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Sample records for chemical bath deposition

  1. Antimony sulfide thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaji, S.; Garcia, L. V.; Loredo, S. L.; Krishnan, B.; Aguilar Martinez, J. A.; Das Roy, T. K.; Avellaneda, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) thin films were prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD) technique. These thin films were deposited on glass substrates from a chemical bath containing antimony chloride, acetone and sodium thiosulfate under various conditions of normal chemical bath deposition (CBD) as well as in-situ irradiation of the chemical bath using a continuous laser of 532 nm wavelength. Structure, composition, morphology, optical and electrical properties of the Sb2S3 thin films produced by normal CBD and LACBD were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectroscopy and Photoconductivity. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain Sb2S3 thin films for optoelectronic applications.

  2. Short review on chemical bath deposition of thin film and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mugle, Dhananjay, E-mail: dhananjayforu@gmail.com; Jadhav, Ghanshyam, E-mail: ghjadhav@rediffmail.com

    2016-05-06

    This reviews the theory of early growth of the thin film using chemical deposition methods. In particular, it critically reviews the chemical bath deposition (CBD) method for preparation of thin films. The different techniques used for characterizations of the chemically films such as X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Electrical conductivity and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) are discussed. Survey shows the physical and chemical properties solely depend upon the time of deposition, temperature of deposition.

  3. Cadmium sulfide thin films growth by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariech, S.; Aida, M. S.; Bougdira, J.; Belmahi, M.; Medjahdi, G.; Genève, D.; Attaf, N.; Rinnert, H.

    2018-03-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films have been prepared by a simple technique such as chemical bath deposition (CBD). A set of samples CdS were deposited on glass substrates by varying the bath temperature from 55 to 75 °C at fixed deposition time (25 min) in order to investigate the effect of deposition temperature on CdS films physical properties. The determination of growth activation energy suggests that at low temperature CdS film growth is governed by the release of Cd2+ ions in the solution. The structural characterization indicated that the CdS films structure is cubic or hexagonal with preferential orientation along the direction (111) or (002), respectively. The optical characterization indicated that the films have a fairly high transparency, which varies between 55% and 80% in the visible range of the optical spectrum, the refractive index varies from 1.85 to 2.5 and the optical gap value of which can reach 2.2 eV. It can be suggested that these properties make these films perfectly suitable for their use as window film in thin films based solar cells.

  4. SnS thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition, dip coating and SILAR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaki, Sunil H.; Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2016-05-01

    The SnS thin films were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD), dip coating and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) techniques. In them, the CBD thin films were deposited at two temperatures: ambient and 70 °C. The energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the thin films. The electrical transport properties studies on the as-deposited thin films were done by measuring the I-V characteristics, DC electrical resistivity variation with temperature and the room temperature Hall effect. The obtained results are deliberated in this paper.

  5. Deposition of zinc sulfide thin films by chemical bath process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladeji, Isaiah O.; Chow, Lee

    1996-11-01

    Deposition of high quality zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin film over a large area is required if it is to be effectively used in electroluminescent devices, solar cells, and other optoelectronic devices. Of all deposition techniques, chemical bath deposition (CBD) is the least costly technique that meets the above requirements. Recently it is found that the growth of ZnS film, of thickness less than 100 nm in a single dip, by CBD is facilitated by the use of ammonia and hydrazine as complexing agents. Here we report that the thickness of the deposited ZnS film can be increased if ammonium salt is used as a buffer. We also present an analytical study to explain our results and to further understand the ZnS growth process in CBD.

  6. Substrate spacing and thin-film yield in chemical bath deposition of semiconductor thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-Carbajal Reádigos, A.; García, V. M.; Gomezdaza, O.; Campos, J.; Nair, M. T. S.; Nair, P. K.

    2000-11-01

    Thin-film yield in the chemical bath deposition technique is studied as a function of separation between substrates in batch production. Based on a mathematical model, it is proposed and experimentally verified in the case of CdS thin films that the film thickness reaches an asymptotic maximum with increase in substrate separation. It is shown that at a separation less than 1 mm between substrates the yield, i.e. percentage in moles of a soluble cadmium salt deposited as a thin film of CdS, can exceed 50%. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the existence of a critical layer of solution near the substrate, within which the relevant ionic species have a higher probability of interacting with the thin-film layer than of contributing to precipitate formation. The critical layer depends on the solution composition and the temperature of the bath as well as the duration of deposition. An effective value for the critical layer thickness has been defined as half the substrate separation at which 90% of the maximum film thickness for the particular bath composition, bath temperature and duration of deposition is obtained. In the case of CdS thin films studied as an example, the critical layer is found to extend from 0.5 to 2.5 mm from the substrate surface, depending on the deposition conditions.

  7. A suitable deposition method of CdS for high performance CdS-sensitized ZnO electrodes: Sequential chemical bath deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haining; Li, Weiping; Liu, Huicong

    2010-07-15

    A suitable deposition method of CdS is necessary for the high performance CdS-sensitized ZnO electrodes. In this paper, chemical bath deposition (CBD) and sequential chemical bath deposition (S-CBD) methods were used to deposit CdS on ZnO mesoporous films for ZnO/CdS electrodes. The analysis results of XRD patterns and UV-vis spectroscopy indicated that CBD deposition method leaded to the dissolving of ZnO mesoporous films in deposition solution and thickness reduction of ZnO/CdS electrodes. Absorption in visible region by the ZnO/CdS electrodes with CdS deposition by S-CBD was enhanced as deposition cycles increased due to the stability of ZnO mesoporous films inmore » the S-CBD deposition solutions. The results of photocurrent-voltage (I-V) measurement showed that the performance of ZnO/CdS electrodes with CdS deposition by CBD first increased and then decreased as deposition time increased, and the greatest short-circuit current (J{sub sc}) was obtained at the deposition time of 4 min. The performance of ZnO/CdS electrodes with CdS deposition by S-CBD increased as deposition cycles increased, and both open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) and J{sub sc} were greater than those electrodes with CdS deposition by CBD when the deposition cycles of S-CBD were 10 or greater. These results indicated that S-CBD is a more suitable method for high performance ZnO/CdS electrodes. (author)« less

  8. Fabrication of ZnO nanorod using spray-pyrolysis and chemical bath deposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadhani, Muhammad F., E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id; Pasaribu, Maruli A. H., E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id; Yuliarto, Brian, E-mail: brian@tf.itb.ac.id

    2014-02-24

    ZnO thin films with nanorod structure were deposited using Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis method for seed growth, and Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) for nanorod growth. High purity Zn-hydrate and Urea are used to control Ph were dissolved in ethanol and aqua bidest in Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis process. Glass substrate was placed above the heater plate of reaction chamber, and subsequently sprayed with the range duration of 5, 10 and 20 minutes at the temperatures of 3500 C. As for the Chemical Bath Deposition, the glass substrate with ZnO seed on the surface was immerse to Zn-hydrate, HMTA (Hexa Methylene Tetra Amine)more » and deionized water solution for duration of 3, 5 and 7 hour and temperatures of 600 C, washed in distilled water, dried, and annealed at 3500 C for an hour. The characterization of samples was carried out to reveal the surface morphology using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the data, the combination of 5 minutes of Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis process and 3 hour of CBD has showed the best structure of nanorod. Meanwhile the longer Spraying process and CBD yield the bigger nanorod structure that have been made, and it makes the films more dense which make the nanorod collide each other and as a result produce unsymetric nanorod structure.« less

  9. Chemical bath deposition of II-VI compound thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladeji, Isaiah Olatunde

    II-VI compounds are direct bandgap semiconductors with great potentials in optoelectronic applications. Solar cells, where these materials are in greater demand, require a low cost production technology that will make the final product more affordable. Chemical bath deposition (CBD) a low cost growth technique capable of producing good quality thin film semiconductors over large area and at low temperature then becomes a suitable technology of choice. Heterogeneous reaction in a basic aqueous solution that is responsible for the II-VI compound film growth in CBD requires a metal complex. We have identified the stability constant (k) of the metal complex compatible with CBD growth mechanism to be about 106.9. This value is low enough to ensure that the substrate adsorbed complex relax for subsequent reaction with the chalcogen precursor to take place. It is also high enough to minimize the metal ion concentration in the bath participating in the precipitation of the bulk compounds. Homogeneous reaction that leads to precipitation in the reaction bath takes place because the solubility products of bulk II-VI compounds are very low. This reaction quickly depletes the bath of reactants, limit the film thickness, and degrade the film quality. While ZnS thin films are still hard to grow by CBD because of lack of suitable complexing agent, the homogeneous reaction still limits quality and thickness of both US and ZnS thin films. In this study, the zinc tetraammine complex ([Zn(NH3) 4]2+) with k = 108.9 has been forced to acquire its unsaturated form [Zn(NH3)3]2+ with a moderate k = 106.6 using hydrazine and nitrilotriacetate ion as complementary complexing agents and we have successfully grown ZnS thin films. We have also, minimized or eliminated the homogeneous reaction by using ammonium salt as a buffer and chemical bath with low reactant concentrations. These have allowed us to increase the saturation thickness of ZnS thin film by about 400% and raise that of US film

  10. Growth of different phases and morphological features of MnS thin films by chemical bath deposition: Effect of deposition parameters and annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, Amira; Maghraoui-Meherzi, Hager

    2017-03-01

    Manganese sulfide thin films have been deposited on glass slides by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The effects of preparative parameters such as deposition time, bath temperature, concentration of precursors, multi-layer deposition, different source of manganese, different complexing agent and thermal annealing on structural and morphological film properties have been investigated. The prepared thin films have been characterized using the X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). It exhibit the metastable forms of MnS, the hexagonal γ-MnS wurtzite phase with preferential orientation in the (002) plane or the cubic β-MnS zinc blende with preferential orientation in the (200) plane. Microstructural studies revealed the formation of MnS crystals with different morphologies, such as hexagons, spheres, cubes or flowers like.

  11. Chemical bath deposition of Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Deshmukh, S.G., E-mail: deshmukhpradyumn@gmail.com; Vipul, Kheraj, E-mail: vipulkheraj@gmail.com; Panchal, A.K.

    2016-05-06

    First time, copper bismuth sulfide (Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3}) thin films were synthesized on the glass substrate using simple, low-cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The synthesized parameters such as temperature of bath, pH and concentration of precursors were optimized for the deposition of uniform, well adherent Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} thin films. The optical, surface morphology and structural properties of the Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} thin films were studied using UV-VIS-NIR spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The as- synthesized Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} film exhibits a direct band gap 1.56 to 1.58 eV having absorption coefficient of the ordermore » of 10{sup 5} cm{sup −1}. The XRD declares the amorphous nature of the films. SEM images shows films were composed of close-packed fine spherical nanoparticles of 70-80 nm in diameter. The chemical composition of the film was almost stoichiometric. The optical study indicates that the Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} films can be applied as an absorber layer for thin film solar cells.« less

  12. Structural and optical properties of nano-structured CdS thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Rekha, E-mail: rekha.mittal07@gmail.com; Kumar, Dinesh; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2016-05-06

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films have been deposited on conducting glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The effect of precursor concentration on the structural, morphological, compositional, and optical properties of the CdS films has been studied. Crystal structure of these CdS films is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and it reveals polycrystalline structure with mixture of cubic and wurtzite phases with grain size decreasing as precursor concentration is increased. Optical studies reveal that the CdS thin films have high transmittance in visible spectral region reaching 90% and the films possess direct optical band gap that decreases from 2.46more » to 2.39 eV with decreasing bath concentration. Our study suggests that growth is nucleation controlled.« less

  13. Combinatorial chemical bath deposition of CdS contacts for chalcogenide photovoltaics

    DOE PAGES

    Mokurala, Krishnaiah; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; de Souza Lucas, Francisco W.; ...

    2016-08-01

    Contact layers play an important role in thin film solar cells, but new material development and optimization of its thickness is usually a long and tedious process. A high-throughput experimental approach has been used to accelerate the rate of research in photovoltaic (PV) light absorbers and transparent conductive electrodes, however the combinatorial research on contact layers is less common. Here, we report on the chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS thin films by combinatorial dip coating technique and apply these contact layers to Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGSe) and Cu 2ZnSnSe 4 (CZTSe) light absorbers in PV devices. Combinatorial thickness steps ofmore » CdS thin films were achieved by removal of the substrate from the chemical bath, at regular intervals of time, and in equal distance increments. The trends in the photoconversion efficiency and in the spectral response of the PV devices as a function of thickness of CdS contacts were explained with the help of optical and morphological characterization of the CdS thin films. The maximum PV efficiency achieved for the combinatorial dip-coating CBD was similar to that for the PV devices processed using conventional CBD. Finally, the results of this study lead to the conclusion that combinatorial dip-coating can be used to accelerate the optimization of PV device performance of CdS and other candidate contact layers for a wide range of emerging absorbers.« less

  14. Chemical bath deposited and dip coating deposited CuS thin films - Structure, Raman spectroscopy and surface study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailor, Jiten P.; Khimani, Ankurkumar J.; Chaki, Sunil H.

    2018-05-01

    The crystal structure, Raman spectroscopy and surface microtopography study on as-deposited CuS thin films were carried out. Thin films deposited by two techniques of solution growth were studied. The thin films used in the present study were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) and dip coating deposition techniques. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of both the as-deposited thin films showed that both the films possess covellite phase of CuS and hexagonal unit cell structure. The determined lattice parameters of both the films are in agreement with the standard JCPDS as well as reported data. The crystallite size determined by Scherrer's equation and Hall-Williamsons relation using XRD data for both the as-deposited thin films showed that the respective values were in agreement with each other. The ambient Raman spectroscopy of both the as-deposited thin films showed major emission peaks at 474 cm-1 and a minor emmision peaks at 265 cm-1. The observed Raman peaks matched with the covellite phase of CuS. The atomic force microscopy of both the as-deposited thin films surfaces showed dip coating thin film to be less rough compared to CBD deposited thin film. All the obtained results are presented and deliberated in details.

  15. Annealing Temperature Dependence of ZnO Nanostructures Grown by Facile Chemical Bath Deposition for EGFET pH Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilah Rosli, Aimi; Awang, Zaiki; Sobihana Shariffudin, Shafinaz; Herman, Sukreen Hana

    2018-03-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were deposited using chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique in water bath at 95 °C for 4 h. Post-deposition heat treatment in air ambient at various temperature ranging from 200-600 °C for 30 min was applied in order to enhance the electrical properties of ZnO nanostructures as the sensing membrane of extended-gate field effect transistor (EGFET) pH sensor. The as-deposited sample was prepared for comparison. The samples were characterized in terms of physical and sensing properties. FESEM images showed that scattered ZnO nanorods were formed for the as-deposited sample, and the morphology of the ZnO nanorods changed to ZnO nanoflowers when the heat treatment was applied from 200-600 °C. For sensing properties, the samples heated at 300 °C showed the higher sensitivity which was 39.9 mV/pH with the linearity of 0.9792. The sensing properties was increased with the increasing annealing treatment temperature up to 300 °C before decreased drastically.

  16. Physical properties of nanostructured strontium oxide thin film grown by chemical bath deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Farhan; Belkhedkar, M. R.; Salodkar, R. V.

    2018-05-01

    Nanostructured SrO thin film of thickness 139 nm was deposited by chemical bath deposition technique onto glass substrates using SrCl2.6H2O and NaOH as cationic and anionic precursors without complexing agents. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed that, SrO thin film is nanocrystalline in nature with cubic structure. The surface morphology of the SrO film was investigated by means of field emission scanning electron microscopy. The optical studies showed that SrO film exhibits direct as well as indirect optical band gap energy. The electrical resistivity and activation energy of SrO thin film is found to be of the order of 106 Ω cm and 0.58eV respectively.

  17. Structural and optical properties of PbS thin films grown by chemical bath deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Seghaier, S.; Kamoun, N.; Guasch, C.

    2007-09-19

    Lead sulphide thin films are grown on glass substrates at various deposition times tD, in the range of 40-60 min per step of 2 min, using the chemical bath deposition technique. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy are used to characterize the film structure. The surface composition is analysed by Auger electron spectroscopy. It appears that the as-prepared thin films are polycrystalline with cubic structure. Nanometric scale crystallites are uniformly distributed on the surface. They exhibit almost a stoechiometric composition with a [Pb]/[S] ratio equal to 1.10. Optical properties are studied in the range of 300-3300 nm by spectrophotometric measurements.more » Analysis of the optical absorption data of lead sulphide thin layers reveals a narrow optical direct band gap equal to 0.46 eV for the layer corresponding to a deposition time equal to 60 min.« less

  18. Chemical bath deposition of semiconductor thin films & nanostructures in novel microreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPeak, Kevin M.

    Chemical bath deposition (CBD) offers a simple and inexpensive route to deposit semiconductor nanostructures and thin films, but lack of fundamental understanding and control of the underlying chemistry has limited its versatility. CBD is traditionally performed in a batch reactor, requiring only a substrate to be immersed in a supersaturated solution of aqueous precursors such as metal salts, complexing agents, and pH buffers. Highlights of CBD include low cost, operation at low temperature and atmospheric pressure, and scalability to large area substrates. In this dissertation, I explore CBD of semiconductor thin films and nanowire arrays in batch and continuous flow microreactors. Microreactors offer many advantages over traditional reactor designs including a reduction in mass transport limitations, precise temperature control and ease of production scale-up by "numbering up". Continuous flow micoreactors offer the unique advantage of providing reaction conditions that are time-invariant but change smoothly as a function of distance down the reaction channel. Growth from a bath whose composition changes along the reactor length results in deposited materials whose properties vary as a function of position on the substrate, essentially creating a combinatorial library. These substrates can be rapidly characterized to identify relationships between growth conditions and material properties or growth mechanisms. I have used CBD in a continuous flow microreactor to deposit ZnO nanowire arrays and CdZnS films whose optoelectronic properties vary as a function of position. The spatially-dependent optoelectronic properties of these materials have been correlated to changes in the composition, structure or growth mechanisms of the materials and ultimately their growth conditions by rigorous spatial characterization. CBD in a continuous flow microreactor, coupled with spatial characterization, provides a new route to understanding the connection between CBD growth

  19. Breakthrough to Non-Vacuum Deposition of Single-Crystal, Ultra-Thin, Homogeneous Nanoparticle Layers: A Better Alternative to Chemical Bath Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yu-Kuang; Liu, Yung-Tsung; Hsieh, Dan-Hua; Shen, Tien-Lin; Hsieh, Ming-Yang; Tzou, An-Jye; Chen, Shih-Chen; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Lin, Wei-Sheng; Chan, Sheng-Wen; Shen, Yen-Ping; Cheng, Shun-Jen; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Chen, Hao-Ming; Kuo, Shou-Yi; Charlton, Martin D. B.; Hsieh, Tung-Po; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2017-01-01

    Most thin-film techniques require a multiple vacuum process, and cannot produce high-coverage continuous thin films with the thickness of a few nanometers on rough surfaces. We present a new ”paradigm shift” non-vacuum process to deposit high-quality, ultra-thin, single-crystal layers of coalesced sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable thickness down to a few nanometers, based on thermal decomposition. This provides high-coverage, homogeneous thickness, and large-area deposition over a rough surface, with little material loss or liquid chemical waste, and deposition rates of 10 nm/min. This technique can potentially replace conventional thin-film deposition methods, such as atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical bath deposition (CBD) as used by the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin-film solar cell industry for decades. We demonstrate 32% improvement of CIGS thin-film solar cell efficiency in comparison to reference devices prepared by conventional CBD deposition method by depositing the ZnS NPs buffer layer using the new process. The new ZnS NPs layer allows reduction of an intrinsic ZnO layer, which can lead to severe shunt leakage in case of a CBD buffer layer. This leads to a 65% relative efficiency increase. PMID:28383488

  20. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) studies on Cu2SnS3 (CTS) thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition method.

    PubMed

    Shelke, H D; Lokhande, A C; Kim, J H; Lokhande, C D

    2017-11-15

    Cu 2 SnS 3 (CTS) thin films have been successfully deposited on a cost-effective stainless steel substrate by simple and inexpensive chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The films are deliberated in provisos of their structural, morphological, optical and photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties before and after annealing treatment, using various physico-chemical techniques. The XRD studies showed the formation of triclinic phase of CTS films with nanocrystalline structure. Also, the crystallinity is enhanced with annealing and the secondary phase of Cu 2 S observed. Raman analysis confirmed the formation of CTS compound with secondary Cu 2 S phase. The SEM images also discovered mostly tiny spherical grains and significant progress in the size of grains after annealing. The films possess direct transitions with band gap energies of 1.35eV and 1.31eV before and after annealing, respectively. The improved photoconversion efficiency of CTS thin film based PEC cell is explained with the help of theoretical modeling of energy band diagram and correspondent circuit model of the impedance spectra. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of the morphology of ZnS thin films deposited on different substrates via chemical bath deposition.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Claudia M; Luque, P A; Castro-Beltran, A; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Lugo-Medina, Eder; Carrillo-Castillo, A; Quevedo-Lopez, M A; Olivas, A

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the influence of substrate on the morphology of ZnS thin films by chemical bath deposition is studied. The materials used were zinc acetate, tri-sodium citrate, thiourea, and ammonium hydroxide/ammonium chloride solution. The growth of ZnS thin films on different substrates showed a large variation on the surface, presenting a poor growth on SiO2 and HfO2 substrates. The thin films on ITO substrate presented a uniform and compact growth without pinholes. The optical properties showed a transmittance of about 85% in the visible range of 300-800 nm with band gap of 3.7 eV. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Preparation of ZnS microdisks using chemical bath deposition and ZnS/p-Si heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Y. J.; Meen, T. H.; Ji, L. W.; Tsai, J. K.; Wu, Y. S.; Huang, C. J.

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis and heterojunction solar cell properties of ZnS microdisks prepared by the chemical bath deposition method were investigated. The ZnS deposited on the p-Si blanket substrate exhibits good coverage. The lower reflectance spectra were found as the thickness of the ZnS film increased. The optical absorption spectra of the 80 °C ZnS microdisk exhibited a band-gap energy of 3.4 eV and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the AZO/ZnS/p-Si heterojunction solar cell with a 300 nm thick ZnS film was η=2.72%.

  3. Fabrication and electrical properties of low temperature-processed thin-film-transistors with chemical-bath deposited ZnO layer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joo-Seob; Kwon, Ji-Hye; Yang, Heesun

    2013-06-01

    ZnO film was grown on ZnO quantum dot seed layer-coated substrate by a low-temperature chemical bath deposition, where sodium citrate serves as a complexing agent for Zn2+ ion. The ZnO film deposited under the optimal condition exhibited a highly uniform surface morphology with a thickness of approimately 30 nm. For the fabrication of thin-film-transistor with a bottom-gate structure, ZnO film was chemically deposited on the transparent substrate of a seed layer-coated SiN(x)/ITO (indium tin oxide)/glass. As-deposited ZnO channel was baked at low temperatures of 60-200 degrees C to investigate the effect of baking temperature on electrical performances. Compared to the device with 60 degrees C-baked ZnO channel, the TFT performances of one with 200 degrees C-baked channel were substantially improved, exhibiting an on-off current ratio of 3.6 x 10(6) and a saturated field-effect mobility of 0.27 cm2/V x s.

  4. Experimental Studies on role of pH, potential and concentration of buffer solution for chemical bath deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresha, B. L.; Sumantha, H. S.; Salman, K. Mohammed; Pramod, N. G.; Abhiram, J.

    2018-04-01

    The ionization potential is usually found to be less in acid and more in base. The experiment proves that the ionization potential increases on dilution of acid to base and reduces from base to acid. The potential can be tailored according to the desired properties based on our choice of acid or base. The experimental study establishes a direct relationship between pH and electric potential. This work provides theoretical insights on the need for a basic media of pH 10 in chemical thin film growth techniques called Chemical Bath Deposition Techniques.

  5. Cadmium sulphide (CdS) thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) and dip coating techniques—a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khimani, Ankurkumar J.; Chaki, Sunil H.; Malek, Tasmira J.; Tailor, Jiten P.; Chauhan, Sanjaysinh M.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2018-03-01

    The CdS thin films were deposited on glass slide substrates by Chemical Bath Deposition and dip coating techniques. The films thickness variation with deposition time showed maximum films deposition at 35 min for both the films. The energy dispersive analysis of x-ray showed both the films to be stoichiometric. The x-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the films possess hexagonal crystal structure. The transmission electron, scanning electron and optical microscopy study showed the films deposition to be uniform. The selected area electron diffraction exhibited ring patterns stating the films to be polycrystalline in nature. The atomic force microscopy images showed surface formed of spherical grains, hills and valleys. The recorded optical absorbance spectra analysis revealed the films possess direct optical bandgap having values of 2.25 eV for CBD and 2.40 eV for dip coating. The refractive index (η), extinction coefficient (k), complex dielectric constant (ε) and optical conductivity (σ 0) variation with wavelength showed maximum photon absorption till the respective wavelengths corresponding to the optical bandgap energy values. The recorded photoluminescence spectra showed two emission peaks. All the obtained results have been discussed in details.

  6. Annealing effect on structural and optical properties of chemical bath deposited MnS thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Ulutas, Cemal, E-mail: cemalulutas@hakkari.edu.tr; Gumus, Cebrail

    2016-03-25

    MnS thin film was prepared by the chemical bath deposition (CBD) method on commercial microscope glass substrate deposited at 30 °C. The as-deposited film was given thermal annealing treatment in air atmosphere at various temperatures (150, 300 and 450 °C) for 1 h. The MnS thin film was characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis spectrophotometer and Hall effect measurement system. The effect of annealing temperature on the structural, electrical and optical properties such as optical constants of refractive index (n) and energy band gap (E{sub g}) of the film was determined. XRD measurements reveal that the film is crystallized inmore » the wurtzite phase and changed to tetragonal Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase after being annealed at 300 °C. The energy band gap of film decreased from 3.69 eV to 3.21 eV based on the annealing temperature.« less

  7. An investigation into the role of polyethyleneimine in chemical bath deposition of zinc oxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari, Alireza; Abdizadeh, Hossein; Pourshaban, Erfan; Golobostanfard, Mohammad Reza

    2018-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanowires are considered as promising materials for wide range of optoelectrical and chemical devices, thanks to their desirable structural and optoelectrical properties. Over the past decade, chemical bath deposition (CBD) has been widely used to synthesize these nanostructures due to its low cost and controllability. Since improving the aspect ratio and length of nanowires is a vital issue in growing one-dimensional nanostructures, the influence of polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a complexing and chelating agent on the structural, morphological, and optoelectrical properties of ZnO nanowires has been studied in this report. As-grown ZnO nanowires synthesized by mixing deionized water, zinc acetate dihydrate, hexamethylenetetramine, and PEI were characterized with field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). FESEM results unambiguously show that increasing PEI concentration (from 0 to 0.2 g in 50 ml DI water) reduces the diameter and density of nanowires from ˜120 to 56 nm and from ˜85% to 65%, respectively. Interestingly, although adding more PEI decreases nanowires diameter, over-increasing of PEI brings about an inappropriate nanostructures growth. Moreover, XRD patterns demonstrate that all the samples have wurtzite structure with a preferred orientation along c-axis which may be improved or deteriorated by adding PEI into the chemical bath. Accordingly, it is crucial to optimize the amount of PEI in CBD method. Near-band edge (NBE) region in PL spectrum also confirms wide bandgap of ZnO (˜3.3 eV). In addition, comparing the appearance of PEI free with PEI assisted solutions show a considerable difference in their colors, which may be attributed to the formation of new chemical compounds. Considering these results, PEI plays a couple of determining roles in synthesizing ZnO nanowires; making nanowires thinner, with selectively absorption to the non-polar, lateral facets of

  8. A chemical bath deposition route to facet-controlled Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} thin films with improved visible light photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gunjakar, Jayavant L.; Jo, Yun Kyung; Kim, In Young

    A facile, economic, and reproducible chemical bath deposition (CBD) method is developed for the fabrication of facet-controlled Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} thin films with enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity. The fine-control of bath temperature, precursor, complexing agent, substrate, and solution pH is fairly crucial in preparing the facet-selective thin film of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} nanocrystal. The change of precursor from silver nitrate to silver acetate makes possible the tailoring of the crystal shape of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} from cube to rhombic dodecahedron and also the bandgap tuning of the deposited films. The control of [Ag{sup +}]/[phosphate] ratio enables to maximize themore » loading amount of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} crystals per the unit area of the deposited film. All the fabricated Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} thin films show high photocatalytic activity for visible light-induced degradation of organic molecules, which can be optimized by tailoring the crystal shape of the deposited crystals. This CBD method is also useful in preparing the facet-controlled hybrid film of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}–ZnO photocatalyst. The present study clearly demonstrates the usefulness of the present CBD method for fabricating facet-controlled thin films of metal oxosalt and its nanohybrid. - Highlights: • The crystal facet of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} films can be tuned by chemical bath deposition. • The crystal shape of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is tailorable from cube to rhombic dodecahedron. • Facet-tuned Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} film shows enhanced visible light photocatalyst activity.« less

  9. Tuning the morphology of metastable MnS films by simple chemical bath deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhandayuthapani, T.; Girish, M.; Sivakumar, R.; Sanjeeviraja, C.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2015-10-01

    In the present investigation, we have prepared the spherical particles, almond-like, and cauliflower-like morphological structures of metastable MnS films on glass substrate by chemical bath deposition technique at low temperature without using any complexing or chelating agent. The morphological change of MnS films with molar ratio may be due to the oriented aggregation of adjacent particles. The compositional purity of deposited film was confirmed by the EDAX study. X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman studies confirm the sulfur source concentration induced enhancement in the crystallization of films with metastable MnS phase (zinc-blende β-MnS, and wurtzite γ-MnS). The shift in PL emission peak with molar ratio may be due to the change in optical energy band gap of the MnS, which was further confirmed by the optical absorbance study. The paramagnetic behavior of the sample was confirmed by the M-H plot.

  10. Coercivity enhancement of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiushuang; Guo, Shuai; Yang, Xiao; Zeng, Jiling; Cao, Xuejing; Chen, Renjie; Yan, Aru

    2018-05-01

    The chemical bath deposition (CBD) method is used to diffuse the heavy rare earth element in order to obtain the high coercivity magnets with low heavy rare earth element. The jet mill powders are soaked in the alcohol suspension of Dy(CH3CHOHCH3)3 (Dy-ipa) so that Nd2Fe14B powder particles are surrounded by Dy-ipa homogeneously. By adding 1.0 wt. % Dy, the coercivity of magnet is increased from 14.47 kOe to 17.55 kOe with slight reduction of remanence after grain boundary diffusion (GBD) in the sintering and annealing processes. The temperature coefficient of coercivity optimizes from -0.629 %/°C to -0.605 %/°C as well as that of remanence improves from -0.108 %/°C to -0.100 %/°C. The CBD method is helpful for thermal stability and alignment either. The relation between the microstructure and the coercivity has been studied systematically.

  11. Structural, optical and electrical properties of copper antimony sulfide thin films grown by a citrate-assisted single chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranca-Ramos, F. E.; Diliegros-Godines, C. J.; Silva González, R.; Pal, Mou

    2018-01-01

    Copper antimony sulfide (CAS) has been proposed as low toxicity and earth abundant absorber materials for thin film photovoltaics due to their suitable optical band gap, high absorption coefficient and p-type electrical conductivity. The present work reports the formation of copper antimony sulfide by chemical bath deposition using sodium citrate as a complexing agent. We show that by tuning the annealing condition, one can obtain either chalcostibite or tetrahedrite phase. However, the main challenge was co-deposition of copper and antimony as ternary sulfides from a single chemical bath due to the distinct chemical behavior of these metals. The as-deposited films were subjected to several trials of thermal treatment using different temperatures and time to find the optimized annealing condition. The films were characterized by different techniques including Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), profilometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis spectrophotometer, and Hall Effect measurements. The results show that the formation of chalcostibite and tetrahedrite phases is highly sensitive to annealing conditions. The electrical properties obtained for the chalcostibite films varied as the annealing temperature increases from 280 to 350 °C: hole concentration (n) = 1017-1018 cm-3, resistivity (ρ) = 1.74-2.14 Ωcm and carrier mobility (μ) = 4.7-9.26 cm2/Vseg. While for the tetrahedrite films, the electrical properties were n = 5 × 1019 cm-3, μ = 18.24 cm2/Vseg, and ρ = 5.8 × 10-3 Ωcm. A possible mechanism for the formation of ternary copper antimony sulfide has also been proposed.

  12. Electrochemical deposited nickel nanowires: influence of deposition bath temperature on the morphology and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofiah, A. G. N.; Kananathan, J.; Samykano, M.; Ulakanathan, S.; Lah, N. A. C.; Harun, W. S. W.; Sudhakar, K.; Kadirgama, K.; Ngui, W. K.; Siregar, J. P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the electrolytic bath temperature on the morphology and physical properties of nickel (Ni) nanowires electrochemically deposited into the anodic alumina oxide porous membrane (AAO). The synthesis was performed using nickel sulfate hexahydrate (NiSO4.6H2O) and boric acid (H3BO3) as an electrolytic bath for the electrochemical deposition of Ni nanowires. During the experiment, the electrolyte bath temperature varied from 40°C, 80°C, and 120°C. After the electrochemical deposition process, AAO templates cleaned with distilled water preceding to dissolution in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution to obtain free-standing Ni nanowires. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis were employed to characterize the morphology and physical properties of the synthesized Ni nanowires. Finding reveals the electrodeposition bath temperature significantly influences the morphology and physical properties of the synthesized Ni nanowires. Rougher surface texture, larger crystal size, and longer Ni nanowires obtained as the deposition bath temperature increased. From the physical properties properties analysis, it can be concluded that deposition bath temperature influence the physical properties of Ni nanowires.

  13. In Situ X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure Spectroscopy of ZnO Nanowire Growth During Chemical Bath Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    McPeak, Kevin M.; Becker, Matthew A.; Britton, Nathan G.

    2010-12-03

    Chemical bath deposition (CBD) offers a simple and inexpensive route to deposit semiconductor nanostructures, but lack of fundamental understanding and control of the underlying chemistry has limited its versatility. Here we report the first use of in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy during CBD, enabling detailed investigation of both reaction mechanisms and kinetics of ZnO nanowire growth from zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) precursors. Time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were used to quantify Zn(II) speciation in both solution and solid phases. ZnO crystallizes directly from [Zn(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} without long-lived intermediates. Using ZnO nanowire deposition as an example,more » this study establishes in situ XANES spectroscopy as an excellent quantitative tool to understand CBD of nanomaterials.« less

  14. Structural and optical studied of nano structured lead sulfide thin films prepared by the chemical bath deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Al Din, Nasser Saad, E-mail: nsaadaldin@yahoo.com; Hussain, Nabiha, E-mail: nabihahssin@yahoo.com; Jandow, Nidhal, E-mail: nidhaljandow@yahoo.com

    2016-07-25

    Lead (II) Sulfide PbS thin films were deposited on glass substrates at 25°C by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The structural properties of the films were studied as a function of the concentration of Thiourea (CS (NH{sub 2}){sub 2}) as Source of Sulfide and deposition time. The surface morphology of the films was characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM. The obtained results showed that the as-deposited films Polycrystalline had cubic crystalline phase that belong to S.G: Fm3m. We found that they have preferred orientation [200]. Also the thickness of thin films decrease with deposition time after certain value and, itmore » observed free sulfide had orthorhombic phase. Optical properties showed that the thin films have high transmission at visible range and low transmission at UV, IR range. The films of PbS have direct band gap (I.68 - 2.32 ev) at 300 K the values of band energy decreases with increases thickness of the Lead (II) Sulfide films.« less

  15. Synthesis and photosensor study of as-grown CuZnO thin film by facile chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubari, Ghamdan M. M.; Ibrahim Mohammed S., M.; Huse, Nanasaheb P.; Dive, Avinash S.; Sharma, Ramphal

    2018-05-01

    We have successfully deposited CuZnO thin film on a glass substrate by facile chemical bath deposition method at 85 °C for 1 hr. Structural, topographical, Optical and Electrical properties of the prepared Thin Films were investigated by XRD, Raman spectrum, AFM, UV-Visible Spectrophotometer and I-V Measurement System respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed the formation of the CuZnO composition when compared with standard JCPDS card (JCPDF # 75-0576 & # 36-1451). The Raman analysis shows a major peak at 458 cm-1 with E2 (High) vibrational mode. AFM images revealed uniform deposition over an entire glass substrate with 66.2 nm average roughness of the film. From the optical absorption spectrum, clear band edge around ˜407 nm was observed which results in a wide energy band gap of ˜3.04 eV. The electrical properties were measured at room temperature in the voltage range ±5 V, showed a drastic enhancement in current under light illumination with the highest photosensitivity of ˜99.9 % for 260 W.

  16. Evaluation of the structural, optical and electrical properties of AZO thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K. Deva Arun; Valanarasu, S.; Rosario, S. Rex; Ganesh, V.; Shkir, Mohd.; Sreelatha, C. J.; AlFaify, S.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films for electrode applications were deposited on glass substrates using chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The influence of deposition time on the structural, morphological, and opto-electrical properties of AZO films were investigated. Structural studies confirmed that all the deposited films were hexagonal wurtzite structure with polycrystalline nature and exhibited (002) preferential orientation. There is no other impurity phases were detected for different deposition time. Surface morphological images shows the spherically shaped grains are uniformly arranged on to the entire film surface. The EDS spectrum confirms the presence of Zn, O and Al elements in deposited AZO film. The observed optical transmittance is high (87%) in the visible region, and the calculated band gap value is 3.27 eV. In this study, the transmittance value is decreased with increasing deposition time. The room temperature PL spectrum exposed that AZO thin film deposited at (60 min) has good optical quality with less defect density. The minimum electrical resistivity and maximum carrier concentration values were observed as 8.53 × 10-3(Ω cm) and 3.53 × 1018 cm-3 for 60 min deposited film, respectively. The obtained figure of merit (ϕ) value 3.05 × 10-3(Ω/sq)- 1 is suggested for an optoelectronic device.

  17. In Situ Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) Spectroscopy to Investigate Kinetics of Chemical Bath Deposition of CdS Thin Films

    DOE PAGES

    Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Taz, Humaira; Ruther, Rose E.; ...

    2015-02-11

    Techniques that can characterize the early stages of thin film deposition from liquid phase processes can aid greatly in our understanding of mechanistic aspects of chemical bath deposition (CBD). Here we have used localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy to monitor in-situ the kinetics of early-stage growth of cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films on Ag nanoparticle on quartz substrates. Real-time shift during CdS deposition showed that the LSPR wavelength red shifted rapidly due to random deposition of CdS on the substrate, but saturated at longer times. LSPR modeling showed that these features could be interpreted as an initial deposition ofmore » CdS islands followed by preferential deposition onto itself. The CdS also showed significantly enhanced Raman signals up to 170 times due to surface enhanced raman scattering (SERS) from the CdS/Ag NP regions. The ex-situ SERS effect supported the LSPR shift suggesting that these techniques could be used to understand nucleation and growth phenomena from the liquid phase.« less

  18. Effect of growth time on Ti-doped ZnO nanorods prepared by low-temperature chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidier, Shaker A.; Hashim, M. R.; Al-Diabat, Ahmad M.; Bououdina, M.

    2017-04-01

    Ti-doped ZnO nanorod arrays were grown onto Si substrate using chemical bath deposition (CBD) method at 93 °C. To investigate the effect of time deposition on the morphological, and structural properties, four Ti-doped ZnO samples were prepared at various deposition periods of time (2, 3.5, 5, and 6.5 h). FESEM images displayed high-quality and uniform nanorods with a mean length strongly dependent upon deposition time; i.e. it increases for prolonged growth time. Additionally, EFTEM images reveal a strong erosion on the lateral side for the sample prepared for 6.5 h as compared to 5 h. This might be attributed to the dissolution reaction of ZnO with for prolonged growth time. XRD analysis confirms the formation of a hexagonal wurtzite-type structure for all samples with a preferred growth orientation along the c-axis direction. The (100) peak intensity was enhanced and then quenched, which might be the result of an erosion on the lateral side of nanorods as seen in EFTEM. This study confirms the important role of growth time on the morphological features of Ti-doped ZnO nanorods prepared using CBD. Increase the growth time causes an erosion in lateral side -(100) direction XRD- and enhances the axial direction -(002), XRD.

  19. Structural and optical properties of Ni-doped CdS thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Premarani, R.; Saravanakumar, S., E-mail: sarophy84@gmail.com; Chandramohan, R.

    2015-06-24

    The structural and optical behavior of undoped Cadmiun Sulphide (CdS) and Ni-doped CdS thinfilms prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) technique is reported. The crystallite sizes of the thinfilms have been characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD). The particle sizes increase with the increase of Ni content in the CdS thinfilms. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) results indicated that CdS thinfilms is made up of aggregate of spherical-like particles. The composition was estimated by Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDX) and reported. Spectroscopic studies revealed considerable improvement in transmission and the band gap of the films changes with addition of Nimore » dopant that is associated with variation in crystallite sizes in the nano regime.« less

  20. Chemical bath deposited ZnS buffer layer for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jiyeon; Lim, Donghwan; Eo, Young-Joo; Choi, Changhwan

    2018-02-01

    The dependence of Zn precursors using zinc sulfate (ZnSO4), zinc acetate (Zn(CH3COO)2), and zinc chloride (ZnCl2) on the characteristics of the chemical bath deposited ZnS thin film used as a buffer layer of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cell was studied. It is found that the ZnS film deposition rate increases with higher stability constant during decomplexation reaction of zinc ligands, which affects the crack formation and the amount of sulfur and oxygen contents within the film. The band gap energies of all deposited films are in the range of 3.40-3.49 eV, which is lower than that of the bulk ZnS film due to oxygen contents within the films. Among the CIGS solar cells having ZnS buffer layers prepared by different Zn precursors, the best cell efficiency with 9.4% was attained using Zn(CH3COO)2 precursor due to increased Voc mainly. This result suggests that [Zn(NH3)4]2+ complex formation should be well controlled to attain the high quality ZnS thin films.

  1. Chemical Bath Deposited Zinc Sulfide Buffer Layers for Copper Indium Gallium Sulfur-selenide Solar Cells and Device Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Sambhu N.; Olsen, Larry C.

    2005-01-03

    Cd free CIGSS thin film solar cell structures with a MgF2/TCO/CGD-ZnS/CIGSS/Mo/SLG structure have been fabricated using chemical bath deposited (CBD)-ZnS buffer layers and high quality CIGSS absorber layers supplied from Shell Solar Industries. The use of CBD-ZnS, which is a higher band gap materials than CdS, improved the quantum efficiency of fabricated cells at lower wavelengths, leading to an increase in short circuit current. The best cell to date yielded an active area (0.43 cm2) efficiency of 13.3%. This paper also presents a discussion of the issues relating to the use of the CBD-ZnS buffer materials for improving device performance.

  2. Photoluminescence transient study of surface defects in ZnO nanorods grown by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbagiovanni, E. G.; Strano, V.; Franzò, G.; Crupi, I.; Mirabella, S.

    2015-03-01

    Two deep level defects (2.25 and 2.03 eV) associated with oxygen vacancies (Vo) were identified in ZnO nanorods (NRs) grown by low cost chemical bath deposition. A transient behaviour in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the two Vo states was found to be sensitive to the ambient environment and to NR post-growth treatment. The largest transient was found in samples dried on a hot plate with a PL intensity decay time, in air only, of 23 and 80 s for the 2.25 and 2.03 eV peaks, respectively. Resistance measurements under UV exposure exhibited a transient behaviour in full agreement with the PL transient, indicating a clear role of atmospheric O2 on the surface defect states. A model for surface defect transient behaviour due to band bending with respect to the Fermi level is proposed. The results have implications for a variety of sensing and photovoltaic applications of ZnO NRs.

  3. Physical Property Characterization of Pb2+-Doped CdS Nanofilms Deposited by Chemical-Bath Deposition at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Reyes, J.; Contreras-Rascón, J. I.; Galván-Arellano, M.; Arias-Cerón, J. S.; Gutiérrez-Arias, J. E. M.; Flores-Mena, J. E.; Morín-Castillo, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    Pb2 +-doped CdS nanofilms are prepared using the growth technique chemical bath deposition (CBD) under optimum conditions lead acetate at the reservoir temperature of 20 ± 2 °C. The Pb2+ molar concentration was in the range 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.19.67, which was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The X-ray diffraction results show that the films are of PbS-CdS composites with individual CdS and PbS planes. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Raman scattering reveal that CdS-deposited films showed the zincblende (ZB) crystalline phase. The average grain size of the CdS films ranged from 1.21 to 6.67 nm that was determined by the Debye-Scherrer equation from ZB (111) direction, and it was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Raman scattering shows that the lattice dynamics is characteristic of bimodal behaviour and the multipeaks adjust of the first optical longitudinal mode for the Pb2+-doped CdS denotes the Raman shift of the characteristic peak in the range of 305-298 cm-1 of the CdS crystals, which is associated with the lead ion incorporation. The films exhibit three direct bandgaps, 2.44 eV attributed to CdS; the other varies continuously from 1.67 to 1.99 eV and another disappears as Pb2+ molar fraction increases.

  4. Effect of Thermal Annealing on the Band GAP and Optical Properties of Chemical Bath Deposited ZnSe Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezema, F. I.; Ekwealor, A. B. C.; Osuji, R. U.

    2006-05-01

    Zinc selenide (ZnSe) thin films were deposited on glass substrate using the chemical bath deposition method at room temperature from aqueous solutions of zinc sulphate and sodium selenosulfate in which sodium hydroxide was employed as complexing agents. The `as-deposited' ZnSe thin films are red in color and annealed in oven at 473 K for 1 hour and on a hot plate in open air at 333 K for 5 minutes, affecting the morphological and optical properties. Optical properties such as absorption coefficient a and extinction coefficient k, were determined using the absorbance and transmission measurement from Unico UV-2102 PC spectrophotometer, at normal incidence of light in the wavelength range of 200-1000 nm. The films have transmittance in VIS-NIR regions that range between 26 and 87%. From absorbance and transmittance spectra, the band gap energy determined ranged between 1.60 eV and 1.75 for the `as deposited' samples, and the annealed samples exhibited a band gap shift of 0.15 eV. The high transmittance of the films together with its large band gap made them good materials for selective coatings for solar cells.

  5. Optical properties of PVA capped nanocrystalline Cd1-xZnxS thin film synthesized by chemical bath deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Lipika; Chaliha, Sumbit; Saikia, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-04-01

    A simple cost effective Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) technique has been employed for the preparation of nanocrystalline Cd1-xZnxS thin films in an alkaline medium at 333K for 120 minutes in polymer matrix. Optical parameters such as transmittance, optical band gap, reflectance, refractive index and extinction coefficient of the films was made using UV-Visible spectrophotometer. UV-spectroscopy study shows a good transmittance of 80-88% in visible wavelength region for the deposited films. The direct band gap energy (Eg) for the deposited films ranged from 3.5 to 3.7 eV depending on attribution of Zn into CdS. It shows a blue shift with respect to bulk value. A increase in transmittance and band gap is found with the increase of volume of Zn content. Cd1-xZnxS thin films exhibit the least reflectance for all the wavelengths in the visible region. The refractive indices (n) of the Cd1-xZnxS films were found in the range 1.38 to 2.94 in the visible region.

  6. Synthesis of Mn-doped ZnS thin films by chemical bath deposition: Optical properties in the visible region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erken, Ozge; Gunes, Mustafa; Gumus, Cebrail

    2017-04-01

    Transparent ZnS:Mn thin films were produced by chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique at 80 °C for 4h, 6h and 8h durations. The optical properties such as optical transmittance (T %), reflectance (R %), extinction coefficient (k) and refractive index (n) were deeply investigated in terms of contribution ratio, wavelength and film thickness. The optical properties of ZnS:Mn thin films were determined by UV/vis spectrophotometer transmittance measurements in the range of λ=300-1100 nm. Optical transmittances of the films were found from 12% to 92% in the visible region. The refractive index (n) values for visible region were calculated as 1.34-5.09. However, film thicknesses were calculated between 50 and 901 nm by gravimetric analysis.

  7. Incorporation of Mn2+ into CdSe quantum dots by chemical bath co-deposition method for photovoltaic enhancement of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenguang; Liu, Shaowen; Liu, Xingwei; Deng, Fei; Xiong, Yan; Tsai, Fang-Chang

    2018-03-01

    A photoelectric conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.9% was obtained under 100 mW cm-2 illumination by quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) using a CdS/Mn : CdSe sensitizer. CdS quantum dots (QDs) were deposited on a TiO2 mesoporous oxide film by successive ionic layer absorption and reaction. Mn2+ doping into CdSe QDs is an innovative and simple method-chemical bath co-deposition, that is, mixing the Mn ion source with CdSe precursor solution for Mn : CdSe QD deposition. Compared with the CdS/CdSe sensitizer without Mn2+ incorporation, the PCE was increased from 3.4% to 4.9%. The effects of Mn2+ doping on the chemical, physical and photovoltaic properties of the QDSSCs were investigated by energy dispersive spectrometry, absorption spectroscopy, photocurrent density-voltage characteristics and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Mn-doped CdSe QDs in QDSSCs can obtain superior light absorption, faster electron transport and slower charge recombination than CdSe QDs.

  8. Fabrication of p-type CuO thin films using chemical bath deposition technique and their solar cell applications with Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Funda Aksoy; Akgul, Guvenc

    2017-02-01

    Recently, CuO has attracted much interest owing to its suitable material properties, inexpensive fabrication cost and potential applications for optoelectronic devices. In this study, CuO thin films were deposited on glass substrates using chemical bath deposition technique and post-deposition annealing effect on the properties of the prepared samples were investigated. p-n heterojunction solar cells were then constructed by coating of p-type CuO films onto the vertically well-aligned n-type Si nanowires synthesized through MACE method. Photovoltaic performance of the fabricated devices were determined with current-voltage (I-V) measurements under AM 1.5 G illumination. The optimal short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage, fill factor and power conversion efficiency were found to be 3.2 mA/cm-2, 337 mV, 37.9 and 0.45%, respectively. The observed performance clearly indicates that the investigated device structure could be a promising candidate for high-performance low-cost new-generation photovoltaic diodes.

  9. ZnS Buffer Layers Grown by Modified Chemical Bath Deposition for CIGS Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongchan; Ahn, Heejin; Shin, Hyundo; Um, Youngho

    2018-03-01

    ZnS thin films were prepared by the chemical bath deposition method using disodium ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid and hexamethylenetetramine as complexing agents in acidic conditions. The film prepared using a preheated S-ion source showed full surface coverage, but some clusters were found that were generated by the cluster-by-cluster reaction mechanism. On the other hand, the film prepared without this source had a uniform, dense, and smooth surface and showed fewer clusters than the film prepared using a preheated S-ion source. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra showed the energy core levels of Zn, O, and S components, and Zn-OH bonding decreased on the film using the preheated S-ion source. Especially, various binding energy peaks were found in the Zn 2p 3/2 spectrum by Gaussian function fitting, and no peak corresponding to Zn-OH bonding was found for the film prepared using a preheated S-ion source. Moreover, the x-ray diffraction spectrum of the ZnS thin film using a non-preheated S-ion source showed amorphous or nanoscale crystallinity, but the emission peaks indicated that the structure of the film using preheated S-ion source was zincblende.

  10. ZnS Buffer Layers Grown by Modified Chemical Bath Deposition for CIGS Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongchan; Ahn, Heejin; Shin, Hyundo; Um, Youngho

    2018-07-01

    ZnS thin films were prepared by the chemical bath deposition method using disodium ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid and hexamethylenetetramine as complexing agents in acidic conditions. The film prepared using a preheated S-ion source showed full surface coverage, but some clusters were found that were generated by the cluster-by-cluster reaction mechanism. On the other hand, the film prepared without this source had a uniform, dense, and smooth surface and showed fewer clusters than the film prepared using a preheated S-ion source. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra showed the energy core levels of Zn, O, and S components, and Zn-OH bonding decreased on the film using the preheated S-ion source. Especially, various binding energy peaks were found in the Zn 2 p 3/2 spectrum by Gaussian function fitting, and no peak corresponding to Zn-OH bonding was found for the film prepared using a preheated S-ion source. Moreover, the x-ray diffraction spectrum of the ZnS thin film using a non-preheated S-ion source showed amorphous or nanoscale crystallinity, but the emission peaks indicated that the structure of the film using preheated S-ion source was zincblende.

