen, helium, and lithium were created in the earliest moments of the Big Bang while heavier elements beyond iron were a result of billions of years of nuclear fusion within stars and a more exotic process of neutron capture inside the core of red giants. University of Texas astronomer Chris Sneden explains these processes and how the periodic table of the elements exists today because of these natural processes of stellar and galactic evolution.

  11. Chemical routes to discharging graphenides.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Stephen A; Buckley, David J; Yau, Hin Chun; Skipper, Neal T; Howard, Christopher A; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2017-03-02

    Chemical and electrochemical reduction methods allow the dispersion, processing, and/or functionalization of discrete sp(2)-hybridised nanocarbons, including fullerenes, nanotubes and graphenes. Electron transfer to the nanocarbon raises the Fermi energy, creating nanocarbon anions and thereby activating an array of possible covalent reactions. The Fermi level may then be partially or fully lowered by intended functionalization reactions, but in general, techniques are required to remove excess charge without inadvertent covalent reactions that potentially degrade the nanocarbon properties of interest. Here, simple and effective chemical discharging routes are demonstrated for graphenide polyelectrolytes and are expected to apply to other systems, particularly nanotubides. The discharging process is inherently linked to the reduction potentials of such chemical discharging agents and the unusual fundamental chemistry of charged nanocarbons.

  12. Chemical Mahjong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  13. Delicious Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana M.

    This paper presents an approach to chemistry and nutrition that focuses on food items that people consider delicious. Information is organized according to three categories of food chemicals that provide energy to the human body: (1) fats and oils; (2) carbohydrates; and (3) proteins. Minerals, vitamins, and additives are also discussed along with…

  14. Chemical Mahjong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  15. Chemical Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prombain, Dorothy R.; And Others

    This science sourcebook was written for intermediate grade teachers to provide guidance in teaching a specially developed unit on chemical indicators. Directions and suggestions for guiding student science activities are given. Some of the activities concern soil testing, crystals, and household powders such as sugar and salt. A list of necessary…

  16. Drag reduction in nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Moore, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies on the drag-reducing shapes, structures, and behaviors of swimming and flying animals are reviewed, with an emphasis on potential analogs in vehicle design. Consideration is given to form drag reduction (turbulent flow, vortex generation, mass transfer, and adaptations for body-intersection regions), skin-friction drag reduction (polymers, surfactants, and bubbles as surface 'additives'), reduction of the drag due to lift, drag-reduction studies on porpoises, and drag-reducing animal behavior (e.g., leaping out of the water by porpoises). The need for further research is stressed.

  17. Drag reduction in nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Moore, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies on the drag-reducing shapes, structures, and behaviors of swimming and flying animals are reviewed, with an emphasis on potential analogs in vehicle design. Consideration is given to form drag reduction (turbulent flow, vortex generation, mass transfer, and adaptations for body-intersection regions), skin-friction drag reduction (polymers, surfactants, and bubbles as surface 'additives'), reduction of the drag due to lift, drag-reduction studies on porpoises, and drag-reducing animal behavior (e.g., leaping out of the water by porpoises). The need for further research is stressed.

  18. CARBON DIOXIDE REDUCTION SYSTEM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CARBON DIOXIDE , *SPACE FLIGHT, RESPIRATION, REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), RESPIRATION, AEROSPACE MEDICINE, ELECTROLYSIS, INSTRUMENTATION, ELECTROLYTES, VOLTAGE, MANNED, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS, NICKEL.

  19. Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal

    DOEpatents

    Coops, Melvin S.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

  20. Managing Faculty Reductions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, Kent F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A process for the management of reductions in the number of faculty positions available to a university is described. It considers staffing by projections, the evolution of personnel planning, and the balance of reductions in faculty and administration, along with coping strategies and advice growing out of five years of enrollment decline…

  1. Microbial reductive dehalogenation.

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, W W; Tiedje, J M

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of compounds can be biodegraded via reductive removal of halogen substituents. This process can degrade toxic pollutants, some of which are not known to be biodegraded by any other means. Reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds has been found primarily in undefined, syntrophic anaerobic communities. We discuss ecological and physiological principles which appear to be important in these communities and evaluate how widely applicable these principles are. Anaerobic communities that catalyze reductive dehalogenation appear to differ in many respects. A large number of pure cultures which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aliphatic compounds are known, in contrast to only a few organisms which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds. Desulfomonile tiedjei DCB-1 is an anaerobe which dehalogenates aromatic compounds and is physiologically and morphologically unusual in a number of respects, including the ability to exploit reductive dehalogenation for energy metabolism. When possible, we use D. tiedjei as a model to understand dehalogenating organisms in the above-mentioned undefined systems. Aerobes use reductive dehalogenation for substrates which are resistant to known mechanisms of oxidative attack. Reductive dehalogenation, especially of aliphatic compounds, has recently been found in cell-free systems. These systems give us an insight into how and why microorganisms catalyze this activity. In some cases transition metal complexes serve as catalysts, whereas in other cases, particularly with aromatic substrates, the catalysts appear to be enzymes. Images PMID:1406492

  2. Does Source Reduction Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaway, David

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that quantification is essential to establish the cost-effectiveness of source reduction (SR). Presents case studies of monitoring methods for seven different kinds of SR efforts: (1) packaging changes, (2) SR businesses, (3) waste exchanges, (4) individual nonresidential efforts, (5) variable garbage rates, (6) yard waste reduction, and…

  3. Does Source Reduction Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaway, David

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that quantification is essential to establish the cost-effectiveness of source reduction (SR). Presents case studies of monitoring methods for seven different kinds of SR efforts: (1) packaging changes, (2) SR businesses, (3) waste exchanges, (4) individual nonresidential efforts, (5) variable garbage rates, (6) yard waste reduction, and…

  4. INCORPORATING ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS INTO PROCESS DESIGN: THE WASTE REDUCTION (WAR) ALGORITHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general theory known as the WAste Reduction (WASR) algorithm has been developed to describe the flow and the generation of potential environmental impact through a chemical process. This theory integrates environmental impact assessment into chemical process design Potential en...

