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Sample records for chemical biodynamics division

  1. Chemical Biodynamics Division. Annual report 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Chemical Biodynamics Division of LBL continues to conduct basic research on the dynamics of living cells and on the interaction of radiant energy with organic matter. Many aspects of this basic research are related to problems of environmental and health effects of fossil fuel combustion, solar energy conversion and chemical/ viral carcinogenesis.

  2. Chemical Biodynamics Division: Annual report, October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    The research in the Laboratory of Chemical Biodynamics is almost entirely fundamental research. The biological research component is strongly dominated by a long term interest in two main themes which make up our Structural Biology Program. The first interest has to do with understanding the molecular dynamics of photosynthesis. The Laboratory's investigators are studying the various components that make up the photosynthetic reaction center complexes in many different organisms. This work not only involves understanding the kinetics of energy transfer and storage in plants, but also includes studies to work out how photosynthetic cells regulate the expression of genes encoding the photosynthetic apparatus. The second biological theme is a series of investigations into the relationship between structure and function in nucleic acids. Our basic mission in this program is to couple our chemical and biophysical expertise to understand how not only the primary structure of nucleic acids, but also higher levels of structure including interactions with proteins and other nucleic acids regulate the functional activity of genes. In the chemical sciences work in the Laboratory, our investigators are increasing our understanding of the fundamental chemistry of electronically excited molecules, a critical dimension of every photosynthetic energy storage process. We are developing approaches not only toward the utilization of sophisticated chemistry to store photon energy, but also to develop systems that can emulate the photosynthetic apparatus in the trapping and transfer of photosynthetic energy.

  3. Chemical Biodynamics Division: Annual report, October 1, 1986-September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Investigators are studying the various components that make up the photosynthetic reaction center complexes in many different organisms. This work not only involves understanding the kinetics of energy transfer and storage in plants, but also includes studies to work out how photosynthetic cells regulate the expression of genes encoding the photosynthetic apparatus. The second biological theme is a series of investigations into the relationship between structure and function in nucleic acids. Our basic mission in this program is to couple our chemical and biophysical expertise to understand how not only the primary structure of nucleic acids, but also higher levels of structure including interactions with proteins and other nucleic acids regulate the functional activity of genes. In the chemical sciences investigators are increasing our understanding of the fundamental chemistry of electronically excited molecules, a critical dimension of every photosynthetic energy storage process. We are developing approaches not only toward the utilization of sophisticated chemistry to store photon energy, but also to develop systems that can emulate the photosynthetic apparatus in the trapping and transfer of photosynthetic energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base.

  4. Chemical Engineering Division Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical Engineering Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The 1978 ASEE Chemical Engineering Division Lecturer was Theodore Vermeulen of the University of California at Berkeley. Other chemical engineers who received awards or special recognition at a recent ASEE annual conference are mentioned. (BB)

  5. Characterization of conventional, biodynamic, and organic purple grape juices by chemical markers, antioxidant capacity, and instrumental taste profile.

    PubMed

    Granato, Daniel; Margraf, Tiago; Brotzakis, Ioannis; Capuano, Edoardo; van Ruth, Saskia M

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize organic, biodynamic, and conventional purple grape juices (n = 31) produced in Europe based on instrumental taste profile, antioxidant activity, and some chemical markers and to propose a multivariate statistical model to analyze their quality and try to classify the samples from the 3 different crop systems. Results were subjected to ANOVA, correlation, and regression analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA). No statistical significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed among juices from the 3 crop systems. Using PCA and HCA, no clear separation among crop systems was observed, corroborating the ANOVA data. However, PCA showed that the producing region highly affects the chemical composition, electronic tongue parameters, and bioactivity of grape juices. In this sense, when organic and biodynamic were grouped as "nonconventional" juices, SIMCA model was able to discriminate 12 out of 13 organic/biodynamic juices and 17 out of 18 conventional juices, presenting an efficiency of 93.5%, while 11 out of 13 non-conventional and 100% conventional grape juices were correctly classified using PLSDA. The use of electronic tongue and the determination of antioxidant properties and major phenolic compounds have shown to be a quick and accurate analytical approach to assess the quality of grape juices. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Chemical and sensory characterisation of Sangiovese red wines: comparison between biodynamic and organic management.

    PubMed

    Parpinello, Giuseppina Paola; Rombolà, Adamo Domenico; Simoni, Marco; Versari, Andrea

    2015-01-15

    The effects of biodynamic production practices on composition and sensory attributes of Sangiovese wines were examined for 2 years (2009 and 2010) in a vineyard that was converted from organic (ORG) to biodynamic (BDN) viticulture. During the first year (2009), the BDN wines were characterised by low alcohol strength, colour intensity, total polyphenols, monomeric anthocyanins and catechin. Conversely, the second year BDN wines differed from the organic wines in terms of total polyphenols and phenolic compounds, including polymeric pigments, co-pigmentation, tannins and iron-reactive polyphenols. The effect of management practices, harvest and their interaction was analysed for each compound. Positive interaction was observed for total acidity, volatile acidity, cyanidin-3-glucoside, protocatechuic acid, (+)-catechin, quercetin and trans-resveratrol. ORG wine initially showed a more complex aroma profile; however, the differences were almost indistinguishable during the second year. Trained panellists highlighted differences in colour intensity between ORG and BDN wines although no preference was found by consumers. The concentrations of ochratoxin A and biogenic amines were far below the health-hazardous threshold. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

  8. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  9. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1997 are presented.

  10. 1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

    1999-08-06

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

  11. Analysis of Chemical Technology Division waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, T.J.; Donaldson, T.L.; Walker, A.B.; Cummins, R.L.; Reeves, M.E.; Hylton, T.D.

    1990-07-01

    This document is a summary of the sources, quantities, and characteristics of the wastes generated by the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The major contributors of hazardous, mixed, and radioactive wastes in the CTD as of the writing of this document were the Chemical Development Section, the Isotopes Section, and the Process Development Section. The objectives of this report are to identify the sources and the summarize the quantities and characteristics of hazardous, mixed, gaseous, and solid and liquid radioactive wastes that are generated by the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This study was performed in support of the CTD waste-reduction program -- the goals of which are to reduce both the volume and hazard level of the waste generated by the division. Prior to the initiation of any specific waste-reduction projects, an understanding of the overall waste-generation system of CTD must be developed. Therefore, the general approach taken in this study is that of an overall CTD waste-systems analysis, which is a detailed presentation of the generation points and general characteristics of each waste stream in CTD. The goal of this analysis is to identify the primary waste generators in the division and determine the most beneficial areas to initiate waste-reduction projects. 4 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, N.

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  13. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Laidler, J.J.; Myles, K.M.; Green, D.W.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems.

  14. Soil quality and financial performance of biodynamic and conventional farms in new zealand.

    PubMed

    Reganold, J P; Palmer, A S; Lockhart, J C; Macgregor, A N

    1993-04-16

    Biodynamic farming practices and systems show promise in mitigating some of the detrimental effects of chemical-dependent, conventional agriculture on the environment. The physical, biological, and chemical soil properties and economic profitability of adjacent, commercial biodynamic and conventional farms (16 total) in New Zealand were compared. The biodynamic farms in the study had better soil quality than the neighboring conventional farms and were just as financially viable on a per hectare basis.

  15. 2003 Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.; Graziano, D.; Miller, J. F.; Vandegrift, G.

    2004-04-26

    The Chemical Engineering Division is one of six divisions within the Engineering Research Directorate at Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, to promote national security, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. The Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which provides a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training in chemistry; physics; materials science; and electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineering. They are specialists in electrochemistry, ceramics, metallurgy, catalysis, materials characterization, nuclear magnetic resonance, repository science, and the nuclear fuel cycle. Our staff have experience working in and collaborating with university, industry and government research and development laboratories throughout the world. Our wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy, national security, and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by governmental and industrial organizations for advice and contributions to problem solving in areas that intersect present and past Division programs and activities. Currently, we are engaged in the development of several technologies of

  16. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  17. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  18. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  20. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1994-04-01

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

  2. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  3. The Division of Chemical Education Revisited, 25 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines what has happened over a period of 25 years since a separate Division of Chemical Education was created within the Department of Chemistry at Purdue University. It argues that the faith in the chemical education graduate program that was demonstrated when the division was created was well-placed, and that chemical education has…

  4. The Division of Chemical Education Revisited, 25 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines what has happened over a period of 25 years since a separate Division of Chemical Education was created within the Department of Chemistry at Purdue University. It argues that the faith in the chemical education graduate program that was demonstrated when the division was created was well-placed, and that chemical education has…

  5. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1990 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for coal- fired magnetohydrodynamics and fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for a high-level waste repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, concentrating plutonium solids in pyrochemical residues by aqueous biphase extraction, and treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 66 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    CMT is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. It conducts R&D in 3 general areas: development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, materials chemistry of electrified interfaces and molecular sieves, and the theory of materials properties. It also operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at ANL and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1996 are presented.

  7. Biodynamic total hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pipino, F; Calderale, P M

    1987-09-01

    The biodynamic total hip prosthesis which was devised in 1977-78 and implanted in 1979 was derived from a series of experimental studies and a lengthy clinical experience, both dating back to 1968. This prosthesis introduced two new and original concepts into the field of prosthetic hip surgery: 1) the biequatorial design of the cup; 2) the preservation of the femoral neck. This prosthetic system is based on maximum preservation of the bone stock as well as hip function. The biequatorial cup allows for positioning corresponding to that of the normal acetabulum. The femoral component incorporates features (collar, sagittal and frontal angulation, external surface, etc.) which facilitate proximal cortical fixation and cancellous metaphyseal biological anchoring, thus ensuring total adhesion. The average 3.5 years follow-up (maximum 7 years, minimum one year) in 280 cases confirms the effectiveness of this prosthesis and the validity of the basic principles on which it is founded.

  8. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1993-06-01

    In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste, mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and municipal solid waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, treating water contaminated with volatile organics, and concentrating radioactive waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (EFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials (corium; Fe-U-Zr, tritium in LiAlO{sub 2} in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel` ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, and molecular sieve structures; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  9. A Survey of Biodynamic Test Devices and Methods,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    DEVELOPMENT (ORGANISATION DU TRAITE DE L’ATLANTIQUE NORD) AGARDograph No.276 A SURVEY OF BIODYNAMIC TEST DEVICES AND METHODS by Noel S.Nussbaum, Ph.D.* Air ...Force Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory Aerospace Medical Division Air Force Systems Command Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Ohio USA *Present...it advantageous to update the "Catalogue" regularly. During the tenure of a University Resident Research Fellowship sponsored by the Air Force Office

  10. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures.

  11. Chemical Engineering Division research highlights, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, L.; Webster, D. S.; Barney, D. L.; Cafasso, F. A.; Steindler, M. J.

    1980-06-01

    In 1979, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-temperature, rechargeable lithium/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and electric utility load leveling; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (4) coal technology - mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO/sub 2/ sorbent of limestone; (5) heat- and seed- recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (6) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (7) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (8) fuel cycle technology - reprocessing of nuclear fuels, management of nuclear wastes, geologic migration studies, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; (9) magnetic fusion research - lithium processing technology and materials research; and (10) basic energy sciences - homogeneous catalysis, thermodynamics of inorganic and organic materials, environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, and physical properties of salt vapors. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these areas.

  12. The Chemical Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory: Applying chemical innovation to environmental problems

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Chemical Technology Division is one of the largest technical divisions at Argonne National Laboratory, a leading center for research and development related to energy and environmental issues. Since its inception in 1948, the Division has pioneered in developing separations processes for the nuclear industry. The current scope of activities includes R&D on methods for disposing of radioactive and hazardous wastes and on energy conversion processes with improved efficiencies, lower costs, and reduced environmental impact. Many of the technologies developed by CMT can be applied to solve manufacturing as well as environmental problems of industry.

  13. The validation of biodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M J

    2001-01-01

    Biodynamic models may: (i) represent understanding of how the body moves (i.e., 'mechanistic models'), (ii) summarise biodynamic measurements (i.e., 'quantitative models'), and (iii) provide predictions of the effects of motion on human health, comfort or performance (i.e., 'effects models'). Model validation may involve consideration of evidence used to derive a model, comparison of the model with alternatives, and a comparison between model predictions and independent observations of the predicted qualities or quantities. Models should be associated with a specified range of independent and dependent variables and indicate how intra-subject variability and inter-subject variability are accommodated. Models of the mechanisms of body movement may be validated by demonstrations that the mechanisms are well represented. Models giving numerical predictions ('quantitative models' and 'effects models') should specify the expected accuracy of predictions. 'Effects models' advocated for predicting health, comfort or performance require that: (i) vibration or shock is a proven cause of the specified effect, (ii) within all reasonable ranges of model inputs, there must be reason to expect a positive correlation and acceptable error between the model predictions and the effect, (iii) other variables having a large influence on the effect must be taken into consideration. It is more useful to report the accuracy of 'quantitative models' and 'effects models' models than to state that they are 'validated' or 'un-validated'. Checklists for assessing the quality of a biodynamic model are proposed, taking into account the type of model and the model assertions, the evidence, the assumptions, the accuracy, and the appropriateness of the model. Biodynamic models can be used to predict risks of injury or disease. Models can be used to optimise designs in order to minimise predicted risks. However, models can be promulgated and used without knowledge of their accuracy or usefulness.

  14. Evaluation of the oenological suitability of grapes grown using biodynamic agriculture: the case of a bad vintage.

    PubMed

    Guzzon, R; Gugole, S; Zanzotti, R; Malacarne, M; Larcher, R; von Wallbrunn, C; Mescalchin, E

    2016-02-01

    We compare the evolution of the microbiota of grapes grown following conventional or biodynamic protocols during the final stage of ripening and wine fermentation in a year characterized by adverse climatic conditions. The observations were made in a vineyard subdivided into two parts, cultivated using a biodynamic and traditional approach in a year which saw a combination of adverse events in terms of weather, creating the conditions for extensive proliferation of vine pests. The biodynamic approach was severely tested, as agrochemicals were not used and vine pests were counteracted with moderate use of copper, sulphur and plant extracts and with intensive use of agronomical practices aimed at improving the health of the vines. Agronomic, microbiological and chemical testing showed that the response of the vineyard cultivated using a biodynamic approach was comparable or better to that of vines cultivated using the conventional method. The work suggests that biodynamic cultivation of the grapevine may be sustainable even in difficult conditions, representing an interesting alternative to traditional vine-growing approaches. This theme is topical and of interest to winemakers and consumers today, but is not easy to study due to the difficulties in finding vineyards with homogeneous characteristics, cultivated using different agronomical protocols. The particular climatic conditions observed in 2014 made this year a rare model, making it possible to verify the applicability of biodynamics to vine growing. The strict experimental plan gave results particularly useful for understanding the features of grape microbiota in a biodynamic context. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. The ORNL Chemical Technology Division, 1950-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, R.L.; Genung, R.K.; McNeese, L.E.; Mrochek, J.E.

    1994-10-01

    This document attempts to reconstruct the role played by the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the atomic era since the 1940`s related to the development and production of nuclear weapons and power reactors. Chem Tech`s early contributions were landmark pioneering studies. Unknown and dimly perceived problems like chemical hazards, radioactivity, and criticality had to be dealt with. New chemical concepts and processes had to be developed to test the new theories being developed by physicists. New engineering concepts had to be developed and demonstrated in order to build facilities and equipment that had never before been attempted. Chem Tech`s role was chemical separations, especially uranium and plutonium, and nuclear fuel reprocessing. With diversification of national and ORNL missions, Chem Tech undertook R&D studies in many areas including biotechnology; clinical and environmental chemistry; nuclear reactors; safety regulations; effective and safe waste management and disposal; computer modeling and informational databases; isotope production; and environmental control. The changing mission of Chem Tech are encapsulated in the evolving activities.

  16. 75 FR 9437 - Wacker Chemical Corporation Wacker Polymers Division a Subsidiary of Wacker Chemie AG Including...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Wacker Chemical Corporation Wacker Polymers Division a Subsidiary of... Chemical Corporation Wacker Polymers Division a Subsidiary of Wacker Chemie AG Including On-Site Leased... Assistance on July 16, 2009, applicable to workers of Wacker Chemical Corporation, Wacker Polymers...

  17. Chemical Technology Division progress report, January 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This progress report presents a summary of the missions and activities of the various sections and administrative groups in this Division for this period. Specific projects in areas such as energy research, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing are highlighted, and special programmatic activities conducted by the Division are identified and described. The administrative summary portion features information about publications and presentations of Chemical Technology Division staff, as well as a listing of patents awarded to Division personnel during this period.

  18. American Chemical Society division of fuel chemistry Henry H. Storch award.

    SciTech Connect

    Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    American Chemical Society Division of Fuel Chemistry Henry H. Storch Award ... The purpose of the Henry H. Storch Award is to recognize distinguished contributions worldwide to fundamental or engineering research on the chemistry and utilization of all hydrocarbon fuels, with the exception of petroleum. ... The award was established in 1964 by the American Chemical Society Division of Fuel Chemistry and administered by the Division until 1985.

  19. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition

  20. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2017-02-21

    Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition, molecular

  1. Division of Chemical Education: Secretary's Report, Fall 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarquis, J. L.

    1998-08-01

    At the Boston ACS meeting, several CHED committees will meet in generally open meetings. If you are interested in becoming more involved in the Division, this is a good way to find out about areas where you can contribute. Meetings will be in the Boston Park Plaza. For specific rooms, contact Jerry Sarquis by phone (513/529-2819) or email (SarquiJL@MUOhio.edu) or check the Division's Web site at http://divched.chem.wisc.edu/divched/ after July 20 to get the locations and times of the meetings you wish to attend.

  2. AN OVERVIEW OF PATHOGEN RESEARCH IN THE MICROBIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Microbiological and Chemical Exposure Assessment Research Division of the EPA Office of Research and Development's National Exposure Research Laboratory has a robust in-house research program aimed at developing better occurrence and exposure methods for waterborne pathogens....

  3. Expectation or Sensorial Reality? An Empirical Investigation of the Biodynamic Calendar for Wine Drinkers.

    PubMed

    Parr, Wendy V; Valentin, Dominique; Reedman, Phil; Grose, Claire; Green, James A

    2017-01-01

    The study's aim was to investigate a central tenet of biodynamic philosophy as applied to wine tasting, namely that wines taste different in systematic ways on days determined by the lunar cycle. Nineteen New Zealand wine professionals tasted blind 12 Pinot noir wines at times determined within the biodynamic calendar for wine drinkers as being favourable (Fruit day) and unfavourable (Root day) for wine tasting. Tasters rated each wine four times, twice on a Fruit day and twice on a Root day, using 20 experimenter-provided descriptors. Wine descriptors spanned a range of varietal-relevant aroma, taste, and mouthfeel characteristics, and were selected with the aim of elucidating both qualitative and quantitative aspects of each wine's perceived aromatic, taste, and structural aspects including overall wine quality and liking. A post-experimental questionnaire was completed by each participant to determine their degree of knowledge about the purpose of the study, and their awareness of the existence of the biodynamic wine drinkers' calendar. Basic wine physico-chemical parameters were determined for the wines tasted on each of a Fruit day and a Root day. Results demonstrated that the wines were judged differentially on all attributes measured although type of day as determined by the biodynamic calendar for wine drinkers did not influence systematically any of the wine characteristics evaluated. The findings highlight the importance of testing experimentally practices that are based on anecdotal evidence but that lend themselves to empirical investigation.

  4. Expectation or Sensorial Reality? An Empirical Investigation of the Biodynamic Calendar for Wine Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Wendy V.; Valentin, Dominique; Reedman, Phil; Grose, Claire; Green, James A.

    2017-01-01

    The study’s aim was to investigate a central tenet of biodynamic philosophy as applied to wine tasting, namely that wines taste different in systematic ways on days determined by the lunar cycle. Nineteen New Zealand wine professionals tasted blind 12 Pinot noir wines at times determined within the biodynamic calendar for wine drinkers as being favourable (Fruit day) and unfavourable (Root day) for wine tasting. Tasters rated each wine four times, twice on a Fruit day and twice on a Root day, using 20 experimenter-provided descriptors. Wine descriptors spanned a range of varietal-relevant aroma, taste, and mouthfeel characteristics, and were selected with the aim of elucidating both qualitative and quantitative aspects of each wine’s perceived aromatic, taste, and structural aspects including overall wine quality and liking. A post-experimental questionnaire was completed by each participant to determine their degree of knowledge about the purpose of the study, and their awareness of the existence of the biodynamic wine drinkers’ calendar. Basic wine physico-chemical parameters were determined for the wines tasted on each of a Fruit day and a Root day. Results demonstrated that the wines were judged differentially on all attributes measured although type of day as determined by the biodynamic calendar for wine drinkers did not influence systematically any of the wine characteristics evaluated. The findings highlight the importance of testing experimentally practices that are based on anecdotal evidence but that lend themselves to empirical investigation. PMID:28046047

  5. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  6. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April-June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during th eperiod April-June 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  7. Problems in modeling man machine control behavior in biodynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Reviewed are some current problems in modeling man-machine control behavior in a biodynamic environment. It is given in two parts: (1) a review of the models which are appropriate for manual control behavior and the added elements necessary to deal with biodynamic interfaces; and (2) a review of some biodynamic interface pilot/vehicle problems which have occurred, been solved, or need to be solved.

  8. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described. (CBS)

  9. Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division progress report for the period January 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides brief summaries of progress in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) during 1993 and 1994. The first four chapters, which cover the research mission, are organized to mirror the major organizational units of the division and indicate the scope of the research portfolio. These divisions are the Analytical Spectroscopy Section, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Section, Organic Chemistry Section, and Physical and Materials Chemistry Section. The fifth and sixth chapters summarize the support activities within CASD that are critical for research progress. Finally, the appendices indicate the productivity and recognition of the staff in terms of various forms of external publications, professional activities, and awards.

  10. Division of Chemical Education: Condensed Norms: ACS Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Condensed norms are presented for the most recent American Chemical Society examinations. These are the polymer chemistry form 1978, organic chemistry form 1978, physical chemistry form 1976 I, brief qualitative analysis form 1977B, and brief organic chemistry form 1977B examinations. (BB)

  11. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program.

  12. Biodynamics of deformable human body motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, A. M.; Huston, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The objective is to construct a framework wherein the various models of human biomaterials fit in order to describe the biodynamic response of the human body. The behavior of the human body in various situations, from low frequency, low amplitude vibrations to impact loadings in automobile and aircraft crashes, is very complicated with respect to all aspects of the problem: materials, geometry and dynamics. The materials problem is the primary concern, but the materials problem is intimately connected with geometry and dynamics.

  13. Biodynamics of deformable human body motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, A. M.; Huston, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The objective is to construct a framework wherein the various models of human biomaterials fit in order to describe the biodynamic response of the human body. The behavior of the human body in various situations, from low frequency, low amplitude vibrations to impact loadings in automobile and aircraft crashes, is very complicated with respect to all aspects of the problem: materials, geometry and dynamics. The materials problem is the primary concern, but the materials problem is intimately connected with geometry and dynamics.

  14. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-{Tc} systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  15. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H[sub 2], and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO[sub 2], potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-[Tc] systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  16. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January-March 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies.

  17. 75 FR 879 - National Starch and Chemical Company Specialty Starches Division Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... Employment and Training Administration National Starch and Chemical Company Specialty Starches Division..., applicable to workers of National Starch and Chemical Company, Specialty Starches Division, Island Falls.... The workers were engaged in the production of drum dried and modified food starches. New information...

  18. 75 years of the Division of Analytical Chemistry of the American Chemical Society.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Roland F

    2013-04-02

    The Division of Analytical Chemistry is celebrating the 75th anniversary of its founding in 1938. We celebrate the continuing high importance of our discipline for all aspects of chemical science and for its applications in so many aspects of everyday life. We especially celebrate the accomplishments of our fellow analytical chemists through the years, and the impact we have had on the profession. This article is a short history of the Division within the context of the parallel development of our profession and our science.

  19. Chemical Technology Division progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Genung, R.K.; Hightower, J.R.; Bell, J.T.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period July 1, 1991, through December 31, 1992. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Special programmatic activities conducted by the division are identified and described. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  20. Symposium introduction: the first joint American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division (AGFD) and the ACS International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand (ICSCT) worked together to stage the “1st Joint ACS AGFD - ACS ICSCT Symposium on Agricultural and Food Chemistry,” which was held in Bangkok, Thailand ...

  1. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1997. Created in March 1997 when the CTD Chemical Development and Energy Research sections were combined, the Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within seven major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, and Biotechnology Research. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described in the report, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  2. Visions, Achievements, and Challenges of the Division of Chemical Education during the Early Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benfey, Theodor

    2003-06-01

    The first decade of the American Chemical Society Division of Chemical Education (DIVCHED) was most extraordinary. It began in 1924 with grand visions, plans, and accomplishments, and ended in the Depression. The period was dominated by two figures, Neil Gordon, founding editor of the Journal of Chemical Education, and Francis Garvan, the United States Alien Property Custodian who, through the Chemical Foundation, poured money into chemical education for his own purposes. At Garvan's urging, DIVCHED also published a journal for high school teachers, The Chemistry Leaflet, edited by Pauline Beery Mack, later famous for advising NASA on bone density loss in space travel. The Chemistry Leaflet later appeared as the ACS educational magazine, Chemistry. Woven into the paper are three continuing concerns of the DIVCHED: sustained service to the high school teacher, participation of university and industrial leaders in DIVCHED, and women in chemical education.

  3. Conventional, organic and biodynamic farming: differences in polyphenol content and antioxidant activity of Batavia lettuce.

    PubMed

    Heimler, Daniela; Vignolini, Pamela; Arfaioli, Paola; Isolani, Laura; Romani, Annalisa

    2012-02-01

    Lactuca sativa L. ssp. acephala L., cv. Batavia red Mohican plants were cultivated under intensive conventional, organic and biodynamic farming and were analyzed for their polyphenol content and antiradical activity in order to demonstrate the influence of farming on yield, polyphenol content and antiradical activity. The yield of plants from conventional farming was the highest (2.89 kg m⁻²), while polyphenol content, measured by spectrophotometry, of these plants was lower at P < 0.05 (1.36 mg g⁻¹) than the content of plants from organic and biodynamic farming (1.74 and 1.85 mg g⁻¹, respectively). The antiradical activity, measured by DPPH · assay, was positively correlated to flavonoid and hydroxycinnamic acid contents. Flavonoid, hydroxycinnamic acid and anthocyan patterns were not affected by the type of cultivation, while quantitative differences were demonstrated and some differences were found between conventional farming and organic or biodynamic farming. The yield of conventionally grown salads was the highest. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Biodynamics--the key to flight.

    PubMed

    Stapp, J P

    1986-10-01

    Biodynamics measures the effects of mechanical force on living tissues. The quantitative relations of mechanical stress factors and biological strain responses of the living body provide criteria for limits of injury threshold, reversible injury, permanently disabling injury, and fatal injury. These criteria are guidelines for aerospace design and performance standards involving human survival in the environment of flight. Below these limits, the effects of mechanical force factors on human performance while acutely or chronically exposed to them in aerial or space flight are crucial. Some can be accumulatively disabling; others can be adapted to over a period of time. Extremes of low-frequency vibration cannot be long endured, while sustained zero gravity in space flight produces mild, transient malaise followed by adaptation in several hours. Aerospace flight biodynamics deals with human reactions to absence of gravity; sustained curvilinear acceleration; sustained acceleration and deceleration (launch and reentry in space flight); single impact force (collisions); low-frequency vibration in the whole human body resonance response range; whole-body tumbling and spinning, as in high-altitude free-fall; acoustical range vibrations; explosive blast in air or water; abrupt decompression, as in cabin pressure failure; static forces in tension, compression, torsion and shear. Biodynamic stress analysis takes into account whole-body responses, particular responses of rigid bone, viscous elastic soft tissues, pneumatic and hydraulic effects of gas and fluids in hollow organs, and displacements of solid organs suspended in body cavities. Accurate and comprehensive results require physical measurements, clinical and laboratory studies before and after exposure, subjective reports of trained volunteer subjects, and objective medical and bioengineering evaluation of results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  6. Suppression of Biodynamic Interference by Adaptive Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velger, M.; Merhav, S. J.; Grunwald, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary experimental results obtained in moving base simulator tests are presented. Both for pursuit and compensatory tracking tasks, a strong deterioration in tracking performance due to biodynamic interference is found. The use of adaptive filtering is shown to substantially alleviate these effects, resulting in a markedly improved tracking performance and reduction in task difficulty. The effect of simulator motion and of adaptive filtering on human operator describing functions is investigated. Adaptive filtering is found to substantially increase pilot gain and cross-over frequency, implying a more tight tracking behavior. The adaptive filter is found to be effective in particular for high-gain proportional dynamics, low display forcing function power and for pursuit tracking task configurations.

  7. Mathematical biodynamic feedthrough model applied to rotorcraft.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, Joost; Mulder, Mark; Abbink, David A; van Paassen, Marinus M; Mulder, Max; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bulthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-07-01

    Biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) occurs when vehicle accelerations feed through the human body and cause involuntary control inputs. This paper proposes a model to quantitatively predict this effect in rotorcraft. This mathematical BDFT model aims to fill the gap between the currently existing black box BDFT models and physical BDFT models. The model structure was systematically constructed using asymptote modeling, a procedure described in detail in this paper. The resulting model can easily be implemented in many typical rotorcraft BDFT studies, using the provided model parameters. The model's performance was validated in both the frequency and time domain. Furthermore, it was compared with several recent BDFT models. The results show that the proposed mathematical model performs better than typical black box models and is easier to parameterize and implement than a recent physical model.

  8. Chemical Technology Division: Progress report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period January 1, 1987, to June 30, 1988. The following major areas are covered: waste management and environmental programs, radiochemical and reactor engineering programs, basic science and technology, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, and administrative resources and facilities. The Administrative Summary, an appendix, presents a comprehensive listing of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this period. A staffing level and financial summary and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included.

  9. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  10. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech's energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  11. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period April 1, 1985, through December 31, 1986. The following major areas are covered in the discussion: nuclear and chemical waste management, environmental control technology, basic science and technology, biotechnology research, transuranium-element processing, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, radioactive materials production, computer/engineering applications, fission energy, environmental cleanup projects, and various other work activities. As an appendix, the Administrative Summary presents a comprehensive compilation of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this report period. An organization chart, a staffing level and financial summary, and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included to provide additional information. 78 figs., 40 tabs.

  12. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-02-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

  13. Impact of pilots' biodynamic feedthrough on rotorcraft by robust stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaranta, Giuseppe; Masarati, Pierangelo; Venrooij, Joost

    2013-09-01

    The coupling of rotorcraft dynamics with the dynamics of one of the main systems devoted to its control, the pilot, may lead to several peculiar phenomena, known as Rotorcraft-Pilot Couplings (RPCs), all characterized by an abnormal behavior that may jeopardize flight safety. Among these phenomena, there is a special class of couplings which is dominated by the biodynamic behavior of the pilot's limbs that close the loop between the vibrations and the control inceptors in the cockpit. Leveraging robust stability analysis, the inherently uncertain pilot biodynamics can be treated as the uncertain portion of a feedback system, making analytical, numerical or graphical determination of proneness to RPC possible by comparing robust stability margins of helicopter models with experimental Biodynamic Feedthrough (BDFT) data. The application of the proposed approach to collective bounce is exemplified using simple analytical helicopter and pilot models. The approach is also applied to detailed helicopter models and experimental BDFT measurement data.

  14. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1997-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October-December 1996. The report describes ten tasks conducted in four major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area -- Chemical Processes for Waste Management -- includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents, and Sludge Treatment Studies. Within the second research area -- Reactor Fuel Chemistry -- the distribution of iodine in containment during an AP600 design-basis accident was evaluated using models in the TRENDS code. Within the third research area -- Thermodynamics -- efforts continued in the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of energy-Related Materials task. The fourth major research area -- Processes for Waste Management -- includes work on these tasks: Ion-Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Search for Technetium in Natural Metallurgical Residues, and Waste Form Development and Testing of a Glass- and Cement-Based Dedicated Hot-Cell Facility.

  15. AICD: Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, and a listing of program output including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  16. AICD -- Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program. 1993 Annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  17. A biodynamic microsystem for fluids viscosity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marius Avram, Andrei; Avram, Marioara; Bragaru, Adina; Vasilco, Roxana; Iliescu, Ciprian

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to model, design and fabricate a biodynamic analysis microsystem required for determination of various molecular transport properties of the biological fluids. In order to achieve this, a lab-on-a-chip device was fabricated. The microfluidic system developed satisfies the objectives for the study of microcirculation and characterization of cell rheological properties, functions and behaviour. The measurement principle of the viscosity of biological fluids is based on the detection of the rotation of a polysilicon gear-wheels system. The gear-wheels have external diameters of 250 µm, 200 µm, 160 µm and 3 µm thickness. The micromachining process combines the undercut and refill technique with pin-joint bearing permitting the fabrication of bushings that were used to elevate the rotor away from the silicon surface. The testing of the microfluidic dynamic system was performed using electromagnetic micropumps and magnetic controllers. Each device was fabricated by silicon micromachining technology and tested to obtain the specific characteristics.

  18. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period April--June 1996. The report describes 12 tasks conducted in 4 major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area--Chemical Processes for Waste Management--includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Sludge Treatment Studies, and Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents. Within the second research area--Reactor Fuel Chemistry--a new scope of work for the Technical Assistance in Review of Advanced Reactors task has been established to include assessments of iodine behavior nd pH control in operating nuclear reactor containments as well as in advanced reactor systems. This task is on hold, awaiting finalization of the revised proposal and receipt of the necessary information from Westinghouse to permit the start of the study. Within the third research area--Thermodynamics--the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Energy-Related Materials task has used a differential thermal analysis (DTA)/thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to study the phase transitions of phase-pure YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (123). The fourth major research area--Processes for Waste Management--includes work on these tasks: Ion Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Hot Cell Cross-Flow Filtration Studies of Gunite Tank Sludges, and Chemical Conversion of Nitrate Directly to Nitrogen Gas: A Feasibility Study.