  11. Single step synthesis of rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoflower array film by chemical bath deposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Dhandayuthapani, T.; Sivakumar, R.; Ilangovan, R., E-mail: rilangovan@yahoo.com

    2016-05-06

    Titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanostructures such as nanorod arrays, nanotube arrays and nanoflower arrays have been extensively investigated by the researchers. Among them nanoflower arrays has shown superior performance than other nanostructures in Dye sensitized solar cell, photocatalysis and energy storage applications. Herein, a single step synthesis for rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoflower array films suitable for device applications has been reported. Rutile TiO{sub 2} nanoflower thin film was synthesized by chemical bath deposition method using NaCl as an additive. Bath temperature induced evolution of nanoflower thin film arrays was observed from the morphological study. X-ray diffraction study confirmed the presencemore » of rutile phase polycrystalline TiO{sub 2}. Micro-Raman study revealed the presence of surface phonon mode at 105 cm{sup −1} due to the phonon confinement effect (finite size effect), in addition with the rutile Raman active modes of B{sub 1}g (143 cm{sup −1}), Eg (442 cm{sup −1}) and A{sub 1}g (607 cm{sup −1}). Further, the FTIR spectrum confirmed the presence of Ti-O-Ti bonding vibration. The Tauc plot showed the direct energy band gap nature of the film with the value of 2.9 eV.« less

  12. Evolution of structural and optical properties of rutile TiO2 thin films synthesized at room temperature by chemical bath deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayabadi, A. H.; Waman, V. S.; Kamble, M. M.; Ghosh, S. S.; Gabhale, B. B.; Rondiya, S. R.; Rokade, A. V.; Khadtare, S. S.; Sathe, V. G.; Pathan, H. M.; Gosavi, S. W.; Jadkar, S. R.

    2014-02-01

    Nanocrystalline thin films of TiO2 were prepared on glass substrates from an aqueous solution of TiCl3 and NH4OH at room temperature using the simple and cost-effective chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The influence of deposition time on structural, morphological and optical properties was systematically investigated. TiO2 transition from a mixed anatase-rutile phase to a pure rutile phase was revealed by low-angle XRD and Raman spectroscopy. Rutile phase formation was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that the multigrain structure of as-deposited TiO2 thin films was completely converted into semi-spherical nanoparticles. Optical studies showed that rutile thin films had a high absorption coefficient and a direct bandgap. The optical bandgap decreased slightly (3.29-3.07 eV) with increasing deposition time. The ease of deposition of rutile thin films at low temperature is useful for the fabrication of extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, and gas sensors.

  13. Effect of Annealing Temperature on Flowerlike Cu3BiS3 Thin Films Grown by Chemical Bath Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, S. G.; Patel, S. J.; Patel, K. K.; Panchal, A. K.; Kheraj, Vipul

    2017-10-01

    For widespread application of thin-film photovoltaic solar cells, synthesis of inexpensive absorber material is essential. In this work, deposition of ternary Cu3BiS3 absorber material, which contains abundant and environmentally benign elements, was carried out on glass substrate. Flowerlike Cu3BiS3 thin films with nanoflakes as building block were formed on glass substrate by chemical bath deposition. These films were annealed at 573 K and 673 K in sulfur ambient for structural improvement. Their structure was characterized using Raman spectroscopy, as well as their surface morphological and optical properties. The x-ray diffraction profile of as-deposited Cu3BiS3 thin film revealed amorphous structure, which transformed to orthorhombic phase after annealing. The Raman spectrum exhibited a characteristic peak at 290 cm-1. Scanning electron microscopy of as-deposited Cu3BiS3 film confirmed formation of nanoflowers with diameter of around 1052 nm. Wettability testing of as-deposited Cu3BiS3 thin film demonstrated hydrophobic nature, which became hydrophilic after annealing. The measured ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectra of the Cu3BiS3 thin films gave an absorption coefficient of 105 cm-1 and direct optical bandgap of about 1.42 eV after annealing treatment. Based on all these results, such Cu3BiS3 material may have potential applications in the photovoltaic field as an absorber layer.

  14. Incorporation of Mn2+ into CdSe quantum dots by chemical bath co-deposition method for photovoltaic enhancement of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenguang; Liu, Shaowen; Liu, Xingwei; Deng, Fei; Xiong, Yan; Tsai, Fang-Chang

    2018-03-01

    A photoelectric conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.9% was obtained under 100 mW cm -2 illumination by quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) using a CdS/Mn : CdSe sensitizer. CdS quantum dots (QDs) were deposited on a TiO 2 mesoporous oxide film by successive ionic layer absorption and reaction. Mn 2+ doping into CdSe QDs is an innovative and simple method-chemical bath co-deposition, that is, mixing the Mn ion source with CdSe precursor solution for Mn : CdSe QD deposition. Compared with the CdS/CdSe sensitizer without Mn 2+ incorporation, the PCE was increased from 3.4% to 4.9%. The effects of Mn 2+ doping on the chemical, physical and photovoltaic properties of the QDSSCs were investigated by energy dispersive spectrometry, absorption spectroscopy, photocurrent density-voltage characteristics and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Mn-doped CdSe QDs in QDSSCs can obtain superior light absorption, faster electron transport and slower charge recombination than CdSe QDs.

  15. Incorporation of Mn2+ into CdSe quantum dots by chemical bath co-deposition method for photovoltaic enhancement of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenguang; Liu, Shaowen; Liu, Xingwei; Deng, Fei

    2018-01-01

    A photoelectric conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.9% was obtained under 100 mW cm−2 illumination by quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) using a CdS/Mn : CdSe sensitizer. CdS quantum dots (QDs) were deposited on a TiO2 mesoporous oxide film by successive ionic layer absorption and reaction. Mn2+ doping into CdSe QDs is an innovative and simple method—chemical bath co-deposition, that is, mixing the Mn ion source with CdSe precursor solution for Mn : CdSe QD deposition. Compared with the CdS/CdSe sensitizer without Mn2+ incorporation, the PCE was increased from 3.4% to 4.9%. The effects of Mn2+ doping on the chemical, physical and photovoltaic properties of the QDSSCs were investigated by energy dispersive spectrometry, absorption spectroscopy, photocurrent density–voltage characteristics and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Mn-doped CdSe QDs in QDSSCs can obtain superior light absorption, faster electron transport and slower charge recombination than CdSe QDs. PMID:29657776

  16. Synthesis and Physical Properties Characterization of CdSe1-ySy Nanolayers Deposited by Chemical Bath Deposition at Low-Temperature Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Mena, J. E.; Contreras-Rascón, J. I.; Diaz-Reyes, J.; Castillo-Ojeda, R. S.

    In this work, we present the synthesis and structural and optical characterizations of CdSe1-y S y deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique on corning glass at a temperature of 20 ± 2 °C. The sulfur molar fraction was varied from 0 to 42.13 %, which was realized by varying the thiourea volume added to the growth solution in the range from 0 to 30 mL. The chemical stoichiometry was estimated by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The CdSe1-y S y showed hexagonal wurtzite crystalline phase that was found by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The average grain size range of the films was 1.48-1.68 nm that was determined using the Debye-Scherrer equation W(002) direction and was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Raman scattering shows that the lattice dynamics is characteristic of bimodal behavior and the multipeaks adjust to the first optical longitudinal mode for the CdSeS, in all cases, Raman spectra show two dominant vibrational bands about 208 and 415 cm-1 associated at CdSe-1LO-like and CdSe-2LO-like. CdSe1-y S y band gap energy can be varied from 1.86 to 2.16 eV by varying the thiourea volume added in growth solution in the investigated range obtained by transmittance measurements at room temperature. The room temperature photoluminescence shows a dominant radiation band at about 3.0 eV that can be associated with exciton bonded to donor impurity and the quantum confinement because of the grain size is less than the Bohr radius.

  17. Role of the conducting layer substrate on TiO2 nucleation when using microwave activated chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumeta, I.; Espinosa, R.; Ayllón, J. A.; Vigil, E.

    2002-12-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 is used in novel dye sensitized solar cells. Because of their interaction with light, thin TiO2 films are also used as coatings for self-cleaning glasses and tiles. Microwave activated chemical bath deposition represents a simple and cost-effective way to obtain nanostructured TiO2 films. It is important to study, in this technique, the role of the conducting layer used as the substrate. The influence of microwave-substrate interactions on TiO2 deposition is analysed using different substrate positions, employing substrates with different conductivities, and also using different microwave radiation powers for film deposition. We prove that a common domestic microwave oven with a large cavity and inhomogeneous radiation field can be used with equally satisfactory results. The transmittance spectra of the obtained films were studied and used to analyse film thickness and to obtain gap energy values. The results, regarding different indium-tin oxide resistivities and different substrate positions in the oven cavity, show that the interaction of the microwave field with the conducting layer is determinant in layer deposition. It has also been found that film thickness increases with the power of the applied radiation while the gap energies of the TiO2 films decrease approaching the 3.2 eV value reported for bulk anatase. This indicates that these films are not crystalline and it agrees with x-ray spectra that do not reveal any peak.

  18. Coercivity enhancement of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets by chemical bath deposition of TbCl{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shuai, E-mail: gshuai@nimte.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Ding, Guangfei

    2014-05-07

    The chemical bath deposition (CBD) and the grain boundary diffusion method were combined to diffuse the heavy rare earth for obtain the thick magnets with high coercivity and low heavy rare earth. The jet mill powders were soaked into the alcohol solution of 0.2 wt. % TbCl{sub 3}. A thin layer of TbCl{sub 3} was wrapped to the surface of (PrNd){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B powder particles. The coercivity of magnet is increased from 11.89 kOe to 14.72 kOe without significant reduction of remanence after grain boundary diffusion in the sintering and the annealing processes. The temperature coefficients of the remanence and themore » coercivity are improved by the substitution of PrNd by Tb in the surface of grains. The highly accelerated temperature/humidity stress test (HAST) results indicate that the CBD magnet has poor corrosion resistance, attributing to the present of Cl atoms in the grain boundaries.« less

  19. Chemical bath deposited (CBD) CuO thin films on n-silicon substrate for electronic and optical applications: Impact of growth time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Jenifar; Paul, Somdatta; Karmakar, Anupam; Yi, Ren; Dalapati, Goutam Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Sanatan

    2017-10-01

    Thin film of p-type cupric oxide (p-CuO) is grown on silicon (n-Si) substrate by using chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique and a precise control of thickness from 60 nm to 178 nm has been achieved. The structural properties and stoichiometric composition of the grown films are observed to depend significantly on the growth time. The chemical composition, optical properties, and structural quality are investigated in detail by employing XRD, ellipsometric measurements and SEM images. Also, the elemental composition and the oxidation states of Cu and O in the grown samples have been studied in detail by XPS measurements. Thin film of 110 nm thicknesses exhibited the best performance in terms of crystal quality, refractive index, dielectric constant, band-gap, and optical properties. The study suggests synthesis route for developing high quality CuO thin film using CBD method for electronic and optical applications.

  20. Structural and Optical Properties of Core-Shell TiO2/CdS Prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jawad, Selma M. H.

    2017-10-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanorod arrays (NRAs) sensitized with cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD). TiO2 NRAs were also obtained by using the same method on glass substrates coated with fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO). The structure of the FTO/TiO2/CdS core-shell was characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and photoelectrocatalysis of FTO/TiO2 and FTO/TiO2/CdS. The FTO/TiO2 conformed to anatase and rutile phase structures for different pH values and also with annealing. XRD patterns of the FTO/TiO2/CdS sample exhibited two peaks corresponding to hexagonal (100) and (101) for CdS. Scanning electron micrographs showed nanorod structures for the TiO2 thin films deposited at a pH value equal 0.7. Optical results showed the CdS deposited on nanorod TiO2 exhibited increased absorption ability in the visible light, indicating an increased photocatalytic activity for TiO2/CdS core-shell nanorods in the visible light. When illuminated with a UV-Vis light source, the TiO2/CdS core-shell films displayed high responses. A composite exists between the TiO2 nanostructure and CdS NPs because the film absorbs the incident light located in both the visible and UV-Vis regions. A higher response to UV-Vis light was attained with the use of TiO2 NRAs/CdS NPs films prepared by CBD. This approach offers a technique for fabricating photoelectrodes.

  1. On the sub-band gap optical absorption in heat treated cadmium sulphide thin film deposited on glass by chemical bath deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, P.; Karim, B.; Guha Roy, S.

    2013-12-01

    The sub-band gap optical absorption in chemical bath deposited cadmium sulphide thin films annealed at different temperatures has been critically analyzed with special reference to Urbach relation. It has been found that the absorption co-efficient of the material in the sub-band gap region is nearly constant up to a certain critical value of the photon energy. However, as the photon energy exceeds the critical value, the absorption coefficient increases exponentially indicating the dominance of Urbach rule. The absorption coefficients in the constant absorption region and the Urbach region have been found to be sensitive to annealing temperature. A critical examination of the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient indicates two different kinds of optical transitions to be operative in the sub-band gap region. After a careful analyses of SEM images, energy dispersive x-ray spectra, and the dc current-voltage characteristics, we conclude that the absorption spectra in the sub-band gap domain is possibly associated with optical transition processes involving deep levels and the grain boundary states of the material.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of photoconducting (Cd:Zn)S thin films by hydrothermal assisted chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Joissy; Devasia, Sebin; Anila, E. I.

    2018-04-01

    We report the synthesis of polycrystalline ternary (Cd:Zn)S thin films by hydrothermal assisted chemical bath deposition on glass substrates. X-ray diffraction reveals the hexagonal phase of cadmium zinc sulphide (CZS) film with preferred orientation along the (002) plane and the average grain size to be 22.78 nm. SEM image shows clusters of nano fibers grown on the film. The optical band gap obtained from the optical absorption studies using UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy is 3.4 eV. Broad and asymmetric emission due to the combination of near band edge emission and emission fromintrinsic point defects was observed in the PL spectrum. The filmexhibit photo conductivity under illumination by light from 32 watts halogen bulb. In dark condition, the I-V curve shows non-linear behavior, whereas ohmic behavior under illumination. The Photo response of film was recorded for the light-on and light-off conditions at intervals of 100 seconds when 10V voltage was applied. We observed fast rise and decay of the photocurrent depicting high photosensitivity. This work present a simple way to obtain photo-detectors and will benefit in optical-electron devices manufacture.

  3. Flexible low-cost infrared photodetector based on SnS thin film grown by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi, Mohamed S.; Ibrahim, K.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Kadhim, A.; Azzez, Shrook A.; Mustafa, Falah I.; Bououdina, M.

    2017-10-01

    A novel, flexible, and low-cost infrared (IR) SnS photodetector was fabricated onto a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by a simple approach based on chemical bath deposition. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed an orthorhombic structure, scanning electron microscopy observations revealed flower-like morphology, and UV-vis spectroscopy indicated a direct energy gap of 1.42 eV. The photodetector exhibited maximum responsivity at 850 nm under the illumination of a Hg (Xe) lamp. The photoresponse properties of the photodetector were determined under illumination of 850 nm at various bias voltages (3, 5 and 7 V). The photodetector manifested good sensitivity, excellent reproducibility and fast response time. Both rise/decay times measured at bias voltage of 3 V were determined: τ rise  =  0.38 s and τ decay  =  0.67 s. Additionally, the photoresponse versus different power density of illumination was also measured. The as-obtained results, highlighted that the newly fabricated SnS photodetector can be considered as a promising photoelectronic device that can be effectively used in the IR region due to its excellent photoresponce characteristics, low cost, flexibility, and non-toxicity.

  4. Chemically Deposited Thin-Film Solar Cell Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, R.; Junek, W.; Gorse, J.; Thompson, T.; Harris, J.; Hehemann, D.; Hepp, A.; Rybicki, G.

    2005-01-01

    We have been working on the development of thin film photovoltaic solar cell materials that can be produced entirely by wet chemical methods on low-cost flexible substrates. P-type copper indium diselenide (CIS) absorber layers have been deposited via electrochemical deposition. Similar techniques have also allowed us to incorporate both Ga and S into the CIS structure, in order to increase its optical bandgap. The ability to deposit similar absorber layers with a variety of bandgaps is essential to our efforts to develop a multi-junction thin-film solar cell. Chemical bath deposition methods were used to deposit a cadmium sulfide (CdS) buffer layers on our CIS-based absorber layers. Window contacts were made to these CdS/CIS junctions by the electrodeposition of zinc oxide (ZnO). Structural and elemental determinations of the individual ZnO, CdS and CIS-based films via transmission spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy will be presented. The electrical characterization of the resulting devices will be discussed.

  5. Characterization of honeycomb-like "β-Ni(OH) 2" thin films synthesized by chemical bath deposition method and their supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, U. M.; Gurav, K. V.; Fulari, V. J.; Lokhande, C. D.; Joo, Oh Shim

    Nanostructured nickel hydroxide thin films are synthesized via a simple chemical bath deposition (CBD) method using nickel nitrate Ni(NO 3) 2 as the starting material. The deposition process is based on the thermal decomposition of ammonia-complexed nickel ions at 333 K. The structural, surface morphological, optical, electrical and electrochemical properties of the films are examined. The nanocrystalline "β" phase of Ni(OH) 2 is confirmed by the X-ray diffraction analysis. Scanning electron microscopy reveals a macroporous and interconnected honeycomb-like morphology. Optical absorption studies show that "β-Ni(OH) 2" has a wide optical band-gap of 3.95 eV. The negative temperature coefficient of the electrical resistance of "β-Ni(OH) 2", is attributed to the semiconducting nature of the material. The electrochemical properties of "β-Ni(OH) 2" in KOH electrolyte are examined by cyclic voltammetric (CV) measurements. The scan-rate dependent voltammograms demonstrate pseudocapacitive behaviour when "β-Ni(OH) 2" is employed as a working electrode in a three-electrode electrochemical cell containing 2 M KOH electrolyte with a platinum counter electrode and a saturated calomel reference electrodes. A specific capacitance of ∼398 × 10 3 F kg -1 is obtained.

  6. Synthesis of Nanocrystalline SnOx (x = 1–2) Thin Film Using a Chemical Bath Deposition Method with Improved Deposition Time, Temperature and pH

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimiasl, Saeideh; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan; Kassim, Anuar; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystalline SnOx (x = 1–2) thin films were prepared on glass substrates by a simple chemical bath deposition method. Triethanolamine was used as complexing agent to decrease time and temperature of deposition and shift the pH of the solution to the noncorrosive region. The films were characterized for composition, surface morphology, structure and optical properties. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that SnOx thin films consist of a polycrystalline structure with an average grain size of 36 nm. Atomic force microscopy studies show a uniform grain distribution without pinholes. The elemental composition was evaluated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average O/Sn atomic percentage ratio is 1.72. Band gap energy and optical transition were determined from optical absorbance data. The film was found to exhibit direct and indirect transitions in the visible spectrum with band gap values of about 3.9 and 3.7 eV, respectively. The optical transmittance in the visible region is 82%. The SnOx nanocrystals exhibit an ultraviolet emission band centered at 392 nm in the vicinity of the band edge, which is attributed to the well-known exciton transition in SnOx. Photosensitivity was detected in the positive region under illumination with white light. PMID:22163690

  7. Influence of a NiO intermediate layer on the properties of ZnO grown on Si by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djiokap, S. R. Tankio; Urgessa, Z. N.; Mbulanga, C. M.; Boumenou, C. Kameni; Venter, A.; Botha, J. R.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the growth of ZnO nanorods on bare and NiO-coated p-Si substrates is reported. A two-step chemical bath deposition process has been used to grow the nanorods. X-ray diffraction and scanning probe microscopy confirmed that the NiO films were polycrystalline, and that the average grain size correlated with the NiO layer thickness. The ZnO nanorod morphology, orientation and optical properties seemed to be unaffected by the intermediate NiO layer thickness. Current-voltage measurements confirmed the rectifying behavior of all the ZnO/NiO/Si heterostructures. The inclusion of a NiO layer between the substrate and the ZnO nanorods are shown to cause a reduction in both the forward and reverse bias currents. This is in qualitative agreement with the band diagram of these heterostructures, which suggests that the intermediate NiO layer should act as an electron blocking layer.

  8. Spray-Pyrolyzed Three-Dimensional CuInS2 Solar Cells on Nanocrystalline-Titania Electrodes with Chemical-Bath-Deposited Inx(OH)ySz Buffer Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duy-Cuong; Mikami, Yuki; Tsujimoto, Kazuki; Ryo, Toshihiro; Ito, Seigo

    2012-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) compound solar cells with the structure of have been fabricated by spray pyrolysis deposition of CuInS2 and chemical-bath deposition of Inx(OH)ySz for the light absorber and buffer layer, respectively. The effect of deposition and annealing conditions of Inx(OH)ySz on the photovoltaic properties of 3D CuInS2 solar cells was investigated. Inx(OH)ySz annealed in air ambient showed a better cell performance than those annealed in nitrogen ambient and without annealing. The improvement of the performance of cells with Inx(OH)ySz buffer layers annealed in air ambient is due to the increase in oxide concentration in the buffer layers [confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement]. Among cells with Inx(OH)ySz buffer layers deposited for 1, 1.5, 1.75, and 2 h, that with Inx(OH)ySz deposited for 1.75 h showed the best cell performance. The best cell performance was observed for Inx(OH)ySz deposited for 1.75 h with annealing at 300 °C for 30 min in air ambient, and cell parameters were 22 mA cm-2 short-circuit photocurrent density, 0.41 V open-circuit voltage, 0.35 fill factor, and 3.2% conversion efficiency.

  9. A hetero-homogeneous investigation of chemical bath deposited Ga-doped ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhsha, Amir Hosein; Abdizadeh, Hossein; Pourshaban, Erfan; Golobostanfard, Mohammad Reza

    2018-01-01

    One-dimensional nanostructures of zinc oxide (ZnO) have been in the center of attention, mostly for electronic applications due to their distinctive properties such as high electron mobility (100 cm2V-1s-1) and crystallinity. Thanks to its high density of vacancies and interstitial sites, wurtzite lattice of ZnO is a suitable host for gallium (Ga) as a dopant element. Herein, ZnO nanorod arrays (NRAs) are synthesized by a low-temperature chemical bath deposition (CBD) method with various concentrations of gallium nitrate hydrate as a dopant precursor. Structural and morphological analyses confirm that optimum properties of gallium-doped ZnO (GZO) are obtained at 1% (Ga to Zn molar ratio). Owing to the replacement of smaller Ga3+ ions with Zn2+ ions in the GZO structure, a slight shift of (002) peak to higher angles could be observed in XRD pattern of GZO NRAs. The scanning electron microscope images demonstrate a proliferation in the ZnO NRAs length from 650 nm for undoped ZnO (UZO) to 1200 nm for GZO-1%. However, increasing the dopant concentration above 2.5% results in formation of homogeneous zinc gallium oxide in the bulk solution, which is a sign of inefficient process of doping in GZO NRAs. Furthermore, photoluminescence spectroscopy is used to characterize the band-gap variation of the samples, which demonstrates a small red-shift in the UV emission peak and a decrease in visible emission peak intensity with introducing Ga in ZnO lattice. Lower resistivity for GZO-1% (1.1 MΩ) sample compared to UZO (1.4 MΩ) is recorded, which is compelling evidence for the presence of Ga3+ in ZnO lattice. The results suggest that incorporating Ga into ZnO lattice using CBD method is an easy and effective technique to improve the electrical properties of ZnO NRAs that is an essential factor for a broad range of devices.

  10. High-throughput combinatorial chemical bath deposition: The case of doping Cu (In, Ga) Se film with antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zongkai; Zhang, Xiaokun; Li, Guang; Cui, Yuxing; Jiang, Zhaolian; Liu, Wen; Peng, Zhi; Xiang, Yong

    2018-01-01

    The conventional methods for designing and preparing thin film based on wet process remain a challenge due to disadvantages such as time-consuming and ineffective, which hinders the development of novel materials. Herein, we present a high-throughput combinatorial technique for continuous thin film preparation relied on chemical bath deposition (CBD). The method is ideally used to prepare high-throughput combinatorial material library with low decomposition temperatures and high water- or oxygen-sensitivity at relatively high-temperature. To check this system, a Cu(In, Ga)Se (CIGS) thin films library doped with 0-19.04 at.% of antimony (Sb) was taken as an example to evaluate the regulation of varying Sb doping concentration on the grain growth, structure, morphology and electrical properties of CIGS thin film systemically. Combined with the Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), automated X-ray Diffraction (XRD) for rapid screening and Localized Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (LEIS), it was confirmed that this combinatorial high-throughput system could be used to identify the composition with the optimal grain orientation growth, microstructure and electrical properties systematically, through accurately monitoring the doping content and material composition. According to the characterization results, a Sb2Se3 quasi-liquid phase promoted CIGS film-growth model has been put forward. In addition to CIGS thin film reported here, the combinatorial CBD also could be applied to the high-throughput screening of other sulfide thin film material systems.

  11. Chemical surface deposition of ultra-thin semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    McCandless, Brian E.; Shafarman, William N.

    2003-03-25

    A chemical surface deposition process for forming an ultra-thin semiconducting film of Group IIB-VIA compounds onto a substrate. This process eliminates particulates formed by homogeneous reactions in bath, dramatically increases the utilization of Group IIB species, and results in the formation of a dense, adherent film for thin film solar cells. The process involves applying a pre-mixed liquid coating composition containing Group IIB and Group VIA ionic species onto a preheated substrate. Heat from the substrate causes a heterogeneous reaction between the Group IIB and VIA ionic species of the liquid coating composition, thus forming a solid reaction product film on the substrate surface.

  12. Multi-phase structures of boron-doped copper tin sulfide nanoparticles synthesized by chemical bath deposition for optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakspun, Jariya; Kantip, Nathakan; Vailikhit, Veeramol; Choopun, Supab; Tubtimtae, Auttasit

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the influence of boron doping on the structural, optical, and electrical properties of copper tin sulfide (CTS) nanoparticles coated on a WO3 surface and synthesized using chemical bath deposition. Boron doping at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 wt% was investigated. The X-ray diffraction pattern of CTS showed the presence of monoclinic Cu2Sn3S7, cubic Cu2SnS3, and orthorhombic Cu4SnS4. Boron doping influenced the preferred orientation of the nanoparticles for all phase structures and produced a lattice strain effect and changes in the dislocation density. Increasing the concentration of boron in CTS from 0.5 wt% to 2.0 wt% reduced the band gap for all phases of CTS from 1.46 to 1.29 eV and reduced the optical transmittance. Optical constants, such as the refractive index, extinction coefficient, and dissipation factor, were also obtained for B-doped CTS. The dispersion behavior of the refractive index was investigated in terms of a single oscillator model and the physical parameters were determined. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the successful synthesis of CTS nanoparticles. Cyclic voltammetry indicated that optimum boron doping (<1.5 wt% for all phases) resulted in desirable p-n junction behavior for optoelectronic applications.

  13. Effect of band-aligned double absorber layers on photovoltaic characteristics of chemical bath deposited PbS/CdS thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ho Yeon, Deuk; Chandra Mohanty, Bhaskar; Lee, Seung Min; Soo Cho, Yong

    2015-09-23

    Here we report the highest energy conversion efficiency and good stability of PbS thin film-based depleted heterojunction solar cells, not involving PbS quantum dots. The PbS thin films were grown by the low cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) process at relatively low temperatures. Compared to the quantum dot solar cells which require critical and multistep complex procedures for surface passivation, the present approach, leveraging the facile modulation of the optoelectronic properties of the PbS films by the CBD process, offers a simpler route for optimization of PbS-based solar cells. Through an architectural modification, wherein two band-aligned junctions are stacked without any intervening layers, an enhancement of conversion efficiency by as much as 30% from 3.10 to 4.03% facilitated by absorption of a wider range of solar spectrum has been obtained. As an added advantage of the low band gap PbS stacked over a wide gap PbS, the devices show stability over a period of 10 days.

  14. The study of metal sulphide nanomaterials obtained by chemical bath deposition and hot-injection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraeva, E. V.; Alexandrova, O. A.; Forostyanaya, N. A.; Levitskiy, V. S.; Mazing, D. S.; Maskaeva, L. N.; Markov, V. Ph; Moshnikov, V. A.; Shupta, A. A.; Spivak, Yu M.; Tulenin, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this study lead sulphide - cadmium sulphide based layers were obtained through chemical deposition of water solutions and cadmium sulphide quantum dots were formed through hot-injection technique. The article discusses the results of surface investigations with the use of atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements.

  15. Effective properties of undoped and Indium3+-doped tin manganese telluride (Sn1 - xMnxTe) nanoparticles via using a chemical bath deposition route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon-on, Patsorn; Tubtimtae, Auttasit; Vailikhit, Veeramol; Teesetsopon, Pichanan; Choopun, Supab

    2017-06-01

    Tin manganese telluride nanoparticles (Sn1-xMnxTe NPs) were first synthesized on a niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5) film using a chemical bath deposition (CBD) route. An individual particle size before and after indium (In3+) doping of ∼70-150 nm was investigated with stoichiometric formation of the SnMnTe phase. Furthermore, a cubic or rocksalt structure of the Sn0.938Mn0.062Te phase was also kept incorporated in the structure. The plotted energy band gaps for undoped and In3+-doped samples were 2.17 and 1.83 eV, respectively. The reduction of photoluminescence (PL) spectra after In3+ doping, while the indium dopant acted as a trap state incorporated in Sn1-xMnxTe NPs, showed enhanced charge separation and reduced charge recombination, which resulted in a higher charge density trapped in the conduction band of Nb2O5 and was also confirmed by the result of anodic peaks in the cyclic voltammetry. These results suggest new possibilities in optoelectronic and electrochemical devices.

  16. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of lead sulphide thin films from ethanolamine (ETA) complexing agent chemical bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashaw Hone, Fekadu; Dejene, F. B.

    2018-02-01

    Polycrystalline lead sulphide (PbS) thin films were grown on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition route using ethanolamine (ETA) as a complexing agent. The effects of ETA molar concentration on the structural, morphological, electrical and optical properties of lead sulphide thin films were thoroughly studied. The XRD analyses revealed that all the deposited thin films were face center cubic crystal structure and their preferred orientations were varied along the (111) and (200) planes. The XRD results further confirmed that ETA concentration had a significant effects on the strain, average crystalline size and dislocation density of the deposited thin films. The SEM studies illustrated the evolution and transformation of surface morphology as ETA molar concentration increased from 0.41 M to 1.64 M. The energy dispersive x-ray analysis was used to verify the compositional elements of the deposited thin films. Optical spectroscopy investigation established that the band gap of the PbS thin films were reduced from 0.98 eV to 0.68 eV as ETA concentration increased. The photoluminescence spectra showed a well defined peak at 428 nm and shoulder around 468 nm for all PbS thin films. The electrical resistivity of the thin films found in the order of 103 Ω cm at room temperature and decreased as the ETA molar concentration was increased.

  18. Quantitative study on the chemical solution deposition of zinc oxysulfide

    DOE PAGES

    Reinisch, Michael; Perkins, Craig L.; Steirer, K. Xerxes

    2015-11-21

    Zinc Oxysulfide (ZnOS) has demonstrated potential in the last decade to replace CdS as a buffer layer material since it is a wide-band-gap semiconductor with performance advantages over CdS (E g = 2.4 eV) in the near UV-range for solar energy conversion. However, questions remain on the growth mechanisms of chemical bath deposited ZnOS. In this study, a detailed model is employed to calculate solubility diagrams that describe simple conditions for complex speciation control using only ammonium hydroxide without additional base. For these conditions, ZnOS is deposited via aqueous solution deposition on a quartz crystal microbalance in a continuous flowmore » cell. Data is used to analyze the growth rate dependence on temperature and also to elucidate the effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) when used as a co-solvent. Activation energies (EA) of ZnOS are calculated for different flow rates and solution compositions. As a result, the measured EA relationships are affected by changes in the primary growth mechanism when DMSO is included.« less

  19. Preparation and characterization of copper telluride thin films by modified chemical bath deposition (M-CBD) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathan, H. M.; Lokhande, C. D.; Amalnerkar, D. P.; Seth, T.

    2003-09-01

    Copper telluride thin films were deposited using modified chemical method using copper(II) sulphate; pentahydrate [CuSO 4·5H 2O] and sodium tellurite [Na 2TeO 3] as cationic and anionic sources, respectively. Modified chemical method is based on the immersion of the substrate into separately placed cationic and anionic precursors. The preparative conditions such as concentration, pH, immersion time, immersion cycles, etc. were optimized to get good quality copper telluride thin films at room temperature. The films have been characterized for structural, compositional, optical and electrical transport properties by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), optical absorption/transmission, electrical resistivity and thermoemf measurement techniques.

  20. Room temperature chemical bath deposition of cadmium selenide, cadmium sulfide and cadmium sulfoselenide thin films with novel nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderHyde, Cephas A.; Sartale, S. D.; Patil, Jayant M.; Ghoderao, Karuna P.; Sawant, Jitendra P.; Kale, Rohidas B.

    2015-10-01

    A simple, convenient and low cost chemical synthesis route has been used to deposit nanostructured cadmium sulfide, selenide and sulfoselenide thin films at room temperature. The films were deposited on glass substrates, using cadmium acetate as cadmium ion and sodium selenosulfate/thiourea as a selenium/sulfur ion sources. Aqueous ammonia was used as a complex reagent and also to adjust the pH of the final solution. The as-deposited films were uniform, well adherent to the glass substrate, specularly reflective and red/yellow in color depending on selenium and sulfur composition. The X-ray diffraction pattern of deposited cadmium selenide thin film revealed the nanocrystalline nature with cubic phase; cadmium sulfide revealed mixture of cubic along with hexagonal phase and cadmium sulfoselenide thin film were grown with purely hexagonal phase. The morphological observations revealed the growth and formation of interesting one, two and three-dimensional nanostructures. The band gap of thin films was calculated and the results are reported.

  1. Preparation and characterization of ZnS thin films by the chemical bath deposition method (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Shizutoshi; Iwashita, Taisuke

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, the conversion efficiency of Cu(In・Ga)Se2 (CIGS)-based solar cell already reached over 20%. CdS thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method are used for CIGS-based thin film solar cells as the buffer layer. Over the past several years, a considerable number of studies have been conducted on ZnS buffer layer prepared by CBD in order to improve in conversion efficiency of CIGS-based solar cells. In addition, application to CIGS-based solar cell of ZnS buffer layer is expected as an eco-friendly solar cell by cadmium-free. However, it was found that ZnS thin films prepared by CBD included ZnO or Zn(OH)2 as different phase [1]. Nakata et. al reported that the conversion efficiency of CIGS-based solar cell using ZnS buffer layer (CBD-ZnS/CIGS) reached over 18% [2]. The problem which we have to consider next is improvement in crystallinity of ZnS thin films prepared by CBD. In this work, we prepared ZnS thin films on quarts (Si02) and SnO2/glass substrates by CBD with the self-catalysis growth process in order to improve crystallinity and quality of CBD-ZnS thin films. The solution to use for CBD were prepared by mixture of 0.2M ZnI2 or ZnSO4, 0.6M (NH2)2CS and 8.0M NH3 aq. In the first, we prepared the particles of ZnS on Si02 or SnO2/glass substrates by CBD at 80° for 20 min as initial nucleus (1st step ). After that, the particles of ZnS on Si02 or SnO2/glass substrates grew up to be ZnS thin films by CBD method at 80° for 40 min again (2nd step). We found that the surface of ZnS thin films by CBD with the self-catalyst growth process was flat and smooth. Consequently, we concluded that the CBD technique with self-catalyst growth process in order to prepare the particles of ZnS as initial nucleus layer was useful for improvement of crystallinity of ZnS thin films on SnO2/glass. [1] J.Vidal et,al., Thin Solid Films 419 (2002) 118. [2] T.Nakata et.al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 41(2B), L165-L167 (2002)

  2. Zn-Mn alloy coatings from acidic chloride bath: Effect of deposition conditions on the Zn-Mn electrodeposition-morphological and structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukil, N.; Feki, M.

    2017-07-01

    Zn-Mn alloy electrodeposition on steel electrode in chloride bath was investigated using cyclic voltammetric, chronopotentiometric and chronoamperometric techniques. Cyclic voltammetries (CV) reveal a deep understanding of electrochemical behaviors of each metal Zn, Mn, proton discharge and Zn-Mn co-deposition. The electrochemical results show that with increasing Mn2+ ions concentration in the electrolytic bath, Mn2+ reduction occurs at lower over-potential leading to an enhancement of Mn content into the Zn-Mn deposits. A dimensionless graph model was used to analyze the effect of Mn2+ ions concentration on Zn-Mn nucleation process. It was found that the nucleation process is not extremely affected by Mn2+ concentration. Nevertheless, it significantly depends on the applied potential. Several parameters such as Mn2+ ions concentration, current density and stirring were investigated with regard to the Mn content into the final Zn-Mn coatings. It was found that the Mn content increases with increasing the applied current density jimp and Mn2+ ions concentration in the electrolytic bath. However, stirring of the solution decreases the Mn content in the Zn-Mn coatings. The phase structure and surface morphology of Zn-Mn deposits are characterized by means of X-ray diffraction analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), respectively. The Zn-Mn deposited at low current density is tri-phasic and consisting of η-Zn, ζ-MnZn13 and hexagonal close packed ε-Zn-Mn. An increase in current density leads to a transition from crystalline to amorphous structure, arising from the hydroxide inclusions in the Zn-Mn coating at high current density.

  3. Bath for electrolytic reduction of alumina and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-11-26

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises a molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: (a) AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and (b) about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound may be, for example, a fluoride, oxide, or carbonate. The metal can be nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath can be employed in a combination that includes a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the bath of the present invention during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum can improve the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode. Removing sulfur from the bath can also minimize cathode deposits. Aluminum formed on the cathode can be removed directly from the cathode.

  4. Influence of Annealing Temperature on Some Optical and Structural Properties of Cu2ZnSnS4 Deposited by CZT Co-Electrodeposition Coupled with Chemical Bath Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoth, Obila Jorim; Domtau, Dinfa Luka; Marina, Mukabi; John, Onyatta; Awuor, Ogacho Alex

    Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) is currently most efficient thin film solar technology in use but it is faced with problems of material scarcity and toxicity. An alternative earth abundant and non-toxic materials consisting of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) have been investigated as a replacement for CIGS. In this work, CZTS thin films deposited by low cost co-electrodeposition, at a potential of -1.2V, coupled with chemical bath techniques at room temperature and then annealed under sulphur rich atmosphere were investigated. CZTS thin film quality determination was carried out using Raman spectroscopy which confirmed formation of quality CZTS film, main Raman peaks at 288cm-1 and 338cm-1 were observed. Electrical characterization was carried out using four-point probe instrument and the resistivity was in the order of ˜10-4Ω-cm. The optical characterization was done using UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer. The bandgaps of the annealed CZTS film ranged from 1.45 to 1.94eV with absorption coefficient of order ˜104cm-1 in the visible and near infrared range of the solar spectrum were observed.

  5. Influence of processing conditions on the optical properties of chemically deposited zinc sulphide (ZnS) thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igweoko, A. E.; Augustine, C.; Idenyi, N. E.; Okorie, B. A.; Anyaegbunam, F. N. C.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we present the influence of post deposition annealing and varying concentration on the optical properties of ZnS thin films fabricated by chemical bath deposition (CBD) at 65 °C from chemical baths comprising NH3/SC(NH2)2/ZnSO4 solutions at pH of about 10. The film samples were annealed at temperatures ranging from 373 K–473 K and the concentration of the film samples vary from 0.1 M–0.7 M. Post deposition annealing and concentration played an important role on the optical parameters investigated which includes absorbance, transmittance, reflectance, absorption coefficient, band gap, refractive index and extinction coefficient. The optical parameters were found to vary with post deposition annealing in one direction and concentration of Zn2+ in the reverse direction. For instance, post deposition annealing increases the band gap from 3.65 eV for as-deposited to 3.70 eV, 3.75 eV and 3.85 eV for annealed at 373 K, 423 K and 473 K respectively whereas concentration of Zn2+ decreases the band gap from 3.95 eV at 0.1 M to 3.90 eV, 3.85 eV and 3.80 eV at 0.3 M, 0.5 M and 0.7 M respectively. The fundamental absorption edge of ZnS thin films shifted toward the highest photon energies (blue shift) after annealing and shifted toward the lowest photon energies (red shift) with increasing Zn ions concentration. A linear relation between band gap energy and Urbach energy was found. After annealing, the Urbach energy increases form 3.10 eV to 3.50 eV and decreases from 3.40 eV to 3.10 eV at varying Zn2+ concentration. The property of wide band gap makes ZnS suitable for buffer layer of film solar cells, permitting more light especially the short wavelength light into absorber layer.

  6. Effect of Aluminum Doping on the Nanocrystalline ZnS:Al3+ Films Fabricated on Heavily-Doped p-type Si(100) Substrates by Chemical Bath Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, He-Jie; Liang, Yan; Gao, Xiao-Yong; Guo, Rui-Fang; Ji, Qiang-Min

    2015-06-01

    Intrinsic ZnS and aluminum-doped nanocrystalline ZnS (ZnS:Al3+) films with zinc-blende structure were fabricated on heavily-doped p-type Si(100) substrates by chemical bath deposition method. Influence of aluminum doping on the microstructure, and photoluminescent and electrical properties of the films, were intensively investigated. The average crystallite size of the films varying in the range of about 9.0 ˜ 35.0 nm initially increases and then decreases with aluminum doping contents, indicating that the crystallization of the films are initially enhanced and then weakened. The incorporation of Al3+ was confirmed from energy dispersive spectrometry and the induced microstrain in the films. Strong and stable visible emission band resulting from the defect-related light emission were observed for the intrinsic ZnS and ZnS:Al3+ films at room temperature. The photoluminescence related to the aluminum can annihilate due to the self-absorption of ZnS:Al3+ when the Al3+ content surpasses certain value. The variation of the resistivity of the films that initially reduces and then increases is mainly caused by the partial substitute for Zn2+ by Al3+ as well as the enhanced crystallization, and by the enhanced crystal boundary scattering, respectively.

  7. Electroless deposition of Ni Cu P alloy and study of the influences of some parameters on the properties of deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Dolati, H.; Parvini-Ahmadi, N.; Manzoori, J.

    2002-01-01

    Cupronickel alloys are known for their excellent corrosion resistance, especially in marine atmosphere. The development of an appropriate electroless bath involves the use of a reducing agent, complexing and stabilizing compounds and metallic salts. In this work, autocatalytic deposition of Ni-Cu-P alloys (28-95 wt.% Ni, 66-0 wt.% Cu, 7.5-3 wt.% P) has been carried out on 302 b steel sheets from bath containing: NiCl 2·6H 2O, CuCl 2·2H 2O, NaH 2PO 2, Na citrate, sulphosalicilic acid and triethanolamine. The effects of pH, temperature, and bath composition on the hardness and the composition of deposits have been studied. In addition, the deposition rates of alloy, nickel, copper and phosphorus were investigated and optimum conditions were obtained. The average rate of alloy deposition was 9 mg cm -2 h -1 and the optimum pH and temperature were 8.5 and 80 °C, respectively. The chemical stability of bath was desirable, and no spontaneous decomposition occurred. The changes in the structure of deposit by heat treatment were studied by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The XRD patterns indicate that the copper content affects the structure changes. With increasing copper content, the phosphorus content decreased and the crystallinity of the deposits grew. After heat treatment of alloys with lower copper content at 400 °C for 1 h, the crystallization to Ni 3P was observed.

  8. Modeling the transport of organic chemicals between polyethylene passive samplers and water in finite and infinite bath conditions.

    PubMed

    Tcaciuc, A Patricia; Apell, Jennifer N; Gschwend, Philip M

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the transfer of chemicals between passive samplers and water is essential for their use as monitoring devices of organic contaminants in surface waters. By applying Fick's second law to diffusion through the polymer and an aqueous boundary layer, the authors derived a mathematical model for the uptake of chemicals into a passive sampler from water, in finite and infinite bath conditions. The finite bath model performed well when applied to laboratory observations of sorption into polyethylene (PE) sheets for various chemicals (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane [DDT]) and at varying turbulence levels. The authors used the infinite bath model to infer fractional equilibration of PCB and DDT analytes in field-deployed PE, and the results were nearly identical to those obtained using the sampling rate model. However, further comparison of the model and the sampling rate model revealed that the exchange of chemicals was inconsistent with the sampling rate model for partially or fully membrane-controlled transfer, which would be expected in turbulent conditions or when targeting compounds with small polymer diffusivities and small partition coefficients (e.g., phenols, some pesticides, and others). The model can be applied to other polymers besides PE as well as other chemicals and in any transfer regime (membrane, mixed, or water boundary layer-controlled). Lastly, the authors illustrate practical applications of this model such as improving passive sampler design and understanding the kinetics of passive dosing experiments. © 2015 SETAC.

  9. Chemical Safety: Molten Salt Baths Cited as Lab Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Rudy

    1982-01-01

    Discusses danger of explosions with molten salts baths, commonly used as heat-transfer media. One such explosion involved use of a bath containing 3-lb sodium nitrite and 1-lb potassium thiocyanate. Although most commercially available mixtures for heat transfer contain oxidizers, a reducer (thiocyanate) was included which possibly triggered the…

  10. What controls deposition rate in electron-beam chemical vapor deposition?

    PubMed

    White, William B; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2006-08-25

    The key physical processes governing electron-beam-assisted chemical vapor deposition are analyzed via a combination of theoretical modeling and supporting experiments. The scaling laws that define growth of the nanoscale deposits are developed and verified using carefully designed experiments of carbon deposition from methane onto a silicon substrate. The results suggest that the chamber-scale continuous transport of the precursor gas is the rate controlling process in electron-beam chemical vapor deposition.

  11. Hydrodynamic and Chemical Modeling of a Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor for Zirconia Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, T.; Gavillet, J.; Czerwiec, T.; Ablitzer, D.; Michel, H.

    1997-09-01

    Zirconia is deposited on cylindrical substrates by flowing post-discharge enhanced chemical vapor deposition. In this paper, a two dimensional hydrodynamic and chemical modeling of the reactor is described for given plasma characteristics. It helps in determining rate constants of the synthesis reaction of zirconia in gas phase and on the substrate which is ZrCl4 hydrolysis. Calculated deposition rate profiles are obtained by modeling under various conditions and fits with a satisfying accuracy the experimental results. The role of transport processes and the mixing conditions of excited gases with remaining ones are studied. Gas phase reaction influence on the growth rate is also discussed.

  12. Diffusion mechanism in molten salt baths during the production of carbide coatings via thermal reactive diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadi, Aliakbar; Saghafian, Hassan; Soltanieh, Mansour; Yang, Zhi-gang

    2017-12-01

    The diffusion mechanism of carbide-forming elements from a molten salt bath to a substrate surface was studied in this research, with particular focus on the processes occurring in the molten bath at the time of coating. Metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths were investigated, and the coating process was performed on H13 steel substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and electron-probe microanalysis were used to study the coated samples and the quenched salt bath. The thickness of the carbide coating layer was 6.5 ± 0.5, 5.2 ± 0.5, or 5.7 ± 0.5 μm depending on whether it was deposited in a metal, oxide, or metal-oxide bath, respectively. The phase distribution of vanadium-rich regions was 63%, 57%, and 74% of the total coating deposited in metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths, respectively. The results obtained using the metal bath indicated that undissolved suspended metal particles deposited onto the substrate surface. Then, carbon subsequently diffused to the substrate surface and reacted with the metal particles to form the carbides. In the oxide bath, oxide powders dissolved in the bath with or without binding to the oxidative structure (Na2O) of borax; they were then reduced by aluminum and converted into metal particles. We concluded that, in the metal and oxide baths, the deposition of metal particles onto the sample surface is an important step in the formation of the coating.

  13. Investigation on growth, structural, optical, electrical and X-ray sensing properties of chemically deposited zinc bismuth sulfide (ZnxBi2‑xS3) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabarish, R.; Suriyanarayanan, N.; Kalita, J. M.; Sarma, M. P.; Wary, G.

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, ZnxBi2‑xS3 films were synthesized (x = 0.2 M) by a chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique at different bath temperatures (60 °C, 70 °C and 80 °C). The role of bath temperature on the formation of the films has been examined. The crystalline nature, structural parameters and surface morphology of the films were ascertained using x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) respectively. These studies confirmed the formation of crystalline Zn0.2Bi1.8S3 films with uniform distribution of homogenous grains. The characterization results revealed that the film deposited at 70 °C has the good crystalline quality than the films deposited at 60 and 80 °C. Further, the optical absorption spectra showed that the bandgap (E g ) of the film deposited at 70 °C was about 2.39 eV which was found to be less than the same film deposited at 60 and 80 °C. The Current-Voltage (I-V) characteristics of all the films were measured under dark condition. This showed that the electrical conductivity of the film deposited at 70 °C was 1.61 × 10‑5 S cm‑1 which is ten times higher than other films. Further, the I-V characteristics of the film deposited at 70 °C was studied under x-ray radiation. The current under the x-ray radiation was significantly higher compared to the dark current. The x-ray detection sensitivity of the film was found to be maximum at 0.7 V and gradually decreases with increase of bias voltage. This analysis reveals that the film deposited at 70 °C can be used as an x-ray sensor.

  14. ELECTRO-DEPOSITION OF NICKEL ALLOYS FROM THE PYROPHOSPHATE BATH: NICKEL- ZINC AND NICKEL-MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Panikkar, S.K.; Char, T.L.R.

    1958-02-01

    Results of studies on the electrodeposition of nickel-zinc and nickel-- molybdenum alloys in a pyrophosphate bath using platinium electrodes are presented. The fects of varying current density and metal contents of the electrolyte on alloy deposit composition, cathode efficiency, and cathode potential are presented in tabular form. (J.R.D.) l2432 A study was made of the effect of homogenization on the mechanical properties of solution-treated and aged aluminum and the quantitative effects of several variables on hardness. The effect of alloying elements on the increase in hardness of aluminum is shown. (J.E.D.)

  15. Elucidating doping driven microstructure evolution and optical properties of lead sulfide thin films grown from a chemical bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Bhaskar Chandra; Bector, Keerti; Laha, Ranjit

    2018-03-01

    Doping driven remarkable microstructural evolution of PbS thin films grown by a single-step chemical bath deposition process at 60 °C is reported. The undoped films were discontinuous with octahedral-shaped crystallites after 30 min of deposition, whereas Cu doping led to a distinctly different surface microstructure characterized by densely packed elongated crystallites. A mechanism, based on the time sequence study of microstructural evolution of the films, and detailed XRD and Raman measurements, has been proposed to explain the contrasting microstructure of the doped films. The incorporation of Cu forms an interface layer, which is devoid of Pb. The excess Cu ions in this interface layer at the initial stages of film growth strongly interact and selectively stabilize the charged {111} faces containing either Pb or S compared to the uncharged {100} faces that contain both Pb and S. This interaction interferes with the natural growth habit resulting in the observed surface features of the doped films. Concurrently, the Cu-doping potentially changed the optical properties of the films: A significant widening of the bandgap from 1.52 eV to 1.74 eV for increase in Cu concentration from 0 to 20% was observed, making it a highly potential absorber layer in thin film solar cells.

  16. Chemical-Vapor Deposition Of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Ren, J.; Zaghi, F.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments in chemical-vapor deposition of silicon carbide by pyrolysis of dimethyldichlorosilane in hydrogen and argon carrier gases. Directed toward understanding chemical-kinetic and mass-transport phenomena affecting infiltration of reactants into, and deposition of SiC upon, fabrics. Part of continuing effort to develop method of efficient and more nearly uniform deposition of silicon carbide matrix throughout fabric piles to make improved fabric/SiC-matrix composite materials.

  17. Chemical Bath Deposition of p-Type Transparent, Highly Conducting (CuS)x:(ZnS)1-x Nanocomposite Thin Films and Fabrication of Si Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojie; Bullock, James; Schelhas, Laura T; Stutz, Elias Z; Fonseca, Jose J; Hettick, Mark; Pool, Vanessa L; Tai, Kong Fai; Toney, Michael F; Fang, Xiaosheng; Javey, Ali; Wong, Lydia Helena; Ager, Joel W

    2016-03-09

    P-type transparent conducting films of nanocrystalline (CuS)x:(ZnS)1-x were synthesized by facile and low-cost chemical bath deposition. Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were used to evaluate the nanocomposite structure, which consists of sub-5 nm crystallites of sphalerite ZnS and covellite CuS. Film transparency can be controlled by tuning the size of the nanocrystallites, which is achieved by adjusting the concentration of the complexing agent during growth; optimal films have optical transmission above 70% in the visible range of the spectrum. The hole conductivity increases with the fraction of the covellite phase and can be as high as 1000 S cm(-1), which is higher than most reported p-type transparent materials and approaches that of n-type transparent materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) synthesized at a similar temperature. Heterojunction p-(CuS)x:(ZnS)1-x/n-Si solar cells were fabricated with the nanocomposite film serving as a hole-selective contact. Under 1 sun illumination, an open circuit voltage of 535 mV was observed. This value compares favorably to other emerging heterojunction Si solar cells which use a low temperature process to fabricate the contact, such as single-walled carbon nanotube/Si (370-530 mV) and graphene/Si (360-552 mV).