  5. INCORPORATING ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS INTO PROCESS DESIGN: THE WASTE REDUCTION (WAR) ALGORITHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general theory known as the WAste Reduction (WASR) algorithm has been developed to describe the flow and the generation of potential environmental impact through a chemical process. This theory integrates environmental impact assessment into chemical process design Potential en...

  6. WORKSHOP ON MONITORING OXIDATION-REDUCTION PROCESSES FOR GROUND-WATER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Redox conditions are among the most important parameters for controlling contaminant transport and fate in ground-water systems. Oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions mediate the chemical behavior of both inorganic and organic chemical constituents by affecting solubility, rea...

  7. Bayesian supervised dimensionality reduction.

    PubMed

    Gönen, Mehmet

    2013-12-01

    Dimensionality reduction is commonly used as a preprocessing step before training a supervised learner. However, coupled training of dimensionality reduction and supervised learning steps may improve the prediction performance. In this paper, we introduce a simple and novel Bayesian supervised dimensionality reduction method that combines linear dimensionality reduction and linear supervised learning in a principled way. We present both Gibbs sampling and variational approximation approaches to learn the proposed probabilistic model for multiclass classification. We also extend our formulation toward model selection using automatic relevance determination in order to find the intrinsic dimensionality. Classification experiments on three benchmark data sets show that the new model significantly outperforms seven baseline linear dimensionality reduction algorithms on very low dimensions in terms of generalization performance on test data. The proposed model also obtains the best results on an image recognition task in terms of classification and retrieval performances.

  8. Chemical reduction of biomass polysaccharides to liquid hydrocarbon fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M.; Alaniz, N.J.; Beech, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Biomass is fractionated into the principle components cellulose (1), hemicellulose (2), and lignin (3). The two polysaccharide fractions 1 & 2 are converted into polyols by catalytic hydrogenation. Sorbitol, resulting from 1 for example, is treated sequentially with a redox coupled mixture of hydriodic acid and phosphorous acid and then with alcoholic base to afford a mixture of hydrocarbons including hexene. Step 2 of the process is highly tunable and can directly produce about 80% hydrocarbon oligomers, C{sub 12}H{sub 22} and C{sub 18}H{sub 32} and only about 20% of the intermediate 2-iodohexane. Recent results in the development of this new process will be presented. Oxygenate fuel additives, hexanols and hexyl ethers are also available by further reactions of hexene. These are presented in the accompanying paper.

  9. Ultralow Level Mercury Treatment Using Chemical Reduction and Air Stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.

    2001-02-23

    The overall objective of this work is to develop a reasonable and cost-effective approach to meet the emerging mercury standards, especially for high volume outfalls with concentrations below the drinking water standard.

  10. Chemical warfare

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Richard Ian; Mattoso, Thalles Cardoso; Moreira, Denise D.O.

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-cutting ants are well known for their highly complex social organization, which provides them with a strong defense against parasites invading their colonies. Besides this attribute, these insects have morphological, physiological and structural characteristics further reinforcing the defense of their colonies. With the discovery of symbiotic bacteria present on the integument of leaf-cutting ants, a new line of defense was proposed and considered to be specific for the control of a specialized fungal parasite of the ants’ fungus gardens (Escovopsis). However, recent studies have questioned the specificity of the integumental bacteria, as they were also found to inhibit a range of fungi, including entomopathogens. The microbiota associated with the leaf-cutting ant gardens has also been proposed as another level of chemical defense, protecting the garden from parasite invasion. Here we review the chemical defense weaponry deployed by leaf-cutting ants against parasites of their fungus gardens and of the ants themselves. PMID:23795235

  11. Pathogen reduction in human plasma using an ultrashort pulsed laser

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pathogen reduction is an ideal approach to ensure the continued safety of the blood supply against emerging pathogens. However, the currently licensed pathogen reduction techniques are ineffective against non-enveloped viruses, and they introduce chemicals with concerns of side effects which prevent...

  12. Reduction of Dissolved Oxygen at a Copper Rotating Disc Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kear, Gareth; Albarran, Carlos Ponce-de-Leon; Walsh, Frank C.

    2005-01-01

    Undergraduates from chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and environmental science courses, together with first-year postgraduate research students in electrochemical technology, are provided with an experiment that demonstrates the reduction of dissolved oxygen in aerated seawater at 25°C. Oxygen reduction is examined using linear sweep…

  13. Reduction of Dissolved Oxygen at a Copper Rotating Disc Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kear, Gareth; Albarran, Carlos Ponce-de-Leon; Walsh, Frank C.

    2005-01-01

    Undergraduates from chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and environmental science courses, together with first-year postgraduate research students in electrochemical technology, are provided with an experiment that demonstrates the reduction of dissolved oxygen in aerated seawater at 25°C. Oxygen reduction is examined using linear sweep…

  14. Toxicity reduction in the treatment of refinery waste water

    SciTech Connect

    Eckenfelder, W.W. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Aquatic Toxicity in refinery and petrochemical wastewaters may result from chemicals present in the feedstock, chemicals added or generated in the process, or chemicals generated during the wastewater treatment process, usually referred to as soluble microbial products (SMP). In most cases, the chemicals originally present or generated are biodegradable and can be removed in the biological treatment process. In some cases, a physical-chemical source treatment may be required. SMP generated through the wastewater treatment process are non-biodegradable and are best handled by the application of powdered activated carbon (PAC) integrated into the activated sludge process. This paper describes toxicity reduction in refinery effluents.