  19. Using biodynamic models to reconcile differences between laboratory toxicity tests and field biomonitoring with aquatic insects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchwalter, D.B.; Cain, D.J.; Clements, W.H.; Luoma, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    Aquatic insects often dominate lotic ecosystems, yet these organisms are under-represented in trace metal toxicity databases. Furthermore, toxicity data for aquatic insects do not appear to reflect their actual sensitivities to metals in nature, because the concentrations required to elicit toxicity in the laboratory are considerably higher than those found to impact insect communities in the field. New approaches are therefore needed to better understand how and why insects are differentially susceptible to metal exposures. Biodynamic modeling is a powerful tool for understanding interspecific differences in trace metal bioaccumulation. Because bioaccumulation alone does not necessarily correlate with toxicity, we combined biokinetic parameters associated with dissolved cadmium exposures with studies of the subcellular compartmentalization of accumulated Cd. This combination of physiological traits allowed us to make predictions of susceptibility differences to dissolved Cd in three aquatic insect taxa: Ephemerella excrucians, Rhithrogena morrisoni, and Rhyacophila sp. We compared these predictions with long-term field monitoring data and toxicity tests with closely related taxa: Ephemerella infrequens, Rhithrogena hageni, and Rhyacophila brunea. Kinetic parameters allowed us to estimate steady-state concentrations, the time required to reach steady state, and the concentrations of Cd projected to be in potentially toxic compartments for different species. Species-specific physiological traits identified using biodynamic models provided a means for better understanding why toxicity assays with insects have failed to provide meaningful estimates for metal concentrations that would be expected to be protective in nature. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  20. Biodynamics: Why the Wirewalker Doesn't Fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Griffin, Lori A.

    2003-11-01

    You can never step in the same river twice, goes the old adage of philosophy. An observation on the transitory nature of fluids in motion, this saying also describes the endless variations researchers face when studying human movement. Understanding these biodynamics-why the wirewalker doesn't fall-requires a grasp of the constant fluctuations and fine tunings which maintain balance in the complex, fluid system of human locomotion. Taking a comprehensive approach to the phenomenon of locomotion, Biodynamics: Why the Wirewalker Doesn't Fall integrates physical laws and principles with concepts of fractals, chaos, and randomness. In so doing, it formulates a description of both the large-scale, smooth aspects of locomotion and the more minute, randomized mechanisms of this physiological process. Ideal for beginners in this subject, Biodynamics provides an elegant explanation without assuming the reader's understanding of complex physical principles or mathematical equations. Chapter topics include: * Dimensions, measurement, and scaling * Mechanics and dynamics * Biometrics * Conservation of momentum * Biomechanics * Bioelectricity * Bioenergetics * Fluid mechanics and dynamics * Data analysis * Biostatistics Packed with problem sets, examples, and original line drawings, Biodynamics is an invaluable text for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and instructors in medicine, biology, physiology, biophysics, and bioengineering.

  1. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    2001-04-16

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within ten major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Physical Properties Research, Biochemical Engineering, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structures and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of the Cell Operations involved the testing of two continuously stirred tank reactors in series to evaluate the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium and transuranics from supernatant. Within the area of Process Chemistry, various topics related to solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge were addressed. Saltcake dissolution efforts continued, including the development of a predictive algorithm. New initiatives for the section included modeling activities centered on detection of hydrogen in {sup 233}U storage wells and wax formation in petroleum mixtures, as well as support for the Spallation Neutron Source (investigation of transmutation products formed during operation). Other activities involved in situ grouting and evaluation of options for use (i.e., as castable shapes) of depleted uranium. In a continuation of activities of the preceding

  2. A Proposed Theory on Biodynamic Frequency Weighting for Hand-Transmitted Vibration Exposure

    PubMed Central

    DONG, Ren G.; WELCOME, Daniel E.; MCDOWELL, Thomas W.; XU, Xueyan S.; KRAJNAK, Kristine; WU, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a theory on the biodynamic frequency weighting for studying hand-transmitted vibration exposures and vibration-induced effects. We hypothesize that the development of a vibration effect is the result of two consecutive but synergistic processes: biodynamic responses to input vibration and biological responses to the biomechanical stimuli resulting from the biodynamic responses. Hence, we further hypothesize that the frequency-dependency (W) of the effect generally includes two components: a biodynamic frequency weighting (W1) and a biological frequency weighting (W2), or W=W1•W2. These hypotheses are consistent with the stress and strain analysis theory and methods widely used in structural dynamics and biomechanics. The factorization may make it easier to study the complex frequency-dependency using different approaches: the biodynamic frequency weighting depends on the passive physical response of the system to vibration, and it can thus be determined by examining the biodynamic response of the system using various engineering methods; on the other hand, the biological frequency weighting depends on the biological mechanisms of the effects, and it can be investigated by studying the psychophysical, physiological, and pathological responses. To help test these hypotheses, this study reviewed and further developed methods to derive the finger biodynamic frequency weighting. As a result, preliminary finger biodynamic frequency weightings are proposed. The implications of the proposed theory and the preliminary biodynamic frequency weightings are also discussed. PMID:23060254

  3. A proposed theory on biodynamic frequency weighting for hand-transmitted vibration exposure.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W; Xu, Xueyan S; Krajnak, Kristine; Wu, John Z

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a theory on the biodynamic frequency weighting for studying hand-transmitted vibration exposures and vibration-induced effects. We hypothesize that the development of a vibration effect is the result of two consecutive but synergistic processes: biodynamic responses to input vibration and biological responses to the biomechanical stimuli resulting from the biodynamic responses. Hence, we further hypothesize that the frequency-dependency (W) of the effect generally includes two components: a biodynamic frequency weighting (W1) and a biological frequency weighting (W2), or W=W1• W2. These hypotheses are consistent with the stress and strain analysis theory and methods widely used in structural dynamics and biomechanics. The factorization may make it easier to study the complex frequency-dependency using different approaches: the biodynamic frequency weighting depends on the passive physical response of the system to vibration, and it can thus be determined by examining the biodynamic response of the system using various engineering methods; on the other hand, the biological frequency weighting depends on the biological mechanisms of the effects, and it can be investigated by studying the psychophysical, physiological, and pathological responses. To help test these hypotheses, this study reviewed and further developed methods to derive the finger biodynamic frequency weighting. As a result, preliminary finger biodynamic frequency weightings are proposed. The implications of the proposed theory and the preliminary biodynamic frequency weightings are also discussed.

  4. Materials dispersion and biodynamics project research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1992-01-01

    The Materials Dispersion and Biodynamics Project (MDBP) focuses on dispersion and mixing of various biological materials and the dynamics of cell-to-cell communication and intracellular molecular trafficking in microgravity. Research activities encompass biomedical applications, basic cell biology, biotechnology (products from cells), protein crystal development, ecological life support systems (involving algae and bacteria), drug delivery (microencapsulation), biofilm deposition by living organisms, and hardware development to support living cells on Space Station Freedom (SSF). Project goals are to expand the existing microgravity science database through experiments on sounding rockets, the Shuttle, and COMET program orbiters and to evolve,through current database acquisition and feasibility testing, to more mature and larger-scale commercial operations on SSF. Maximized utilization of SSF for these science applications will mean that service companies will have a role in providing equipment for use by a number of different customers. An example of a potential forerunner of such a service for SSF is the Materials Dispersion Apparatus (MDA) 'mini lab' of Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc. (ITA) in use on the Shuttle for the Commercial MDAITA Experiments (CMIX) Project. The MDA wells provide the capability for a number of investigators to perform mixing and bioprocessing experiments in space. In the area of human adaptation to microgravity, a significant database has been obtained over the past three decades. Some low-g effects are similar to Earth-based disorders (anemia, osteoporosis, neuromuscular diseases, and immune system disorders). As new information targets potential profit-making processes, services and products from microgravity, commercial space ventures are expected to expand accordingly. Cooperative CCDS research in the above mentioned areas is essential for maturing SSF biotechnology and to ensure U.S. leadership in space technology

  5. Proceedings of the frst joint american chemical society agricultural and food chemistry division – american chemical society international chemical sciences chapter in Thailand symposium on agricultural and food chemistry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This Proceedings is a compilation of papers from contributed oral and poster presentations presented at the first joint symposium organized by the American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand ...

  6. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-11-01

    This reports summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within eight major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included column loading of cesium from Melton Valley Storage Tank supematants using an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate. A second task was to design and construct a continuously stirred tank reactor system to test the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium, and transuranics from supematant. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed, including issues such as pipeline plugging and viscosity measurements. Investigation of solution conditions required to dissolve Hanford saltcake was also continued. MSRE Remediation Studies focused on recovery of {sup 233}U and its transformation into a stable oxide and radiolysis experiments to permit remediation of MSRE fuel salt. In the area of Chemistry Research, activities included studies relative to molecular imprinting for

  7. Human Male and Female Biodynamic Response to Underwater Explosion Events.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    HUMAN MALE AND FEMALE BIODYNAMIC RESPONSE TO UNDERWATER EXPLOSION EVENTS 6 . AUTHOR(S) Oglesby, Douglas B. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...Injuries to the Cervical Spine Due to Axial Loading 51 6 . Injuries to the Femur 58 7. Injuries to the Foot/Ankle Complex 59 C. SUMMARY OF INJURY CRITERIA...IX LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Submarine Shock Test Vehicle (SSTV). From Ref. [ 6 ] 8 Figure 2. SSTV First Platform Accelerometer Locations. From Ref

  8. [Biodynamic response of the human shank subjected to impulse load].

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Bai, R; Tumer, S T

    2000-06-01

    This paper reported the establishment of biodynamic modelling of the human shank in the sagittal palne while the human thigh is fixed. And when the shank is subjected to the two types of externally applied impulse loads, the forces associated with the four main ligaments, as well as the bone-to-bone contact forces in the knee joint are numerically obtained. The contact point locations are also presented together with the angular motions of the lower limb segments.

  9. A biodynamic feedthrough model based on neuromuscular principles.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, Joost; Abbink, David A; Mulder, Mark; van Paassen, Marinus M; Mulder, Max; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bulthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-07-01

    A biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) model is proposed that describes how vehicle accelerations feed through the human body, causing involuntary limb motions and so involuntary control inputs. BDFT dynamics strongly depend on limb dynamics, which can vary between persons (between-subject variability), but also within one person over time, e.g., due to the control task performed (within-subject variability). The proposed BDFT model is based on physical neuromuscular principles and is derived from an established admittance model-describing limb dynamics-which was extended to include control device dynamics and account for acceleration effects. The resulting BDFT model serves primarily the purpose of increasing the understanding of the relationship between neuromuscular admittance and biodynamic feedthrough. An added advantage of the proposed model is that its parameters can be estimated using a two-stage approach, making the parameter estimation more robust, as the procedure is largely based on the well documented procedure required for the admittance model. To estimate the parameter values of the BDFT model, data are used from an experiment in which both neuromuscular admittance and biodynamic feedthrough are measured. The quality of the BDFT model is evaluated in the frequency and time domain. Results provide strong evidence that the BDFT model and the proposed method of parameter estimation put forward in this paper allows for accurate BDFT modeling across different subjects (accounting for between-subject variability) and across control tasks (accounting for within-subject variability).

  10. Multi-stimuli-responsive biohybrid nanoparticles with cross-linked albumin coronae self-assembled by a polymer-protein biodynamer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Liu, Li; Dong, Bingyang; Zhao, Hanying; Zhang, Mingming; Chen, Wenjuan; Hong, Yanhang

    2017-05-01

    . The prepared biodynamer can offer a potential platform for intracellular protein delivery. The multi-stimuli-responsive biohybrid nanoparticles containing disulfide functionalities are constructed by cross-linking albumin coronae of the biodynamer micelles. With the combination of a thermoresponsive polymer, protein and reversible covalent bonds, the biohybrid nanoparticles are endowed with highly biocompatible, environmentally responsive and adaptive features. These nanoparticles present the ability to undergo changes in their constitution, hydrodynamic size and nanostructure in response to physical, chemical and biological stimuli, which make them interesting candidates as vehicles for drug delivery application and a biomimetic platform to investigate the biological process in nature. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. (1)H NMR foodomics reveals that the biodynamic and the organic cultivation managements produce different grape berries (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Sangiovese).

    PubMed

    Picone, Gianfranco; Trimigno, Alessia; Tessarin, Paola; Donnini, Silvia; Rombolà, Adamo Domenico; Capozzi, Francesco

    2016-12-15

    The increasing demand for natural foods and beverages, i.e. prepared by excluding synthetic chemicals along the whole production chain, has boosted the adoption of organic and biodynamic cultivation methods which are based on protocols avoiding use of synthetic pesticides. This trend is striking in viticulture, since wine production is largely shaped by the varying drinking attitudes of environment-friendly consumers. Using (1)H NMR, the compositions of grape berries, collected at harvest in 2009 and 2011, in experimental plots cultivated either with biodynamic or organic methods, were compared. Although the analysis provides a comprehensive metabolic profile of berries, the resulting distinctive pattern consists of a few molecules. Lower content of sugars, coumaric and caffeic acids, as well as higher amount of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were observed in biodynamic grapes. The (1)H NMR foodomics approach evidenced a diverse fruit metabolome that could be associated to a different physiological response of plants to the agronomic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biodynamic Doppler imaging of subcellular motion inside 3D living tissue culture and biopsies (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Biodynamic imaging is an emerging 3D optical imaging technology that probes up to 1 mm deep inside three-dimensional living tissue using short-coherence dynamic light scattering to measure the intracellular motions of cells inside their natural microenvironments. Biodynamic imaging is label-free and non-invasive. The information content of biodynamic imaging is captured through tissue dynamics spectroscopy that displays the changes in the Doppler signatures from intracellular constituents in response to applied compounds. The affected dynamic intracellular mechanisms include organelle transport, membrane undulations, cytoskeletal restructuring, strain at cellular adhesions, cytokinesis, mitosis, exo- and endo-cytosis among others. The development of 3D high-content assays such as biodynamic profiling can become a critical new tool for assessing efficacy of drugs and the suitability of specific types of tissue growth for drug discovery and development. The use of biodynamic profiling to predict clinical outcome of living biopsies to cancer therapeutics can be developed into a phenotypic companion diagnostic, as well as a new tool for therapy selection in personalized medicine. This invited talk will present an overview of the optical, physical and physiological processes involved in biodynamic imaging. Several different biodynamic imaging modalities include motility contrast imaging (MCI), tissue-dynamics spectroscopy (TDS) and tissue-dynamics imaging (TDI). A wide range of potential applications will be described that include process monitoring for 3D tissue culture, drug discovery and development, cancer therapy selection, embryo assessment for in-vitro fertilization and artificial reproductive technologies, among others.

  13. Plant growth promoting bacteria from cow dung based biodynamic preparations.

    PubMed

    Radha, T K; Rao, D L N

    2014-12-01

    Indigenous formulations based on cow dung fermentation are commonly used in organic farming. Three biodynamic preparations viz., Panchagavya (PG), BD500 and 'Cow pat pit' (CPP) showed high counts of lactobacilli (10(9) ml(-1)) and yeasts (10(4) ml(-1)). Actinomycetes were present only in CPP (10(4) ml(-1)) and absent in the other two. Seven bacterial isolates from these ferments were identified by a polyphasic approach: Bacillus safensis (PG1), Bacillus cereus (PG2, PG4 PG5), Bacillus subtilis (BD2) Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus (BD3) and Bacillus licheniformis (CPP1). This is the first report of L. xylanilyticus and B. licheniformis in biodynamic preparations. Only three carbon sources-dextrose, sucrose and trehalose out of 21 tested were utilized by all the bacteria. None could utilize arabinose, dulcitol, galactose, inositol, inulin, melibiose, raffinose, rhamnose and sorbitol. All the strains produced indole acetic acid (1.8-3.7 μg ml(-1) culture filtrate) and ammonia. None could fix nitrogen; but all except B. safensis and B. licheniformis could solubilize phosphorous from insoluble tri-calcium phosphate. All the strains except L. xylaniliticus exhibited antagonism to the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia bataticola whereas none could inhibit Sclerotium rolfsi. In green house experiment in soil microcosms, bacterial inoculation significantly promoted growth of maize; plant dry weight increased by ~21 % due to inoculation with B. cereus (PG2). Results provide a basis for understanding the beneficial effects of biodynamic preparations and industrial deployment of the strains.

  14. Research programs for Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    A chemical sciences review meeting was held in which research programs in chemistry were discussed. Major topics included: chemistry of actinides and fission products, interactions of solvents, solutes and surfaces in supercritical extraction, chemical and physical principles in multiphase separations, and chemical kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  15. Growth, Yield and Fruit Quality of Grapevines under Organic and Biodynamic Management

    PubMed Central

    Döring, Johanna; Frisch, Matthias; Tittmann, Susanne; Stoll, Manfred; Kauer, Randolf

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine growth, yield and fruit quality of grapevines under organic and biodynamic management in relation to integrated viticultural practices. Furthermore, the mechanisms for the observed changes in growth, yield and fruit quality were investigated by determining nutrient status, physiological performance of the plants and disease incidence on bunches in three consecutive growing seasons. A field trial (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Riesling) was set up at Hochschule Geisenheim University, Germany. The integrated treatment was managed according to the code of good practice. Organic and biodynamic plots were managed according to Regulation (EC) No 834/2007 and Regulation (EC) No 889/2008 and according to ECOVIN- and Demeter-Standards, respectively. The growth and yield of the grapevines differed strongly among the different management systems, whereas fruit quality was not affected by the management system. The organic and the biodynamic treatments showed significantly lower growth and yield in comparison to the integrated treatment. The physiological performance was significantly lower in the organic and the biodynamic systems, which may account for differences in growth and cluster weight and might therefore induce lower yields of the respective treatments. Soil management and fertilization strategy could be responsible factors for these changes. Yields of the organic and the biodynamic treatments partially decreased due to higher disease incidence of downy mildew. The organic and the biodynamic plant protection strategies that exclude the use of synthetic fungicides are likely to induce higher disease incidence and might partially account for differences in the nutrient status of vines under organic and biodynamic management. Use of the biodynamic preparations had little influence on vine growth and yield. Due to the investigation of important parameters that induce changes especially in growth and yield of grapevines under

  16. Growth, Yield and Fruit Quality of Grapevines under Organic and Biodynamic Management.

    PubMed

    Döring, Johanna; Frisch, Matthias; Tittmann, Susanne; Stoll, Manfred; Kauer, Randolf

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine growth, yield and fruit quality of grapevines under organic and biodynamic management in relation to integrated viticultural practices. Furthermore, the mechanisms for the observed changes in growth, yield and fruit quality were investigated by determining nutrient status, physiological performance of the plants and disease incidence on bunches in three consecutive growing seasons. A field trial (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Riesling) was set up at Hochschule Geisenheim University, Germany. The integrated treatment was managed according to the code of good practice. Organic and biodynamic plots were managed according to Regulation (EC) No 834/2007 and Regulation (EC) No 889/2008 and according to ECOVIN- and Demeter-Standards, respectively. The growth and yield of the grapevines differed strongly among the different management systems, whereas fruit quality was not affected by the management system. The organic and the biodynamic treatments showed significantly lower growth and yield in comparison to the integrated treatment. The physiological performance was significantly lower in the organic and the biodynamic systems, which may account for differences in growth and cluster weight and might therefore induce lower yields of the respective treatments. Soil management and fertilization strategy could be responsible factors for these changes. Yields of the organic and the biodynamic treatments partially decreased due to higher disease incidence of downy mildew. The organic and the biodynamic plant protection strategies that exclude the use of synthetic fungicides are likely to induce higher disease incidence and might partially account for differences in the nutrient status of vines under organic and biodynamic management. Use of the biodynamic preparations had little influence on vine growth and yield. Due to the investigation of important parameters that induce changes especially in growth and yield of grapevines under

  17. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  18. Construction of a biodynamic model for Cry protein production studies.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Mtz, Ana Karin; Pérez-Guevara, Fermín

    2014-12-01

    Mathematical models have been used from growth kinetic simulation to gen regulatory networks prediction for B. thuringiensis culture. However, this culture is a time dependent dynamic process where cells physiology suffers several changes depending on the changes in the cell environment. Therefore, through its culture, B. thuringiensis presents three phases related with the predominance of three major metabolic pathways: vegetative growth (Embded-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway), transition (γ-aminobutiric cycle) and sporulation (tricarboxylic acid cycle). There is not available a mathematical model that relates the different stages of cultivation with the metabolic pathway active on each one of them. Therefore, in the present study, and based on published data, a biodynamic model was generated to describe the dynamic of the three different phases based on their major metabolic pathways. The biodynamic model is used to study the interrelation between the different culture phases and their relationship with the Cry protein production. The model consists of three interconnected modules where each module represents one culture phase and its principal metabolic pathway. For model validation four new fermentations were done showing that the model constructed describes reasonably well the dynamic of the three phases. The main results of this model imply that poly-β-hydroxybutyrate is crucial for endospore and Cry protein production. According to the yields of dipicolinic acid and Cry from poly-β-hydroxybutyrate, calculated with the model, the endospore and Cry protein production are not just simultaneous and parallel processes they are also competitive processes.

  19. Measurement of biodynamic response of human hand arm system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, R. G.; Welcome, D. E.; McDowell, T. W.; Wu, J. Z.

    2006-07-01

    Biodynamics of the human hand-arm system is one of the most important foundations for understanding hand-transmitted vibration exposure and its health effects. Considerable differences among the reported data of the biodynamic response (BR) of the hand-arm system have been observed. A significant portion of the differences are believed to have resulted from instrumentation problems and/or computational algorithm errors. To help establish a reliable and accurate methodology for BR measurement, this study addresses the fundamental instrumentation issues. Specifically, the general theory of the driving-point BR is reviewed and summarized. An accurate mass cancellation method for BR measurement is identified and further developed. A set of methods is proposed to systematically examine and calibrate the BR measurement system. Based on the experimental results and theoretical analyses, several instrumentation and algorithm problems are identified. This study demonstrated that the instrumentation problems can be resolved or avoided by appropriately selecting the force and motion sensors, improving the structure design of the instrumented handle and fixture, using the frequency-domain method for the handle mass cancellation, and conducting the static and dynamic calibrations of the measurement system using the proposed methods. The information and knowledge presented in this paper can help to generate reliable experimental data in further BR studies.

  20. Biodynamic profiling of three-dimensional tissue growth techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Merrill, Dan; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional tissue culture presents a more biologically relevant environment in which to perform drug development than conventional two-dimensional cell culture. However, obtaining high-content information from inside three dimensional tissue has presented an obstacle to rapid adoption of 3D tissue culture for pharmaceutical applications. Biodynamic imaging is a high-content three-dimensional optical imaging technology based on low-coherence interferometry and digital holography that uses intracellular dynamics as high-content image contrast. In this paper, we use biodynamic imaging to compare pharmaceutical responses to Taxol of three-dimensional multicellular spheroids grown by three different growth techniques: rotating bioreactor, hanging-drop and plate-grown spheroids. The three growth techniques have systematic variations among tissue cohesiveness and intracellular activity and consequently display different pharmacodynamics under identical drug dose conditions. The in vitro tissue cultures are also compared to ex vivo living biopsies. These results demonstrate that three-dimensional tissue cultures are not equivalent, and that drug-response studies must take into account the growth method.

  1. Establishing the Biodynamics Data Resource (BDR): Human Volunteer Impact Acceleration Research Data in the BDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    junior enlisted Navy personnel who volunteered and passed a rigorous program of qualification examinations to ensure their physical and psychological ...1981. Cinematography Data Systems at the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory. Proceedings of the 25th Annual Society of Photographic Instrumentation

  2. Chemical profiles, division of labor and social status in Pachycondyla queens (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tentschert, J.; Kolmer, K.; Hölldobler, B.; Bestmann, H.-J.; Delabie, J. H. C.; Heinze, J.

    2001-03-01

    Queens of the neotropical ponerine ant Pachycondyla cf. 'inversa' may co-operate during colony founding. One of several co-founding queens specializes in foraging, whereas the others remain in the nest and guard the brood. Division of labor is achieved by aggressive interactions, which result in the formation of dominance hierarchies. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry of cuticular hydrocarbons obtained from live queens by SPME revealed consistent differences between the patterns of cuticular hydrocarbons of queens with high versus low rank: only high-ranking queens showed considerable amounts of cuticular pentadecane (n-C15) and heptadecene (n-C17:1). These two substances presumably originate from the queens' Dufour glands.

  3. Cerebral chemical dominance and neural regulation of cell division, cell proliferation, neoplastic transformation, and genomic function.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-05-01

    The study assessed the isoprenoid pathway, digoxin synthesis, and neurotransmitter patterns in individuals of differing hemispheric dominance, neurogenetic disorders, and neoplasms. The HMG CoA reductase activity, serum digoxin, magnesium, tryptophan catabolites, tyrosine catabolites, and RBC membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity were measured in individuals of differing hemispheric dominance. The digoxin status, membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity, and serum magnesium were assessed in Huntington's disease, trisomy 21, glioblastoma multiforme, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (high grade lymphoma). The results showed that right hemispheric, chemically dominant individuals had elevated digoxin synthesis, increased tryptophan catabolites, and reduced tyrosine catabolites, and membrane Na+-K+ ATPase with hypomagnesemia. Left hemispheric, chemically dominant individuals had the opposite patterns. In neurogenetic disorders and neo plasms also hyperdigoxinemia induced membrane Na+-K+ ATPase inhibition, and hypomagnesemia similar to right hemispheric chemical dominance could be demonstrated. The role of hemispheric chemical dominance and hypothalamic digoxin secretion play a key role in the regulation of cell differentiation/proliferation and genomic function. Ninety-five percent of the patients with neurogenetic disorders and neoplasms were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant by dichotic listening test. However, all of them had biochemical patterns similar to right hemispheric chemical dominance. Hemispheric chemical dominance has no correlation to cerebral dominance detected by handness/dichotic listening test.

  4. Bibliography of Scientific Publications of the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory: 1980-1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    AD-A268 886 NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY NBDL-93R001 BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS OF THE NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY: 1980-1992 NAVAL...LA, November 1980. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS Dixon, D. J., Copeland, M. O., and Halcomb, C. G., Psychomotor Battery Approaches to...Factors Society, Inc., Los Angeles, CA, October 1980. 3 BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS McCauley, M. E., Kennedy, R. S., and Bittner, A. C., Jr

  5. Bibliography of Scientific Publications of the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory: 1980-1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-04

    NBDL-90R005 r-’ -- nt AD-A229 030 111ILur BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS OF THE NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY: 1980-1990 [ELECT A D NAVAL...AND DATES COVERED 74 Sept 1990 interim: I Jan 1980 - 31 Aug 1990 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Bibliography of Scientific Publications of...CALL Captain, Medical Service Corps -w"O U.S. Navy 6 Commanding Officer. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS OF THE NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY

  6. Chemical Technology Division progress report, April 1, 1983-March 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: fission energy; nuclear and chemical waste management; environmental control technology; basic science and technology; biotechnology programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project; radioactive materials production; computer 1 engineering applications; and miscellanous programs.

  7. Medium term follow up of the Biodynamic neck sparing prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Molfetta, Luigi; Capozzi, Michele; Caldo, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Hip resurfacing (HR) and neck sparing prostheses (NSP) have been advocated for the treatment of arthritis in younger patients. Some complications following HR have been documented in the recent literature, but NSP are not yet supported by clinical follow-up studies of sufficient duration. We present an assessment of the neck sparing "Biodynamic" prosthesis. 153 patients were evaluated in a longitudinal cohort prospective study, with survival analysis, clinical score and radiographic assessment of stability and osteointegration at 41.8 months average follow up. Survival and clinical outcome were similar to most traditional prostheses in the literature. On radiographic analysis we recorded good neck preservation and osteointegration. Only two stem failures were recorded. Poor clinical outcome was related to misalignment of prostheses implanted during the 'learning curve'. The NSP system described may be a good alternative to HR for younger patients. The system is characterized by good survival and clinical and radiographic outcome combined with bone stock preservation.

  8. Facial skin-mucosal biodynamic blast injuries and management.

    PubMed

    Shuker, Sabri T

    2010-08-01

    The blast biodynamic presents maxillofacial injuries of a different type. The analysis of facial skin lacerations and intense flash burns will add new clinical findings that will assist in the early diagnosis of life-threatening airway compromise due to the inhalation of hot gases and toxic fumes. Improvised explosive devices most likely result in blast injuries and severe incendiary situations. Consequently, we require a better understanding of blast pathophysiologic effects, as well as the diagnosis and emergency management of facial soft tissue injuries, which create and provoke new challenges in lifesaving techniques and procedures. This article reviews the physics and biophysics of blast facial skin shredding, extensive contusions, lacerations, multiple puncture wounds, partial scalping, flash and thermal burns, thermal inhalation, and toxic fume injuries, as well as detailing the management of blast and thermal wound injuries. In addition, the initial and immediate care of related airway compromise resulting in life-threatening conditions is reviewed. A new type of conflict-related blast injury is described and evaluated. These explosion wounds result in facial soft tissue injuries, edema of the mucosa of the upper respiratory region, and lung trauma. The understanding of the blast biodynamic injuries associated with thermal burns and inhalation of hot toxic fumes that cause serious respiratory injuries requiring special management should be shared globally with our colleagues. Recently, many victims of improvised explosive devices have shown varying degrees of facial injuries in different patterns with or without flash burns. In addition, patients have had intense thermal inhalation that leads to oral-nasal-pharyngeal edema and toxic fume inhalation that may require the management of life-threatening airway compromise. This report will contribute to the lexicon of maxillofacial surgery diagnosis and procedures, including lifesaving airway management, by the

  9. Suppression of biodynamic interference in head-tracked teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lifshitz, S.; Merhav, S. J.; Grunwald, A. J.; Tucker, G. E.; Tischler, M. B.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of helmet-tracked sights to provide pointing commands for teleoperation of cameras, lasers, or antennas in aircraft is degraded by the presence of uncommanded, involuntary heat motion, referred to as biodynamic interference. This interference limits the achievable precision required in pointing tasks. The noise contributions due to biodynamic interference consists of an additive component which is correlated with aircraft vibration and an uncorrelated, nonadditive component, referred to as remnant. An experimental simulation study is described which investigated the improvements achievable in pointing and tracking precision using dynamic display shifting in the helmet-mounted display. The experiment was conducted in a six degree of freedom motion base simulator with an emulated helmet-mounted display. Highly experienced pilot subjects performed precision head-pointing tasks while manually flying a visual flight-path tracking task. Four schemes using adaptive and low-pass filtering of the head motion were evaluated to determine their effects on task performance and pilot workload in the presence of whole-body vibration characteristic of helicopter flight. The results indicate that, for tracking tasks involving continuously moving targets, improvements of up to 70 percent can be achieved in percent on-target dwelling time and of up to 35 percent in rms tracking error, with the adaptive plus low-pass filter configuration. The results with the same filter configuration for the task of capturing randomly-positioned, stationary targets show an increase of up to 340 percent in the number of targets captured and an improvement of up to 24 percent in the average capture time. The adaptive plus low-pass filter combination was considered to exhibit the best overall display dynamics by each of the subjects.

  10. Microbiological features and bioactivity of a fermented manure product (preparation 500) used in biodynamic agriculture.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Matteo; Vendramin, Elena; Fornasier, Flavio; Alberghini, Sara; Zanardo, Marina; Stellin, Fabio; Concheri, Giuseppe; Stevanato, Piergiorgio; Ertani, Andrea; Nardi, Serenella; Rizzi, Valeria; Piffanelli, Pietro; Spaccini, Riccardo; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Piccolo, Alessandro; Squartini, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    The fermented manure derivative known as Preparation 500 is traditionally used as a field spray in biodynamic agriculture for maintaining and increasing soil fertility. This work aimed at characterizing the product from a microbiological standpoint and at assaying its bioactive properties. The approach involved molecular taxonomical characterization of the culturable microbial community; ARISA fingerprints of the total bacteria and fungal communities; chemical elemental macronutrient analysis via a combustion analyzer; activity assays for six key enzymes; bioassays for bacterial quorum sensing and chitolipooligosaccharide production; and plant hormonelike activity. The material was found to harbor a bacterial community of 2.38 × 10(8) CFU/g dw dominated by Grampositives with minor instances of Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. ARISA showed a coherence of bacterial assemblages in different preparation lots of the same year in spite of geographic origin. Enzymatic activities showed elevated values of beta-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase, chitinase, and esterase. The preparation had no quorum sensing-detectable signal, and no rhizobial nod gene-inducing properties, but displayed a strong auxin-like effect on plants. Enzymatic analyses indicated a bioactive potential in the fertility and nutrient cycling contexts. The IAA activity and microbial degradation products qualify for a possible activity as soil biostimulants. Quantitative details and possible modes of action are discussed.

  11. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Steindler, M J; Ader, M; Barletta, R E

    1980-01-01

    In the program on pyrochemical and dry processing methods (PDPM) for nuclear fuel, tungsten crucibles were successfully spun for use in laboratory-scale experiments. Corrosion testing of refractory metals and alloys in PDPM environments was done. Ceramic substrates were successfully coated with tungsten. Solubility measurements were made to determine Cd/Mg alloy composition and temperature at which dissolved Th will precipitate. Experiments were started to study the reduction of high-fired ThO/sub 2/ with Ca in a molten metal-molten salt system. Work on the fused salt electrolysis of CaO was started. Equipment for determining phase diagrams for U-Cu-Mg system was set up. The reaction of UO/sub 2/ with molten equimolar NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ was studied as part of a project to identify chemically feasible nonaqueous fuel reprocessing methods. Work was continued on development of a flowsheet for reprocessing actinide oxides by extracting actinides into ammonium chloro-aluminate (and alternative salts) from a bismuth solution. Preparation of Th, U, and Pu nitrides after dissolution of spent fuel elements in molten tin is being studied. Leach rates of glass beads, pulverized beads, and beads encapsulated in a lead matrix with no protective envelope were studied. A method (employing no pressure or vacuum systems) of encapsulating various solid wastes in a lead metal matrix was developed and tested. A preliminary integration was made of earlier data on effects of impacts on metal-matrix waste forms.Leach migration experiments were compared with conventional infiltration experiments as methods of evaluating geologic formations as barriers to nuclide migration. The effect of the streaming potential on the rates of transport of radioactive I/sup -/ and Na/sup +/ through kaolinite columns was measured, as well as adsorption of iodide and iodate by several compounds; implications of the results upon the disposal of radioactive iodine are discussed.