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOEpatents

    Berkman, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  19. Automatic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Report reviews chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for processing integrated circuits and describes fully automatic machine for CVD. CVD proceeds at relatively low temperature, allows wide choice of film compositions (including graded or abruptly changing compositions), and deposits uniform films of controllable thickness at fairly high growth rate. Report gives overview of hardware, reactants, and temperature ranges used with CVD machine.

  20. Influence of Annealing Temperature on the Characteristics of Nanocrystalline SnO2 Thin Films Produced by Sol-Gel and Chemical Bath Deposition for Gas Sensor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jawad, Selma M. H.; Elttayf, Abdulhussain K.; Saber, Amel S.

    Pure nanocrystalline SnO2 films were grown on a clean glass substrate by using sol-gel dip coating and chemical bath deposition (CBD) techniques for gas sensor applications. The films were annealed in air at 300∘C, 400∘C, and 500∘C for 60min. The deposited films with a thickness of approximately 300 ± 20 nm were analyzed through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and optical absorption spectroscopy. Results revealed that the films produced by dip coating exhibited a tetragonal rutile structure and those produced by CBD showed a tetragonal rutile and orthorhombic structure. The crystalline sizes of the films produced by dip coating annealed at 300∘C, 400∘C, and 500∘C were 8, 14, and 22.34 nm and those for CBD films at these temperatures were 10, 15, and 22 nm, respectively. AFM and SEM results indicated that the average grain size increased as annealing temperature increased. The transmittance and absorbance spectra were then recorded at wavelengths ranging from 300nm to 1000nm. The films produced by both the methods yielded high transmission at visible regions. The optical band gap energy of dip-coated films also increased as annealing temperature increased. In particular, their optical band gap energies were 3.5, 3.75, and 3.87eV at 300∘C, 400∘C, and 500∘C, respectively. By comparison, the energy band gap of CBD-prepared films decreased as annealing temperature increased, and their corresponding band gaps were 3.95, 3.85, and 3.8eV at the specified annealing temperatures. The films were further investigated in terms of their sensing abilities for carbon monoxide (CO) gas at 50 ppm by measuring their sensitivity to this gas at different times and temperatures. Our results demonstrated that dip-coated and CBD-prepared films were highly sensitive to CO at 200∘C and 250∘C, respectively.

  1. Anneal-Hardening Behavior of Cr-Fe-C Alloy Deposits Prepared in a Cr3+-Based Bath with Fe2+ Ions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching An; Chen, Jhih You; Wang, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Cr-Fe-C alloy deposits were successfully prepared on high-carbon tool steel in a Cr3+-based electroplating bath containing Fe2+ ions and suitable complex agents. A Cr-based alloy deposit was obtained with an electroplating current density higher than 25 Adm−2, and a Fe-based alloy deposit was obtained using a current density of 20 Adm−2. Following electroplating, these alloy deposited specimens were annealed via rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 500 °C for different periods up to 30 s. The experimental results show that Cr- and Fe-based alloy deposits could be significantly hardened after RTA at 500 °C for a few seconds. The maximum hardness was that of the Cr-Fe-C alloy deposit annealed at 500 °C for 10 s. The maximum hardness of 1205 Hv was detected from the annealed Cr-based alloy deposit prepared with 30 ASD. The hardening mechanism of annealed Cr- and Fe-based alloy deposits is attributed to the precipitation of C-related membranes. The hardness values of the annealed Cr- and Fe-based alloy deposits increase with the increasing degree of crystallization of the C-related membranes. PMID:29206206

  2. Cycle life improvement of alkaline batteries via optimization of pulse current deposition of manganese dioxide under low bath temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelkhani, H.; Ghaemi, M.; Jafari, S. M.

    Pulse current electrodeposition (PCD) method has been applied to the preparation of novel electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) in order to enhance the cycle life of rechargeable alkaline MnO 2-Zn batteries (RAM). The investigation was carried out under atmospheric pressure through a systematic variation of pulse current parameters using additive free sulfuric acid-MnSO 4 electrolyte solutions. On time (t on) was varied from 0.1 to 98.5 ms, off time (t off) from 0.25 to 19.5 ms, pulse frequencies (f) from 10 to 1000 Hz and duty cycles (θ) from 0.02 to 0.985. A constant pulse current density (I p) of 0.8 A dm -2 and average current densities (I a) in the range of 0.08-0.8 A dm -2 were applied in all experiments. Resultant materials were characterized by analyzing their chemical compositions, X-ray diffractions (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrochemical characterizations carried out by charge/discharge cycling of samples in laboratory designed RAM batteries and cyclic voltammetric experiments (CV). It has been proved that specific selection of duty cycle, in the order of 0.25, and a pulse frequency of 500 Hz, results in the production of pulse deposited samples (pcMDs) with more uniform distribution of particles and more compact structure than those obtained by direct current techniques (dcMDs). Results of the test batteries demonstrated that, in spite of reduction of bath temperature in the order of 40 °C, the cycle life of batteries made of pcMDs (bath temperature: 60 °C) was rather higher than those made of conventional dcMDs (boiling electrolyte solution). Under the same conditions of EMD synthesis temperature of 80 °C and battery testing, the maximum obtainable cycle life of optimized pcMD was nearly 230 cycles with approximately 30 mAh g -1 MnO 2, compared to that of dcMD, which did not exceed 20 cycles. In accordance to these results, CV has confirmed that the pulse duty cycle is the most influential parameter on the cycle life than the

  3. Structural and morphological study of chemically synthesized CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P.; Singh, Randhir; Sharma, Jeewan; Sachdeva, M.; Singh, Anupinder; Bhargava, A.

    2018-05-01

    Nanocrystalline CdSe thin films were prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) method using potassium nitrilo-triacetic acid cadmium complex and sodium selenosulphite. The as deposited films were red in color, uniform and well adherent to the glass substrate. These films were strongly dependent on the deposition parameters such as bath composition, deposition temperature and time. Films were annealed at 350 °C for four hours. The morphological, structural and optical properties were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-VIS spectrophotometer measurements, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The XRD analysis confirmed that films are predominantly in hexagonal phase. Scanning electron micrograph shows that the grains are uniformly spread all over the film and each grain contains many nanocrystals with spherical shapes.

  4. Bath for electrolytic reduction of alumina and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2001-07-10

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises a molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: (a) AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and (b) about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound may be, for example, a fluoride, oxide, or carbonate. The metal can be nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath can be employed in a combination that includes a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the bath of the present invention during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum can improve the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode.

  5. Influence of bath PH value on microstructure and corrosion resistance of phosphate chemical conversion coating on sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xia; Xue, Long-fei; Wang, Xiu-chun; Ding, Kai-hong; Cui, Sheng-li; Sun, Yong-cong; Li, Mu-sen

    2016-10-01

    The effect of bath PH value on formation, microstructure and corrosion resistance of the phosphate chemical conversion (PCC) coatings as well as the effect on the magnetic property of the magnets is investigated in this paper. The results show that the coating mass and thickness increase with the decrease of the bath PH value. Scanning electron microscopy observation demonstrates that the PCC coatings are in a blocky structure with different grain size. Transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer tests reveal the coatings are polycomponent and are mainly composed of neodymium phosphate hydrate and praseodymium phosphate hydrate. The electrochemical analysis and static immersion corrosion test show the corrosion resistance of the PCC coatings prepared at bath PH value of 0.52 is worst. Afterwards the corrosion resistance increases first and then decreases with the increasing of the bath PH values. The magnetic properties of all the samples with PCC treatment are decreased. The biggest loss is occurred when the bath PH value is 0.52. Taken together, the optimum PH range of 1.00-1.50 for the phosphate solution has been determined.

  6. Processing of CuInSe{sub 2}-based solar cells: Characterization of deposition processes in terms of chemical reaction analyses. Phase 2 Annual Report, 6 May 1996--5 May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.

    This report describes research performed by the University of Florida during Phase 2 of this subcontract. First, to study CIGS, researchers adapted a contactless, nondestructive technique previously developed for measuring photogenerated excess carrier lifetimes in SOI wafers. This dual-beam optical modulation (DBOM) technique was used to investigate the differences between three alternative methods of depositing CdS (conventional chemical-bath deposition [CBD], metal-organic chemical vapor deposition [MOCVD], and sputtering). Second, a critical assessment of the Cu-In-Se thermochemical and phase diagram data using standard CALPHAD procedures is being performed. The outcome of this research will produce useful information on equilibrium vapor compositions (requiredmore » annealing ambients, Sex fluxes from effusion cells), phase diagrams (conditions for melt-assisted growth), chemical potentials (driving forces for diffusion and chemical reactions), and consistent solution models (extents of solid solutions and extending phase diagrams). Third, an integrated facility to fabricate CIS PV devices was established that includes migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE) for deposition of CIS, a rapid thermal processing furnace for absorber film formation, sputtering of ZnO, CBD or MOCVD of CdS, metallization, and pattern definition.« less

  7. Effect of complexing agent on the photoelectrochemical properties of bath deposited CdS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, S. B.; Singh, A. K.

    2010-02-01

    In the present paper photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance of bath deposited CdS thin films based on complexing agents i.e. ammonia and triethanolamine (TEA) has been discussed. Effect of annealing has also been analyzed. The as-deposited and annealed (at 523 K for 1 h in air) films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, SEM, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and PEC properties. XRD studies revealed that the films were nanocrystalline in nature with mixed hexagonal and cubic phases. TEA complex resulted in better crystallinity. Further improvement in the crystallinity of the films was observed after air annealing. The marigold flower-like structure, in addition to flakes morphology, was observed with TEA complex, whereas for ammonia complex only flakes morphology was observed. The UV-vis absorption studies revealed that the optical absorption edge for the films with ammonia and TEA complex was around 475 nm and 500 nm, respectively. Annealing of the films resulted in red shift in the UV-vis absorption. The PEC cell performance of CdS films was found to be strongly affected by crystallinity and morphology of the films resulted due to complexing agent and annealing. The air annealed film deposited using TEA complex showed maximum short circuit current density ( Jsc) and open circuit voltage ( Voc) i.e. 99 μA/cm 2 and 376 mV respectively, under 10 mW/cm 2 of illumination. The films deposited using TEA complex showed good stability under PEC cell conditions.

  8. Occult chemical deposition to a Maritime forest

    SciTech Connect

    Vong, R.J.; Kowalski, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    Studies of chemical fluxes from the atmosphere to vegetated surfaces have suggested that, along with conventional wet and dry processes, an additional chemical input occurs when wind-blown cloud droplets are directly intercepted by vegetation. This cloud water deposition process has been sometimes termed {open_quote}occult deposition{close_quote} because the water fluxes cannot ordinarily be observed using rain gauges. Such occult deposition of cloud water has rarely been measured directly, in part because of the complexity of the governing turbulent transfer process. However, reviews by the National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP SoS/T-2,6) have suggested that the chemical flux to be forest declinemore » in the eastern USA. This paper presents direct field measurements occult chemical fluxes to a silver fir forest located in complex terrain on the Olympic Peninsula near the coast of Washington State, USA.« less

  9. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  10. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  11. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700??C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S2 and O2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  12. Numerical modeling tools for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J.; Childs, Edward P.

    1992-01-01

    Development of general numerical simulation tools for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was the objective of this study. Physical models of important CVD phenomena were developed and implemented into the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The resulting software can address general geometries as well as the most important phenomena occurring with CVD reactors: fluid flow patterns, temperature and chemical species distribution, gas phase and surface deposition. The physical models are documented which are available and examples are provided of CVD simulation capabilities.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  14. Effect of Reaction Time and Temperature on Chemical, Structural, Optical, and Photoelectrical Properties of PbS Thin Films Chemically Deposited from the Pb(OAc)2-NaOH-TU-TEA Aqueous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelo-González, O. A.; Sotelo-Lerma, M.; García-Valenzuela, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Lead sulfide (PbS) thin films have been deposited on float glass substrates by the chemical bath deposition technique using a Pb(CH3COO)2-NaOH-(NH2)2CS-N(CH2CH2OH)3 definite aqueous system. The chemical and structural characteristics, as well as the variation of the optical and photoelectrical properties, were studied as functions of reaction time and temperature. For this purpose, the following characterization techniques were employed: x-ray diffraction analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrophotometry, and dark and light current measurements. Based on the results, it was observed that increase in the reaction temperature increased the deposition rate of the PbS thin film (associated with the cubic crystalline structure); increase of this parameter from 40°C to 70°C (with reaction time of 60 min) led to an increase of the thickness from ˜129 nm to ˜459 nm and the crystallite size ( D) from 15.3 nm to 20.2 nm; on the other hand, increase in temperature decreased the energy bandgap ( E g) from 1.66 eV to 0.51 eV and the relative photosensitivity factor ( S ph) from 0.468 to 0.032. A similar effect was obtained with increase of the reaction time for given temperature.

  15. Effects of choline chloride on electrodeposited Ni coating from a Watts-type bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yurong; Yang, Caihong; He, Jiawei; Wang, Wenchang; Mitsuzak, Naotoshi; Chen, Zhidong

    2016-05-01

    Electrodeposition of bright nickel (Ni) was carried out in a Watts-type bath. Choline chloride (ChCl) was applied as a multifunctional additive and substitute for nickel chloride (NiCl2) in a Watts-type bath. The function of ChCl was investigated through conductivity tests, anodic polarization, and cathodic polarization experiments. The studies revealed that ChCl performed well as a conducting salt, anodic activator, and cathodic inhibitor. The effects of ChCl on deposition rate, preferred orientation, grain size, surface morphology, and microhardness of Ni coatings were also studied. The deposition rate reached a maximum value of greater than 27 μm h-1 when 20 g L-1 ChCl was introduced to the bath. Using X-ray diffraction, it was confirmed that progressive addition of ChCl promoted the preferred crystal orientation modification from (2 0 0) and (2 2 0) to (1 1 1), refined grain size, and enhanced microhardness. The presence of ChCl lowered the roughness of the coating.

  16. Lattice Matched Iii-V IV Semiconductor Heterostructures: Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition and Remote Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungwoo

    1992-01-01

    This thesis describes the growth and characterization of wide gap III-V compound semiconductors such as aluminum gallium arsenide (Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As), gallium nitride (GaN), and gallium phosphide (GaP), deposited by the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (Remote PECVD). In the first part of the thesis, the optimization of GaAs and Al_{rm x}Ga _{rm 1-x}As hetero -epitaxial layers on Ge substrates is described in the context of the application in the construction of cascade solar cells. The emphasis on this study is on the trade-offs in the choice of the temperature related to increasing interdiffusion/autodoping and increasing perfection of the epilayer with increasing temperature. The structural, chemical, optical, and electrical properties of the heterostructures are characterized by x-ray rocking curve measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron beam induced current (EBIC), cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (X-TEM), Raman spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). Based on the results of this work the optimum growth temperature is 720^circC. The second part of the thesis describes the growth of GaN and GaP layers on silicon and sapphire substrates and the homoepitaxy of GaP by remote PECVD. I have designed and built an ultra high vacuum (UHV) deposition system which includes: the gas supply system, the pumping system, the deposition chamber, the load-lock chamber, and the waste disposal system. The work on the deposition of GaN on Si and sapphire focuses onto the understanding of the growth kinetics. In addition, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for surface analysis, x-ray diffraction methods and microscopic analyses using SEM and TEM for structural characterization, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) absorption measurements for optical characterization, and electrical characterization results

  17. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  18. METAL COATING BATHS

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

  19. Consequence of oxidant concentration on XPS properties of chemically synthesized polythiophene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Sandip V.; Chhabra, Jasvinder; Patil, V. S.; Yadav, J. B.; Puri, R. K.; Puri, Vijaya

    2018-05-01

    The polythiophene thin films were prepared by a wellknown chemical bath deposition technique. The deposited thin films were characterized for structural morphological properties and the adhesion of these thin films were measured by direct pull off (DPO) method, the effect of oxidant concentration on these thin films also studied. The FTIR spectra of chemically deposited polythiophene thin films shows the absorption peak at 836 cm-1 which represents c-s stretching vibrations, shifts to 869 cm-1 as the oxidant concentration increases. The band at 666 cm-1 representing c-s-c ring deformation becomes sharper and appears with a shoulder peak due to increase in oxidant concentration.

  20. Moire-Fringe Images of Twin Boundaries in Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-10

    Moire-Fringe Images of Twin Boundaries in Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond IJ PERSONAL AUITHOR(S) - D. Shechtman. A. Fldman, M.D. Vaudin, and J.L...micrographs of chemical vapor deposited diamond can be interprete as Moire fringes that occur when viewing twin boundaries that are inclined to the electron...Dist J Special TECHNICAL REPORT No. 14 eca MOIRE-FRINGE IMAGES OF TWIN BOUNDARIES IN CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITED DIAMOND D. Shechtman, A. Feldman, M.D

  1. Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Robert E.; Hansen, Brian N.

    1990-01-01

    A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

  2. Electrophoretic Deposition on Porous Non-Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compson, Charles; Besra, Laxmidhar; Liu, Meilin

    2007-01-01

    A method of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on substrates that are porous and electrically non-conductive has been invented. Heretofore, in order to perform an EPD, it has been necessary to either (1) use a substrate material that is inherently electrically conductive or (2) subject a non-conductive substrate to a thermal and/or chemical treatment to render it conductive. In the present method, instead of relying on the electrical conductivity of the substrate, one ensures that the substrate is porous enough that when it is immersed in an EPD bath, the solvent penetrates throughout the thickness, thereby forming quasi-conductive paths through the substrate. By making it unnecessary to use a conductive substrate, this method simplifies the overall EPD process and makes new applications possible. The method is expected to be especially beneficial in enabling deposition of layers of ceramic and/or metal for chemical and electrochemical devices, notably including solid oxide fuel cells.

  3. Analysis of the co-deposition of Al2O3 particles with nickel by an electrolytic route: The influence of organic additives presence and Al2O3 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temam, H. B.; Temam, E. G.

    2016-04-01

    Alloy coatings were prepared by co-deposition of Al2O3 particles in Ni matrix on carbon steel substrate from nickel chloride bath in which metallic powders were held in suspension. The influence of metal powder amount in the bath on chemical composition, morphology, thickness, microhardness and corrosion behavior of obtained coatings, has been investigated. It was shown that the presence of Al2O3 particles in deposit greatly improves the hardness and the wear resistance of alloy coatings. Characterization by microanalysis (EDX) of the various deposits elaborated confirms that the rate of particles incorporated increases as the concentration of solid particles increasing. The results showed that the presence of organic additives in Ni-Al2O3 electrolyte deposition led to an increase in the hardness and corrosion resistance of the deposits.

  4. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

    1994-09-13

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

  5. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Tracy, C. Edwin; King, David E.; Stanley, James T.

    1994-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

  6. The chemical/physical and microbiological characteristics of typical bath and laundry waste waters. [waste water reclamation during manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hypes, W. D.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Chemical/physical and microbiological characteristics are studied of typical bath and laundry waters collected during a 12 day test in which the untreated waste waters were reused for toilet flush. Most significant changes were found for ammonia, color, methylene blue active substances, phosphates, sodium, sulfates, total organic carbon, total solids, and turbidity in comparison with tap water baseline. The mean total number of microorganisms detected in the waste waters ranged from 1 million to 10 to the 7th power cells/m1 and the mean number of possible coliforms ranged from 10 to the 5th power to 1 million. An accumulation of particulates and an objectible odor were detected in the tankage used during the 12 day reuse of the untreated waste waters. The combined bath and laundry waste waters from a family of four provided 91 percent of the toilet flush water for the same family.

  7. Effect of deposition temperature on the structural and optical properties of CdSe QDs thin films deposited by CBD method

    SciTech Connect

    Laatar, F., E-mail: fakher8laatar@gmail.com; Harizi, A.; Smida, A.

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of CdSe QDs with L-Cysteine capping agent for applications in nanodevices. • The films of CdSe QDs present uniform and good dispersive particles at the surface. • Effect of bath temperature on the structural and optical properties of CdSe QDs thin films. • Investigation of the optical constants and dispersion parameters of CdSe QDs thin films. - Abstract: Cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QDs) thin films were deposited onto glass substrates by a chemical bath deposition (CBD) method at different temperatures from an aqueous solution containing L-Cysteine (L-Cys) as capping agent. The evolution of the surface morphologymore » and elemental composition of the CdSe films were studied by AFM, SEM, and EDX analyses. Structural and optical properties of CdSe thin films were investigated by XRD, UV–vis and PL spectroscopy. The dispersion behavior of the refractive index is described using the single oscillator Wemple-DiDomenico (W-D) model, and the physical dispersion parameters are calculated as a function of deposition temperature. The dispersive optical parameters such as average oscillator energy (E{sub o}), dispersion energy (E{sub d}), and static refractive index (n{sub o}) were found to vary with the deposition temperature. Besides, the electrical free carrier susceptibility (χ{sub e}) and the carrier concentration of the effective mass ratio (N/m*) were evaluated according to the Spitzer-Fan model.« less

  8. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  9. Interior view of bath 1 showing original cabinet and bath ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of bath 1 showing original cabinet and bath fixtures, facing southeast. - Albrook Air Force Station, Company Officer's Quarters, East side of Canfield Avenue, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  10. Inverse Leidenfrost effect: self-propelling drops on a bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Anais; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef; Physics of Fluids Team

    2017-11-01

    When deposited on very hot solid, volatile drops can levitate over a cushion of vapor, in the so-called Leidenfrost state. This phenomenon can also be observed on a hot bath and similarly to the solid case, drops are very mobile due to the absence of contact with the substrate that sustains them. We discuss here a situation of ``inverse Leidenfrost effect'' where room-temperature drops levitate on a liquid nitrogen pool - the vapor is generated here by the bath sustaining the relatively hot drop. We show that the drop's movement is not random: the liquid goes across the bath in straight lines, a pattern only disrupted by elastic bouncing on the edges. In addition, the drops are initially self-propelled; first at rest, they accelerate for a few seconds and reach velocities of the order of a few cm/s, before slowing down. We investigate experimentally the parameters that affect their successive acceleration and deceleration, such as the size and nature of the drops and we discuss the origin of this pattern.

  11. Influence of ammonium hydroxide solution on LiMn2O4 nanostructures prepared by modified chemical bath method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koao, Lehlohonolo F.; Motloung, Setumo V.; Motaung, Tshwafo E.; Kebede, Mesfin A.

    2018-04-01

    LiMn2O4 (LMO) powders were prepared by modified chemical bath deposition (CBD) method by varying ammonium hydroxide solution (AHS). The volume of the AHS was varied from 5 to 120 mL in order to determine the optimum volume that is needed for preparation of LMO powders. The effect of AHS volume on the structure, morphology, and electrochemical properties of LMO powders was investigated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the LMO powders correspond to the cubic spinel LMO phase. It was found that the XRD peaks increased in intensity with increasing volume of the AHS up to 20 mL. The estimated average grain sizes calculated using the XRD patterns were found to be in the order of 66 ± 1 nm. It was observed that the estimated average grain sizes increased up to 20 mL of AHS. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results revealed that the AHS volume does not influence the surface morphology of the prepared nano-powders. Elemental energy dispersive (EDS) analysis mapping conducted on the samples revealed homogeneous distribution of Mn and O for the sample synthesized with 120 mL of AHS. The UV-Vis spectra showed a red shift with an increase in AHS up 20 mL. The cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge cycle testing confirmed that 20 mL of AHS has superior lithium ion kinetics and electrochemical performance.

  12. Texture related unusual phenomena in electrodeposition and vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. N.; Han, H. N.

    2015-04-01

    The tensile strength of electrodeposits generally decreases with increasing bath temperature because the grain size increases and the dislocation density decreases with increasing bath temperature. Therefore, discontinuities observed in the tensile strength vs. bath temperature curves in electrodeposition of copper are unusual. The tensile strength of electrodeposits generally increases with increasing cathode current density because the rate of nucleation in electrodeposits increases with increasing current density, which in turn gives rise to a decrease in the grain size and in turn an increase in the strength. Therefore, a decrease in the tensile strength of copper electrodeposits at a high current density is unusual. The grain size of vapor deposits is expected to decrease with decreasing substrate temperature. However, rf sputtered Co-Cr deposits showed that deposits formed on water-cooled polyimide substrates had a larger grain size than deposits formed on polyimide substrates at 200 °C. These unusual phenomena can be explained by the preferred growth model for deposition texture evolution.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits including the wafer carrier and loading from a receiving air track into automatic furnaces and unloading on to a sending air track is discussed. Passivation using electron beam deposited quartz is also considered.

  14. High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases

    DOEpatents

    Stafford, Byron L.; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Nelson, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

  15. Deposition and characterization of ZnSe nanocrystalline thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Sinan; Gökmen, F. Özge; Yaman, Elif; Nebi, Murat

    2018-02-01

    ZnSe nanocrystalline thin films were deposited at different deposition times by using the Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) technique. Effects of deposition time on structural, morphological and optical properties of the obtained thin films were characterized. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used to study the structural properties of ZnSe nanocrystalline thin films. It was found that ZnSe thin films have a cubic structure with a preferentially orientation of (111). The calculated average grain size value was about 28-30 nm. The surface morphology of these films was studied by the Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The surfaces of the thin films were occurred from small stacks and nano-sized particles. The band gap values of the ZnSe nanocrystalline thin films were determined by UV-Visible absorption spectrum and the band gap values were found to be between 2.65-2.86 eV.

  16. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  17. The chemical deposition of semiconductor thin-films for photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, Marc Louis

    Initially, possible precursors to metal sulfide films formed by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), the standard commercial technique for manufacturing photovoltaic semiconductors, were synthesized. Triple-junction GaInP 2/GaAs/Ge solar cells, prepared by this method, were studied to understand how chemical properties and material defects can effect the performance of photovoltaic devices. Finally, novel methods for the low-temperature, solution growth of CdS, CdSe, and CuInSe2 photovoltaic materials were targeted which will reduce manufacturing costs and increase the economic feasibility of solar energy conversion. A series of dialkyldithiocarbamate copper, gallium and indium compounds were studied as possible metal sulfide MOCVD precursors. Metal powders were oxidized by dialkylthiurams in 3- or 4-methylpyridine using standard techniques for handling air and moisture-sensitive compounds. Metal chlorides reacted directly with the sodium dialkyldithiocarbamate salts. In these complexes, the metal was found in a roughly octahedral orientation, surrounded by dithiocarbamate ligands and/or solvent molecules. Triple-junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge cells were composed of thin-films of GaInP2 and GaAs grown monolithically on top of a germanium substrate. Each layer of semiconductor material had a different bandgap and absorbed a different portion of the solar spectrum, thus improving the overall efficiency of the cell. Work focused on dark current-voltage behavior which is known to limit solar cell open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and conversion efficiency. Cells were studied using microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to correlate the effect of physical defects in the materials with poor performance of the devices as evaluated through current vs. voltage measurements. Films of US and CdSe were readily prepared in solution through an "ion-by-ion" deposition of Cd2+ and S2- (or Se 2-) generated from the slow hydrolysis of thiourea (or dimethylthiourea). The bath

  18. Baby Bath Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... bit first. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends sponge baths until the umbilical cord stump falls off — ... week or two. To give your baby a sponge bath, you'll need: A warm place with ...

  19. Ozonation of exhausted dark shade reactive dye bath for reuse.

    PubMed

    Sundrarajan, M; Vishnu, G; Joseph, Kurian

    2006-10-01

    Exhausted reactive dye bath of dark shades were collected from cotton knit wear dyeing units in Tirupur. Ozonation was conducted in a column reactor system fed with ozone at the rate of 0.16 g/min to assess its efficiency in reducing the color, chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon. The potential of the decolorized dye bath for its repeated reuse was also analyzed. The results from the reusability studies indicate that the dyeing quality was not affected by the reuse of decolorized dye bath for two successive cycles. Complete decolorization of the effluent was achieved in 60 minutes contact time at an ozone consumption of 183 mg/L for Red, 175 for Navy Blue and 192 for Green shades respectively. The corresponding COD removal was 60%, 54% and 63% for the three shades while TOC removal efficiency was 59%, 55% and 62% respectively. It is concluded that ozonation is efficient in decolorization of exhausted dye bath effluents containing conventional reactive dyes. However, the corresponding removal of COD from the textile effluent was not significant.

  20. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage.

  1. Float processing of high-temperature complex silicate glasses and float baths used for same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Reid Franklin (Inventor); Cook, Glen Bennett (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A float glass process for production of high melting temperature glasses utilizes a binary metal alloy bath having the combined properties of a low melting point, low reactivity with oxygen, low vapor pressure, and minimal reactivity with the silicate glasses being formed. The metal alloy of the float medium is exothermic with a solvent metal that does not readily form an oxide. The vapor pressure of both components in the alloy is low enough to prevent deleterious vapor deposition, and there is minimal chemical and interdiffusive interaction of either component with silicate glasses under the float processing conditions. Alloys having the desired combination of properties include compositions in which gold, silver or copper is the solvent metal and silicon, germanium or tin is the solute, preferably in eutectic or near-eutectic compositions.

  2. Influence of mechanical and chemical polishing in the solubility of acrylic resins polymerized by microwave irradiation and conventional water bath.

    PubMed

    Machado, Cristiane; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M; Gabriotti, Morgana N; Joia, Fábio A; Ribeiro, Margarete C; Sousa, Rodrigo L S

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the solubility of acrylic resin activated by microwave irradiation (MI) or water bath (WB), when submitted to chemical (CP) or mechanical (MP) polishing. Forty acrylic resin samples were made and processed either by water bath (74 +/- 1 degrees C, 9 h) or microwave irradiation (500 W, 3 min). After deflasking, the samples were finished with aluminum oxide sandpapers in decreasing granulations till reaching similar dimensions. The samples were divided into four groups according to the association between kind of polymerization and polishing: A (WB + CP), B (WB + MP), C (MI + CP) and D (MI + MP). Solubility test was performed for each group and percentile solubility was calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using variance analysis and Kruskal-Wallis. The average of percentile solubility (%) was obtained: A = 0.07, B = 0.02, C = 0.04, D = -0.14, however, no significant difference was found between types of polishing in the samples polymerized by water bath (A and B). When processed by microwave irradiation (C and D), there was significant difference between the applied methods of polishing, so that mechanical polishing lead to a lower solubility. Solubility is a property of acrylic resins, representing not reacted substances releasing that could promote tissular reactions in prosthesis users. The association between polymerization by microwave irradiation and mechanical polishing showed less residual substances releasing for heat-cured acrylic resins, reducing the probability of developing tissular reactions.

  3. Flatbed scanners as a source of imaging. Brightness assessment and additives determination in a nickel electroplating bath.

    PubMed

    Vidal, M; Amigo, J M; Bro, R; Ostra, M; Ubide, C; Zuriarrain, J

    2011-05-23

    Desktop flatbed scanners are very well-known devices that can provide digitized information of flat surfaces. They are practically present in most laboratories as a part of the computer support. Several quality levels can be found in the market, but all of them can be considered as tools with a high performance and low cost. The present paper shows how the information obtained with a scanner, from a flat surface, can be used with fine results for exploratory and quantitative purposes through image analysis. It provides cheap analytical measurements for assessment of quality parameters of coated metallic surfaces and monitoring of electrochemical coating bath lives. The samples used were steel sheets nickel-plated in an electrodeposition bath. The quality of the final deposit depends on the bath conditions and, especially, on the concentration of the additives in the bath. Some additives become degraded with the bath life and so is the quality of the plate finish. Analysis of the scanner images can be used to follow the evolution of the metal deposit and the concentration of additives in the bath. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to find significant differences in the coating of sheets, to find directions of maximum variability and to identify odd samples. The results found are favorably compared with those obtained by means of specular reflectance (SR), which is here used as a reference technique. Also the concentration of additives SPB and SA-1 along a nickel bath life can be followed using image data handled with algorithms such as partial least squares (PLS) regression and support vector regression (SVR). The quantitative results obtained with these and other algorithms are compared. All this opens new qualitative and quantitative possibilities to flatbed scanners. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrodeposition of CdTe thin film from acetate-based ionic liquid bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldiya, Manmohansingh; Bhagat, Dharini; Mukhopadhyay, Indrajit

    2018-05-01

    CdTe being a direct band gap semiconductor, is mostly used in photovoltaics. Here we present, the synthesis of CdTe thin film on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate potentiostatically using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([Bmim][Ac]) ionic liquid (IL) bath at 90 °C. Major advantages of using electrodeposition involves process simplicity, large scalability & economic viability. Some of the benefits offered by IL electrolytic bath are low vapour pressure, wide electrochemical window, and good ionic mobility. Cd(CH3COO)2 (anhydrous) and TeO2 were used as the source precursors. The IL electrolytic bath temperature was kept at 90 °C for deposition, owing to the limited solubility of TeO2 in [Bmim][Ac] IL at room temperature. Cathodic electrodeposition was carried out using a three electrode cell setup at a constant potential of -1.20 V vs. platinum (Pt) wire. The CdTe/FTO thin film were annealed in argon (Ar) atmosphere. Optical study of nanostructured CdTe film were done using UV-Vis-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Raman analysis confirms the formation of CdTe having surface optics (SO) mode at 160.6 cm-1 and transverse optics (TO) mode at 140.5 cm-1. Elemental Te peaks at 123, 140.5 and 268 cm-1 were also observed. The optical band gap of Ar annealed CdTe thin film were found to be 1.47 eV (absorbance band edge ˜ 846 nm). The optimization of deposition parameters using acetate-based IL electrolytic bath to get nearly stoichiometric CdTe thin film is currently being explored.

  5. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  6. Chemical etching and organometallic chemical vapor deposition on varied geometries of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Results of micron-spaced geometries produced by wet chemical etching and subsequent OMCVD growth on various GaAs surfaces are presented. The polar lattice increases the complexity of the process. The slow-etch planes defined by anisotropic etching are not always the same as the growth facets produced during MOCVD deposition, especially for deposition on higher-order planes produced by the hex groove etching.

  7. Chemical effect on ozone deposition over seawater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface layer resistance plays an important role in determining ozone deposition velocity over seawater. Recent studies suggest that surface layer resistance over sea-water is influenced by wind-speed and chemical interaction at the air-water interface. Here, we investigate the e...

  8. Chemical vapor deposition modeling: An assessment of current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1991-01-01

    The shortcomings of earlier approaches that assumed thermochemical equilibrium and used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) phase diagrams are pointed out. Significant advancements in predictive capabilities due to recent computational developments, especially those for deposition rates controlled by gas phase mass transport, are demonstrated. The importance of using the proper boundary conditions is stressed, and the availability and reliability of gas phase and surface chemical kinetic information are emphasized as the most limiting factors. Future directions for CVD are proposed on the basis of current needs for efficient and effective progress in CVD process design and optimization.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  11. Particle formation in SiOx film deposition by low frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyo; Sakamoto, Naoshi; Shimozuma, Mitsuo; Yoshino, Masaki; Tagashira, Hiroaki

    1998-01-01

    Dust particle formation dynamics in the process of SiOx film deposition from a SiH4 and N2O gas mixture by a low frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy and laser light scattering. The deposited films are confirmed to be SiOx from the measurements of Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is observed by scanning electron microscopy that particles are deposited on Si substrate at the plasma power frequency f=5 kHz and above both with and without substrate heating (400 °C), while no particle is deposited below f=1 kHz. Moreover, the laser light scattering indicates that particles are generated at the plasma power frequency of f=3 kHz and above in the gas phase, and that they are not generated in the gas phase at below f=3 kHz. Properties (the refractive index, resistivity, and Vickers hardness) of the films with particles are inferior to those of the films without particles. This article has revealed experimentally the effect of plasma power frequency on SiOx particle formation and makes a contribution to the explication of the particle formation mechanism. We suggest that high-quality film deposition with the low frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method is attained at f=1 kHz or less without substrate heating.

  12. Growth of tungsten oxide nanostructures by chemical solution deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L. H.; Bai, Y.; Li, C. S.; Wang, Y.; Feng, J. Q.; Lei, L.; Zhao, G. Y.; Zhang, P. X.

    2018-05-01

    Tungsten oxide nanostructures were fabricated on LaAlO3 (00l) substrates by a simple chemical solution deposition. The decomposition behavior and phase formation of ammonium tungstate precursor were characterized by thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. Moreover, the morphology and chemical state of nanostructures were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectra. The effects of crystallization temperature on the formation of nanodots and nanowires were investigated. The results indicated that the change of nanostructures had close relationship with the crystallization temperature during the chemical solution deposition process. Under higher crystallization temperature, the square-like dots transformed into the dome-like nanodots and nanowires. Moreover high density well-ordered nanodots could be obtained on the substrate with the further increase of crystallization temperature. It also suggested that this simple chemical solution process could be used to adjust the nanostructures of tungsten oxide compounds on substrate.

  13. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Casey, Alton W.

    1982-01-01

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200.degree. C.; and impinging a gas containing in a flowing atmosphere of air N.sub.2, SiCl.sub.4, and AlCl.sub.3 on the surface.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  16. Combinatorial Characterization of TiO2 Chemical Vapor Deposition Utilizing Titanium Isopropoxide.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Michael; Ponomarev, Evgeniy; Kuzminykh, Yury; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2015-07-13

    The combinatorial characterization of the growth kinetics in chemical vapor deposition processes is challenging because precise information about the local precursor flow is usually difficult to access. In consequence, combinatorial chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized more to study functional properties of thin films as a function of chemical composition, growth rate or crystallinity than to study the growth process itself. We present an experimental procedure which allows the combinatorial study of precursor surface kinetics during the film growth using high vacuum chemical vapor deposition. As consequence of the high vacuum environment, the precursor transport takes place in the molecular flow regime, which allows predicting and modifying precursor impinging rates on the substrate with comparatively little experimental effort. In this contribution, we study the surface kinetics of titanium dioxide formation using titanium tetraisopropoxide as precursor molecule over a large parameter range. We discuss precursor flux and temperature dependent morphology, crystallinity, growth rates, and precursor deposition efficiency. We conclude that the surface reaction of the adsorbed precursor molecules comprises a higher order reaction component with respect to precursor surface coverage.

  17. Preparation of CIGS-based solar cells using a buffered electrodeposition bath

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu Nath

    2007-11-20

    A photovoltaic cell exhibiting an overall conversion efficiency of at least 9.0% is prepared from a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide thin film. The thin film is prepared by simultaneously electroplating copper, indium, gallium, and selenium onto a substrate using a buffered electro-deposition bath. The electrodeposition is followed by adding indium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film.

  18. Avian Assemblages at Bird Baths: A Comparison of Urban and Rural Bird Baths in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Gráinne P.; Parsons, Holly; Davis, Adrian; Coleman, Bill R.; Jones, Darryl N.; Miller, Kelly K.; Weston, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Private gardens provide habitat and resources for many birds living in human-dominated landscapes. While wild bird feeding is recognised as one of the most popular forms of human-wildlife interaction, almost nothing is known about the use of bird baths. This citizen science initiative explores avian assemblages at bird baths in private gardens in south-eastern Australia and how this differs with respect to levels of urbanisation and bioregion. Overall, 992 citizen scientists collected data over two, four-week survey periods during winter 2014 and summer 2015 (43% participated in both years). Avian assemblages at urban and rural bird baths differed between bioregions with aggressive nectar-eating species influenced the avian assemblages visiting urban bird baths in South Eastern Queensland, NSW North Coast and Sydney Basin while introduced birds contributed to differences in South Western Slopes, Southern Volcanic Plains and Victorian Midlands. Small honeyeaters and other small native birds occurred less often at urban bird baths compared to rural bird baths. Our results suggest that differences between urban versus rural areas, as well as bioregion, significantly influence the composition of avian assemblages visiting bird baths in private gardens. We also demonstrate that citizen science monitoring of fixed survey sites such as bird baths is a useful tool in understanding large-scale patterns in avian assemblages which requires a vast amount of data to be collected across broad areas. PMID:26962857

  19. Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposited Thin Films for Space Photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; McNatt, Jeremiah; Dickman, John E.; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Kelly, Christopher V.; AquinoGonzalez, Angel R.; Rockett, Angus A.

    2006-01-01

    Copper indium disulfide thin films were deposited via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using single source precursors. Processing and post-processing parameters were varied in order to modify morphology, stoichiometry, crystallography, electrical properties, and optical properties in order to optimize device-quality material. Growth at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal hot-wall reactor at 395 C yielded best device films. Placing the susceptor closer to the evaporation zone and flowing a more precursor-rich carrier gas through the reactor yielded shinier, smoother, denser-looking films. Growth of (112)-oriented films yielded more Cu-rich films with fewer secondary phases than growth of (204)/(220)-oriented films. Post-deposition sulfur-vapor annealing enhanced stoichiometry and crystallinity of the films. Photoluminescence studies revealed four major emission bands (1.45, 1.43, 1.37, and 1.32 eV) and a broad band associated with deep defects. The highest device efficiency for an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposited cell was 1.03 percent.

  20. Modeling of InP metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Linda R.; Clark, Ivan O.; Kui, J.; Jesser, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of InP by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in a horizontal reactor is being modeled with a commercially available computational fluid dynamics modeling code. The mathematical treatment of the MOCVD process has four primary areas of concern: 1) transport phenomena, 2) chemistry, 3) boundary conditions, and 4) numerical solution methods. The transport processes involved in CVD are described by conservation of total mass, momentum, energy, and atomic species. Momentum conservation is described by a generalized form of the Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid and laminar flow. The effect of Soret diffusion on the transport of particular chemical species and on the predicted deposition rate is examined. Both gas-phase and surface chemical reactions are employed in the model. Boundary conditions are specified at the inlet and walls of the reactor for temperature, fluid flow and chemical species. The coupled set of equations described above is solved by a finite difference method over a nonuniform rectilinear grid in both two and three dimensions. The results of the 2-D computational model is presented for gravity levels of zero- and one-g. The predicted growth rates at one-g are compared to measured growth rates on fused silica substrates.

  1. Room temperature deposition of silicon nanodot clusters by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Jun Young; Yoon, Jae-Sik; Lee, Ji-Myon

    2013-10-01

    The formation of nanometer-scale (ns)-Si dots and clusters on p-GaN layers has been studied by controlling the early stage of growth during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at room temperature. We found that ns-Si dots and clusters formed on the p-GaN surface, indicating that growth was the Volmer-Weber mode. The deposition parameters such as radio frequency (RF) power and processing time mainly influenced the size of the ns-Si dots (40 nm-160 nm) and the density of the ns-Si dot clusters.

  2. Deposition Time Dependent Properties of Copper Tin Telluride (Cu₂SnTe₃) Nanoparticles for Solar Absorber Applications.

    PubMed

    Rakspun, Jariya; Tubtimtae, Auttasit; Vailikhit, Veeramol; Teesetsopon, Pichanan; Choopun, Supab

    2018-06-01

    We report the growth of copper tin telluride nanoparticles as an absorber layer using a chemical bath deposition (CBD) process for solar selective applications. The XRD results showed the phase of Cu2SnTe3 with a cubical structure. The larger-sized nanoparticles resulted with increased absorption properties and the optical band gap ranging from 1.93, 1.90, 1.58 and 1.56 eV for deposition times of 20-120 min, respectively. Then, the electrical properties of Cu2SnTe3 nanoparticles were also provided a higher current (~6-8 mA) with bias potential of zero.

  3. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a) The... and other craft, except those vessels under the supervision or contract to local military or Naval...

  4. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a) The... and other craft, except those vessels under the supervision or contract to local military or Naval...

  5. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a) The... and other craft, except those vessels under the supervision or contract to local military or Naval...

  6. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a) The... and other craft, except those vessels under the supervision or contract to local military or Naval...

  7. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a) The... and other craft, except those vessels under the supervision or contract to local military or Naval...

  8. Effect of bath temperature on structure, morphology and thermoelectric properties of CoSb{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Suchitra, E-mail: suchitrayadav87@gmail.com; Pandya, Dinesh K.; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2016-05-23

    CoSb{sub 3} thin films are deposited on conducting glass substrates (FTO) by electrodeposition at different bath temperatures (60°C, 70°C and 80°C) and the resulting influence of the bath temperature on the structure, morphology and electrical properties of films is investigated. X-ray diffraction confirms the formation of CoSb{sub 3} phase in the films. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that different morphologies ranging from branched nano-flakes to nano-needles evolve as bath temperature increases. It is concluded that a growth temperature of 80°C is suitable for producing CoSb{sub 3} films with such properties that show potential feasibility for thermoelectric applications.

  9. A study on the structural and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline CuS thin films grown by chemical bath deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Nillohit; Sinha, Arijit; Khan, Gobinda Gopal

    2011-01-15

    We report a chemical route for the deposition of nanocrystalline thin films of CuS, using aqueous solutions of Cu(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}, SC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH){sub 3} [triethanolamine, i.e. TEA] in proper concentrations and ratios. The films were structurally characterized using X-ray diffraction technique (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and optical analysis [both photo luminescence (PL) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis)]. Optical studies showed a large blue shift in the band gap energy of the films due to quantum confinement effect exerted by the nanocrystals. From both XRD and FESEM analyses, formation of CuS nanocrystals with sizes withinmore » 10-15 nm was evident. A study on the mechanical properties was carried out using nanoindentation and nanoscratch techniques, which showed good mechanical stability and high adherence of the films with the bottom substrate. Such study on the mechanical properties of the CuS thin films is being reported here for the first time. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements were also carried out for the films, which showed p-type conductivity.« less

  10. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  11. Comparison of chemical and heating methods to enhance latent fingerprint deposits on thermal paper.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2014-03-01

    A comparison is made of proprietary methods to develop latent fingerprint deposits on the inked side of thermal paper using either chemical treatment (Thermanin) or the application of heat to the paper (Hot Print System). Results with a trial of five donors show that the application of heat produces statistically significantly more fingerprint ridge detail than the chemical treatment for both fingerprint deposits aged up to 4 weeks and for a nine sequence depletion series. Subjecting the thermal paper to heat treatment with the Hot Print System did not inhibit subsequent ninhydrin chemical development of fingerprint deposits on the noninked side of the paper. A further benefit of the application of heat is the rapid development of fingerprint deposits (less than a minute) compared with up to 12 h for the Thermanin chemical treatment.

  12. Origin and chemical composition of evaporite deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, George William

    1960-01-01

    A comparative study of marine evaporite deposits forming at the present time along the pacific coast of central Mexico and evaporite formations of Permian age in West Texas Basin was made in order to determine if the modern sediments provide a basis for understanding environmental conditions that existed during deposition of the older deposits. The field work was supplemented by investigations of artificial evaporite minerals precipitated in the laboratory and by study of the chemical composition of halite rock of different geologic ages. The environment of deposition of contemporaneous marine salt deposits in Mexico is acidic, is strongly reducing a few centimeters below the surface, and teems with microscopic life. Deposition of salt, unlike that of many other sediments, is not wholly a constructional phenomenon. Permanent deposits result only if a favorable balance exists between deposition in the dry season and dissolution in the wet season. Evaporite formations chosen for special study in the West Texas Basin are, in ascending order, the Castile, Salado, and Rustler formations, which have a combined thickness of 1200 meters. The Castile formation is largely composed of gypsum rock, the Salado, halite rock, and the Rustler, quartz and carbonate sandstone. The lower part of the Castile formation is bituminous and contains limestone laminae. The Castile and Rustler formations thicken to the south at the expense of salt of the intervening Salado formation. The clastic rocks of the Rustler formation are interpreted as the deposits of a series of barrier islands north of which halite rock of the Salado was deposited. The salt is believed to have formed in shallow water of uniform density that was mixed by the wind. Where water depth exceeded the depth of the wind mixing, density stratification developed, and gypsum was deposited. Dense water of high salinity below the density discontinuity was overlain by less dense, more normally saline water which was derived from

  13. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  14. Process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Caputo, Anthony J.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for preparing fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of a fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  15. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  16. Effect of deposition pressure on the morphology and structural properties of carbon nanotubes synthesized by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Arendse, C J; Malgas, G F; Scriba, M R; Cummings, F R; Knoesen, D

    2007-10-01

    Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition has developed into an attractive method for the synthesis of various carbon nanostructures, including carbon nanotubes. This is primarily due to its versatility, low cost, repeatability, up-scalability, and ease of production. The resulting nano-material synthesized by this technique is dependent on the deposition conditions which can be easily controlled. In this paper we report on the effect of the deposition pressure on the structural properties and morphology of carbon nanotubes synthesized by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition, using Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, respectively. A 10 nm-thick Ni layer, deposited on a SiO2/Si substrate, was used as catalyst for carbon nanotube growth. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters ranging from 20-100 nm were synthesized at 500 degrees C with high structural perfection at deposition pressures between 150 and 200 Torr. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm that the carbon nanotube deposit is homogeneous across the entire substrate area.

  17. A kinetic and equilibrium analysis of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition on monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical kinetics of atmospheric pressure silicon carbide (SiC) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from dilute silane and propane source gases in hydrogen is numerically analyzed in a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for CVD on monofilaments. The chemical composition of the SiC deposit is assessed both from the calculated total fluxes of carbon and silicon and from chemical equilibrium considerations for the prevailing temperatures and species concentrations at and along the filament surface. The effects of gas and surface chemistry on the evolution of major gas phase species are considered in the analysis.

  18. Mapping of an ultrasonic bath for ultrasound assisted extraction of mangiferin from Mangifera indica leaves.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Vrushali M; Rathod, Virendra K

    2014-03-01

    The present work deals with the mapping of an ultrasonic bath for the maximum extraction of mangiferin from Mangifera indica leaves. I3(-) liberation experiments (chemical transformations) and extraction (physical transformations) were carried out at different locations in an ultrasonic bath and compared. The experimental findings indicated a similar trend in variation in an ultrasonic bath by both these methods. Various parameters such as position and depth of vessel in an ultrasonic bath, diameter and shape of a vessel, frequency and input power which affect the extraction yield have been studied in detail. Maximum yield of mangiferin obtained was approximately 31 mg/g at optimized parameters: distance of 2.54 cm above the bottom of the bath, 7 cm diameter of vessel, flat bottom vessel, 6.35 cm liquid height, 122 W input power and 25 kHz frequency. The present work indicates that the position and depth of vessel in an ultrasonic bath, diameter and shape of a vessel, frequency and input power have significant effect on the extraction yield. This work can be used as a base for all ultrasonic baths to obtain maximum efficiency for ultrasound assisted extraction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Multispectral Domes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    optical testing, was also cut out as indicated in Figure 10. The image spoiling measureinents were performed at the Air Force Avionics Laboratory on...AD-A014 362 CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF MULTISPECTRAL DOMES B. A. diBenedetto, et al Raytheon Company Prepared for: Air Force Materials Laboratory...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. ) F) .• •~~EP 7 ’+ i.i AIR FORCE MATERIALS LABORATORY AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND WRIGHT-PATrERSON AIR

  20. Crystalline ha coating on peek via chemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almasi, D.; Izman, S.; Assadian, M.; Ghanbari, M.; Abdul Kadir, M. R.

    2014-09-01

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) has a similar elastic modulus to bone and can be a suitable alternative to metallic implants. However, PEEK is bioinert and does not integrate well with the surrounding tissues. The current commercial method for solving this problem is by coating PEEK substrates with calcium phosphates via plasma spraying. However, this method produces a low bonding strength between the substrate and the coating layer, as well as non-uniform density of the coating. In this study, chemical deposition was used to deposit HA crystalline particles on PEEK substrate without any subsequent crystallisation process therefore producing crystalline treated layer. EDX results confirmed the deposition of HA, and the XRD results confirmed that the treated layer was crystalline HA. FT-IR analysis confirmed the chemical bonding between HA and the substrate. Surface roughness increased from 24.27 nm to 34.08 nm for 3 min immersion time. The water contact angle showed an increase in wettability of the treated sample from 71.6 to 36.4 degrees, which in turn increased its bioactivity. The proposed method is a suitable alternative to other conventional methods as high temperature was not involved in the process which could damage the surface of the substrate.

  1. Chemical precursor impact on the properties of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} absorber layer

    SciTech Connect

    Vashistha, Indu B., E-mail: indu-139@yahoo.com; Sharma, S. K.; Sharma, Mahesh C.