  15. Microbial reduction of uranium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Gorby, Y.A.; Landa, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    REDUCTION of the soluble, oxidized form of uranium, U(VI), to insoluble U(IV) is an important mechanism for the immobilization of uranium in aquatic sediments and for the formation of some uranium ores1-10. U(VI) reduction has generally been regarded as an abiological reaction in which sulphide, molecular hydrogen or organic compounds function as the reductant1,2,5,11. Microbial involvement in U(VI) reduction has been considered to be limited to indirect effects, such as microbial metabolism providing the reduced compounds for abiological U(VI) reduction and microbial cell walls providing a surface to stimulate abiological U(VI) reduction1,12,13. We report here, however, that dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can obtain energy for growth by electron transport to U(VI). This novel form of microbial metabolism can be much faster than commonly cited abiological mechanisms for U(VI) reduction. Not only do these findings expand the known potential terminal electron acceptors for microbial energy transduction, they offer a likely explanation for the deposition of uranium in aquatic sediments and aquifers, and suggest a method for biological remediation of environments contaminated with uranium.

  16. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos; Mackey, Paul; Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction methods are expensive, time-consuming or restricted to small, limited formats. Graphene has potential uses in ultracapacitors, energy storage, solar cells, flexible and light-weight circuits, touch screens, and chemical sensors. In addition, graphite oxide is a sustainable material that can be produced from any form of carbon, making this method environmentally friendly and adaptable for in-situ reduction.

  17. Experimental reduction of lunar mare soil and volcanic glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Morris, Richard V.; Mckay, David S.

    1994-01-01

    We have reduced high-titanium lunar mare soil and iron-rich lunar volcanic glass with hydrogen at temperatures of 900-1100 C. Ilmenite is the most reactive phase in the soil, exhibiting rapid and complete reduction at all temperatures. Ferrous iron in the glass is extensively reduced concurrent with partial crystallization. In both samples pyroxene and olivine undergo partial reduction along with chemical and mineralogical modifications. High-temperature reduction provides insight into the optical and chemical effects of lunar soil maturation, and places constraints on models of that process. Mare soil and volcanic glass are attractive feedstocks for lunar oxygen production, with achievable yields of 2-5 wt%.

  18. Reduction of astrometric plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method for the reduction of comet or asteroid plates is described. Projection equations, scale length correction, rotation of coordinates, linearization, the search for additional reference stars, and the final solution are examined.

  19. Reduction of astrometric plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method for the reduction of comet or asteroid plates is described. Projection equations, scale length correction, rotation of coordinates, linearization, the search for additional reference stars, and the final solution are examined.

  20. Waste Reduction Model

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To help solid waste planners and organizations track/report GHG emissions reductions from various waste management practices. To assist in calculating GHG emissions of baseline and alternative waste management practices and provide the history of WARM.

  1. Reduction of bone strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, Cindy

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on reduction of bone strength are presented. WEHI 231 B growth rates, experimental chambers used to apply the electric field to the cell cultures, and a mouse suspended by rotating cuff in electromagnetic field are shown.

  2. Dissimilatory metal reduction.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R

    1993-01-01

    Microorganisms can enzymatically reduce a variety of metals in metabolic processes that are not related to metal assimilation. Some microorganisms can conserve energy to support growth by coupling the oxidation of simple organic acids and alcohols, H2, or aromatic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV). This dissimilatory Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction influences the organic as well as the inorganic geochemistry of anaerobic aquatic sediments and ground water. Microorganisms that use U(VI) as a terminal electron acceptor play an important role in uranium geochemistry and may be a useful tool for removing uranium from contaminated environments. Se(VI) serves as a terminal electron acceptor to support anaerobic growth of some microorganisms. Reduction of Se(VI) to Se(O) is an important mechanism for the precipitation of selenium from contaminated waters. Enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI) to the less mobile and less toxic Cr(III), and reduction of soluble Hg(II) to volatile Hg(O) may affect the fate of these compounds in the environment and might be used as a remediation strategy. Microorganisms can also enzymatically reduce other metals such as technetium, vanadium, molybdenum, gold, silver, and copper, but reduction of these metals has not been studied extensively.

  3. Structural basis of enzymatic benzene ring reduction.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Tobias; Huwiler, Simona G; Kung, Johannes W; Weidenweber, Sina; Hellwig, Petra; Stärk, Hans-Joachim; Biskup, Till; Weber, Stefan; Cotelesage, Julien J H; George, Graham N; Ermler, Ulrich; Boll, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    In chemical synthesis, the widely used Birch reduction of aromatic compounds to cyclic dienes requires alkali metals in ammonia as extremely low-potential electron donors. An analogous reaction is catalyzed by benzoyl-coenzyme A reductases (BCRs) that have a key role in the globally important bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds at anoxic sites. Because of the lack of structural information, the catalytic mechanism of enzymatic benzene ring reduction remained obscure. Here, we present the structural characterization of a dearomatizing BCR containing an unprecedented tungsten cofactor that transfers electrons to the benzene ring in an aprotic cavity. Substrate binding induces proton transfer from the bulk solvent to the active site by expelling a Zn(2+) that is crucial for active site encapsulation. Our results shed light on the structural basis of an electron transfer process at the negative redox potential limit in biology. They open the door for biological or biomimetic alternatives to a basic chemical synthetic tool.