  12. Hand-transmitted vibration and biodynamic response of the human hand-arm: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Dong, R G; Rakheja, S; Schopper, A W; Han, B; Smutz, W P

    2001-01-01

    Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) has been associated with prolonged exposure to vibration transmitted to the human hand-arm system from hand-held power tools, vibrating machines, or hand-held vibrating workpieces. The biodynamic response of the human hand and arm to hand transmitted vibration (HTV) forms an essential basis for effective evaluations of exposures, vibration-attenuation mechanisms, and potential injury mechanisms. The biodynamic response to HTV and its relationship to HAVS are critically reviewed and discussed to highlight the advances and the need for further research. In view of its strong dependence on the nature of HTV and the lack of general agreement on the characteristics of HTV, the reported studies are first reviewed to enhance an understanding of HTV and related issues. The characteristics of HTV and relevant unresolved issues are discussed on the basis of measured data, proposed standards, and measurement methods, while the need for further developments in measurement systems is emphasized. The studies on biodynamic response and their findings are grouped into four categories based on the methodology used and the objective. These include studies on (1) through-the-hand-arm response, expressed in terms of vibration transmissibility; (2) to-the-hand response, expressed in terms of the force-motion relationship of the hand-arm system; (3) to-the-hand biodynamic response function, expressed in terms of vibration energy absorption; and (4) computer modeling of the biodynamic response characteristics.

  13. American Chemical Society 217th National Meeting division of Medicinal Chemistry general session. 21-25 March 1999, Anaheim, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Swords, B

    1999-06-01

    The National Meeting of the American Chemical Society is a twice-yearly event attracting in excess of 6000 papers from the Society's numerous divisions. The Medicinal Chemistry division played host to several general, topical and poster sessions. This year 280 medicinal chemistry papers were presented which featured some of the most current, competitive and state of the art research in today's pharmaceutical industry. The opening session was chaired by Stanislaw Pikul (Procter and Gamble Co, OH, USA) and included talks covering aspects of the syntheses and SARs of corticotropin releasing hormone antagonists, serine proteinase, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and cysteine proteinase inhibitors.

  14. Biodynamic modelling and the prediction of accumulated trace metal concentrations in the polychaete Arenicola marina.

    PubMed

    Casado-Martinez, M Carmen; Smith, Brian D; DelValls, T Angel; Luoma, Samuel N; Rainbow, Philip S

    2009-10-01

    The use of biodynamic models to understand metal uptake directly from sediments by deposit-feeding organisms still represents a special challenge. In this study, accumulated concentrations of Cd, Zn and Ag predicted by biodynamic modelling in the lugworm Arenicola marina have been compared to measured concentrations in field populations in several UK estuaries. The biodynamic model predicted accumulated field Cd concentrations remarkably accurately, and predicted bioaccumulated Ag concentrations were in the range of those measured in lugworms collected from the field. For Zn the model showed less but still good comparability, accurately predicting Zn bioaccumulation in A. marina at high sediment concentrations but underestimating accumulated Zn in the worms from sites with low and intermediate levels of Zn sediment contamination. Therefore, it appears that the physiological parameters experimentally derived for A. marina are applicable to the conditions encountered in these environments and that the assumptions made in the model are plausible.

  15. Ernst Haeckel's biodynamics 1866 and the occult basis of organic farming.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2016-07-02

    One hundred and 50 years ago (Sept. 1866), Ernst Haeckel published a monograph entitled General Morphology of Organisms, wherein key terms, such as Protista, Monera, ontogeny, phylogeny, ecology and the 'biogenetic law' where introduced. In addition, Haeckel coined the word "biodynamics" as a synonym for "general physiology." In contrast, Rudolf Steiner's "biodynamic agriculture," which originated in 1924, and was promoted via Ehrenfried Pfeiffer's book of 1938 with the same title, is an occult pseudoscience still popular today. The misuse of Haeckel's term to legitimize disproven homeopathic principles and esoteric rules within the context of applied plant research is unacceptable.

  16. An investigation on the biodynamic foundation of a rat tail vibration model.

    PubMed

    Welcome, D E; Krajnak, K; Kashon, M L; Dong, R G

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to examine the fundamental characteristics of the biodynamic responses of a rat tail to vibration and to compare them with those of human fingers. Vibration transmission through tails exposed to three vibration magnitudes (1 g, 5 g, and 10 g r.m.s.) at six frequencies (32 Hz, 63 Hz, 125 Hz, 160 Hz, 250 Hz, and 500 Hz) was measured using a laser vibrometer. A mechanical-equivalent model of the tail was established on the basis of the transmissibility data, which was used to estimate the biodynamic deformation and vibration power absorption at several representative locations on the tail. They were compared with those derived from a mechanical-equivalent model of human fingers reported in the literature. This study found that, similar to human fingers, the biodynamic responses of the rat tail depends on the vibration magnitude, frequency, and measurement location. With the restraint method used in this study, the natural frequency of the rat tail is in the range 161-368 Hz, which is mostly within the general range of human finger resonant frequencies (100-350 Hz). However, the damping ratios of the rat tail at the unconstrained locations are from 0.094 to 0.394, which are lower than those of human fingers (0.708-0.725). Whereas the biodynamic responses of human fingers at frequencies lower than 100 Hz could be significantly influenced by the biodynamics of the entire hand-arm system, the rat tail biodynamic responses can be considered independent of the rat body in the frequency range used in this study. Based on these findings it is concluded that, although there are some differences between the frequency dependences of the biodynamic responses of the rat tail and human fingers, the rat tail model can provide a practical and reasonable approach to examine the relationships between the biodynamic and biological responses at midrange to high frequencies, and to understand the mechanisms underlying vibration-induced finger disorders.

  17. Biodynamic Hypothesis for the Frequency Tuning of Motion Sickness.

    PubMed

    Golding, John F; Gresty, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Motion sickness is often provoked by oscillatory translational (linear) acceleration. For humans, motion frequencies around 0.2-0.3 Hz are the most provocative. A current explanation for this frequency band is that it spans a region of maximum ambiguity concerning the interpretation of vestibular signals. Below 0.2-0.3 Hz, linear accelerations are interpreted as 'tilt', whereas at higher frequencies accelerations are interpreted as 'translation', i.e., linear motion through space. This is termed the 'tilt-translation' hypothesis. However, the origin of this particular frequency range is unclear. We investigated whether the differential perceptions of oscillations at different frequencies derives from the biodynamics of active self-initiated whole body motion. Video-films were taken of subjects running slaloms of various combinations of lengths/amplitudes to provoke a range of temporal frequencies of slalom (reciprocal of time to run a cycle). The usual tactic for cornering at frequencies <0.25 Hz was whole-body tilt, whereas >0.4 Hz lateropulsion of the legs with torso erect was observed. Between these frequencies subjects showed variable tactics, mixing components of both tilt and lateropulsion. This uncertainty in selecting the appropriate tactic for movement control around 0.2-0.3 Hz is the possible origin of 'tilt-translation' ambiguity. It also follows that externally imposed motion around these frequencies would challenge both perception and motor control, with the consequence of motion sickness.

  18. Biodynamic response of shipboard sitting subject to ship shock motion.

    PubMed

    Zong, Z; Lam, K Y

    2002-01-01

    Underwater shock can produce very high accelerations, resulting in severe human injuries. In this paper, a shock-structure-human interaction model is proposed to study the biodynamic response of a shipboard sitting subject to ship motion induced by underwater shock (ship shock motion) wherein, the human body is modeled using a lumped parameter system with the parameters obtained from dynamic tensile tests. The results obtained from the human model used in this paper and living human drop test are also compared. Numerical results have revealed the characteristics of human response to ship shock motion. The part in direct contact with the structure (like the pelvis) is much more vulnerable than other parts (like the head). The influences of structural damping and stiffness on the peak loads acting on the human body are investigated. Both damping and stiffness have important influences on the pelvis, but have much less influences on other parts. Injury criteria in the literature are also summarized to facilitate injury assessment.

  19. Bibliography of Research Reports and Publications Issued by the Biodynamics and Bioengineering Division, 1944-1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    were conducted jointly with or supported by other U.S. Government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration , the Department of ...Meatus of the Guinea Pig", Acta Otolaryng, 71:456-461, 1971, AFAMRL Technical " - Report 71-011, (AD 722990) A-250 A.J. Goldstein, J.R. Mundie, " Rupture ...Effects of Vibration, Noise and Exposure Duration on Auditory Temporary Threshold Shift", September 1973, AFAMRL.Technical Report 73-034, (AD 770285) A-283

  20. Bionics and Biocybernetics Bibliography, Biodynamics and Bioengineering Division 1959-1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Pathway in the Frog Corneal Reflex", Experimental Neurology, Vol. 7, pp 224- 239, 1963 M-45 S. Winogard, J.D. Cowan, "Reliable Computation in the...T.J. Moore, "Speech Analysis as the Ear Sees It: Aural Topography ", Proceedings of Conference on Speech Communications and Processing, 1967, AFAMRL

  1. Molecular properties of a fermented manure preparation used as field spray in biodynamic agriculture.

    PubMed

    Spaccini, R; Mazzei, P; Squartini, A; Giannattasio, M; Piccolo, A

    2012-11-01

    Manure products fermented underground in cow horns and commonly used as field spray (preparation 500) in the biodynamic farming system, were characterized for molecular composition by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance [(13) C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning NMR ((13) C-CPMAS-NMR)] spectroscopy and offline tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Both thermochemolysis and NMR spectroscopy revealed a complex molecular structure, with lignin aromatic derivatives, polysaccharides, and alkyl compounds as the predominant components. CPMAS-NMR spectra of biodynamic preparations showed a carbon distribution with an overall low hydrophobic character and significant contribution of lignocellulosic derivatives. The results of thermochemolysis confirmed the characteristic highlighted by NMR spectroscopy, revealing a molecular composition based on alkyl components of plant and microbial origin and the stable incorporation of lignin derivatives. The presence of biolabile components and of undecomposed lignin compounds in the preparation 500 should be accounted to its particularly slow maturation process, as compared to common composting procedures. Our results provide, for the first time, a scientific characterization of an essential product in biodynamic agriculture, and show that biodynamic products appear to be enriched of biolabile components and, therefore, potentially conducive to plant growth stimulation.

  2. Biodynamic Assessment of Pilot Knee-Board Configurations During Simulated T-38 Catapult Acceleration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    0041 Biodynamic Assessment of Pilot Knee -Board Configurations During Simulated T-38 Catapult Acceleration Mr. Chris Perry Mr. Chris...distribution unlimited. STINFO COPY AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY 711 HUMAN PERFORMANCE WING, HUMAN EFFECTIVENESS DIRECTORATE, WRIGHT...PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH 45433 AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND UNITED STATES AIR FORCE NOTICE AND SIGNATURE PAGE Using Government drawings

  3. Biodynamics of the ankle in spastic children--effect of chronic stretching of the calf musculature.

    PubMed

    Walsh, E G; Wright, G W; Brown, K; Bell, E

    1990-05-01

    The biodynamics of the feet of spastic children have been studied by estimating the resonant frequency using a printed motor to supply rhythmic torques. Changes induced when the muscles have been stretched by casting for four weeks are trivial or absent. The position of the feet, however, after the procedure became more nearly normal.

  4. Soil response to biodynamic farming practices in estevia -Stevia Rebaudiana- (Extremadura, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrador, Juana; Colmenares, Ricardo; Sánchez, Eduardo; Creus, Juan; García, Nieves; Blázquez, Jaime; Moreno, Marta M.

    2014-05-01

    The first results of the evolution of an organic-biodynamic cultivation of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) in Extremadura (Spain) are shown here. The organic-biodynamic approach permits experimentally for a more holistic view of the crop development process what means the understanding and quantification of its evolution at different scales. The research methodology applied includes not only quantitative individual parameters of the crop development but also global parameters which make a contribution of very relevant information concerning unbalances between growth and differentiation processes, as well as other aspects linked to the product intrinsic quality. The crop cultivation has been done over a plot of 2.5 has, on acid soils (pH 5.18) and very poor organic matter content (0.5 %). On this first year of cultivation two cuts were given to the plant with an average total yield of 4,500 kg/ha without any supply of solid organic matter, only with the application of the biodynamic preparations. So far results regarding soil improvement and crop productivity, taking into consideration the practices used, let us introduce this pioneer crop in Extremadura, not only as an alternative crop to the current tobacco crop in this area, but also as a development resource for the rural environment of this region. Key words: Agroecology, Organic Biodynamic Agriculture, Stevia Rebaudiana

  5. Application of biodynamic imaging for personalized chemotherapy in canine lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custead, Michelle R.

    Biodynamic imaging (BDI) is a novel phenotypic cancer profiling technology which characterizes changes in cellular and subcellular motion in living tumor tissue samples following in vitro or ex vivo treatment with chemotherapeutics. The ability of BDI to predict clinical response to single-agent doxorubicin chemotherapy was tested in ten dogs with naturally-occurring non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Pre-treatment tumor biopsy samples were obtained from all dogs and treated with doxorubicin (10 muM) ex vivo. BDI captured cellular and subcellular motility measures on all biopsy samples at baseline and at regular intervals for 9 hours following drug application. All dogs subsequently received treatment with a standard single-agent doxorubicin protocol. Objective response (OR) to doxorubicin and progression-free survival time (PFST) following chemotherapy were recorded for all dogs. The dynamic biomarkers measured by BDI were entered into a multivariate logistic model to determine the extent to which BDI predicted OR and PFST following doxorubicin therapy. The model showed that the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of BDI for predicting treatment outcome were 95%, 91%, and 93%, respectively. To account for possible over-fitting of data to the predictive model, cross-validation with a one-left-out analysis was performed, and the adjusted sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy following this analysis were 93%, 87%, and 91%, respectively. These findings suggest that BDI can predict, with high accuracy, treatment outcome following single-agent doxorubicin chemotherapy in a relevant spontaneous canine cancer model, and is a promising novel technology for advancing personalized cancer medicine.

  6. [Biodynamic responses of the seated posture of human upper-body under horizontal and vertical stimuli].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xishi; Jiang, Fuchuan; Ma, Jian; Hou, Xinping

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, a biodynamic model of human upper-body in the seated posture is developed. Based on d'Alembert's principle, the non-linear biodynamic equation of the modelling is derivated. Furthermore, the function of frequency and amplitude of modelling is obtained by employing the KB method in the non-linear theory. The response of realistic human parameters and the external stimulus on the modelling is simulated by MATLAB. The results show that the modelling presents a plenty of non-linear characteristics. The parameters identified and the stable areas to keep the stabilization of upper-body in the seated posture are discussed. These data can be used to explain and estimate the mechanism for the maintenance of stable trunk posture due to the mechanical shocks transmitted through the vehicle seat.

  7. Biodynamic imaging of live porcine oocytes, zygotes and blastocysts for viability assessment in assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    An, Ran; Wang, Chunmin; Turek, John; Machaty, Zoltan; Nolte, David D

    2015-03-01

    The success of assisted reproductive technologies relies on accurate assessment of reproductive viability at successive stages of development for oocytes and embryos. The current scoring system used to select good-quality oocytes relies on morphologically observable traits and hence is indirect and subjective. Biodynamic imaging may provide an objective approach to oocyte and embryo assessment by measuring physiologically-relevant dynamics. Biodynamic imaging is a coherence-gated approach to 3D tissue imaging that uses digital holography to perform low-coherence speckle interferometry to capture dynamic light scattering from intracellular motions. The changes in intracellular activity during cumulus oocyte complex maturation, before and after in vitro fertilization, and the subsequent development of the zygote and blastocyst provide a new approach to the assessment of preimplant candidates.

  8. Biodynamic imaging of live porcine oocytes, zygotes and blastocysts for viability assessment in assisted reproductive technologies

    PubMed Central

    An, Ran; Wang, Chunmin; Turek, John; Machaty, Zoltan; Nolte, David D.

    2015-01-01

    The success of assisted reproductive technologies relies on accurate assessment of reproductive viability at successive stages of development for oocytes and embryos. The current scoring system used to select good-quality oocytes relies on morphologically observable traits and hence is indirect and subjective. Biodynamic imaging may provide an objective approach to oocyte and embryo assessment by measuring physiologically-relevant dynamics. Biodynamic imaging is a coherence-gated approach to 3D tissue imaging that uses digital holography to perform low-coherence speckle interferometry to capture dynamic light scattering from intracellular motions. The changes in intracellular activity during cumulus oocyte complex maturation, before and after in vitro fertilization, and the subsequent development of the zygote and blastocyst provide a new approach to the assessment of preimplant candidates. PMID:25798318

  9. SU-E-J-31: Biodynamic Imaging of Cancer Tissue and Response to Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, D; Turek, J; Childress, M; An, R; Merrill, D; Matei, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure intracellular motions inside three-dimensional living cancer tissue samples to establish a novel set of biodynamic biomarkers that assess tissue proliferative activity and sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy. Methods: Biodynamic imaging (BDI) uses digital holography with low-coherence low-intensity light illumination to construct 3D holograms from depths up to a millimeter deep inside cancer tissue models that include multicellular tumor spheroids and ex vivo cancer biopsies from canine non-Hodgkins lymphoma and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) mouse explants. Intracellular motions modulate the holographic intensity with frequencies related to the Doppler effect caused by the motions of a wide variety of intracellular components. These motions are affected by applied therapeutic agents, and BDI produces unique fingerprints of the action of specific drugs on the motions in specific cell types. In this study, chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin for canine lymphoma and oxoplatin for ovarian) are applied to the living tissue models and monitored over 10 hours by BDI. Results: Multicellular spheroids and patient biopsies are categorized as either sensitive or insensitive to applied therapeutics depending on the intracellular Doppler signatures of chemotherapy response. For both lymphoma and EOC there is strong specificity to the two types of sensitivities, with sensitive cell lines and biopsies exhibiting a global cessation of proliferation and strong suppression of metabolic activity, while insensitive cell lines and biopsies show moderate activation of Doppler frequencies associated with membrane processes and possible membrane trafficking. Conclusion: This work supports the hypothesis that biodynamic biomarkers from three-dimensional living tumor tissue, that includes tissue heterogeneity and measured within 24 hours of surgery, is predictive of near-term patient response to therapy. Future work will correlate biodynamic biomarkers with

  10. A method to quantify hand-transmitted vibration exposure based on the biodynamic stress concept.

    PubMed

    Dong, R G; Welcome, D E; Wu, J Z

    2007-11-01

    This study generally hypothesized that the vibration-induced biodynamic stress and number of its cycles in a substructure of the hand-arm system play an important role in the development of vibration-induced disorders in the substructure. As the first step to test this hypothesis, the specific aims of this study were to develop a practical method to quantify the biodynamic stress-cycle measure, to compare it with ISO-weighted and unweighted accelerations, and to assess its potential for applications. A mechanical-equivalent model of the system was established using reported experimental data. The model was used to estimate the average stresses in the fingers and palm. The frequency weightings of the stresses in these substructures were derived using the proposed stress-cycle measure. This study found the frequency dependence of the average stress distributed in the fingers is different from that in the palm. Therefore, this study predicted that the frequency dependencies of finger disorders could also be different from those of the disorders in the palm, wrist, and arms. If vibration-induced white finger (VWF) is correlated better with unweighted acceleration than with ISO-weighted acceleration, the biodynamic stress distributed in the fingers is likely to play a more important role in the development of VWF than is th e biodynamic stressdistributed in the other substructures of the hand-arm system. The results of this study also suggest that the ISO weighting underestimates the high-frequency effect on the finger disorder development but it may provide a reasonable risk assessment of the disorders in the wrist and arm.

  11. Estimation of biodynamic forces distributed on the fingers and the palm exposed to vibration.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; Wu, John Z

    2005-07-01

    The hand-tool coupling force in the operation of a vibrating tool is generally composed of applied force (AF) and biodynamic force (BF). There is wide interest in quantifying the coupling force. The objectives of this study are to develop an effective method for estimating the BF and to investigate its fundamental characteristics. Using the biodynamic response of the hand-arm system, such as apparent mass or mechanical impedance, and the acceleration that can be measured on vibrating tools, this study proposed an indirect method for the BF estimation. The BFs distributed on the fingers and the palm of the hand along the forearm direction (z(h)-axis) in the operations of eighteen types of tool were estimated and used to identify the distributed BF characteristics. The results indicate that the BFs depend on both the tool vibration spectrum and the biodynamic properties of the hand-arm system. The dominant BF frequency component is usually at the same frequency as the dominant vibration frequency of each tool. The BF distributed on the palm (2-98 N) is much higher than that distributed on the fingers (1-30 N) at frequencies less than 100 Hz, but these biodynamic forces (2-22 N) are comparable at higher frequencies. The palm BF on several tools with relatively low dominant frequencies (< or = 40 Hz), especially in the resonant frequency range (16-40 Hz), is comparable with the applied palm force (50-100 N). Since the resonant frequency of the palm BF is also in the range of the dominant vibration frequencies of many percussive tools, the palm BF may be related to the disorders in the wrist-arm system. The BF on the fingers is likely to be closely related to the dynamic stresses and deformations in the fingers and it may thus be used to quantify the finger vibration exposure.

  12. Head and Helmet Biodynamics and Tracking Performance During Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Vibration Suzanne D. Smith Air Force Research Laboratory Jeanne A. Smith Raymond J. Newman Advanced Information Engineering Services, Inc. A General...AND HELMET BIODYNAMICS AND TRACKING PERFORMANCE DURING EXPOSURE TO WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62202F 6. AUTHOR(S...distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Presented at the UK Conference on Human Response to Vibration , England Sep 2004 14. ABSTRACT Helmet

  13. Why is metal bioaccumulation so variable? Biodynamics as a unifying concept

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, Samuel N.; Rainbow, Philip S.

    2005-01-01

    Ecological risks from metal contaminants are difficult to document because responses differ among species, threats differ among metals, and environmental influences are complex. Unifying concepts are needed to better tie together such complexities. Here we suggest that a biologically based conceptualization, the biodynamic model, provides the necessary unification for a key aspect in risk:  metal bioaccumulation (internal exposure). The model is mechanistically based, but empirically considers geochemical influences, biological differences, and differences among metals. Forecasts from the model agree closely with observations from nature, validating its basic assumptions. The biodynamic metal bioaccumulation model combines targeted, high-quality geochemical analyses from a site of interest with parametrization of key physiological constants for a species from that site. The physiological parameters include metal influx rates from water, influx rates from food, rate constants of loss, and growth rates (when high). We compiled results from 15 publications that forecast species-specific bioaccumulation, and compare the forecasts to bioaccumulation data from the field. These data consider concentrations that cover 7 orders of magnitude. They include 7 metals and 14 species of animals from 3 phyla and 11 marine, estuarine, and freshwater environments. The coefficient of determination (R2) between forecasts and independently observed bioaccumulation from the field was 0.98. Most forecasts agreed with observations within 2-fold. The agreement suggests that the basic assumptions of the biodynamic model are tenable. A unified explanation of metal bioaccumulation sets the stage for a realistic understanding of toxicity and ecological effects of metals in nature.

  14. Development of high time resolution measurement system of frequency characteristics in bioelectrical impedance for biodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takao; Kusuhara, Toshimasa; Yamamoto, Yoshitake

    2006-11-01

    We have proposed biodynamic analysis using bioelectrical impedance at 50 kHz, which is measured with synchronous rectification method. In order to analyze impedance parameters in biodynamics, the measurement of frequency characteristics in bioelectrical impedance with a high time resolution are required. Therefore we have developed a high time resolution measurement system for bioelectrical impedance with 10 frequency points and time resolution of 1 ms. A voltage E A, which consisted of fundamental wave and 9 kinds of harmonic wave from 1 kHz to 1MHz, were converted to current. The current flowed through human body and a potential voltage, EV was detected in the measured part. After A/D conversion of EV and E A in the sampling frequency 2 MHz, data number 2048 points, the impedance were calculated using Fast Fourier Transform. The measured time 1.024 ms was the period of the fundamental wave and time resolution of this system. The specification is enough accuracy for measurement of bioelectrical impedance for biodynamic analysis.

  15. Contacts in the Office of Pesticide Programs, Registration Division

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Registration Division (RD) is responsible product registrations, amendments, registrations, tolerances, experimental use permits, and emergency exemptions for conventional chemical pesticides. Find contacts in this division.

  16. Bioavailability of particulate metal to zebra mussels: biodynamic modelling shows that assimilation efficiencies are site-specific.

    PubMed

    Bourgeault, Adeline; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Priadi, Cindy; Ayrault, Sophie; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates the ability of the biodynamic model to predict the trophic bioaccumulation of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) in a freshwater bivalve. Zebra mussels were transplanted to three sites along the Seine River (France) and collected monthly for 11 months. Measurements of the metal body burdens in mussels were compared with the predictions from the biodynamic model. The exchangeable fraction of metal particles did not account for the bioavailability of particulate metals, since it did not capture the differences between sites. The assimilation efficiency (AE) parameter is necessary to take into account biotic factors influencing particulate metal bioavailability. The biodynamic model, applied with AEs from the literature, overestimated the measured concentrations in zebra mussels, the extent of overestimation being site-specific. Therefore, an original methodology was proposed for in situ AE measurements for each site and metal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Common-path biodynamic imaging for dynamic fluctuation spectroscopy of 3D living tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Turek, John; Nolte, David D.

    2017-03-01

    Biodynamic imaging is a novel 3D optical imaging technology based on short-coherence digital holography that measures intracellular motions of cells inside their natural microenvironments. Here both common-path and Mach-Zehnder designs are presented. Biological tissues such as tumor spheroids and ex vivo biopsies are used as targets, and backscattered light is collected as signal. Drugs are applied to samples, and their effects are evaluated by identifying biomarkers that capture intracellular dynamics from the reconstructed holograms. Through digital holography and coherence gating, information from different depths of the samples can be extracted, enabling the deep-tissue measurement of the responses to drugs.

  18. Reports from the award symposia hosted by the American Chemical Society, Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry at the 245th American Chemical Society National Meeting.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuefei; Vocadlo, David J

    2013-07-19

    We would like to congratulate all of the award winners for the well deserved honor. The award symposia provided a snapshot of some of the state-of-the-art research at the interface between chemistry and biology in the glycoscience field. The presentations serve as prime examples of the increasing integration of chemical and biological research in the area of glycoscience and how tools of chemistry can be applied to answer interesting, important, and fundamental biological questions. We look forward to many more years of exciting developments in the chemistry and chemical biology of glycoscience and anticipate improved tools and approaches will drive major advances while also spurring interests in the wider field.

  19. Biodynamic modeling of PCB uptake by Macoma balthica and Corbicula fluminea from sediment amended with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLeod, Pamela B.; Luoma, S.N.; Luthy, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Activated carbon amendment was assessed in the laboratory as a remediation strategy for freshwater sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the Grasse River (near Massena, NY). Three end points were evaluated: aqueous equilibrium PCB concentration, uptake into semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), and 28-day bioaccumulation in the clam Corbicula fluminea. PCB uptake by water, SPMDs, and clams followed similar trends, with reductions increasing as a function of carbon dose. Average percent reductions in clam tissue PCBs were 67, 86, and 95% for activated carbon doses of 0.7, 1.3, and 2.5% dry wt, respectively. A biodynamic model that incorporates sediment geochemistry and dietary and aqueous uptake routes was found to agree well with observed uptake by C. fluminea in our laboratory test systems. Results from this study were compared to 28-day bioaccumulation experiments involving PCB-contaminated sediment from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (San Francisco Bay, CA) and the clam Macoma balthica. Due to differences in feeding strategy, M. balthica deposit-feeds whereas C. fluminea filter-feeds, the relative importance of the aqueous uptake route is predicted to be much higher for C. fluminea than for M. balthica. Whereas M. balthica takes up approximately 90% of its body burden through sediment ingestion, C. fluminea only accumulates approximately 45% via this route. In both cases, results strongly suggest that it is the mass transfer of PCBs from native sediment to added carbon particles, not merely reductions in aqueous PCB concentrations, that effectively reduces PCB bioavailability and uptake by sediment-dwelling organisms. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  20. Physico-chemical characteristics of ground and surface water in Gohpur sub-division of Sonitpur district, Assam (India).

    PubMed

    Sabhapandit, Pranab; Mishra, Abani K

    2011-01-01

    According to WHO, about 80% of all the diseases of human beings are caused by water. Since these diseases are directly related with human health, it is necessary to bring awareness among the present and future generation about the consequences of water pollution. Therefore, in this study 34 samples from different sources such as dug wells, bore wells, hand pumps and ponds, where no information is available, were collected during 2008.The samples were analyzed for different physico-chemical parameters like chloride, sulphate, nitrate, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, cadmium, chromium, lead and zinc using standard methods. The result indicated that chloride and nitrate concentrations in all the sources were within the permissible limit, but ponds contained high amount. The concentrations of sulphate, sodium and zinc in dug wells and bore wells were very high and the concentrations of calcium and chromium were within the permissible limit. In case of lead and calcium their concentrations in ponds were higher than the other sources but chromium was not detected in ponds and hand pumps. The iron and copper concentrations in all the sources exceeded the WHO value, particularly dug wells and bore wells contained high concentrations. Magnesium content was greater than potassium and less than sodium in dug wells and bore wells, but in ponds its concentration was greater than the other sources. In our investigation the results indicate that TDS, EC, pH, BOD, DO, COD, TSS were found very high. In 76% samples turbidity exceeded WHO guideline value 5NTU. It was found that 97% and 76% of the sources were positive for TC and FC. Overall analysis revealed that 11 samples were fit for drinking purpose with respect to the parameters studied.

  1. Adaptive filtering of biodynamic stick feedthrough in manipulation tasks on board moving platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velger, M.; Grunwald, A.; Merhav, S.

    1986-01-01

    A novel approach to suppress the effects of biodynamic interference is presented. An adaptive noise canceling technique is employed for substracting the platform motion correlated components from the control stick output. The effects of biodynamic interference and its suppression by adaptive noise cancellation has been evaluated in a series of tracking tasks performed in a moving base simulator. Simulator motions were in pitch, roll and combined pitch and roll. Human operator performance was assessed from the mean square values of the tracking error and the control activity. The tracking error and the total stick output signal were found to increase significantly with motion and to diminish substantially with adaptive noise cancellation, thus providing a considerable improvement in tracking performance under conditions in which platform motion were present. The adaptive filter was found to cause a significant increase in the cross-over frequency and decrease in the phase margin. Moreover, the adaptive filter was found to significantly improve the human operator visual motor response. This improvement is manifested as an increased human operator gain, a smaller time delay and lower pilot workload.

  2. Phenotypic profiling of Raf inhibitors and mitochondrial toxicity in 3D tissue using biodynamic imaging.

    PubMed

    An, Ran; Merrill, Dan; Avramova, Larisa; Sturgis, Jennifer; Tsiper, Maria; Robinson, J Paul; Turek, John; Nolte, David D

    2014-04-01

    The existence of phenotypic differences in the drug responses of 3D tissue relative to 2D cell culture is a concern in high-content drug screening. Biodynamic imaging is an emerging technology that probes 3D tissue using short-coherence dynamic light scattering to measure the intracellular motions inside tissues in their natural microenvironments. The information content of biodynamic imaging is displayed through tissue dynamics spectroscopy (TDS) but has not previously been correlated against morphological image analysis of 2D cell culture. In this article, a set of mitochondria-affecting compounds (FCCP, valinomycin, nicardipine, ionomycin) and Raf kinase inhibitors (PLX4032, PLX4720, GDC, and sorafenib) are applied to multicellular tumor spheroids from two colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (HT-29 and DLD-1). These were screened by TDS and then compared against conventional image-based high-content analysis (HCA). The responses to the Raf inhibitors PLX4032 and PLX4720 are grouped separately by cell line, reflecting the Braf/Kras difference in these cell lines. There is a correlation between TDS and HCA phenotypic clustering for most cases, which demonstrates the ability of dynamic measurements to capture phenotypic responses to drugs. However, there are significant 2D versus 3D phenotypic differences exhibited by several of the drugs/cell lines.

  3. Using biodynamic models to reconcile differences between laboratory toxicity tests and field biomonitoring with aquatic insects.

    PubMed

    Buchwalter, D B; Cain, D J; Clements, W H; Luoma, S N

    2007-07-01

    Aquatic insects often dominate lotic ecosystems, yet these organisms are under-represented in trace metal toxicity databases. Furthermore, toxicity data for aquatic insects do not appear to reflect their actual sensitivities to metals in nature, because the concentrations required to elicit toxicity in the laboratory are considerably higher than those found to impact insect communities in the field. New approaches are therefore needed to better understand how and why insects are differentially susceptible to metal exposures. Biodynamic modeling is a powerful tool for understanding interspecific differences in trace metal bioaccumulation. Because bioaccumulation alone does not necessarily correlate with toxicity, we combined biokinetic parameters associated with dissolved cadmium exposures with studies of the subcellular compartmentalization of accumulated Cd. This combination of physiological traits allowed us to make predictions of susceptibility differences to dissolved Cd in three aquatic insect taxa: Ephemerella excrucians, Rhithrogena morrisoni, and Rhyacophila sp. We compared these predictions with long-term field monitoring data and toxicity tests with closely related taxa: Ephemerella infrequens, Rhithrogena hageni, and Rhyacophila brunea. Kinetic parameters allowed us to estimate steady-state concentrations, the time required to reach steady state, and the concentrations of Cd projected to be in potentially toxic compartments for different species. Species-specific physiological traits identified using biodynamic models provided a means for better understanding why toxicity assays with insects have failed to provide meaningful estimates for metal concentrations that would be expected to be protective in nature.

  4. Adaptive filtering of biodynamic stick feedthrough in manipulation tasks on board moving platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velger, M.; Grunwald, A.; Merhav, S.

    1986-01-01

    A novel approach to suppress the effects of biodynamic interference is presented. An adaptive noise canceling technique is employed for substracting the platform motion correlated components from the control stick output. The effects of biodynamic interference and its suppression by adaptive noise cancellation has been evaluated in a series of tracking tasks performed in a moving base simulator. Simulator motions were in pitch, roll and combined pitch and roll. Human operator performance was assessed from the mean square values of the tracking error and the control activity. The tracking error and the total stick output signal were found to increase significantly with motion and to diminish substantially with adaptive noise cancellation, thus providing a considerable improvement in tracking performance under conditions in which platform motion were present. The adaptive filter was found to cause a significant increase in the cross-over frequency and decrease in the phase margin. Moreover, the adaptive filter was found to significantly improve the human operator visual motor response. This improvement is manifested as an increased human operator gain, a smaller time delay and lower pilot workload.

  5. A biodynamic understanding of dietborne metal uptake by a freshwater invertebrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.