    2016-04-13

    In present work impact of different chemical precursor on the deposition of solar absorber layer Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) were studied by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) method without using expensive vacuum facilities and followed by annealing. As compared to the other deposition methods, CBD method is interesting one because it is simple, reproducible, non-hazardous, cost effective and well suited for producing large-area thin films at low temperatures, although effect of precursors and concentration plays a vital role in the deposition. So, the central theme of this work is optimizing and controlling of chemical reactions for different chemical precursors. Further Effectmore » of different chemical precursors i.e. sulphate and chloride is analyzed by structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) of annealed CZTS thin film revealed that films were polycrystalline in nature with kestarite tetragonal crystal structure. The Atomic Force micrographs (AFM) images indicated total coverage compact film and as well as growth of crystals. The band gap of annealed CZTS films was found in the range of optimal band gap by absorption spectroscopy.« less

  2. Development of a Computational Chemical Vapor Deposition Model: Applications to Indium Nitride and Dicyanovinylaniline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    A computational chemical vapor deposition (CVD) model is presented, that couples chemical reaction mechanisms with fluid dynamic simulations for vapor deposition experiments. The chemical properties of the systems under investigation are evaluated using quantum, molecular and statistical mechanics models. The fluid dynamic computations are performed using the CFD-ACE program, which can simulate multispecies transport, heat and mass transfer, gas phase chemistry, chemistry of adsorbed species, pulsed reactant flow and variable gravity conditions. Two experimental setups are being studied, in order to fabricate films of: (a) indium nitride (InN) from the gas or surface phase reaction of trimethylindium and ammonia; and (b) 4-(1,1)dicyanovinyl-dimethylaminoaniline (DCVA) by vapor deposition. Modeling of these setups requires knowledge of three groups of properties: thermodynamic properties (heat capacity), transport properties (diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity), and kinetic properties (rate constants for all possible elementary chemical reactions). These properties are evaluated using computational methods whenever experimental data is not available for the species or for the elementary reactions. The chemical vapor deposition model is applied to InN and DCVA. Several possible InN mechanisms are proposed and analyzed. The CVD model simulations of InN show that the deposition rate of InN is more efficient when pulsing chemistry is used under conditions of high pressure and microgravity. An analysis of the chemical properties of DCVA show that DCVA dimers may form under certain conditions of physical vapor transport. CVD simulations of the DCVA system suggest that deposition of the DCVA dimer may play a small role in the film and crystal growth processes.

  3. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  4. Growth of diamond by RF plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Duane E.; Ianno, Natale J.; Woollam, John A.; Swartzlander, A. B.; Nelson, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    A system has been designed and constructed to produce diamond particles by inductively coupled radio-frequency, plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. This is a low-pressure, low-temperature process used in an attempt to deposit diamond on substrates of glass, quartz, silicon, nickel, and boron nitride. Several deposition parameters have been varied including substrate temperature, gas concentration, gas pressure, total gas flow rate, RF input power, and deposition time. Analytical methods employed to determine composition and structure of the deposits include scanning electron microscopy, absorption spectroscopy, scanning Auger microprobe spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Analysis indicates that particles having a thin graphite surface, as well as diamond particles with no surface coatings, have been deposited. Deposits on quartz have exhibited optical bandgaps as high as 4.5 eV. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that particles are deposited on a pedestal which Auger spectroscopy indicates to be graphite. This is a phenomenon that has not been previously reported in the literature.

  5. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  6. Environmental geology of Bath, England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellaway, G. A.

    1995-10-01

    The hot springs of Bath, England, have been of importance to man for hundreds of years. It was a famous spa in Roman times. Subsequently, the springs were used during the 17th through the 20th centuries and extensive urban and commercial properties were developed at Bath using the water for medical and tourist-oriented activities. With urban and commercial development in the area, man's impact on the environment was substantial and typical environmental problems included pollution, land subsidence, or stability that effected construction, drainage, highways, and canals. During the growth of Bath in the 18th and 19th centuries these environmental problems were described by geologist William Smith and Joseph Townsend. Bath and vicinity provides a unique example of environmental geoscience.

  7. Room temperature chemical vapor deposition of c-axis ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Teresa M.; Leaf, Jacquelyn; Fry, Cassandra; Wolden, Colin A.

    2005-02-01

    Highly (0 0 2) oriented ZnO films have been deposited at temperatures between 25 and 230 °C by high-vacuum plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (HVP-CVD) on glass and silicon substrates. The HVP-CVD process was found to be weakly activated with an apparent activation energy of ∼0.1 eV, allowing room temperature synthesis. Films deposited on both substrates displayed a preferential c-axis texture over the entire temperature range. Films grown on glass demonstrated high optical transparency throughout the visible and near infrared.

  8. Chemical Synthesis of ZnS:Cu Nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodo, Bhaskarjyoti; Kalita, P. K.

    2010-10-01

    ZnS thin films are synthesized through chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique from aqueous solution of ZnSO4 and thiourea mixing in equal volume and equimolar ratio. A 1% CuSO4 solution is mixed with the ZnSO4 solution for doping before the final chemical reaction. SEM image shows the formation of mainly nanosheets, teeth and comb like structures. Absorption studies show red shift of enhanced band gap on Cu doping. Photoluminescence of ZnS:Cu reveals the enhancement of blue luminescence at 468 nm and low intensity green emission at 493 nm which is attributed to more Cu2+ lying in the interstices. XRD shows that the prepared ZnS nanophosphors possess cubic zinc blende structures.

  9. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Roger W.; Neff, Wayne A.

    1992-01-01

    A process for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO.sub.3. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths.

  10. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of Thin Metal Oxide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurie, Angus Buchanan

    1990-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is an important method of preparing thin films of materials. Copper (II) oxide is an important p-type semiconductor and a major component of high T_{rm c} superconducting oxides. By using a volatile copper (II) chelate precursor, copper (II) bishexafluoroacetylacetonate, it has been possible to prepare thin films of copper (II) oxide by low temperature normal pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. In the metalorganic CVD (MOCVD) production of oxide thin films, oxygen gas saturated with water vapor has been used mainly to reduce residual carbon and fluorine content. This research has investigated the influence of water-saturated oxygen on the morphology of thin films of CuO produced by low temperature chemical vapor deposition onto quartz, magnesium oxide and cubic zirconia substrates. ZnO is a useful n-type semiconductor material and is commonly prepared by the MOCVD method using organometallic precursors such as dimethyl or diethylzinc. These compounds are difficult to handle under atmospheric conditions. In this research, thin polycrystalline films of zinc oxide were grown on a variety of substrates by normal pressure CVD using a zinc chelate complex with zinc(II) bishexafluoroacetylacetonate dihydrate (Zn(hfa)_2.2H _2O) as the zinc source. Zn(hfa) _2.2H_2O is not moisture - or air-sensitive and is thus more easily handled. By operating under reduced-pressure conditions (20-500 torr) it is possible to substantially reduce deposition times and improve film quality. This research has investigated the reduced-pressure CVD of thin films of CuO and ZnO. Sub-micron films of tin(IV) oxide (SnO _2) have been grown by normal pressure CVD on quartz substrates by using tetraphenyltin (TPT) as the source of tin. All CVD films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA).

  11. CHEMICAL SOLUTION DEPOSITION BASED OXIDE BUFFERS AND YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    We have reviewed briefly the growth of buffer and high temperature superconducting oxide thin films using a chemical solution deposition (CSD) method. In the Rolling-Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) process, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, utilizes the thermo mechanical processing to obtain the flexible, biaxially oriented copper, nickel or nickel-alloy substrates. Buffers and Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconductors have been deposited epitaxially on the textured nickel alloy substrates. The starting substrate serves as a template for the REBCO layer, which has substantially fewer weak links. Buffer layers play a major role in fabricating the second generation REBCOmore » wire technology. The main purpose of the buffer layers is to provide a smooth, continuous and chemically inert surface for the growth of the REBCO film, while transferring the texture from the substrate to the superconductor layer. To achieve this, the buffer layers need to be epitaxial to the substrate, i.e. they have to nucleate and grow in the same bi-axial texture provided by the textured metal foil. The most commonly used RABiTS multi-layer architectures consist of a starting template of biaxially textured Ni-5 at.% W (Ni-W) substrate with a seed (first) layer of Yttrium Oxide (Y2O3), a barrier (second) layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), and a Cerium Oxide (CeO2) cap (third) layer. These three buffer layers are generally deposited using physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques such as reactive sputtering. On top of the PVD template, REBCO film is then grown by a chemical solution deposition. This article reviews in detail about the list of oxide buffers and superconductor REBCO films grown epitaxially on single crystal and/or biaxially textured Ni-W substrates using a CSD method.« less

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of W-Si-N and W-B-N

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth Lynn; Smith, Paul M.; Custer, Jonathan S.; Jones, Ronald V.; Nicolet, Marc-A.; Madar, Roland; Bernard, Claude

    1999-01-01

    A method of depositing a ternary, refractory based thin film on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition employing precursor sources of tungsten comprising WF.sub.6, either silicon or boron, and nitrogen. The result is a W--Si--N or W--B--N thin film useful for diffusion barrier and micromachining applications.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  14. Electrodes from carbon nanotubes/NiO nanocomposites synthesized in modified Watts bath for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamada, Masataka; Abe, Tatsuhiko; Mabuchi, Mamoru

    2016-09-01

    A modified Watts bath coupled with pulsed current electroplating is used to uniformly deposit ultrafine nickel oxide particles (diameter < 4 nm) on multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The capacitance of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes/nickel oxide electrodes was as high as 2480 F g-1 (per mass of nickel oxide), which is close to the theoretical capacitance of NiO.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition of W-Si-N and W-B-N

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Roherty-Osmun, E.L.; Smith, P.M.; Custer, J.S.; Jones, R.V.; Nicolet, M.; Madar, R.; Bernard, C.

    1999-06-29

    A method of depositing a ternary, refractory based thin film on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition employing precursor sources of tungsten comprising WF[sub 6], either silicon or boron, and nitrogen. The result is a W-Si-N or W-B-N thin film useful for diffusion barrier and micromachining applications. 10 figs.

  16. Responses of Lithium-Modified Bath to a Shift in Heat Input/Output Balance and Observation of Freeze-Lining Formation During the Heat Balance Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingjing; Taylor, Mark; Dorreen, Mark

    2018-02-01

    In the aluminum electrolysis process, new industrial aluminum/electricity power markets demand a new cell technology to extend the cell heat balance and amperage operating window of smelters by shifting the steady states. The current work investigates the responses of lithium-modified bath system when the input/output balance is shifted in a laboratory analogue to the industrial heat balance shift. Li2CO3 is added to the cryolite-AlF3-CaF2-Al2O3 system as a bath modifier. A freeze deposit is formed on a `cold finger' dipped into the bath and investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. The macro- and micro-structure of the freeze lining varies with the bath superheat (bath temperature minus bath liquidus temperature) and an open crystalline layer with entrapped liquid dominates the freeze thickness. Compared with the cryolite-AlF3-CaF2-Al2O3 bath system, the lithium-modified bath freeze is more sensitive to the heat balance shift. This freeze investigation provides primary information to understand the variation of the side ledge in an industrial cell when the lithium-modified bath system is used.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of Mo thin films from Mo(CO){sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, P.; Bond, J.; Westmore, T.

    1995-12-01

    Low levels of carbon and/or oxygen contamination in metallic thin films significantly alter the physical and chemical properties of these films often rendering them useless for any commercial applications. These impurities are often observed in films grown by a technique called metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). MOCVD films are grown by heating a substrate in the presence of a metallorganic precursor. We wish to identify the source(s) of contamination in films produced from the Group VIB metal hexacarbonyls, M(CO){sub 6}. Towards attaining this goal we have initiated studies on the elemental composition of thin films deposited by MOCVD using Mo(CO){submore » 6} as the precursor. The results obtained so far indicate that the level of contamination of the films partially depends on the deposition temperature. Our results will be compared to published work on films deposited by laser assisted CVD from Mo(CO){sub 6}.« less

  18. Chemical vapor deposition modeling for high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    The formalism for the accurate modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes has matured based on the well established principles of transport phenomena and chemical kinetics in the gas phase and on surfaces. The utility and limitations of such models are discussed in practical applications for high temperature structural materials. Attention is drawn to the complexities and uncertainties in chemical kinetics. Traditional approaches based on only equilibrium thermochemistry and/or transport phenomena are defended as useful tools, within their validity, for engineering purposes. The role of modeling is discussed within the context of establishing the link between CVD process parameters and material microstructures/properties. It is argued that CVD modeling is an essential part of designing CVD equipment and controlling/optimizing CVD processes for the production and/or coating of high performance structural materials.

  19. The modelling routes for the chemical vapour deposition process: application to Si 1- xGe x deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, M.; Bernard, C.; Rouch, H.; Madar, R.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the modelling routes for the chemical vapour deposition process with a special emphasis on mass transport models with near local thermochemical equilibrium imposed in the gas-phase and at the deposition surface. The theoretical problems arising from the linking of the two selected approaches, thermodynamics and mass transport, are shown and a solution procedure is proposed. As an illustration, selected results of thermodynamic and mass transport analysis and of the coupled approach showed that, for the deposition of Si 1- xGe x solid solution at 1300 K (system SiGeClHAr), the thermodynamic heterogeneous stability of the reactive gases and the thermal diffusion led to the germanium depletion of the deposit.

  20. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.W.; Neff, W.A.

    1992-05-12

    A process is described for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO[sub 3]. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths. 18 figs.

  1. 36 CFR 21.5 - Therapeutic bathing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Therapeutic bathing requirements. 21.5 Section 21.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.5 Therapeutic bathing requirements. Baths...

  2. 36 CFR 21.5 - Therapeutic bathing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Therapeutic bathing requirements. 21.5 Section 21.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.5 Therapeutic bathing requirements. Baths...

  3. 36 CFR 21.5 - Therapeutic bathing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Therapeutic bathing requirements. 21.5 Section 21.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.5 Therapeutic bathing requirements. Baths...

  4. 36 CFR 21.5 - Therapeutic bathing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Therapeutic bathing requirements. 21.5 Section 21.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.5 Therapeutic bathing requirements. Baths...

  5. 36 CFR 21.5 - Therapeutic bathing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Therapeutic bathing requirements. 21.5 Section 21.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.5 Therapeutic bathing requirements. Baths...

  6. 28 CFR 551.7 - Bathing and clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bathing and clothing. 551.7 Section 551.7 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Grooming § 551.7 Bathing and clothing. Each inmate must observe the standards concerning bathing and...

  7. 28 CFR 551.7 - Bathing and clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bathing and clothing. 551.7 Section 551.7 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Grooming § 551.7 Bathing and clothing. Each inmate must observe the standards concerning bathing and...

  8. Bath Salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... panic attacks depression suicidal thoughts paranoia delusions and hallucinations distorted sense of reality decreased ability to think ... of bath salts may cause people to have hallucinations, hear voices, feel paranoid, and develop a psychosis ...

  9. Elimination of a pollution associated with chromic acid during the electro-deposition of Cr(III) using appropriate anodic and membrane materials in a double film bath.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Chen, Wenchao; Xu, Hongbo

    2009-01-01

    A method using trivalent chromium has been used to replace hexavalent chromium for the electro-deposition of chromium. Using a tri-chamber bath system various anodic materials and membranes were evaluated to minimize the production of environmentally and health damaging chromic acid. By measuring the absorbance of Cr(VI) at 640 nm, the results indicate that the use of a titanium plated ruthenium (Ti-Ru) anode produces the least amount of chromic acid byproduct compared to lead-gold alloy and graphite anodes. The concentration of Cr(VI) in the immediate vicinity of the Ti-Ru anode decreased from 0.389 mg/L to 0 during a 40-min deposition period. The use of a Nafion(TM) quaternary cation exchange membrane portioning the buffer and anode selectively prevented Cr(III) from entering the anode compartment whilst allowing the migration of H(+) to maintain overall voltaic continuity. It has been demonstrated that the use of a Ti-Ru anode with a Nafion(TM) membrane can eliminate the production of chromic acid associated with the electro-deposition of chromium plate thereby preventing its health damaging exposure to plant operators and preventing discharge of Cr(VI) into the environment. Addition of a surfactant improved current efficiency by 34.7%.

  10. Creation of superhydrophobic stainless steel surfaces by acid treatments and hydrophobic film deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Lester; Breedveld, Victor; Hess, Dennis W

    2012-09-26

    In this work, we present a method to render stainless steel surfaces superhydrophobic while maintaining their corrosion resistance. Creation of surface roughness on 304 and 316 grade stainless steels was performed using a hydrofluoric acid bath. New insight into the etch process is developed through a detailed analysis of the chemical and physical changes that occur on the stainless steel surfaces. As a result of intergranular corrosion, along with metallic oxide and fluoride redeposition, surface roughness was generated on the nano- and microscales. Differences in alloy composition between 304 and 316 grades of stainless steel led to variations in etch rate and different levels of surface roughness for similar etch times. After fluorocarbon film deposition to lower the surface energy, etched samples of 304 and 316 stainless steel displayed maximum static water contact angles of 159.9 and 146.6°, respectively. However, etching in HF also caused both grades of stainless steel to be susceptible to corrosion. By passivating the HF-etched samples in a nitric acid bath, the corrosion resistant properties of stainless steels were recovered. When a three step process was used, consisting of etching, passivation and fluorocarbon deposition, 304 and 316 stainless steel samples exhibited maximum contact angles of 157.3 and 134.9°, respectively, while maintaining corrosion resistance.

  11. Survival of the faucet snail after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, A.J.; Cole, Rebecca A.

    2008-01-01

    The faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata, a nonindigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia, was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871 and has spread to the mid-Atlantic states, the Great Lakes region, Montana, and most recently, the Mississippi River. The faucet snail serves as intermediate host for several trematodes that have caused large-scale mortality among water birds, primarily in the Great Lakes region and Montana. It is important to limit the spread of the faucet snail; small fisheries equipment can serve as a method of snail distribution. Treatments with chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water baths were tested to determine their effectiveness as a disinfectant for small fisheries equipment. Two treatments eliminated all test snails: (1) a 24-h exposure to Hydrothol 191 at a concentration of at least 20 mg/L and (2) a treatment with 50°C heated water for 1 min or longer. Faucet snails were highly resistant to ethanol, NaCl, formalin, Lysol, potassium permanganate, copper sulfate, Baquacil, Virkon, household bleach, and pH extremes (as low as 1 and as high as 13).

  12. Effects of system-bath coupling on a photosynthetic heat engine: A polaron master-equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Zhao, X. L.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-07-01

    Stimulated by suggestions of quantum effects in energy transport in photosynthesis, the fundamental principles responsible for the near-unit efficiency of the conversion of solar to chemical energy became active again in recent years. Under natural conditions, the formation of stable charge-separation states in bacteria and plant reaction centers is strongly affected by the coupling of electronic degrees of freedom to a wide range of vibrational motions. These inspire and motivate us to explore the effects of the environment on the operation of such complexes. In this paper, we apply the polaron master equation, which offers the possibilities to interpolate between weak and strong system-bath coupling, to study how system-bath couplings affect the exciton-transfer processes in the Photosystem II reaction center described by a quantum heat engine (QHE) model over a wide parameter range. The effects of bath correlation and temperature, together with the combined effects of these factors are also discussed in detail. We interpret these results in terms of noise-assisted transport effect and dynamical localization, which correspond to two mechanisms underpinning the transfer process in photosynthetic complexes: One is resonance energy transfer and the other is the dynamical localization effect captured by the polaron master equation. The effects of system-bath coupling and bath correlation are incorporated in the effective system-bath coupling strength determining whether noise-assisted transport effect or dynamical localization dominates the dynamics and temperature modulates the balance of the two mechanisms. Furthermore, these two mechanisms can be attributed to one physical origin: bath-induced fluctuations. The two mechanisms are manifestations of the dual role played by bath-induced fluctuations depending on the range of parameters. The origin and role of coherence are also discussed. It is the constructive interplay between noise and coherent dynamics, rather

  13. Comparison of InGaAs(100) Grown by Chemical Beam Epitaxy and Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Greene, A. L.; Daniels-Race, T.; Lum, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to study the effects of substrate temperature on the composition and growth rate of InGaAs/InP(100) multilayers grown by chemical beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and solid source molecular beam epitaxy. The growth kinetics of the material grown by the different techniques are analyzed and compared.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  15. SciTech Connect

    Sandoval-Paz, M.G., E-mail: myrnasandoval@udec.cl; Rodríguez, C.A.; Porcile-Saavedra, P.F.

    Copper (I) selenide thin films with orthorhombic and cubic structure were deposited on glass substrates by using the chemical bath deposition technique. The effects of the solution pH on the films growth and subsequently the structural, optical and electrical properties of the films were studied. Films with orthorhombic structure were obtained from baths wherein both metal complex and hydroxide coexist; while films with cubic structure were obtained from baths where the metal hydroxide there is no present. The structural modifications are accompanied by changes in bandgap energy, morphology and electrical resistivity of the films. - Graphical abstract: “Study of themore » crystallographic phase change on copper (I) selenide thin films prepared through chemical bath deposition by varying the pH of the solution” by M. G. Sandoval-Paz, C. A. Rodríguez, P. F. Porcile-Saavedra, C. Trejo-Cruz. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Copper (I) selenide thin films were obtained by chemical bath deposition. • Orthorhombic to cubic phase change was induced by varying the reaction solution pH. • Orthorhombic phase is obtained mainly from a hydroxides cluster mechanism. • Cubic phase is obtained mainly from an ion by ion mechanism. • Structural, optical and electrical properties are presented as a function of pH.« less

  16. Confined high-pressure chemical deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Baril, Neil F; He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Keshavarzi, Banafsheh; Krishnamurthi, Mahesh; Borhan, Ali; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Peacock, Anna C; Healy, Noel; Sazio, Pier J A; Badding, John V

    2012-01-11

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is one of the most technologically important semiconductors. The challenge in producing it from SiH(4) precursor is to overcome a significant kinetic barrier to decomposition at a low enough temperature to allow for hydrogen incorporation into a deposited film. The use of high precursor concentrations is one possible means to increase reaction rates at low enough temperatures, but in conventional reactors such an approach produces large numbers of homogeneously nucleated particles in the gas phase, rather than the desired heterogeneous deposition on a surface. We report that deposition in confined micro-/nanoreactors overcomes this difficulty, allowing for the use of silane concentrations many orders of magnitude higher than conventionally employed while still realizing well-developed films. a-Si:H micro-/nanowires can be deposited in this way in extreme aspect ratio, small-diameter optical fiber capillary templates. The semiconductor materials deposited have ~0.5 atom% hydrogen with passivated dangling bonds and good electronic properties. They should be suitable for a wide range of photonic and electronic applications such as nonlinear optical fibers and solar cells. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of silicon, silicon dioxide, titanium and ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng

    Various silicon-based thin films (such as epitaxial, polycrystalline and amorphous silicon thin films, silicon dioxide thin films and silicon nitride thin films), titanium thin film and various ferroelectric thin films (such as BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin films) play critical roles in the manufacture of microelectronics circuits. For the past few years, there have been tremendous interests to search for cheap, safe and easy-to-use methods to develop those thin films with high quality and good step coverage. Silane is a critical chemical reagent widely used to deposit silicon-based thin films. Despite its wide use, silane is a dangerous material. It is pyrophoric, extremely flammable and may explode from heat, shock and/or friction. Because of the nature of silane, serious safety issues have been raised concerning the use, transportation, and storage of compressed gas cylinders of silane. Therefore it is desired to develop safer ways to deposit silicon-based films. In chapter III, I present the results of our research in the following fields: (1) Silane generator, (2) Substitutes of silane for deposition of silicon and silicon dioxide thin films, (3) Substitutes of silane for silicon dioxide thin film deposition. In chapter IV, hydropyridine is introduced as a new ligand for use in constructing precursors for chemical vapor deposition. Detachement of hydropyridine occurs by a low-temperature reaction leaving hydrogen in place of the hydropyridine ligands. Hydropyridine ligands can be attached to a variety of elements, including main group metals, such as aluminum and antimony, transition metals, such as titanium and tantalum, semiconductors such as silicon, and non-metals such as phosphorus and arsenic. In this study, hydropyridine-containing titanium compounds were synthesized and used as chemical vapor deposition precursors for deposition of titanium containing thin films. Some other titanium compounds were also studied for comparison. In chapter V, Chemical Vapor

  18. 33 CFR 165.104 - Safety Zone: Vessel Launches, Bath Iron Works, Kennebec River, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION... Bath Iron Works dry dock while it is being moved to and from its moored position at the Bath Iron Works... into or movement within this zone is prohibited unless authorized by the Captain of the Port, Portland...

  19. Giant spin Hall effect in graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Jayakumar; Koon, Gavin Kok Wai; Avsar, Ahmet; Ho, Yuda; Lee, Jong Hak; Jaiswal, Manu; Baeck, Seung-Jae; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Ferreira, Aires; Cazalilla, Miguel A.; Neto, Antonio H. Castro; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2014-09-01

    Advances in large-area graphene synthesis via chemical vapour deposition on metals like copper were instrumental in the demonstration of graphene-based novel, wafer-scale electronic circuits and proof-of-concept applications such as flexible touch panels. Here, we show that graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition on copper is equally promising for spintronics applications. In contrast to natural graphene, our experiments demonstrate that chemically synthesized graphene has a strong spin-orbit coupling as high as 20 meV giving rise to a giant spin Hall effect. The exceptionally large spin Hall angle ~0.2 provides an important step towards graphene-based spintronics devices within existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology. Our microscopic model shows that unavoidable residual copper adatom clusters act as local spin-orbit scatterers and, in the resonant scattering limit, induce transverse spin currents with enhanced skew-scattering contribution. Our findings are confirmed independently by introducing metallic adatoms-copper, silver and gold on exfoliated graphene samples.

  20. Designing the Color of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet Through Destructive Light Interference Using a Zn-Ti Liquid Metallic Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levai, Gabor; Godzsák, Melinda; Török, Tamas I.; Hakl, Jozsef; Takáts, Viktor; Csik, Attila; Vad, Kalman; Kaptay, George

    2016-07-01

    The color of hot-dip galvanized steel sheet was adjusted in a reproducible way using a liquid Zn-Ti metallic bath, air atmosphere, and controlling the bath temperature as the only experimental parameter. Coloring was found only for samples cooled in air and dipped into Ti-containing liquid Zn. For samples dipped into a 0.15 wt pct Ti-containing Zn bath, the color remained metallic (gray) below a 792 K (519 °C) bath temperature; it was yellow at 814 K ± 22 K (541 °C ± 22 °C), violet at 847 K ± 10 K (574 °C ± 10 °C), and blue at 873 K ± 15 K (600 °C ± 15 °C). With the increasing bath temperature, the thickness of the adhered Zn-Ti layer gradually decreased from 52 to 32 micrometers, while the thickness of the outer TiO2 layer gradually increased from 24 to 69 nm. Due to small Al contamination of the Zn bath, a thin (around 2 nm) alumina-rich layer is found between the outer TiO2 layer and the inner macroscopic Zn layer. It is proven that the color change was governed by the formation of thin outer TiO2 layer; different colors appear depending on the thickness of this layer, mostly due to the destructive interference of visible light on this transparent nano-layer. A complex model was built to explain the results using known relationships of chemical thermodynamics, adhesion, heat flow, kinetics of chemical reactions, diffusion, and optics. The complex model was able to reproduce the observations and allowed making predictions on the color of the hot-dip galvanized steel sample, as a function of the following experimental parameters: temperature and Ti content of the Zn bath, oxygen content, pressure, temperature and flow rate of the cooling gas, dimensions of the steel sheet, velocity of dipping the steel sheet into the Zn-Ti bath, residence time of the steel sheet within the bath, and the velocity of its removal from the bath. These relationships will be valuable for planning further experiments and technologies on color hot-dip galvanization of steel

  1. Effects of deposition temperature and ammonia flow on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Anthony; Allerman, Andrew; Crawford, Mary; Beechem, Thomas; Ohta, Taisuke; Spataru, Catalin; Figiel, Jeffrey; Smith, Michael

    2018-03-01

    The use of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition at high temperature is investigated as a means to produce epitaxial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) at the wafer scale. Several categories of hBN films were found to exist based upon precursor flows and deposition temperature. Low, intermediate, and high NH3 flow regimes were found to lead to fundamentally different deposition behaviors. The low NH3 flow regimes yielded discolored films of boron sub-nitride. The intermediate NH3 flow regime yielded stoichiometric films that could be deposited as thick films. The high NH3 flow regime yielded self-limited deposition with thicknesses limited to a few mono-layers. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism is proposed to explain the onset of self-limited behavior for the high NH3 flow regime. Photoluminescence characterization determined that the intermediate and high NH3 flow regimes could be further divided into low and high temperature behaviors with a boundary at 1500 °C. Films deposited with both high NH3 flow and high temperature exhibited room temperature free exciton emission at 210 nm and 215.9 nm.

  2. Modeling chemical vapor deposition of silicon dioxide in microreactors at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiphysics mathematical model for simulation of silicon dioxide Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and oxygen mixture in a microreactor at atmospheric pressure. Microfluidics is a promising technology with numerous applications in chemical synthesis due to its high heat and mass transfer efficiency and well-controlled flow parameters. Experimental studies of CVD microreactor technology are slow and expensive. Analytical solution of the governing equations is impossible due to the complexity of intertwined non-linear physical and chemical processes. Computer simulation is the most effective tool for design and optimization of microreactors. Our computational fluid dynamics model employs mass, momentum and energy balance equations for a laminar transient flow of a chemically reacting gas mixture at low Reynolds number. Simulation results show the influence of microreactor configuration and process parameters on SiO2 deposition rate and uniformity. We simulated three microreactors with the central channel diameter of 5, 10, 20 micrometers, varying gas flow rate in the range of 5-100 microliters per hour and temperature in the range of 300-800 °C. For each microchannel diameter we found an optimal set of process parameters providing the best quality of deposited material. The model will be used for optimization of the microreactor configuration and technological parameters to facilitate the experimental stage of this research.

  3. Epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films fabricated by chemical solution deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. K.; Kim, Y. K.; Funakubo, H.; Ishiwara, H.

    2006-04-01

    Epitaxial BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films were fabricated on (001)-, (110)-, and (111)-oriented single-crystal SrRuO3(SRO )/SrTiO3(STO) structures by chemical solution deposition. X-ray diffraction indicates the formation of an epitaxial single-phase perovskite structure and pole figure measurement confirms the cube-on-cube epitaxial relationship of BFO ‖SRO‖STO. Chemical-solution-deposited BFO films have a rhombohedral structure with lattice parameter of 0.395nm, which is the same structure as that of a bulk single crystal. The remanent polarization of approximately 50μC/cm2 was observed in BFO (001) thin films at 80K.

  4. Reduced chemical warfare agent sorption in polyurethane-painted surfaces via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of perfluoroalkanes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Durke, Erin M

    2015-04-01

    Perfluoralkalation via plasma chemical vapor deposition has been used to improve hydrophobicity of surfaces. We have investigated this technique to improve the resistance of commercial polyurethane coatings to chemicals, such as chemical warfare agents. The reported results indicate the surface treatment minimizes the spread of agent droplets and the sorption of agent into the coating. The improvement in resistance is likely due to reduction of the coating's surface free energy via fluorine incorporation, but may also have contributing effects from surface morphology changes. The data indicates that plasma-based surface modifications may have utility in improving chemical resistance of commercial coatings.

  5. A Self Consistent RF Discharge, Plasma Chemistry and Surface Model for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    consists of three submodels for the electron kinetics, plasma chemistry , and surface deposition kinetics for a-Si:H deposited from radio frequency...properties. Plasma enhanced, Chemical vapor deposition, amorphous silicon, Modeling, Electron kinetics, Plasma chemistry , Deposition kinetics, Rf discharge, Silane, Film properties, Silicon.

  6. Investigation on structural and optical properties of ZnO film prepared by simple wet chemical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholehah, Amalia; Mulyadi, Rendi; Haryono, Didied; Muttakin, Imamul; Rusbana, Tb Bahtiar; Mardiyanto

    2018-04-01

    ZnO thin layer has a broad potential application in electronic and optoelectronic devices. In this study, vertically align ZnO layers were deposited on ITO glass using wet chemistry method. The seed layers were prepared using electrodeposition technique at 3°C. The growing process was carried out using chemical bath deposition at 90°C. To improve the structural properties, two different hydrothermal treatment variations were applied separately. From the experiment, it is shown that the hydrothermal process using N2 gas has given the best result, with average diameter, crystallite size, and band-gap energy of 68.83 nm; 56.37 nm; and 3.16 eV, respectively.

  7. Electrolytically deposited Cadmium Selenide Films for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervos, C. T.; Palaiologopoulou, M. D.

    2012-10-01

    CdSe films were electrodeposited on pure nickel substrates. The nickel substrate was polished to a mirror finish by Al2O3 paste, etched in 10% HCl solution for 40 s and rinsed thoroughly by de-ionized water. The deposition bath contained solutions with excessive Cd2+ (0.2M) from CdSO4 and small amounts of SeO2 (1x10-3 M). The pH of the bath was adjusted to a value of 2.2 at RT by adding 10% H2SO4. The bath was first thermostated at the required temperature, which varied from 55°C to 65°C. Plating was accomplished at deposition potential 1000 mV (vs. Hg/Hg2SO4). The films formed had a uniform thickness and it was found to be approximately 2.0 μm thick (for 20 min electrodeposition process. The produced CdSe films were characterized by X-Ray diffraction and SEM. The induced semiconductor doping effect by thermal annealing in pure dry nitrogen gas was also investigated. Gold contacts were placed on top of the CdSe films, either by evaporation, or mechanically. Depending on the deposition parameters the electrical characteristics of the Ni/CdSe/Au structures may exhibit rectification properties. The optical excitation of the structure was investigated for various CdSe thicknesses.

  8. Influence of γ-phase on corrosion resistance of Zn–Ni alloy electrodeposition from acetate electrolytic bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraju, V.; Thangaraj, V.

    2018-05-01

    The electrodeposition of Zn–Ni alloy containing 10% to 15% nickel was deposited from acetate electrolytic bath. The effect of current density, pH, temperature, cathodic current efficiency on the deposition of Zn–Ni alloy and the throwing power ability of the solution was investigated. The composition of the deposits and the morphology were strongly influenced by the temperature and applied current density. Corrosion resistance of a Zn–Ni alloy deposit was increases with the increase of current density. Zn–Ni alloy deposits shows higher corrosion resistance at optimum current density of 3.0 A dm‑2. X-Ray diffraction measurement confirms the presence of γ –phase Zn–Ni alloy deposition. The XRD reflection of Zn–Ni (831) was found to be increased with increase in current density. SEM studies reveal that the nanovial structure of Zn–Ni alloy deposited at 3.0 A dm‑2 gives high protection against corrosion.

  9. Annealing effects on the chemical deposited CdS films and the electrical properties of CdS/CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Junfeng; Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt; Liao, Cheng, E-mail: Cliao@pku.edu.cn

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: From XPS core level spectras, compared with as-depositing CdS (sample A), the Fermi level is shifting closer to the conduction band after annealing treatment in the oxygen (sample B) while it is shifting closer to the valence band after annealing treatment in the argon-hydrogen (sample C). That might be the main reason of the different performance of the final devices. The open circuit voltage of the CdS/CdTe solar cell increases when the CBD CdS is annealed with oxygen, while the performance of the solar cell decreases when the CBD CdS is annealed with argon-hydrogen. Research highlights: {yields} Twomore » different methods (oxidation and reduction) were used to anneal CdS films for CdTe solar cells. {yields} Electrical properties were analyzed by XPS (Fermi levels of CdS films). {yields} Annealing treatment in oxidation atmosphere could shift Fermi level of CdS film to higher position and consequently improve the CdS/CdTe junction and performance of solar cells. -- Abstract: CdS layers grown by chemical bath deposition (CBD) are annealed in the oxygen and argon-hydrogen atmosphere respectively. It has been found that the open circuit voltage of the CdS/CdTe solar cell increases when the CBD CdS is annealed with oxygen before the deposition of CdTe by close spaced sublimation (CSS), while the performance of the solar cell decreases when the CBD CdS is annealed with argon-hydrogen. Electronic properties of the CdS films are investigated using X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which indicates that the Fermi level is shifting closer to the conduction band after annealing in the oxygen and consequently a higher open circuit voltage of the solar cell can be obtained.« less

  10. Thermal baths as quantum resources: more friends than foes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurizki, Gershon; Shahmoon, Ephraim; Zwick, Analia

    2015-12-01

    In this article we argue that thermal reservoirs (baths) are potentially useful resources in processes involving atoms interacting with quantized electromagnetic fields and their applications to quantum technologies. One may try to suppress the bath effects by means of dynamical control, but such control does not always yield the desired results. We wish instead to take advantage of bath effects, that do not obliterate ‘quantumness’ in the system-bath compound. To this end, three possible approaches have been pursued by us. (i) Control of a quantum system faster than the correlation time of the bath to which it couples: such control allows us to reveal quasi-reversible/coherent dynamical phenomena of quantum open systems, manifest by the quantum Zeno or anti-Zeno effects (QZE or AZE, respectively). Dynamical control methods based on the QZE are aimed not only at protecting the quantumness of the system, but also diagnosing the bath spectra or transferring quantum information via noisy media. By contrast, AZE-based control is useful for fast cooling of thermalized quantum systems. (ii) Engineering the coupling of quantum systems to selected bath modes: this approach, based on field-atom coupling control in cavities, waveguides and photonic band structures, allows one to drastically enhance the strength and range of atom-atom coupling through the mediation of the selected bath modes. More dramatically, it allows us to achieve bath-induced entanglement that may appear paradoxical if one takes the conventional view that coupling to baths destroys quantumness. (iii) Engineering baths with appropriate non-flat spectra: this approach is a prerequisite for the construction of the simplest and most efficient quantum heat machines (engines and refrigerators). We may thus conclude that often thermal baths are ‘more friends than foes’ in quantum technologies.

  11. Comprehensive investigation of HgCdTe metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raupp, Gregory B.

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of this experimental and theoretical research program was to explore the possibility of depositing high quality epitaxial CdTe and HgCdTe at very low pressures through metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We explored two important aspects of this potential process: (1) the interaction of molecular flow transport and deposition in an MOCVD reactor with a commercial configuration, and (2) the kinetics of metal alkyl source gas adsorption, decomposition and desorption from the growing film surface using ultra high vacuum surface science reaction techniques. To explore the transport-reaction issue, we have developed a reaction engineering analysis of a multiple wafer-in-tube ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) reactor which allows an estimate of wafer or substrate throughput for a reactor of fixed geometry and a given deposition chemistry with specified film thickness uniformity constraints. The model employs a description of ballistic transport and reaction based on the pseudo-steady approximation to the Boltzmann equation in the limit of pure molecular flow. The model representation takes the form of an integral equation for the flux of each reactant or intermediate species to the wafer surfaces. Expressions for the reactive sticking coefficients (RSC) for each species must be incorporated in the term which represents reemission from a wafer surface. The interactions of MOCVD precursors with Si and CdTe were investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in ultra high vacuum combined with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). These studies revealed that diethyltellurium (DETe) and dimethylcadmium (DMCd) adsorb weakly on clean Si(100) and desorb upon heating without decomposing. These precursors adsorb both weakly and strongly on CdTe(111)A, with DMCd exhibiting the stronger interaction with the surface than DETe.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of Mo tubes for fuel cladding applications

    DOE PAGES

    Beaux, Miles F.; Vodnik, Douglas R.; Peterson, Reuben J.; ...

    2018-01-31

    In this study, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have been evaluated for fabrication of free-standing 0.25 mm thick molybdenum tubes with the end goal of nuclear fuel cladding applications. In order to produce tubes with the wall thickness and microstructures desirable for this application, long deposition durations on the order of 50 h with slow deposition rates were employed. A standard CVD method, involving molybdenum pentachloride reduction by hydrogen, as well as a fluidized-bed CVD (FBCVD) method was applied towards these objectives. Characterization of the tubes produced in this manner revealed regions of material with fine grain microstructure and wallmore » thickness suitable for fuel cladding applications, but lacking necessary uniformity across the length of the tubes. Finally, a path forward for the production of freestanding molybdenum tubes that possess the desired properties across their entire length has been identified and can be accomplished by future optimization of the deposition system.« less

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of Mo tubes for fuel cladding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Beaux, Miles F.; Vodnik, Douglas R.; Peterson, Reuben J.

    In this study, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have been evaluated for fabrication of free-standing 0.25 mm thick molybdenum tubes with the end goal of nuclear fuel cladding applications. In order to produce tubes with the wall thickness and microstructures desirable for this application, long deposition durations on the order of 50 h with slow deposition rates were employed. A standard CVD method, involving molybdenum pentachloride reduction by hydrogen, as well as a fluidized-bed CVD (FBCVD) method was applied towards these objectives. Characterization of the tubes produced in this manner revealed regions of material with fine grain microstructure and wallmore » thickness suitable for fuel cladding applications, but lacking necessary uniformity across the length of the tubes. Finally, a path forward for the production of freestanding molybdenum tubes that possess the desired properties across their entire length has been identified and can be accomplished by future optimization of the deposition system.« less

  14. New system for bathing bedridden patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Staley, R. A.; Payne, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    Multihead shower facility can be used with minimal patient handling. Waterproof curtain allows patient to bathe with his head out of shower. He can move completely inside shower to wash his face and hair. Main advantage of shower system is time saved in giving bath.

  15. Finite Element Analysis Modeling of Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Carbide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-19

    thesis primarily focuses on mass transport by gas -phase flow and diffusion , chemical reaction in gas phase and on solid surfaces, and thin film...chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This thesis primarily focuses on mass transport by gas -phase flow and diffusion , chemical reaction in gas phase and...9 Fluid Flow…………………………………………..…………………..…………….9 Thermodynamics………………………………………..………………….….…….11 Chemical Reaction and Diffusion

  16. Unusual behavior in magnesium-copper cluster matter produced by helium droplet mediated deposition.

    PubMed

    Emery, S B; Xin, Y; Ridge, C J; Buszek, R J; Boatz, J A; Boyle, J M; Little, B K; Lindsay, C M

    2015-02-28

    We demonstrate the ability to produce core-shell nanoclusters of materials that typically undergo intermetallic reactions using helium droplet mediated deposition. Composite structures of magnesium and copper were produced by sequential condensation of metal vapors inside the 0.4 K helium droplet baths and then gently deposited onto a substrate for analysis. Upon deposition, the individual clusters, with diameters ∼5 nm, form a cluster material which was subsequently characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Results of this analysis reveal the following about the deposited cluster material: it is in the un-alloyed chemical state, it maintains a stable core-shell 5 nm structure at sub-monolayer quantities, and it aggregates into unreacted structures of ∼75 nm during further deposition. Surprisingly, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the copper appears to displace the magnesium at the core of the composite cluster despite magnesium being the initially condensed species within the droplet. This phenomenon was studied further using preliminary density functional theory which revealed that copper atoms, when added sequentially to magnesium clusters, penetrate into the magnesium cores.

  17. Unusual behavior in magnesium-copper cluster matter produced by helium droplet mediated deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, S. B., E-mail: samuel.emery@navy.mil; Little, B. K.; Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, 2306 Perimeter Rd., Eglin AFB, Florida 32542

    2015-02-28

    We demonstrate the ability to produce core-shell nanoclusters of materials that typically undergo intermetallic reactions using helium droplet mediated deposition. Composite structures of magnesium and copper were produced by sequential condensation of metal vapors inside the 0.4 K helium droplet baths and then gently deposited onto a substrate for analysis. Upon deposition, the individual clusters, with diameters ∼5 nm, form a cluster material which was subsequently characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Results of this analysis reveal the following about the deposited cluster material: it is in the un-alloyed chemical state, it maintains a stable core-shell 5 nm structuremore » at sub-monolayer quantities, and it aggregates into unreacted structures of ∼75 nm during further deposition. Surprisingly, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the copper appears to displace the magnesium at the core of the composite cluster despite magnesium being the initially condensed species within the droplet. This phenomenon was studied further using preliminary density functional theory which revealed that copper atoms, when added sequentially to magnesium clusters, penetrate into the magnesium cores.« less

  18. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  19. Zincblende to Wurtzite phase shift of CdSe thin films prepared by electrochemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Rekha; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K.

    2018-04-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanostructured thin films have been deposited on conducting glass substrates by potentiostatic electrochemical deposition (ECD) technique. The effect of electrolyte bath pH on the structural, morphological and optical properties of CdSe films has been investigated. Crystal structure of these films is characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy which reveal polycrystalline nature of CdSe films exhibiting phase shift from zincblende to wurtzite structure with increase in bath pH. Optical studies reveal that the CdSe thin films have good absorbance in visible spectral region and they possess direct optical band gap which increases from 1.68 to 1.97 eV with increase in bath pH. The results suggest CdSe is an efficient absorber material for next generation solar cells.

  20. Fabrication of lightweight ceramic mirrors by means of a chemical vapor deposition process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goela, Jitendra S. (Inventor); Taylor, Raymond L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process to fabricate lightweigth ceramic mirrors, and in particular, silicon/silicon carbide mirrors, involves three chemical vapor deposition steps: one to produce the mirror faceplate, the second to form the lightweight backstructure which is deposited integral to the faceplate, and the third and final step which results in the deposition of a layer of optical grade material, for example, silicon, onto the front surface of the faceplate. The mirror figure and finish are fabricated into this latter material.

  1. Estimating Chemical Exchange between Atmospheric Deposition and Forest Canopy in Guizhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Gao, Fang; Liao, Xueqin

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of atmospheric deposition on forest ecosystems, wet-only precipitation and throughfall samples were collected in two forest types (Masson pine [ Lamb.] forests and mixed conifer and broadleaf forests) in the Longli forest in the Guizhou province of southwestern China for a period of 21 successive months from April 2007 to December 2008. The pH and chemical components of precipitation and throughfall were analyzed. In addition, the canopy budget model was applied to distinguish between in-canopy and atmospheric sources of chemical compounds. Canopy leaching and total potentially acidifying deposition fluxes were calculated. The results showed that the average pH and the concentration of ions in throughfall were higher than those in precipitation, with the exception of the NH concentration. Dry deposition of S and N accumulated more in Masson pine forests than in mixed conifer and broadleaf forests. Canopy leaching was the most significant source of base cations in forest throughfall, which was higher in the mixed forests than in the coniferous forests. Anions in throughfall deposition in Masson pine forests exceeded those in the mixed forests. Higher total potentially acidifying deposition fluxes reflected the more effective amounts of acid delivered to Masson pine forests compared with mixed conifer and broadleaf forests. In addition, acid deposition induced the leaching and loss of nutrient ions such as Mg, K, and Ca. Although the trees of the studied areas have not shown any symptoms of cation loss, a potentially harmful influence was engendered by atmospheric deposition in the two forest types in the Longli area. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  2. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  3. 21 CFR 890.5110 - Paraffin bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Paraffin bath. 890.5110 Section 890.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5110 Paraffin bath. (a...

  4. 21 CFR 890.5110 - Paraffin bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Paraffin bath. 890.5110 Section 890.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5110 Paraffin bath. (a...

  5. 21 CFR 890.5110 - Paraffin bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Paraffin bath. 890.5110 Section 890.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5110 Paraffin bath. (a...

  6. 21 CFR 890.5110 - Paraffin bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Paraffin bath. 890.5110 Section 890.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5110 Paraffin bath. (a...

  7. 21 CFR 890.5110 - Paraffin bath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Paraffin bath. 890.5110 Section 890.5110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5110 Paraffin bath. (a...

  8. Investigation of diamond deposition by chemical vapor transport with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarczyk, Wladyslaw; Messier, Russell F.; Roy, Rustum; Engdahl, Chris

    1990-12-01

    The carbon-hydrogen chemical vapor transport system was examined in accordance with a four-stage transport model. A result of this examination is that graphite co-deposition could be avoided when diamond is deposited from gas solutions under-saturated with respect to diamond. Actual deposition experiments showed that this unusual requirement can be fulfilled but only for the condition that the transport distance between the carbon source and the substrate surface is short. In such a case diamond can be deposited equally from super-saturated as well as from under-saturated gas solutions. On the basis of thermodynamic considerations a possible explanation of this unusual phenomenon is given. It is shown that there is a possibility of deposition of diamond from both super-saturated as well as under-saturated gas solutions but only on the condition that they are in a non-equilibrium state generally called the activated state. A model of the diamond deposition process consisting of two steps is proposed. In the first step diamond and graphite are deposited simultaneously. The most important carbon deposition reaction is C2H2(g) + 2 H(g) C(diamond graphite) + CH(g). The amount of co-deposited graphite is not a direct function of the saturation state of the gas phase. In the second step graphite is etched according to the most probable reaction C(graphite) + 4 H(g) CH4(g). Atomic hydrogen in a super-equilibrium concentration is necessary not only to etch graphite but also to precipitate and graphite. 1.

  9. SciTech Connect

    Hannachi, Amira, E-mail: amira.hannachi88@gmail.com; Maghraoui-Meherzi, Hager

    Manganese sulfide thin films have been deposited on glass slides by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The effects of preparative parameters such as deposition time, bath temperature, concentration of precursors, multi-layer deposition, different source of manganese, different complexing agent and thermal annealing on structural and morphological film properties have been investigated. The prepared thin films have been characterized using the X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). It exhibit the metastable forms of MnS, the hexagonal γ-MnS wurtzite phase with preferential orientation in the (002) plane or the cubic β-MnS zinc blende with preferentialmore » orientation in the (200) plane. Microstructural studies revealed the formation of MnS crystals with different morphologies, such as hexagons, spheres, cubes or flowers like. - Graphical Abstract: We report the preparation of different phases of manganese sulfide thin films (γ, β and α-MnS) by chemical bath deposition method. The effects of deposition parameters such as deposition time and temperature, concentrations of precursors and multi-layer deposition on MnS thin films structure and morphology were investigated. The influence of thermal annealing under nitrogen atmosphere at different temperature on MnS properties was also studied. Different manganese precursors as well as different complexing agent were also used. - Highlights: • γ and β-MnS films were deposited on substrate using the chemical bath deposition. • The effect of deposition parameters on MnS film properties has been investigated. • Multi-layer deposition was also studied to increase film thickness. • The effect of annealing under N{sub 2} at different temperature was investigated.« less

  10. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, Robert K.; LaCamera, Alfred F.; Troup, R. Lee; Ray, Siba P.; Hosler, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride.

  11. Synthesis of BiFeO3 thin films by chemical solution deposition - Structural and magnetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angappane, S.; Kambhala, Nagaiah

    2012-06-01

    BiFeO3 thin films were deposited on Si (100) substrates by chemical solution deposition. A precursor solution of bismuth acetate and iron acetylacetonate dissolved in distilled water and acetic acid was spin coated on to silicon substrates at ambient conditions, followed by drying and annealing at 650 °C. The films were characterized by XRD and FESEM to study structural properties and morphology. The magnetic properties studied by SQUID magnetometer shows the ferromagnetic nature of the chemical solution deposited BiFeO3 films which are crucial for low cost device applications.

  12. 7 CFR 3201.62 - Bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bath products. 3201.62 Section 3201.62 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.62 Bath products. (a)...

  13. 7 CFR 3201.62 - Bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bath products. 3201.62 Section 3201.62 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.62 Bath products. (a)...

  14. 7 CFR 3201.62 - Bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bath products. 3201.62 Section 3201.62 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.62 Bath products. (a)...

  15. Fabrication of ultrathin film capacitors by chemical solution deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Brennecka, Geoff L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.

    2007-10-01

    We present that a facile solution-based processing route using standard spin-coating deposition techniques has been developed for the production of reliable capacitors based on lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) with active areas of ≥1 mm 2 and dielectric layer thicknesses down to 50 nm. With careful control of the dielectric phase development through improved processing, ultrathin capacitors exhibited slim ferroelectric hysteresis loops and dielectric constants of >1000, similar to those of much thicker films. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that chemical solution deposition is a viable route to the production of capacitor films which are as thin as 50 nmmore » but are still macroscopically addressable with specific capacitance values >160 nF/mm 2.« less

  16. Quantum Bath Refrigeration towards Absolute Zero: Challenging the Unattainability Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolář, M.; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, D.; Alicki, R.; Kurizki, G.

    2012-08-01

    A minimal model of a quantum refrigerator, i.e., a periodically phase-flipped two-level system permanently coupled to a finite-capacity bath (cold bath) and an infinite heat dump (hot bath), is introduced and used to investigate the cooling of the cold bath towards absolute zero (T=0). Remarkably, the temperature scaling of the cold-bath cooling rate reveals that it does not vanish as T→0 for certain realistic quantized baths, e.g., phonons in strongly disordered media (fractons) or quantized spin waves in ferromagnets (magnons). This result challenges Nernst’s third-law formulation known as the unattainability principle.