  4. Method for producing chemical energy

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Danen, Wayne C.

    2004-09-21

    Fluoroalkylsilane-coated metal particles having a central metal core, a buffer layer surrounding the core, and a fluoroalkylsilane layer attached to the buffer layer are prepared by combining a chemically reactive fluoroalkylsilane compound with an oxide coated metal particle having a hydroxylated surface. The resulting fluoroalkylsilane layer that coats the particles provides them with excellent resistance to aging. The particles can be blended with oxidant particles to form energetic powder that releases chemical energy when the buffer layer is physically disrupted so that the reductant metal core can react with the oxidant.

  5. Physical chemistry of carbothermic reduction of alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Robert A.

    1985-09-01

    Production of aluminium, by means of carbothermic reduction of alumina, is discussed. By employing a solvent metal bath to absorb the alumina metal, carbothermic reduction of alumina was accomplished at temperatures 300/degree/C lower than the temperatures reported in the literature. Reduction occurred without the formation of intermediate compounds and without the high volatilization of aluminum bearing species. Reduction of alumina immersed in a solvent bath appeared to be rate limited by chemical reaction control. The rates seemed to be a function of the activity of aluminum in the solvent metal bath. Reduction of alumina particles, above the surface of the bath, seemed to occur via vapor transport with carbon in the particles or in the crucible walls. Mass transport in the gas phase appeared to be rate limiting. The rates seemed to be a function of the distance separating the alumina and carbon sources. With both submerged alumina and alumina particles, increasing the surface area of the alumina increased the rate of reduction. 58 refs., 65 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Decontamination of metals using chemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Lerch, Ronald E.; Partridge, Jerry A.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to chemical etching process for reclaiming contaminated equipment wherein a reduction-oxidation system is included in a solution of nitric acid to contact the metal to be decontaminated and effect reduction of the reduction-oxidation system, and includes disposing a pair of electrodes in the reduced solution to permit passage of an electrical current between said electrodes and effect oxidation of the reduction-oxidation system to thereby regenerate the solution and provide decontaminated equipment that is essentially radioactive contamination-free.

  7. Chemical Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    As a preliminary study on the effects of chemical aging of polymer materials MERL and TRI have examined two polymeric materials that are typically used for offshore umbilical applications. These two materials were Tefzel, a copolymer of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene, and Coflon, polyvinylidene fluoride. The Coflon specimens were cut from pipe sections and exposed to H2S at various temperatures and pressures. One of these specimens was tested for methane permeation, and another for H2S permeation. The Tefzel specimens were cut from .05 mm sheet stock material and were exposed to methanol at elevated temperature and pressure. One of these specimens was exposed to methanol permeation for 2 days at 100 C and 2500 psi. An additional specimen was exposed to liquid methanol for 3 days at 150 C and 15 Bar. Virgin specimens of each material were similarly prepared and tested.

  8. Household Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chemical Emergencies Hurricanes Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear ... containing hazardous materials or chemicals. Although the risk of a chemical accident is slight, knowing how to handle these products ...

  9. Microbial reduction of iron in smectite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Joseph W.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2006-06-01

    Bacteria-mediated changes in the oxidation state of iron in soil clay minerals play an important role in determining the chemical and physical properties of soils and sediments. As structural Fe(III) in the octahedral sheet of smectites is reduced to Fe(II) by bacteria, specific surface area decreases, cation exchange capacity (CEC) increases, swelling in water decreases, reactivity with organic chemicals and pesticides increases, and the potential for mineral dissolution and transformation increases. Changes in clay mineral structure due to bacterial reduction is, however, small. Because of the large potential for the redox state of soil minerals to change with natural environmental conditions, the chemical properties of the soil must be regarded as constantly changing. The resulting dynamic nature of soil behavior must be taken into account in management strategies to maximize soil fertility and structural performance. To cite this article: J.W. Stucki, J.E. Kostka, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  10. The cyclic reduction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Dario; Meini, Beatrice

    2009-05-01

    Cyclic reduction is an algorithm invented by G.H. Golub and R. W. Hockney in the mid 1960s for solving linear systems related to the finite differences discretization of the Poisson equation over a rectangle. Among the algorithms of Gene Golub, it is one of the most versatile and powerful ever created. Recently, it has been applied to solve different problems from different applicative areas. In this paper we survey the main features of cyclic reduction, relate it to properties of analytic functions, recall its extension to solving more general finite and infinite linear systems, and different kinds of nonlinear matrix equations, including algebraic Riccati equations, with applications to Markov chains, queueing models and transport theory. Some new results concerning the convergence properties of cyclic reduction and its applicability are proved under very weak assumptions. New formulae for overcoming breakdown are provided.

  11. Recovery of Iron from Copper Tailings by Direct Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jing; Xia, De-Hong; Gu, Jing; Liu, Kai-Qi; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Shou-Zeng; Qi, Zhao-Dong; Ao, Wen-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Direct reduction of copper tailings were performed to recover iron efficiently by carbon-containing pellets, and the metallization rate was gained by chemical analysis method. The results showed that the metallization rate of copper tailings was up to 85.32% and the best reduction parameters are also found. Content of precious metals, such as, gold, silver in copper tailings can be enriched by 1.8~1.9 times through removing iron. The apparent activation energy of direct reduction of iron oxide in copper tailings is calculated to be 125.4 kJ/mol and the restrictive factor of reduction process is solid diffusion.