    2008-01-01

    Aquatic organisms accumulate metals from dissolved and particulate phases. Dietborne metal uptake likely prevails in nature, but the physiological processes governing metal bioaccumulation from diet are not fully understood. We characterize dietborne copper, cadmium, and nickel uptake by a freshwater gastropod (Lymnaea stagnalis) both in terms of biodynamics and membrane transport characteristics. We use enriched stable isotopes to trace newly accumulated metals from diet, determine food ingestion rate (IR) and estimate metal assimilation efficiency (AE). Upon 18-h exposure, dietborne metal influx was linear over a range encompassing most environmental concentrations. Dietary metal uptake rate constants (kuf) ranged from 0.104 to 0.162 g g -1 day-1, and appeared to be an expression of transmembrane transport characteristics. Although kuf values were 1000-times lower than uptake rate constants from solution, biodynamic modeling showed that diet is the major Cd, Cu, and Ni source in nature. AE varied slightly among metals and exposure concentrations (84-95%). Suppression of Cd and Cu influxes upon exposure to extreme concentrations coincided with a 10-fold decrease in food IR, suggesting that feeding inhibition could act as an end point for dietary metal toxicity in L. stagnalis.

  6. Biodynamic feedback training to assure learning partial load bearing on forearm crutches.

    PubMed

    Krause, Daniel; Wünnemann, Martin; Erlmann, Andre; Hölzchen, Timo; Mull, Melanie; Olivier, Norbert; Jöllenbeck, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    To examine how biodynamic feedback training affects the learning of prescribed partial load bearing (200N). Three pre-post experiments. Biomechanics laboratory in a German university. A volunteer sample of 98 uninjured subjects who had not used crutches recently. There were 24 subjects in experiment 1 (mean age, 23.2y); 64 in experiment 2 (mean age, 43.6y); and 10 in experiment 3 (mean age, 40.3y), parallelized by arm force. Video instruction and feedback training: In experiment 1, 2 varied instruction videos and reduced feedback frequency; in experiment 2, varied frequencies of changing tasks (contextual interference); and in experiment 3, feedback training (walking) and transfer (stair tasks). Vertical ground reaction force. Absolute error of practiced tasks was significantly reduced for all samples (P<.050). Varied contextual interference conditions did not significantly affect retention (P=.798) or transfer (P=.897). Positive transfer between tasks was significant in experiment 2 (P<.001) and was contrary to findings in experiment 3 (P=.071). Biodynamic feedback training is applicable for learning prescribed partial load bearing. The frequency of changing tasks is irrelevant. Despite some support for transfer effects, additional practice in climbing and descending stairs might be beneficial.

  7. Simulation and analysis of a biodynamic human model subjected to low accelerations—A correlation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirouche, F. M. L.; Ider, S. K.

    1988-06-01

    A simulation of responses of a biodynamic human model subjected to pure sinusoidal vertical vibrations is presented. The procedures used in the analysis are based on a computer automated approach developed by Amirouche for the study of multi-body system dynamics. A three-dimensional computer program called HBVA (human body vibration analysis) was developed and its corresponding algorithm is presented. The motion of the upper part of the human model is investigated in the sagittal plane for axial and rotary accelerations, including correlation studies with experimental findings by Panjabi et al. [1], Pradko et al. [2], Sandover [3], Coermann [4], and Griffin et al. [5]. The root mean square values were used to determine the transfer functions for each segment of the upper body of the model in the frequency domain. Based upon our results the biodynamic model used in the analysis is found to be exceptionally useful in determining the responses of each segment, and the magnitudes of the linear joint forces when the human body is subjected to low accelerations.

  8. Analysis of handle dynamics-induced errors in hand biodynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2008-12-01

    Reliable experimental data of the driving-point biodynamic response (DPBR) of the hand-arm system are required to develop better biodynamic models for several important applications. The objectives of this study are to enhance the understanding of mechanisms of errors induced via the dynamics of instrumented handles and to identify a relatively more reliable method for DPBR measurement. A model of the handle-hand-arm system was developed and applied to examine various measurement methods. Both analytical and finite element methods were used to perform the examinations. This study found that the handle dynamic response could cause an uneven vibration distribution on its structures, especially at high frequencies (⩾500 Hz), and hand coupling on the handle could influence the distribution characteristics. Whereas the uneven distribution itself could directly result in measurement error, the hand coupling-induced vibration changes could cause errors in tare mass cancellation. The essential reason for both types of error is that the acceleration measured at one point on the handle may not be the same as that distributed at other locations. Because the cap measurement method that separately measures the DPBRs distributed at the fingers and palm can minimize both types of error, it is the best one among the methods examined in this study. The theory developed in this study can be used to help select, develop, and improve the measurement method for a specific application.

  9. Biodynamic response and spinal load estimation of seated body in vibration using finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenping; Bazrgari, Babak; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Rakheja, Subhash; Boileau, Paul-Émile

    2010-01-01

    Trunk biomechanical models play an indispensable role in predicting muscle forces and spinal loads under whole-body vibration (WBV) exposures. Earlier measurements on the force-motion biodynamic response (impedance, apparent mass) at the body-seat interface and vibration transmissibility (seat to head) have led to the development of different mechanical models. Such models could simulate the overall passive response and serve as an important tool for vehicle seat design. They cannot, however, evaluate physiological parameters of interest under the WBV. On the contrary, anatomical models simulating human's physiological characteristics can predict activities in muscles and their dynamic effects on the spine. In this study, a kinematics-driven nonlinear finite element model of the spine, in which the kinematics data are prescribed, is used to analyse the trunk response in seated WBV. Predictions of the active model (i.e., with varying muscle forces) as compared with the passive model (i.e., with no muscle forces) compared satisfactorily with measurements on vertical apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility biodynamic responses. Results demonstrated the crucial role of muscle forces in the dynamic response of the trunk. Muscle forces, while maintaining trunk equilibrium, substantially increased the compression and shear forces on the spine and, hence, the risk of tissue injury.

  10. A biodynamic understanding of dietborne metal uptake by a freshwater invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Marie-Noële; Luoma, Samuel N

    2008-03-01

    Aquatic organisms accumulate metals from dissolved and particulate phases. Dietborne metal uptake likely prevails in nature, but the physiological processes governing metal bioaccumulation from diet are not fully understood. We characterize dietborne copper, cadmium, and nickel uptake by a freshwater gastropod (Lymnaea stagnalis) both in terms of biodynamics and membrane transport characteristics. We use enriched stable isotopes to trace newly accumulated metals from diet, determine food ingestion rate (IR) and estimate metal assimilation efficiency (AE). Upon 18-h exposure, dietborne metal influx was linear over a range encompassing most environmental concentrations. Dietary metal uptake rate constants (k(uf)) ranged from 0.104 to 0.162 g g(-1) day(-1), and appeared to be an expression of transmembrane transport characteristics. Although k(uf) values were 1000-times lower than uptake rate constants from solution, biodynamic modeling showed that diet is the major Cd, Cu, and Ni source in nature. AE varied slightly among metals and exposure concentrations (84-95%). Suppression of Cd and Cu influxes upon exposure to extreme concentrations coincided with a 10-fold decrease in food IR, suggesting that feeding inhibition could act as an end point for dietary metal toxicity in L. stagnalis.

  11. Phenotypic Profiling of Raf Inhibitors and Mitochondrial Toxicity in 3D Tissue Using Biodynamic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    An, Ran; Merrill, Dan; Avramova, Larisa; Sturgis, Jennifer; Tsiper, Maria; Robinson, J. Paul; Turek, John; Nolte, David D.

    2014-01-01

    The existence of phenotypic differences in the drug responses of 3D tissue relative to 2D cell culture is a concern in high-content drug screening. Biodynamic imaging is an emerging technology that probes 3D tissue using short-coherence dynamic light scattering to measure the intracellular motions inside tissues in their natural microenvironments. The information content of biodynamic imaging is displayed through tissue dynamics spectroscopy (TDS) but has not previously been correlated against morphological image analysis of 2D cell culture. In this article, a set of mitochondria-affecting compounds (FCCP, valinomycin, nicardipine, ionomycin) and Raf kinase inhibitors (PLX4032, PLX4720, GDC, and sorafenib) are applied to multicellular tumor spheroids from two colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (HT-29 and DLD-1). These were screened by TDS and then compared against conventional image-based high-content analysis (HCA). The responses to the Raf inhibitors PLX4032 and PLX4720 are grouped separately by cell line, reflecting the Braf/Kras difference in these cell lines. There is a correlation between TDS and HCA phenotypic clustering for most cases, which demonstrates the ability of dynamic measurements to capture phenotypic responses to drugs. However, there are significant 2D versus 3D phenotypic differences exhibited by several of the drugs/cell lines. PMID:24361645

  12. A framework for biodynamic feedthrough analysis--part I: theoretical foundations.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, Joost; van Paassen, Marinus M; Mulder, Mark; Abbink, David A; Mulder, Max; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bulthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-09-01

    Biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) is a complex phenomenon, which has been studied for several decades. However, there is little consensus on how to approach the BDFT problem in terms of definitions, nomenclature, and mathematical descriptions. In this paper, a framework for biodynamic feedthrough analysis is presented. The goal of this framework is two-fold. First, it provides some common ground between the seemingly large range of different approaches existing in the BDFT literature. Second, the framework itself allows for gaining new insights into BDFT phenomena. It will be shown how relevant signals can be obtained from measurement, how different BDFT dynamics can be derived from them, and how these different dynamics are related. Using the framework, BDFT can be dissected into several dynamical relationships, each relevant in understanding BDFT phenomena in more detail. The presentation of the BDFT framework is divided into two parts. This paper, Part I, addresses the theoretical foundations of the framework. Part II, which is also published in this issue, addresses the validation of the framework. The work is presented in two separate papers to allow for a detailed discussion of both the framework's theoretical background and its validation.

  13. On 4-degree-of-freedom biodynamic models of seated occupants: Lumped-parameter modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Xu, Shi-Xu; Cheng, Wei; Qian, Li-Jun

    2017-08-01

    It is useful to develop an effective biodynamic model of seated human occupants to help understand the human vibration exposure to transportation vehicle vibrations and to help design and improve the anti-vibration devices and/or test dummies. This study proposed and demonstrated a methodology for systematically identifying the best configuration or structure of a 4-degree-of-freedom (4DOF) human vibration model and for its parameter identification. First, an equivalent simplification expression for the models was made. Second, all of the possible 23 structural configurations of the models were identified. Third, each of them was calibrated using the frequency response functions recommended in a biodynamic standard. An improved version of non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) based on Pareto optimization principle was used to determine the model parameters. Finally, a model evaluation criterion proposed in this study was used to assess the models and to identify the best one, which was based on both the goodness of curve fits and comprehensive goodness of the fits. The identified top configurations were better than those reported in the literature. This methodology may also be extended and used to develop the models with other DOFs.

  14. Chemical divisions in the medial geniculate body and surrounding paralaminar nuclei of the rat: quantitative comparison of cell density, NADPH diaphorase, acetyl cholin esterase and basal expression of c-fos.

    PubMed

    Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E; Pérez-Villalba, Ana; Teruel-Martí, Vicent; Ruiz-Torner, Amparo

    2004-11-01

    Quantitative methods of cell density, the intensities of both acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and NADPH diaphorase (NADPHd), as well as the basal expression of c-fos, have been carried out in order to study the anatomical divisions of the medial geniculate body (MGB) and the group of nuclei located ventromedially to the MGB called the paralaminar complex (PL). The MGB was composed of the dorsal (MGd), and the ventral (MGv) divisions. We included the medial, or the magnocellular division (MGm), in the PL complex. MGd was composed of a dorsolateral (DL) core and a belt. The belt was composed of the suprageniculate (SG), the deep dorsal (DD), the caudo-medial (CM) and the caudo-dorsal (CD) nuclei. In the MGv, the basal expression of c-fos was the only way to trace a clear boundary between the ovoid (Ov) and the ventrolateral (VL) divisions. However, the marginal zone (MZ) was clearly and contrastingly different. The PL was considered to be composed of: the MGm, the posterior intralaminar nucleus (PIN), the peripeduncular nucleus (PP) and the nucleus subparafascicularis lateralis (SPFL). The MGm and the PIN share most of the chemical features, meanwhile both SPFL and PP displayed different patterns of NADPHd reactivity. The study of cell density on Giemsa stained sections confirmed main divisions of the area. AChE and NADPHd methods allowed the main MGB divisions to be discriminated. The differences between subdivisions were emphasized when cell density and c-fos activity were quantified in each nucleus. Each MGB division displayed a different pattern of c-fos activity under basal conditions. Thus, c-fos basal expression was a particular feature in each MGB or PL nucleus.

  15. Migration of biodynamic response to vibratory and blast-induced shock loads using magnetorheological seat suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Tai; Wereley, Norman M.

    2003-08-01

    This study investigates biodynamic response mitigation to three different excitations of sinusoidal and random vibrations and shock load using a magnetorheological (MR) seat suspension. In doing so, an MR seat suspension model for military vehicles, with a detailed lumped parameter model of the human body, was developed. The lumped parameter model of the human body consists of four parts: pelvis, upper torso, viscera and head. From the model, the governing equation of motion of the MR seat suspension considering the human body was derived. Based on this equation, a semi-active nonlinear optimal control algorithm appropriate for the MR seat suspension was developed. The simulated control performance of the MR seat suspension was evaluated under three different excitations of sinusoidal and random vibration and tremendous shock load due to a mine explosion. In addition, the mitigation of injuries to humans due to such shock load was also evaluated and compared with the passive seat suspension using a passive hydraulic damper.

  16. Admittance-Adaptive Model-Based Approach to Mitigate Biodynamic Feedthrough.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, Joost; Mulder, Max; Mulder, Mark; Abbink, David A; van Paassen, Marinus M; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bulthoff, Heinrich H

    2016-09-12

    Biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) refers to the feedthrough of vehicle accelerations through the human body, leading to involuntary control device inputs. BDFT impairs control performance in a large range of vehicles under various circumstances. Research shows that BDFT strongly depends on adaptations in the neuromuscular admittance dynamics of the human body. This paper proposes a model-based approach of BDFT mitigation that accounts for these neuromuscular adaptations. The method was tested, as proof-of-concept, in an experiment where participants inside a motion simulator controlled a simulated vehicle through a virtual tunnel. Through evaluating tracking performance and control effort with and without motion disturbance active and with and without cancellation active, the effectiveness of the cancellation was evaluated. Results show that the cancellation approach is successful: the detrimental effects of BDFT were largely removed.

  17. Ernst Haeckel's biodynamics 1866 and the occult basis of organic farming

    PubMed Central

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT One hundred and 50 years ago (Sept. 1866), Ernst Haeckel published a monograph entitled General Morphology of Organisms, wherein key terms, such as Protista, Monera, ontogeny, phylogeny, ecology and the ‘biogenetic law’ where introduced. In addition, Haeckel coined the word “biodynamics” as a synonym for “general physiology.” In contrast, Rudolf Steiner's “biodynamic agriculture,” which originated in 1924, and was promoted via Ehrenfried Pfeiffer's book of 1938 with the same title, is an occult pseudoscience still popular today. The misuse of Haeckel's term to legitimize disproven homeopathic principles and esoteric rules within the context of applied plant research is unacceptable. PMID:27322020

  18. Determination of backrest inclination based on biodynamic response study for prevention of low back pain.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Setsuo

    2010-07-01

    Whole-body vibration experiments with subjects under vertical vibration were performed to examine and evaluate effects of backrest inclination on vibration transmitted through seats to the human body by using biodynamic response parameters represented by apparent mass (APMS) and vibration power absorption (VPA). The biodynamic response parameters of twelve male subjects, exposed to vertical random vibration at 0.8 m/s(2) r.m.s., were characterized under three different backrest support conditions, with the upper body supported against backrest inclined at angles of 0 degrees (vertical), 10 degrees, and 30 degrees with respect to the vertical axis. An increased backrest inclination angle resulted in reduction of the total power absorption calculated particularly the frequency range of 1-20 Hz. Normalized APMS magnitudes showed a principal resonance at about 5 Hz for each subject for a backrest supported vertically. A second resonant peak appeared at about 7.5 Hz in addition to the primary resonant peak for a backrest inclined at an angle of 10 degrees and then became much steeper for a backrest inclined at angle of 30 degrees. For a backrest inclined at an angle of 30 degrees, the resonant peak at 5 Hz was less apparent than in other backrest inclination postures. All subjects showed the second resonant peak at about 7.5 Hz in the double-normalized VPA for a backrest inclined at an angle of 30 degrees. According to the evaluation of vibration absorption behavior performed in this study, backrest inclination angle is preferable between 10 degrees and 30 degrees from the viewpoint of prevention of low back pain disorder. Copyright 2010 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative Biodynamics; The Form and Function of Two Living Stromatolite Assemblages.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, D. M.; Gleeson, D.; Burns, B.; Collins, L.

    2014-12-01

    Life arose very rapidly on the surface of the Earth after the conditions on the early planet stabilized. The first visible record of life is now represented by the fossilized signature of microbial communities on the surface of ancient sediments. Even at this early stage, at the onset of ecology, it is clear that the development of biofilms at the sediment-water interface would have affected the response of the surface to erosive force. The close interaction between biology and physical dynamics started early. The stabilization of the sediment will have been important in promoting the development of biogeochemical gradients, and promoting the niche segregation that drives evolution. As these microbial mat systems evolved is likely that their binding capacity changed as form and function developed. The onset of photosynthesis was a step change in this process. Studies on the biodynamics of modern Bahamian stromatolites demonstrated the importance of photosynthesis in promoting the biogenic stabilization of the carbonate (ooid) sediments by microbial assemblages derived from living stromatolites. The present study presents a comparative assessment of this work using new material from living stromatolitic assemblages from Shark Bay, Australia. Samples of stromatolites were taken and the natural microbial assemblages extracted and characterized. Microbial assemblages were incubated on the surface of clean sediment and the relative stabilization of the surface measured using the cohesive strength meter system to determine surface stability against time. Magnetic particle induction was also used to determine the relative adhesive capacity of the surfaces as assemblages developed. The results are presented and examined in contrast to the previous work on the biodynamics of modern Bahamian stromatolitic systems showing significant variation in form and function between the two different stromatolitic assemblages. The reasons for this variation are discussed.

  20. Experimentally fitted biodynamic models for pedestrian-structure interaction in walking situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toso, Marcelo André; Gomes, Herbert Martins; da Silva, Felipe Tavares; Pimentel, Roberto Leal

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between moving humans and structures usually occurs in slender structures in which the level of vibration is potentially high. Furthermore, there is the addition of mass to the structural system due to the presence of people and an increase in damping due to the human body´s ability to absorb vibrational energy. In this paper, a test campaign is presented to obtain parameters for a single degree of freedom (SDOF) biodynamic model that represents the action of a walking pedestrian in the vertical direction. The parameters of this model are the mass (m), damping (c) and stiffness (k). The measurements were performed on a force platform, and the inputs were the spectral acceleration amplitudes of the first three harmonics at the waist level of the test subjects and the corresponding amplitudes of the first three harmonics of the vertical ground reaction force. This leads to a system of nonlinear equations that is solved using a gradient-based optimization algorithm. A set of individuals took part in the tests to ensure inter-subject variability, and, regression expressions and an artificial neural network (ANN) were used to relate the biodynamic parameters to the pacing rate and the body mass of the pedestrians. The results showed some scatter in damping and stiffness that could not be precisely correlated with the masses and pacing rates of the subjects. The use of the ANN resulted in significant improvements in the parameter expressions with a low uncertainty. Finally, the measured vertical accelerations on a prototype footbridge show the adequacy of the numerical model for the representation of the effects of walking pedestrians on a structure. The results are consistent for many crowd densities.

  1. Structures Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center Structures Division is an international leader and pioneer in developing new structural analysis, life prediction, and failure analysis related to rotating machinery and more specifically to hot section components in air-breathing aircraft engines and spacecraft propulsion systems. The research consists of both deterministic and probabilistic methodology. Studies include, but are not limited to, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue as well as material creep. Studies of structural failure are at both the micro- and macrolevels. Nondestructive evaluation methods related to structural reliability are developed, applied, and evaluated. Materials from which structural components are made, studied, and tested are monolithics and metal-matrix, polymer-matrix, and ceramic-matrix composites. Aeroelastic models are developed and used to determine the cyclic loading and life of fan and turbine blades. Life models are developed and tested for bearings, seals, and other mechanical components, such as magnetic suspensions. Results of these studies are published in NASA technical papers and reference publication as well as in technical society journal articles. The results of the work of the Structures Division and the bibliography of its publications for calendar year 1995 are presented.

  2. A method for assessing the effectiveness of anti-vibration gloves using biodynamic responses of the hand arm system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, R. G.; Rakheja, S.; McDowell, T. W.; Welcome, D. E.; Wu, J. Z.; Warren, C.; Barkley, J.; Washington, B.; Schopper, A. W.

    2005-04-01

    Anti-vibration gloves are widely used to help minimize hand-arm vibration exposure. In this study, an alternative method is proposed to assess the vibration isolation effectiveness of these gloves using the biodynamic responses of the bare- and gloved-hand-arm system exposed to vibration. The laboratory experiments were performed with a total of five human subjects using a typical anti-vibration air bladder glove subjected to a broad-band random vibration spectrum in conjunction with a specially designed instrumented handle. The measured data were analyzed to derive the biodynamic responses of the bare as well as gloved human hand-arm system in terms of the apparent mass and the mechanical impedance. The two biodynamic responses were applied to estimate the vibration isolation effectiveness of the glove. The validity of the proposed concept was examined by comparing the estimated vibration transmissibility magnitudes of the glove with those obtained using a palm adapter method. The comparison of the results suggests that the proposed method offers a good alternative for estimating glove vibration transmissibility. The measured data and the proposed method based upon the biodynamic responses were further used to investigate the effect of the palm adapter on the vibration transmissibility of the glove. The results suggest that the presence of the palm adapter between the subject's palm and the glove may not alter the basic trends in the transmissibility response, but it would affect the transmissibility magnitudes in the middle- and high-frequency ranges. A distinct advantage of the proposed method is that it eliminates the use of an adapter in assessing the vibration isolation effectiveness of the gloves.

  3. Review and Evaluation of Hand-Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Sinsel, Erik W; Welcome, Daniel E; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2015-09-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study.

  4. Review and Evaluation of Hand–Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Sinsel, Erik W.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study. PMID:26929824

  5. Long Divisions

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-08

    The shadow of Saturn on the rings, which stretched across all of the rings earlier in Cassini's mission (see PIA08362), now barely makes it past the Cassini division. The changing length of the shadow marks the passing of the seasons on Saturn. As the planet nears its northern-hemisphere solstice in May 2017, the shadow will get even shorter. At solstice, the shadow's edge will be about 28,000 miles (45,000 kilometers) from the planet's surface, barely making it past the middle of the B ring. The moon Mimas is a few pixels wide, near the lower left in this image. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 35 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on May 21, 2016. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 2.0 million miles (3.2 million kilometers) from Saturn. Image scale is 120 miles (190 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20494

  6. U.S. Army Chemical Corps Historical Studies, Gas Warfare in World War I: The 78th Division at the Kriemhilde Stellung, October 1918

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1957-07-01

    on 2 November, the 155th Brigade moved out of the Bois des Loges, by noon had passed through Beffu et le Horthomme, and by 5«30 porno had taken...ammunition was found, also many deserted dugouts and a few wagon oartso We arrived back at 4tl5 porno ™ The next day, the Division Gas Officer, In

  7. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  8. Influences of Biodynamic and Conventional Farming Systems on Quality of Potato (Solanum Tuberosum L.) Crops: Results from Multivariate Analyses of Two Long-Term Field Trials in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Kjellenberg, Lars; Granstedt, Artur

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this paper was to present results from two long term field experiments comparing potato samples from conventional farming systems with samples from biodynamic farming systems. The principal component analyses (PCA), consistently exhibited differences between potato samples from the two farming systems. According to the PCA, potato samples treated with inorganic fertilizers exhibited a variation positively related to amounts of crude protein, yield, cooking or tissue discoloration and extract decomposition. Potato samples treated according to biodynamic principles, with composted cow manure, were more positively related to traits such as Quality- and EAA-indices, dry matter content, taste quality, relative proportion of pure protein and biocrystallization value. Distinctions between years, crop rotation and cultivars used were sometimes more significant than differences between manuring systems. Grown after barley the potato crop exhibited better quality traits compared to when grown after ley in both the conventional and the biodynamic farming system.

  9. Influences of Biodynamic and Conventional Farming Systems on Quality of Potato (Solanum Tuberosum L.) Crops: Results from Multivariate Analyses of Two Long-Term Field Trials in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Kjellenberg, Lars; Granstedt, Artur

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to present results from two long term field experiments comparing potato samples from conventional farming systems with samples from biodynamic farming systems. The principal component analyses (PCA), consistently exhibited differences between potato samples from the two farming systems. According to the PCA, potato samples treated with inorganic fertilizers exhibited a variation positively related to amounts of crude protein, yield, cooking or tissue discoloration and extract decomposition. Potato samples treated according to biodynamic principles, with composted cow manure, were more positively related to traits such as Quality- and EAA-indices, dry matter content, taste quality, relative proportion of pure protein and biocrystallization value. Distinctions between years, crop rotation and cultivars used were sometimes more significant than differences between manuring systems. Grown after barley the potato crop exhibited better quality traits compared to when grown after ley in both the conventional and the biodynamic farming system. PMID:28231216

  10. 4-DOF biodynamic lumped-parameter models for a seated occupant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Xu, Shi-Xu; Qian, Li-Jun; Bai, Xian-Xu

    2016-04-01

    In order to study how vibrations from ground vehicles/aircraft will impact on the seated occupants, it is of significance to develop an effective biodynamic model for the seated occupants. In this paper, a wide variety of 4-degree-of-freedom (4- DOF) lumped-parameter models for a seated occupant is investigated. A linear 4-DOF model with 18 parameters is deduced and employed as an example. The parameters of the 4-DOF model are identified based on the Pareto optimization principle. The goodness of fit (ɛ) is established and employed to evaluate the effectiveness of the models. Then, all possible linear 4-DOF models are analyzed and discussed with the same parameters identification and effectiveness evaluation. The most-effective two models are obtained and compared with two other existing models. The research results show that: (i) The total types of linear 4-DOF models is limited and all the parameters of models are identifiable; (ii) The number of parameters of the 4-DOF models affects little on the goodness of fit (ɛ); and (iii) The presented models are more effective than the two existing models.

  11. A framework for biodynamic feedthrough analysis--part II: validation and application.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, Joost; van Paassen, Marinus M; Mulder, Mark; Abbink, David A; Mulder, Max; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bulthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-09-01

    Biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) is a complex phenomenon, that has been studied for several decades. However, there is little consensus on how to approach the BDFT problem in terms of definitions, nomenclature, and mathematical descriptions. In this paper, the framework for BDFT analysis, as presented in Part I of this dual publication, is validated and applied. The goal of this framework is twofold. First of all, it provides some common ground between the seemingly large range of different approaches existing in BDFT literature. Secondly, the framework itself allows for gaining new insights into BDFT phenomena. Using recently obtained measurement data, parts of the framework that were not already addressed elsewhere, are validated. As an example of a practical application of the framework, it will be demonstrated how the effects of control device dynamics on BDFT can be understood and accurately predicted. Other ways of employing the framework are illustrated by interpreting the results of three selected studies from the literature using the BDFT framework. The presentation of the BDFT framework is divided into two parts. This paper, Part II, addresses the validation and application of the framework. Part I, which is also published in this journal issue, addresses the theoretical foundations of the framework. The work is presented in two separate papers to allow for a detailed discussion of both the framework's theoretical background and its validation.

  12. Mercury accumulation in marine bivalves: influences of biodynamics and feeding niche.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ke; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2011-10-01

    Differences in the accumulation of mercury (Hg) in five species of marine bivalves, including scallops Chlamys nobilis, clams Ruditapes philippinarum, oysters Saccostrea cucullata, green mussels Perna viridis, and black mussels Septifer virgatus, were investigated. The bivalves displayed different patterns of Hg accumulation in terms of the body concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total Hg (THg), as well as the ratio of MeHg to THg. Parameters of the biodynamics of the accumulation of Hg(II) and MeHg could reflect the species-dependent Hg concentrations in the bivalves. With the exception of black mussels, we found a significant relationship between the efflux rates of Hg(II) and the THg concentrations in the bivalves. The interspecific variations in the MeHg to THg ratio were largely controlled by the relative difference between the elimination rates of Hg(II) and MeHg. Stable isotope (δ(13)C) analysis indicated that the five bivalve species had contrasting feeding niches, which may also affect the Hg accumulation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biodynamic imaging for phenotypic profiling of three-dimensional tissue culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Turek, John; Matei, Daniela; Nolte, David D.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture represents a more biologically relevant environment for testing new drugs compared to conventional two-dimensional cancer cell culture models. Biodynamic imaging is a high-content 3-D optical imaging technology based on low-coherence interferometry and digital holography that uses dynamic speckle as high-content image contrast to probe deep inside 3-D tissue. Speckle contrast is shown to be a scaling function of the acquisition time relative to the persistence time of intracellular transport and hence provides a measure of cellular activity. Cellular responses of 3-D multicellular spheroids to paclitaxel are compared among three different growth techniques: rotating bioreactor (BR), hanging-drop (HD), and nonadherent (U-bottom, UB) plate spheroids, compared with ex vivo living tissues. HD spheroids have the most homogeneous tissue, whereas BR spheroids display large sample-to-sample variability as well as spatial heterogeneity. The responses of BR-grown tumor spheroids to paclitaxel are more similar to those of ex vivo biopsies than the responses of spheroids grown using HD or plate methods. The rate of mitosis inhibition by application of taxol is measured through tissue dynamics spectroscopic imaging, demonstrating the ability to monitor antimitotic chemotherapy. These results illustrate the potential use of low-coherence digital holography for 3-D pharmaceutical screening applications.

  14. Methods for deriving a representative biodynamic response of the hand-arm system to vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2009-09-01

    Vibration-induced biodynamic responses (BR) of the human hand-arm system measured with subjects participating in an experiment are usually arithmetically averaged and used to represent their mean response. The mean BR data reported from different studies are further arithmetically averaged to form the reference mean response for standardization and other applications. The objectives of this study are to clarify whether such a response-based averaging process could significantly misrepresent the characteristics of the original responses, and to identify an appropriate derivation method. The arithmetically averaged response was directly compared with the response derived from a property-based method proposed in this study. Two sets of reported mechanical impedance data measured at the fingers and the palms of the hands were used to derive the models required for the comparison. This study found that the response-based arithmetic averaging could generate some systematic errors. The range of the subjects' natural frequencies in each resonance mode, the mode damping ratio, and the number of subjects participating in the experiment are among the major factors influencing the level of the errors. An effective and practical approach for reducing the potential for error is to increase the number of subjects in the BR measurement. On the other hand, the property-based derivation method can be generally used to obtain the representative response, but it is less efficient than the response-based derivation method.

  15. Biodynamic response of human fingers in a power grip subjected to a random vibration.

    PubMed

    Dong, R G; Welcome, D E; McDowell, T W; Wu, J Z

    2004-08-01

    Knowledge of the biodynamic response (BR) of the human hand-arm system is an important part of the foundation for the measurement and assessment of hand-transmitted vibration exposure. This study investigated the BR of human fingers in a power grip subjected to a random vibration. Ten male subjects were used in the experiment. Each subject applied three coupling actions to a simulated tool handle at three different finger grip force levels. The BR is practically independent of the hand coupling actions for frequencies at or above 100 Hz. Above 50 Hz, the BR is correlated to finger and hand sizes. Increasing the finger coupling force significantly increases the BR. Therefore, hand forces should be measured and used when assessing hand-transmitted vibration exposure. The results also show that under a constant-velocity vibration, the finger vibration power absorption at frequencies above 200 Hz is approximately twice that at frequencies below 100 Hz. This suggests that the frequency weighting specified in the current ISO 5349-1 (2001) may underestimate the high frequency effect on vibration-induced finger disorders.

  16. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts. PMID:26732545

  17. Biodynamic method for 3-D correction of idiopathic scoliosis: a description of the method.

    PubMed

    Dobosiewicz, Krystyna; Durmała, Jacek; Kotwicki, Tomasz

    2005-02-28

    The biodynamic method of three-dimensional correction of idiopathic scoliosis is based on the pathomechanics of idiopathic scoliosis, and consists in active, segmental, three-dimensional correction of spinal curvature. The course of action focuses in the vicinity of the apical vertebra. Proprioceptive facilitation is applied on the concave side of the curvature, and exteroceptive facilitation on the convex side. Correction, likewise proprio- or exteroceptive facilitation, is phase-locked with asymmetric respiratory movement, as well as with particular phases of the respiratory cycle. In the course of exercises three-planar movement is generated, opposite to the direction in which scoliosis is progressing. This method is in accordance with the state of the art of scoliosis pathomechanics. The method requires detailed training, and can then can be applied at home under periodic control by a physician and a physiotherapist. The method can be applied in tandem with a Cheneau brace, as well as in surgical pretreatment. A etailed description of the method of three-dimensional scoliosis treatment will be presented in this article.

  18. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-06

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts.

  19. Biodynamic characteristics of upper limb reaching movements of the seated human under whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heon-Jeong; Martin, Bernard J

    2013-02-01

    Simulation of human movements is an essential component for proactive ergonomic analysis and biomechanical model development (Chaffin, 2001). Most studies on reach kinematics have described human movements in a static environment, however the models derived from these studies cannot be applied to the analysis of human reach movements in vibratory environments such as in-vehicle operations. This study analyzes three-dimensional joint kinematics of the upper extremity in reach movements performed in static and specific vibratory conditions and investigates vibration transmission to shoulder, elbow, and hand along the body path during pointing tasks. Thirteen seated subjects performed reach movements to five target directions distributed in their right hemisphere. The results show similarities in the characteristics of movement patterns and reach trajectories of upper body segments for static and dynamic environments. In addition, vibration transmission through upper body segments is affected by vibration frequency, direction, and location of the target to be reached. Similarities in the pattern of movement trajectories revealed by filtering vibration-induced oscillations indicate that coordination strategy may not be drastically different in static and vibratory environments. This finding may facilitate the development of active biodynamic models to predict human performance and behavior under whole body vibration exposure.