  17. Quantum bath refrigeration towards absolute zero: challenging the unattainability principle.

    PubMed

    Kolář, M; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, D; Alicki, R; Kurizki, G

    2012-08-31

    A minimal model of a quantum refrigerator, i.e., a periodically phase-flipped two-level system permanently coupled to a finite-capacity bath (cold bath) and an infinite heat dump (hot bath), is introduced and used to investigate the cooling of the cold bath towards absolute zero (T=0). Remarkably, the temperature scaling of the cold-bath cooling rate reveals that it does not vanish as T→0 for certain realistic quantized baths, e.g., phonons in strongly disordered media (fractons) or quantized spin waves in ferromagnets (magnons). This result challenges Nernst's third-law formulation known as the unattainability principle.

  18. Exploration of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition as a method for thin-film fabrication with biological applications.

    PubMed

    Vasudev, Milana C; Anderson, Kyle D; Bunning, Timothy J; Tsukruk, Vladimir V; Naik, Rajesh R

    2013-05-22

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been used historically for the fabrication of thin films composed of inorganic materials. But the advent of specialized techniques such as plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) has extended this deposition technique to various monomers. More specifically, the deposition of polymers of responsive materials, biocompatible polymers, and biomaterials has made PECVD attractive for the integration of biotic and abiotic systems. This review focuses on the mechanisms of thin-film growth using low-pressure PECVD and current applications of classic PECVD thin films of organic and inorganic materials in biological environments. The last part of the review explores the novel application of low-pressure PECVD in the deposition of biological materials.

  19. Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Larkin, David J.; Matus, Lawrence G.; Petit, Jeremy B.

    1993-01-01

    Large single-crystal SiC boules from which wafers of large area cut now being produced commerically. Availability of wafers opens door for development of SiC semiconductor devices. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process produces thin single-crystal SiC films on SiC wafers. Essential step in sequence of steps used to fabricate semiconductor devices. Further development required for specific devices. Some potential high-temperature applications include sensors and control electronics for advanced turbine engines and automobile engines, power electronics for electromechanical actuators for advanced aircraft and for space power systems, and equipment used in drilling of deep wells. High-frequency applications include communication systems, high-speed computers, and microwave power transistors. High-radiation applications include sensors and controls for nuclear reactors.

  20. Bath water contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria in 24-hour home baths, hot springs, and public bathhouses of Nagano Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiko; Oana, Kozue; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bath water samples were collected from 116 hot springs, 197 public bathhouses, and 38 24-hour home baths in Nagano Prefecture, Japan, during the period of April 2009 to November 2011, for determining the presence and extent of contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Cultures positive for Legionella were observed in 123 of the 3,314 bath water samples examined. The distribution and abundance of Legionella and/or combined contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria were investigated to clarify the contamination levels. The abundance of Legionella was demonstrated to correlate considerably with the levels of combined contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Legionella spp. were obtained from 61% of the water samples from 24-hour home baths, but only from 3% of the samples from public bathhouses and hot springs. This is despite the fact that a few outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease in Nagano Prefecture as well as other regions of Japan have been traced to bath water contamination. The comparatively higher rate of contamination of the 24-hour home baths is a matter of concern. It is therefore advisable to routinely implement good maintenance of the water basins, particularly of the 24-hour home baths.

  1. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.; Troup, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Hosler, R.B.

    1999-08-17

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride. 4 figs.

  2. Chemical Controls of Ozone Dry Deposition to the Sea Surface Microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, L.; Chance, R.; Tinel, L.; Saint, A.; Sherwen, T.; Loades, D.; Evans, M. J.; Boxhall, P.; Hamilton, J.; Stolle, C.; Wurl, O.; Ribas-Ribas, M.; Pereira, R.

    2017-12-01

    Oceanic dry deposition of atmospheric ozone (O3) is both the largest and most uncertain O3 depositional sink, and is widely acknowledged to be controlled largely by chemical reactions in the sea surface microlayer (SML) involving iodide (I-) and dissolved organic material (DOM). These reactions not only determine how quickly O3 can be removed from the atmosphere, but also result in emissions of trace gases including volatile organic compounds and may constitute a source of secondary organic aerosols to the marine atmosphere. Iodide concentrations at the sea surface vary by approximately an order of magnitude spatially, leading to more than fivefold variation in ozone deposition velocities (and volatile iodine fluxes). Sea-surface temperature is a reasonable predictor of [I-], however two recent parameterisations for surface I- differ by a factor of two at low latitudes. The nature and reactivity of marine DOM to O3 is almost completely unknown, although studies have suggested approximately equivalent chemical control of I- and DOM on ozone deposition. Here we present substantial new measurements of oceanic I- in both bulk seawater and the overlying SML, and show improved estimates of the global sea surface iodide distribution. We also present analyses of water-soluble DOM isolated from the SML and bulk seawater, and corresponding laboratory studies of ozone uptake to bulk and SML seawater, with the aim of characterizing the reactivity of O3 towards marine DOM.

  3. Physiological and subjective responses to standing showers, sitting showers, and sink baths.

    PubMed

    Ohnaka, T; Tochihara, Y; Kubo, M; Yamaguchi, C

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate physiological and subjective responses during and after bathing in three different bathing methods. Eight healthy males bathed for 10 minutes, and then rested for 30 minutes. Three kinds of bathing methods - standing shower, sitting shower and sink bath - were adopted in this experiment. Water temperature and flow volume of the showers were kept at 41 degrees C and 11 liter/min, while water temperature of the bath was kept at 40 degrees C. Rectal temperature, skin temperatures and heart rate of the subjects were measured continuously during bathing and the subsequent 30-minute rest. Blood pressure and votes for thermal sensations were recorded before bathing, after 5 and 10 minutes of bathing, and 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes after bathing. The following results were obtained. 1) Although rectal temperature rose, on the average, by 0.15 degrees C in all bathing methods, there were no significant differences among the three bathing methods at any time in the experiment. 2) Mean skin temperature (Tsk) during the sink bath was significantly higher than that in the standing or sitting shower. After bathing, Tsk of sink bath was slightly higher than those of the remaining conditions, but did not significantly differ among the bathing methods. 3) Heart rate increased gradually during all the bathing methods, however, only HR in the standing shower exceeded 100 beats/min which was significantly higher than those of the two remaining bathing methods. 4) Blood pressure (BP) decreased rapidly during the sink bath in contrast to an increased BP in the sitting and standing showers.

  4. Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reye, John T.; McFadden, Lisa S.; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    With the rise of environmental awareness and the renewed importance of environmentally friendly processes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has targeted surface pre-treatment processes based on chromates. Indeed, this process has been subject to regulations under the Clean Water Act as well as other environmental initiatives, and there is today a marked movement to phase the process out in the near future. Therefore, there is a clear need for new advances in coating technology that could provide practical options for replacing present industrial practices. Depending on the final application, such coatings might be required to be resistant to corrosion, act as chemically resistant coatings, or both. This research examined a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) mechanism to deposit uniform conversion coatings onto aluminum alloy substrates. Robust protocols based on solutions of aryl phosphate ester and multi-oxide conversion coating (submicron) films were successfully grown onto the aluminum alloy samples. These films were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary results indicate the potential of this technology to replace aqueous-based chromate processes.

  5. Effects of digestion, chemical separation, and deposition on Po-210 quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Seiner, Brienne N.; Morley, Shannon M.; Beacham, Tere A.

    Polonium-210 is a radioactive isotope often used to study sedimentation processes, food chains, aerosol behavior, and atmospheric circulations related to environmental sciences. Materials for the analysis of Po-210 range from tobacco leaves or cotton fibers, to soils and sediments. The purpose of this work was to determine polonium losses from a variety of sample types (soil, cotton fiber, and air filter) due to digestion technique, chemical separation, and deposition method for alpha energy analysis. Results demonstrated that yields from a perchloric acid wet-ash were similar to that from a microwave digestion. Both were greater than the dry-ash procedure. The poloniummore » yield from the perchloric acid wet ash was 87 ± 5%, the microwave digestion had a yield of 100 ± 7%, and the dry ash had a yield of 38 ± 5%. The chemical separation of polonium by an anion exchange resin was used only on the soil samples due to the complex nature of this sample. The yield of Po-209 tracer after chemical separation and deposition for alpha analysis was 83 ± 7% for the soil samples. Spontaneous deposition yields for the cotton and air filters were 87 ± 4% and 92 ± 6%, respectively. Based on the overall process yields for each sample type the amount of Po-210 was quantified using alpha energy analysis. The soil contained 0.18 ± 0.08 Bq/g, the cotton swipe contained 0.7 mBq/g, and the air filter contained 0.04 ± 0.02 mBq/g. High and robust yields of polonium are possible using a suitable digestion, separation, and deposition method.« less

  6. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of titanium nitride thin films using cyclopentadienyl cycloheptatrienyl titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charatan, R. M.; Gross, M. E.; Eaglesham, D. J.

    1994-10-01

    The use of a low oxidation state Ti compound, cyclopentadienyl cycloheptatrienyl titanium, (C5H5) Ti(C7H7) (CPCHT), as a potential source for TiN and Ti in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes has been investigated. This precursor provides us with a new chemical vapor deposition route to TiN films that offer an interesting contrast to films deposited from Ti(IV) precursors. Film depositions were carried out by introducing CPCHT, with H2 carrier gas, into the downstream region of a NH3, N2, H2, or mixed H2/N2 plasma. Low resistivity (100-250 micro-ohm cm) nitrogen-rich TiN films with little carbon or oxygen incorporation and good conformality were deposited with activated N2 or NH3 at deposition temperatures of 300-600 C, inclusive. Mixed H2/N2 plasmas resulted in more stoichiometric TiN films with similar properties. The most striking feature of these films is the absence of columnar grain growth, in contrast to TiN films deposited using TiCl4 or Ti(NR(2))(4). Although the film texture was influenced by the plasma gas, the average grain size of the films deposited using activated N2 and NH3 was similar. The TiN films that we deposited were effective diffusion barriers between aluminum and silicon up to 575 C. Depositions using activated H2 resulted in films with significantly less carbon than CPCHT, but still having a minimum of 2.7:1 C:Ti. The lower oxidation state of the precursor did not facilitate the deposition of a Ti-rich film. No depositions were observed with any of the reactant gases in the absence of plasmas activation.

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposited Zinc Sulfide. SPIE Press Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Tustison, Randal W.

    2013-04-22

    Zinc sulfide has shown unequaled utility for infrared windows that require a combination of long-wavelength infrared transparency, mechanical durability, and elevated-temperature performance. This book reviews the physical properties of chemical vapor deposited ZnS and their relationship to the CVD process that produced them. An in-depth look at the material microstructure is included, along with a discussion of the material's optical properties. Finally, because the CVD process itself is central to the development of this material, a brief history is presented.

  8. Linear-algebraic bath transformation for simulating complex open quantum systems

    DOE PAGES

    Huh, Joonsuk; Mostame, Sarah; Fujita, Takatoshi; ...

    2014-12-02

    In studying open quantum systems, the environment is often approximated as a collection of non-interacting harmonic oscillators, a configuration also known as the star-bath model. It is also well known that the star-bath can be transformed into a nearest-neighbor interacting chain of oscillators. The chain-bath model has been widely used in renormalization group approaches. The transformation can be obtained by recursion relations or orthogonal polynomials. Based on a simple linear algebraic approach, we propose a bath partition strategy to reduce the system-bath coupling strength. As a result, the non-interacting star-bath is transformed into a set of weakly coupled multiple parallelmore » chains. Furthermore, the transformed bath model allows complex problems to be practically implemented on quantum simulators, and it can also be employed in various numerical simulations of open quantum dynamics.« less

  9. Development and study of chemical vapor deposited tantalum base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, G. H.; Bryant, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    A technique for the chemical vapor deposition of alloys was developed. The process, termed pulsing, involves the periodic injection of reactant gases into a previously-evacuated reaction chamber where they blanket the substrate almost instantaneously. Formation of alternating layers of the alloy components and subsequent homogenization allows the formation of an alloy of uniform composition with the composition being determined by the duration and relative numbers of the various cycles. The technique has been utilized to produce dense alloys of uniform thickness and composition (Ta- 10 wt % W) by depositing alternating layers of Ta and W by the hydrogen reduction of TaCl5 and WCl6. A similar attempt to deposit a Ta - 8 wt % W - 2 wt% Hf alloy was unsuccessful because of the difficulty in reducing HfCl4 at temperatures below those at which gas phase nucleation of Ta and W occurred.

  10. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and characterization of ZnO materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shangzu; Tompa, Gary S.; Hoerman, Brent; Look, David C.; Claflin, Bruce B.; Rice, Catherine E.; Masaun, Puneet

    2006-04-01

    Zinc oxide is attracting growing interest for potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, photonics, and chemical and biochemical sensing, among other applications. We report herein our efforts in the growth and characterization of p- and n-type ZnO materials by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), focusing on recent nitrogen-doped films grown using diethyl zinc as the zinc precursor and nitric oxide (NO) as the dopant. Characterization results, including resistivity, Hall measurements, photoluminescence, and SIMS, are reported and discussed. Electrical behavior was observed to be dependent on illumination, atmosphere, and heat treatment, especially for p-type material.

  11. Reduced quantum dynamics with arbitrary bath spectral densities: hierarchical equations of motion based on several different bath decomposition schemes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Zhu, Lili; Bai, Shuming; Shi, Qiang

    2014-04-07

    We investigated applications of the hierarchical equation of motion (HEOM) method to perform high order perturbation calculations of reduced quantum dynamics for a harmonic bath with arbitrary spectral densities. Three different schemes are used to decompose the bath spectral density into analytical forms that are suitable to the HEOM treatment: (1) The multiple Lorentzian mode model that can be obtained by numerically fitting the model spectral density. (2) The combined Debye and oscillatory Debye modes model that can be constructed by fitting the corresponding classical bath correlation function. (3) A new method that uses undamped harmonic oscillator modes explicitly in the HEOM formalism. Methods to extract system-bath correlations were investigated for the above bath decomposition schemes. We also show that HEOM in the undamped harmonic oscillator modes can give detailed information on the partial Wigner transform of the total density operator. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations of the spin-Boson dynamics and the absorption line shape of molecular dimers show that the HEOM formalism for high order perturbations can serve as an important tool in studying the quantum dissipative dynamics in the intermediate coupling regime.

  12. Reduced quantum dynamics with arbitrary bath spectral densities: Hierarchical equations of motion based on several different bath decomposition schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hao; Zhu, Lili; Bai, Shuming

    2014-04-07

    We investigated applications of the hierarchical equation of motion (HEOM) method to perform high order perturbation calculations of reduced quantum dynamics for a harmonic bath with arbitrary spectral densities. Three different schemes are used to decompose the bath spectral density into analytical forms that are suitable to the HEOM treatment: (1) The multiple Lorentzian mode model that can be obtained by numerically fitting the model spectral density. (2) The combined Debye and oscillatory Debye modes model that can be constructed by fitting the corresponding classical bath correlation function. (3) A new method that uses undamped harmonic oscillator modes explicitly inmore » the HEOM formalism. Methods to extract system-bath correlations were investigated for the above bath decomposition schemes. We also show that HEOM in the undamped harmonic oscillator modes can give detailed information on the partial Wigner transform of the total density operator. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations of the spin-Boson dynamics and the absorption line shape of molecular dimers show that the HEOM formalism for high order perturbations can serve as an important tool in studying the quantum dissipative dynamics in the intermediate coupling regime.« less

  13. Pulsed Electrodeposition of Ni with Uniform Co-Deposition of Micron Sized Diamond Particles on Copper Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashant; Mahato, Neelima

    Nanocrystalline nickel was deposited on annealed copper substrate of unit surface area (1 cm2) via pulsed electrodeposition technique using potentiostat (model 263A, Princeton Applied Research, USA) from Watts bath containing nickel sulfate, nickel chloride ,boric acid and sodium citrate. Diamond particles of three different dimensions, viz., 1, 3, and 6 micron were added separately (5 g/L) to the watts bath and co-deposited along with nanocrystalline nickel. The temperature was kept constant at 55 °C. The solution was ultrasonicated for 45-60 minutes prior to deposition to disperse the diamond particles uniformly in the bath. Depositions were carried out at different current densities, viz., 50, 100,150 and 200 mA/ cm2 for different durations, i.e.7, 14 and 21 minutes and best results are optimized for 200mA/cm2 so it is used for all process here .Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) show uniform deposition of microstructure of micron diamond on the surface of copper embedded in the nickel matrix. Elemental mapping confirmed uniform deposition of nickel and diamond with almost no cracks or pits. Mechanical properties of the sample such as, Vicker's hardness increased abruptly after the electrodeposition. Improved microstructural and mechanical properties were found in the case of electrodeposited surfaces containing followed by 3 and 6 micron diamond. The properties were also found better than those processed via stirring the solution during deposition.

  14. Bath salts: they are not what you think.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Diane M; Halter, Margaret J; Levine, Ciara

    2012-02-01

    Psychoactive bath salts are a relatively new group of designer drugs sold as tablets, capsules, or powder and pur-chased in places such as tobacco and convenience stores, gas stations, head shops, and the Internet. Bath salts are stimulant agents that mimic cocaine,lysergic acid diethylamide, methamphetamine, or methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy). The most common bath salts are the cathinone derivatives 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone(MDPV), 4-methylmethcathinone(mephedrone), and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylcathinone (methylone). The drugs cause intense stimulation, eu-phoria, elevated mood, and a pleasurable "rush" Tachycardia, hypertension,peripheral constriction, chest pain, hallucinations, paranoia, erratic behavior,inattention, lack of memory of substance use, and psychosis have been observed in those who have used bath salts. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration recently exercised an emergency authority to name three key ingredients in bath salts as Schedule I, thereby making them illegal to possess or sell in the United States. Nursing implications related to both clinical and educational settings are discussed.

  15. Structural studies of ZnO nanostructures by varying the deposition parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunus, S. H. A.; Sahdan, M. Z.; Ichimura, M.; Supee, A.; Rahim, S.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin film on the growth of ZnO nanorods (NRs) was investigated. The structures of ZnO NRs were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method in aqueous solution of N2O6Zn.6H2O and C6H12N4 at 90°C of deposition temperature. One of the ZnO NRs samples was deposited on a ZnO seed layer coated on a glass substrate to investigate the properties of ZnO NRs without receiving effect of other materials. Next, for diode application, the ZnO NRs was deposited on tin monosulfide (SnS) coated on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate (SnS/ITO). The next, the ZnO structural properties were studied from surface morphology, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectra, and chemical composition by using field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), XRD and energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The growth of ZnO NRs on ZnO seed layer was investigated by ZnO seed layer condition while the growth of ZnO NRs on SnS/ITO was investigated by deposition time and deposition temperature parameters. From FESEM images, aligned ZnO NRs were obtained, and the diameters of ZnO NRs were 0.024-3.94 µm. The SnS thin film was affected by the diameter of ZnO NRs which are the ZnO NRs grow on SnS thin films has a larger diameter compared to ZnO NRs grow on ZnO seed layer. Besides that, all of ZnO peaks observed from XRD corresponding to the wurzite structure and preferentially oriented along the c-axis. In addition, EDX shows a high composition of zinc (Zn) and oxygen (O) signals, which indicated that the NRs are indeed made up of Zn and O.

  16. Influence of the normalized ion flux on the constitution of alumina films deposited by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kurapov, Denis; Reiss, Jennifer; Trinh, David H.

    2007-07-15

    Alumina thin films were deposited onto tempered hot working steel substrates from an AlCl{sub 3}-O{sub 2}-Ar-H{sub 2} gas mixture by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The normalized ion flux was varied during deposition through changes in precursor content while keeping the cathode voltage and the total pressure constant. As the precursor content in the total gas mixture was increased from 0.8% to 5.8%, the deposition rate increased 12-fold, while the normalized ion flux decreased by approximately 90%. The constitution, morphology, impurity incorporation, and the elastic properties of the alumina thin films were found to depend on the normalized ion flux. Thesemore » changes in structure, composition, and properties induced by normalized ion flux may be understood by considering mechanisms related to surface and bulk diffusion.« less

  17. ZnO/CdS bi-layer nanostructures photoelectrode for dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dalal, Paresh V., E-mail: paresh10dalal@gmail.com; Deshpande, Milind P., E-mail: vishwadeshpande@yahoo.co.in; Solanki, Bharat G., E-mail: bhrt.solanki17@gmail.com

    2016-05-06

    Simple chemical deposition method for the synthesis of ZnO/CdS bilayer photoelectrode on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrate in aqueous medium at low temperature (< 373K) is described. The different preparative parameters such as deposition time, bath temperature, concentration of precursor solution and, pH of the bath etc. were optimized. Nanograined ZnO was deposited on FTO coated glass substrates by dip-coating method, whereas CdS nanorods were successfully synthesized on pre-deposited ZnO film by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) method. The Photovoltaic properties of FTO/ZnO/CdS bilayer photo electrodes were also studied. A maximum short circuit current density of 9.1 mA cm-2more » and conversion efficiency 1.05% are observed for ZnO/CdS-10min. Layer, which supports fast electron injection kinetics due to hetero structured nanorod, while minimum values of 0.53mA cm-2 and 0.01% respectively are observed for only ZnO deposited layer.« less

  18. Characterization of Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jesser, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations to develop a more complete understanding of the reactive fluid dynamics of chemical vapor deposition were conducted. In the experimental phases of the effort, a horizontal CVD reactor configuration was used for the growth of InP at UVA and for laser velocimetry measurements of the flow fields in the reactor at LaRC. This horizontal reactor configuration was developed for the growth of III-V semiconductors and has been used by our research group in the past to study the deposition of both GaAs and InP. While the ultimate resolution of many of the heat and mass transport issues will require access to a reduced-gravity environment, the series of groundbased research makes direct contributions to this area while attempting to answer the design questions for future experiments of how low must gravity be reduced and for how long must this gravity level be maintained to make the necessary measurements. It is hoped that the terrestrial experiments will be useful for the design of future microgravity experiments which likely will be designed to employ a core set of measurements for applications in the microgravity environment such as HOLOC, the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility, or the Schlieren photography, the Laser Imaging Velocimetry and the Laser Doppler Velocimetry instruments under development for the Advanced Fluids Experiment Module.

  19. Magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide via chemically and mechanically modified fluids.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Sivan; Romanofsky, Henry J; Giannechini, Lucca J; Jacobs, Stephen D; Lambropoulos, John C

    2016-02-20

    We describe the anisotropy in the material removal rate (MRR) of the polycrystalline, chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS). We define the polycrystalline anisotropy via microhardness and chemical erosion tests for four crystallographic orientations of ZnS: (100), (110), (111), and (311). Anisotropy in the MRR was studied under magnetorheological finishing (MRF) conditions. Three chemically and mechanically modified magnetorheological (MR) fluids at pH values of 4, 5, and 6 were used to test the MRR variations among the four single-crystal planes. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with pH 5 and pH 6 MR fluids, variations were found in the MRR among the four single-crystal planes and surface artifacts were observed on the polycrystalline material. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with the modified MR fluid at pH 4, however, minimal variation was observed in the MRR among the four orientations and a reduction in surface artifacts was achieved on the polycrystalline material.

  20. [The use of white and yellow turpentine baths with diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Davydova, O B; Turova, E A; Golovach, A V

    1998-01-01

    In patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus while and yellow turpentine baths produced a positive effect on carbohydrate metabolism. White baths were more effective in respect to lipid metabolism, blood viscosity, produced a good effect on plasmic hemocoagulation factors. Both while and yellow turpentine baths were beneficial for capillary blood flow: initially high distal blood flow in patients with prevailing distal polyneuropathy decreased while in patients with macroangiopathy initially subnormal blood flow increased. Both white and yellow turpentine baths promoted better pulse blood filling of the lower limbs and weaker peripheral resistance of large vessels. In patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus white and yellow turpentine baths contributed to normalization of carbohydrate metabolism. Yellow baths were more effective in lowering lipids. White baths induced inhibition of platelet aggregation but had no effect on coagulation, yellow baths promoted a reduction of fibrinogen but had no effect on platelet aggregation. Yellow baths produced more pronounced effect than white ones on blood viscosity and microcirculation. Both yellow and white baths stimulated pulse blood filling, corrected peripheral resistance of large and small vessels of the lower limbs.

  1. Temperature crossover of decoherence rates in chaotic and regular bath dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sanz, A S; Elran, Y; Brumer, P

    2012-03-01

    The effect of chaotic bath dynamics on the decoherence of a quantum system is examined for the vibrational degrees of freedom of a diatomic molecule in a realistic, constant temperature collisional bath. As an example, the specific case of I(2) in liquid xenon is examined as a function of temperature, and the results compared with an integrable xenon bath. A crossover in behavior is found: The integrable bath induces more decoherence at low bath temperatures than does the chaotic bath, whereas the opposite is the case at the higher bath temperatures. These results, verifying a conjecture due to Wilkie, shed light on the differing views of the effect of chaotic dynamics on system decoherence.

  2. Fabrication of 100 A class, 1 m long coated conductor tapes by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvamanickam, V.; Lee, H. G.; Li, Y.; Xiong, X.; Qiao, Y.; Reeves, J.; Xie, Y.; Knoll, A.; Lenseth, K.

    2003-10-01

    SuperPower has been scaling up YBa 2Cu 3O x-based second-generation superconducting tapes by techniques such as pulsed laser deposition (PLD) using industrial laser and metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Both techniques offer advantage of high deposition rates, which is important for high throughput. Using highly-polished substrates produced in a reel-to-reel polishing facility and buffer layers deposited in a pilot ion beam assisted deposition facility, meter-long second-generation high temperature superconductor tapes have been produced. 100 A class, meter-long coated conductor tapes have been reproducibly demonstrated in this work by both MOCVD and PLD. The best results to date are 148 A over 1.06 m by MOCVD and 135 A over 1.1 m by PLD using industrial laser.

  3. Initiated chemical vapor deposition polymers for high peak-power laser targets

    SciTech Connect

    Baxamusa, Salmaan H.; Lepro, Xavier; Lee, Tom

    2016-12-05

    Here, we report two examples of initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) polymers being developed for use in laser targets for high peak-power laser systems. First, we show that iCVD poly(divinylbenzene) is more photo-oxidatively stable than the plasma polymers currently used in laser targets. Thick layers (10–12 μm) of this highly crosslinked polymer can be deposited with near-zero intrinsic film stress. Second, we show that iCVD epoxy polymers can be crosslinked after deposition to form thin adhesive layers for assembling precision laser targets. The bondlines can be made as thin as ~ 1 μm, approximately a factor of 2 thinner thanmore » achievable using viscous resin-based adhesives. These bonds can withstand downstream coining and stamping processes.« less

  4. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.

    2014-12-08

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the dopingmore » efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.« less

  5. Synergistic influence of Al, Ni, Bi and Sn addition to a zinc bath upon growth kinetics and the structure of coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kania, H.; Liberski, P.

    2012-05-01

    In this article the authors have analysed the current knowledge about the influence of alloy additions used in galvanizing baths. The optimum concentration of Al, Ni, Bi and Sn addition has been established. Some tests have been conducted to determine the synergistic effect of the addition of AlNiBiSn to a zinc bath upon the structure and growth kinetics of coatings. The structure of the coatings obtained on steel with low silicon contents and on Sandelin steel as well as their chemical composition have been revealed. It has been established that the addition of AlNiBiSn helps to reduce excessive growth of coating on Sandelin steel. The chemical composition and the structure of the coating on Sandelin steel are similar to the chemical composition and structure obtained on steel with regular silicon contents.

  6. Short communication: Efficacy of copper sulfate hoof baths against digital dermatitis--Where is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Peter T

    2015-04-01

    Digital dermatitis is a major problem in modern dairy production because of decreased animal welfare and financial losses. Individual cow treatments are often seen as too time consuming by farmers, and walk-through hoof baths have therefore been used extensively to control digital dermatitis. For decades, copper sulfate hoof baths have been used to treat and prevent digital dermatitis. Copper sulfate has been referred to as the industry gold standard when it comes to hoof-bath chemicals. In several scientific studies testing the efficacy of other hoof-care products, copper sulfate has been used as a positive control, thereby indicating that copper sulfate has a known positive effect. However, this may not be the case. A dilemma may exist between (1) copper sulfate generally being perceived as being effective against digital dermatitis and (2) a possible lack of well-documented scientific evidence of this effect. The objective of this study was to evaluate the existing scientific literature to determine whether the efficacy of copper sulfate used in hoof baths against digital dermatitis has in fact been demonstrated scientifically. A systematic literature search identified 7 peer-reviewed journal articles describing the efficacy of copper sulfate in hoof baths as treatment or prevention of bovine digital dermatitis. Only 2 of the 7 studies compared copper sulfate to a negative control; most studies were relatively small, and often no clear positive effect of copper sulfate was demonstrated. In conclusion, the frequent claim that copper sulfate is widely reported to be effective is supported by little scientific evidence. Well-designed clinical trials evaluating the effect of copper sulfate against digital dermatitis compared with a negative control are needed. Until such studies have been made, the efficacy of copper sulfate in hoof baths against digital dermatitis remains largely unproven. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier

  7. Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of low in situ phosphorus doped silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarret, M.; Liba, A.; Bonnaud, O.

    1991-09-01

    In situ low phosphorus doped silicon films are deposited onto glass substrates by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition method. The deposition parameters, temperature, total pressure, and pure silane gas flow are, respectively, fixed at 550 °C, 0.08 Torr, and 50 sccm. The varying deposition parameter is phosphine/silane mole ratio; when this ratio varies from 2×10-6 to 4×10-4, the phosphorus concentration and the resistivity after annealing, respectively, vary from 2×1018 to 3×1020 atoms cm-3 and from 1.5 Ω cm to 2.5×10-3 Ω cm.

  8. Control of electron spin decoherence in nuclear spin baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ren-Bao

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear spin baths are a main mechanism of decoherence of spin qubits in solid-state systems, such as quantum dots and nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers of diamond. The decoherence results from entanglement between the electron and nuclear spins, established by quantum evolution of the bath conditioned on the electron spin state. When the electron spin is flipped, the conditional bath evolution is manipulated. Such manipulation of bath through control of the electron spin not only leads to preservation of the center spin coherence but also demonstrates quantum nature of the bath. In an NV center system, the electron spin effectively interacts with hundreds of 13 C nuclear spins. Under repeated flip control (dynamical decoupling), the electron spin coherence can be preserved for a long time (> 1 ms) . Thereforesomecharacteristicoscillations , duetocouplingtoabonded 13 C nuclear spin pair (a dimer), are imprinted on the electron spin coherence profile, which are very sensitive to the position and orientation of the dimer. With such finger-print oscillations, a dimer can be uniquely identified. Thus, we propose magnetometry with single-nucleus sensitivity and atomic resolution, using NV center spin coherence to identify single molecules. Through the center spin coherence, we could also explore the many-body physics in an interacting spin bath. The information of elementary excitations and many-body correlations can be extracted from the center spin coherence under many-pulse dynamical decoupling control. Another application of the preserved spin coherence is identifying quantumness of a spin bath through the back-action of the electron spin to the bath. We show that the multiple transition of an NV center in a nuclear spin bath can have longer coherence time than the single transition does, when the classical noises due to inhomogeneous broadening is removed by spin echo. This counter-intuitive result unambiguously demonstrates the quantumness of the nuclear spin bath

  9. Two dimensional radial gas flows in atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gwihyun; Park, Seran; Shin, Hyunsu; Song, Seungho; Oh, Hoon-Jung; Ko, Dae Hong; Choi, Jung-Il; Baik, Seung Jae

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) operation of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is one of promising concepts for high quality and low cost processing. Atmospheric plasma discharge requires narrow gap configuration, which causes an inherent feature of AP PECVD. Two dimensional radial gas flows in AP PECVD induces radial variation of mass-transport and that of substrate temperature. The opposite trend of these variations would be the key consideration in the development of uniform deposition process. Another inherent feature of AP PECVD is confined plasma discharge, from which volume power density concept is derived as a key parameter for the control of deposition rate. We investigated deposition rate as a function of volume power density, gas flux, source gas partial pressure, hydrogen partial pressure, plasma source frequency, and substrate temperature; and derived a design guideline of deposition tool and process development in terms of deposition rate and uniformity.

  10. Thermodynamic Analysis and Growth of Zirconium Carbide by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sun; Hua, Hao Zheng; Xiang, Xiong

    Equilibrium calculations were used to optimize conditions for the chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide from zirconium halide + CxHy+H2+Ar system. The results show the CVD-ZrC phase diagram is divided into ZrC+C, ZrC and ZrC+Zr zones by C, Zr generating lines. For the same mole of ZrCl4 reactant, it needs higher concentration of CH4 to generate single ZrC phase than that of C3H6. Using these calculations as a guide, single-phase cubic zirconium carbide coatings were deposited onto graphite substrate.

  11. Polypyrrole-MWCNT-Ag composites for electromagnetic shielding: Comparison between chemical deposition and UV-reduction approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Izadyar; Gashti, Mazeyar Parvinzadeh

    2018-07-01

    In this study, we focused on the synthesis of polypyrrole-MWCNT-Ag composites and we evaluated their electrical properties to determine the electromagnetic interference shielding performance. We reduced silver nanoparticles in composites using two different in situ methods: UV-reduction and chemical deposition. Composites were characterized using spectroscopic and microscopic tools for evaluation of the chemical, morphological, electrical conductivity and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness. Results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and dispersive Raman microscope showed chemical interactions between silver and the polypyrrole-MWCNT composite due to the charge-transfer within the structure. X-ray diffraction confirmed appearance of two new peaks for silver nanoparticles embedded in polypyrrole-MWCNT independent to reduction method. According to microscopy images, silver nanoparticles were homogenously distributed at the PPy-MWCNTs interfaces by UV reduction, while, chemical reduction resulted to deposition of silver within the PPy matrix. Finally, our results revealed that the polypyrrole-MWCNT-Ag composite produced via UV-reduction has higher electrical conductivity and shielding effectiveness in comparison to chemically reduced one.

  12. Impacts of chemical enhancers on skin permeation and deposition of terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Erdal, Meryem Sedef; Peköz, Ayca Yıldız; Aksu, Buket; Araman, Ahmet

    2014-08-01

    The addition of chemical enhancers into formulations is the most commonly employed approach to overcome the skin barrier. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of vehicle and chemical enhancers on the skin permeation and accumulation of terbinafine, an allylamine antifungal drug. Terbinafine (1% w/w) was formulated as a Carbopol 934 P gel formulation in presence and absence of three chemical enhancers, nerolidol, dl-limonene and urea. Terbinafine distribution and deposition in stratum corneum (SC) and skin following 8-h ex vivo permeation study was determined using a sequential tape stripping procedure. The conformational order of SC lipids was investigated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Nerolidol containing gel formulation produced significantly higher enhancement in terbinafine permeation through skin and its skin accumulation was increased. ATR-FTIR results showed enhancer induced lipid bilayer disruption in SC. Urea resulted in enhanced permeation of terbinafine across the skin and a balanced distribution to the SC was achieved. But, dl-limonene could not minimize the accumulation of terbinafine in the upper SC. Nerolidol dramatically improved the skin permeation and deposition of terbinafine in the skin that might help to optimize targeting of the drug to the epidermal sites as required for both of superficial and deep cutaneous fungal infections.

  13. Boron nitride microfibers grown by plasma-assisted laser chemical vapor deposition without a metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Shojiro; Kazami, Daisuke; Tanaka, Hironori; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Moriyoshi, Yusuke; Shiratani, Masaharu; Okada, Katsuyuki

    2006-04-01

    Boron nitride fibers were found to grow on polycrystalline nickel and Si (100) substrates by plasma-assisted laser chemical vapor deposition from B2H6+NH3 using an excimer laser at 193nm. Their diameter was typically a few hundreds of nanometers, while the length was a few tens of micrometers. They were stoichiometric or boron-rich BN in chemical composition. When the substrate was rotated during deposition, spiral fibers were found to grow. We conclude that they grew with the help of laser light by other than the vapor - liquid - solid mechanism.

  14. Characteristics of epitaxial garnets grown by CVD using single metal alloy sources. [Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besser, P. J.; Hamilton, T. N.; Mee, J. E.; Stermer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Single metal alloys have been explored as the cation source in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron garnets. Growth of good quality single crystal garnet films containing as many as five different cations has been achieved over a wide range of deposition conditions. The relationship of film composition to alloy compositions and deposition conditions has been determined for several materials. By proper choice of the alloy composition and the deposition conditions, uncrazed deposits were grown on (111) gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates. Data on physical, magnetic and optical properties of representative films is presented and discussed.

  15. Spontaneous Oscillations and Waves during Chemical Vapor Deposition of InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F.; Munkholm, A.; Wang, R.-V.; Streiffer, S. K.; Thompson, Carol; Fuoss, P. H.; Latifi, K.; Elder, K. R.; Stephenson, G. B.

    2008-08-01

    We report observations of self-sustaining spatiotemporal chemical oscillations during metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of InN onto GaN. Under constant supply of vapor precursors trimethylindium and NH3, the condensed-phase cycles between crystalline islands of InN and elemental In droplets. Propagating fronts between regions of InN and In occur with linear, circular, and spiral geometries. The results are described by a model in which the nitrogen activity produced by surface-catalyzed NH3 decomposition varies with the exposed surface areas of GaN, InN, and In.

  16. Spontaneous oscillations and waves during chemical vapor deposition of InN.

    PubMed

    Jiang, F; Munkholm, A; Wang, R-V; Streiffer, S K; Thompson, Carol; Fuoss, P H; Latifi, K; Elder, K R; Stephenson, G B

    2008-08-22

    We report observations of self-sustaining spatiotemporal chemical oscillations during metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of InN onto GaN. Under constant supply of vapor precursors trimethylindium and NH3, the condensed-phase cycles between crystalline islands of InN and elemental In droplets. Propagating fronts between regions of InN and In occur with linear, circular, and spiral geometries. The results are described by a model in which the nitrogen activity produced by surface-catalyzed NH3 decomposition varies with the exposed surface areas of GaN, InN, and In.

  17. Physical vapor deposition and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of yttria-stabilized zirconia thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, David Y.

    Two vapor deposition techniques, dual magnetron oblique sputtering (DMOS) and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), have been developed to produce yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films with unique microstructures. In particular, biaxially textured thin films on amorphous substrates and dense thin films on porous substrates have been fabricated by DMOS and MOCVD, respectively. DMOS YSZ thin films were deposited by reactive sputtering onto Si (native oxide surface) substrates positioned equidistant between two magnetron sources such that the fluxes arrived at oblique angles with respect to the substrate normal. Incident fluxes from two complimentary oblique directions were necessary for the development of biaxial texture. The films displayed a strong [001] out-of-plane orientation with the <110> direction in the film aligned with the incident flux. Biaxial texture improved with increasing oblique angle and film thickness, and was stronger for films deposited with Ne than with Ar. The films displayed a columnar microstructure with grain bundling perpendicular to the projected flux direction, the degree of which increased with oblique angle and thickness. The texture decreased by sputtering at pressures at which the flux of sputtered atoms was thermalized. These results suggested that grain alignment is due to directed impingement of both sputtered atoms and reflected energetic neutrals. The best texture, a {111} phi FWHM of 23°, was obtained in a 4.8 mum thick film deposited at an oblique angle of 56°. MOCVD YSZ thin films were deposited in a vertical cold-wall reactor using Zr(tmhd)4 and Y(tmhd)3 precursors. Fully stabilized YSZ films with 9 mol% could be deposited by controlling the bubbler temperatures. YSZ films on Si substrates displayed a transition at 525°C from surface kinetic limited growth, with an activation energy of 5.5 kJ/mole, to mass transport limited growth. Modifying the reactor by lowering the inlet height and introducing an Ar baffle

  18. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  19. A comparison of head-out mist bathing, with or without facial fanning, with head-out half-body low-water level bathing in humans--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi; Kawahara, Yuko; Nishimura, Naoki; Nishimura, Rumiko; Miwa, Chihiro; Kataoka, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Chihiro; Suzuki, Takahiro; Shigaraki, Masayuki; Maeda, Yoichi; Takada, Hiroki; Watanabe, Yoriko

    2014-07-01

    To reduce the risks of Japanese-style bathing, half-body bathing (HBLB) has been recommended in Japan, but discomfort due to the cold environment in winter prevents its widespread adoption. The development of the mist sauna, which causes a gradual core temperature rise with sufficient thermal comfort, has reduced the demerits of HBLB. We examined head-out 42 °C mist bathing with 38 °C HBLB up to the navel to see if it could improve thermal comfort without detracting from the merits of HBLB, with and without the effects of facial fanning (FF). The subjects were seven healthy males aged 22-25 years. The following bathing styles were provided: (1) HBLB-head-out half-body low bathing of 38 °C up to the navel (20 min); (2) HOMB-head-out mist bathing of 42 °C and HBLB of 38 °C (20 min); and (3) HOMBFF-HOMB with FF (20 min). HOMB raised the core temperature gradually. HOMBFF suppressed the core temperature rise in a similar fashion to HOMB. Increases in blood pressure and heart rate usually observed in Japanese traditional-style bathing were less marked in HOMBs with no significant difference with and without FF. The greatest body weight loss was observed after Japanese traditional-style bathing, with only one-third of this amount lost after mist bathing, and one-sixth after HBLB. HOMB increased thermal sensation, and FF also enhanced post-bathing invigoration. We conclude that HOMB reduces the risks of Japanese traditional style bathing by mitigating marked changes in the core temperature and hemodynamics, and FF provides thermal comfort and invigoration.

  20. A comparison of head-out mist bathing, with or without facial fanning, with head-out half-body low-water level bathing in humans—a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Satoshi; Kawahara, Yuko; Nishimura, Naoki; Nishimura, Rumiko; Miwa, Chihiro; Kataoka, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Chihiro; Suzuki, Takahiro; Shigaraki, Masayuki; Maeda, Yoichi; Takada, Hiroki; Watanabe, Yoriko

    2014-07-01

    To reduce the risks of Japanese-style bathing, half-body bathing (HBLB) has been recommended in Japan, but discomfort due to the cold environment in winter prevents its widespread adoption. The development of the mist sauna, which causes a gradual core temperature rise with sufficient thermal comfort, has reduced the demerits of HBLB. We examined head-out 42 °C mist bathing with 38 °C HBLB up to the navel to see if it could improve thermal comfort without detracting from the merits of HBLB, with and without the effects of facial fanning (FF). The subjects were seven healthy males aged 22-25 years. The following bathing styles were provided: (1) HBLB—head-out half-body low bathing of 38 °C up to the navel (20 min); (2) HOMB—head-out mist bathing of 42 °C and HBLB of 38 °C (20 min); and (3) HOMBFF—HOMB with FF (20 min). HOMB raised the core temperature gradually. HOMBFF suppressed the core temperature rise in a similar fashion to HOMB. Increases in blood pressure and heart rate usually observed in Japanese traditional-style bathing were less marked in HOMBs with no significant difference with and without FF. The greatest body weight loss was observed after Japanese traditional-style bathing, with only one-third of this amount lost after mist bathing, and one-sixth after HBLB. HOMB increased thermal sensation, and FF also enhanced post-bathing invigoration. We conclude that HOMB reduces the risks of Japanese traditional style bathing by mitigating marked changes in the core temperature and hemodynamics, and FF provides thermal comfort and invigoration.

  1. Effect of trunk-to-head bathing on physiological responses in newborns.

    PubMed

    So, Hyun-Sook; You, Mi-Ae; Mun, Je-Yung; Hwang, Myeong-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Pyeon, Suk-Jin; Shin, Mi-Young; Chang, Bong-Hee

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of trunk-to-head bathing versus the traditional head-to-trunk bathing on newborns' body temperature, heart rate, and oxygen saturation. A prospective, two-group, quasi-experimental repeated measures design. A newborn nursery in an urban university hospital. Sixty-two healthy full-term newborns. Newborns were randomly assigned to two groups. The newborns in the experimental group were bathed from trunk to head; those in the control group were bathed from head to trunk. Measurements of body temperature, heart rate, and oxygen saturation were obtained at four time points: before the bath, immediately after the bath, 30 minutes after the bath, and 60 minutes after the bath. No significant differences in body temperature, heart rate, or oxygen saturation were observed between groups. However, body temperature was significantly different across measurement times, and there was a significant interaction between group and measurement time. The mean body temperature dropped 0.2°C after bathing in both groups, but the experimental group returned to their initial body temperature more rapidly than the control group. These findings suggest that newborns who were bathed from trunk to head and whose heads were wet for shorter periods of time benefited with a more rapid recovery of body temperature and decreased heat loss due to evaporation. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  2. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket may...

  3. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket may...

  4. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket may...

  5. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket may...

  6. 36 CFR 21.12 - Lost bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lost bath tickets. 21.12 Section 21.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.12 Lost bath tickets. A patron who loses his ticket may...

  7. Controlling the quantum dynamics of a mesoscopic spin bath in diamond

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Gijs; van der Sar, Toeno; Blok, Machiel; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Dobrovitski, Viatcheslav; Hanson, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and mitigating decoherence is a key challenge for quantum science and technology. The main source of decoherence for solid-state spin systems is the uncontrolled spin bath environment. Here, we demonstrate quantum control of a mesoscopic spin bath in diamond at room temperature that is composed of electron spins of substitutional nitrogen impurities. The resulting spin bath dynamics are probed using a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre electron spin as a magnetic field sensor. We exploit the spin bath control to dynamically suppress dephasing of the NV spin by the spin bath. Furthermore, by combining spin bath control with dynamical decoupling, we directly measure the coherence and temporal correlations of different groups of bath spins. These results uncover a new arena for fundamental studies on decoherence and enable novel avenues for spin-based magnetometry and quantum information processing. PMID:22536480

  8. Wash and Wean: Bathing Patients Undergoing Weaning Trials During Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Happ, Mary Beth; Tate, Judith A.; Swigart, Valerie A.; DiVirgilio-Thomas, Dana; Hoffman, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bathing is a fundamental nursing care activity performed for or with the self-assistance of critically ill patients. Few studies address caregiver and/or patient-family perspectives about bathing activity during weaning from prolonged mechanical ventilation. OBJECTIVE To describe practices and beliefs about bathing patients during weaning from prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV). METHODS Secondary analysis of qualitative data (observational field notes, interviews, and clinical record review) from a larger ethnographic study involving 30 patients weaning from PMV and the clinicians who cared for them using basic qualitative description. RESULTS Bathing, hygiene, and personal care were highly valued and equated with “good” nursing care by families and nurses. Nurses and respiratory therapists reported “working around” bath time and promoted conducting weaning trials before or after bathing. Patients were nevertheless bathed during weaning trials despite clinicians expressed concerns for energy conservation. Clinicians’ recognized individual patient response to bathing during PMV weaning trials. CONCLUSION Bathing is a central care activity for PMV patients and a component of daily work processes in the ICU. Bathing requires assessment of patient condition and activity tolerance and nurse-respiratory therapist negotiation and accommodation with respect to the initiation and/or continuation of PMV weaning trials during bathing. Further study is needed to validate the impact (or lack of impact) of various timing strategies for bathing PMV patients. PMID:20561877

  9. Properties of zinc tin oxide thin film by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, Muhammad Arif; Rahman, Abu Bakar Abd; Sepeai, Suhaila; Ludin, Norasikin Ahmad; Teridi, Mohd Asri Mat; Ibrahim, Mohd Adib

    2018-05-01

    This study focuses on the properties of ZTO which have been deposited by a low-cost method namely aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD). The precursors used in this method were zinc acetate dihidrate and tin chloride dihydrate for ZTO thin film deposition. Both precursors were mixed and stirred until fully dissolved before deposition. The ZTO was deposited on borosilicate glass substrate for the investigation of optical properties. The films deposited have passed the scotch tape adherence test. XRD revealed that the crystal ZTO is slightly in the form of perovskite structure but several deteriorations were also seen in the spectrum. The UV-Vis analysis showed high transmittance of ˜85% and the band gap was calculated to be 3.85 eV. The average thickness of the film is around 284 nm. The results showed that the ZTO thin films have been successfully deposited by the utilization of AACVD method.

  10. Culture and long-term care: the bath as social service in Japan.

    PubMed

    Traphagan, John W

    2004-01-01

    A central feature of Japan's approach to community-based care of the elderly, including long-term home health care, is the emphasis on providing bath facilities. For mobile elders, senior centers typically provide a public bathing facility in which people can enjoy a relaxing soak along with friends who also visit the centers. In terms of in-home long-term care, visiting bath services are provided to assist family care providers with the difflcult task of bathing a frail or disabled elder--a task made more problematic as a result of the Japanese style of bathing. I argue that the bath, as social service, is a culturally shaped solution to a specific problem of elder care that arises in the Japanese context as a result of the importance of the bath in everyday life for Japanese. While the services may be considered specific to Japan, some aspects of bathing services, particularly the mobile bath service, may also have applicability in the United States.

  11. Magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide via chemically and mechanically modified fluids

    DOE PAGES

    Salzman, Sivan; Romanofsky, Henry J.; Giannechini, Lucca J.; ...

    2016-02-19

    In this study, we describe the anisotropy in the material removal rate (MRR) of the polycrystalline, chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS).We define the polycrystalline anisotropy via microhardness and chemical erosion tests for four crystallographic orientations of ZnS: (100), (110), (111), and (311). Anisotropy in the MRR was studied under magnetorheological finishing (MRF) conditions. Three chemically and mechanically modified magnetorheological (MR) fluids at pH values of 4, 5, and 6 were used to test the MRR variations among the four single-crystal planes. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with pH 5 and pH 6MR fluids, variations were found inmore » the MRR among the four single-crystal planes and surface artifacts were observed on the polycrystalline material. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with the modified MR fluid at pH 4, however, minimal variation was observed in the MRR among the four orientations and a reduction in surface artifacts was achieved on the polycrystalline material.« less

  12. Self-organization of SiO{sub 2} nanodots deposited by chemical vapor deposition using an atmospheric pressure remote microplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Arnoult, G.; Belmonte, T.; Henrion, G.

    Self-organization of SiO{sub 2} nanodots is obtained by chemical vapor deposition out of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and atmospheric pressure remote Ar-O{sub 2} plasma operating at high temperature (1200-1600 K). The dewetting of the film being deposited when it is still thin enough (<500 nm) is found to be partly responsible for this self-organization. When the coating becomes thicker (approx1 mum), and for relatively high contents in HMDSO, SiO{sub 2} walls forming hexagonal cells are obtained on a SiO{sub 2} sublayer. For thicker coatings (>1 mum), droplet-shaped coatings with a Gaussian distribution in thickness over their width are deposited. The coatings aremore » submitted to high compressive stress. When it is relaxed, 'nestlike structures' made of nanoribbons are synthesized.« less

  13. Mycological flora of the Hammams, traditional Turkish bath.

    PubMed

    Goksugur, Nadir; Karabay, Oguz; Kocoglu, Esra

    2006-09-01

    Traditional Turkish baths, Hammams, occupy a prominent place in public health in history and at present. It is well-known that baths are major sources of fungal skin infections, but according to our knowledge fungal flora of Turkish Hammams was not defined yet. In Bolu, Turkey, two Hammams were open to public and for detecting fungal flora, we collected 209 samples from different part of floors, tools and screened for the fungal pathogens. From floors of the dressing rooms, Trichophyton rubrum and Candida albicans; from slippers T. rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, Epidermophyton floccosum, Candida albicans and C. tropicalis were isolated. While we could not isolate any dermatophyte species and yeasts from the vicinity of the bath windows and walls of baths, Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. were isolated from the same locations. Samples taken from marble floors of baths, central massage platforms (hottest part of the Hammam) and towels did not show any fungal growth. This report reveals that components of the Turkish Hammams have low risk for fungal contamination as a result of frequent cleaning and environmental high temperature. But shared tools like slippers were found to be an important source of fungal contamination.