  12. Application of Hydrogen for the Reduction of Bauxite Mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parhi, B. R.; Sahoo, S. K.; Bhoi, B.; Satapathy, B. K.; Paramguru, R. K.

    2016-02-01

    Reduction of oxides present in bauxite through hydrogen was investigated in the present study. The bauxite samples were subjected to reduction through molecular hydrogen and hydrogen plasma at 650oC and 800oC with different flow rates of hydrogen for different time periods respectively. The samples, after the reduction processes, were characterized by X-ray diffraction technique and chemical analysis. It was observed that the oxides of iron present in bauxite were only undergone through reduction while other oxides remain unreduced. An attempt was then made to separate pure Al2O3 present in bauxite samples through acid leaching process.

  13. Protecting reproductive health and the environment: toxics use reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, K

    1993-01-01

    Toxics use reduction is a new chemical hazard management approach that has emerged in several state laws over the past years. While toxics use reduction has been promoted as a means of preventing environmental pollution, little thought has been given to its adoption as a means of managing reproductive hazards. This paper provides illustrations of use reduction approaches to conventionally recognized reproductive and developmental toxicants. These approaches will require the opening of a new dialogue between industrial designers and process managers and those most concerned about reproductive health. Several different strategies are proposed that might be adopted into state programs for promoting reduction in the use of reproductive and developmental toxicants. PMID:8243394

  14. Time, Chance, and Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Gerhard; Hüttemann, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    List of contributors; 1. Introduction Gerhard Ernst and Andreas Hütteman; Part I. The Arrows of Time: 2. Does a low-entropy constraint prevent us from influencing the past? Mathias Frisch; 3. The part hypothesis meets gravity Craig Callender; 4. Quantum gravity and the arrow of time Claus Kiefer; Part II. Probability and Chance: 5. The natural-range conception of probability Jacob Rosenthal; 6. Probability in Boltzmannian statistical mechanics Roman Frigg; 7. Humean mechanics versus a metaphysics of powers Michael Esfeld; Part III. Reduction: 8. The crystallisation of Clausius's phenomenological thermodynamics C. Ulises Moulines; 9. Reduction and renormalization Robert W. Batterman; 10. Irreversibility in stochastic dynamics Jos Uffink; Index.

  15. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-16

    This paper briefly summarizes the series in which we consider the possibilities for losing, or compromising, key capabilities of the U.S. nuclear force in the face of modernization and reductions. The first of the three papers takes an historical perspective, considering capabilities that were eliminated in past force reductions. The second paper is our attempt to define the needed capabilities looking forward in the context of the current framework for force modernization and the current picture of the evolving challenges of deterrence and assurance. The third paper then provides an example for each of our undesirable outcomes: the creation of roach motels, box canyons, and wrong turns.

  16. Discrete reductive perturbation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Decio; Petrera, Matteo

    2006-04-15

    We expand a partial difference equation (P{delta}E) on multiple lattices and obtain the P{delta}E which governs its far field behavior. The perturbative-reductive approach is here performed on well-known nonlinear P{delta}Es, both integrable and nonintegrable. We study the cases of the lattice modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation, the Hietarinta equation, the lattice Volterra-Kac-Van Moerbeke equation and a nonintegrable lattice KdV equation. Such reductions allow us to obtain many new P{delta}Es of the nonlinear Schroedinger type.

  17. Chemical properties of mendelevium

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.

    1980-11-01

    Even with the most intense ion beams and the largest available quantities of target isotope, about 10/sup 6/ atoms at a time is all the Md that can be produced for chemical studies. This lack of sufficient sample size coupled with the very short lifetimes of the few atoms produced has severely restricted the gathering and the broadness of our knowledge concerning the properties of Md and the heavier elements. To illustrate, the literature contains a mere eleven references to the chemical studies of Md, and none of these deal with bulk properties associated with the element bound in solid phases. Some of these findings are: Md was found to be more volatile than other actinide metals which lead to the belief that it is divalent in the metallic state; separation of Md from the other actinides can be accomplished either by reduction of Md/sup 3 +/ to the divalent state or by chromatographic separations with Md remaining in the tripositive state; extraction of Md/sup 2 +/ with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid is much poorer than the extraction of the neighboring tripositive actinides; attempts to oxidize Md/sup 3 +/ with sodium bismuthate failed to show any evidence for Md/sup 4 +/; reduction potential of Md/sup 3 +/ was found to be close to -0.1 volt; Md/sup 3 +/ can be reduced to Md(Hg) by sodium amalgams and by electrolysis; the electrochemical behavior of Md is very similar to that of Fm and can be summarized in the equation, Md/sup 2 +/ + 2e/sup -/ = Md(Hg) and E/sup 0/ = -1.50 V.; and Md cannot be reduced to a monovalent ion with Sm/sup 2 +/.

  18. CAMEO Chemicals Software

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    CAMEO Chemicals is an extensive chemical database, available for download, with critical response information for thousands of chemicals, and a tool that tells you what reactions might occur if chemicals were mixed together.