  20. Biodynamic response at the palm of the human hand subjected to a random vibration.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; McDowell, Thomas W; Welcome, Daniel E

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the biodynamic response (BR) distributed at the palm of the hand subjected to a random vibration. Twelve male subjects were used in the experiment. Each subject applied three coupling actions (grip-only, push-only, and combined grip and push) on a simulated tool handle at three different levels (50, 75, and 100 N) of palm force. This study found that the hand-arm system resonated mostly in the frequency range of 20 to 50 Hz, depending on the specific test treatment and individual characteristics. The maximum vibration power transmission through the palm occurred at the resonant frequency. Increasing the effective palm force generally increased the BR magnitude and resonant frequency. The apparent stiffness measured at the middle frequencies (80-100 Hz) is correlated to the BR in almost the entire frequency range (20-1,000 Hz). Under the same palm force, the push-only action corresponded to the highest BR values while the grip-only action generally produced the lowest values. Since the resonant frequency range matches the dominant vibration frequency range of many percussive tools, it is anticipated that the palm BR and vibration power transmission may have an association with vibration-induced injuries or disorders in the wrist-arm system among the workers using these tools.

  1. A probabilistic finger biodynamic model better depicts the roles of the flexors during unloaded flexion.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Zhang, Xudong

    2010-09-17

    Previous deterministic finger biomechanical models predicted that the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) was silent and the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) was the only active flexor during finger flexion. Experimental studies in vivo, however, recorded activities of both flexors. In this study, in an attempt to elucidate the roles of the flexors, a probabilistic biodynamic model of the index finger was constructed to estimate the muscle-tendon forces during an experimentally measured index finger flexion movement. A Monte-Carlo simulation was performed with four model parameters, including moment arms, physiological cross sectional areas (PCSA), passive torques, and anthropometric measures as independent random variables. The muscle-tendon forces at each time point were determined using a nonlinear optimization technique. The model predicted that both FDS and FDP contributed to sustaining the movement and the FDS was not necessarily silent. The two distinct force patterns observed in vivo in experimental studies were also corroborated by the simulation. These findings, contrary to previous deterministic models' predictions but in agreement with experimental measurements, explained the observed coactivation of FDS and FDP, and resolved the controversy regarding the roles of the flexors in finger movement dynamics.

  2. A New View on Biodynamic Feedthrough Analysis: Unifying the Effects on Forces and Positions.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, Joost; Mulder, Mark; Abbink, David A; van Paassen, Marinus M; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Mulder, Max

    2013-02-01

    When performing a manual control task, vehicle accelerations can cause involuntary limb motions, which can result in unintentional control inputs. This phenomenon is called biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT). In the past decades, many studies into BDFT have been performed, but its fundamentals are still only poorly understood. What has become clear, though, is that BDFT is a highly complex process, and its occurrence is influenced by many different factors. A particularly challenging topic in BDFT research is the role of the human operator, which is not only a very complex but also a highly adaptive system. In literature, two different ways of measuring and analyzing BDFT are reported. One considers the transfer of accelerations to involuntary forces applied to the control device (CD); the other considers the transfer of accelerations to involuntary CD deflections or positions. The goal of this paper is to describe an approach to unify these two methods. It will be shown how the results of the two methods relate and how this knowledge may aid in understanding BDFT better as a whole. The approach presented is based on the notion that BDFT dynamics can be described by the combination of two transfer dynamics: 1) the transfer dynamics from body accelerations to involuntary forces and 2) the transfer dynamics from forces to CD deflections. The approach was validated using experimental results.

  3. Biodynamic imaging for phenotypic profiling of three-dimensional tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Turek, John; Matei, Daniela; Nolte, David D

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture represents a more biologically relevant environment for testing new drugs compared to conventional two-dimensional cancer cell culture models. Biodynamic imaging is a high-content 3-D optical imaging technology based on low-coherence interferometry and digital holography that uses dynamic speckle as high-content image contrast to probe deep inside 3-D tissue. Speckle contrast is shown to be a scaling function of the acquisition time relative to the persistence time of intracellular transport and hence provides a measure of cellular activity. Cellular responses of 3-D multicellular spheroids to paclitaxel are compared among three different growth techniques: rotating bioreactor (BR), hanging-drop (HD), and nonadherent (U-bottom, UB) plate spheroids, compared with ex vivo living tissues. HD spheroids have the most homogeneous tissue, whereas BR spheroids display large sample-to-sample variability as well as spatial heterogeneity. The responses of BR-grown tumor spheroids to paclitaxel are more similar to those of ex vivo biopsies than the responses of spheroids grown using HD or plate methods. The rate of mitosis inhibition by application of taxol is measured through tissue dynamics spectroscopic imaging, demonstrating the ability to monitor antimitotic chemotherapy. These results illustrate the potential use of low-coherence digital holography for 3-D pharmaceutical screening applications.

  4. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts.

  5. Bioaccumulation of arsenic from water and sediment by a deposit-feeding polychaete (Arenicola marina): a biodynamic modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Casado-Martinez, M C; Smith, B D; Luoma, S N; Rainbow, P S

    2010-06-01

    Arsenic bioaccumulation in the deposit-feeding polychaete Arenicola marina has been investigated using biodynamic modelling. Radiotracer techniques were used to determine the rates of uptake of As as arsenate from water and sediment and its subsequent efflux in the laboratory. Lugworms accumulated As from solution linearly at concentrations of 2-20 microg l(-1), with a corresponding uptake rate constant of 0.1648+/-0.0135 l g(-1)d(-1). 7.8+/-0.8% (assimilation efficiency) of the As ingested bound to sediments was retained after egestion of unassimilated metal. Elimination of As followed a two-compartment model, with mean efflux rate constants (from the slow pool) very similar for As accumulated from solution and ingested sediments (0.0449+/-0.0034 and 0.0478+/-0.0225 d(-1), respectively) and a corresponding biological half-time of roughly 15 d. A biodynamic model was constructed and validated through the comparison of biodynamic model predictions against measured bioaccumulated concentrations in lugworms from five UK estuaries. The model accurately predicted bioaccumulated As concentrations in lugworms using mean values of relevant physiological parameters (uptake rate, efflux rate and growth rate constants), a site-specific ingestion rate (calculated according to mean worm size and sediment organic matter content and expressed as the rate of ingestion of the mass of fine sediment), a site-specific sediment concentration measured after HCl extraction, and a standard dissolved As concentration. This combination of parameters showed that sediment ingestion contributed 30-60% of the total As accumulated by lugworms at the studied sites, depending on the different geochemistry at each site. This study showed that it is difficult to predict accurately As bioaccumulation at sites with different chemistries, unless that chemistry is taken into account. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Validation of Intra-Subject Variation in Biodynamic Responses of Seated Human Exposed to Whole-Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Soo; Yoshimura, Takuya; Tamaoki, Gen

    Many studies have been conducted to investigate the change in human response under various experimental conditions. Usually, these experiments were conducted using many subjects and the inter-subject variation was evaluated. However, the intra-subject variation in human response is also necessary for understanding the change in an individual's physical response to whole-body vibration (WBV). The aim of this study is to investigate the intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses (both apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility) of a seated human exposed to vertical whole-body vibration over time. In the experiments, nine male subjects were exposed to vertical random vibration (0.2-0.3 m/s2 in r.m.s.) in the 0-30Hz frequency range. The measurement variation was also evaluated, wherein the measurements were repeated five times without any change to form the “baseline” for each subject, and the intra-subject variations were evaluated by comparing their responses with these “baseline.” The intra-subject variation was examined from two different viewpoints: variation “within a day” and that “over several days.” To determine the intra-subject variation “within a day”, the five measurements were obtained at two-hour intervals on the same day. In the intra-subject variation “over several days”, the five measurements were obtained again, but at the same time of the day on five consecutive days. The results show that the intra-subject variations (both “within a day” and “over several days”) in biodynamic responses are larger than the “baseline.” However, when the variation “within a day” in biodynamic responses is compared to that “over several days,” no common trend is observed among subjects. Although the magnitude of intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses depends on each subject, both variations “within a day” and that “over several days” have a similar range of variation.

  7. Biodynamic modelling of the accumulation of Ag, Cd and Zn by the deposit-feeding polychaete Nereis diversicolor: inter-population variability and a generalised predictive model.

    PubMed

    Kalman, J; Smith, B D; Riba, I; Blasco, J; Rainbow, P S

    2010-06-01

    Biodynamic parameters of the ragworm Nereis diversicolor from southern Spain and south England were experimentally derived to assess the inter-population variability of physiological parameters of the bioaccumulation of Ag, Cd and Zn from water and sediment. Although there were some limited variations, these were not consistent with the local metal bioavailability nor with temperature changes. Incorporating the biodynamic parameters into a defined biodynamic model, confirmed that sediment is the predominant source of Cd and Zn accumulated by the worms, accounting in each case for 99% of the overall accumulated metals, whereas the contribution of dissolved Ag to the total accumulated by the worm increased from about 27 to about 53% with increasing dissolved Ag concentration. Standardised values of metal-specific parameters were chosen to generate a generalised model to be extended to N. diversicolor populations across a wide geographical range from western Europe to North Africa. According to the assumptions of this model, predicted steady state concentrations of Cd and Zn in N. diversicolor were overestimated, those of Ag underestimated, but still comparable to independent field measurements. We conclude that species-specific physiological metal bioaccumulation parameters are relatively constant over large geographical distances, and a single generalised biodynamic model does have potential to predict accumulated Ag, Cd and Zn concentrations in this polychaete from a single sediment metal concentration.

  8. Definition of a Range of Idealized Values to Characterize Seated Body Biodynamic Response Under Vertical Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boileau, P.-É.; Wu, X.; Rakheja, S.

    1998-08-01

    While a considerable quantity of data has been published on driving-point mechanical impedance, apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility magnitude and phase characteristics of seated subjects under vertical whole-body vibration, significant variation is known to exist between various data sets. Such variations may be partly attributed to differences associated with the methodology, experimental conditions or subject population used by various investigators to determine the biodynamic response characteristics. As part of this study, various published data sets on driving-point mechanical impedance, apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility, are identified for which the experimental conditions are reported to fall within a prescribed range of conditions for subjects maintaining an erect seated posture without backrest support, while the feet are supported on a vibrating platform. Only those data sets are considered for which the magnitude of vertical sine and/or random excitation is reported to have been maintained below 5 m/s-2. A further screening of the data sets defining the magnitude and phase responses of each function is performed by eliminating all data representing outliers in the 0·5-20 Hz frequency range. On that basis, mean and envelopes of the magnitude and phase responses associated with each function are derived in the 0·5-20 Hz frequency range, representing the most probable values likely applicable under the predefined range of conditions. The resulting range of idealized values on the magnitude and phase responses are based on 8 and 7 data sets respectively for driving-point mechanical impedance and apparent mass, while only 4 and 3 data sets respectively were left to define the seat-to-head transmissibility magnitude and phase.

  9. Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

    2003-11-01

    Seated human subjects have been exposed to vertical whole-body vibration so as to investigate the non-linearity in their biodynamic responses and quantify the response in directions other than the direction of excitation. Twelve males were exposed to random vertical vibration in the frequency range 0.25-25 Hz at four vibration magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s -2 r.m.s.). The subjects sat in four sitting postures having varying foot heights so as to produce differing thigh contact with the seat (feet hanging, feet supported with maximum thigh contact, feet supported with average thigh contact, and feet supported with minimum thigh contact). Forces were measured in the vertical, fore-and-aft, and lateral directions on the seat and in the vertical direction at the footrest. The characteristic non-linear response of the human body with reducing resonance frequency at increasing vibration magnitudes was seen in all postures, but to a lesser extent with minimum thigh contact. Appreciable forces in the fore-and-aft direction also showed non-linearity, while forces in the lateral direction were low and showed no consistent trend. Forces at the feet were non-linear with a multi-resonant behaviour and were affected by the position of the legs. The decreased non-linearity with the minimum thigh contact posture suggests the tissues of the buttocks affect the non-linearity of the body more than the tissues of the thighs. The forces in the fore-and-aft direction are consistent with the body moving in two directions when exposed to vertical vibration. The non-linear behaviour of the body, and the considerable forces in the fore-aft direction should be taken into account when optimizing vibration isolation devices.

  10. A Method to Measure the Relationship Between Biodynamic Feedthrough and Neuromuscular Admittance.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, J; Abbink, D A; Mulder, M; van Paassen, M M

    2011-08-01

    Biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) refers to a phenomenon where accelerations cause involuntary limb motions, which can result in unintentional control inputs that can substantially degrade manual control. It is known that humans can adapt the dynamics of their limbs by adjusting their neuromuscular settings, and it is likely that these adaptations have a large influence on BDFT. The goal of this paper is to present a method that can provide evidence for this hypothesis. Limb dynamics can be described by admittance, which is the causal dynamic relation between a force input and a position output. This paper presents a method to simultaneously measure BDFT and admittance in a motion-based simulator. The method was validated in an experiment. Admittance was measured by applying a force disturbance signal to the control device; BDFT was measured by applying a motion disturbance signal to the motion simulator. To allow distinguishing between the operator's responses to each disturbance signal, the perturbation signals were separated in the frequency domain. To show the impact of neuromuscular adaptation, subjects were asked to perform three different control tasks, each requiring a different setting of the neuromuscular system (NMS). Results show a dependence of BDFT on neuromuscular admittance: A change in neuromuscular admittance results in a change in BDFT dynamics. This dependence is highly relevant when studying BDFT. The data obtained with the proposed measuring method provide insight in how exactly the settings of the NMS influence the level of BDFT. This information can be used to gain fundamental knowledge on BDFT and also, for example, in the development of a canceling controller.

  11. Influence of biodynamic preparations on compost development and resultant compost extracts on wheat seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Jennifer R; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne; Reganold, John P; York, Alan L; Brinton, William F

    2010-07-01

    Biodynamic (BD) agriculture, a form of organic agriculture, includes the use of specially fermented preparations, but peer-reviewed studies on their efficacy are rare. Composting of a grape pomace and manure mixture was studied in two years (2002 and 2005) with and without the BD compost preparations. Water extracts of finished composts were then used to fertigate wheat seedlings, with and without added inorganic fertilizer. BD-treated mixtures had significantly greater dehydrogenase activity than did untreated (control) mixtures during composting, suggesting greater microbial activity in BD-treated compost. In both years there was a distinct compost effect on wheat shoot and root biomass irrespective of supplemental fertilizer. Shoot biomass was highest in all treatments receiving 1% compost extract. Wheat seedlings that received 1% compost extract in 2005 grew similar root and shoot biomass as fertilized seedlings, despite only containing 30% as much nitrogen as the fertilizer treatment. In both years seedlings that received fertilizer plus 1% compost extract produced 22-61% more shoot biomass and 40-66% more root biomass than seedlings that received fertilizer alone, even at higher rates. In 2002 a 1% extract of BD compost grew 7% taller wheat seedlings than did 1% extract of untreated compost. At 0.1% only BD extract grew taller plants than water, but in 2002 only. No effect on shoot or root biomass was seen at 0.1%. Our results support the use of compost extracts as fertilizer substitutes or supplements, testimonial reports on the growth promoting effects of compost extracts, and the occasional superiority of BD compost to untreated compost. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: biodynamic responses to sinusoidal and random vibration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The dependence of biodynamic responses of the seated human body on the frequency, magnitude and waveform of vertical vibration has been studied in 20 males and 20 females. With sinusoidal vibration (13 frequencies from 1 to 16 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.1-1.6 ms(-2) r.m.s.) and with random vibration (1-16 Hz) at the same magnitudes, the apparent mass of the body was similar with random and sinusoidal vibration of the same overall magnitude. With increasing magnitude of vibration, the stiffness and damping of a model fitted to the apparent mass reduced and the resonance frequency decreased (from 6.5 to 4.5 Hz). Male and female subjects had similar apparent mass (after adjusting for subject weight) and a similar principal resonance frequency with both random and sinusoidal vibration. The change in biodynamic response with increasing vibration magnitude depends on the frequency of the vibration excitation, but is similar with sinusoidal and random excitation.

  13. Characterizing dissolved Cu and Cd uptake in terms of the biotic ligand and biodynamics using enriched stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    The biotic ligand model considers the biological and geochemical complexities that affect metal exposure. It relates toxicity to the fraction of physiological active sites impacted by reactive metal species. The biodynamic model is a complementary construct that predicts bioaccumulation and assumes that toxicity occurs when influx rates exceed rates of loss and detoxification. In this paper we presume that metal influx rates are mechanistically the resulting processes that characterize transmembrane transport. We use enriched stable isotopes to characterize, both in terms of the biotic ligand and biodynamics, dissolved metal uptake by a freshwater snail at water hardness varying up to 180-fold. Upon 24 h exposure, metal uptake was linear over a range encompassing most environmental concentrations; although saturation kinetics were observed at higher concentrations. Cadmium influx rates correlate with changes in the affinity of the biotic ligand, whereas those of Cu correlate with changes in both site affinity and capacity. A relationship between metal influx rate and ligand character asks whether toxicity is the result of accumulation at the biotic ligand or the rate at which metal is transported by that ligand.

  14. Modeling of the biodynamic responses distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop models of the hand-arm system in the three orthogonal directions (xh, yh , and zh ) and to enhance the understanding of the hand vibration dynamics. A four-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) model and 5-DOF model were used in the simulation for each direction. The driving-point mechanical impedances distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand reported in a previous study were used to determine the parameters of the models. The 5-DOF models were generally superior to the 4-DOF models for the simulation. Hence, as examples of applications, the 5-DOF models were used to predict the transmissibility of a vibration-reducing glove and the vibration transmissibility on the major substructures of the hand-arm system. The model-predicted results were also compared with the experimental data reported in two other recent studies. Some reasonable agreements were observed in the comparisons, which provided some validation of the developed models. This study concluded that the 5-DOF models are acceptable for helping to design and analyze vibrating tools and anti-vibration devices. This study also confirmed that the 5-DOF model in the zh direction is acceptable for a coarse estimation of the biodynamic responses distributed throughout the major substructures of the hand-arm system. Some interesting phenomena observed in the experimental study of the biodynamic responses in the three directions were also explained in this study.

  15. Modeling of the biodynamic responses distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop models of the hand–arm system in the three orthogonal directions (xh, yh, and zh) and to enhance the understanding of the hand vibration dynamics. A four-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) model and 5-DOF model were used in the simulation for each direction. The driving-point mechanical impedances distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand reported in a previous study were used to determine the parameters of the models. The 5-DOF models were generally superior to the 4-DOF models for the simulation. Hence, as examples of applications, the 5-DOF models were used to predict the transmissibility of a vibration-reducing glove and the vibration transmissibility on the major substructures of the hand-arm system. The model-predicted results were also compared with the experimental data reported in two other recent studies. Some reasonable agreements were observed in the comparisons, which provided some validation of the developed models. This study concluded that the 5-DOF models are acceptable for helping to design and analyze vibrating tools and anti-vibration devices. This study also confirmed that the 5-DOF model in the zh direction is acceptable for a coarse estimation of the biodynamic responses distributed throughout the major substructures of the hand–arm system. Some interesting phenomena observed in the experimental study of the biodynamic responses in the three directions were also explained in this study. PMID:26609187

  16. Modeling of the biodynamic responses distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand in three orthogonal directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop models of the hand-arm system in the three orthogonal directions (xh, yh, and zh) and to enhance the understanding of the hand vibration dynamics. A four-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) model and 5-DOF model were used in the simulation for each direction. The driving-point mechanical impedances distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand reported in a previous study were used to determine the parameters of the models. The 5-DOF models were generally superior to the 4-DOF models for the simulation. Hence, as examples of applications, the 5-DOF models were used to predict the transmissibility of a vibration-reducing glove and the vibration transmissibility on the major substructures of the hand-arm system. The model-predicted results were also compared with the experimental data reported in two other recent studies. Some reasonable agreements were observed in the comparisons, which provided some validation of the developed models. This study concluded that the 5-DOF models are acceptable for helping to design and analyze vibrating tools and anti-vibration devices. This study also confirmed that the 5-DOF model in the zh direction is acceptable for a coarse estimation of the biodynamic responses distributed throughout the major substructures of the hand-arm system. Some interesting phenomena observed in the experimental study of the biodynamic responses in the three directions were also explained in this study.

  17. Human body modeling method to simulate the biodynamic characteristics of spine in vivo with different sitting postures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Rui-Chun; Guo, Li-Xin

    2017-03-06

    The aim of this study is to model the computational model of seated whole human body including skeleton, muscle, viscera, ligament, intervertebral disc, and skin to predict effect of the factors (sitting postures, muscle and skin, buttocks, viscera, arms, gravity, and boundary conditions) on the biodynamic characteristics of spine. Two finite element models of seated whole body and a large number of finite element models of different ligamentous motion segments were developed and validated. Static, modal, and transient dynamic analyses were performed. The predicted vertical resonant frequency of seated body model was in the range of vertical natural frequency of 4 to 7 Hz. Muscle, buttocks, viscera, and the boundary conditions of buttocks have influence on the vertical resonant frequency of spine. Muscle played a very important role in biodynamic response of spine. Compared with the vertical posture, the posture of lean forward or backward led to an increase in stress on anterior or lateral posterior of lumbar intervertebral discs. This indicated that keeping correct posture could reduce the injury of vibration on lumbar intervertebral disc under whole-body vibration. The driving posture not only reduced the load of spine but also increased the resonant frequency of spine. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Life sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Day, L.

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  19. Detailing the Division

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-11

    NASA Cassini spacecraft looks between Saturn A and B rings to spy structure in the Cassini Division. The Cassini Division, occupying the middle and left of the image, contains five dim bands of ring material, but not all of the division is shown here.

  20. Ground-water resources of the Middle Loup division of the lower Platte River basin, Nebraska, with a section on Chemical quality of the ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Delbert Wayne; Rainwater, Frank Hays

    1955-01-01

    The Middle Loup division of the lower Platte River basin is an area of 650 square miles which includes the Middle Loup River valley from the confluence of the Middle and North Loup Rivers in Howard County, Nebr., to the site of the diversion dam that the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation proposes to construct in Blaine County near Milburn, Nebr. It also includes land in Howard and Sherman Counties designated by the Bureau of Reclamation as the Farwell unit. Irrigable land in this division is present on both sides of the Middle Loup River and along its tributaries. Most of the Middle Loup River valley is already irrigated by the Middle Loup Public Power and Irrigation District, which is strictly an irrigation enterprise. The uplands are not irrigated. Loess, dune sand, gravel, silt, and clay of Pleistocene or Recent age are exposed in the report area. These unconsolidated sediments rest on bedrock consisting of alternating layers of shale, mudstone, sandstone, and limestone, which are essentially fiat lying or slightly warped. The Ogallala formation, of Tertiary (Pliocene) age, immediately underlies the Pleistocene sediments and rests on the Pierre shale of Cretaceous age. Belts of alluvium occupy the Middle Loup River valley and the valleys of the principal streams in the area. The soils, dune sand, and terrace deposits are the most recent deposits. The Ogallala formation is water bearing and is the source of supply for some domestic and livestock wells. The saturated part of the sand and gravel formations of Pleistocene age, which yields water freely to wells, is the most important aquifer in the Middle Loup division. The water generally is under water-table conditions. The yields of properly constructed wells range from a few gallons per minute (gpm) to as much as 1,800 gpm. Some wells tap water in both the sand and gravel of Pleistocene age and in the underlying Ogallala formation. No wells are known to penetrate into formations older than the Ogallala. Fluctuations

  1. Vibration exposure and biodynamic responses during whole-body vibration training.

    PubMed

    Abercromby, Andrew F J; Amonette, William E; Layne, Charles S; McFarlin, Brian K; Hinman, Martha R; Paloski, William H

    2007-10-01

    Excessive, chronic whole-body vibration (WBV) has a number of negative side effects on the human body, including disorders of the skeletal, digestive, reproductive, visual, and vestibular systems. Whole-body vibration training (WBVT) is intentional exposure to WBV to increase leg muscle strength, bone mineral density, health-related quality of life, and decrease back pain. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate vibration exposure and biodynamic responses during typical WBVT regimens. Healthy men and women (N = 16) were recruited to perform slow, unloaded squats during WBVT (30 Hz; 4 mm(p-p)), during which knee flexion angle (KA), mechanical impedance, head acceleration (Ha(rms)), and estimated vibration dose value (eVDV) were measured. WBVT was repeated using two forms of vibration: 1) vertical forces to both feet simultaneously (VV), and 2) upward forces to only one foot at a time (RV). Mechanical impedance varied inversely with KA during RV (effect size, eta(p)(2): 0.668, P < 0.01) and VV (eta(p)(2): 0.533, P < 0.05). Ha(rms) varied with KA (eta(p)(2): 0.686, P < 0.01) and is greater during VV than during RV at all KA (P < 0.01). The effect of KA on Ha(rms) is different for RV and VV (eta(p)(2): 0.567, P < 0.05). The eVDV associated with typical RV and VV training regimens (30 Hz, 4 mm(p-p), 10 min.d(-1)) exceeds the recommended daily vibration exposure as defined by ISO 2631-1 (P < 0.01). ISO standards indicate that 10 min.d(-1) WBVT is potentially harmful to the human body; the risk of adverse health effects may be lower during RV than VV and at half-squats rather than full-squats or upright stance. More research is needed to explore the long-term health hazards of WBVT.

  2. Recent advances in coumarins and 1-azacoumarins as versatile biodynamic agents.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manohar V; Kulkarni, Geeta M; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Sun, Chung-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Coumarins, also referred as benzopyran-2-ones, and their corresponding nitrogen counterpart, 1-azacoumarins also referred to as carbostyrils, are a family of nature-occurring lactones and lactams respectively. The plant extracts containing coumarin-related heterocycles, which were employed as herbal remedies in early days, have now been extensively studied for their biological activities. These investigations have revealed their potentials as versatile biodynamic agents. For example, coumarins with phenolic hydroxyl groups have the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species and thus prevent the formation of 5-HETE and HHT in the arachidonic pathway of inflammation suppression. Recent in vivo studies have revealed the role of coumarins in hepatotoxicity and also in depletion of cytochrome P450. Similarly 1-azacoumarins which is part of quinoline alkaloids, are known for their diverse biological activity and recently, a 6-functionalized 1-aza coumarins are undergoing human clinical trials as an orally active anti-tumor drug in view of its farnesyl protein-inhibiting activity in the nanomolar range. Furthermore, several synthetic coumarins with a variety of pharmacophoric groups at C-3, C-4 and C-7 positions have been intensively screened for anti-microbial, anti-HIV, anti-cancer, lipid-lowering, anti-oxidant, and anti-coagulation activities. Specifically, coumarin-3-sulfonamides and carboxamides were reported to exhibit selective cytotoxicity against mammalian cancer cell lines. The C4-substituted aryloxymethyl, arylaminomethyl, and dichloroacetamidomethyl coumarins, along with the corresponding 1-azacoumarins, have been demonstrated to be potential anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory agents. To expand the structural diversity of synthetic courmarins for biological functions, attempts have also been made to attach a chloramphenicol side chain at C-3 position of courmarin. In addition, the bi- and tri-heterocyclic coumarins and 1-azacoumarins with benzofuran, furan

  3. Establishment of one-axis vibration test system for measurement of biodynamic response of human hand-arm system.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Nobuyuki; Hosoya, Naoki; Maeda, Setsuo

    2008-12-01

    Prolonged exposure to hand-arm vibration (HAV) due to use of hand-held power tools leads to an increased occurrence of symptoms of disorders in the vascular, neurological, and osteo-articular systems of the upper limbs called hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). Biodynamic responses of the hand-arm system to vibration can be suggestive parameters that give us better assessment of exposure to HAV and fundamental data for design of low-vibration-exposure power tools. Recently, a single axis hand-arm vibration system has been installed in the Japan National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The aims of this study were to obtain the fundamental dynamic characteristics of an instrumented handle and to validate the performance and measurement accuracy of the system applied to dynamic response measurement. A pseudo-random vibration signal with a frequency range of 5-1,250 Hz and a power spectrum density of 1.0 (m/s2)2/Hz was used in this study. First the dynamic response of the instrumented handle without any weight was measured. After this measurement, the dynamic response measurement of the handle with weights mounted on the handle was performed. The apparent mass of a weight itself was obtained by using the mass cancellation method. The mass of the measuring cap on the instrumented handle was well compensated by using the mass cancellation method. Based on the 10% error tolerance, this handle can reliably measure the dynamic response represented by an apparent mass with a minimum weight of 2.0 g in a frequency range of 10.0 to 1,000 Hz. A marked increase in the AM magnitude of the weights of 15 g and 20 g in frequency ranges greater than 800 Hz is attributed not to the fundamental resonance frequency of the handle with weights, but to the fixation of the weight to the measuring cap. In this aspect, the peak of the AM magnitude can be reduced and hence should not be an obstacle to the biodynamic response measurement of the human hand-arm system. On the

  4. Role of Prolactin in the Regulation of Bicarbonates Biodynamics in Female Rat Model of Cholestasis of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bulaeva, O A; Abramicheva, P A; Balakina, T A; Smirnova, O V

    2017-03-01

    We studied possible involvement of prolactin in the regulation of bicarbonate biodynamics using female rat model of cholestasis of pregnancy induced by transplantation of the donor pituitary under the renal capsule of a recipient (hyperprolactinemia) and bile duct ligation (cholestasis). The concentration of bicarbonates in the bile and blood, their excretion, clearance, and reabsorption, as well as glomerular filtration rate and excretion of sodium ions were assessed. It was found that the main effect of prolactin was directed to the kidney-regulated pool of bicarbonates and consisted in stimulation of their clearance and inhibition of reabsorption, which led to a decrease in bicarbonate blood concentration. Parallel influence of prolactin on the clearance of bicarbonates and sodium ions was observed.

  5. Division Chief Meeting, April, 1929

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Caption: 'LMAL division chiefs confer with the engineer-in-charge in April 1929. Left to right: E.A. Myers, Personnel Division; Edward R. Sharp, Property and Clerical Division; Thomas Carroll, Flight Test Division; Henry J.E. Reid, engineer in chief; Carlton Kemper, Power Plants Division; Elton Miller, aerodynamics division.'

  6. Effect of different production systems on chemical profiles of dwarf French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Top Crop) pods.

    PubMed

    Jakopic, Jerneja; Slatnar, Ana; Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja; Veberic, Robert; Stampar, Franci; Bavec, Franci; Bavec, Martina

    2013-03-13

    The chemical composition of dwarf French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cv. Top Crop was compared among five production systems: conventional, integrated, organic, and biodynamic production systems and the control. Determination of sugars and organic acids was performed with a HPLC system, and identification of individual phenolic compounds using HPLC-MS. The chemical composition of the beans was unaffected by the production systems; however, the content levels of individual compounds were changed. The pods from integrated production contained the lowest levels of glucose and sucrose and the highest levels of catechin, procyanidin dimers, and a vanillic acid derivative. The control treatment, as well as organic and biodynamic productions, positively affected the levels of sugar content and caused a lower content of catechin and trans-p-coumaroylaldaric acids. Beans from the conventional production system contained the lowest levels of fructose, glucose, ascorbic acid, and many phenolics from various groups.

  7. Industry-wide studies report of an in-depth industrial-hygiene survey of the Dow Chemical, Michigan Division, Midland, Michigan, September 11-13, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Greife, A.

    1985-08-01

    An indepth survey was conducted at Dow Chemical Company. The purpose of the survey was to investigate the acrylamide and polyacrylamide production facilities as part of an industry-wide assessment of acrylamide exposures. Three production facilities were involved in the production of acrylamide monomer or polymer. Breathing-zone, general-area, and wipe samples were collected in all three facilities for a single day shift and analyzed for acrylamide. The highest airborne acrylamide concentrations (breathing zone, 0.119 cu m and general area, 0.054mg/cu m, were found in the monomer facility. Most of the general air samples were below the limit of detection, 0.002mg/cu m. All but two of the wipe samples were below the limit of detection, 0.5 microgram (microg) per sample. The author concludes that all samples collected during the survey were below any standard or recommended evaluation criteria for acrylamide. Evaluating work practices to reduce potential dermal exposure is recommended.

  8. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  9. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  10. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1979. [Pyrochemical/dry processing; waste encapsulation in metal; transport in geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    For pyrochemical and dry processing materials development included exposure to molten metal and salt of Mo-0.5% Ti-0.07% Ti-0.01% C, Mo-30% W, SiC, Si/sub 2/ON/sub 2/, ZrB/sub 2/-SiC, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, AlN, HfB/sub 2/, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, nickel nitrate-infiltrated W, W-coated Mo, and W-metallized alumina-yttria. Work on Th-U salt transport processing included solubility of Th in liquid Cd, defining the Cd-Th and Cd-Mg-Th phase diagrams, ThO/sub 2/ reduction experiments, and electrolysis of CaO in molten salt. Work on pyrochemical processes and associated hardware for coprocessing U and Pu in spent FBR fuels included a second-generation computer model of the transport process, turntable transport process design, work on the U-Cu-Mg system, and U and Pu distribution coefficients between molten salt and metal. Refractory metal vessels are being service-life tested. The chloride volatility processing of Th-based fuel was evaluated for its proliferation resistance, and a preliminary ternary phase diagram for the Zn-U-Pu system was computed. Material characterization and process analysis were conducted on the Exportable Pyrochemical process (Pyro-Civex process). Literature data on oxidation of fissile metals to oxides were reviewed. Work was done on chemical bases for the reprocessing of actinide oxides in molten salts. Flowsheets are being developed for the processing of fuel in molten tin. Work on encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in metal matrix included studies of leach rate of crystalline waste materials and of the impact resistance of metal-matrix waste forms. In work on the transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media, adsorption of Sr on oolitic limestone was studied, as well as the migration of Cs in basalt. Fitting of data on the adsorption of iodate by hematite to a mathematical model was attempted.

  11. Report: Task Force on Safety Policies for Division Meeting Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Expresses concern over the dangers in presenting chemical demonstrations at regional and national conventions. Lists the interim minimum guidelines for chemical demonstrations to be required for future meeting sessions of the Division of Chemical Education of the American Chemical Society. (TW)

  12. Division Iv: Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, Christopher; D'Antona, Francesca; Spite, Monique; Asplund, Martin; Charbonnel, Corinne; Docobo, Jose Angel; Gray, Richard O.; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2012-04-01

    This Division IV was started on a trial basis at the General Assembly in The Hague 1994 and was formally accepted at the Kyoto General Assembly in 1997. Its broad coverage of ``Stars'' is reflected in its relatively large number of Commissions and so of members (1266 in late 2011). Its kindred Division V, ``Variable Stars'', has the same history of its beginning. The thinking at the time was to achieve some kind of balance between the number of members in each of the 12 Divisions. Amid the current discussion of reorganizing the number of Divisions into a more compact form it seems advisable to make this numerical balance less of an issue than the rationalization of the scientific coverage of each Division, so providing more effective interaction within a particular field of astronomy. After all, every star is variable to a certain degree and such variability is becoming an ever more powerful tool to understand the characteristics of every kind of normal and peculiar star. So we may expect, after hearing the reactions of members, that in the restructuring a single Division will result from the current Divisions IV and V.