  14. Effect of bathing on atopic dermatitis during the summer season

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hakyoung; Ban, Jeongsuk; Park, Mi-Ran; Kim, Do-Soo; Kim, Hye-Young; Han, Youngshin; Ahn, Kangmo

    2012-01-01

    Background There are little objective data regarding the optimal practice methods of bathing, although bathing and the use of moisturizers are the most important facets to atopic dermatitis (AD) management. Objective We performed this study to evaluate the effect of bathing on AD. Methods Ninety-six children with AD were enrolled during the summer season. Parents were educated to bathe them once daily with mildly acidic cleansers, and to apply emollients for 14 days. Parents recorded the frequency of bathing and skin symptoms in a diary. Scoring AD (SCORAD) scores were measured at the initial and follow-up visits. Patients were divided into two groups, based on the compliance of bathing; poor compliance was defined as ≥ 2 bathless days. Results There was an improvement of SCORAD score, itching, and insomnia in the good compliance group (all p < 0.001). The mean change in SCORAD score from the baseline at the follow-up visit was greater in the good compliance group than the poor compliance group (p = 0.038). Conclusion Daily bathing using weakly acidic syndets can reduce skin symptoms of pediatric AD during the summer season. PMID:23130333

  15. Chromium recovery from exhausted baths generated in plating processes and its reuse in the tanning industry.

    PubMed

    Torras, Josep; Buj, Irene; Rovira, Miquel; de Pablo, Joan

    2012-03-30

    Chromium plating used for functional purposes provides an extremely hard, wear and corrosion resistant layer by means of electrolytic deposition. Typical layer thicknesses range between 2.5 and 500 μm. Chromium electroplating baths contain high concentrations of Cr(VI) with chromium trioxide (CrO(3)) as the chromium source. When because of technical or economic reasons a bath gets exhausted, a waste containing mainly chromium as dichromate as well as other heavy metals is generated. Chromium may then be purified for use in other industrial processes with different requirements. In this work, a sustainable system for using galvanic wastes as reagents in the leather tanning industry, thus reducing quantity of wastes to be treated, is presented. Metal cations present in the chromium exhausted bath were precipitated with NaOH. Then, the solution containing mainly soluble Cr(VI) was separated. By means of sodium sulphite in acidic conditions, Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) as chromium (III) sulphate. From chromium (III) sulphate a basic Cr(III) sulphate may be obtained, which is one of most used compounds in the tanning industry. Cr(III) concentration in the final solution allows its reuse without concentration, but with a slight dilution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A comparative study of physico-chemical properties of CBD and SILAR grown ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jambure, S.B.; Patil, S.J.; Deshpande, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic model indicating ZnO nanorods by CBD (Z{sub 1}) and nanograins by SILAR (Z{sub 2}). - Highlights: • Simple methods for the synthesis of ZnO thin films. • Comparative study of physico-chemical properties of ZnO thin films prepared by CBD and SILAR methods. • CBD outperforms SILAR method. - Abstract: In the present work, nanocrystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been successfully deposited onto glass substrates by simple and economical chemical bath deposition (CBD) and successive ionic layer adsorption reaction (SILAR) methods. These films were further characterized for their structural, optical, surface morphological and wettability properties. Themore » X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns for both CBD and SILAR deposited ZnO thin films reveal the highly crystalline hexagonal wurtzite structure. From optical studies, band gaps obtained are 2.9 and 3.0 eV for CBD and SILAR deposited thin films, respectively. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) patterns show growth of well defined randomly oriented nanorods and nanograins on the CBD and SILAR deposited samples, respectively. The resistivity of CBD deposited films (10{sup 2} Ω cm) is lower than that of SILAR deposited films (10{sup 5} Ω cm). Surface wettability studies show hydrophobic nature for both films. From the above results it can be concluded that CBD grown ZnO thin films show better properties as compared to SILAR method.« less

  17. Diamond deposition by chemical vapor transport with hydrogen in a closed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarczyk, W.; Messier, R.; Roy, R.; Engdahl, C.

    1990-11-01

    The carbon-hydrogen chemical vapor transport system was examined in accordance with a four-stage transport model. A result of this examination is that graphite co-deposition could be avoided when diamond is deposited from gas solutions undersaturated with regard to diamond. Actual deposition experiments showed that this unusual requirement can be fulfilled but only for the condition that the transport distance between the carbon source and the substrate surface is short. In such a case diamond can be deposited equally from supersaturated as well as from undersaturated gas solutions. On the basis of thermodynamic considerations, a possible explanation of this unusual phenomenon is given. It is shown that there is a possibility of deposition of diamond from both supersaturated and undersaturated gas solutions but only on the condition that they are in a non-equilibrium state generally called the activated state. A model of the diamond deposition process consisting of two steps is proposed. In the first step diamond and graphite are deposited simultaneously. The most important carbon deposition reaction is C 2H 2(g)+2H(g) = C(diamond+graphite) +CH 4(g). The amount of co-deposited graphite is not a direct function of the saturation state of the gas phase. In the second step graphite is etched according to the most probable reaction C(graphite)+4H(g) = CH 4(g). Atomic hydrogen in a concentration exceeding equilibrium is necessary not only to etch graphite, but also to precipitate diamond and graphite.

  18. Lateral epitaxial overgowth of GaAs by organometallic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gale, R. P.; Mcclelland, R. W.; Fan, J. C. C.; Bozler, C. O.

    1982-01-01

    Lateral epitaxial overgrowth of GaAs by organometallic chemical vapor deposition has been demonstrated. Pyrolytic decomposition of trimethylgallium and arsine, without the use of HCl, was used to deposit GaAs on substrates prepared by coating (110) GaAs wafers with SiO2, then using photolithography to open narrow stripes in the oxide. Lateral overgrowth was seeded by epitaxial deposits formed on the GaAs surfaces exposed by the stripe openings. The extent of lateral overgrowth was investigated as a function of stripe orientation and growth temperature. Ratios of lateral to vertical growth rates greater than five have been obtained. The lateral growth is due to surface-kinetic control for the two-dimensional growth geometry studied. A continuous epitaxial GaAs layer 3 microns thick has been grown over a patterned mask on a GaAs substrate and then cleaved from the substrate.

  19. Post-industrial river water quality-Fit for bathing again?

    PubMed

    Kistemann, Thomas; Schmidt, Alexandra; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2016-10-01

    For the Ruhr River, bathing has been prohibited for decades. However, along with significant improvements of the hygienic water quality, there is an increasing demand of using the river for recreational purposes, in particular for bathing. In the "Safe Ruhr" interdisciplinary research project, demands, options and chances for lifting the bathing ban for the Ruhr River were investigated. As being the prominent reason for persisting recreational restrictions, microbiological water quality was in the focus of interest. Not only the faecal indicator organisms (FIOs) as required by the European Bathing Water Directive were considered, but also pathogens such as Salmonella, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, Campylobacter, Leptospira, enteroviruses and protozoan parasites. In this introductory paper, we firstly relate current recreational desires to historical experiences of river bathing. After recapitulating relevant microbial river contamination sources (predominantly sewage treatment plants, combined sewer overflows, and surface runoffs), we review existing knowledge about the relationships of FIOs and pathogens in rivers designated for recreational purposes, and then trace the evolution, rationale and validity of recreational freshwater quality criteria which are, despite obvious uncertainties, mostly relying on the FIO paradigm. In particular, the representativeness of FIOs is critically discussed. The working programme of Safe Ruhr, aiming at initiating and facilitating a process towards legalisation of Ruhr River bathing, is outlined. Sources of contamination can be technically handled which leaves the actual measures to political decisions. As contaminations are transient, only occasionally exceeding legal limits, a flexible bathing site management, warning bathers of non-safe situations, may amend technical interventions and offer innovative solutions. As a result, a situation-adapted system for lifting of the bathing ban for Ruhr River appears

  20. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of multiwalled carbon nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Kristopher; Cruden, Brett A; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M; Delzeit, Lance

    2002-10-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to grow vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanofibers (MWNFs). The graphite basal planes in these nanofibers are not parallel as in nanotubes; instead they exhibit a small angle resembling a stacked cone arrangement. A parametric study with varying process parameters such as growth temperature, feedstock composition, and substrate power has been conducted, and these parameters are found to influence the growth rate, diameter, and morphology. The well-aligned MWNFs are suitable for fabricating electrode systems in sensor and device development.

  1. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of multiwalled carbon nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Kristopher; Cruden, Brett A.; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.; Delzeit, Lance

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to grow vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanofibers (MWNFs). The graphite basal planes in these nanofibers are not parallel as in nanotubes; instead they exhibit a small angle resembling a stacked cone arrangement. A parametric study with varying process parameters such as growth temperature, feedstock composition, and substrate power has been conducted, and these parameters are found to influence the growth rate, diameter, and morphology. The well-aligned MWNFs are suitable for fabricating electrode systems in sensor and device development.

  2. Ballistic transport in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Calado, V. E.; Goswami, S.; Xu, Q.

    2014-01-13

    In this letter, we report the observation of ballistic transport on micron length scales in graphene synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Transport measurements were done on Hall bar geometries in a liquid He cryostat. Using non-local measurements, we show that electrons can be ballistically directed by a magnetic field (transverse magnetic focussing) over length scales of ∼1 μm. Comparison with atomic force microscope measurements suggests a correlation between the absence of wrinkles and the presence of ballistic transport in CVD graphene.

  3. Optimal Magnetorheological Fluid for Finishing of Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Zinc Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzman, Sivan

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) of polycrystalline, chemical-vapor- deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS) optics leaves visible surface artifacts known as "pebbles". These artifacts are a direct result of the material's inner structure that consists of cone-like features that grow larger (up to a few millimeters in size) as deposition takes place, and manifest on the top deposited surface as "pebbles". Polishing the pebble features from a CVD ZnS substrate to a flat, smooth surface to below 10 nm root-mean-square is challenging, especially for a non-destructive polishing process such as MRF. This work explores ways to improve the surface finish of CVD ZnS processed with MRF through modification of the magnetorheological (MR) fluid's properties. A materials science approach is presented to define the anisotropy of CVD ZnS through a combination of chemical and mechanical experiments and theoretical predictions. Magnetorheological finishing experiments with single crystal samples of ZnS, whose cuts and orientations represent most of the facets known to occur in the polycrystalline CVD ZnS, were performed to explore the influence of material anisotropy on the material removal rate during MRF. By adjusting the fluid's viscosity, abrasive type concentration, and pH to find the chemo-mechanical conditions that equalize removal rates among all single crystal facets during MRF, we established an optimized, novel MR formulation to polish CVD ZnS without degrading the surface finish of the optic.

  4. Bath Salts Abuse Leading to New-Onset Psychosis and Potential for Violence.

    PubMed

    John, Michelle E; Thomas-Rozea, Crystal; Hahn, David

    Bath salts have recently emerged as a popular designer drug of abuse causing significant hazardous effects on mental health and physical health, resulting in public health legislation making its usage illegal in the United States. To educate mental health providers on the effects of the new designer drug bath salts, including its potential to cause psychosis and violence in patients. This is a case report on a 40-year-old male with no past psychiatric history who presented with new-onset psychosis and increased risk for violence after ingesting bath salts. In addition, a literature review was performed to summarize the documented effects of bath salts abuse and the current U.S. public health legislation on bath salts. The presented case illustrates a new-onset, substance-induced psychotic disorder related to bath salts usage. The literature review explains the sympathomimetic reaction and the potential for psychotic symptoms. To discuss the physical and psychological effects of bath salts, treatment options for bath salts abuse and U.S. legislation by Ohio state law to current U.S. federal law that bans production, sale, and possession of main substances found in bath salts. It is important for mental health providers to be aware of bath salts, understand the physical and psychiatric effects of bath salts and be familiar with current legislative policy banning its usage. Lastly, bath salts abuse should be in the differential diagnosis where psychosis is new onset or clinically incongruent with known primary presentation of a psychotic disorder.

  5. Physical and chemical properties of deposited airborne particulates over the Arabian Red Sea coastal plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Johann P.; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Jish Prakash, P.; Lersch, Traci; Anisimov, Anatolii; Shevchenko, Illia

    2017-09-01

    Mineral dust is the most abundant aerosol, having a profound impact on the global energy budget. This research continues our previous studies performed on surface soils in the Arabian Peninsula, focusing on the mineralogical, physical and chemical composition of dust deposits from the atmosphere at the Arabian Red Sea coast. For this purpose, aerosols deposited from the atmosphere are collected during 2015 at six sites on the campus of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) situated on the Red Sea coastal plain of Saudi Arabia and subjected to the same chemical and mineralogical analysis we conducted on soil samples. Frisbee deposition samplers with foam inserts were used to collect dust and other deposits, for the period December 2014 to December 2015. The average deposition rate measured at KAUST for this period was 14 g m-2 per month, with lowest values in winter and increased deposition rates in August to October. The particle size distributions provide assessments of < 10 and < 2.5 µm dust deposition rates, and it is suggested that these represent proxies for PM10 (coarse) and PM2. 5 (fine) particle size fractions in the dust deposits.X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of a subset of samples confirms variable amounts of quartz, feldspars, micas, and halite, with lesser amounts of gypsum, calcite, dolomite, hematite, and amphibole. Freeze-dried samples were re-suspended onto the Teflon® filters for elemental analysis by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), while splits from each sample were analyzed for water-soluble cations and anions by ion chromatography. The dust deposits along the Red Sea coast are considered to be a mixture of dust emissions from local soils and soils imported from distal dust sources. Airborne mineral concentrations are greatest at or close to dust sources, compared to those through medium- and long-range transport. It is not possible to identify the exact origin

  6. CuInS2 Films Deposited by Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Ternary Single-Source Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Michael; Banger, Kal; Harris, Jerry; Hepp, Aloysius

    2003-01-01

    Polycrystalline CuInS2 films were deposited by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using both solid and liquid ternary single-source precursors (SSPs) which were prepared in-house. Films with either (112) or (204/220) preferred orientation, had a chalcopyrite structure, and (112)-oriented films contained more copper than (204/220)-oriented films. The preferred orientation of the film is likely related to the decomposition and reaction kinetics associated with the molecular structure of the precursors at the substrate. Interestingly, the (204/220)-oriented films were always In-rich and were accompanied by a secondary phase. From the results of post-growth annealing, etching experiments, and Raman spectroscopic data, the secondary phase was identified as an In-rich compound. On the contrary, (112)-oriented films were always obtained with a minimal amount of the secondary phase, and had a maximum grain size of about 0.5 micron. Electrical and optical properties of all the films grown were characterized. They all showed p-type conduction with an electrical resistivity between 0.1 and 30 Omega-cm, and an optical band gap of approximately 1.46 eV +/- 0.02, as deposited. The material properties of deposited films revealed this methodology of using SSPs for fabricating chalcopyrite-based solar cells to be highly promising.

  7. Effects of argon addition on a-CNx film deposition by hot carbon filament chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Aono, Masami; Yamazaki, Ayumi; Kitazawa, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Yoshikazu

    2002-07-01

    Using a carbon filament which supplies carbon and heat, amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films were prepared on Si (100) substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Deposition was performed in a low-pressure atmosphere of pure nitrogen and a gas mixture of nitrogen and argon. Effects of argon additions to the nitrogen atmosphere on the film microstructure and interface composition between the film and substrate were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). FESEM observations reveal that the film prepared in a pure nitrogen atmosphere has uniform nucleation and a densely packed columnar pieces structure. The film prepared in the nitrogen and argon gas mixture exhibits preferential nucleation and a tapered structure with macroscopic voids. Depth analyses using XPS reveal that the film prepared in pure nitrogen possesses a broad interface, which includes silicon carbide as well as a-CNx, whereas a sharp interface is discerned in the film prepared in the mixed nitrogen and argon gas. We observed that silicon carbide formation is suppressed by an argon addition to the nitrogen atmosphere during deposition. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  8. Study of Silicidation Process of Tungsten Catalyzer during Silicon Film Deposition in Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Kazuhiro; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2008-05-01

    In catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD), often called hot-wire CVD, source gases are decomposed by catalytic cracking reactions with heated catalyzing metal wires. In the case of silicon (Si) film deposition, such metal wires are often converted to silicide, which shortens the lifetime of catalyzing wires. As a catalyzer, tungsten (W) is widely used. Thus, the process of silicidation of a W catalyzer at temperatures over 1650 °C, which is the temperature used in Cat-CVD for Si film deposition, was studied extensively in various experiments. It is found that two phases of tungsten-silicide, WSi2 and W5Si3, are formed at this temperature, and that the radiation emissivity of WSi2 is 1.2 to 1.7 times higher than that of W5Si3 and pure W. The increase of surface emissivity due to the formation of WSi2 decreases the catalyzer surface temperature which induces further growth of the tungsten-silicide layer. It is also found that the suppression of WSi2 formation by elevating catalyzer temperatures over 1750 °C is a key to extending the lifetime of the W catalyzer in Cat-CVD.

  9. Dissolution of synthetic uranium dibutyl phosphate deposits in oxidizing and reducing chemical formulations.

    PubMed

    Rufus, A L; Sathyaseelan, V S; Narasimhan, S V; Velmurugan, S

    2013-06-15

    Permanganate and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) based dilute chemical formulations were evaluated for the dissolution of uranium dibutyl phosphate (U-DBP), a compound that deposits over the surfaces of nuclear reprocessing plants and waste storage tanks. A combination of an acidic, oxidizing treatment (nitric acid with permanganate) followed by reducing treatment (NTA based formulation) efficiently dissolved the U-DBP deposits. The dissolution isotherm of U-DBP in its as precipitated form followed a logarithmic fit. The same chemical treatment was also effective in dissolving U-DBP coated on the surface of 304-stainless steel, while resulting in minimal corrosion of the stainless steel substrate material. Investigation of uranium recovery from the resulting decontamination solutions by ion exchange with a bed of mixed anion and cation resins showed quantitative removal of uranium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. SILAR deposition of nickel sulfide counter electrode for application in quantum dot sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Navjot; Siwatch, Poonam; Arora, Anmol; Sharma, Jadab; Tripathi, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells are a likely replacement for Silicon-based solar cells. Counter electrodes are a fundamental aspect of QDSSC's performance. NiS being a less expensive material is a decent choice for the purpose. In this paper, we have discussed the synthesis of NiS by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption Reaction. Optical, Crystallographic and Electrical studies have been presented. Electrical studies of the device with NiS counter electrode is compared with characteristics of the device with CNTs as the counter electrode. SILAR method is easy and less time to consume than chemical bath deposition or any other method. Results show the success of NiS synthesized by SILAR method as the counter electrode.

  11. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmazuçar, Hasan H.; Gündüz, Güngör

    2000-12-01

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed.

  12. Selective growth of titanium dioxide by low-temperature chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Michael; Kuzminykh, Yury; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2015-05-13

    A key factor in engineering integrated optical devices such as electro-optic switches or waveguides is the patterning of thin films into specific geometries. In particular for functional oxides, etching processes are usually developed to a much lower extent than for silicon or silicon dioxide; therefore, selective area deposition techniques are of high interest for these materials. We report the selective area deposition of titanium dioxide using titanium isopropoxide and water in a high-vacuum chemical vapor deposition (HV-CVD) process at a substrate temperature of 225 °C. Here—contrary to conventional thermal CVD processes—only hydrolysis of the precursor on the surface drives the film growth as the thermal energy is not sufficient to thermally decompose the precursor. Local modification of the substrate surface energy by perfluoroalkylsilanization leads to a reduced surface residence time of the precursors and, consequently, to lower reaction rate and a prolonged incubation period before nucleation occurs, hence, enabling selective area growth. We discuss the dependence of the incubation time and the selectivity of the deposition process on the presence of the perfluoroalkylsilanization layer and on the precursor impinging rates—with selectivity, we refer to the difference of desired material deposition, before nucleation occurs in the undesired regions. The highest measured selectivity reached (99 ± 5) nm, a factor of 3 superior than previously reported in an atomic layer deposition process using the same chemistry. Furthermore, resolution of the obtained patterns will be discussed and illustrated.

  13. Psychoactive “bath salts”: not so soothing

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Michael H.; Partilla, John S.; Lehner, Kurt R.

    2012-01-01

    Recently there has been a dramatic rise in the abuse of so-called “bath salts” products that are purchased as legal alternatives to illicit drugs like cocaine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Baths salts contain one or more synthetic derivatives of the naturally-occurring stimulant cathinone. Low doses of bath salts produce euphoria and increase alertness, but high doses or chronic use can cause serious adverse effects such as hallucinations, delirium, hyperthermia and tachycardia. Owing to the risks posed by bath salts, the governments of many countries have made certain cathinones illegal, namely: 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone), 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). Similar to other psychomotor stimulants, synthetic cathinones target plasma membrane transporters for dopamine (i.e., DAT), norepinephrine (i.e., NET) and serotonin (i.e, SERT). Mephedrone and methylone act as non-selective transporter substrates, thereby stimulating non-exocytotic release of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin. By contrast, MDPV acts as a potent blocker at DAT and NET, with little effect at SERT. Administration of mephedrone or methylone to rats increases extracellular concentrations of dopamine and serotonin in the brain, analogous to the effects of MDMA. Not surprisingly, synthetic cathinones elicit locomotor activation in rodents. Stimulation of dopamine transmission by synthetic cathinones predicts a high potential for addiction and may underlie clinical adverse effects. As popular synthetic cathinones are rendered illegal, new replacement cathinones are appearing in the marketplace. More research on the pharmacology and toxicology of abused cathinones is needed to inform public health policy and develop strategies for treating medical consequence of bath salts abuse. PMID:23178799

  14. [Pseudomonas folliculitis after spa bath exposure].

    PubMed

    Uldall Pallesen, Kristine Appel; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mørtz, Charlotte Gotthard

    2012-06-25

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of folliculitis. Pseudomonas folliculitis can develop after contact with contaminated water from swimming pools, hot tubs and spa baths. Systemic therapy may be indicated in patients with widespread lesions, systemic symptoms or in immunosuppressed patients. We describe a 23-year-old healthy woman who developed a pustular rash and general malaise after using a spa bath contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial culture from a pustule confirmed Pseudomonas folliculitis and the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with rapid good effect.

  15. Preparation of cuxinygazsen precursor films and powders by electroless deposition

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Batchelor, Wendi Kay; Wiesner, Holm; Ramanathan, Kannan; Noufi, Rommel

    1999-01-01

    A method for electroless deposition of Cu.sub.x In.sub.y Ga.sub.z Se.sub.n (x=0-2, y=0-2, z=0-2, n=0-3) precursor films and powders onto a metallic substrate comprising: preparing an aqueous bath solution of compounds selected from the group consisting of: I) a copper compound, a selenium compound, an indium compound and gallium compound; II) a copper compound, a selenium compound and an indium compound; III) a selenium compound, and indium compound and a gallium compound; IV) a selenium compound and a indium compound; and V) a copper compound and selenium compound; each compound being present in sufficient quantity to react with each other to produce Cu.sub.x In.sub.y Ga.sub.z Se.sub.n (x=0-2, y=0-2, z=0-2, n=0-3); adjusting the pH of the aqueous bath solution to an acidic value by the addition of a dilute acid; and initiating an electroless reaction with an oxidizing counterelectrode for a sufficient time to cause a deposit of Cu.sub.x In.sub.y Ga.sub.z Se.sub.n (x=0-2, y=0-2, z=0-2, n=0-3) from the aqueous bath solution onto a metallic substrate.

  16. Emollient bath additives for the treatment of childhood eczema (BATHE): multicentre pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial of clinical and cost effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ridd, Matthew J; Francis, Nick A; Stuart, Beth; Rumsby, Kate; Chorozoglou, Maria; Becque, Taeko; Roberts, Amanda; Liddiard, Lyn; Nollett, Claire; Hooper, Julie; Prude, Martina; Wood, Wendy; Thomas, Kim S; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Williams, Hywel C; Little, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To determine the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of including emollient bath additives in the management of eczema in children. Design Pragmatic randomised open label superiority trial with two parallel groups. Setting 96 general practices in Wales and western and southern England. Participants 483 children aged 1 to 11 years, fulfilling UK diagnostic criteria for atopic dermatitis. Children with very mild eczema and children who bathed less than once weekly were excluded. Interventions Participants in the intervention group were prescribed emollient bath additives by their usual clinical team to be used regularly for 12 months. The control group were asked to use no bath additives for 12 months. Both groups continued with standard eczema management, including leave-on emollients, and caregivers were given standardised advice on how to wash participants. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was eczema control measured by the patient oriented eczema measure (POEM, scores 0-7 mild, 8-16 moderate, 17-28 severe) weekly for 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes were eczema severity over one year (monthly POEM score from baseline to 52 weeks), number of eczema exacerbations resulting in primary healthcare consultation, disease specific quality of life (dermatitis family impact), generic quality of life (child health utility-9D), utilisation of resources, and type and quantity of topical corticosteroid or topical calcineurin inhibitors prescribed. Results 483 children were randomised and one child was withdrawn, leaving 482 children in the trial: 51% were girls (244/482), 84% were of white ethnicity (447/470), and the mean age was 5 years. 96% (461/482) of participants completed at least one post-baseline POEM, so were included in the analysis, and 77% (370/482) completed questionnaires for more than 80% of the time points for the primary outcome (12/16 weekly questionnaires to 16 weeks). The mean baseline POEM score was 9.5 (SD 5.7) in the

  17. INVESTIGATION INTO THE REJUVENATION OF SPENT ELECTROLESS NICKEL BATHS BY ELECTRODIALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electroless nickel plating generates substantially more waste than other metal-finishing processes due to the inherent limited bath life and the need for regular bath disposal. Electrodialysis can be used to generate electroless nickel baths, but poor membrane permselectivity, l...

  18. Ruthenium films by digital chemical vapor deposition: Selectivity, nanostructure, and work function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sandwip K.; Goswami, Jaydeb; Gu, Diefeng; de Waard, Henk; Marcus, Steve; Werkhoven, Chris

    2004-03-01

    Ruthenium electrodes were selectively deposited on photoresist-patterned HfO2 surface [deposited on a SiOx/Si wafer by atomic layer deposition (ALD)] by a manufacturable, digital chemical vapor deposition (DCVD) technique. DCVD of Ru was carried out at 280-320 °C using an alternate delivery of Bis (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)(1,5-cyclooctadiene)Ru (dissolved in tetrahydrofuran) and oxygen. The as-deposited Ru films were polycrystalline, dense, and conducting (resistivity ˜20.6 μΩ cm). However, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and high-resolution electron microscopy results indicate the presence of an amorphous RuOx at the Ru grain boundaries and at the DCVD-Ru/ALD-HfO2 interface. The estimated work function of DCVD-Ru on ALD-HfO2 was ˜5.1 eV. Moreover, the equivalent oxide thickness, hysteresis in capacitance-voltage, and leakage current density at -2 V of the HfO2/SiOx dielectric, after forming gas (95% N2+5% H2) annealing at 450 °C for 30 min, were 1.4 nm, 20 mV, and 7.4×10-7 A cm-2, respectively.

  19. Quantum mechanical treatment of large spin baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhrig, Robin; Schering, Philipp; Gravert, Lars B.; Fauseweh, Benedikt; Uhrig, Götz S.

    2018-04-01

    The electronic spin in quantum dots can be described by central spin models (CSMs) with a very large number Neff≈104 to 106 of bath spins posing a tremendous challenge to theoretical simulations. Here, a fully quantum mechanical theory is developed for the limit Neff→∞ by means of iterated equations of motion (iEoM). We find that the CSM can be mapped to a four-dimensional impurity coupled to a noninteracting bosonic bath in this limit. Remarkably, even for infinite bath the CSM does not become completely classical. The data obtained by the proposed iEoM approach are tested successfully against data from other, established approaches. Thus the iEoM mapping extends the set of theoretical tools that can be used to understand the spin dynamics in large CSMs.

  20. Novikov Engine with Fluctuating Heat Bath Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalbe, Karsten; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz

    2018-04-01

    The Novikov engine is a model for heat engines that takes the irreversible character of heat fluxes into account. Using this model, the maximum power output as well as the corresponding efficiency of the heat engine can be deduced, leading to the well-known Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency. The classical model assumes constant heat bath temperatures, which is not a reasonable assumption in the case of fluctuating heat sources. Therefore, in this article the influence of stochastic fluctuations of the hot heat bath's temperature on the optimal performance measures is investigated. For this purpose, a Novikov engine with fluctuating heat bath temperature is considered. Doing so, a generalization of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency is found. The results can help to quantify how the distribution of fluctuating quantities affects the performance measures of power plants.

  1. 36 CFR 21.11 - Redemption of bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Redemption of bath tickets. 21.11 Section 21.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.11 Redemption of bath tickets. Unused...

  2. 36 CFR 21.11 - Redemption of bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Redemption of bath tickets. 21.11 Section 21.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.11 Redemption of bath tickets. Unused...

  3. 36 CFR 21.11 - Redemption of bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Redemption of bath tickets. 21.11 Section 21.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.11 Redemption of bath tickets. Unused...

  4. 36 CFR 21.11 - Redemption of bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Redemption of bath tickets. 21.11 Section 21.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.11 Redemption of bath tickets. Unused...

  5. 36 CFR 21.11 - Redemption of bath tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Redemption of bath tickets. 21.11 Section 21.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.11 Redemption of bath tickets. Unused...

  6. 20 CFR 654.412 - Bathing, laundry, and handwashing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Bathing, laundry, and handwashing. (a) Bathing and handwashing facilities, supplied with hot and cold... floor drains. Except in individual family units, separate shower facilities shall be provided each sex. When common use shower facilities for both sexes are in the same building they shall be separated by a...

  7. 20 CFR 654.412 - Bathing, laundry, and handwashing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Bathing, laundry, and handwashing. (a) Bathing and handwashing facilities, supplied with hot and cold... floor drains. Except in individual family units, separate shower facilities shall be provided each sex. When common use shower facilities for both sexes are in the same building they shall be separated by a...

  8. 20 CFR 654.412 - Bathing, laundry, and handwashing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Bathing, laundry, and handwashing. (a) Bathing and handwashing facilities, supplied with hot and cold... floor drains. Except in individual family units, separate shower facilities shall be provided each sex. When common use shower facilities for both sexes are in the same building they shall be separated by a...

  9. 20 CFR 654.412 - Bathing, laundry, and handwashing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Bathing, laundry, and handwashing. (a) Bathing and handwashing facilities, supplied with hot and cold... floor drains. Except in individual family units, separate shower facilities shall be provided each sex. When common use shower facilities for both sexes are in the same building they shall be separated by a...

  10. 20 CFR 654.412 - Bathing, laundry, and handwashing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Bathing, laundry, and handwashing. (a) Bathing and handwashing facilities, supplied with hot and cold... floor drains. Except in individual family units, separate shower facilities shall be provided each sex. When common use shower facilities for both sexes are in the same building they shall be separated by a...

  11. 21 CFR 740.17 - Foaming detergent bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Foaming detergent bath products. 740.17 Section 740.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.17 Foaming detergent bath products...

  12. 21 CFR 740.17 - Foaming detergent bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Foaming detergent bath products. 740.17 Section 740.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.17 Foaming detergent bath products...

  13. 21 CFR 740.17 - Foaming detergent bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Foaming detergent bath products. 740.17 Section 740.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.17 Foaming detergent bath products...

  14. 21 CFR 740.17 - Foaming detergent bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foaming detergent bath products. 740.17 Section 740.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.17 Foaming detergent bath products...

  15. 21 CFR 740.17 - Foaming detergent bath products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Foaming detergent bath products. 740.17 Section 740.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.17 Foaming detergent bath products...

  16. Deposition kinetics and characterization of stable ionomers from hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Urstöger, Georg; Resel, Roland; Coclite, Anna Maria, E-mail: anna.coclite@tugraz.at

    2016-04-07

    A novel ionomer of hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid was synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PECVD process, being solventless, allows mixing of monomers with very different solubilities, and for polymers formed at high deposition rates and with high structural stability (due to the high number of cross-links and covalent bonding to the substrate) to be obtained. A kinetic study over a large set of parameters was run with the aim of determining the optimal conditions for high stability and proton conductivity of the polymer layer. Copolymers with good stability over 6 months' time in air and watermore » were obtained, as demonstrated by ellipsometry, X-Ray reflectivity, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Stable coatings showed also proton conductivity as high as 1.1 ± 0.1 mS cm{sup −1}. Chemical analysis showed that due to the high molecular weight of the chosen precursors, it was possible to keep the plasma energy-input-per-mass low. This allowed limited precursor fragmentation and the functional groups of both monomers to be retained during the plasma polymerization.« less

  17. Image analysis for maintenance of coating quality in nickel electroplating baths--real time control.

    PubMed

    Vidal, M; Amigo, J M; Bro, R; van den Berg, F; Ostra, M; Ubide, C

    2011-11-07

    The aim of this paper is to show how it is possible to extract analytical information from images acquired with a flatbed scanner and make use of this information for real time control of a nickel plating process. Digital images of plated steel sheets in a nickel bath are used to follow the process under degradation of specific additives. Dedicated software has been developed for making the obtained results accessible to process operators. This includes obtaining the RGB image, to select the red channel data exclusively, to calculate the histogram of the red channel data and to calculate the mean colour value (MCV) and the standard deviation of the red channel data. MCV is then used by the software to determine the concentration of the additives Supreme Plus Brightner (SPB) and SA-1 (for confidentiality reasons, the chemical contents cannot be further detailed) present in the bath (these two additives degrade and their concentration changes during the process). Finally, the software informs the operator when the bath is generating unsuitable quality plating and suggests the amount of SPB and SA-1 to be added in order to recover the original plating quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Selenization of CIS and CIGS layers deposited by chemical spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, B. J.; Egaas, B.; Velumani, S.

    Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 (CIGS) thin films with x=0 (CIS) and x=0.3 (CIGS) were prepared on Mo-coated glass substrate by using chemical spray pyrolysis at a substrate temperature of 350 degrees C, followed by selenization treatment at 550 degrees C in selenium environment under N2 gas flow. X-ray diffraction patterns of as-deposited CIGS layers on Mo showed polycrystalline chalcopyrite phase with an intense (112) plane. Splitting of (204)/(220) and (116)/(312) planes for the film with x=0.3 reveals deviation of tetragonal nature. Field emission scanning electron microscopy cross-sectional images of selenized films showed clear re-crystallization of grains. During the selenization process of the CIGSmore » absorber, a thin interface layer of MoSe2 is formed. Line mapping of Mo/CIGS layer showed more gallium segregation at the interface of back contact resulting in band gap grading. Chemical composition and mapping of the as-deposited and selenized samples were determined by energy dispersive analysis of X-rays. This work leads to fabrication of low cost and large scale Mo/CIGS/CdS/ZnO/ZnO:Al device structure.« less

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of low reflective cobalt (II) oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin-Chalhoub, Eliane; Duguet, Thomas; Samélor, Diane; Debieu, Olivier; Ungureanu, Elisabeta; Vahlas, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Low reflective CoO coatings are processed by chemical vapor deposition from Co2(CO)8 at temperatures between 120 °C and 190 °C without additional oxygen source. The optical reflectivity in the visible and near infrared regions stems from 2 to 35% depending on deposition temperature. The combination of specific microstructural features of the coatings, namely a fractal ⿿cauliflower⿿ morphology and a grain size distribution more or less covering the near UV and IR wavelength ranges enhance light scattering and gives rise to a low reflectivity. In addition, the columnar morphology results in a density gradient in the vertical direction that we interpret as a refractive index gradient lowering reflectivity further down. The coating formed at 180 °C shows the lowest average reflectivity (2.9%), and presents an interesting deep black diffuse aspect.

  20. CFD Modeling of Swirl and Nonswirl Gas Injections into Liquid Baths Using Top Submerged Lances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Nazmul; Naser, J.; Brooks, G.; Reuter, M. A.; Matusewicz, R. W.

    2010-02-01

    Fluid flow phenomena in a cylindrical bath stirred by a top submerged lance (TSL) gas injection was investigated by using the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling technique for an isothermal air-water system. The multiphase flow simulation, based on the Euler-Euler approach, elucidated the effect of swirl and nonswirl flow inside the bath. The effects of the lance submergence level and the air flow rate also were investigated. The simulation results for the velocity fields and the generation of turbulence in the bath were validated against existing experimental data from the previous water model experimental study by Morsi et al.[1] The model was extended to measure the degree of the splash generation for different liquid densities at certain heights above the free surface. The simulation results showed that the two-thirds lance submergence level provided better mixing and high liquid velocities for the generation of turbulence inside the water bath. However, it is also responsible for generating more splashes in the bath compared with the one-third lance submergence level. An approach generally used by heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system simulations was applied to predict the convective mixing phenomena. The simulation results for the air-water system showed that mean convective mixing for swirl flow is more than twice than that of nonswirl in close proximity to the lance. A semiempirical equation was proposed from the results of the present simulation to measure the vertical penetration distance of the air jet injected through the annulus of the lance in the cylindrical vessel of the model, which can be expressed as L_{va} = 0.275( {do - di } )Frm^{0.4745} . More work still needs to be done to predict the detail process kinetics in a real furnace by considering nonisothermal high-temperature systems with chemical reactions.

  1. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of aluminum oxide thin films via pyrolysis of dimethylaluminum isopropoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Benjamin W.; Sweet, William J. III; Rogers, Bridget R.

    2010-03-15

    Metal-organic chemical vapor deposited aluminum oxide films were produced via pyrolysis of dimethylaluminum isopropoxide in a high vacuum reaction chamber in the 417-659 deg. C temperature range. Deposited films contained aluminum, oxygen, and carbon, and the carbon-to-aluminum ratio increased with increased deposition temperature. Aluminum-carbon bonding was observed in films deposited at 659 deg. C by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, but not in films deposited at 417 deg. C. The apparent activation energy in the surface reaction controlled regime was 91 kJ/mol. The O/Al and C/Al ratios in the deposited films were greater and less than, respectively, the ratios predicted by themore » stoichiometry of the precursor. Flux analysis of the deposition process suggested that the observed film stoichiometries could be explained by the participation of oxygen-containing background gases present in the reactor at its base pressure.« less

  2. Bandages and difficulty with bathing: introducing Seal-Tight.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Ellie

    2005-06-01

    Patients with compression bandages experience difficulty with bathing due to the possibility that bandages may become wet and affect the wound. Bandage and dressing changes resulting from accidental wetting also cost the NHS considerable time and money. This product focus highlights the social and psychological impact on the patient when they are unable to bathe and offers a solution to the problem. Seal-Tight is a product that has been newly placed on the drug tariff, making it widely available to all patients who wear bandages (or plaster casts). Seal-Tight enables the patient to bathe, in some cases for the first time for months or even years.

  3. Two-level system in spin baths: Non-adiabatic dynamics and heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Dvira

    2014-04-01

    We study the non-adiabatic dynamics of a two-state subsystem in a bath of independent spins using the non-interacting blip approximation, and derive an exact analytic expression for the relevant memory kernel. We show that in the thermodynamic limit, when the subsystem-bath coupling is diluted (uniformly) over many (infinite) degrees of freedom, our expression reduces to known results, corresponding to the harmonic bath with an effective, temperature-dependent, spectral density function. We then proceed and study the heat current characteristics in the out-of-equilibrium spin-spin-bath model, with a two-state subsystem bridging two thermal spin-baths of different temperatures. We compare the behavior of this model to the case of a spin connecting boson baths, and demonstrate pronounced qualitative differences between the two models. Specifically, we focus on the development of the thermal diode effect, and show that the spin-spin-bath model cannot support it at weak (subsystem-bath) coupling, while in the intermediate-strong coupling regime its rectifying performance outplays the spin-boson model.

  4. Kinetic and microstructural study of titanium nitride deposited by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egland, Keith Maynard

    Titanium nitride (TiN) films were deposited onto Ti-6Al-4V substrates by laser chemical vapor deposition using a cw COsb2 laser and TiClsb4,\\ Nsb2, and Hsb2 reactant gases. In-situ laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and multi-wavelength pyrometry determined relative titanium gas phase atomic number density and deposition temperature, respectively. Deposited films were yellow to gold in color. Transmission electron microscopy on one sample revealed a face-centered cubic structure with a lattice parameter (0.4237 nm) expected for TiN. Auger electron spectroscopy found substoichiometric compositions with a N/Ti ratio between 0.7 and 0.9. Variables decreasing grain size (lower temperature, higher TiClsb4 input) decreased the N/Ti ratio. Higher Nsb2 input increased stoichiometry, while larger Hsb2 input decreased stoichiometry. The deposit substoichiometry is believed to be caused by diffusion of nitrogen through TiN grain boundaries to the titanium alloy substrate. The morphology starts as a dense polycrystalline structure evolving into a columnar structure having facets or nodules at the surface with crystallite sizes ranging from 10-1000 nm. TiClsb4 input had a inverse correlation with crystallite size, while Nsb2:Hsb2 ratio had minimal effect; the crystallite size (G) varied exponentially with temperature (T) for a given irradiation time, i.e., G = C exp (-28000/T), with constant C reflecting substrate roughness and gas composition. Microhardness tests revealed substrate contributions; nevertheless, films appeared to have a minimum hardness of 2000 Hsbv. The deposition apparent activation energy was calculated as 122 ± 9 kJ/mole using growth rates measured by film height and 117 ± 23 kJ/mole using growth rates measured by LIF signals. This puts the process in the surface kinetic growth regime over the temperature range 1370-1610 K. Above Nsb2 and Hsb2 levels of 1.25% and below TiClsb4 input of 4.5%, the growth rate has a half-order dependence on nitrogen and a

  5. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ, and Hα were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm-1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit "coral" and "cauliflower-like" morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  6. Quantitative and simultaneous analysis of the polarity of polycrystalline ZnO seed layers and related nanowires grown by wet chemical deposition.

    PubMed

    Guillemin, Sophie; Parize, Romain; Carabetta, Joseph; Cantelli, Valentina; Albertini, David; Gautier, Brice; Brémond, Georges; Fong, Dillon D; Renevier, Hubert; Consonni, Vincent

    2017-03-03

    The polarity in ZnO nanowires is an important issue since it strongly affects surface configuration and reactivity, nucleation and growth, electro-optical properties, and nanoscale-engineering device performances. However, measuring statistically the polarity of ZnO nanowire arrays grown by chemical bath deposition and elucidating its correlation with the polarity of the underneath polycrystalline ZnO seed layer grown by the sol-gel process represents a major difficulty. To address that issue, we combine resonant x-ray diffraction (XRD) at Zn K-edge using synchrotron radiation with piezoelectric force microscopy and polarity-sensitive chemical etching to statistically investigate the polarity of more than 10 7 nano-objects both on the macroscopic and local microscopic scales, respectively. By using high temperature annealing under an argon atmosphere, it is shown that the compact, highly c-axis oriented ZnO seed layer is more than 92% Zn-polar and that only a few small O-polar ZnO grains with an amount less than 8% are formed. Correlatively, the resulting ZnO nanowires are also found to be Zn-polar, indicating that their polarity is transferred from the c-axis oriented ZnO grains acting as nucleation sites in the seed layer. These findings pave the way for the development of new strategies to form unipolar ZnO nanowire arrays as a requirement for a number of nanoscale-engineering devices like piezoelectric nanogenerators. They also highlight the great advantage of resonant XRD as a macroscopic, non-destructive method to simultaneously and statistically measure the polarity of ZnO nanowire arrays and of the underneath ZnO seed layer.

  7. Quantitative and simultaneous analysis of the polarity of polycrystalline ZnO seed layers and related nanowires grown by wet chemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemin, Sophie; Parize, Romain; Carabetta, Joseph; Cantelli, Valentina; Albertini, David; Gautier, Brice; Brémond, Georges; Fong, Dillon D.; Renevier, Hubert; Consonni, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    The polarity in ZnO nanowires is an important issue since it strongly affects surface configuration and reactivity, nucleation and growth, electro-optical properties, and nanoscale-engineering device performances. However, measuring statistically the polarity of ZnO nanowire arrays grown by chemical bath deposition and elucidating its correlation with the polarity of the underneath polycrystalline ZnO seed layer grown by the sol-gel process represents a major difficulty. To address that issue, we combine resonant x-ray diffraction (XRD) at Zn K-edge using synchrotron radiation with piezoelectric force microscopy and polarity-sensitive chemical etching to statistically investigate the polarity of more than 107 nano-objects both on the macroscopic and local microscopic scales, respectively. By using high temperature annealing under an argon atmosphere, it is shown that the compact, highly c-axis oriented ZnO seed layer is more than 92% Zn-polar and that only a few small O-polar ZnO grains with an amount less than 8% are formed. Correlatively, the resulting ZnO nanowires are also found to be Zn-polar, indicating that their polarity is transferred from the c-axis oriented ZnO grains acting as nucleation sites in the seed layer. These findings pave the way for the development of new strategies to form unipolar ZnO nanowire arrays as a requirement for a number of nanoscale-engineering devices like piezoelectric nanogenerators. They also highlight the great advantage of resonant XRD as a macroscopic, non-destructive method to simultaneously and statistically measure the polarity of ZnO nanowire arrays and of the underneath ZnO seed layer.

  8. Quantitative and simultaneous analysis of the polarity of polycrystalline ZnO seed layers and related nanowires grown by wet chemical deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Sophie; Parize, Romain; Carabetta, Joseph

    The polarity in ZnO nanowires is an important issue since it strongly affects surface configuration and reactivity, nucleation and growth, electro-optical properties, and nanoscaleengineering device performances. However, measuring statistically the polarity of ZnO nanowire arrays grown by chemical bath deposition and elucidating its correlation with the polarity of the underneath polycrystalline ZnO seed layer grown by the sol–gel process represents a major difficulty. To address that issue, we combine resonant x-ray diffraction (XRD) at Zn K-edge using synchrotron radiation with piezoelectric force microscopy and polarity-sensitive chemical etching to statistically investigate the polarity of more than 107 nano-objects both on themore » macroscopic and local microscopic scales, respectively. By using high temperature annealing under an argon atmosphere, it is shown that the compact, highly c-axis oriented ZnO seed layer is more than 92% Zn-polar and that only a few small O-polar ZnO grains with an amount less than 8% are formed. Correlatively, the resulting ZnO nanowires are also found to be Zn-polar, indicating that their polarity is transferred from the c-axis oriented ZnO grains acting as nucleation sites in the seed layer. These findings pave the way for the development of new strategies to form unipolar ZnO nanowire arrays as a requirement for a number of nanoscaleengineering devices like piezoelectric nanogenerators. They also highlight the great advantage of resonant XRD as a macroscopic, non-destructive method to simultaneously and statistically measure the polarity of ZnO nanowire arrays and of the underneath ZnO seed layer.« less

  9. [Turpentine white emulsion baths in the rehabilation in patients with sexual dysfunctions].

    PubMed

    Karpukhin, I V; Li, A A; Gusev, M E

    2000-01-01

    100 patients with sexual dysfunction (SD) and 20 SD patients took turpentine white emulsion baths and sodium chloride baths, respectively. The turpentine baths were given with step-by-step rise in turpentine concentration from 20 to 50 ml per 200 l of water, temperature 36-37 degrees C, duration of the procedure 10-15 min. The course consisted of 10-12 procedures which were conducted daily or each other day. The turpentine baths were more effective than sodium chloride baths (85 vs 50%, respectively).

  10. Quantum Otto engine using a single ion and a single thermal bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Asoka; Chand, Suman

    2016-05-01

    Quantum heat engines employ a quantum system as the working fluid, that gives rise to large work efficiency, beyond the limit for classical heat engines. Existing proposals for implementing quantum heat engines require that the system interacts with the hot bath and the cold bath (both modelled as a classical system) in an alternative fashion and therefore assumes ability to switch off the interaction with the bath during a certain stage of the heat-cycle. However, it is not possible to decouple a quantum system from its always-on interaction with the bath without use of complex pulse sequences. It is also hard to identify two different baths at two different temperatures in quantum domain, that sequentially interact with the system. Here, we show how to implement a quantum Otto engine without requiring to decouple the bath in a sequential manner. This is done by considering a single thermal bath, coupled to a single trapped ion. The electronic degree of freedom of the ion is chosen as a two-level working fluid while the vibrational degree of freedom plays the role of the cold bath. Measuring the electronic state mimics the release of heat into the cold bath. Thus, our model is fully quantum and exhibits very large work efficiency, asymptotically close to unity.

  11. Deposition and reentrainment of Brownian particles in porous media under unfavorable chemical conditions: some concepts and applications.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Melinda W; O'Meliae, Charles R

    2004-01-01

    The deposition and reentrainment of particles in porous media have been examined theoretically and experimentally. A Brownian Dynamics/Monte Carlo (MC/BD) model has been developed that simulates the movement of Brownian particles near a collector under "unfavorable" chemical conditions and allows deposition in primary and secondary minima. A simple Maxwell approach has been used to estimate particle attachment efficiency by assuming deposition in the secondary minimum and calculating the probability of reentrainment. The MC/BD simulations and the Maxwell calculations support an alternative view of the deposition and reentrainment of Brownian particles under unfavorable chemical conditions. These calculations indicate that deposition into and subsequent release from secondary minima can explain reported discrepancies between classic model predictions that assume irreversible deposition in a primary well and experimentally determined deposition efficiencies that are orders of magnitude larger than Interaction Force Boundary Layer (IFBL) predictions. The commonly used IFBL model, for example, is based on the notion of transport over an energy barrier into the primary well and does not address contributions of secondary minimum deposition. A simple Maxwell model based on deposition into and reentrainment from secondary minima is much more accurate in predicting deposition rates for column experiments at low ionic strengths. It also greatly reduces the substantial particle size effects inherent in IFBL models, wherein particle attachment rates are predicted to decrease significantly with increasing particle size. This view is consistent with recent work by others addressing the composition and structure of the first few nanometers at solid-water interfaces including research on modeling water at solid-liquid interfaces, surface speciation, interfacial force measurements, and the rheological properties of concentrated suspensions. It follows that deposition under these

  12. Deposition of Zinc Oxide on Different Polymer Textiles and Their Antibacterial Properties.

    PubMed

    Fiedot-Toboła, Marta; Ciesielska, Magdalena; Maliszewska, Irena; Rac-Rumijowska, Olga; Suchorska-Woźniak, Patrycja; Teterycz, Helena; Bryjak, Marek

    2018-04-30

    A surface modification of polyamide 6 (PA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polypropylene (PP) textiles was performed using zinc oxide to obtain antibacterial layer. ZnO microrods were synthesized on ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) as a nucleus centers by chemical bath deposition (CBD) process. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that wurzite ZnO microrods were obtained on every sample. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Liquid Absorption Capacity (LAC) analysis indicate that the amount and structure of antibacterial layer is dependent on roughness and wettability of textile surface. The rougher and more hydrophilic is the material, the more ZnO were deposited. All studied textiles show significant bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) and Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus ). A possible mechanism and difference in sensitivity between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria to ZnO is discussed. Considering that antibacterial activity of ZnO is caused by Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation, an influence of surface to volume ratio and crystalline parameters is also discussed.

  13. Effect of growth parameters on the optical properties of ZnO nanostructures grown by simple solution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Anjana

    2017-05-01

    ZnO, a wide band gap semiconductor is of significant interest for a range of practical applications. One of the highly attractive features of ZnO is to grow variety of nanostructures by using low-cost techniques. In this paper, we report deposition of ZnO nanostructure rod-arrays (NRA) via low-temperature, solution-based deposition techniques such as chemical bath deposition (CBD) and microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition (MACBD). A detailed study of film deposition parameters such as variation in concentration of precursors and deposition temperature has been carried out. Compositional and structural study of the films has been done by X-ray Diffractometer to know the phase and purity of the final product. Morphological study of these structures has been carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Optical study such as transmittance and diffuse reflectance of the films has been carried out as a function of growth parameters.

  14. Self-cleaning and surface chemical reactions during hafnium dioxide atomic layer deposition on indium arsenide.

    PubMed

    Timm, Rainer; Head, Ashley R; Yngman, Sofie; Knutsson, Johan V; Hjort, Martin; McKibbin, Sarah R; Troian, Andrea; Persson, Olof; Urpelainen, Samuli; Knudsen, Jan; Schnadt, Joachim; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2018-04-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the ultrathin high-quality oxide layers that are central to all modern metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Crucial to achieving superior device performance are the chemical reactions during the first deposition cycle, which could ultimately result in atomic-scale perfection of the semiconductor-oxide interface. Here, we directly observe the chemical reactions at the surface during the first cycle of hafnium dioxide deposition on indium arsenide under realistic synthesis conditions using photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the widely used ligand exchange model of the ALD process for the removal of native oxide on the semiconductor and the simultaneous formation of the first hafnium dioxide layer must be significantly revised. Our study provides substantial evidence that the efficiency of the self-cleaning process and the quality of the resulting semiconductor-oxide interface can be controlled by the molecular adsorption process of the ALD precursors, rather than the subsequent oxide formation.