  19. Assessing chromate reduction by dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria using mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Liu, Yiwen; Gao, Shu-Hong; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-11-01

    Chromate (Cr (VI)) is a ubiquitous contaminant in aquifers and soils, which can be reduced to its trivalent counterpart (Cr (III)), with the hazard being relieved. The coupling microbial and chemical reduction by dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (IRB) is a promising approach for the reduction of Cr (VI) to Cr (III). In this work, three mathematical models with different Cr (VI) reduction pathways were proposed and compared based on their ability to predict the performance of an IRB-based stirred-flow reactor treating Cr (VI) contaminated medium and to provide insights into the possible chemical or microbial pathways for Cr (VI) reduction in the system. The Cr (VI) reduction was considered as chemical reaction between Fe (II) and Cr (VI), direct microbial reduction by IRB and combined biotic-abiotic reduction in these three models, respectively. Model evaluation results indicated that the model incorporating both chemical and microbial Cr (VI) reductions could well describe the system performance. In contrast, the other two single-pathway models were not capable of predicting the experimental data, suggesting that both chemical and microbial pathways contributed to Cr (VI) reduction by IRB. The validity of the two-pathway model was further confirmed by an independent experimental data set with different conditions. The results further revealed that the organic carbon availability and Cr (VI) loading rates for the IRB in the system determined the relative contributions of chemical and microbial pathways to overall Cr (VI) reduction.

  20. Chemical information science coverage in Chemical Abstracts.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, G

    1987-02-01

    For many years Chemical Abstracts has included in its coverage publications on chemical documentation or chemical information science. Although the bulk of those publications can be found in section 20 of Chemical Abstracts, many relevant articles were found scattered among 39 other sections of CA in 1984-1985. In addition to the scattering of references in CA, the comprehensiveness of Chemical Abstracts as a secondary source for chemical information science is called into question. Data are provided on the journals that contributed the most references on chemical information science and on the languages of publication of relevant articles.

  1. Financing Class Size Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Class size reduction has been shown to, among other things, improve academic achievement for all students and particularly for low-income and minority students. With the No Child Left Behind Act's heavy emphasis on scientifically based research, adequate yearly progress, and disaggregated results, one wonders why all children aren't enrolled in…

  2. Exercise and Fat Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    This document analyzes the problems encountered by the obese individual and the effects of regular exercise on weight loss and fat reduction. Part one compares the psychological traits of obese children with age groups of normal weight and discusses the organic disorders and social attitudes which plague the overweight individual. Part two states…

  3. Nagel on reduction.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    2015-10-01

    This paper attempts a critical reappraisal of Nagel's (1961, 1970) model of reduction taking into account both traditional criticisms and recent defenses. This model treats reduction as a type of explanation in which a reduced theory is explained by a reducing theory after their relevant representational items have been suitably connected. In accordance with the deductive-nomological model, the explanation is supposed to consist of a logical deduction. Nagel was a pluralist about both the logical form of the connections between the reduced and reducing theories (which could be conditionals or biconditionals) and their epistemological status (as analytic connections, conventions, or synthetic claims). This paper defends Nagel's pluralism on both counts and, in the process, argues that the multiple realizability objection to reductionism is misplaced. It also argues that the Nagel model correctly characterizes reduction as a type of explanation. However, it notes that logical deduction must be replaced by a broader class of inferential techniques that allow for different types of approximation. Whereas Nagel (1970), in contrast to his earlier position (1961), recognized the relevance of approximation, he did not realize its full import for the model. Throughout the paper two case studies are used to illustrate the arguments: the putative reduction of classical thermodynamics to the kinetic theory of matter and that of classical genetics to molecular biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Solar array cost reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    A brief description is given of the cost of solar power systems over the last decade and means by which cost reductions may be achieved in the future. Costs were broken down into nonrecurring and recurring costs for solar array, battery, and power conditioning. Correlation of costs with power were poor; however, costs correlated reasonably well with the array area.

  5. Reduction in Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phay, Robert

    Chapter 2 in a book on school law discusses the reasons for reduction in force (RIF) and presents a set of model regulations for school districts as the best means of minimizing legal problems resulting from RIF. The reasons for RIF include declining student enrollments; reduced turnover among teachers; changes in programs; and more constrained…

  6. Simple Spectroscopy Reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Martin; Holloway, Anthony

    This Cookbook describes the basic concepts and methods used in optical astronomical spectroscopy; it is aimed at those new to the field. Complete worked example reductions for both one- and two-dimensional longslit spectra, using real datasets, are described. Common problems and their solutions are discussed. A section on related resources is included, as is a glossary of commonly used terms.

  7. Controlling toxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Postel, S.

    1988-01-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture and the disposal of industrial chemical wastes constitute two major pathways by which people are inadvertently exposed to toxics. These practices release hundreds of millions of tons of potentially hazardous substances into the environment each year. In many ways the situation with industrial chemical waste parallels the predicament with pesticides: Not only are current practices contaminating the environment and creating health risks, but they are unsustainable over the long term. Strategies that reduce pesticide use in agriculture and minimize waste generation in industry offer cost-effective approaches to decreasing risks from toxics. Such strategies differ fundamentally from current practice and require new ways of thinking. The quick fixes of pesticide spraying and end-of-pipe pollution control are replaced with new production systems aimed at reconciling economic profits with environmental protection. Current efforts in integrated pest management and industrial waste reduction, although clearly promising, only hint at their long-term potential for detoxifying the environment.