  13. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    Nonlinear biodynamic responses are evident in many studies of the apparent masses of sitting and standing subjects in static postures that require muscle activity for postural control. In the present study, 12 male subjects adopted a relaxed semi-supine posture assumed to involve less muscle activity than during static sitting and standing. The supine subjects were exposed to two types of vertical vibration (in the x-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 m s -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 10.35 to 7.32 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 m s -2 rms. This nonlinear response was apparent in both the vertical ( x-axis) apparent mass and in the horizontal ( z-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. As the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 m s -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass with intermittent random vibration decreased from 9.28 to 8.06 Hz whereas, over the same range of magnitudes with continuous random vibration, the resonance frequency decreased from 9.62 to 7.81 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms) was 1.37 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 1.71 with the continuous random vibration. With the intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration of the same magnitudes. The response was typical of thixotropy that may be a primary cause of the nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration.

  14. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during longitudinal horizontal whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    The resonance frequencies in frequency response functions of the human body (e.g. apparent mass and transmissibility) decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear biodynamic response is found with various sitting and standing postures requiring postural control. The present study measured the apparent mass of the body in a relaxed semi-supine posture with two types of longitudinal horizontal vibration (in the z-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 ms -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 ms -2 rms. A nonlinear response was apparent in both the horizontal ( z-axis) apparent mass and the vertical ( x-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. With intermittent random vibration, as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 ms -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass decreased from 3.2 to 2.5 Hz whereas, with continuous random vibration over the same range of magnitudes, the resonance frequency decreased from 3.4 to 2.4 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms) was 0.6 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 0.9 Hz with the continuous random vibration. With intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration at the same magnitudes. The responses were consistent with passive thixotropy being a primary cause of nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration, although reflex activity of the muscles may also have an influence.

  15. Bioaccumulation of arsenic and silver by the caddisfly larvae Hydropsyche siltalai and H. pellucidula: a biodynamic modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Awrahman, Zmnako A; Rainbow, Philip S; Smith, Brian D; Khan, Farhan R; Bury, Nicolas R; Fialkowski, Wojciech

    2015-04-01

    Biodynamic modeling was used to investigate the uptake and bioaccumulation of arsenic and silver from water and food by two Hydropsychid caddisfly larvae: Hydropsyche siltalai and Hydropsyche pellucidula. Radiotracer techniques determined the uptake rate constants of arsenic and silver from water, and assimilation efficiencies from food, and their subsequent loss rate constants after accumulation from either route. The uptake rate constants (±SE) of As and Ag from solution were 0.021±0.005 and 0.350±0.049Lg(-1)day(-1), respectively, for H. siltalai, and 0.435±0.054 and 0.277±0.021Lg(-1)day(-1), respectively, for H. pellucidula in moderately hard synthetic water at 10°C. The assimilation efficiencies (±SE) of As and Ag from radiolabeled ingested food were 46.0±7.7% and 75.7±3.6%, respectively, for H. siltalai, and 61.0±4.2% and 52.6±8.6%, respectively, for H. pellucidula. Ag, but not As, AEs were significantly different between species. The AE of Ag differed from the AE of As in H. siltalai, but not in H. pellucidula. Mean efflux rate constants after accumulation of metals from solution or food ranged from 0.039 to 0.190day(-1). The efflux rate constants of As and Ag accumulated from solution were significantly lower than those of As and Ag assimilated from ingested food in both species. Experimentally derived ku and ke values were then used to predict As and Ag tissue concentrations in hydropsychids collected from 13 UK sites, including metal-contaminated streams in Cornwall. Arsenic and silver concentrations in environmental water and food (suspended particles) samples were measured. Biodynamic models successfully predicted accumulated As and Ag concentrations in resident H. siltalai and H. pellucidula at each site. The models also showed that more than 95% of accumulated As and almost 100% of accumulated Ag in H. siltalai and H. pellucidula are derived from ingested food rather than from water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Oriented divisions, fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Scott E.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    During development, the establishment of proper tissue architecture depends upon the coordinated control of cell divisions not only in space and time, but also direction. Execution of an oriented cell division requires establishment of an axis of polarity and alignment of the mitotic spindle along this axis. Frequently, the cleavage plane also segregates fate determinants, either unequally or equally between daughter cells, the outcome of which is either an asymmetric or symmetric division, respectively. The last few years have witnessed tremendous growth in understanding both the extrinsic and intrinsic cues that position the mitotic spindle, the varied mechanisms in which the spindle orientation machinery is controlled in diverse organisms and organ systems, and the manner in which the division axis influences the signaling pathways that direct cell fate choices. PMID:24021274

  17. Reconsidering Division Cavalry Squadrons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-25

    battalions because they were “the central core of the reconnaissance team,” other cavalry champions, like Major General Robert Wagner , countered that they...29 Starry, Mounted Combat, 221; Robert Wagner , “Division Cavalry: The Broken Saber,” Armor (September-October 1989): 39; Thomas Tait...Cavalry Squadron of 2025.” Armor (January-March 2015): 67-71. Wagner , Robert. “Division Cavalry: The Broken Saber.” Armor (September-October 1989

  18. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  19. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  20. Animal Preparations to Assess Neurophysiological Effects of Bio-Dynamic Environments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-17

    lateral hypothalmic lesions in the cat: parallels with development. J . Comp. Physiol. Psychol. (1980) in press. Whittington, D ., Pettijohn, D . and Hein...Biological Sciences Division of the Office of Naval Research ......... , D T C ,5I 90 /( l0 ELECTE , / fl~~l4-8’-C-O𔄃/.l.J" ’ SEp , 2 goSP2980D dAlan...Department of Psychology Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 J A. Hein GENERAL INTRODUCTION eridical perception of the visual world and motor performance

  1. a Comparison of Biodynamic Models of the Human HAND-ARM System for Applications to Hand-Held Power Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RAKHEJA, S.; WU, J. Z.; DONG, R. G.; SCHOPPER, A. W.; BOILEAU, P.-É.

    2002-01-01

    The biodynamic response characteristics of various mechanical models of the human hand and arm system, reported in the literature, are evaluated in terms of their driving-point mechanical impedance modulus and phase responses. The suitability of the reported models for applications in realizing a mechanical simulator and assessment of vibration behavior of hand-held power tools is examined using three different criteria. These include the ability of the model to characterize the driving-point mechanical impedance of the human hand-arm system within the range of idealized values presented in ISO-10068 (1998); the magnitude of model deflection under a static feed force; and the vibration properties of the human hand and arm evaluated in terms of natural frequencies and damping ratios. From the relative evaluations of 12 different models, it is concluded that a vast majority of these models cannot be applied for the development of a mechanical hand-arm simulator or the assessment of dynamic behavior of the coupled hand-tool system. The higher order models, with three and four degrees of freedom, in general, yield impedance characteristics within the range of idealized values, but exhibit excessive static deflections. Moreover, these models involve very light masses (in the 1·2-4·8 g range), and exhibit either one or two vibration modes at frequencies below 10 Hz. The majority of the lower order models yield reasonable magnitudes of static deflections but relatively poor agreement with idealized values of driving-point mechanical impedance.

  2. Development and validation of a biodynamic model for predicting multi-finger movements in cylinder-grasping tasks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Wook; Zhang, Xudong

    2009-03-01

    This article describes the development and validation of a model for predicting multi-finger movements in grasping activities. The model builds upon a newly proposed approach that incorporates forward dynamics and a system identification procedure, and is amenable to empirical tests. A database of multi-fingered grasping movements performed by 28 subjects was established and divided into four sets, one for model development and three for model validation. In the development phase, model parameter values were estimated by the iterative system identification procedure through a physics-based heuristic algorithm. The estimated parameter values were then statistically synthesised and integrated into the prediction model. In the validation phase, the model was applied to three novel datasets containing different grasping movements involving objects of varied sizes and different subjects. The results demonstrated the model's ability to predict hand prehensile movements with error magnitudes comparable to the inter-person variability in performing such movements. New insights into the control of multi-fingered hand prehensile movements at the systems and joint levels emerged from the model development and validation process. The current study contributes to building a foundation for long-term development of realistic biodynamic simulation of multi-finger hand movements. Such simulation capabilities will aid in design of hand-operated tools, devices or hand-intensive work for proactive ergonomics and in evaluation as well as treatment of functional impairment of the hand.

  3. High pressure assessment of bilayered electrospun vascular grafts by means of an Electroforce Biodynamic System®.

    PubMed

    Armentano, Ricardo L; Valdez Jasso, Daniela; Cymberknop, Leandro J; Montini Ballarin, Florencia; Velez, Daniela; Caracciolo, Pablo C; Abraham, Gustavo

    2015-08-01

    Tissue engineering offers the possibility of developing a biological substitute material in vitro with the inherent properties required in vivo. However, the inadequate performance in vascular replacement of small diameter vascular grafts (VG) reduces considerably the current alternatives in this field. In this study, a bilayered tubular VG was produced, where its mechanical response was tested at high pressure ranges and compared to a native femoral artery. The VG was obtained using sequential electrospinning technique, by means of two blends of Poly(L-lactic acid) and segmented poly(ester urethane). Mechanical testing was performed in a biodynamic system and the pressure-strain relationship was used to determine the elastic modulus. Elastic modulus assessed value of femoral artery at a high pressure range (33.02×106 dyn/cm(2)) was founded to be 36% the magnitude of VG modulus (91.47×106 dyn/cm(2)) at the same interval. A new circulating mock in combination with scan laser micrometry have been employed for the mechanical evaluation of bioresorbable bilayered VGs. At same pressure levels, graft elasticity showed a purely "collagenic" behavior with respect to a femoral artery response.

  4. Modeling of biodynamic responses distributed at the fingers and the palm of the human hand-arm system.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Dong, Jennie H; Wu, John Z; Rakheja, Subhash

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop analytical models for simulating driving-point biodynamic responses distributed at the fingers and palm of the hand under vibration along the forearm direction (z(h)-axis). Two different clamp-like model structures are formulated to analyze the distributed responses at the fingers-handle and palm-handle interfaces, as opposed to the single driving point invariably considered in the reported models. The parameters of the proposed four- and five degrees-of-freedom models are identified through minimization of an rms error function of the model and measured responses under different hand actions, namely, fingers pull, push only, grip only, and combined push and grip. The results show that the responses predicted from both models agree reasonably well with the measured data in terms of distributed as well total impedance magnitude and phase. The variations in the identified model parameters under different hand actions are further discussed in view of the biological system behavior. The proposed models are considered to serve as useful tools for design and assessment of vibration isolation methods, and for developing a hand-arm simulator for vibration analysis of power tools.

  5. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: biodynamic responses to mechanical shocks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    The biodynamic response of the seated human body has been investigated with 20 males exposed to upward and downward shocks at 13 fundamental frequencies (1-16 Hz) and 18 magnitudes (up to ±8.3 ms(-2)). For 1- and 2- degree-of-freedom models, the stiffness and damping coefficients were obtained by fitting seat acceleration waveforms predicted from the measured force to the measured seat acceleration waveform. Stiffness and damping coefficients were also obtained in the frequency domain with random vibration. The optimum stiffness and damping coefficients varied with the magnitude and the frequency of shocks. With both upward and downward shocks, the resonance frequency of the models decreased from 6.3 to 4 Hz as the vibration dose values of the shocks increased from 0.05 to 2.0 ms(-1.75). The stiffness and damping obtained from responses to shocks were correlated with, and similar to, the stiffness and damping obtained with random vibration. Practitioner Summary: When modelling the dynamic response of the seated human body to vertical acceleration less than 1 g, the relation between force and acceleration can be well represented by a single degree-of-freedom model although the optimum stiffness and damping depend on the magnitude and frequency of sinusoidal, random or shock motion.

  6. Website for the Space Science Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, James; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Space Science Division at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to research in astrophysics, exobiology, advanced life support technologies, and planetary science. These research programs are structured around Astrobiology (the study of life in the universe and the chemical and physical forces and adaptions that influence life's origin, evolution, and destiny), and address some of the most fundamental questions pursued by science. These questions examine the origin of life and our place in the universe. Ames is recognized as a world leader in Astrobiology. In pursuing our mission in Astrobiology, Space Science Division scientists perform pioneering basic research and technology development.

  7. Division i: Fundamental Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Dennis D.; Klioner, Sergei A.; Vondrák, Jan; Evans, Dafydd Wyn; Hohenkerk, Catherine Y.; Hosokawa, Mizuhiko; Huang, Cheng-Li; Kaplan, George H.; Knežević, Zoran; Manchester, Richard N.; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Petit, Gérard; Schuh, Harald; Soffel, Michael H.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2012-04-01

    The goal of the division is to address the scientific issues that were developed at the 2009 IAU General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro. These are:•Astronomical constants-Gaussian gravitational constant, Astronomical Unit, GMSun, geodesic precession-nutation•Astronomical software•Solar System Ephemerides-Pulsar research-Comparison of dynamical reference frames•Future Optical Reference Frame•Future Radio Reference Frame•Exoplanets-Detection-Dynamics•Predictions of Earth orientation•Units of measurements for astronomical quantities in relativistic context•Astronomical units in the relativistic framework•Time-dependent ecliptic in the GCRS•Asteroid masses•Review of space missions•Detection of gravitational waves•VLBI on the Moon•Real time electronic access to UT1-UTCIn pursuit of these goals Division I members have made significant scientific and organizational progress, and are organizing a Joint Discussion on Space-Time Reference Systems for Future Research at the 2012 IAU General Assembly. The details of Division activities and references are provided in the individual Commission and Working Group reports in this volume. A comprehensive list of references related to the work of the Division is available at the IAU Division I website at http://maia.usno.navy.mil/iaudiv1/.

  8. Division II: Sun and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David F.; Melrose, Donald B.; Benz, Arnold O.; Bogdan, Thomas J.; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Klimchuk, James A.; Martinez Pillet, Valentin

    2007-03-01

    Division II of the IAU provides a forum for astronomers studying a wide range of phenomena related to the structure, radiation and activity of the Sun, and its interaction with the Earth and the rest of the solar system. Division II encompasses three Commissions, 10, 12 and 49, and four working groups. During the last triennia the activities of the division involved some reorganization of the division and its working groups, developing new procedures for election of division and commission officers, promoting annual meetings from within the division and evaluating all the proposed meetings, evaluating the division's representatives for the IAU to international scientific organizations, and participating in general IAU business.

  9. Biodynamic response of the seated human body to single-axis and dual-axis vibration: effect of backrest and non-linearity.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi; Griffin, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The biodynamic responses to the human body give an understanding of why human responses to vibration (changes in health, comfort, and performance) vary with the frequency and direction of vibration. Studies have shown that biodynamic responses also vary with the magnitude of vibration and that the backrests of seats influence the transmission of vibration to the seated human body. There has been little study of the nonlinearity in the biodynamic responses of the body to dual-axis excitation and no study of the influence of backrests during dual-axis excitation. This study investigated the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of the human body exposed to random vibration (0.2 to 20 Hz) in all 15 possible combinations of four magnitudes (0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 ms(-2) r.m.s.) of fore-and-aft vibration and the same four magnitudes of vertical vibration. Nonlinearity was evident, with the body softening with increasing magnitude of vibration when using a fixed magnitude of vibration in one direction and varying the magnitude of vibration in the other direction. The fore-and-aft apparent mass on the seat was greater without a backrest at the lower frequencies but greater with a backrest at the higher frequencies. The vertical apparent mass on the seat was decreased by the backrest at low frequencies. Cross-axis coupling was evident, with excitation in one axis producing a response in the other axis. It is concluded that the nonlinearity of the body evident during single-axis and multi-axis vibration, and the influence of backrests, should be taken into account when determining frequency weightings for predicting human responses to vibration and when optimising the dynamics of seating to minimise exposure to vibration.

  10. Biodynamic modelling of the bioaccumulation of trace metals (Ag, As and Zn) by an infaunal estuarine invertebrate, the clam Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Kalman, J; Smith, B D; Bury, N R; Rainbow, P S

    2014-09-01

    Biodynamic modelling was used to investigate the uptake and accumulation of three trace metals (Ag, As, Zn) by the deposit feeding estuarine bivalve mollusc Scrobicularia plana. Radioactive labelling techniques were used to quantify the rates of trace metal uptake (and subsequent elimination) from water and sediment diet. The uptake rate constant from solution (±SE) was greatest for Ag (3.954±0.375 l g(-1) d(-1)) followed by As (0.807±0.129 l g(-1) d(-1)) and Zn (0.103±0.016 l g(-1) d(-1)). Assimilation efficiencies from ingested sediment were 40.2±1.3% (Ag), 31.7±1.0% (Zn) and 25.3±0.9% (As). Efflux rate constants after exposure to metals in the solution or sediment fell in the range of 0.014-0.060 d(-1). By incorporating these physiological parameters into biodynamic models, our results showed that dissolved metal is the predominant source of accumulated Ag, As and Zn in S. plana, accounting for 66-99%, 50-97% and 52-98% of total accumulation of Ag, As and Zn, respectively, under different field exposure conditions. In general, model-predicted steady state concentrations of Ag, As and Zn matched well with those observed in clams collected in SW England estuaries. Our findings highlight the potential of biodynamic modelling to predict Ag, As and Zn accumulation in S. plana, taking into account specific dissolved and sediment concentrations of the metals at a particular field site, together with local water and sediment geochemistries.

  11. Cadmium Bioaccumulation in Aquatic Oligochaetes Using a Biodynamic Model: A Review of Values of Physiological Parameters and Model Validation Using Laboratory and Field Bioaccumulation Data.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Fernández, Leire; Rodriguez, Pilar; Martínez-Madrid, Maite

    This study reviews certain physiological digestive parameters in the literature that could be used to predict tissue residues in aquatic oligochaetes using the biodynamic model. Predictions were evaluated with independently measured Cd bioaccumulation data in sediment bioassays and field oligochaetes. The parameter review focused on three species commonly used in ecotoxicity testing and bioaccumulation studies: Tubifex tubifex (Tt), Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri (Lh) and Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). Median Ingestion rates (g g(-1) d(-1), dw) at unpolluted conditions were 7.8 (Tt), 24.5 (Lh) and 11.5 (Lv), while results were lower (1.7-2.4) at polluted conditions. Assimilation efficiencies ranged from 3.4-19.6% (Tt), 2.7-16.1% (Lh), and 10.9-25.6% (Lv). The biodynamic model accurately predicted Cd tissue concentration in T. tubifex exposed to spiked sediments in laboratory bioassays. Comparisons of predicted vs. measured Cd tissue concentration in bioassays or field aquatic oligochaetes suggest that the biodynamic model can predict Cd tissue concentration within a factor of five in 81.3% of cases, across a range of measured tissue concentrations from 0.1 to 100 μg Cd g(-1) dw. Predictions can be refined by using physiological parameter values that have been measured under varying environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, dissolved oxygen). The model can underestimate tissue concentration by up to one order of magnitude when worms are exposed to highly contaminated sediments. Contrarily, predictions overestimate tissue concentration by up to two orders of magnitude when the measured Cd < 0.1 μg g(-1) dw, although in most cases these predictions do not fail bioaccumulation-based risk assessments, using a tissue threshold value of 1.5 μg Cd g(-1) dw.

  12. Are Epiphytic Microbial Communities in the Carposphere of Ripening Grape Clusters (Vitis vinifera L.) Different between Conventional, Organic, and Biodynamic Grapes?

    PubMed

    Kecskeméti, Elizabeth; Berkelmann-Löhnertz, Beate; Reineke, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Using barcoded pyrosequencing fungal and bacterial communities associated with grape berry clusters (Vitis vinifera L.) obtained from conventional, organic and biodynamic vineyard plots were investigated in two subsequent years at different stages during berry ripening. The four most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on fungal ITS data were Botrytis cinerea, Cladosporium spp., Aureobasidium pullulans and Alternaria alternata which represented 57% and 47% of the total reads in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Members of the genera Sphingomonas, Gluconobacter, Pseudomonas, Erwinia, and Massilia constituted 67% of the total number of bacterial 16S DNA reads in 2010 samples and 78% in 2011 samples. Viticultural management system had no significant effect on abundance of fungi or bacteria in both years and at all three sampling dates. Exceptions were A. alternata and Pseudomonas spp. which were more abundant in the carposphere of conventional compared to biodynamic berries, as well as Sphingomonas spp. which was significantly less abundant on conventional compared to organic berries at an early ripening stage in 2011. In general, there were no significant differences in fungal and bacterial diversity indices or richness evident between management systems. No distinct fungal or bacterial communities were associated with the different maturation stages or management systems, respectively. An exception was the last stage of berry maturation in 2011, where the Simpson diversity index was significantly higher for fungal communities on biodynamic compared to conventional grapes. Our study highlights the existence of complex and dynamic microbial communities in the grape cluster carposphere including both phytopathogenic and potentially antagonistic microorganisms that can have a significant impact on grape production. Such knowledge is particularly relevant for development, selection and application of effective control measures against economically important

  13. Are Epiphytic Microbial Communities in the Carposphere of Ripening Grape Clusters (Vitis vinifera L.) Different between Conventional, Organic, and Biodynamic Grapes?

    PubMed Central

    Kecskeméti, Elizabeth; Berkelmann-Löhnertz, Beate; Reineke, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Using barcoded pyrosequencing fungal and bacterial communities associated with grape berry clusters (Vitis vinifera L.) obtained from conventional, organic and biodynamic vineyard plots were investigated in two subsequent years at different stages during berry ripening. The four most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on fungal ITS data were Botrytis cinerea, Cladosporium spp., Aureobasidium pullulans and Alternaria alternata which represented 57% and 47% of the total reads in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Members of the genera Sphingomonas, Gluconobacter, Pseudomonas, Erwinia, and Massilia constituted 67% of the total number of bacterial 16S DNA reads in 2010 samples and 78% in 2011 samples. Viticultural management system had no significant effect on abundance of fungi or bacteria in both years and at all three sampling dates. Exceptions were A. alternata and Pseudomonas spp. which were more abundant in the carposphere of conventional compared to biodynamic berries, as well as Sphingomonas spp. which was significantly less abundant on conventional compared to organic berries at an early ripening stage in 2011. In general, there were no significant differences in fungal and bacterial diversity indices or richness evident between management systems. No distinct fungal or bacterial communities were associated with the different maturation stages or management systems, respectively. An exception was the last stage of berry maturation in 2011, where the Simpson diversity index was significantly higher for fungal communities on biodynamic compared to conventional grapes. Our study highlights the existence of complex and dynamic microbial communities in the grape cluster carposphere including both phytopathogenic and potentially antagonistic microorganisms that can have a significant impact on grape production. Such knowledge is particularly relevant for development, selection and application of effective control measures against economically important

  14. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Division Vi: Interstellar Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, Tom; Chu, You-Hua; Dyson, John; Breitschwerdt, Dieter; Burton, Mike; Cabrit, Sylvie; Caselli, Paola; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete; Ferland, Gary; Juvela, Mika; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kwok, Sun; Lizano, Susana; Rozyczka, Michal; Tóth, Viktor; Tsuboi, Masato; Yang, Ji

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of Division VI was held on Monday 10 October 2009. Apologies had been received in advance from D Breitschwerdt, P Caselli, G Ferland, M Juvela, S Lizano, M Rozyczka, V Tóth, M Tsuboi, J Yang and B-C Koo.

  16. Order Division Automated System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniemeyer, Justin M.; And Others

    This publication was prepared by the Order Division Automation Project staff to fulfill the Library of Congress' requirement to document all automation efforts. The report was originally intended for internal use only and not for distribution outside the Library. It is now felt that the library community at-large may have an interest in the…

  17. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  18. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Cell division in Corynebacterineae

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Bramkamp, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cells must coordinate a number of events during the cell cycle. Spatio-temporal regulation of bacterial cytokinesis is indispensable for the production of viable, genetically identical offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, precise midcell assembly of the division machinery relies on inhibitory systems such as Min and Noc. In rod-shaped Actinobacteria, for example Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the divisome assembles in the proximity of the midcell region, however more spatial flexibility is observed compared to Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Actinobacteria represent a group of bacteria that spatially regulate cytokinesis in the absence of recognizable Min and Noc homologs. The key cell division steps in E. coli and B. subtilis have been subject to intensive study and are well-understood. In comparison, only a minimal set of positive and negative regulators of cytokinesis are known in Actinobacteria. Nonetheless, the timing of cytokinesis and the placement of the division septum is coordinated with growth as well as initiation of chromosome replication and segregation. We summarize here the current knowledge on cytokinesis and division site selection in the Actinobacteria suborder Corynebacterineae. PMID:24782835

  20. Painless Division with Doc Spitler's Magic Division Estimator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitler, Gail

    1981-01-01

    An approach to teaching pupils the long division algorithm that relies heavily on a consistent and logical approach to estimation is reviewed. Once learned, the division estimator can be used to support the standard repeated subtraction algorithm. (MP)

  1. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division`s research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth`s crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

  2. Biodynamic modeling of PCB uptake by Macoma balthica and Corbicula fluminea from sediment amended with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Pamela B; Luoma, Samuel N; Luthy, Richard G

    2008-01-15

    Activated carbon amendment was assessed in the laboratory as a remediation strategy for freshwater sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the Grasse River (near Massena, NY). Three end points were evaluated: aqueous equilibrium PCB concentration, uptake into semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), and 28-day bioaccumulation in the clam Corbicula fluminea. PCB uptake by water, SPMDs, and clams followed similar trends, with reductions increasing as a function of carbon dose. Average percent reductions in clam tissue PCBs were 67, 86, and 95% for activated carbon doses of 0.7, 1.3, and 2.5% dry wt, respectively. A biodynamic model that incorporates sediment geochemistry and dietary and aqueous uptake routes was found to agree well with observed uptake by C. fluminea in our laboratory test systems. Results from this study were compared to 28-day bioaccumulation experiments involving PCB-contaminated sediment from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (San Francisco Bay, CA) and the clam Macoma balthica. Due to differences in feeding strategy, M. balthica deposit-feeds whereas C. fluminea filter-feeds, the relative importance of the aqueous uptake route is predicted to be much higher for C. fluminea than for M. balthica. Whereas M. balthica takes up approximately 90% of its body burden through sediment ingestion, C. fluminea only accumulates approximately 45% via this route. In both cases, results strongly suggest that it is the mass transfer of PCBs from native sediment to added carbon particles, not merely reductions in aqueous PCB concentrations, that effectively reduces PCB bioavailability and uptake by sediment-dwelling organisms.

  3. In vivo isotopic fractionation of zinc and biodynamic modeling yield insights into detoxification mechanisms in the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer.

    PubMed

    Wanty, Richard B; Balistrieri, Laurie S; Wesner, Jeff S; Walters, David M; Schmidt, Travis S; Stricker, Craig A; Kraus, Johanna M; Wolf, Ruth E

    2017-12-31

    Diversity and biomass of aquatic insects decline in metal-rich aquatic environments, but the mechanisms by which insects from such environments cope with potentially toxic metal concentrations to survive through adulthood are less well understood. In this study, we measured Zn concentrations and isotopes in laboratory-reared diatoms and mayflies (Neocloeon triangulifer) from larval through adult stages. The larvae were fed Zn-enriched diatoms, and bio-concentrated Zn by a factor of 2.5-5 relative to the diatoms but maintained the same Zn-isotopic ratio. These results reflect the importance of dietary uptake and the greater rate of uptake relative to excretion or growth. Upon metamorphosis to subimago, Zn concentrations declined by >70%, but isotopically heavy Zn remained in the subimago bodies. We surmised that the loss of isotopically light Zn during metamorphosis was due to the loss of detoxified Zn and retention of metabolically useful Zn. Through the transition from subimago to imago, Zn concentrations and isotope ratios were virtually unchanged. Because the decrease in Zn body concentration and increase in heavier Zn are seen in the subimagos relative to the larvae, the compartmentalization of Zn must be occurring within the larvae. A biodynamic model was constructed, allowing for isotopic fractionation and partitioning of Zn between metabolically essential and detoxified Zn reservoirs within larvae. The model provides a consistent set of rate and fractionation constants that successfully describe the experimental observations. Specifically, metabolically essential Zn is isotopically heavier and is tightly held once assimilated, and excess, isotopically light Zn is sequestered, detoxified, and ultimately lost during the metamorphosis of larvae to subimagos. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of in vivo isotopic fractionation in insects, offering an improved understanding of the mechanisms and rates by which the N. triangulifer larvae regulate

  4. In vivo validation of DNA adduct formation by estragole in rats predicted by physiologically based biodynamic modelling.

    PubMed

    Paini, Alicia; Punt, Ans; Scholz, Gabriele; Gremaud, Eric; Spenkelink, Bert; Alink, Gerrit; Schilter, Benoît; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2012-11-01

    Estragole is a naturally occurring food-borne genotoxic compound found in a variety of food sources, including spices and herbs. This results in human exposure to estragole via the regular diet. The objective of this study was to quantify the dose-dependent estragole-DNA adduct formation in rat liver and the urinary excretion of 1'-hydroxyestragole glucuronide in order to validate our recently developed physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model. Groups of male outbred Sprague Dawley rats (n = 10, per group) were administered estragole once by oral gavage at dose levels of 0 (vehicle control), 5, 30, 75, 150, and 300mg estragole/kg bw and sacrificed after 48h. Liver, kidney and lungs were analysed for DNA adducts by LC-MS/MS. Results obtained revealed a dose-dependent increase in DNA adduct formation in the liver. In lungs and kidneys DNA adducts were detected at lower levels than in the liver confirming the occurrence of DNA adducts preferably in the target organ, the liver. The results obtained showed that the PBBD model predictions for both urinary excretion of 1'-hydroxyestragole glucuronide and the guanosine adduct formation in the liver were comparable within less than an order of magnitude to the values actually observed in vivo. The PBBD model was refined using liver zonation to investigate whether its predictive potential could be further improved. The results obtained provide the first data set available on estragole-DNA adduct formation in rats and confirm their occurrence in metabolically active tissues, i.e. liver, lung and kidney, while the significantly higher levels found in liver are in accordance with the liver as the target organ for carcinogenicity. This opens the way towards future modelling of dose-dependent estragole liver DNA adduct formation in human.

  5. Emergency treatment strategy and the biodynamic effects of massive, "chopped off", mandibular tissue and a prolapsed tongue.

    PubMed

    Shuker, Sabri T

    2013-04-01

    Current weaponry possesses unobserved new, biodynamic wounding effects. For many victims, high velocity, large shell fragments have resulted in massive lower jaw "chopped off" hard and soft tissues injuries accompanied by tongue prolapse. The management challenges begin with lifesaving which is possibly complicated by airway compromise, severe hemorrhage, massive lower jaw loss, and a prolapsed tongue. Consequently, the goal shall be "No patient should die from massive facial tissue injuries alone". That is, if feasible, sensible, lifesaving techniques are applied at the appropriate time. Following general condition stabilization, the surgical management steps of massive lower jaw tissue loss should begin with immediate lost tissue reconstruction. Seventeen cases were selected from an unquantified number patients who had massive mandibular tissue losses in which the tongue, surprisingly, remained intact. In these cases, definitive, early scaffolding stabilization was accomplished by joining the remaining two lower jaw intact segments. The successful procedure consists of using a 2 mm horseshoe shaped Kirschner wire bridging the gap of the mandibular arch which effectively is used as a "scaffold" for rebuilding the soft tissue. Proper, initial, surgical management resulted in protecting lacerated tissue, diminishing subsequent morbidity and disfigurement, preventing a prolapsed tongue and preserving the intact tissues physiological functions. As the spectrum of injuries continues to evolve the clinical characterization of the severity of facial wounds need an expanded classification, appropriate to massive facial injuries. It is suggested it has the following descriptors: blast, penetration, perforation, avulsions and "chopping off" (BPPAC). Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 2016 T Division Lightning Talks

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann; Adams, Luke Clyde; Ferre, Gregoire Robing; Grantcharov, Vesselin; Iaroshenko, Oleksandr; Krishnapriyan, Aditi; Kurtakoti, Prajvala Kishore; Le Thien, Minh Quan; Lim, Jonathan Ng; Low, Thaddeus Song En; Lystrom, Levi Aaron; Ma, Xiaoyu; Nguyen, Hong T.; Pogue, Sabine Silvia; Orandle, Zoe Ann; Reisner, Andrew Ray; Revard, Benjamin Charles; Roy, Julien; Sandor, Csanad; Slavkova, Kalina Polet; Weichman, Kathleen Joy; Wu, Fei; Yang, Yang

    2016-11-29

    These are the slides for all of the 2016 T Division lightning talks. There are 350 pages worth of slides from different presentations, all of which cover different topics within the theoretical division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  7. Podcast: The Electronic Crimes Division

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sept 26, 2016. Chris Lukas, the Special Agent in Charge of the Electronic Crimes Division within the OIG's Office of Investigations talks about computer forensics, cybercrime in the EPA and his division's role in criminal investigations.

  8. Energy Systems Divisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applewhite, John

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the JSC Energy Systems Divisions work in propulsion. Specific work in LO2/CH4 propulsion, cryogenic propulsion, low thrust propulsion for Free Flyer, robotic and Extra Vehicular Activities, and work on the Morpheus terrestrial free flyer test bed is reviewed. The back-up slides contain a chart with comparisons of LO2/LCH4 with other propellants, and reviewing the advantages especially for spacecraft propulsion.

  9. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  10. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  11. Biorepositories | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Carefully collected and controlled high-quality human biospecimens, annotated with clinical data and properly consented for investigational use, are available through the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories listed in the charts below. Biorepositories Managed by the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories Supported by the Division of Cancer Prevention Related Biorepositories | Information about accessing biospecimens collected from DCP-supported clinical trials and projects.

  12. 41. JL photographer, summer 1978, view of chemical mixer from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. JL photographer, summer 1978, view of chemical mixer from atop chemical spray nozzels. - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  13. The Spanish Blue Division

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-18

    the German North Army Group. WORD COUNT=5933 20 ENDNOTES 1 Torres, Francisco. La Divisi6n Azul50 AFos Despu6s. Madrid: Editorial Fuerza Nueva , 1991,31...osDespu6s. Madrid: Editorial Fuerza Nueva , 1991,47. ’ Kleinfield, Gerald R. and Tambs, Lewis A. La Divisi6n espatjola de Hitler. Madrid: Editorial San Martin...1983, 25. ’ Torres, Francisco. La Divisi6n Azu150AiosDespu6s. Madrid: Editorial Fuerza Nueva , 1991,53 6 The Division was popularly known as the Blue

  14. Artificial cell division.

    PubMed

    Mange, Daniel; Stauffer, André; Petraglio, Enrico; Tempesti, Gianluca

    2004-01-01

    After a survey of the theory and some realizations of self-replicating machines, this paper presents a novel self-replicating loop endowed with universal construction and computation properties. Based on the hardware implementation of the so-called Tom Thumb algorithm, the design of this loop leads to a new kind of cellular automaton made of a processing and a control units. The self-replication of the Swiss flag serves as an artificial cell division example of the loop which, according to autopoietic evaluation criteria, corresponds to a cell showing the phenomenology of a living system.