  15. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid [Raymond, OH; Hornyak, Louis [Evergreen, CO; Dillon, Anne C [Boulder, CO; Heben, Michael J [Denver, CO

    2008-10-07

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  16. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  17. Diagnostic Techniques Used to Study Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    The advantages and utility of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond as an industrial ceramic can only be realized if the price and quality are right. Until recently, this technology was of interest only to the academic and basic research community. However, interest has grown because of advances made by leading CVD diamond suppliers: 1) Reduction of the cost of CVD polycrystalline diamond deposition below $5/carat ($8/sq cm); 2) Installation of production capacity; 3) Epitaxial growth of CVD single-crystal diamond. Thus, CVD diamond applications and business are an industrial reality. At present, CVD diamond is produced in the form of coatings or wafers. CVD diamond film technology offers a broader technological potential than do natural and high-pressure synthetic diamonds because size, geometry, and eventually cost will not be as limiting. Now that they are cost effective, diamond coatings - with their extreme properties - can be used in a variety of applications. Diamond coatings can improve many of the surface properties of engineering substrate materials, including erosion, corrosion, and wear resistance. Examples of actual and potential applications, from microelectromechanical systems to the wear parts of diamond coatings and related superhard coatings are described. For example, diamond coatings can be used as a chemical and mechanical barrier for the space shuttles check valves, particularly on the guide pins and seat assemblies.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition fluid flow simulation modelling tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullister, Edward T.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate numerical simulation of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes requires a general purpose computational fluid dynamics package combined with specialized capabilities for high temperature chemistry. In this report, we describe the implementation of these specialized capabilities in the spectral element code NEKTON. The thermal expansion of the gases involved is shown to be accurately approximated by the low Mach number perturbation expansion of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The radiative heat transfer between multiple interacting radiating surfaces is shown to be tractable using the method of Gebhart. The disparate rates of reaction and diffusion in CVD processes are calculated via a point-implicit time integration scheme. We demonstrate the use above capabilities on prototypical CVD applications.

  19. Vaporization of a mixed precursors in chemical vapor deposition for YBCO films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Gang; Meng, Guangyao; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1995-01-01

    Single phase YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films with T(c) values around 90 K are readily obtained by using a single source chemical vapor deposition technique with a normal precursor mass transport. The quality of the films is controlled by adjusting the carrier gas flow rate and the precursor feed rate.

  20. Does the bathing water classification depend on sampling strategy? A bootstrap approach for bathing water quality assessment, according to Directive 2006/7/EC requirements.

    PubMed

    López, Iago; Alvarez, César; Gil, José L; Revilla, José A

    2012-11-30

    Data on the 95th and 90th percentiles of bacteriological quality indicators are used to classify bathing waters in Europe, according to the requirements of Directive 2006/7/EC. However, percentile values and consequently, classification of bathing waters depend both on sampling effort and sample-size, which may undermine an appropriate assessment of bathing water classification. To analyse the influence of sampling effort and sample size on water classification, a bootstrap approach was applied to 55 bacteriological quality datasets of several beaches in the Balearic Islands (Spain). Our results show that the probability of failing the regulatory standards of the Directive is high when sample size is low, due to a higher variability in percentile values. In this way, 49% of the bathing waters reaching an "Excellent" classification (95th percentile of Escherichia coli under 250 cfu/100 ml) can fail the "Excellent" regulatory standard due to sampling strategy, when 23 samples per season are considered. This percentage increases to 81% when 4 samples per season are considered. "Good" regulatory standards can also be failed in bathing waters with an "Excellent" classification as a result of these sampling strategies. The variability in percentile values may affect bathing water classification and is critical for the appropriate design and implementation of bathing water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Programs. Hence, variability of percentile values should be taken into account by authorities if an adequate management of these areas is to be achieved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electro deposition of cuprous oxide for thin film solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrestani, Seyed Mohammad

    p and n type copper oxide semiconductor layers were fabricated by electrochemistry using new approaches for photovoltaic applications. Thin films were electroplated by cathodic polarization on a copper foil or indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. The optimum deposition conditions (composition, pH and temperature of the electrolyte and applied potential) of the layers as thin films have been identified; in particular the conditions that allow getting the n-type layers have been well identified for the first time. The configuration of a photo - electrochemical cell was used to characterize the spectral response of the layers. It was shown that the p type layers exhibit a photocurrent in the cathode potential region and n layers exhibit photo current in the anode potential region. Measurements of electrical resistivity of electro chemically deposited layers of p and n type Cu2O, showed that the resistivity of p-type Cu2O varies from 3.2 x 105 to 2.0 x 108 Ocm. These values depend the electrodepositing conditions such as the pH of the solution, the deposition potential and temperature. The influence of several plating parameters of the p type layers of Cu2O, such as applied potential, pH and temperature of the bath on the chemical composition, degree of crystallinity, grain size and orientation parameters of the sample was systematically studied using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Depending of the electro-deposition potential, two different surface morphologies with various preferential crystal orientations were obtained for the temperatures of the electro-deposition of 30 °C and pH 9. For the same temperature, the layers of p type Cu2O of highly crystalline p type are obtained at pH 12, indicating that the crystallinity depends on the pH of the bath. Also, it has been shown that the morphology of Cu2O layers was changed by varying the potential and the duration of deposition, as well as the temperature of the solution. The conditions for the

  2. Emollient bath additives for the treatment of childhood eczema (BATHE): multicentre pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial of clinical and cost effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Santer, Miriam; Ridd, Matthew J; Francis, Nick A; Stuart, Beth; Rumsby, Kate; Chorozoglou, Maria; Becque, Taeko; Roberts, Amanda; Liddiard, Lyn; Nollett, Claire; Hooper, Julie; Prude, Martina; Wood, Wendy; Thomas, Kim S; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Williams, Hywel C; Little, Paul

    2018-05-03

    To determine the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of including emollient bath additives in the management of eczema in children. Pragmatic randomised open label superiority trial with two parallel groups. 96 general practices in Wales and western and southern England. 483 children aged 1 to 11 years, fulfilling UK diagnostic criteria for atopic dermatitis. Children with very mild eczema and children who bathed less than once weekly were excluded. Participants in the intervention group were prescribed emollient bath additives by their usual clinical team to be used regularly for 12 months. The control group were asked to use no bath additives for 12 months. Both groups continued with standard eczema management, including leave-on emollients, and caregivers were given standardised advice on how to wash participants. The primary outcome was eczema control measured by the patient oriented eczema measure (POEM, scores 0-7 mild, 8-16 moderate, 17-28 severe) weekly for 16 weeks. Secondary outcomes were eczema severity over one year (monthly POEM score from baseline to 52 weeks), number of eczema exacerbations resulting in primary healthcare consultation, disease specific quality of life (dermatitis family impact), generic quality of life (child health utility-9D), utilisation of resources, and type and quantity of topical corticosteroid or topical calcineurin inhibitors prescribed. 483 children were randomised and one child was withdrawn, leaving 482 children in the trial: 51% were girls (244/482), 84% were of white ethnicity (447/470), and the mean age was 5 years. 96% (461/482) of participants completed at least one post-baseline POEM, so were included in the analysis, and 77% (370/482) completed questionnaires for more than 80% of the time points for the primary outcome (12/16 weekly questionnaires to 16 weeks). The mean baseline POEM score was 9.5 (SD 5.7) in the bath additives group and 10.1 (SD 5.8) in the no bath additives group. The mean POEM score

  3. Meeting the needs of elderly with bathing disability.

    PubMed

    Zingmark, Magnus; Bernspång, Birgitta

    2011-06-01

    Difficulties with bathing are frequent among older people and are associated with an increasing need for societal support. As loss of independence has a negative impact on health and wellbeing, it is important to study interventions that can provide the required support for people to be able to remain independent. Occupational therapy interventions can improve clients' abilities enabling them to bathe themselves, thus reducing the need for other, more long-term societal support from, e.g. a home help. In this study, two groups of elderly people with difficulties in bathing were compared; the clients in the intervention group were engaged in occupational therapy. A quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design was used, in which participants with reported difficulties in bathing were recruited consecutively from two municipalities. The clients in the intervention group routinely received occupational therapy, whereas clients in the control group received assistance from a home help for bathing. Activities of daily living, quality of life and home-help allocation were assessed at the baseline and after 15 weeks. Clients in the intervention group received less than three home visits on average, with majority of interventions consisting of graded activity and the use of an encouraging approach. Seventy per cent of the interventions were adaptive. Activities of daily living and quality of life of both groups improved, but the differences of being allocated a home help were significant. Occupational therapy interventions seem beneficial in terms of supporting older people in becoming independent of home help in bathing but the results must be interpreted with caution as there were differences at baseline between the groups. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Australian Association of Occupational Therapists.

  4. The Association Between Bathing Habits and Severity of Atopic Dermatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Koutroulis, Ioannis; Pyle, Tia; Kopylov, David; Little, Anthony; Gaughan, John; Kratimenos, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that frequently affects children. The current recommendations on management using lifestyle modification are highly variable, leading to confusion and uncertainty among patients. To determine current bathing behaviors and the subsequent impact on disease severity. This was an observational cross-sectional study conducted at an urban pediatric emergency department. Parents were asked to fill out a questionnaire concerning the patient's bathing habits. The results were correlated with the atopic dermatitis severity determined by the SCORAD (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis) tool. No difference between variables was found to be significant for bathing frequency, time spent bathing, or use of moisturizers. Multivariate analysis showed that atopic dermatitis severity increased with age greater than 2 years (P = .0004) and with greater bathing duration (P = .001). Atopic dermatitis severity may be associated with a longer duration of bathing. The frequency of bathing does not appear to affect atopic dermatitis severity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Dust-bathing behavior of laying hens in enriched colony housing systems and an aviary system

    PubMed Central

    Louton, H.; Bergmann, S.; Reese, S.; Erhard, M. H.; Rauch, E.

    2016-01-01

    The dust-bathing behavior of Lohmann Selected Leghorn hens was compared in 4 enriched colony housing systems and in an aviary system. The enriched colony housing systems differed especially in the alignment and division of the functional areas dust bath, nest, and perches. Forty-eight-hour video recordings were performed at 3 time-points during the laying period, and focal animal sampling and behavior sampling methods were used to analyze the dust-bathing behavior. Focal animal data included the relative fractions of dust-bathing hens overall, of hens bathing in the dust-bath area, and of those bathing on the wire floor throughout the day. Behavior data included the number of dust-bathing bouts within a predefined time range, the duration of 1 bout, the number of and reasons for interruptions, and the number of and reasons for the termination of dust-bathing bouts. Results showed that the average duration of dust bathing varied between the 4 enriched colony housing systems compared with the aviary system. The duration of dust-bathing bouts was shorter than reported under natural conditions. A positive correlation between dust-bathing activity and size of the dust-bath area was observed. Frequently, dust baths were interrupted and terminated by disturbing influences such as pecking by other hens. This was especially observed in the enriched colony housing systems. In none of the observed systems, neither in the enriched colony housing nor in the aviary system, were all of the observed dust baths terminated “normally.” Dust bathing behavior on the wire mesh rather than in the provided dust-bath area generally was observed at different frequencies in all enriched colony housing systems during all observation periods, but never in the aviary system. The size and design of the dust-bath area influenced the prevalence of dust-bathing behavior in that small and subdivided dust-bath areas reduced the number of dust-bathing bouts but increased the incidence of sham dust

  6. Electrodeposition of CuZn Alloys from the Non-Cyanide Alkaline Baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minggang; Wei, Guoying; Hu, Shuangshuang; Xu, Shuhan; Yang, Yejiong; Miao, Qinfang

    2015-10-01

    Effect of copper sulfate on CuZn alloys electroplating from non-cyanide baths are investigated by different electrochemical methods. Cyclic voltammetry and current transient measurements are used to characterize the CuZn alloys electroplating system in order to analyze the nucleation and growth mechanism. The reduction of Cu and CuZn alloy on sheet iron substrates shows an instantaneous nucleation process. However, the reduction of Zn on sheet iron substrates shows a progressive nucleation process. The structure and surface morphology of CuZn alloys are analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphology of CuZn alloys obtained with 50 g L-1 copper sulfate presents a smooth and compact deposit and the size of crystal particle is uniform.

  7. Damping mechanisms in chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Goldsby, Jon C.

    1993-01-01

    Evaluating the damping of reinforcement fibers is important for understanding their microstructures and the vibrational response of their structural composites. In this study the damping capacities of two types of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers were measured from -200 C to as high as 800 C. Measurements were made at frequencies in the range 50 to 15000 Hz on single cantilevered fibers. At least four sources were identified which contribute to fiber damping, the most significant being thermoelastic damping and grain boundary sliding. The mechanisms controlling all sources and their potential influence on fiber and composite performance are discussed.

  8. Testing of Wrought Iridium/Chemical Vapor Deposition Rhenium Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1996-01-01

    A 22-N class, iridium/rhenium (Ir/Re) rocket chamber, composed of a thick (418 miocrometer) wrought iridium (Ir) liner and a rhenium substrate deposited via chemical vapor deposition, was tested over an extended period on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) propellants. The test conditions were designed to produce species concentrations similar to those expected in an Earth-storable propellant combustion environment. Temperatures attained in testing were significantly higher than those expected with Earth-storable propellants, both because of the inherently higher combustion temperature of GO2/GH2 propellants and because the exterior surface of the rocket was not treated with a high-emissivity coating that would be applied to flight class rockets. Thus the test conditions were thought to represent a more severe case than for typical operational applications. The chamber successfully completed testing (over 11 hr accumulated in 44 firings), and post-test inspections showed little degradation of the Ir liner. The results indicate that use of a thick, wrought Ir liner is a viable alternative to the Ir coatings currently used for Ir/Re rockets.

  9. Quantitative assessment of combination bathing and moisturizing regimens on skin hydration in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Charles; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2009-01-01

    Standard recommendations for skin care for patients with atopic dermatitis stress the importance of skin hydration and the application of moisturizers. However, objective data to guide recommendations regarding the optimal practice methods of bathing and emollient application are scarce. This study quantified cutaneous hydration status after various combination bathing and moisturizing regimens. Four bathing/moisturizer regimens were evaluated in 10 subjects, five pediatric subjects with atopic dermatitis and five subjects with healthy skin. The regimens consisted of bathing alone without emollient application, bathing and immediate emollient application, bathing and delayed application, and emollient application alone. Each regimen was evaluated in all subjects, utilizing a crossover design. Skin hydration was assessed with standard capacitance measurements. In atopic dermatitis subjects, emollient alone yielded a significantly (p < 0.05) greater mean hydration over 90 minutes (206.2% baseline hydration) than bathing with immediate emollient (141.6%), bathing and delayed emollient (141%), and bathing alone (91.4%). The combination bathing and emollient application regimens demonstrated hydration values at 90 minutes not significantly greater than baseline. Atopic dermatitis subjects had a decreased mean hydration benefit compared with normal skin subjects. Bathing without moisturizer may compromise skin hydration. Bathing followed by moisturizer application provides modest hydration benefits, though less than that of simply applying moisturizer alone.

  10. Entropy production of active particles and for particles in active baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Seifert, Udo

    2018-01-01

    Entropy production of an active particle in an external potential is identified through a thermodynamically consistent minimal lattice model that includes the chemical reaction providing the propulsion and ordinary translational noise. In the continuum limit, a unique expression follows, comprising a direct contribution from the active process and an indirect contribution from ordinary diffusive motion. From the corresponding Langevin equation, this physical entropy production cannot be inferred through the conventional, yet here ambiguous, comparison of forward and time-reversed trajectories. Generalizations to several interacting active particles and passive particles in a bath of active ones are presented explicitly, further ones are briefly indicated.

  11. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hultqvist, Adam; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2015-07-20

    Partial CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnOx buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II-VImore » systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.« less

  12. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hultqvist, Adam; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2015-07-20

    Partial CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnOx buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II–VImore » systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.« less

  13. Synthesis of zirconia (ZrO2) nanowires via chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, M. K.; Park, S. J.; Choi, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    Monoclinic zirconia nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using ZrCl4 powder as a starting material at 1200 °C and 760 Torr. Graphite was employed as a substrate, and an Au thin film was pre-deposited on the graphite as a catalyst. The zirconia nanostructure morphology was observed through scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Based on X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy data, the resulting crystal structure was found to be single crystalline monoclinic zirconia. The homogeneous distributions of Zr, O and Au were studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping, and there was no metal droplet at the nanowire tips despite the use of an Au metal catalyst. This result is apart from that of conventional metal catalyzed nanowires.

  14. Growth control, structure, chemical state, and photoresponse of CuO-CdS core-shell heterostructure nanowires.

    PubMed

    El Mel, A A; Buffière, M; Bouts, N; Gautron, E; Tessier, P Y; Henzler, K; Guttmann, P; Konstantinidis, S; Bittencourt, C; Snyders, R

    2013-07-05

    The growth of single-crystal CuO nanowires by thermal annealing of copper thin films in air is studied. We show that the density, length, and diameter of the nanowires can be controlled by tuning the morphology and structure of the copper thin films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering. After identifying the optimal conditions for the growth of CuO nanowires, chemical bath deposition is employed to coat the CuO nanowires with CdS in order to form p-n nanojunction arrays. As revealed by high-resolution TEM analysis, the thickness of the polycrystalline CdS shell increases when decreasing the diameter of the CuO core for a given time of CdS deposition. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy combined with transmission x-ray microscopy allows the chemical analysis of isolated nanowires. The absence of modification in the spectra at the Cu L and O K edges after the deposition of CdS on the CuO nanowires indicates that neither Cd nor S diffuse into the CuO phase. We further demonstrate that the core-shell nanowires exhibit the I-V characteristic of a resistor instead of a diode. The electrical behavior of the device was found to be photosensitive, since increasing the incident light intensity induces an increase in the collected electrical current.

  15. Electro-deposition of superconductor oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2001-01-01

    Methods for preparing high quality superconducting oxide precursors which are well suited for further oxidation and annealing to form superconducting oxide films. The method comprises forming a multilayered superconducting precursor on a substrate by providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a substrate electrode, and providing to the bath a plurality of precursor metal salts which are capable of exhibiting superconducting properties upon subsequent treatment. The superconducting precursor is then formed by electrodepositing a first electrodeposited (ED) layer onto the substrate electrode, followed by depositing a layer of silver onto the first electrodeposited (ED) layer, and then electrodepositing a second electrodeposited (ED) layer onto the Ag layer. The multilayered superconducting precursor is suitable for oxidation at a sufficient annealing temperature in air or an oxygen-containing atmosphere to form a crystalline superconducting oxide film.

  16. Stress hysteresis during thermal cycling of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurn, Jeremy; Cook, Robert F.

    2002-02-01

    The mechanical response of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited SiO2 to thermal cycling is examined by substrate curvature measurement and depth-sensing indentation. Film properties of deposition stress and stress hysteresis that accompanied thermal cycling are elucidated, as well as modulus, hardness, and coefficient of thermal expansion. Thermal cycling is shown to result in major plastic deformation of the film and a switch from a compressive to a tensile state of stress; both athermal and thermal components of the net stress alter in different ways during cycling. A mechanism of hydrogen incorporation and release from as-deposited silanol groups is proposed that accounts for the change in film properties and state of stress.

  17. One-step microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-PECVD) for transparent superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongrom, Sukrit; Tirawanichakul, Yutthana; Munsit, Nantakan; Deangngam, Chalongrat

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate a rapid and environmental friendly fabrication technique to produce optically clear superhydrophobic surfaces using poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a sole coating material. The inert PDMS chain is transformed into a 3-D irregular solid network through microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-PECVD) process. Thanks to high electron density in the microwave-activated plasma, coating can be done in just a single step with rapid deposition rate, typically much shorter than 10 s. Deposited layers show excellent superhydrophobic properties with water contact angles of ∼170° and roll-off angles as small as ∼3°. The plasma-deposited films can be ultrathin with thicknesses under 400 nm, greatly diminishing the optical loss. Moreover, with appropriate coating conditions, the coating layer can even enhance the transmission over the entire visible spectrum due to a partial anti-reflection effect.

  18. Chemical vapor deposited carbon nanotubes for aqueous H2-Cl2 fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Suryavanshi, U B; Bhosale, C H

    2010-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes having large surface area is an interesting material to develop H2-Cl2 fuel cell electrodes. The attempts were made to deposit carbon nanotubes on porous substrates by chemical vapour deposition. Turpentine oil (C10H16) was used as a precursor, decomposed at 1100 degrees C reactor temperature. Nickel, platinum, tin, Ni-Pt, Ni-Sn, Pt-Sn, Ni-Pt-Sn catalysts were used to grow carbon nanotubes. Nickel was deposited with electrodeposition, platinum with sputter coater and tin with vacuum deposition technique. The developed electrodes were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR, and resistivity by van-der Pauw method. Carbon nanotubes have been formed for 0.25 N nickel deposited for 45 and 60 min; 0.5 N, 0.75 N and 1 N nickel deposited for 15 to 60 min, at the interval of 15. Ni-Pt, Ni-Sn, Pt-Sn and Ni-Pt-Sn activated carbon also shows the well grown CNTs. Aqueous H2-Cl2 fuel cell performance was tested with these grown carbon nanotubes. 40% KCl with 1067 mohm(-1) cm(-1) conductivity was used as electrolyte. Linear sweep voltametry shows reduction potential for hydrogen gas. Chronoamperometry results show better half cell performance for nickel, deposited with 1 N, 45 min deposition time period; and combination of Ni-Pt-Sn with 140, and 110-100 mA/cm2 stable current density respectively.

  19. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  20. Bathing a patient in bed

    MedlinePlus

    ... ed. American National Red Cross; 2013:chap 13. Smith SF, Duell DJ, Martin BC, Gonzalez L, Aebersold M. Bathing, bedmaking, and maintaining skin integrity. In: Smith SF, Duell DJ, Martin BC, Gonzalez L, Aebersold ...

  1. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  2. Optimization of chemical displacement deposition of copper on porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Bandarenka, Hanna; Redko, Sergey; Nenzi, Paolo; Balucani, Marco; Bondarenko, Vitaly

    2012-11-01

    Copper (II) sulfate was used as a source of copper to achieve uniform distribution of Cu particles deposited on porous silicon. Layers of the porous silicon were formed by electrochemical anodization of Si wafers in a mixture of HF, C3H7OH and deionized water. The well-known chemical displacement technique was modified to grow the copper particles of specific sizes. SEM and XRD analysis revealed that the outer surface of the porous silicon was covered with copper particles of the crystal orientation inherited from the planes of porous silicon skeleton. The copper crystals were found to have the cubic face centering elementary cell. In addition, the traces of Cu2O cubic primitive crystalline phases were identified. The dimensions of Cu particles were determined by the Feret's analysis of the SEM images. The sizes of the particles varied widely from a few to hundreds of nanometers. A phenomenological model of copper deposition was proposed.

  3. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.; Hemawan, Kadek W.

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been successfully synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH 4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C 2, Ar, N 2, CH, H β and H α were observed in emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T 2g phonon at 1333 cm -1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Furthermore, fieldmore » emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images reveal that, depending on the on growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.« less

  4. Computer Program for the Calculation of Multicomponent Convective Diffusion Deposition Rates from Chemically Frozen Boundary Layer Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Chen, B. K.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The computer program based on multicomponent chemically frozen boundary layer (CFBL) theory for calculating vapor and/or small particle deposition rates is documented. A specific application to perimter-averaged Na2SO4 deposition rate calculations on a cylindrical collector is demonstrated. The manual includes a typical program input and output for users.

  5. Emergent transport in a many-body open system driven by interacting quantum baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisons, Juris; Mascarenhas, Eduardo; Savona, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    We analyze an open many-body system that is strongly coupled at its boundaries to interacting quantum baths. We show that the two-body interactions inside the baths induce emergent phenomena in the spin transport. The system and baths are modeled as independent spin chains resulting in a global nonhomogeneous X X Z model. The evolution of the system-bath state is simulated using matrix-product-states methods. We present two phase transitions induced by bath interactions. For weak bath interactions we observe ballistic and insulating phases. However, for strong bath interactions a diffusive phase emerges with a distinct power-law decay of the time-dependent spin current Q ∝t-α . Furthermore, we investigate long-lasting current oscillations arising from the non-Markovian dynamics in the homogeneous case and find a sharp change in their frequency scaling coinciding with the triple point of the phase diagram.

  6. A novel three-jet microreactor for localized metal-organic chemical vapour deposition of gallium arsenide: design and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel three-jet microreactor design for localized deposition of gallium arsenide (GaAs) by low-pressure Metal-Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD) for semiconductor devices, microelectronics and solar cells. Our approach is advantageous compared to the standard lithography and etching technology, since it preserves the nanostructure of the deposited material, it is less time-consuming and less expensive. We designed two versions of reactor geometry with a 10-micron central microchannel for precursor supply and with two side jets of a dilutant to control the deposition area. To aid future experiments, we performed computational modeling of a simplified-geometry (twodimensional axisymmetric) microreactor, based on Navier-Stokes equations for a laminar flow of chemically reacting gas mixture of Ga(CH3)3-AsH3-H2. Simulation results show that we can achieve a high-rate deposition (over 0.3 μm/min) on a small area (less than 30 μm diameter). This technology can be used in material production for microelectronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, solar cells, etc.

  7. A new sampler for collecting separate dry and wet atmospheric depositions of trace organic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, Don T.; Cessna, Allan J.; Gurprasad, Narine P.; Banner, James

    Studies conducted in Saskatchewan and elsewhere have demonstrated the atmospheric transport of agricultural pesticides and other organic contaminants and their deposition into aquatic ecosystems. To date these studies have focused on ambient concentrations in the atmosphere and in wet precipitation. To measure the dry deposition of organic chemicals, a new sampler was designed which uses a moving sheet of water to passively trap dry particles and gasses. The moving sheet of water drains into a reservoir and, during recirculation through the sampler, is passed through an XAD-2 resin column which adsorbs the trapped organic contaminants. All surfaces which contact the process water are stainless steel or Teflon. Chemicals collected can be related to airborne materials depositing into aquatic ecosystems. The sampler has received a United States patent (number 5,413,003 - 9 May 1996) with the Canadian patent pending. XAD-2 resin adsorption efficiencies for 10 or 50 μg fortifications of ten pesticides ranged from 76% for atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino- S-triazine) to 110% for triallate [ S-(2,3,3-trichloro-2-phenyl)bis(1-methylethyl)carbamothioate], dicamba (2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid) and toxaphene (chlorinated camphene mixture). Field testing using duplicate samplers showed good reproducibility and amounts trapped were consistent with those from high volume and bulk pan samplers located on the same site. Average atmospheric dry deposition rates of three chemicals, collected for 5 weeks in May and June, were: dicamba, 69 ng m -2 da -1; 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), 276 ng m -2 da -1: and, γ-HCH ( γ-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-hexachlorocyclohexane), 327 ng m -2 da -1.

  8. 30 CFR 75.1712 - Bath houses and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bath houses and toilet facilities. 75.1712 Section 75.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712 Bath houses...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1712 - Bath houses and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bath houses and toilet facilities. 75.1712 Section 75.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712 Bath houses...

  10. The Use of Wetting Agents/Fume Supressants for Minimizing the Atmospheric Emissions from Hard Chromium Electroplating Baths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    ESTCP FINAL REPORT For THE USE OF WETTING AGENTS/ FUME SUPPRESSANTS FOR MINIMIZING THE ATMOSPHERIC EMISSIONS FROM HARD CHROMIUM ...Introduction This project demonstrates that a “third” generation wetting agent / fume suppressant (WA/FS) chemical additive to hard chromium ...DOD operations fall in the same category.) Several papers, including Use of Fume Suppressants in Hard Chromium Baths - Quality Testing and Use

  11. Comparison of Foot Bathing and Foot Massage in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Ranhee; Park, Chaisoon

    2015-01-01

    In a clinical setting, patients have been observed to complain of discomfort and to discontinue treatment because of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), but few data exist regarding the quality of life in these patients in Korea. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to analyze the effects of foot bathing and massage in patients with CIPN. Subjects included 48 patients with CIPN, who were hospitalized in C University Hospital. The subjects were alternately assigned to 1 of 2 groups according to their registration order. The interventions consisted of 8 treatments of foot bathing or massage over a period of 2 weeks, at 30 minutes per session, every other day. The foot skin temperature increased significantly in the foot bathing group, whereas it decreased significantly in the massage group. Quality of life was significantly increased in the foot bathing group, whereas it was significantly decreased in the massage group. Although foot bathing and foot massage are both supportive care techniques for CIPN patients, foot bathing was more effective than foot massage on skin temperature, grade of neurotoxicity, and quality of life. Additional well-designed studies are recommended, so that the effectiveness of foot bathing and foot massage is confirmed. Foot bathing is more useful as supportive care with respect to nonpharmacologic interventions for alleviating CIPN and promoting the quality of life in cancer patients.

  12. Oxidation of Chemically-Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao N.

    1998-01-01

    Chemically-vapor-deposited silicon carbide (CVD SiC) was oxidized in carbon dioxide (CO2) at temperatures of 1200-1400 C for times between 96 and 500 h at several gas flow rates. Oxidation weight gains were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and were found to be very small and independent of temperature. Possible rate limiting kinetic mechanisms are discussed. Passive oxidation of SiC by CO2 is negligible compared to the rates measured for other oxidants that are also found in combustion environments, oxygen and water vapor.

  13. Ion chromatography in the manufacture of multilayer circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Ion chromatography (IC) has proven useful in analyzing chemical solutions used in the manufacture of multilayer circuit boards. Unlike other chemical quantification techniques, IC provides results on ions not expected in the production solutions. Thus, solution contamination and break-down products can be monitored in every phase of the circuit board manufacturing. During the first phase, epoxy laminates experience an etchback, first in chromic acid, which can be analyzed for trace chloride and sulfate, then in ammonium bifluoride/HCl, which can be analyzed for fluoride and chloride. Following a wet-blasting to roughen up the surface, 20 microinches of copper are deposited using an electroless bath. Again, IC is applicable for monitoring formate, tartarate, and sulfate levels. Next, an acid copper bath is used to electroplate the through holes with 0.001 inches of ductile copper. This bath is analyzed for trace chloride. Photoimaging is then performed, and the organic solvents used can be assayed for trace ionic chloride. Finally, a fluoroboric acid-based tin-lead bath is used to deposit a solderable alloy. This bath is analyzed for fluoroborate, tin, and lead. In addition, mobile phase ion chromatography (MPIC) is used to monitor the nonionic organic brighteners in the baths.

  14. Atomic Layer Deposition of Chemical Passivation Layers and High Performance Anti-Reflection Coatings on Back-Illuminated Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Greer, Frank (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A back-illuminated silicon photodetector has a layer of Al2O3 deposited on a silicon oxide surface that receives electromagnetic radiation to be detected. The Al2O3 layer has an antireflection coating deposited thereon. The Al2O3 layer provides a chemically resistant separation layer between the silicon oxide surface and the antireflection coating. The Al2O3 layer is thin enough that it is optically innocuous. Under deep ultraviolet radiation, the silicon oxide layer and the antireflection coating do not interact chemically. In one embodiment, the silicon photodetector has a delta-doped layer near (within a few nanometers of) the silicon oxide surface. The Al2O3 layer is expected to provide similar protection for doped layers fabricated using other methods, such as MBE, ion implantation and CVD deposition.

  15. Controllable growth of shaped graphene domains by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lili; Li, Zhen; Li, Xiao; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wei, Jinquan; Wu, Dehai; Zhu, Hongwei

    2011-12-01

    Graphene domains in different shapes have been grown on copper substrates via atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition by controlling the growth process parameters. Under stabilized conditions, graphene domains tend to be six-fold symmetric hexagons under low flow rate methane with some domains in an irregular hexagonal shape. After further varying the growth duration, methane flow rate, and temperature, graphene domains have developed shapes from hexagon to shovel and dendrite. Two connecting modes, through overlap and merging of adjacent graphene domains, are proposed.Graphene domains in different shapes have been grown on copper substrates via atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition by controlling the growth process parameters. Under stabilized conditions, graphene domains tend to be six-fold symmetric hexagons under low flow rate methane with some domains in an irregular hexagonal shape. After further varying the growth duration, methane flow rate, and temperature, graphene domains have developed shapes from hexagon to shovel and dendrite. Two connecting modes, through overlap and merging of adjacent graphene domains, are proposed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Schematics of CVD setups for graphene growth, Raman spectra and SEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr11480h

  16. Mechanical properties of ultrahigh molecular weight PHEMA hydrogels synthesized using initiated chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Bose, Ranjita K; Lau, Kenneth K S

    2010-08-09

    In this work, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), a widely used hydrogel, is synthesized using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD), a one-step surface polymerization that does not use any solvents. iCVD synthesis is capable of producing linear stoichiometric polymers that are free from entrained unreacted monomer or solvent and, thus, do not require additional purification steps. The resulting films, therefore, are found to be noncytotoxic and also have low nonspecific protein adsorption. The kinetics of iCVD polymerization are tuned so as to achieve rapid deposition rates ( approximately 1.5 microm/min), which in turn yield ultrahigh molecular weight polymer films that are mechanically robust with good water transport and swellability. The films have an extremely high degree of physical chain entanglement giving rise to high tensile modulus and storage modulus without the need for chemical cross-linking that compromises hydrophilicity.

  17. [Survival of Bacillus anthracis spores in various tannery baths].

    PubMed

    Mendrycka, M; Mierzejewski, J

    2000-01-01

    The influence of tannery baths: liming, deliming, bating, pickling, tanning, retannage on the survival and on the germination dynamism of B. anthracis spores (Sterne strain) was investigated. The periods and the conditions of this influence were established according to technological process of cow hide tannage. Practically after every bath some part of the spores remained vital. The most effective killing of spores occurred after pickling, liming and deliming. Inversely, the most viable spores remained after bating and retannage process. The lack of correlation that was observed between survival and germination of spores after retannage bath can be explained by different mechanism of spores germination inhibition and their killing.

  18. 30 CFR 71.400 - Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.400 Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary...

  19. 30 CFR 71.400 - Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.400 Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary...

  20. 30 CFR 71.400 - Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.400 Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary...

  1. 30 CFR 71.400 - Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.400 Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary...

  2. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hultqvist, Adam; Bent, Stacey F.; Li, Jian V.

    2015-07-20

    Partial CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnO{sub x} buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystallinemore » II–VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.« less

  3. 30 CFR 75.1712 - Bath houses and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adequate facilities for the miners to change from the clothes worn underground, to provide for the storing of such clothes from shift to shift, and to provide sanitary and bathing facilities. Sanitary toilet... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bath houses and toilet facilities. 75.1712...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1712 - Bath houses and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adequate facilities for the miners to change from the clothes worn underground, to provide for the storing of such clothes from shift to shift, and to provide sanitary and bathing facilities. Sanitary toilet... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bath houses and toilet facilities. 75.1712...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1712 - Bath houses and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adequate facilities for the miners to change from the clothes worn underground, to provide for the storing of such clothes from shift to shift, and to provide sanitary and bathing facilities. Sanitary toilet... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bath houses and toilet facilities. 75.1712...

  6. NASA evaluation of Type 2 chemical depositions. [effects of deicer deposition on aircraft tire friction performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Howell, W. Edward; Webb, Granville L.

    1993-01-01

    Recent findings from NASA Langley tests to define effects of aircraft Type 2 chemical deicer depositions on aircraft tire friction performance are summarized. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) is described together with the scope of the tire cornering and braking friction tests conducted up to 160 knots ground speed. Some lower speed 32 - 96 km/hr (20 - 60 mph) test run data obtained using an Instrumented Tire Test Vehicle (ITTV) to determine effects of tire bearing pressure and transverse grooving on cornering friction performance are also discussed. Recommendations are made concerning which parameters should be evaluated in future testing.

  7. Portable oil bath for high-accuracy resistance transfer and maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, Fuyuhiko

    1999-10-01

    A portable oil bath containing one standard resistor for high-accuracy resistance transfer and maintenance was developed and operated for seven years in the National Research Laboratory of Metrology. The aim of the bath is to save labor and apparatus for high-accuracy resistance transfer and maintenance by consistently keeping the standard resistor in an optimum environmental condition. The details of the prototype system, including its performance, are described together with some suggestions for a more practical bath design, which adopts the same concept.

  8. Chemical sputtering by H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} ions during silicon deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Landheer, K., E-mail: c.landheer@uu.nl; Poulios, I.; Rath, J. K.

    2016-08-07

    We investigated chemical sputtering of silicon films by H{sub y}{sup +} ions (with y being 2 and 3) in an asymmetric VHF Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) discharge in detail. In experiments with discharges created with pure H{sub 2} inlet flows, we observed that more Si was etched from the powered than from the grounded electrode, and this resulted in a net deposition on the grounded electrode. With experimental input data from a power density series of discharges with pure H{sub 2} inlet flows, we were able to model this process with a chemical sputtering mechanism. The obtained chemicalmore » sputtering yields were (0.3–0.4) ± 0.1 Si atom per bombarding H{sub y}{sup +} ion at the grounded electrode and at the powered electrode the yield ranged from (0.4 to 0.65) ± 0.1. Subsequently, we investigated the role of chemical sputtering during PECVD deposition with a series of silane fractions S{sub F} (S{sub F}(%) = [SiH{sub 4}]/[H{sub 2}]*100) ranging from S{sub F} = 0% to 20%. We experimentally observed that the SiH{sub y}{sup +} flux is not proportional to S{sub F} but decreasing from S{sub F} = 3.4% to 20%. This counterintuitive SiH{sub y}{sup +} flux trend was partly explained by an increasing chemical sputtering rate with decreasing S{sub F} and partly by the reaction between H{sub 3}{sup +} and SiH{sub 4} that forms SiH{sub 3}{sup +}.« less

  9. Process development for the manufacture of an integrated dispenser cathode assembly using laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ryan William

    2005-07-01

    Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition (LCVD) has been shown to have great potential for the manufacture of small, complex, two or three dimensional metal and ceramic parts. One of the most promising applications of the technology is in the fabrication of an integrated dispenser cathode assembly. This application requires the deposition of a boron nitride-molybdenum composite structure. In order to realize this structure, work was done to improve the control and understanding of the LCVD process and to determine experimental conditions conducive to the growth of the required materials. A series of carbon fiber and line deposition studies were used to characterize process-shape relationships and study the kinetics of carbon LCVD. These studies provided a foundation for the fabrication of the first high aspect ratio multi-layered LCVD wall structures. The kinetics studies enabled the formulation of an advanced computational model in the FLUENT CFD package for studying energy transport, mass and momentum transport, and species transport within a forced flow LCVD environment. The model was applied to two different material systems and used to quantify deposition rates and identify rate-limiting regimes. A computational thermal-structural model was also developed using the ANSYS software package to study the thermal stress state within an LCVD deposit during growth. Georgia Tech's LCVD system was modified and used to characterize both boron nitride and molybdenum deposition independently. The focus was on understanding the relations among process parameters and deposit shape. Boron nitride was deposited using a B3 N3H6-N2 mixture and growth was characterized by sporadic nucleation followed by rapid bulk growth. Molybdenum was deposited from the MoCl5-H2 system and showed slow, but stable growth. Each material was used to grow both fibers and lines. The fabrication of a boron nitride-molybdenum composite was also demonstrated. In sum, this work served to both advance the

  10. The effects of daily bathing on symptoms of patients with bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Arimoto, Yoshihito; Homma, Chie; Takeoka, Shinjiro; Fukusumi, Munehisa; Mouri, Atsuto; Hamamoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of bathing in asthma patients is not yet fully known. Objective We conducted an observational study to investigate changes in symptoms and their degree by bathing in asthmatic patients. Methods A questionnaire focusing on ever experienced bathing-induced symptom changes and their degree, as well as contributing factors, was designed and administered to asthmatic patients in the outpatient department of our institute between January 2012 and November 2013. Results Two hundred fifteen cases were recruited. In 60 cases (27.9%), asthmatic symptoms appeared, including 20 cases of chest discomfort (33.3%), 19 cases of cough (31.7%), and 21 cases of wheezing (35.0%). The triggering factors included vapor inhalation (32 cases, 53.3%), hydrostatic pressure on the thorax due to body immersion in the bathtub (26 cases, 43.3%), and sudden change of air temperature (16 cases, 26.7%). Thirty-eight cases (17.7%) experienced improvement in active asthmatic symptoms by bathing. Vapor inhalation was the most common contributing factor (34 cases, 89.5%), followed by warming of the whole body (13 cases, 34.2%). There was no relationship between asthma severity and the appearance of bathing-induced symptoms or improvement of active asthmatic symptoms by bathing. Conclusion The effects of bathing in asthmatic patients widely differed from patient to patient and their etiology includes several factors. For those who suffer from bathing-induced asthma symptoms, preventive methods, such as premedication with bronchodilators before bathing, should be established. This study is registered in the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) clinical trials registry in Japan with the registration number UMIN000015641. PMID:27141485

  11. A sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process for deposition of oxide liner in high aspect ratio through silicon vias.

    PubMed

    Lisker, Marco; Marschmeyer, Steffen; Kaynak, Mehmet; Tekin, Ibrahim

    2011-09-01

    The formation of a Through Silicon Via (TSV) includes a deep Si trench etching and the formation of an insulating layer along the high-aspect-ratio trench and the filling of a conductive material into the via hole. The isolation of the filling conductor from the silicon substrate becomes more important for higher frequencies due to the high coupling of the signal to the silicon. The importance of the oxide thickness on the via wall isolation can be verified using electromagnetic field simulators. To satisfy the needs on the Silicon dioxide deposition, a sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (SA-CVD) process has been developed to deposit an isolation oxide to the walls of deep silicon trenches. The technique provides excellent step coverage of the 100 microm depth silicon trenches with the high aspect ratio of 20 and more. The developed technique allows covering the deep silicon trenches by oxide and makes the high isolation of TSVs from silicon substrate feasible which is the key factor for the performance of TSVs for mm-wave 3D packaging.

  12. Physical and chemical characteristics and development of the Changuinola peat deposit of northwestern Panama

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.D.; Raymond, R. Jr.; Thayer, G.

    1987-08-01

    A peat deposit occupying over 80 square kilometers, and averaging 8 meters in thickness, was discovered on the Caribbean coast of northwestern Panama near the town of Changuinola. This deposit occurs inland (behind) the present beach-barrier shoreline. It is thickest in the center and thins toward all edges (as if domed). The surface vegetation in the central regions consists primarily of ombrotrophic plants (especially sedges, grasses, Sphagnum, Sagittaria, and various scattered shrubs). Toward the edges, the deposit has a surface cover of more minerotrophic plants (such as swamp-forest trees, ferns, and palms). Petrographic/botanical analysis of the deposit with depth revealsmore » the presence of five peat types (swamp-forest, sedge-grass-fern, Sagittaria et al., Nymphaea et al., and Rhizophora). Typically peats of the thick, central portions of the deposit are very low in ash and sulfur (less than 2% ash and 0.3% sulfur). Ash contents tend to increase abruptly at the base and more gradually toward the edges of the deposit and sulfur contents increasing gradually toward the ocean and bay. Vertical and lateral variations in botanical, chemical, and physical properties of this deposit can be related to factors that have controlled: (1) the surrounding rocks and water chemistry; (2) the source vegetation; and (3) the environments in which these source ingredients were deposited. 3 refs., 10 figs.« less

  13. Low temperature deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films on a flexible polymer substrate by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-hoon; Jung, Jae-soo; Lee, Sung-soo; Lee, Sung-bo; Hwang, Nong-moon

    2016-11-01

    For the applications such as flexible displays and solar cells, the direct deposition of crystalline silicon films on a flexible polymer substrate has been a great issue. Here, we investigated the direct deposition of polycrystalline silicon films on a polyimide film at the substrate temperature of 200 °C. The low temperature deposition of crystalline silicon on a flexible substrate has been successfully made based on two ideas. One is that the Si-Cl-H system has a retrograde solubility of silicon in the gas phase near the substrate temperature. The other is the new concept of non-classical crystallization, where films grow by the building block of nanoparticles formed in the gas phase during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total amount of precipitation of silicon nanoparticles decreased with increasing HCl concentration. By adding HCl, the amount and the size of silicon nanoparticles were reduced remarkably, which is related with the low temperature deposition of silicon films of highly crystalline fraction with a very thin amorphous incubation layer. The dark conductivity of the intrinsic film prepared at the flow rate ratio of RHCl=[HCl]/[SiH4]=3.61 was 1.84×10-6 Scm-1 at room temperature. The Hall mobility of the n-type silicon film prepared at RHCl=3.61 was 5.72 cm2 V-1s-1. These electrical properties of silicon films are high enough and could be used in flexible electric devices.

  14. The Roman-Irish Bath: Medical/health history as therapeutic assemblage.

    PubMed

    Foley, Ronan

    2014-04-01

    The invention of a new form of hot-air bath in Blarney, Ireland in 1856, variously known in its lifetime as the Roman-Irish or Turkish Bath, acted as the starting point for a the production of a globalised therapeutic landscape. Tracking the diffusion of the Roman-Irish bath template from its local invention in Ireland to a global reach across the Victorian world and recognizing its place within a wider hydrotherapeutic history, this paper frames that diffusion as a valuable empirical addition to assemblage theory. The specific empirical history of the spread of the Roman-Irish/Turkish bath idea is drawn from primary archival and secondary historical sources. It is then discussed and, drawing from work on assemblage theory, analyzed against three broad themes: mobile networks, socio-material practices and contested emergence. The emergent relational geographies of the Roman-Irish Bath identify important roles for the diffusion and transformation of specific medical settings, identities and functions. These were linked in turn to competing social-healing pathways wherein bodies were technologically and morally managed, to produce a more inhabited form of therapeutic assemblage. In all cases the differential diffusion of the bath idea, it's shifting and fractured material forms and multiple inhabitations and discourses were contested and mobile and spoke to an assemblage approach which has ripe potential for exploration across a range of medical/health geography settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a 300 L Calibration Bath for Oceanographic Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, S.; Yamazawa, K.; Nakano, T.; Saito, I.; Tamba, J.; Wakimoto, T.; Katoh, K.

    2017-11-01

    The Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has been developing a 300 L calibration bath to calibrate 24 oceanographic thermometers (OT) simultaneously and thereby reduce the calibration work load necessary to service more than 180 OT every year. This study investigated characteristics of the developed 300 L calibration bath using a SBE 3plus thermometer produced by an OT manufacturer. We also used 11 thermistor thermometers that were calibrated to be traceable to the international temperature scale of 1990 (ITS-90) within 1 mK of standard uncertainty through collaboration of JAMSTEC and NMIJ/AIST. Results show that the time stability of temperature of the developed bath was within ± 1 mK. Furthermore, the temperature uniformity was ± 1.3 mK. The expanded uncertainty (k=2) components for the characteristics of the developed 300 L calibration bath were estimated as 2.9 mK, which is much less than the value of 10 mK: the required specification for uncertainty of calibration for the OT. These results demonstrated the utility of this 300 L calibration bath as a device for use with a new calibration system.

  16. Bath-Ambience-A Mechatronic System for Assisting the Caregivers of Bedridden People.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Karolina; Machado, José; Carvalho, Vítor; Castro, Marcelo; Costa, Pedro; Matos, Demétrio; Soares, Filomena

    2017-05-18

    The health of older people is receiving special attention and dedication nowadays, with the aim of increasing their general wellbeing and quality of life. Studies into different aspects of the care of the elderly have found that emphasis should be given to solving problems related to bathing in different situations and environments. In particular, it is important to develop new assistive technologies to streamline and ease the burden of a caregiver's daily tasks. Generally-speaking, in the case of bedridden patients, bathing is typically carried out manually by a caregiver, using towels, sponges, and a water basin. Nevertheless, this apparently simple task needs some precautions in order to avoid the risk of microbial infections, falls and other injuries. With that in mind, this paper presents the design of a portable washing system, called Bath-Ambience, which enables bedridden patients to be bathed efficiently without having to be moved from their position. This portable system can be installed in different situations, both in a domestic setting, and in specialized institutions, and allows the caregiver to perform the bathing tasks without compromising health and safety, thereby making it possible to offer a comfortable and hygienic procedure to patients, improving their quality of life. This paper presents the design of the portable Bath-Ambience washing system, which provides efficient assistance for bathing bedridden patients without moving them to another place. This system is mainly dedicated for integration a smart home application in to allow bathing everywhere.

  17. Bath-Ambience—A Mechatronic System for Assisting the Caregivers of Bedridden People

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Karolina; Machado, José; Carvalho, Vítor; Castro, Marcelo; Costa, Pedro; Matos, Demétrio; Soares, Filomena

    2017-01-01

    The health of older people is receiving special attention and dedication nowadays, with the aim of increasing their general wellbeing and quality of life. Studies into different aspects of the care of the elderly have found that emphasis should be given to solving problems related to bathing in different situations and environments. In particular, it is important to develop new assistive technologies to streamline and ease the burden of a caregiver’s daily tasks. Generally-speaking, in the case of bedridden patients, bathing is typically carried out manually by a caregiver, using towels, sponges, and a water basin. Nevertheless, this apparently simple task needs some precautions in order to avoid the risk of microbial infections, falls and other injuries. With that in mind, this paper presents the design of a portable washing system, called Bath-Ambience, which enables bedridden patients to be bathed efficiently without having to be moved from their position. This portable system can be installed in different situations, both in a domestic setting, and in specialized institutions, and allows the caregiver to perform the bathing tasks without compromising health and safety, thereby making it possible to offer a comfortable and hygienic procedure to patients, improving their quality of life. This paper presents the design of the portable Bath-Ambience washing system, which provides efficient assistance for bathing bedridden patients without moving them to another place. This system is mainly dedicated for integration a smart home application in to allow bathing everywhere. PMID:28524114

  18. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, H.; Kato, M.; Ishimaru, T.

    2014-02-20

    Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma is investigated. Feasibility of precursors of triethylsilane (TES) and bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane (BDMADMS) is discussed based on a calculation of bond energies by computer simulation. Refractive indices of 1.81 and 1.71 are obtained for deposited films with TES and BDMADMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the deposited film revealed that TES-based film coincides with the stoichiometric thermal silicon nitride.

  19. Phase Equilibrium of TiO2 Nanocrystals in Flame-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changran; Camacho, Joaquin; Wang, Hai

    2018-01-19

    Nano-scale titanium oxide (TiO 2 ) is a material useful for a wide range of applications. In a previous study, we showed that TiO 2 nanoparticles of both rutile and anatase crystal phases could be synthesized over the size range of 5 to 20 nm in flame-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Rutile was unexpectedly dominant in oxygen-lean synthesis conditions, whereas anatase is the preferred phase in oxygen-rich gases. The observation is in contrast to the 14 nm rutile-anatase crossover size derived from the existing crystal-phase equilibrium model. In the present work, we made additional measurements over a wider range of synthesis conditions; the results confirm the earlier observations. We propose an improved model for the surface energy that considers the role of oxygen desorption at high temperatures. The model successfully explains the observations made in the current and previous work. The current results provide a useful path to designing flame-assisted chemical vapor deposition of TiO 2 nanocrystals with controllable crystal phases. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Characteristic functions of quantum heat with baths at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurell, Erik

    2018-06-01

    This paper is about quantum heat defined as the change in energy of a bath during a process. The presentation takes into account recent developments in classical strong-coupling thermodynamics and addresses a version of quantum heat that satisfies quantum-classical correspondence. The characteristic function and the full counting statistics of quantum heat are shown to be formally similar. The paper further shows that the method can be extended to more than one bath, e.g., two baths at different temperatures, which opens up the prospect of studying correlations and heat flow. The paper extends earlier results on the expected quantum heat in the setting of one bath [E. Aurell and R. Eichhorn, New J. Phys. 17, 065007 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/6/065007; E. Aurell, Entropy 19, 595 (2017), 10.3390/e19110595].

  1. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, Keith D.; Morgan, Dean T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

  2. Thermal diode utilizing asymmetric contacts to heat baths.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple thermal diode passively acting as a rectifier of heat current. The key design of the diode is the size asymmetry of the areas in contact with two distinct heat baths. The heat-conducting medium is liquid, inside of which gaslike regions are induced depending on the applied conditions. Simulating nanoscale systems of this diode, the rectification of heat current is demonstrated. If the packing density of the medium and the working regime of temperature are properly chosen, the heat current is effectively cut off when the heat bath with narrow contact is hotter, but it flows normally under opposite temperature conditions. In the former case, the gaslike region is induced in the system and it acts as a thermal insulator because it covers the entire narrow area of contact with the bath.

  3. Chronological record of environmental chemicals from analysis of stratified vertebrate excretion deposited in a sheltered environment

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, M.G.; Altenbach, J.S.