  8. The chemical peel.

    PubMed

    Peters, W

    1991-06-01

    Chemical peeling of facial skin has become a valuable adjunct in the armamentarium of the facial aesthetic surgeon. Among the various techniques available, phenol solutions are the most commonly used. Peeling produces a controlled, partial-thickness chemical burn of the epidermis and the outer dermis. Several techniques are available to "fine tune" the depth of the peel. Regeneration of peeled skin results in a fresh, orderly, organized epidermis. In the dermis, a new 2- to 3-mm band of dense, compact, orderly collagen is formed between the epidermis and the underlying damaged dermis, which results in effective ablation of the fine wrinkles in the skin and a reduction of pigmentation. These clinical and histological changes are long lasting (15-20 years) and may be permanent in some patients. Because of the metabolism and systemic complications of phenol, patient selection should involve systemic evaluation of liver, renal, and cardiac function, as well as an evaluation of the skin quality and medication status of the patient. Because of potential cardiac arrhythmias, peeling must be performed in a medically supervised environment, with continuous cardiac monitoring. The local complications of peeling include pigmentation changes, scarring, milia, ectropion, infection, activation of herpes simplex, and toxic shock syndrome.

  9. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  10. Improvement of Expansive Soils Using Chemical Stabilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikizler, S. B.; Senol, A.; Khosrowshahi, S. K.; Hatipoğlu, M.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of two chemical stabilizers on the swelling potential of expansive soil. A high plasticity sodium bentonite was used as the expansive soil. The additive materials including fly ash (FA) and lime (L) were evaluated as potential stabilizers to decrease the swelling pressure of bentonite. Depending on the type of additive materials, they were blended with bentonite in different percentages to assess the optimum state and approch the maximum swell pressure reduction. According to the results of swell pressure test, both fly ash and lime reduce the swelling potential of bentonite but the maximum improvement occurs using bentonite-lime mixture while the swelling pressure reduction approaches to 49%. The results reveal a significant reduction of swelling potential of expansive soil using chemical stabilizers. Keywords: Expansive soil; swell pressure; chemical stabilization; fly ash; lime

  11. Bacterial chromate reduction and product characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlhorn, R.J.; Buchanan, B.B.; Leighton, T.

    1992-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis reduced hexavalent chromate to trivalent chromium under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Reduction of CR(VI) and appearance of extracellular Cr(III) were demonstrated by electron spin resonance and spectrophotometry. Chromate reduction was stimulated more than five-fold by freeze-thawing, indicating that intracellular reductases or chemical reductants reduce chromate more rapidly than do intact cells. Moderately concentrated cells (10% pellet volume after centrifugation) reduced approximately 40 {mu}M chromate/min (2 mg Cr/1-min) when exposed to 100 {mu}M chromate (5 mg Cr/1). Highly concentrated cells (70% pellet volume) reduced more than 99.8% of 2 mM chromate (100 mg Cr/1) within 15 min. This rate of chromate reduction was of the same order of magnitude as the rate of respiration in aerobic cells. A substantial fraction of the reduction product (ca. 75%) was extracellular Cr(M), which could readily be separated from the cells by centrifugation. At high chromate concentrations, some fraction of reduced CR(VI) appeared to be taken up by cells, consistent with a detection of intracellular paramagnetic products. At low chromate concentrations, undefined growth medium alone reduced Cr(VI), but at a slow rate, relative to cells. Under appropriate conditions, B. subtilis appears to be an organism of choice for detoxifying chromate-contaminated soil and water.

  12. Energy Savings from Industrial Water Reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Prakash; McKane, Aimee; de Fontaine, Andre

    2015-08-03

    Although it is widely recognized that reducing freshwater consumption is of critical importance, generating interest in industrial water reduction programs can be hindered for a variety of reasons. These include the low cost of water, greater focus on water use in other sectors such as the agriculture and residential sectors, high levels of unbilled and/or unregulated self-supplied water use in industry, and lack of water metering and tracking capabilities at industrial facilities. However, there are many additional components to the resource savings associated with reducing site water use beyond the water savings alone, such as reductions in energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, treatment chemicals, and impact on the local watershed. Understanding and quantifying these additional resource savings can expand the community of businesses, NGOs, government agencies, and researchers with a vested interest in water reduction. This paper will develop a methodology for evaluating the embedded energy consumption associated with water use at an industrial facility. The methodology developed will use available data and references to evaluate the energy consumption associated with water supply and wastewater treatment outside of a facility’s fence line for various water sources. It will also include a framework for evaluating the energy consumption associated with water use within a facility’s fence line. The methodology will develop a more complete picture of the total resource savings associated with water reduction efforts and allow industrial water reduction programs to assess the energy and CO2 savings associated with their efforts.

  13. Parenteral packaging waste reduction.

    PubMed

    Baetz, B W

    1990-08-01

    The consumption of pharmaceutical products generates waste materials which can cause significant environmental impact when incinerated or landfilled. The purpose of this work is to stimulate discussion among hospital pharmacists and purchasing managers relating to the waste management aspects of their purchasing decisions. As a case study example, a number of commercially available "single use" parenterals are evaluated from a waste reduction perspective, for both the product container and for the packaging of these containers. Glass vials are non-incinerable, and are currently non-recyclable due to the higher melting temperatures required for borosilicate glass. However, plastic vials are potentially both incinerable and recyclable. Packaging quantities are considerably lower for plastic vials on a unit container basis, and also vary to a measurable degree between different manufacturers for a given type of container material. From an environmental perspective, waste reduction potential should become an important criterion in the selection of pharmaceutical products for hospital use.

  14. Injury reduction at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Griffing, Bill; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    In a recent DOE Program Review, Fermilab's director presented results of the laboratory's effort to reduce the injury rate over the last decade. The results, shown in the figure below, reveal a consistent and dramatic downward trend in OSHA recordable injuries at Fermilab. The High Energy Physics Program Office has asked Fermilab to report in detail on how the laboratory has achieved the reduction. In fact, the reduction in the injury rate reflects a change in safety culture at Fermilab, which has evolved slowly over this period, due to a series of events, both planned and unplanned. This paper attempts to describe those significant events and analyze how each of them has shaped the safety culture that, in turn, has reduced the rate of injury at Fermilab to its current value.