  15. Activities of the Solid State Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, P. H.; Hinton, L. W.

    1994-08-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. This research effort was enhanced by new capabilities in atomic-scale materials characterization, new emphasis on the synthesis and processing of materials, and increased partnering with industry and universities. The theoretical effort included a broad range of analytical studies, as well as a new emphasis on numerical simulation stimulated by advances in high-performance computing and by strong interest in related division experimental programs. Superconductivity research continued to advance on a broad front from fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity to the development of new materials and processing techniques. The Neutron Scattering Program was characterized by a strong scientific user program and growing diversity represented by new initiatives in complex fluids and residual stress. The national emphasis on materials synthesis and processing was mirrored in division research programs in thin-film processing, surface modification, and crystal growth. Research on advanced processing techniques such as laser ablation, ion implantation, and plasma processing was complemented by strong programs in the characterization of materials and surfaces including ultrahigh resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic-resolution chemical analysis, synchrotron x-ray research, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  16. Analyses of biodynamic responses of seated occupants to uncorrelated fore-aft and vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandapuram, Santosh; Rakheja, Subhash; Marcotte, Pierre; Boileau, Paul-Émile

    2011-08-01

    The apparent mass and seat-to-head-transmissibility response functions of the seated human body were investigated under exposures to fore-aft ( x), vertical ( z), and combined fore-aft and vertical ( x and z) axis whole-body vibration. The coupling effects of dual-axis vibration were investigated using two different frequency response function estimators based upon the cross- and auto-spectral densities of the response and excitation signals, denoted as H1 and Hv estimators, respectively. The experiments were performed to measure the biodynamic responses to single and uncorrelated dual-axis vibration, and to study the effects of hands support, back support and vibration magnitude on the body interactions with the seatpan and the backrest, characterized in terms of apparent masses and the vibration transmitted to the head. The data were acquired with 9 subjects exposed to two different magnitudes of vibration applied along the individual x- and z-axis (0.25 and 0.4 m/s 2 rms), and along both the axis (0.28 and 0.4 m/s 2 rms along each axis) in the 0.5-20 Hz frequency range. The two methods resulted in identical single-axis responses but considerably different dual-axis responses. The dual-axis responses derived from the Hv estimator revealed notable effects of dual-axis vibration, as they comprised both the direct and cross-axis responses observed under single axis vibration. Such effect, termed as the coupling effect, was not evident in the dual-axis responses derived using the commonly used H1 estimator. The results also revealed significant effects of hands and back support conditions on the coupling effects and the measured responses. The back support constrained the upper body movements and thus showed relatively weaker coupling compared to that observed in the responses without the back support. The effect of hand support was also pronounced under the fore-aft vibration. The results suggest that a better understanding of the seated human body responses to

  17. Non-linear dual-axis biodynamic response to fore-and-aft whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawayseh, N.; Griffin, M. J.

    2005-04-01

    taken into account when considering biodynamic responses to fore-and-aft whole-body vibration.

  18. Nonlinear subjective and biodynamic responses to continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J.

    2005-11-01

    The effect of the magnitude of continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction on both subjective and biodynamic responses of human subjects has been investigated experimentally. Additionally, the relation between the subjective responses and the dynamic responses has also been studied. Twelve subjects were exposed to sinusoidal continuous vibrations at five frequencies (3.15-8.0 Hz) and at three magnitudes (0.5-2.0 m s -2 rms). They were also exposed to transient vibrations that were modulated one-and-half cycle sinusoidal waveforms at the same frequencies as the continuous vibrations and at three magnitudes corresponding to the magnitudes used for the continuous vibrations. Discomfort was measured by the method of magnitude estimation with reference stimuli having frequency components in the middle of the frequency range used in this study. The driving-point dynamic responses (the ratio between the force and the motion, i.e., acceleration and velocity, at the driving point) were also measured and divided by the responses to the reference stimuli used in the measurement of discomfort so as to allow the comparison of the dynamic responses with the discomfort responses. Both the discomfort estimates and the normalised driving-point dynamic responses were influenced by the stimuli magnitudes, especially with the continuous vibration. At 3.15 and 4.0 Hz, the discomfort estimates and the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass increased significantly with increases in vibration magnitude from 0.5-2.0 m s -2 rms. Magnitude estimates for discomfort were correlated with the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass in the frequency range investigated. For the transient vibrations, the discomfort estimates and the driving-point dynamic responses were interpreted as responses in frequency bands around the fundamental frequency of the input motion. The results indicate similar nonlinearities in discomfort and driving-point dynamic

  19. Animating the biodynamics of soil thickness using process vector analysis: A dynamic denudation approach to soil formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.L.; Domier, J.E.J.; Johnson, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper expands the dynamic denudation framework of landscape evolution by providing new process insights and details on how soil and its signature morphological feature, the biomantle, form and function in the environment. We examine soils and their biomantles from disparate parts of the world, from the tropics through midlatitudes and hyperarid through perhumid, a range that exhibits varying environments for, and of, life. We then explicate the process pathways that cause soils to thicken and thin, and to even disappear, then reform. We do this by examining thickness relationships, where soil thickness stand biomantle thickness bt are functions of upbuilding u and deepening d minus removal r processes, hence st/bt=f(u+d-r). Upbuilding has two subsets, u1, which includes all exogenous (allochthonous-outside) mineral and/or organic inputs to the soil system, and u2, which includes all endogenous (autochthonous-in situ) processes and productions, including weathering. Exogenous u1 inputs include eolian and slopewash inputs (sedimentations) of mineral and organic materials, mass wasting accumulations and the like. Endogenous u2 processes and productions include the sum of in situ bioturbations, biosynthetic productions, organic accumulations, biovoid productions, weathering and volume increases caused by their sum. Endogenous upbuildings, which dominantly occur in the biomantle, are basically biodynamic bd processes and productions, hence u2=bd. Therefore, if exogenous upbuildings u1 are minimal or zero, then biomantle thickness bt is expressed by bt=f(u2-r) or bt=f(bd-r). Drawing on these relationships, we employ a graphic-conceptual device called process vector analysis in a digital animation (see supplementary materials or cf. https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/jdomier/www/temp/ biomantle.html) that illustrates the main pathways that form both Earth's soil and its unique epidermis, the biomantle. We then discuss the main elements of the animation using still frames that

  20. Animating the biodynamics of soil thickness using process vector analysis: a dynamic denudation approach to soil formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Domier, J. E. J.; Johnson, D. N.

    2005-04-01

    This paper expands the dynamic denudation framework of landscape evolution by providing new process insights and details on how soil and its signature morphological feature, the biomantle, form and function in the environment. We examine soils and their biomantles from disparate parts of the world, from the tropics through midlatitudes and hyperarid through perhumid, a range that exhibits varying environments for, and of, life. We then explicate the process pathways that cause soils to thicken and thin, and to even disappear, then reform. We do this by examining thickness relationships, where soil thickness st and biomantle thickness bt are functions of upbuilding u and deepening d minus removal r processes, hence st/bt= f( u+ d- r). Upbuilding has two subsets, u1, which includes all exogenous (allochthonous—outside) mineral and/or organic inputs to the soil system, and u2, which includes all endogenous (autochthonous—in situ) processes and productions, including weathering. Exogenous u1 inputs include eolian and slopewash inputs (sedimentations) of mineral and organic materials, mass wasting accumulations and the like. Endogenous u2 processes and productions include the sum of in situ bioturbations, biosynthetic productions, organic accumulations, biovoid productions, weathering and volume increases caused by their sum. Endogenous upbuildings, which dominantly occur in the biomantle, are basically biodynamic bd processes and productions, hence u2=bd. Therefore, if exogenous upbuildings u1 are minimal or zero, then biomantle thickness bt is expressed by bt= f( u2- r) or bt= f(bd- r). Drawing on these relationships, we employ a graphic-conceptual device called process vector analysis in a digital animation (see supplementary materials or cf. https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/jdomier/www/temp/biomantle.html) that illustrates the main pathways that form both Earth's soil and its unique epidermis, the biomantle. We then discuss the main elements of the animation using

  1. Deconstructing Calculation Methods, Part 4: Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    In the final article of a series of four, the author deconstructs the primary national strategy's approach to written division. The approach to division is divided into five stages: (1) mental division using partition; (2) short division of TU / U; (3) "expanded" method for HTU / U; (4) short division of HTU / U; and (5) long division.…

  2. Relaxation Biodynamics: Experimental Studies and Modeling of Biogeochemical Processes in Northern Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panikov, N. S.; Pankratov, T.

    2001-12-01

    Relaxation phenomenon in physics and chemistry stands for delay between the application of an external stress to a system and its response. When an equilibrated nuclear, atomic or molecular system is subjected to an abrupt physical change (sudden rise in temperature or pressure), it takes time for the system to re-equilibrate under the new conditions. This period (relaxation time) can provide a powerful insight into mechanisms of chemical reaction. Our intention is to extend such approach to analysis of the complex biological phenomena related mainly to microbial growth and activity in the soil. We will show how this information can be used for better understanding the biogeochemical processes in northern terrestrial ecosystems such as aerobic and anaerobic decomposition of organic matter, gas (CO2 and CH4) emission to atmosphere, migration and transformation of biogenic elements, etc. The major source of experimental data is laboratory soil incubation under controlled environmental conditions with abrupt changes in one of the key parameters: temperature (including the water-to-ice phase transition), soil moisture, light (illumination of planted soil), supply of organic substrate and mineral nutrients. The state of biological component before and after abrupt changes was followed by continuous recording of gas (CO2, CH4) exchange rate and (in some special experiments), chemical analysis of the soil solution, and the characterization of soil community (microbial and plants biomass, species composition, change of life forms, etc.) The obtained dynamic data were fit to simulation models (sets of differential equations) describing the C- and energy flow through the studied microcosm systems. The comparison of predicted and observed relaxation dynamics allowed us to discard wrong assumptions on the nature of regulatory mechanisms involved in the functioning of the soil community. Finally, the conclusions derived from the lab experiments are projected to field

  3. Potentially biodynamic tetraaza macrocycles and their manganese complexes: antiandrogen, antimicrobial and PDI studies.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ashu; Phor, Anita; Singh, R V

    2005-01-01

    Fourteen to eighteen membered tetraazamacrocyclic ligands N(4)TTD(1)-N(4)TTD(4) have been synthesized by the condensation of aliphatic diamines. H(2)N-(CH(2))(y)-NH(2) (y = 2 or 3) and dicarboxylic acids, HOOC-(CH(2))(x)-COOH (x = 1 or 2) in the presence of condensing reagents dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCHC) and 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP). On reduction these macrocyclic ligands give N(4)TTD(5)-N(4)TTD(8), which form complexes with manganese(II) acetate. The new products with octahedral geometry have been characterized by elemental analyses, molecular weight determinations, magnetic moment and spectral studies viz., infrared, electronic, mass and X-ray. On the basis of the spectral studies the binding sites are proposed as the nitrogen atom of the macrocycles. The formulation of the complexes as [Mn(CH(3)COO)(2)(N(4)TTD(n))] (where n = 1 - 8) has been established on the basis of chemical composition. To assess the growth inhibiting potential of the ligands and their manganese (II) complexes biological screening have been undertaken. The testicular morphology, testicular sperm density, sperm motility, density of cauda epididymal spermatozoa and fertility in mating trials and biochemical parameters of reproductive organs with ligands and their corresponding complexes, in vivo have also been described in the this communication.

  4. Potentially Biodynamic Tetraaza Macrocycles and their Manganese Complexes: Antiandrogen, Antimicrobial and PDI Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Ashu; Phor, Anita

    2005-01-01

    Fourteen to eighteen membered tetraazamacrocyclic ligands N4TTD1–N4TTD4 have been synthesized by the condensation of aliphatic diamines. H2N–(CH2)y–NH2 (y = 2 or 3) and dicarboxylic acids, HOOC-(CH2)x–COOH (x = 1 or 2) in the presence of condensing reagents dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCHC) and 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP). On reduction these macrocyclic ligands give N4TTD5-N4TTD8, which form complexes with manganese(II) acetate. The new products with octahedral geometry have been characterized by elemental analyses, molecular weight determinations, magnetic moment and spectral studies viz., infrared, electronic, mass and X-ray. On the basis of the spectral studies the binding sites are proposed as the nitrogen atom of the macrocycles. The formulation of the complexes as [Mn(CH3COO)2(N4TTDn)] (where n = 1 - 8) has been established on the basis of chemical composition. To assess the growth inhibiting potential of the ligands and their manganese (II) complexes biological screening have been undertaken. The testicular morphology, testicular sperm density, sperm motility, density of cauda epididymal spermatozoa and fertility in mating trials and biochemical parameters of reproductive organs with ligands and their corresponding complexes, in vivo have also been described in the this communication. PMID:18365097

  5. Comparison of biogenic amine and polyphenol profiles of grape berries and wines obtained following conventional, organic and biodynamic agricultural and oenological practices.

    PubMed

    Tassoni, Annalisa; Tango, Nunzio; Ferri, Maura

    2013-08-15

    The bio-active compounds present in food and beverages have a high potential influence on the future health of humans. The levels of biogenic amines, anthocyanins, polyphenols and antioxidant activity were measured in white (Pignoletto) and red (Sangiovese) grape berries and wines from the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy) obtained following conventional, organic and biodynamic agricultural and oenological practices. No significant difference was shown among the samples coming from different agricultural and winemaking practices. Principal Component Analysis was also performed. Biogenic amine amounts were higher in red than in white berries, while in the wines an opposite trend was observed, with histamine, tyramine and putrescine being the most abundant in Pignoletto wines. Red grapes and wines were richer in anthocyanins and showed higher antioxidant activity than white ones. The total level of polyphenols was similar in red and white berries, but with different metabolite profiles depending on the grape variety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biodynamic constituents in the Mexican morning glories: purgative remedies transcending boundaries.

    PubMed

    Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio; Bah, Moustapha

    2003-01-01

    Jalap, a pre-Hispanic herbal remedy still considered a useful laxative, is an ingredient in some over-the-counter products sold by herbalists in contemporary Mexico. The purgative crude drugs are prepared from the roots of several morning glories species which all have been identified as members of the Ipomoea genus (Convolvulaceae). Their incorporation as therapeutical agents into Europe is an outstanding example of the assimilation of botanical drugs from the Americas as substitutes for traditional Old World remedies. Phytochemical investigations on the resin glycosides, main constituents of these drugs, were initiated during the second half of the XIX century; however, the structures of their active ingredients had remained poorly known, and still are for some members of these purgative root species. Modern analytical techniques with higher resolution capabilities (HPLC) for the isolation of the active principles of these crude drugs used in conjunction with powerful spectroscopic methods (high field NMR) have facilitated the investigation of these relevant, to the herbal product market, convolvulaceous species during the last decade. The advantages and limitations of theses techniques will be discussed. This review will also describe the ethnobotanical information associated with the Mexican morning glory species and how the traditional usages of these plants have played an important role in the selection of these materials for chemical studies. Little is as yet known about either the mechanism of purge action caused by the resin glycosides or the ecological significance of these same compounds for the producing plants. Over the five centuries of Mexican herbal medicine, one hundred years of phytochemistry has only partially elucidated the active ingredients of the jalap roots but has exemplified how to further contemporary drug discoveries through the investigation of those plants traditionally held to be economically and medicinally important in developing

  7. Understanding Microbial Divisions of Labor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheren; Claessen, Dennis; Rozen, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Divisions of labor are ubiquitous in nature and can be found at nearly every level of biological organization, from the individuals of a shared society to the cells of a single multicellular organism. Many different types of microbes have also evolved a division of labor among its colony members. Here we review several examples of microbial divisions of labor, including cases from both multicellular and unicellular microbes. We first discuss evolutionary arguments, derived from kin selection, that allow divisions of labor to be maintained in the face of non-cooperative cheater cells. Next we examine the widespread natural variation within species in their expression of divisions of labor and compare this to the idea of optimal caste ratios in social insects. We highlight gaps in our understanding of microbial caste ratios and argue for a shift in emphasis from understanding the maintenance of divisions of labor, generally, to instead focusing on its specific ecological benefits for microbial genotypes and colonies. Thus, in addition to the canonical divisions of labor between, e.g., reproductive and vegetative tasks, we may also anticipate divisions of labor to evolve to reduce the costly production of secondary metabolites or secreted enzymes, ideas we consider in the context of streptomycetes. The study of microbial divisions of labor offers opportunities for new experimental and molecular insights across both well-studied and novel model systems. PMID:28066387

  8. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  9. Lightning Talks 2015: Theoretical Division

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, Jack S.

    2015-11-25

    This document is a compilation of slides from a number of student presentations given to LANL Theoretical Division members. The subjects cover the range of activities of the Division, including plasma physics, environmental issues, materials research, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and computational methods.

  10. The Division of Household Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitze, Glenna D.; Huber, Joan

    A study was conducted to test the following hypotheses concerning division of household labor (DOHL) between husbands and wives: (1) the division of household labor is somewhat affected by the availability of time, especially the wife's time; (2) there are strong effects of relative power, as measured by market-related resources, marital…

  11. Division II: Sun and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, Donald B.; Martínez Pillet, Valentin; Webb, David F.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Klimchuk, James A.; Kosovichev, Alexander; von Steiger, Rudolf

    Division II of the IAU provides a forum for astronomers and astrophysicists studying a wide range of phenomena related to the structure, radiation and activity of the Sun, and its interaction with the Earth and the rest of the solar system. Division II encompasses three Commissions, 10, 12 and 49, and four Working Groups.

  12. Division III--Another Ballgame.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grites, Thomas J.; James, G. Larry

    1986-01-01

    The non-scholarship athletes of Division III represent a substantial group of advisees that are similar to, and yet different from the scholarship athlete. Division III student-athletes, their characteristics, situations, and needs are examined and specific efforts to improve their quality of student life are identified. (MLW)

  13. Streptomyces: a screening tool for bacterial cell division inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jani, Charul; Tocheva, Elitza I; McAuley, Scott; Craney, Arryn; Jensen, Grant J; Nodwell, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Cell division is essential for spore formation but not for viability in the filamentous streptomycetes bacteria. Failure to complete cell division instead blocks spore formation, a phenotype that can be visualized by the absence of gray (in Streptomyces coelicolor) and green (in Streptomyces venezuelae) spore-associated pigmentation. Despite the lack of essentiality, the streptomycetes divisome is similar to that of other prokaryotes. Therefore, the chemical inhibitors of sporulation in model streptomycetes may interfere with the cell division in rod-shaped bacteria as well. To test this, we investigated 196 compounds that inhibit sporulation in S. coelicolor. We show that 19 of these compounds cause filamentous growth in Bacillus subtilis, consistent with impaired cell division. One of the compounds is a DNA-damaging agent and inhibits cell division by activating the SOS response. The remaining 18 act independently of known stress responses and may therefore act on the divisome or on divisome positioning and stability. Three of the compounds (Fil-1, Fil-2, and Fil-3) confer distinct cell division defects on B. subtilis. They also block B. subtilis sporulation, which is mechanistically unrelated to the sporulation pathway of streptomycetes but is also dependent on the divisome. We discuss ways in which these differing phenotypes can be used in screens for cell division inhibitors.

  14. Physics Division computer facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cyborski, D.R.; Teh, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division maintains several computer systems for data analysis, general-purpose computing, and word processing. While the VMS VAX clusters are still used, this past year saw a greater shift to the Unix Cluster with the addition of more RISC-based Unix workstations. The main Divisional VAX cluster which consists of two VAX 3300s configured as a dual-host system serves as boot nodes and disk servers to seven other satellite nodes consisting of two VAXstation 3200s, three VAXstation 3100 machines, a VAX-11/750, and a MicroVAX II. There are three 6250/1600 bpi 9-track tape drives, six 8-mm tapes and about 9.1 GB of disk storage served to the cluster by the various satellites. Also, two of the satellites (the MicroVAX and VAX-11/750) have DAPHNE front-end interfaces for data acquisition. Since the tape drives are accessible cluster-wide via a software package, they are, in addition to replay, used for tape-to-tape copies. There is however, a satellite node outfitted with two 8 mm drives available for this purpose. Although not part of the main cluster, a DEC 3000 Alpha machine obtained for data acquisition is also available for data replay. In one case, users reported a performance increase by a factor of 10 when using this machine.

  15. DIVISION IN THE DINOFLAGELLATE GYRODINIUM COHNII (SCHILLER)

    PubMed Central

    Kubai, Donna F.; Ris, Hans

    1969-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are of interest because their chromosomes resemble the nucleoplasm of prokaryotes both chemically and ultrastructurally. We have studied nuclear division in the dinoflagellate Gyrodinium cohnii (Schiller), using cells obtained from cultures undergoing phasic growth. Electron micrographs of serial sections were used to prepare three-dimensional reconstructions of nuclei and chromosomes at various stages of nuclear division. During division, a complex process of invagination of the intact nuclear envelope takes place at one side of the nucleus and results in the formation of parallel cylindrical cytoplasmic channels through the nucleus. These invaginations contain bundles of microtubules, and each of the bundles comes to lie in the cytoplasm of a cylindrical channel. Nuclear constriction occurs perpendicular to these channels without displacement of the microtubules. There are no associations between chromosomes and the cytoplasmic microtubules. In dividing cells most chromosomes become V-shaped, and the apices of the V's make contact with the membrane surrounding cytoplasmic channels. It is proposed that the membrane surrounding cytoplasmic channels in the dividing nucleus may be involved in the separation of daughter chromosomes. Thus, dinoflagellates may resemble prokaryotes in the manner of genophore separation as well as in genophore chemistry and ultrastructure. PMID:5761923

  16. Chemical induction of sister-chromatid exchanges in human lymphocytes treated in G0 prior to stimulation by different mitogens and revealed 72 h later in second division cells.

    PubMed

    Deknudt, G

    1986-05-01

    Frequencies of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE) were determined in second-division metaphases of human lymphocytes, exposed for 1 h during the G0 phase to mitomycin C (MMC) alone or to cyclophosphamide (CP) in the presence of S9 mix. The cells were then cultured for 72 h in the presence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), Wistaria floribunda (WFA) or Lens culinaris (LcH-A) extracts. Large differences in mitotic indices (MI) and cell-cycle kinetics were observed among cells subjected to the various treatments. However, in the controls as well as in the cultures submitted to a G0 mutagenic exposure, the yield of SCE was not influenced by the mitogenic agent and was, therefore, independent of the proliferation properties of the cultured lymphocyte population.

  17. Time-division SQUID multiplexers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, K. D.; Vale, L. R.; Bergren, N. E.; Deiker, S.; Grossman, E. N.; Hilton, G. C.; Nam, S. W.; Reintsema, C. D.; Rudman, D. A.; Huber, M. E.

    2002-02-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of low-temperature bolometers and microcalorimeters based on superconducting transition-edge sensors with a manageable number of readout channels. We discuss the technical tradeoffs between proposed time-division multiplexer and frequency-division multiplexer schemes and motivate our choice of time division. Our first-generation SQUID multiplexer is now in use in an astronomical instrument. We describe our second-generation SQUID multiplexer, which is based on a new architecture that significantly reduces the dissipation of power at the first stage, allowing thousands of SQUIDs to be operated at the base temperature of a cryostat. .

  18. Physics division annual report 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2008-02-28

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission.

  19. Division rules for polygonal cells.

    PubMed

    Cowan, R; Morris, V B

    1988-03-07

    A number of fascinating mathematical problems concerning the division of two-dimensional space are formulated from questions about the planes of cell division in embryonic epithelia. Their solution aids in the quantitative description of cellular arrangement in epithelia. Cells, considered as polygons, site their division line according to stochastic rules, eventually forming a tessellation of the plane. The equilibrium distributions for the resulting mix of polygonal types are explored for a range of stochastic rules. We find surprising links with some classical distributions from the theory of probability.

  20. Division Iii: Planetary Systems Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meech, Karen; Valsecchi, Giovanni; Bowell, Edward L.; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Boss, Alan; Cellino, Alberto; Consolmagno, Guy; Fernandez, Julio; Irvine, William; Lazzaro, Daniela; Michel, Patrick; Noll, Keith; Schulz, Rita; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Zhu, Jin

    2012-04-01

    Division III, with 1126 members, is the third largest of the 12 IAU Divisions, focusing on subject matter related to the physical study of interplanetary dust, comets, minor planets, satellites, planets, planetary systems and astrobiology. Within the Division are very active working groups that are responsible for planetary system and small body nomenclature, as well as a newly created working group on Near Earth Objects which was established order to investigate the requirements for international ground-and/or space-based NEO surveys to characterize 90% of all NEOs with diameters >40m in order to establish a permanent international NEO Early Warning System.

  1. Biodynamic Response to Windblast.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    and of the ca reful clinical and medico -legal study of injuries due to ejection and the dynamics of their production, it will be possible to achieve...Laboratory, Wright-Patter son Air Force Base, Ohio, 1973. 17.- ROTONDO G. : "Considerazioni clinico-etatidtiche a medico -legali su alcune tipiche...34Contributo allo studio dei problemi medico -legali relativi alla lesi- vith da disastri aersi". Riv.Med.Aeron.e SDaz., 1967, 30, 251. 20.- ROTONDO

  2. An Analysis of Division Commander Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-24

    Department of the Army. Division Command Lessons Learned Program : Experiences in Division Command. Carlisle Barracks: U.S. Army Military History Institute...1985. 2. U.S. Department of the Army. Division Command Lessons Learned Program : Experiences in Division Command. Carlisle Barracks: U.S. Army...Military History Institute, 1986. 3. U.S. Department of the Army. Division Command Lessons Learned Program : Experiences in Division Command. Carlisle 4

  3. E-Division activities report

    SciTech Connect

    Barschall, H.H.

    1984-07-01

    E (Experimental Physics) Division carries out basic and applied research in atomic and nuclear physics, in materials science, and in other areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Some of the activities are cooperative efforts with other divisions of the Laboratory, and, in a few cases, with other laboratories. Many of the experiments are directly applicable to problems in weapons and energy, some have only potential applied uses, and others are in pure physics. This report presents abstracts of papers published by E (Experimental Physics) Division staff members between July 1983 and June 1984. In addition, it lists the members of the scientific staff of the division, including visitors and students, and some of the assignments of staff members on scientific committees. A brief summary of the budget is included.

  4. Division II: Sun and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David F.; Melrose, Donald B.; Benz, Arnold O.; Bogdan, Thomas J.; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Klimchuk, James A.; Martinez-Pillet, Valentin

    2007-12-01

    Division II provides a forum for astronomers studying a wide range of problems related to the structure, radiation and activity of the Sun, and its interaction with the Earth and the rest of the solar system.

  5. Division II: Sun and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, Donald B.; Martinez Pillet, Valentin; Webb, David F.; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Klimchuk, James A.; Kosovichev, Alexander; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; von Steiger, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    This report is on activities of the Division at the General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro. Summaries of scientific activities over the past triennium have been published in Transactions A, see Melrose et al. (2008), Klimchuk et al. (2008), Martinez Pillet et al. (2008) and Bougeret et al. (2008). The business meeting of the three Commissions were incorporated into the business meeting of the Division. This report is based in part on minutes of the business meeting, provided by the Secretary of the Division, Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, and it also includes reports provided by the Presidents of the Commissions (C10, C12, C49) and of the Working Groups (WGs) in the Division.

  6. Division III: Planetary Systems Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowell, Edward L. G.; Meech, Karen J.; Williams, Iwan P.; Boss, Alan; Courtin, Régis; Gustafson, Bo Å. S.; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Mayor, Michel; Spurný, Pavel; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Fernández, Julio A.; Huebner, Walter F.; Marov, Mikhail Ya.; Schulz, Rita M.; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.; Witt, Adolf N.

    2010-05-01

    The meeting was opened by Ted Bowell, president, at 11 am. The 2006 Division III meetings were reviewed by Guy Consolmagno, secretary; as the minutes of those meetings have already been published, they were assumed to be approved.

  7. Division Iii: Planetary System Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Iwan P.; Bowell, Edward L. G.; Marov, Mikhail Ya.; Consolmagno, Guy J.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Boss, Alan P.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Levasseur-Regord, Anny-Chantal; Morrison, David; Tinney, Christopher G.

    2007-12-01

    Division III gathers astronomers engaged in the study of a comprehensive range of phenomena in the solar system and its bodies, from the major planets via comets to meteorites and interplanetary dust.

  8. Harold Seifried, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Harold Seifried is a member of the American Chemical Society Biological Chemistry Division; American College of Toxicology Industrial Toxicology Subcommittee; American Industrial Hygiene Association; Society of Toxicology; International Society for the Study of Xenobiotics; Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology since 1980; American Board of Industrial Hygiene, 1986-2004; and is certified in the Microscopic Examination of Asbestos. |

  9. E-Division activities report

    SciTech Connect

    Barschall, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics and in materials science. In addition, this report describes development work on accelerators and on instrumentation for plasma diagnostics, nitrogen exchange rates in tissue, and breakdown in gases by microwave pulses.

  10. E-Division activities report

    SciTech Connect

    Barschall, H.H.

    1981-07-01

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-Division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics and in material science. In addition this report describes work on accelerators, microwaves, plasma diagnostics, determination of atmospheric oxygen and of nitrogen in tissue.

  11. Cyclic AMP, membrane transport and cell division. I. Effects of various chemicals on cyclic AMP levels and rate of transport of neucleosides, hypoxanthine and deoxyglucose in several lines of cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, J R; Plagemann, P G

    1975-04-01

    Nutrient transport rates and cyclic AMP levels have been implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation. In the present study, however, changes in intracellular cyclic AMP level in several lines of cultured cells (normal 3T3 and SV40 and polyomavirus-transformed 3T3 cells; 3T6, C6 GLIOMA, MOUSE L, and Novikoff rat hepatoma cells) by treatment with papaverine, prostaglandine E1 or isoproterenol did not correlate with the inhibition of the uridine, hypoxanthine or deoxyglucose transport rates by these chemicals. Transport inhibitions by above chemicals or Persantin or Cytochalasin B occurred in most cell lines in the absence of any measurable change in intracellular cyclic AMP concentration. Furthermore, treatment of several cell lines with 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP had no immediate effect on the transport of uridine, thymidine or deoxyglucose, although the transport capacity of the cells for uridine and thymidine, but not that for deoxyglucose, decreased progressively with time of treatment. We also observed that the uridine transport system of all cell lines derived from 3T3 cells and the hypoxanthine transport system of L cells exhibited high degrees of resistance to inhibition by the various chemicals. On the other hand, deoxyglucose transport was inhibited to about the same extent by these chemicals in all the cell lines investigated.

  12. Chemical sciences, annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of eleven research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a DOE National Laboratory. In FY 1993, the Division made considerable progress on developing two end-stations and a beamline to advance combustion dynamics at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). In support of DOE`s national role in combustion research and chemical science, the beamline effort will enable researchers from around the world to make fundamental advances in understanding the structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates and transients, and in understanding the dynamics of elementary chemical reactions. The Division has continued to place a strong emphasis on full compliance with environmental health and safety guidelines and regulations and has made progress in technology transfer to industry. Finally, the Division has begun a new program in advanced battery research and development that should help strengthen industrial competitiveness both at home and abroad.

  13. "Structure and dynamics in complex chemical systems: Gaining new insights through recent advances in time-resolved spectroscopies.” ACS Division of Physical Chemistry Symposium presented at the Fall National ACS Meeting in Boston, MA, August 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Daniel

    2016-09-26

    8-Session Symposium on STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS IN COMPLEX CHEMICAL SYSTEMS: GAINING NEW INSIGHTS THROUGH RECENT ADVANCES IN TIME-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPIES. The intricacy of most chemical, biochemical, and material processes and their applications are underscored by the complex nature of the environments in which they occur. Substantial challenges for building a global understanding of a heterogeneous system include (1) identifying unique signatures associated with specific structural motifs within the heterogeneous distribution, and (2) resolving the significance of each of multiple time scales involved in both small- and large-scale nuclear reorganization. This symposium focuses on the progress in our understanding of dynamics in complex systems driven by recent innovations in time-resolved spectroscopies and theoretical developments. Such advancement is critical for driving discovery at the molecular level facilitating new applications. Broad areas of interest include: Structural relaxation and the impact of structure on dynamics in liquids, interfaces, biochemical systems, materials, and other heterogeneous environments.

  14. Beyond Cookies: Understanding Various Division Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jong, Cindy; Magruder, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Having a deeper understanding of division derived from multiple models is of great importance for teachers and students. For example, students will benefit from a greater understanding of division contexts as they study long division, fractions, and division of fractions. The purpose of this article is to build on teachers' and students'…

  15. Beyond Cookies: Understanding Various Division Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jong, Cindy; Magruder, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Having a deeper understanding of division derived from multiple models is of great importance for teachers and students. For example, students will benefit from a greater understanding of division contexts as they study long division, fractions, and division of fractions. The purpose of this article is to build on teachers' and students'…

  16. EDC RESEARCH AT EPA ATLANTIC ECOLOGY DIVISION: DO ENVIRONMENTAL EDCS IMPACT FISH POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlantic Ecology Division, Office of Research and Development, EP A is a marine laboratory situated on Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Researchers at AED are investigating the effects endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the aquatic environment might have on reproductive ...

  17. 35. JL photographer, summer 1978, general view of chemical mixer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. JL photographer, summer 1978, general view of chemical mixer Baldwin Filtration plant - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  18. Schizosaccharomyces pombe and its Ni(II)-insensitive mutant GA1 in Ni(II) uptake from aqueous solutions: a biodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Sayar, Nihat Alpagu; Durmaz-Sam, Selcen; Kazan, Dilek; Sayar, Ahmet Alp

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, Ni(II) uptake from aqueous solution by living cells of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe haploid 972 with h (-) mating type and a Ni(II)-insensitive mutant GA1 derived from 972 was investigated at various initial glucose and Ni(II) concentrations. A biodynamic model was developed to predict the unsteady and steady-state phases of the uptake process. Gompertz growth and uptake process parameters were optimized to predict the maximum growth rate μ m and the process metric C r, the remaining Ni(II) content in the aqueous solution. The simulated overall metal uptake values were found to be in acceptable agreement with experimental results. The model validation was done through regression statistics and uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. To gain insight into the phenomenon of Ni(II) uptake by wild-type and mutant S. pombe, probable active and passive metal transport mechanisms in yeast cells were discussed in view of the simulation results. The present work revealed the potential of mutant GA1 to remove Ni(II) cations from aqueous media. The results obtained provided new insights for understanding the combined effect of biosorption and bioaccumulation processes for metal removal and offered a possibility for the use of growing mutant S. pombe cell in bioremediation.