    1973-01-01

    Guano deposits of the migratory free-tailed bat Tadarida brasiliensis are stratified into distinguishable annual layers in some caves in the American Southwest. These layers may be dated and analyzed for environmental chemicals thus providing a chronological record of selected chemicals in the food chain of this mammal. It is found that the annual Hg fluctuations observed in the guano correlate with annual production figures of a nearby copper smelter. Analysis of the terms in a mathematical model suggests that the major mechanism by which smelter mercury enters the bat's food chain is dry fallout. A 1-yr delay time between peaksmore » and dips in industrial output and peaks and dips in the mercury present in guano indicate that industrial mercury is ingested by the bat indirectly via the food chain. The preliminary data presented here indicate that analysis of old deposits (preindustrial revolution) will provide baseline data for environmental chemicals.« less

  4. Methylsilane derived silicon carbide particle coatings produced by fluid-bed chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, James Henry

    This report describes the research effort that was undertaken to develop and understand processing techniques for the deposition of both low and high density SiC coatings from a non-halide precursor, in support of the Generation IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) fuel development program. The research was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, the feasibility of producing both porous SiC coatings and dense SiC coatings on surrogate fuel particles by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) using gas mixtures of methylsilane and argon was demonstrated. In the second phase, a combined experimental and modeling effort was carried out in order to gain an understanding of the deposition mechanisms that result in either porous or dense SiC coatings, depending on the coating conditions. For this second phase effort, a simplified (compared to the fluid bed) single-substrate chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system was employed. Based on the experimental and modeling results, the deposition of SiC from methylsilane is controlled by the extent of gas-phase reaction, and is therefore highly sensitive to temperature. The results show that all SiC coatings are due to the surface adsorption of species that result from gas-phase reactions. The model terms these gas-borne species embryos, and while the model does not include a prediction of coating morphology, a comparison of the model and experimental results indicates that the morphology of the coatings is controlled by the nucleation and growth of the embryos. The coating that results from small embryos (embryos with only two Si-C pairs) appears relatively dense and continuous, while the coating that results from larger embryos becomes less continuous and more nodular as embryo size increases. At some point in the growth of embryos they cease to behave as molecular species and instead behave as particles that grow by either agglomeration or by incorporation of molecular species on their surface. As these particles

  5. The Medical Risks and Benefits of Sauna, Steam Bath, and Whirlpool Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1987-01-01

    Saunas, steam baths, and whirlpools--popular fixtures at health clubs--are safe means of relaxation if used properly. Ignoring the recommendations for moderate, commonsense enjoyment of these baths may expose users to health risks, including sudden death, arrhythmias, and skin infections. A guide to safe use of such baths is presented. (Author/CB)

  6. Heteroepitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor compounds by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, Ward J.; Abul-Fadl, Ali

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design, install and operate a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition system which is to be used for the epitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor binary compounds, and ternary and quaternary alloys. The long-term goal is to utilize this vapor phase deposition in conjunction with existing current controlled liquid phase epitaxy facilities to perform hybrid growth sequences for fabricating integrated optoelectronic devices.

  7. 5. UNIT VENTILATOR, MEN'S BATH HALL, SHOWING POSITION AGAINST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. UNIT VENTILATOR, MEN'S BATH HALL, SHOWING POSITION AGAINST WALL ABOVE THE BATHS. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Ozark Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  8. Low-Temperature Silicon Epitaxy by Remote, Plasma - Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermehl, Scott Dwight

    The dynamics of low temperature Si homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial growth, by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, RPECVD, have been investigated. For the critical step of pre-deposition surface preparation of Si(100) surfaces, the attributes of remote plasma generated atomic H are compared to results obtained with a rapid thermal desorption, RTD, technique and a hybrid H-plasma/RTD technique. Auger electron spectroscopy, AES, and electron diffraction analysis indicate the hybrid technique to be very effective at surface passivation, while the RTD process promotes the formation of SiC precipitates, which induce defective epitaxial growth. For GaP and GaAs substrates, the use of atomic H exposure is investigated as a surface passivation technique. AES shows this technique to be effective at producing atomically clean surfaces. For processing at 400^circrm C, the GaAs(100) surface is observed to reconstruct to a c(8 x 2)Ga symmetry while, at 530^ circrm C the vicinal GaP(100) surface, miscut 10^circ , is observed to reconstruct to a (1 x n) type symmetry; an unreconstructed (1 x 1) symmetry is observed for GaP(111). Differences in the efficiency with which native oxides are removed from the surface are attributed to variations in the local atomic bonding order of group V oxides. The microstructure of homoepitaxial Si films, deposited at temperatures of 25-450^circ rm C and pressures of 50-500 mTorr, is catalogued. Optimized conditions for the deposition of low defect, single crystal films are identified. The existence of two pressure dependent regimes for process activation are observed. In-situ mass spectral analysis indicates that the plasma afterglow is dominated by monosilane ions below 200 mTorr, while above 200 mTorr, low mass rm H_{x} ^+ (x = 1,2,3) and rm HHe^+ ions dominate. Consideration of the growth rate data indicates that downstream dissociative silane ionization, in the lower pressure regime, is responsible for an enhanced surface H

  9. Habitual hot-spring bathing by a group of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in their natural habitat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Watanabe, Kunio; Eishi, Tokida

    2007-12-01

    Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in a free-ranging group in Jigokudani valley, Nagano prefecture, are known to bathe in a hot spring. We used scan sampling in a study aimed at elucidating the causal factors and possible social transmission of this behavior. From 1980-2003, 31% of a total 114 females in the group habitually bathed in the hot spring. The habit was more widespread in dominant matrilines than in subordinate matrilines. Infants whose mothers bathed were more likely to bathe than infants of mothers who did not bathe. The number of monkeys bathing was clearly influenced by ambient air temperature. More monkeys bathed in the hot spring in winter than in summer. The results support the thermoregulation hypothesis of hot-spring bathing. Bathing behavior varies among age and sex categories of monkeys, with adult females and juveniles bathing more often than adult males and subadults. We compared hot-spring bathing with other thermoregulatory behaviors in various primate populations. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Optimization of silicon oxynitrides by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for an interferometric biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Sung Joong; Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Sang-Myung; Park, Jung Ho; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, silicon oxynitride layers deposited with different plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) conditions were fabricated and optimized, in order to make an interferometric sensor for detecting biochemical reactions. For the optimization of PECVD silicon oxynitride layers, the influence of the N2O/SiH4 gas flow ratio was investigated. RF power in the PEVCD process was also adjusted under the optimized N2O/SiH4 gas flow ratio. The optimized silicon oxynitride layer was deposited with 15 W in chamber under 25/150 sccm of N2O/SiH4 gas flow rates. The clad layer was deposited with 20 W in chamber under 400/150 sccm of N2O/SiH4 gas flow condition. An integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometric biosensor based on optical waveguide technology was fabricated under the optimized PECVD conditions. The adsorption reaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the silicon oxynitride surface was performed and verified with this device.

  11. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

  12. Method and apparatus for fabricating a thin-film solar cell utilizing a hot wire chemical vapor deposition technique

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Iwaniczko, Eugene

    2006-10-17

    A thin-film solar cell is provided. The thin-film solar cell comprises an a-SiGe:H (1.6 eV) n-i-p solar cell having a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer by hot wire chemical vapor deposition. A method for fabricating a thin film solar cell is also provided. The method comprises depositing a n-i-p layer at a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer.

  13. Ochre Bathing of the Bearded Vulture: A Bio-Mimetic Model for Early Humans towards Smell Prevention and Health

    PubMed Central

    Tributsch, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary The once widespread bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) has the habit of bathing its polluted feathers and skin in red iron oxide-ochre-tainted water puddles. Primitive man may have tried to find out why: ochre is active in sunlight producing aggressive chemical species. They can kill viruses and bacteria and convert smelly organic substances into volatile neutral carbon dioxide gas. There is consequently a sanitary reason for the vulture’s habit of bathing in red ochre mud and this explains why prehistoric people included ochre use into their habits and rituals. Abstract Since primordial times, vultures have been competing with man for animal carcasses. One of these vultures, the once widespread bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), has the habit of bathing its polluted feathers and skin in red iron oxide - ochre - tainted water puddles. Why? Primitive man may have tried to find out and may have discovered its advantages. Red ochre, which has accompanied human rituals and everyday life for more than 100,000 years, is not just a simple red paint for decoration or a symbol for blood. As modern experiments demonstrate, it is active in sunlight producing aggressive chemical species. They can kill viruses and bacteria and convert smelly organic substances into volatile neutral carbon dioxide gas. In this way, ochre can in sunlight sterilize and clean the skin to provide health and comfort and make it scentless, a definitive advantage for nomadic meat hunters. This research thus also demonstrates a sanitary reason for the vulture’s habit of bathing in red ochre mud. Prehistoric people have therefore included ochre use into their rituals, especially into those in relation to birth and death. Significant ritual impulses during evolution of man may thus have developed bio-mimetically, inspired from the habits of a vulture. It is discussed how this health strategy could be developed to a modern standard helping to fight antibiotics-resistant bacteria in

  14. Quantum dynamics simulations in an ultraslow bath using hierarchy of stochastic Schrödinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yaling; Zhao, Yi

    2018-04-01

    The hierarchy of stochastic Schrödinger equation, previously developed under the unpolarised initial bath states, is extended in this paper for open quantum dynamics under polarised initial bath conditions. The method is proved to be a powerful tool in investigating quantum dynamics exposed to an ultraslow Ohmic bath, as in this case the hierarchical truncation level and the random sampling number can be kept at a relatively small extent. By systematically increasing the system-bath coupling strength, the symmetric Ohmic spin-boson dynamics is investigated at finite temperature, with a very small cut-off frequency. It is confirmed that the slow bath makes the system dynamics extremely sensitive to the initial bath conditions. The localisation tendency is stronger in the polarised initial bath conditions. Besides, the oscillatory coherent dynamics persists even when the system-bath coupling is very strong, in correspondence with what is found recently in the deep sub-Ohmic bath, where also the low-frequency modes dominate.

  15. Fabrication of CIGS Films by Electrodeposition Method for Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunju; Yoon, Hyukjoo; Ji, Changwook; Lee, Dongyun; Lee, Jae-Ho; Yun, Jae-Ho; Kim, Yangdo

    2012-12-01

    Cu(InGa)Se2 (CIGS) thin films were fabricated by electrochemical deposition in a single bath containing Cu, In, Ga, and Se ions. The electrolyte was prepared by dissolving CuCl2, InCl3, GaCl3, H2SeO3, and LiCl in deionized water. The potentiostatic deposition process was achieved by applying a voltage ranging from -0.5 V to -0.8 V versus Ag/AgCl. The effects of different chemical bath concentrations on the film composition and morphology were investigated. Stoichiometric CIGS film composition could be achieved by controlling the chemical compositions of the bath and the voltage. Gelatin was added to the solution to improve the surface and microstructures of the CIGS film. The as-deposited films were annealed at 500°C in Ar atmosphere for crystallization. The structural, morphological, and compositional properties of the CIGS thin films before and after annealing were examined by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. This study showed that the composition of the CIGS films is dependent on the bath concentration, whereas the applied potential had relatively less effect on the CIGS film composition. In addition, the use of gelatin helped in the fabrication of crack-free CIGS thin films with greatly improved surface morphology.

  16. Non-Markovian dynamics of fermionic and bosonic systems coupled to several heat baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, A. A.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Lacroix, D.

    2018-03-01

    Employing the fermionic and bosonic Hamiltonians for the collective oscillator linearly FC-coupled with several heat baths, the analytical expressions for the collective occupation number are derived within the non-Markovian quantum Langevin approach. The master equations for the occupation number of collective subsystem are derived and discussed. In the case of Ohmic dissipation with Lorenzian cutoffs, the possibility of reduction of the system with several heat baths to the system with one heat bath is analytically demonstrated. For the fermionic and bosonic systems, a comparative analysis is performed between the collective subsystem coupled to two heat baths and the reference case of the subsystem coupled to one bath.

  17. Continuous roll-to-roll growth of graphene films by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2011-03-01

    Few-layer graphene is obtained in atmospheric chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline copper in a roll-to-roll process. Raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to confirm the few-layer nature of the graphene film, to map the inhomogeneities, and to study and optimize the growth process. This continuous growth process can be easily scaled up and enables the low-cost fabrication of graphene films for industrial applications.

  18. The thickness effect of pre-deposited catalyst film on carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y. Y.; Eres, Gyula; Lowndes, Douglas H.

    2001-03-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was realized on a substrate with a layer of iron film used as a catalyst. The catalyst film was pre-deposited in an electron-gun evaporator equipped with a movable shutter which partially blocks the beam during the evaporation process to produce a catalyst film with a continuously changing thickness from 0 to 60 nm. This technique creates a growth environment in which the film thickness is the only variable and eliminates sample-to-sample variations, enabling a systematic study of the thickness effect of the catalyst film on CNT growth. After the deposition of the catalyst film, the sample was immediately transferred into a CVD chamber where CNT growth was performed. Using Acetylene (C_2H_2) as a carbon-source gas, at the substrate temperature of around 700^oC, MWCNTs preferentially grow as a dense mat on the thin regions of the catalyst film. Moreover, beyond a certain critical film thickness no tubes were observed. The critical film thickness for CNT growth was found to increase with substrate temperature from 640^oC to 800^oC. There appears to be no strong correlation between the film thickness and the diameter of the tubes. At the substrate temperature of over 900^oC, the deposited carbon formed graphite sheets surrounding the catalyst particles and no CNTs were observed. A plot of the critical thickness of the catalyst film where CNTs start to grow as a function of the substrate temperature has obtained, which can be served as a reference for selecting the growth parameter in MWCNT growth. The significance of these experimental trends is discussed within the framework of the diffusion model for MWCNT growth.

  19. SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, C.A.; Sandoval-Paz, M.G.; Cabello, G.

    Highlights: • High quality ZnS thin films have been deposited by chemical bath deposition technique from a non-toxic precursor’s solution. • Nanocrystalline ZnS thin films with large band gap energy were synthesized without using ammonia. • Evidence that the growing of the thin films is carried out by means of hydroxide mechanism was found. • The properties of these ZnS thin films are similar and in some cases better than the corresponding ones produced using toxic precursors such as ammonia. - Abstract: In solar cells, ZnS window layer deposited by chemical bath technique can reach the highest conversion efficiency; however,more » precursors used in the process normally are materials highly volatile, toxic and harmful to the environment and health (typically ammonia and hydrazine). In this work the characterization of ZnS thin films deposited by chemical bath in a non-toxic alkaline solution is reported. The effect of deposition technique (growth in several times) on the properties of the ZnS thin film was studied. The films exhibited a high percentage of optical transmission (greater than 80%); as the deposition time increased a decreasing in the band gap values from 3.83 eV to 3.71 eV was observed. From chemical analysis, the presence of ZnS and Zn(OH){sub 2} was identified and X-ray diffraction patterns exhibited a clear peak corresponding to ZnS hexagonal phase (1 0 3) plane, which was confirmed by electron diffraction patterns. From morphological studies, compact samples with well-defined particles, low roughness, homogeneous and pinhole-free in the surface were observed. From obtained results, it is evident that deposits of ZnS–CBD using a non-toxic solution are suitable as window layer for TFSC.« less

  20. A unified stochastic formulation of dissipative quantum dynamics. II. Beyond linear response of spin baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Cao, Jianshu

    2018-01-01

    We use the "generalized hierarchical equation of motion" proposed in Paper I [C.-Y. Hsieh and J. Cao, J. Chem. Phys. 148, 014103 (2018)] to study decoherence in a system coupled to a spin bath. The present methodology allows a systematic incorporation of higher-order anharmonic effects of the bath in dynamical calculations. We investigate the leading order corrections to the linear response approximations for spin bath models. Two kinds of spin-based environments are considered: (1) a bath of spins discretized from a continuous spectral density and (2) a bath of localized nuclear or electron spins. The main difference resides with how the bath frequency and the system-bath coupling parameters are distributed in an environment. When discretized from a continuous spectral density, the system-bath coupling typically scales as ˜1 /√{NB } where NB is the number of bath spins. This scaling suppresses the non-Gaussian characteristics of the spin bath and justifies the linear response approximations in the thermodynamic limit. For the nuclear/electron spin bath models, system-bath couplings are directly deduced from spin-spin interactions and do not necessarily obey the 1 /√{NB } scaling. It is not always possible to justify the linear response approximations in this case. Furthermore, if the spin-spin Hamiltonian is highly symmetrical, there exist additional constraints that generate highly non-Markovian and persistent dynamics that is beyond the linear response treatments.

  1. Performance of Inductors Attached to a Galvanizing Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinping; Yuan, Shuo; Liu, Chi; Yang, Peng; Qian, Chaoqun; Song, Bao

    2013-12-01

    By taking a galvanizing bath with inductors from an Iron and Steel Co., Ltd as an example, the distributions of Lorentz force and generated heat in the inductor are simulated. As a result, the zinc flow and the temperature distribution driven by the Lorentz force and the generated heat in the inductor of a galvanizing bath are simulated numerically, and their characteristics are analyzed. The relationship of the surface-weighted average velocity at the outlet and the temperature difference between the inlet and the outlet and the effective power for the inductor is studied. Results show that with an increase in effective power for the inductor, the surface-weighted average velocity at the outlet and the temperature difference between the inlet and the outlet increase gradually. We envisage this work to lay a foundation for the study of the performance of the galvanizing bath in future.

  2. Effects of surface morphology on the optical and electrical properties of Schottky diodes of CBD deposited ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwankemwa, Benard S.; Akinkuade, Shadrach; Maabong, Kelebogile; Nel, Jackie M.; Diale, Mmantsae

    2018-04-01

    We report on effect of surface morphology on the optical and electrical properties of chemical bath deposited Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures. ZnO nanostructures were deposited on the seeded conducting indium doped tin oxide substrate positioned in three different directions in the growth solution. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the morphological properties of the synthesized nanostructures and revealed that the positioning of the substrate in the growth solution affects the surface morphology of the nanostructures. The optical absorbance, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy of the resulting nanostructures are discussed. The electrical characterization of the Schottky diode such as barrier height, ideality factor, rectification ratios, reverse saturation current and series resistance were found to depend on the nanostructures morphology. In addition, current transport mechanism in the higher forward bias of the Schottky diode was studied and space charge limited current was found to be the dominant transport mechanism in all samples.

  3. A brain slice bath for physiology and compound microscopy, with dual-sided perifusion.

    PubMed

    Heyward, P M

    2010-12-01

    Contemporary in vitro brain slice studies can employ compound microscopes to identify individual neurons or their processes for physiological recording or imaging. This requires that the bath used to maintain the tissue fits within the working distances of a water-dipping objective and microscope condenser. A common means of achieving this is to maintain thin tissue slices on the glass floor of a recording bath, exposing only one surface of the tissue to oxygenated bathing medium. Emerging evidence suggests that physiology can be compromised by this approach. Flowing medium past both sides of submerged brain slices is optimal, but recording baths utilizing this principle are not readily available for use on compound microscopes. This paper describes a tissue bath designed specifically for microscopy and physiological recording, in which temperature-controlled medium flows past both sides of the slices. A particular feature of this design is the use of concentric mesh rings to support and transport the live tissue without mechanical disturbance. The design is also easily adapted for use with thin acute slices, cultured slices, and acutely dispersed or cultured cells maintained either on cover slips or placed directly on the floor of the bath. The low profile of the bath provides a low angle of approach for electrodes, and allows use of standard condensers, nosepieces and water-dipping objective lenses. If visualization of individual neurons is not required, the bath can be mounted on a simple stand and used with a dissecting microscope. Heating is integral to the bath, and any temperature controller capable of driving a resistive load can be used. The bath is robust, readily constructed and requires minimal maintenance. Full construction and operation details are given. © 2010 The Author Journal of Microscopy © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Chronodiagnostic acquisition of recovery speed of heart rate under bathing stress.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, M; Togawa, T

    1999-11-01

    Cycling on an ergometer is one effective means of measuring cardiovascular function while applying stress on the heart. Bathing in a hot water bath applies a low stress to the heart. The electrocardiograms of a healthy adult male (aged 35 at the start of study) were recorded while taking a hot water bath with no electrode attached to the body over a period of 2 years (376 days over a 762 day period). The recovery speed following the initial overshoot of the heart rate (HR) was observed. The bathtub was designed for the automatic acquisition of ECG data. Immediately after immersion in the tub, the HR reached a peak within 20 s and then exponentially decreased toward the lowest rate in the 120 s of bathing. The initial recovery speed of the HR from the stress of bathing had a specific rhythm in the subject. Spectrum analysis of the speed series indicated that slow recovery speed appeared in cyclic periods of approximately 1 year, 42 days and 17 days. The methodology may provide a chronodiagnostic index of an exercise test for cardiovascular function.

  5. Creep of chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The creep, thermal expansion, and elastic modulus properties for chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers were measured between 1000 and 1500 C. Creep strain was observed to increase logarithmically with time, monotonically with temperature, and linearly with tensile stress up to 600 MPa. The controlling activation energy was 480 + or - 20 kJ/mole. Thermal pretreatments near 1200 and 1450 C were found to significantly reduce fiber creep. These results coupled with creep recovery observations indicate that below 1400 C fiber creep is anelastic with neglible plastic component. This allowed a simple predictive method to be developed for describing fiber total deformation as a function of time, temperature, and stress. Mechanistic analysis of the property data suggests that fiber creep is the result of beta-SiC grain boundary sliding controlled by a small percent of free silicon in the grain boundaries.

  6. Theories of quantum dissipation and nonlinear coupling bath descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui-Xue; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Hou-Dao; Yan, YiJing

    2018-03-01

    The quest of an exact and nonperturbative treatment of quantum dissipation in nonlinear coupling environments remains in general an intractable task. In this work, we address the key issues toward the solutions to the lowest nonlinear environment, a harmonic bath coupled both linearly and quadratically with an arbitrary system. To determine the bath coupling descriptors, we propose a physical mapping scheme, together with the prescription reference invariance requirement. We then adopt a recently developed dissipaton equation of motion theory [R. X. Xu et al., Chin. J. Chem. Phys. 30, 395 (2017)], with the underlying statistical quasi-particle ("dissipaton") algebra being extended to the quadratic bath coupling. We report the numerical results on a two-level system dynamics and absorption and emission line shapes.

  7. Optical and compositional characterization of SiOxNy and SiOx thin films deposited by electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roschuk, T.; Wojcik, J.; Tan, X.; Davies, J. A.; Mascher, P.

    2004-05-01

    Thin silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy) and silicon-rich silicon-oxide (SiOx,x<=2) films of varying composition have been deposited by electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Films were deposited using various source gas flow rates while maintaining a constant chamber pressure. Thicknesses and refractive indices for these films were determined using ellipsometry. Bonding of the constituent atoms was analyzed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR spectroscopy also allowed for the detection of bonded species such as hydrogen. Compositional characteristics were determined using various forms of ion beam analysis such as Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection. These analysis techniques were used to determine the values of x and y, the molar fractions of oxygen and nitrogen, respectively, and the total amount of hydrogen present in the films. Using the results obtained from these methods the film characteristics were determined as a function of the deposition conditions. .

  8. Rapid feedback of chemical vapor deposition growth mechanisms by operando X-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, Aiden A.; Depond, Philip J.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; ...

    2018-03-14

    An operando x-ray diffraction system is presented for elucidating optimal laser assisted chemical vapor deposition growth conditions. The technique is utilized to investigate deposition dynamics of boron-carbon materials using trimethyl borate precursor. Trimethyl borate exhibits vastly reduced toxicological and flammability hazards compared to existing precursors, but has previously not been applied to boron carbide growth. Crystalline boron-rich carbide material is produced in a narrow growth regime on addition of hydrogen during the growth phase at high temperature. Finally, the use of the operando x-ray diffraction system allows for the exploration of highly nonequilibrium conditions and rapid process control, which aremore » not possible using ex situ diagnostics.« less

  9. Rapid feedback of chemical vapor deposition growth mechanisms by operando X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Aiden A.; Depond, Philip J.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael

    An operando x-ray diffraction system is presented for elucidating optimal laser assisted chemical vapor deposition growth conditions. The technique is utilized to investigate deposition dynamics of boron-carbon materials using trimethyl borate precursor. Trimethyl borate exhibits vastly reduced toxicological and flammability hazards compared to existing precursors, but has previously not been applied to boron carbide growth. Crystalline boron-rich carbide material is produced in a narrow growth regime on addition of hydrogen during the growth phase at high temperature. Finally, the use of the operando x-ray diffraction system allows for the exploration of highly nonequilibrium conditions and rapid process control, which aremore » not possible using ex situ diagnostics.« less

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D.W.; Stinton, D.P.

    1992-12-31

    Silicon carbide and silicon nitride heat engine components are susceptible to hot corrosion by molten Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} which forms from impurities present in fuel and the environment. Chemically vapor deposited Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings are being developed as a means to protect components from reaction with these salts and preserve their structural properties. Investigations to optimize the structure of the coating have revealed that the deposition conditions dramatically affect the coating morphology. Coatings deposited at high temperatures are typically columnar in structure; high concentrations of the reactant gases produce oxide powders on the substrate surface. Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} depositedmore » at low temperatures consists of grains that are finer and have significantly less porosity than that formed at high temperatures. Samples of coatings which have been produced by CVD have successfully completed preliminary testing for resistance to corrosion by Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}.« less

  11. Herbal bathing: an analysis of variation in plant use among Saramaccan and Aucan Maroons in Suriname.

    PubMed

    van 't Klooster, Charlotte I E A; Haabo, Vinije; Ruysschaert, Sofie; Vossen, Tessa; van Andel, Tinde R

    2018-03-15

    Herbal baths play an important role in the traditional health care of Maroons living in the interior of Suriname. However, little is known on the differences in plant ingredients used among and within the Maroon groups. We compared plant use in herbal baths documented for Saramaccan and Aucan Maroons, to see whether similarity in species was related to bath type, ethnic group, or geographical location. We hypothesized that because of their dissimilar cultural background, they used different species for the same type of bath. We assumed, however, that plants used in genital baths were more similar, as certain plant ingredients (e.g., essential oils), are preferred in these baths. We compiled a database from published and unpublished sources on herbal bath ingredients and constructed a presence/absence matrix per bath type and study site. To assess similarity in plant use among and within Saramaccan and Aucan communities, we performed three Detrended Correspondence Analyses on species level and the Jaccard Similarity Index to quantify similarity in bath ingredients. We recorded 349 plants used in six commonly used bath types: baby strength, adult strength, skin diseases, respiratory ailments, genital steam baths, and spiritual issues. Our results showed a large variation in plant ingredients among the Saramaccan and Aucans and little similarity between Saramaccans and Aucans, even for the same type of baths. Plant ingredients for baby baths and genital baths shared more species than the others. Even within the Saramaccan community, plant ingredients were stronger associated with location than with bath type. Plant use in bathing was strongly influenced by study site and then by ethnicity, but less by bath type. As Maroons escaped from different plantations and developed their ethnomedicinal practices in isolation, there has been little exchange in ethnobotanical knowledge after the seventeenth century between ethnic groups. Care should be taken in extrapolating plant

  12. Induction salt bath for electrolytic boronizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonenko, A. N.

    1983-08-01

    The induction salt bath ISV-ÉB is intended for electrolytic and nonelectrolytic boronizing and for heating steel parts to be hardened in toolrooms of engineering plants equipped with high-frequency installations.

  13. A chemical and fluid dynamic study of the chemical vapor deposition of aluminum nitride in a vertical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bather, Wayne Anthony

    The metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of compound semiconductors has become important in producing many high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices from the wide bandgaps III-V nitrides, for example, aluminum nitride (AlN). A systematic theoretical and experimental investigation of the chemistry and mass transport process in a MOCVD system can yield predictive models of the deposition process. The chemistries and fluid dynamics of the MOCVD growth of AlN in a vertical reactor is analyzed and characterized in order to parameterize and model the deposition process. A Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic study of the predeposition reactions between trimethylaluminum (TMAl) and ammonia (NHsb3) is carried out in a static gas cell to examine the primary homogeneous gas phase reactions, pyrolysis of the reactants, and adduct formation, possibly accompanied by elimination reactions. A series of reactions, based on laboratory studies and literature review, is then proposed to model the deposition process. All pertinent kinetic, thermochemical, and transport properties were obtained. Utilizing a mass transport model, we performed computational fluid dynamics calculations using the FLUENT software package. We determined temperature, velocity, and concentration profiles, along with deposition rates inside the experimental vertical CVD reactor in the Howard University Material Science Research Center of Excellence. Experimental deposition rate data were found to be in good agreement with those predicted from the simulations, thus validating the proposed model. The control of the homogeneous gas phase reaction leading to the formation and subsequent decomposition of the adduct is critical to the formation of device-grade AlN films. Many basic processes occurring during MOCVD of AlN are still not completely understood, and none of the detailed surface reaction mechanisms are known.

  14. Spray Chemical Vapor Deposition of Single-Source Precursors for Chalcopyrite I-III-VI2 Thin-Film Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Harris, Jerry D.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Dickman, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Thin-film solar cells on flexible, lightweight, space-qualified substrates provide an attractive approach to fabricating solar arrays with high mass-specific power. A polycrystalline chalcopyrite absorber layer is among the new generation of photovoltaic device technologies for thin film solar cells. At NASA Glenn Research Center we have focused on the development of new single-source precursors (SSPs) for deposition of semiconducting chalcopyrite materials onto lightweight, flexible substrates. We describe the syntheses and thermal modulation of SSPs via molecular engineering. Copper indium disulfide and related thin-film materials were deposited via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using SSPs. Processing and post-processing parameters were varied in order to modify morphology, stoichiometry, crystallography, electrical properties, and optical properties to optimize device quality. Growth at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal hotwall reactor at 395 C yielded the best device films. Placing the susceptor closer to the evaporation zone and flowing a more precursor-rich carrier gas through the reactor yielded shinier-, smoother-, and denser-looking films. Growth of (112)-oriented films yielded more Cu-rich films with fewer secondary phases than growth of (204)/(220)-oriented films. Post-deposition sulfur-vapor annealing enhanced stoichiometry and crystallinity of the films. Photoluminescence studies revealed four major emission bands and a broad band associated with deep defects. The highest device efficiency for an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposited cell was one percent.

  15. The oil-dispersion bath in anthroposophic medicine--an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Büssing, Arndt; Cysarz, Dirk; Edelhäuser, Friedrich; Bornhöft, Gudrun; Matthiessen, Peter F; Ostermann, Thomas

    2008-12-04

    Anthroposophic medicine offers a variety of treatments, among others the oil-dispersion bath, developed in the 1930s by Werner Junge. Based on the phenomenon that oil and water do not mix and on recommendations of Rudolf Steiner, Junge developed a vortex mechanism which churns water and essential oils into a fine mist. The oil-covered droplets empty into a tub, where the patient immerses for 15-30 minutes. We review the current literature on oil-dispersion baths. The following databases were searched: Medline, Pubmed, Embase, AMED and CAMbase. The search terms were 'oil-dispersion bath' and 'oil bath', and their translations in German and French. An Internet search was also performed using Google Scholar, adding the search terms 'study' and 'case report' to the search terms above. Finally, we asked several experts for gray literature not listed in the above-mentioned databases. We included only articles which met the criterion of a clinical study or case report, and excluded theoretical contributions. Among several articles found in books, journals and other publications, we identified 1 prospective clinical study, 3 experimental studies (enrolling healthy individuals), 5 case reports, and 3 field-reports. In almost all cases, the studies described beneficial effects - although the methodological quality of most studies was weak. Main indications were internal/metabolic diseases and psychiatric/neurological disorders. Beyond the obvious beneficial effects of warm bathes on the subjective well-being, it remains to be clarified what the unique contribution of the distinct essential oils dispersed in the water can be. There is a lack of clinical studies exploring the efficacy of oil-dispersion baths. Such studies are recommended for the future.

  16. Escherichia coli at Ohio Bathing Beaches--Distribution, Sources, Wastewater Indicators, and Predictive Modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Gifford, Amie M.; Darner, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Results of studies during the recreational seasons of 2000 and 2001 strengthen the science that supports monitoring of our Nation?s beaches. Water and sediment samples were collected and analyzed for concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Ancillary water-quality and environmental data were collected or compiled to determine their relation to E. coli concentrations. Data were collected at three Lake Erie urban beaches (Edgewater, Villa Angela, and Huntington), two Lake Erie beaches in a less populated area (Mentor Headlands and Fairport Harbor), and one inland-lake beach (Mosquito Lake). The distribution of E. coli in water and sediments within the bathing area, outside the bathing area, and near the swash zone was investigated at the three Lake Erie urban beaches and at Mosquito Lake. (The swash zone is the zone that is alternately covered and exposed by waves.) Lake-bottom sediments from outside the bathing area were not significant deposition areas for E. coli. In contrast, interstitial water and subsurface sediments from near the swash zone were enriched with E. coli. For example, E. coli concentrations were as high as 100,000 colonies per 100 milliliters in some interstitial waters. Although there are no standards for E. coli in swash-zone materials, the high concentrations found at some locations warrant concern for public health. Studies were done at Mosquito Lake to identify sources of fecal contamination to the lake and bathing beach. Escherichia coli concentrations decreased with distance from a suspected source of fecal contamination that is north of the beach but increased at the bathing beach. This evidence indicated that elevated E. coli concentrations at the bathing beach are of local origin rather than from transport of bacteria from sites to the north. Samples collected from the three Lake Erie urban beaches and Mosquito Lake were analyzed to determine whether wastewater indicators could be used as surrogates for E. coli at bathing beaches

  17. QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM FOR WET DEPOSITION SAMPLING AND CHEMICAL ANALYSES FOR THE NATIONAL TRENDS NETWORK.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, LeRoy J.; Malo, Bernard A.; ,

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the National Trends Network is to delineate the major inorganic constituents in the wet deposition in the United States. The approach chosen to monitor the Nation's wet deposition is to install approximately 150 automatic sampling devices with at least one collector in each state. Samples are collected at one week intervals, removed from collectors, and transported to an analytical laboratory for chemical analysis. The quality assurance program has divided wet deposition monitoring into 5 parts: (1) Sampling site selection, (2) sampling device, (3) sample container, (4) sample handling, and (5) laboratory analysis. Each of these five components is being examined using existing designs or new designs. Each existing or proposed sampling site is visited and a criteria audit is performed.

  18. Bath Stone - a Possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The Middle Jurassic strata of England have several horizons of oolitic and bioclastic limestones that provide high quality dimension stone. One of the most important is found in and near the City of Bath. The Great Oolite Group (Upper Bathonian) contains the Combe Down and Bath Oolites, consisting of current bedded oolites and shelly oolites, that have been used extensively as freestones for construction nearby, for prestigious buildings through much of southern England and more widely. The stone has been used to some extent since Roman times when the city, then known as Aquae Sulis, was an important hot spa. The stone was used to a limited extent through medieval times but from the early 18th century onwards was exploited on a large scale through surface quarrying and underground mining. The City was extensively redeveloped in the 18th to early 19th century, mostly using Bath Stone, when the spas made it a fashionable resort. Buildings from that period include architectural "gems" such as the Royal Crescent and Pulteney Bridge, as well as the renovated Roman Baths. Many buildings were designed by some of the foremost British architects of the time. The consistent use of this stone gives the City an architectural integrity throughout. These features led to the designation of the City as a World Heritage Site. It is a requirement in current City planning policy documents that Bath Stone should be used for new building to preserve the appearance of the City. More widely the stone was used in major houses (e.g. Buckingham Palace and Apsley House in London; King's Pavilion in Brighton); civic buildings (e.g. Bristol Guildhall; Dartmouth Naval College in Devon); churches and cathedrals (e.g. Truro Cathedral in Cornwall); and engineered structures (e.g. the large Dundas Aqueduct on the Kennet and Avon Canal). More widely, Bath Stone has been used in Union Station in Washington DC; Toronto Bible College and the Town Hall at Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction declined in

  19. [The use of sodium chloride baths in patients with chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Anisimkina, A N; Aĭrapetova, N S; Davydova, O B; Doronina, Iu V; Derevnina, N A; Gontar', E V

    1996-01-01

    80 patients with chronic bronchitis took baths with sodium chloride concentration 20, 40, 60 g/l and temperature 37-38 degrees C. The baths produced a positive effect on central and regional hemodynamics, reduced inflammation and sensitization.

  20. Chemically evolving systems for oil recovery enhancement in heavy oil deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunina, L. K.; Kuvshinov, I. V.; Kuvshinov, V. A.; Stasyeva, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents the results of laboratory studies and field tests of new physicochemical technologies for enhanced oil recovery of heavy oil fields under natural development conditions and with thermal-steam stimulation using oil-displacing "smart" systems. The systems are based on surfactants and buffer systems. Their rheological and acid-base properties can be regulated by their chemical evolution directly in the formation. Field tests of the technologies carried out on high-viscosity oil deposit in the Usinskoye oilfield have shown that the EOR technologies are environmentally friendly and technologically effective.

  1. Influence of Water on Chemical Vapor Deposition of Ni and Co thin films from ethanol solutions of acetylacetonate precursors

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Theodor; Zielasek, Volkmar; Bäumer, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    In chemical vapor deposition experiments with pulsed spray evaporation (PSE-CVD) of liquid solutions of Ni and Co acetylacetonate in ethanol as precursors, the influence of water in the feedstock on the composition and growth kinetics of deposited Ni and Co metal films was systematically studied. Varying the water concentration in the precursor solutions, beneficial as well as detrimental effects of water on the metal film growth, strongly depending on the concentration of water and the β-diketonate in the precursor, were identified. For 2.5 mM Ni(acac)2 precursor solutions, addition of 0.5 vol% water improves growth of a metallic Ni film and reduces carbon contamination, while addition of 1.0 vol% water and more leads to significant oxidation of deposited Ni. By tuning the concentration of both, Ni(acac)2 and water in the precursor solution, the fraction of Ni metal and Ni oxide in the film or the film morphology can be adjusted. In the case of Co(acac)2, even smallest amounts of water promote complete oxidation of the deposited film. All deposited films were analyzed with respect to chemical composition quasi in situ by XPS, their morphology was evaluated after deposition by SEM. PMID:26658547

  2. Effect of Bathroom Aids and Age on Balance Control During Bathing Transfers.

    PubMed

    King, Emily C; Novak, Alison C

    Bathroom assistive devices are used to improve safety during bathing transfers, but biomechanical evidence to support clinical recommendations is lacking. This study evaluated the effectiveness of common bathroom aids in promoting balance control during bathing transfers. Twenty-six healthy adults (12 young, 14 older) stepped into and out of a slippery bathtub while using a vertical grab bar on the side wall, a horizontal grab bar on the back wall, a bath mat, a side wall touch, or no assistance. Balance control was characterized using center of pressure measures and showed greater instability for older adults. The vertical grab bar and wall touch resulted in the safest (best controlled) transfers. The bath mat provided improved balance control in the axis parallel to the bathtub rim but was equivalent to no assistance perpendicular to the rim, in the direction of obstacle crossing. These results can support clinical recommendations for safe bathing transfers. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  3. Effect of laser fluence and ambient gas pressure on surface morphology and chemical composition of hydroxyapatite thin films deposited using pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Tsukasa; Miyake, Akiko; Tashiro, Yuichiro; Komasa, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Yoshiya

    2018-01-01

    The dependence of the surface morphology and chemical composition of hydroxyapatite (HA) thin films on the laser fluence and ambient gas pressure during their formation by pulsed laser deposition was studied as the first step to investigate the effect of physical and chemical interactions between the ablated chemical species and ambient gas molecules on HA film formation. It was found that a higher fluence could decrease the number of large protrusions on the surface of HA thin films. However, too high a fluence caused a phosphorus deficiency from the stoichiometric value, particularly in the case of lower ambient gas pressure. It was also found that for lower fluences, the atomic species among the ablated chemical species were easily scattered by collision processes with ambient gas molecules. This was caused by the lower velocity of the ablated chemical species and higher ambient gas pressure, which induced a shorter mean free path. In addition, these collision processes played an important role in the adsorption, migration, and re-evaporation of the ablated chemical species on the substrate via chemical reactions.

  4. Thermal emission from large area chemical vapor deposited graphene devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxmoore, I. J.; Adlem, C.; Poole, T.; Lawton, L. M.; Mahlmeister, N. H.; Nash, G. R.

    2013-09-01

    The spatial variation of thermal emission from large area graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto SiO2/Si substrates and fabricated into field effect transistor structures, has been investigated using infra-red microscopy. A peak in thermal emission occurs, the position of which can be altered by reversal of the current direction. The experimental results are compared with a one dimensional finite element model, which accounts for Joule heating and electrostatic effects, and it is found that the thermal emission is governed by the charge distribution in the graphene and maximum Joule heating occurs at the point of minimum charge density.

  5. The organometallic chemical vapor deposition of transition metal carbides: The use of homoleptic alkyls

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, M.D.; Smith, D.C.; Springer, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    The organometallic chemical vapor deposition of transition metal carbides (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, and Cr) from tetraneopentyl-metal precursors has been carried out. Metal carbides can be deposited on Si, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and stainless steel substrates from M[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} at temperatures in the range of 300 to 750 C and pressures from 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}4} Torr. Thin films have also been grown using a carrier gas (Ar, H{sub 2}). The effects of variation of the metal center, deposition conditions, and reactor design on the resulting material have been examined by SEM, XPS, XRD, ERDmore » and AES. Hydrocarbon fragments generated in the deposition chamber have been studied in by in-situ mass spectrometry. Complementary studies examining the UHV surface decomposition of Zr[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} have allowed for a better understanding of the mechanism leading to film growth.« less

  6. Epitaxial Growth of GaN Films by Pulse-Mode Hot-Mesh Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komae, Yasuaki; Yasui, Kanji; Suemitsu, Maki; Endoh, Tetsuo; Ito, Takashi; Nakazawa, Hideki; Narita, Yuzuru; Takata, Masasuke; Akahane, Tadashi

    2009-07-01

    Intermittent gas supplies for hot-mesh chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride (GaN) films were investigated to improve film crystallinity and optical properties. The GaN films were deposited on SiC/Si(111) substrates using an alternating-source gas supply or an intermittent supply of source gases such as ammonia (NH3) and trimethylgallium (TMG) in hot-mesh CVD after deposition of an aluminum nitride (AlN) buffer layer. The AlN layer was deposited using NH3 and trimethylaluminum (TMA) on a SiC layer grown by carbonization of a Si substrate using propane (C3H8). GaN films were grown on the AlN layer by a reaction between NHx radicals generated on a ruthenium (Ru)-coated tungsten (W) mesh and TMG molecules. After testing various gas supply modes, GaN films with good crystallinity and surface morphology were obtained using an intermittent supply of TMG and a continuous supply of NH3 gas. An optimal interval for the TMG gas supply was also obtained for the apparatus employed.

  7. Chemical vapour deposition growth and Raman characterization of graphene layers and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Y.-C.; Rafailov, P. M.; Vlaikova, E.; Marinova, V.; Lin, S. H.; Yu, P.; Yu, S.-C.; Chi, G. C.; Dimitrov, D.; Sveshtarov, P.; Mehandjiev, V.; Gospodinov, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    Single-layer graphene films were grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on Cu foil. The CVD process was complemented by plasma enhancement to grow also vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using Ni nanoparticles as catalyst. The obtained samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy analysis. Nature of defects in the samples and optimal growth conditions leading to achieve high quality of graphene and carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  8. Inhable particulate matter from lime industries: Chemical composition and deposition in human respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoi, Ricardo H. M.; Braga, Darci M.; Makarovska, Yaroslava; Alfoldy, Balint; Carvalho Filho, Marco A. S.; Van Grieken, Réne; Godoi, Ana Flavia L.

    Air pollution caused by the lime production industry has become a serious problem with potential effects to human health, especially in developing countries. Colombo is a city included in the Metropolitan Region of Curitiba (capital of Paraná State) in South Brazil. In Colombo city, a correlation has been shown between the lime production and the number of persons who need respiratory treatment in a local hospital, indicating that the lime industry can cause deleterious health effects in the exposed workers and population. This research was conducted to deal firstly with the characterization of the size distribution and chemical compositions of particles emitted from lime manufacturing and subsequently to assess the deposition rate of inhaled dolomitic lime aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract. The elemental chemical composition and particle size of individual atmospheric particles was quantitatively elucidated, including low-Z components like C, N and O, as well as higher-Z elements, using automated electron probe microanalysis. Information concerning the bulk composition is provided by energy-dispersive X-ray detection. The majority of the respirable particulate matter identified was composed of aluminosilicates, Ca-Mg oxides, carbon-rich particles, mixtures of organic particles and Ca-Mg carbonates, soot and biogenic particles. In view of the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, local deposition efficiencies in the human respiratory system were calculated, revealing the deposition of CaO·MgO at extrathoracic, tracheobronchial and pulmonary levels. The results of this study offer evidence to the threat of the fine and coarse particles emitted from dolomite lime manufacturing, allowing policy-makers to better focus their mitigation strategies in an effective way, as well as to the dolomite producers for the purpose of designing and/or implementing improved emission controls.

  9. Carbon nanotubes synthesized by Ni-assisted atmospheric pressure thermal chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, G. S.; Cho, Y. S.; Hong, S. Y.; Park, J. B.; Son, K. H.; Kim, D. J.

    2002-03-01

    A detailed systematic study on the growth morphology of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si in atmospheric pressure thermal chemical vapor deposition was undertaken. The role of NH3 for vertical alignment of CNTs was investigated. The direct cause for the alignment was a dense distribution of the catalytic metal particles, but that the particles are maintained catalytically active under amorphous carbon deposits was established by NH3. It allows a dense nucleation of the CNTs, and consequently, assists vertical alignment through entanglement and mechanical leaning among the tubes. The CNTs grew in a base growth mode. Since Ni is consumed both by silicide reaction and by capture into the growing tube, the growth stops when Ni is totally depleted. It occurs earlier for smaller particles, and thus a long time of growth results in a thin bottom with poor adhesion.

  10. Growth of single-layer graphene on Ge (1 0 0) by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, C. D.; Caldas, P. G.; Freire, F. L.; Maia da Costa, M. E. H.

    2018-07-01

    The integration of graphene into nanoelectronic devices is dependent on the availability of direct deposition processes, which can provide uniform, large-area and high-quality graphene on semiconductor substrates such as Ge or Si. In this work, we synthesised graphene directly on p-type Ge (1 0 0) substrates by chemical vapour deposition. The influence of the CH4:H2 flow ratio on the graphene growth was investigated. Raman Spectroscopy, Raman mapping, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy/Scanning Tunnelling Spectroscopy results showed that good quality and homogeneous monolayer graphene over a large area can be achieved on Ge substrates directly with optimal growth conditions.

  11. Atomic layer epitaxy of GaN over sapphire using switched metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. A.; Skogman, R. A.; van Hove, J. M.; Olson, D. T.; Kuznia, J. N.

    1992-03-01

    In this letter the first switched atomic layer epitaxy (SALE) of single crystal GaN over basal plane sapphire substrates is reported. A low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LPMOCVD) system was used for the epilayer depositions. In contrast to conventional LPMOCVD requiring temperatures higher than 700 C, the SALE process resulted in single crystal insulating GaN layers at growth temperatures ranging from 900 to 450 C. The band-edge transmission and the photoluminescence of the films from the SALE process were comparable to the best LPMOCVD films. As best as is known this is the first report of insulating GaN films which show excellent band-edge photoluminescence.

  12. Dynamics and protection of tripartite quantum correlations in a thermal bath

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jin-Liang, E-mail: guojinliang80@163.com; Wei, Jin-Long

    2015-03-15

    We study the dynamics and protection of tripartite quantum correlations in terms of genuinely tripartite concurrence, lower bound of concurrence and tripartite geometric quantum discord in a three-qubit system interacting with independent thermal bath. By comparing the dynamics of entanglement with that of quantum discord for initial GHZ state and W state, we find that W state is more robust than GHZ state, and quantum discord performs better than entanglement against the decoherence induced by the thermal bath. When the bath temperature is low, for the initial GHZ state, combining weak measurement and measurement reversal is necessary for a successfulmore » protection of quantum correlations. But for the initial W state, the protection depends solely upon the measurement reversal. In addition, the protection cannot usually be realized irrespective of the initial states as the bath temperature increases.« less

  13. Water bath accelerated curing of concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1970-01-01

    Water bath methods for accelerating the strength development of portland cement concrete were investigated in a two phase study as follows. Phase I - Participation in a cooperative accelerated strength testing program sponsored by the American Societ...

  14. [Therapeutic baths and relaxation in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Leseigneur, Matthieu

    2017-03-01

    A neurosurgical nursing and nursing auxiliaries team has started using therapeutic baths. The wellbeing procured favours a re-appropriation of body awareness and a reduction in anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural and optical properties of nanostructured CdSe thin films prepared by electrochemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Rekha; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K.

    2018-05-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanostructured thin films have been grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrates by potentiostatic electrochemical deposition (ECD) technique for use in solar energy conversion devices. The effect of bath temperature on the structural, morphological and optical properties of prepared CdSe films has been explored. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy clearly show that the CdSe films are polycrystalline and exhibit phase transformation from wurtzite to zincblende structure with increase in bath temperature. Optical spectra reveal that the nanostructured CdSe films have high absorbance in visible region and the films show a red shift in direct optical energy band gap from 1.90 to 1.65 eV with increase in bath temperature due to change in phase and bandgap tuning related to quantum confinement effect.

  16. Strain and structure heterogeneity in MoS 2 atomic layers grown by chemical vapour deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Zheng; Amani, Matin; Najmaei, Sina; ...

    2014-11-18

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2) has attracted tremendous attention due to its promising applications in high-performance field-effect transistors, phototransistors, spintronic devices, and nonlinear optics. The enhanced photoluminescence effect in monolayer MoS 2 was discovered and, as a strong tool, was employed for strain and defect analysis in MoS 2. Recently, large-size monolayer MoS 2 has been produced by chemical vapor deposition but has not yet been fully explored. Here we systematically characterize chemical vapor deposition grown MoS 2 by PL spectroscopy and mapping, and demonstrate non-uniform strain in single-crystalline monolayer MoS 2 and strain-induced band gap engineering. We also evaluatemore » the effective strain transferred from polymer substrates to MoS 2 by three-dimensional finite element analysis. In addition, our work demonstrates that PL mapping can be used as a non-contact approach for quick identification of grain boundaries in MoS 2.« less

  17. Conjugate gradient heat bath for ill-conditioned actions.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Bussi, Giovanni; Parrinello, Michele

    2007-08-01

    We present a method for performing sampling from a Boltzmann distribution of an ill-conditioned quadratic action. This method is based on heat-bath thermalization along a set of conjugate directions, generated via a conjugate-gradient procedure. The resulting scheme outperforms local updates for matrices with very high condition number, since it avoids the slowing down of modes with lower eigenvalue, and has some advantages over the global heat-bath approach, compared to which it is more stable and allows for more freedom in devising case-specific optimizations.

  18. Reduced-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Isolated Ge Crystals and Suspended Layers on Micrometric Si Pillars.

    PubMed

    Skibitzki, Oliver; Capellini, Giovanni; Yamamoto, Yuji; Zaumseil, Peter; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Schroeder, Thomas; Ballabio, Andrea; Bergamaschini, Roberto; Salvalaglio, Marco; Miglio, Leo; Montalenti, Francesco

    2016-10-05

    In this work, we demonstrate the growth of Ge crystals and suspended continuous layers on Si(001) substrates deeply patterned in high aspect-ratio pillars. The material deposition was carried out in a commercial reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor, thus extending the "vertical-heteroepitaxy" technique developed by using the peculiar low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor, to widely available epitaxial tools. The growth process was thoroughly analyzed, from the formation of small initial seeds to the final coalescence into a continuous suspended layer, by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and μ-Raman spectroscopy. The preoxidation of the Si pillar sidewalls and the addition of hydrochloric gas in the reactants proved to be key to achieve highly selective Ge growth on the pillars top only, which, in turn, is needed to promote the formation of a continuous Ge layer. Thanks to continuum growth models, we were able to single out the different roles played by thermodynamics and kinetics in the deposition dynamics. We believe that our findings will open the way to the low-cost realization of tens of micrometers thick heteroepitaxial layer (e.g., Ge, SiC, and GaAs) on Si having high crystal quality.

  19. Formation of multicomponent matrix metal oxide films in anodic alumina matrixes by chemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorokh, G. G.; Zakhlebayeva, A. I.; Metla, A. I.; Zhilinskiy, V. V.; Murashkevich, A. N.; Bogomazova, N. V.

    2017-11-01

    The metal oxide films of SnxZnyOz and SnxMoyOz systems deposited onto anodic alumina matrixes by chemical and ion layering from an aqueous solutions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electron probe X-ray microanalysis and IR spectroscopy. The obtained matrix films had reproducible composition and structure and possessed certain morphological characteristics and properties.

  20. Core-shell SrTiO3/graphene structure by chemical vapor deposition for enhanced photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chenye; Bu, Xiuming; Yang, Siwei; He, Peng; Ding, Guqiao; Xie, Xiaoming

    2018-04-01

    Direct growth of high quality graphene on the surface of SrTiO3 (STO) was realized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD), to construct few-layer 'graphene shell' on every STO nanoparticle. The STO/graphene composite shows significantly enhanced UV light photocatalytic activity compared with the STO/rGO reference. Mechanism analysis confirms the role of special core-shell structure and chemical bond (Tisbnd C) for rapid interfacial electron transfer and effective electron-hole separation.