  15. Fully Awake Breast Reduction.

    PubMed

    Filson, Simon A; Yarhi, Danielle; Ramon, Yitzhak

    2016-11-01

    The authors present 25 cases and an in-depth 4-minute video of fully awake aesthetic breast reduction, which was made possible by thoracic epidural anesthesia. There are obvious and important advantages to this technique. Not only does this allow for intraoperative patient cooperation (i.e., patient self-positioning and opinion for comparison of breasts), meaning a shorter and more efficient intraoperative time, there also is a reduction in postoperative pain, complications, recovery, and discharge times. The authors have also enjoyed great success and no complications with this technique in over 150 awake abdominoplasty/total body lift patients. The authors feel that the elimination of the need for general anesthesia by thoracic epidural sensorial-only anesthesia is a highly effective and efficient technique, with very few disadvantages/complications, providing advantages to both patients and surgeons. Therapeutic, IV.

  16. Physical pretreatment – woody biomass size reduction – for forest biorefinery

    Treesearch

    J.Y. Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Physical pretreatment of woody biomass or wood size reduction is a prerequisite step for further chemical or biochemical processing in forest biorefinery. However, wood size reduction is very energy intensive which differentiates woody biomass from herbaceous biomass for biorefinery. This chapter discusses several critical issues related to wood size reduction: (1)...

  17. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Goodnow, Warren H.; Payne, John R.

    1982-01-01

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB.sub.2, for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints.

  18. Reduction of astrographic catalogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.; Prugna, F. D.; Cova, J.

    1984-01-01

    An automatic program for the reduction of overlapping Carte du Ciel plates is described. The projection and transformation equations are given and the RAA subprogram flow is outlined. The program was applied to two different sets of data, namely to nine overlapping plates of the Cape Zone of the CdC, and to fifteen plates taken with the CIDA-refractor of the open cluster Tr10.

  19. Somatic reduction in cycads.

    PubMed

    Storey, W B

    1968-02-09

    Recurrent somatic reduction is a normal ontogenetic process in apogeotropic roots of cycads, which develop into dichotomously branching coralloid masses. The reduced cells make up part of a ring of differentiated cortical tissue lying midway between the pericycle and the epidermis; they serve as fillers among the large cells and become charged with slime. The differentiated tissue is colonized by a species of blue-green algae.

  20. Drag reduction strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. Christopher

    1994-01-01

    previously a description was given of an active control scheme using wall transpiration that leads to a 15% reduction in surface skin friction beneath a turbulent boundary layer, according to direct numerical simulation. In this research brief further details of that scheme and its variants are given together with some suggestions as to how sensor/actuator arrays could be configured to reduce surface drag. The research which is summarized here was performed during the first half of 1994. This research is motivated by the need to understand better how the dynamics of near-wall turbulent flow can be modified so that skin friction is reduced. The reduction of turbulent skin friction is highly desirable in many engineering applications. Experiments and direct numerical simulations have led to an increased understanding of the cycle of turbulence production and transport in the boundary layer and raised awareness of the possibility of disrupting the process with a subsequent reduction in turbulent skin friction. The implementation of active feedback control in a computational setting is a viable approach for the investigation of the modifications to the flow physics that can be achieved. Bewley et al. and Hill describe how ideas from optimal control theory are employed to give 'sub-optimal' drag reduction schemes. The objectives of the work reported here is to investigate in greater detail the assumptions implicit within such schemes and their limitations. It is also our objective to describe how an array of sensors and actuators could be arranged and interconnected to form a 'smart' surface which has low skin friction.

  1. Reduction of astrographic catalogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.; Prugna, F. D.; Cova, J.

    1984-01-01

    An automatic program for the reduction of overlapping Carte du Ciel plates is described. The projection and transformation equations are given and the RAA subprogram flow is outlined. The program was applied to two different sets of data, namely to nine overlapping plates of the Cape Zone of the CdC, and to fifteen plates taken with the CIDA-refractor of the open cluster Tr10.

  2. Television noise reduction device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, B. L.; Stamps, J. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A noise reduction system that divides the color video signal into its luminance and chrominance components is reported. The luminance component of a given frame is summed with the luminance component of at least one preceding frame which was stored on a disc recorder. The summation is carried out so as to achieve a signal amplitude equivalent to that of the original signal. The averaged luminance signal is then recombined with the chrominance signal to achieve a noise-reduced television signal.

  3. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

    1982-09-14

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

  4. 40 CFR 415.632 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  5. 40 CFR 415.552 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  6. 40 CFR 415.602 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  7. 40 CFR 415.142 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  8. 40 CFR 415.122 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  9. 40 CFR 415.442 - Effluent limitations quidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  10. 40 CFR 415.402 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  11. 40 CFR 415.432 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control...

  12. 40 CFR 415.112 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  13. 40 CFR 415.272 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control...

  14. 40 CFR 415.352 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  15. 40 CFR 415.412 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  16. 40 CFR 415.32 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  17. 40 CFR 415.382 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  18. 40 CFR 415.292 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control...

  19. 40 CFR 415.312 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT... representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable...

  20. Probing the pH dependent optical properties of aquatic, terrestrial and microbial humic substances by sodium borohydride reduction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chemically reducing humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) provides insight into spectroscopically identifiable structural moieties generating the optical properties of HA/FA from aquatic, microbial and terrestrial sources. Sodium borohydride reduction provides targeted reduction of carbonyl groups. The...