  19. Predictive value of ex vivo biodynamic imaging in determining response to chemotherapy in dogs with spontaneous non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Custead, M R; An, R; Turek, J J; Moore, G E; Nolte, D D; Childress, M O

    2015-01-01

    Biodynamic imaging (BDI) is a novel phenotypic cancer profiling technology which optically characterizes changes in subcellular motion within living tumor tissue samples in response to ex vivo treatment with cancer chemotherapy drugs. The purpose of this preliminary study was to assess the ability of ex vivo BDI to predict in vivo clinical response to chemotherapy in ten dogs with naturally-occurring non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Pre-treatment tumor biopsy samples were obtained from all dogs and treated ex vivo with doxorubicin (10 μM). BDI measured six dynamic biomarkers of subcellular motion from all biopsy samples at baseline and at regular intervals for 9 h following drug application. All dogs subsequently received doxorubicin to treat their lymphomas. Best overall response to and progression-free survival time following chemotherapy were recorded for all dogs. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine accuracy and identify possible cut-off values for the BDI-measured biomarkers which could accurately predict those dogs' cancers that would and would not respond to doxorubicin chemotherapy. One biomarker (designated 'MEM') showed 100% discriminative capability for predicting clinical response to doxorubicin (area under the ROC curve = 1.00, 95% CI 0.692-1.000), while other biomarkers also showed promising predictive capability. These preliminary findings suggest that ex vivo BDI can accurately predict treatment outcome following doxorubicin chemotherapy in a spontaneous animal cancer model, and is worthy of further investigation as a technology for personalized cancer medicine.

  20. Predictive value of ex vivo biodynamic imaging in determining response to chemotherapy in dogs with spontaneous non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Custead, M R; An, R; Turek, J J; Moore, G E

    2016-01-01

    Biodynamic imaging (BDI) is a novel phenotypic cancer profiling technology which optically characterizes changes in subcellular motion within living tumor tissue samples in response to ex vivo treatment with cancer chemotherapy drugs. The purpose of this preliminary study was to assess the ability of ex vivo BDI to predict in vivo clinical response to chemotherapy in ten dogs with naturally-occurring non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Pre-treatment tumor biopsy samples were obtained from all dogs and treated ex vivo with doxorubicin (10 μM). BDI measured six dynamic biomarkers of subcellular motion from all biopsy samples at baseline and at regular intervals for 9 h following drug application. All dogs subsequently received doxorubicin to treat their lymphomas. Best overall response to and progression-free survival time following chemotherapy were recorded for all dogs. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine accuracy and identify possible cut-off values for the BDI-measured biomarkers which could accurately predict those dogs’ cancers that would and would not respond to doxorubicin chemotherapy. One biomarker (designated ‘MEM’) showed 100% discriminative capability for predicting clinical response to doxorubicin (area under the ROC curve = 1.00, 95% CI 0.692–1.000), while other biomarkers also showed promising predictive capability. These preliminary findings suggest that ex vivo BDI can accurately predict treatment outcome following doxorubicin chemotherapy in a spontaneous animal cancer model, and is worthy of further investigation as a technology for personalized cancer medicine. PMID:27280042

  1. The biodynamics of arboreal locomotion: the effects of substrate diameter on locomotor kinetics in the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica).

    PubMed

    Lammers, Andrew R; Biknevicius, Audrone R

    2004-11-01

    Effects of substrate diameter on locomotor biodynamics were studied in the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica). Two horizontal substrates were used: a flat 'terrestrial' trackway with a force platform integrated into the surface and a cylindrical 'arboreal' trackway (20.3 mm diameter) with a force-transducer instrumented region. On both terrestrial and arboreal substrates, fore limbs exhibited higher vertical impulse and peak vertical force than hind limbs. Although vertical limb impulses were lower on the terrestrial substrate than on the arboreal support, this was probably due to speed effects because the opossums refused to move as quickly on the arboreal trackway. Vertical impulse decreased significantly faster with speed on the arboreal substrate because most of these trials were relatively slow, and stance duration decreased with speed more rapidly at these lower speeds. While braking and propulsive roles were more segregated between limbs on the terrestrial trackway, fore limbs were dominant both in braking and in propulsion on the arboreal trackway. Both fore and hind limbs exerted equivalently strong, medially directed limb forces on the arboreal trackway and laterally directed limb forces on the terrestrial trackway. We propose that the modifications in substrate reaction force on the arboreal trackway are due to the differential placement of the limbs about the dorsolateral aspect of the branch. Specifically, the pes typically made contact with the branch lower and more laterally than the manus, which may explain the significantly lower required coefficient of friction in the fore limbs relative to the hind limbs.

  2. Biodynamic simulations of the effect of a neck-mounted air bag on the head/neck response during high G acceleration.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Freivalds, A; Lee, S Y

    1991-08-01

    New helmet-mounted devices (such as night-vision goggles, laser eye protection, etc.) have created new safety hazards for pilots during ejection or high G maneuvering. In order to prevent the resulting head/neck injuries, this study extends the air-bag protection system developed for ground vehicles to a neck mounted system for aircrew personnel. Results, carried out by computer biodynamic simulations using the Articulated Total Body Model (ATB), showed that: 1) helmet weight had little effect on head/neck torque, contact force and flexion angle; 2) initial head/neck position and center of gravity offsets of the helmet-mounted devices had significant effects on head-neck torques, contact forces, and neck flexion angles; and 3) the neck mounted air bag significantly reduced neck torques, contact forces, and neck flexion angles. We conclude that the neck-mounted air bag system could significantly reduce the severity of head/neck injuries to pilots during ejection or high G maneuvering.

  3. Building an Academic Colorectal Division

    PubMed Central

    Koltun, Walter A.

    2014-01-01

    Colon and rectal surgery is fully justified as a valid subspecialty within academic university health centers, but such formal recognition at the organizational level is not the norm. Creating a colon and rectal division within a greater department of surgery requires an unfailing commitment to academic concepts while promulgating the improvements that come in patient care, research, and teaching from a specialty service perspective. The creation of divisional identity then opens the door for a strategic process that will grow the division even more as well as provide benefits to the institution within which it resides. The fundamentals of core values, academic commitment, and shared success reinforced by receptive leadership are critical. Attention to culture, commitment, collaboration, control, cost, and compensation leads to a successful academic division of colon and rectal surgery. PMID:25067922

  4. Ultrafast charge division imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan; Woo, Brian; Odom, Robert W.

    2000-11-01

    We have developed position computing electronics having less than 60 ns dead times for resistive anode encoders, a form of charge division imaging detector. These electronics are at least a factor of 5 faster than anything available commercially and are based on using a fast, self-resetting charge integrator and subrange digital division techniques. Our primary application for this detector is secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)/ions imaging and we demonstrate that SIMS imaging applications using these ultrafast electronics can readily be performed at ion intensities above 106 cps. This article discusses the overall electronics design and presents experimental data on dead-time measurements, detector lateral resolution, and SIMS imaging.

  5. Environmental Transport Division: 1979 report

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Schubert, J.F.; Bowman, W.W.; Adams, S.E.

    1980-03-01

    During 1979, the Environmental Transport Division (ETD) of the Savannah River Laboratory conducted atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic, and marine studies, which are described in a series of articles. Separate abstracts were prepared for each. Publications written about the 1979 research are listed at the end of the report.

  6. Preschool Children's Informal Division Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blevins-Knabe, Belinda

    The purpose of this study was to examine the division procedures of preschool children to determine whether such procedures involved one-to-one correspondence. Large and small numerosity trials were included so that the amount of effort and ease of using other procedures would vary. Odd and even number trials were included to determine whether…

  7. The Trouble with Long Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    The fourth graders were ready to learn long division; however, their teachers were hesitant to begin the unit--just as they are every year. In a grade-level meeting with the school's math consultant, the teachers voiced their typical concerns. The math consultant was a university mathematics education professor spending a semester of sabbatical…

  8. Manpower Division Looks at CETA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Journal, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The Manpower Division at the American Vocational Association (AVA) convention in Houston was concerned about youth unemployment and about the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA)--its problems and possibilities. The panel discussion reported here reveals some differing perspectives and a general consensus--that to improve their role in…

  9. Divisions of geologic time (Bookmark)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2012-05-03

    DescriptionThis bookmark, designed for use with U.S. Geological Survey activities at the second USA Science and Engineering Festival (April 26–29, 2012), is adapted from the more detailed Fact Sheet 2010–3059 "Divisions of Geologic Time." The information that it presents is widely sought by educators and students.

  10. Understanding Partitive Division of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Jack M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Concrete experience should be a first step in the development of new abstract concepts and their symbolization. Presents concrete activities based on Hyde and Nelson's work with egg cartons and Steiner's work with money to develop students' understanding of partitive division when using fractions. (MDH)

  11. newsletter | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Psychological Sciences Division: 1985 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Naval Research, Washington, DC. Psychological Sciences Div.

    This booklet describes research carried out under sponsorship of the Psychological Sciences Division of the U.S. Office of Naval Research during Fiscal Year 1985. The booklet is divided into three programmatic research areas: (1) Engineering Psychology; (2) Personnel and Training; and (3) Group Psychology. Each program is described by an overview…

  13. Home | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Our Research The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into cancer. |

  14. Understanding Partitive Division of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Jack M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Concrete experience should be a first step in the development of new abstract concepts and their symbolization. Presents concrete activities based on Hyde and Nelson's work with egg cartons and Steiner's work with money to develop students' understanding of partitive division when using fractions. (MDH)

  15. 75 FR 70031 - Antitrust Division

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Open... National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Open Axis... Consulting Corp., Miami Beach, FL; Mobiata, Ann Arbor, MI; AOl Marketing, Minneapolis, MN; eNett...

  16. Division G Commission 35: Stellar Constitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limongi, Marco; Lattanzio, John C.; Charbonnel, Corinne; Dominguez, Inma; Isern, Jordi; Karakas, Amanda; Leitherer, Claus; Marconi, Marcella; Shaviv, Giora; van Loon, Jacco

    2016-04-01

    Commission 35 (C35), ``Stellar Constitution'', consists of members of the International Astronomical Union whose research spans many aspects of theoretical and observational stellar physics and it is mainly focused on the comprehension of the properties of stars, stellar populations and galaxies. The number of members of C35 increased progressively over the last ten years and currently C35 comprises about 400 members. C35 was part of Division IV (Stars) until 2014 and then became part of Division G (Stars and Stellar Physics), after the main IAU reorganisation in 2015. Four Working Groups have been created over the years under Division IV, initially, and Division G later: WG on Active B Stars, WG on Massive Stars, WG on Abundances in Red Giant and WG on Chemically Peculiar and Related Stars. In the last decade the Commission had 4 presidents, Wojciech Dziembowski (2003-2006), Francesca D'Antona (2006-2009), Corinne Charbonnel (2009-2012) and Marco Limongi (2012-2015), who were assisted by an Organizing Committee (OC), usually composed of about 10 members, all of them elected by the C35 members and holding their positions for three years. The C35 webpage (http://iau-c35.stsci.edu) has been designed and continuously maintained by Claus Leitherer from the Space Telescope Institute, who deserves our special thanks. In addition to the various general information on the Commission structure and activities, it contains links to various resources, of interest for the members, such as stellar models, evolutionary tracks and isochrones, synthetic stellar populations, stellar yields and input physics (equation of state, nuclear cross sections, opacity tables), provided by various groups. The main activity of the C35 OC is that of evaluating, ranking and eventually supporting the proposals for IAU sponsored meetings. In the last decade the Commission has supported several meetings focused on topics more or less relevant to C35. Since the primary aim of this document is to

  17. Cell division, differentiation and dynamic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    1994-08-01

    A novel mechanism for cell differentiation is proposed, based on the dynamic clustering in a globally coupled nonlinear system. A simple model with metabolic reaction, active transport of chemicals from media, and cell division is found to show three successive stages with the growth of the number of cells; coherent growth, dynamic clustering, and fixed cell differentiation. At the last stage, disparity in activities, germ line segregation, somatic cell differentiation, and homeochaotic stability against external perturbation are found. Our results, providing a simple interpretation of the experiments of the preceding paper, imply that cell differentiation can occur without a spatial pattern. From dynamical systems viewpoint, the new concept of “open chaos” is proposed, as a novel and general scenario for systems with growing numbers of elements, also seen in economics and sociology.

  18. Physics division annual report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K., ed.

    2001-10-04

    This report summarizes the research performed in 2000 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory and medium energy physics research, and accelerator research and development. As the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee and the nuclear science community create a new long range plan for the field in 2001, it is clear that the research of the Division is closely aligned with and continues to help define the national goals of our field. The NSAC 2001 Long Range Plan recommends as the highest priority for major new construction the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), a bold step forward for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The accelerator R&D in the Physics Division has made major contributions to almost all aspects of the RIA design concept and the community was convinced that this project is ready to move forward. 2000 saw the end of the first Gammasphere epoch at ATLAS, One hundred Gammasphere experiments were completed between January 1998 and March 2000, 60% of which used the Fragment Mass Analyzer to provide mass identification in the reaction. The experimental program at ATLAS then shifted to other important research avenues including proton radioactivity, mass measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap and measurements of high energy gamma-rays in nuclear reactions with the MSU/ORNL/Texas A&M BaF{sub 2} array. ATLAS provided 5460 beam-research hours for user experiments and maintained an operational reliability of 95%. Radioactive beams accounted for 7% of the beam time. ATLAS also provided a crucial test of a key RIA concept, the ability to accelerate multiple charge states in a superconducting heavy-ion linac. This new capability was immediately used to increase the performance for a scheduled experiment. The medium energy program continued to make strides in examining how the quark-gluon structure of matter

  19. 76 FR 4724 - Emerson Transportation Division, a Division of Emerson Electric, Including Workers Located...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ..., Including Workers Located Throughout the United States; Bridgeton, MO; Amended Certification Regarding... Emerson Transportation Division, a division of Emerson Electric, including workers located throughout...

  20. A physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model for estragole DNA binding in rat liver based on in vitro kinetic data and estragole DNA adduct formation in primary hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paini, Alicia; Punt, Ans; Viton, Florian; Scholz, Gabriele; Delatour, Thierry; Marin-Kuan, Maricel; Schilter, Benoit; Bladeren, Peter J. van; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2010-05-15

    Estragole has been shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in rodent species at high-dose levels. Translation of these results into the likelihood of formation of DNA adducts, mutation, and ultimately cancer upon more realistic low-dose exposures remains a challenge. Recently we have developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) models for rat and human predicting bioactivation of estragole. These PBBK models, however, predict only kinetic characteristics. The present study describes the extension of the PBBK model to a so-called physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model predicting in vivo DNA adduct formation of estragole in rat liver. This PBBD model was developed using in vitro data on DNA adduct formation in rat primary hepatocytes exposed to 1'-hydroxyestragole. The model was extended by linking the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole formation predicted by the PBBK model to the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole in the in vitro experiments. The outcome of the PBBD model revealed a linear increase in DNA adduct formation with increasing estragole doses up to 100 mg/kg bw. Although DNA adduct formation of genotoxic carcinogens is generally seen as a biomarker of exposure rather than a biomarker of response, the PBBD model now developed is one step closer to the ultimate toxic effect of estragole than the PBBK model described previously. Comparison of the PBBD model outcome to available data showed that the model adequately predicts the dose-dependent level of DNA adduct formation. The PBBD model predicts DNA adduct formation at low levels of exposure up to a dose level showing to cause cancer in rodent bioassays, providing a proof of principle for modeling a toxicodynamic in vivo endpoint on the basis of solely in vitro experimental data.

  1. A physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model for estragole DNA binding in rat liver based on in vitro kinetic data and estragole DNA adduct formation in primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Paini, Alicia; Punt, Ans; Viton, Florian; Scholz, Gabriele; Delatour, Thierry; Marin-Kuan, Maricel; Schilter, Benoît; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2010-05-15

    Estragole has been shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in rodent species at high-dose levels. Translation of these results into the likelihood of formation of DNA adducts, mutation, and ultimately cancer upon more realistic low-dose exposures remains a challenge. Recently we have developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) models for rat and human predicting bioactivation of estragole. These PBBK models, however, predict only kinetic characteristics. The present study describes the extension of the PBBK model to a so-called physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model predicting in vivo DNA adduct formation of estragole in rat liver. This PBBD model was developed using in vitro data on DNA adduct formation in rat primary hepatocytes exposed to 1'-hydroxyestragole. The model was extended by linking the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole formation predicted by the PBBK model to the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole in the in vitro experiments. The outcome of the PBBD model revealed a linear increase in DNA adduct formation with increasing estragole doses up to 100 mg/kg bw. Although DNA adduct formation of genotoxic carcinogens is generally seen as a biomarker of exposure rather than a biomarker of response, the PBBD model now developed is one step closer to the ultimate toxic effect of estragole than the PBBK model described previously. Comparison of the PBBD model outcome to available data showed that the model adequately predicts the dose-dependent level of DNA adduct formation. The PBBD model predicts DNA adduct formation at low levels of exposure up to a dose level showing to cause cancer in rodent bioassays, providing a proof of principle for modeling a toxicodynamic in vivo endpoint on the basis of solely in vitro experimental data.

  2. Health, Safety, and Environment Division

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, C

    1992-01-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting these responsibilities requires expertise in many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The results of these programs help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental science.

  3. Electronics Division research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacRoberts, M. D. J.; Courtney, E. J.

    1984-03-01

    The status of the research development activities in the Electronics Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. Much of the work described is sponsored by the Laboratory; however, other topics are included for completeness. The Fuels Cells for Transportation Applications and the majority of the electrochemistry research are reported separately in LA-9787-PR. The Thermionic Integrated Circuits are being reported separately. The following topics are continuations of articles reported in Electronics Division Research and Development, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982 (LA-9726-PR): Photoconductive Circuit Elements, Photoconductive Materials for Far-Infrared Detector Applications, Saturable Ferromagnetic Elements, Repetitive Opening Switches, Capacitor Test Facility, Fast Gating of Microchannel-Plate Image Intensifiers, and Oxygen-Reduction Reaction - Electrode Kinetics and Electrocatalysis. The following topics are new work or were included for completeness: Photoconductive Power Switches, Ion Beam Analysis, Link Access Control and Encryption System, Coded Aperture Imaging of Gamma-Ray Sources, and Multilayer Printed Wiring Boards.

  4. Water Resources Division training catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotchkiss, W.R.; Foxhoven, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The National Training Center provides technical and management sessions nesessary for the conductance of the U.S. Geological Survey 's training programs. This catalog describes the facilities and staff at the Lakewood Training Center and describes Water Resources Division training courses available through the center. In addition, the catalog describes the procedures for gaining admission, formulas for calculating fees, and discussion of course evaluations. (USGS)

  5. Jo Ann Rinaudo, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Jo Ann Rinaudo is a Program Director in the Cancer Biomarkers Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute. She received a doctoral degree from the University of Toronto, where she studied chemical carcinogenesis in the liver. She was in the pathology department and has a broad background in human disease. Post-graduate training included further studies on the cell cycle during liver regeneration and cancer. |

  6. Unemployment and Household Division of Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamir, Boas

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the relationship between unemployment of men and women and the division of labor in their households and how the psychological well-being of unemployed individuals related to the division of labor in their families. Changes in the employment status of men and women had only limited effects on household division of labor. (Author/ABL)

  7. 7 CFR 29.16 - Division.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Division. 29.16 Section 29.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.16 Division. Tobacco Division, Agricultural Marketing Service,...

  8. IFLA Advisory Group on Division 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloss, Marjorie E.; Hegedus, Peter; Law, Derek; Nilsen, Sissel; Raseroka, Kay; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Wu, Jianzhong

    Following the 1999 IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) Conference, the Executive Board established an Advisory group to examine issues that were raised concerning Division 8, specifically the recommendation to mainstream Section 8 activities with the other seven divisions, thus dissolving this division. This…

  9. [The Library of Congress Manuscript Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchelmore, Elizabeth

    The first of this set of two papers discusses the administration and activities of the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress. The function of the Division is to safeguard, help acquire, classify and catalog, and make useful the collections of manuscripts in its possessions. To accomplish this the Division maintains a reading room and…

  10. Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, J.S.; Tilson, P.A.

    1980-10-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing.

  11. 7 CFR 11.8 - Division hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the Division. (ii) An appellant or an agency, acting through any appropriate official, may request the... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Division hearings. 11.8 Section 11.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION National Appeals Divison Rules of...

  12. 7 CFR 11.8 - Division hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the Division. (ii) An appellant or an agency, acting through any appropriate official, may request the... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Division hearings. 11.8 Section 11.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION National Appeals Divison Rules of...

  13. 7 CFR 11.8 - Division hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the Division. (ii) An appellant or an agency, acting through any appropriate official, may request the... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Division hearings. 11.8 Section 11.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION National Appeals Divison Rules of...

  14. 7 CFR 11.8 - Division hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Division. (ii) An appellant or an agency, acting through any appropriate official, may request the... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Division hearings. 11.8 Section 11.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION National Appeals Divison Rules of...

  15. 7 CFR 11.8 - Division hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the Division. (ii) An appellant or an agency, acting through any appropriate official, may request the... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Division hearings. 11.8 Section 11.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION National Appeals Divison Rules of...

  16. 75 FR 60444 - Certain New Chemicals; Receipt and Status Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... technical information contact: Bernice Mudd, Information Management Division 7407M, Office of Chemical Safety Pollution Prevention, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington,...

  17. 75 FR 16843 - Core Manufacturing, Multi-Plastics, Inc., Division, Sipco, Inc., Division, Including Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Core Manufacturing, Multi-Plastics, Inc., Division, Sipco, Inc..., 2009, applicable to workers of Core Manufacturing, Multi-Plastics, Inc., Division and Sipco, Inc... of Core Manufacturing, Multi-Plastics, Inc., Division and Sipco, Inc., Division, including...

  18. 49 CFR 177.841 - Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials. 177.841... PUBLIC HIGHWAY Loading and Unloading § 177.841 Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials. (See also § 177... by other appropriate method, and the marking removed. (b) (c) Division 2.3 (poisonous gas) or...

  19. 1. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southwest, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southwest, showing front (east) facade and north side, 213 Division Street is visible at left and 217 Division Street appears at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  20. A division's worth of data.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Christopher; Shearer, Marianne; Gardner, Karina; Kelly, Jill

    2011-03-01

    Throughout the international community there is an increasing focus on the benefits of collecting, pooling and analysing patient data. General practice provides a great opportunity to create a comprehensive database of the Australian population as 90% of Australians visit their general practitioner each year and general practices are increasingly computerised. This article discusses the facilitatory role divisions of general practice can play in harnessing quality data from general practice and the benefits that may follow. It describes experience from 3 years of data pooling by the Melbourne East General Practice Network in Victoria and makes recommendations for other organisations interested in data collection.

  1. PREPRINTS, DIVISION OF PETROLEUM CHEMISTRY, AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY. (R824729)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. Division of Chemical Education: Examinations Committee--ACS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Briefly describes eleven standardized exams, covering both college and secondary levels, that have been released by the Examinations Committee of the American Chemistry Society. Also announces new graduate level placement exams in analytical, organic, and physical chemistry. (MLH)

  3. NEN Division Funding Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, Ernst I.; Goettee, Jeffrey D.; Desimone, David J.; Lakis, Rollin E.; Miko, David K.

    2012-09-05

    The work in NEN Division revolves around proliferation detection. The sponsor funding model seems to have shifted over the last decades. For the past three lustra, sponsors are mainly interested in funding ideas and detection systems that are already at a technical readiness level 6 (TRL 6 -- one step below an industrial prototype) or higher. Once this level is reached, the sponsoring agency is willing to fund the commercialization, implementation, and training for the systems (TRL 8, 9). These sponsors are looking for a fast turnaround (1-2 years) technology development efforts to implement technology. To support the critical national and international needs for nonprolifertion solutions, we have to maintain a fluent stream of subject matter expertise from the fundamental principals of radiation detection through prototype development all the way to the implementation and training of others. NEN Division has large funding gaps in the Valley of Death region. In the current competitive climate for nuclear nonproliferation projects, it is imminent to increase our lead in this field.

  4. Structures Division 1994 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center Structures Division is an international leader and pioneer in developing new structural analysis, life prediction, and failure analysis related to rotating machinery and more specifically to hot section components in air-breathing aircraft engines and spacecraft propulsion systems. The research consists of both deterministic and probabilistic methodology. Studies include, but are not limited to, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue as well as material creep. Studies of structural failure are at both the micro- and macrolevels. Nondestructive evaluation methods related to structural reliability are developed, applied, and evaluated. Materials from which structural components are made, studied, and tested are monolithics and metal-matrix, polymer-matrix, and ceramic-matrix composites. Aeroelastic models are developed and used to determine the cyclic loading and life of fan and turbine blades. Life models are developed and tested for bearings, seals, and other mechanical components, such as magnetic suspensions. Results of these studies are published in NASA technical papers and reference publication as well as in technical society journal articles. The results of the work of the Structures Division and the bibliography of its publications for calendar year 1994 are presented.

  5. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

  6. Chloroplast division checkpoint in eukaryotic algae

    PubMed Central

    Sumiya, Nobuko; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Era, Atsuko; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts evolved from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont. It is believed that the synchronization of endosymbiotic and host cell division, as is commonly seen in existing algae, was a critical step in establishing the permanent organelle. Algal cells typically contain one or only a small number of chloroplasts that divide once per host cell cycle. This division is based partly on the S-phase–specific expression of nucleus-encoded proteins that constitute the chloroplast-division machinery. In this study, using the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, we show that cell-cycle progression is arrested at the prophase when chloroplast division is blocked before the formation of the chloroplast-division machinery by the overexpression of Filamenting temperature-sensitive (Fts) Z2-1 (Fts72-1), but the cell cycle progresses when chloroplast division is blocked during division-site constriction by the overexpression of either FtsZ2-1 or a dominant-negative form of dynamin-related protein 5B (DRP5B). In the cells arrested in the prophase, the increase in the cyclin B level and the migration of cyclin-dependent kinase B (CDKB) were blocked. These results suggest that chloroplast division restricts host cell-cycle progression so that the cell cycle progresses to the metaphase only when chloroplast division has commenced. Thus, chloroplast division and host cell-cycle progression are synchronized by an interactive restriction that takes place between the nucleus and the chloroplast. In addition, we observed a similar pattern of cell-cycle arrest upon the blockage of chloroplast division in the glaucophyte alga Cyanophora paradoxa, raising the possibility that the chloroplast division checkpoint contributed to the establishment of the permanent organelle. PMID:27837024

  7. Divisions Panel Discussion: Astronomy for Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Kevin; Hemenway, Mary Kay; Wolter, Anna; Haghighipour, Nader; Yan, Yihua; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Silva, David; Guinan, Edward

    2016-10-01

    The main purpose of this panel discussion was to encourage conversation around potential collaborations between the IAU Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) and IAU Divisions. The discussion was facilitated by the OAD and the conversation revolved mainly around two questions: (i) What should the OAD be doing to enhance the work of the Divisions? (ii) What could the Divisions (both members and respective scientific discipline in general) contribute towards the implementation of the IAU strategic plan?

  8. Major Programs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations, research networks, investigator-initiated grants, postdoctoral training, and specialized resources across the United States. |

  9. Imaging Asymmetric T Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Charnley, Mirren; Russell, Sarah M

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) controls cell fate decisions in model organisms such as Drosophila and C. elegans and has recently emerged as a mediator of T cell fate and hematopoiesis. The most appropriate methods for assessing ACD in T cells are still evolving. Here we describe the methods currently applied to monitor and measure ACD of developing and activated T cells. We provide an overview of approaches for capturing cells in the process of cytokinesis in vivo, ex vivo, or during in vitro culture. We provide methods for in vitro fixed immunofluorescent staining and for time-lapse analysis. We provide an overview of the different approaches for quantification of ACD of lymphocytes, discuss the pitfalls and concerns in interpretation of these analyses, and provide detailed methods for the quantification of ACD in our group.

  10. Physics division annual report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in {sup 252}No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of {sup 16}N beta-decay to determine the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium isotopes were

  11. Moral Reasoning of Division III and Division I Athletes: Is There a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Sharon Kay; And Others

    This study sought to examine the potentially corrupting influences of media attention, money, and the accompanying stress on the moral reasoning of student athletes at both Division I and Division III National College Athletics Association (NCAA) schools. Subjects were 718 nonathletes and 277 randomly selected athletes at a Division I school and…

  12. Film processing investigation. [improved chemical mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The present operational chemical mixing system for the Photographic Technology Division is evaluated, and the limitations are defined in terms of meeting the present and programmed chemical supply and delivery requirements. A major redesign of the entire chemical mixing, storage, analysis, and supply system is recommended. Other requirements for immediate and future implementations are presented.

  13. Physics Division annual report 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.

    2006-04-06

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne continues to

  14. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P.; Belland, Robert J.; Cox, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments. PMID:27505160

  15. Research Networks Map | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations and research networks at more than 100 sites across the United States. Seven Major Programs' sites are shown on this map. | The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations and research networks at more than 100 sites across the United States.

  16. The Division of Labor as Social Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freidson, Eliot

    1976-01-01

    Three different principles and ideologies by which the division of labor can be organized are sketched, along with their consequences for variation in structure and content. It is noted that the reality of the division of labor lies in the social interaction of its participants. (Author/AM)

  17. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Division orders. 227.19 Section 227.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Rents and Royalties § 227.19 Division orders....

  18. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Division orders. 227.19 Section 227.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Rents and Royalties § 227.19 Division orders....

  19. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P; Belland, Robert J; Cox, John V

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments.

  20. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division, 1991 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Willard S., Ed.

    This report documents research and development performed under the sponsorship of the Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division of the Office of Naval Research in fiscal year 1991. It provides abstracts (title, principal investigator, project code, objective, approach, progress, and related reports) of projects of three program divisions (cognitive…

  1. New Study Designs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention is expanding clinical research beyond standard trial designs to find interventions that may play a role in more than one prevalent disease. | The Division of Cancer Prevention is expanding clinical research beyond standard trial designs to find interventions that may play a role in more than one prevalent disease.

  2. Teaching Cell Division: Basics and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mike U.; Kindfield, Ann C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a concise overview of cell division that includes only the essential concepts necessary for understanding genetics and evolution. Makes recommendations based on published research and teaching experiences that can be used to judge the merits of potential activities and materials for teaching cell division. Makes suggestions regarding the…

  3. The Changing Nature of Division III Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    2014-01-01

    Non-selective Division III institutions often face challenges in meeting their enrollment goals. To ensure their continued viability, these schools recruit large numbers of student athletes. As a result, when compared to FBS (Football Bowl Division) institutions these schools have a much higher percentage of student athletes on campus and a…

  4. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  5. Chloroplast division: a work of ARTEMIS.

    PubMed

    Osteryoung, Katherine W

    2002-12-23

    Chloroplasts contain three membrane systems that constrict together during division of the organelle. A newly identified protein, ARTEMIS, may shed light on the nuclear control of chloroplast division, and also on the mechanism of thylakoid membrane fission and how this is coordinated with fission of the two envelope membranes.

  6. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division 1990 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Willard S., Jr., Ed.

    Research and development efforts carried out under sponsorship of the Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division of the Office of Naval Research during fiscal year 1990 are described in this compilation of project description summaries. The Division's research is organized in three types of programs: (1) Cognitive Science (the human learner--cognitive…

  7. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Rents and Royalties § 227.19 Division orders. (a... approval, as pipeline companies are not permitted to accept or run oil from leased Indian lands until after... division order at any time or require the pipeline company to discontinue to run the oil of any lessee who...

  8. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Rents and Royalties § 227.19 Division orders. (a... approval, as pipeline companies are not permitted to accept or run oil from leased Indian lands until after... division order at any time or require the pipeline company to discontinue to run the oil of any lessee who...

  9. Teaching Cell Division: Basics and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mike U.; Kindfield, Ann C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a concise overview of cell division that includes only the essential concepts necessary for understanding genetics and evolution. Makes recommendations based on published research and teaching experiences that can be used to judge the merits of potential activities and materials for teaching cell division. Makes suggestions regarding the…

  10. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Division orders. 227.19 Section 227.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Rents and Royalties § 227.19 Division orders. (a...

  11. Understanding Division of Fractions: An Alternative View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredua-Kwarteng, E.; Ahia, Francis

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer three alternatives to patterns or visualization used to justify division of fraction "algorithm" invert and multiply". The three main approaches are historical, similar denominators and algebraic, that teachers could use to justify the standard algorithm of division of fraction. The historical approach uses…

  12. Introduction to JPL's Mechanical Systems Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Kendra

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Mechanical Systems Division. It reviews the projects, both past and current that the engineers of this division have worked on. It also reviews the work environment as an exciting place for the entry level engineer.

  13. On Durkheim's Explanation of Division of Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueschemeyer, Dietrich

    1982-01-01

    In De la Division du Travail Social, Durkheim's causal explanation for secular increases in the division of labor and the differentiation of social structure is flawed. His metatheoretical concerns expressed in the critique of utilitarian social theory flawed his contributions to a causal explanation of social differentiation. (Author/AM)

  14. The Changing Nature of Division III Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    2014-01-01

    Non-selective Division III institutions often face challenges in meeting their enrollment goals. To ensure their continued viability, these schools recruit large numbers of student athletes. As a result, when compared to FBS (Football Bowl Division) institutions these schools have a much higher percentage of student athletes on campus and a…

  15. "American Gothic" and the Division of Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Provides historical review of gender-based division of labor. Argues that gender-based division of labor served a purpose in survival of tribal communities but has lost meaning today and may be a handicap to full use of human talent and ability in the arts. There is nothing in various art forms which make them more appropriate for males or…

  16. Growth and division of active droplets provides a model for protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Seyboldt, Rabea; Weber, Christoph A.; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2017-04-01

    It has been proposed that during the early steps in the origin of life, small droplets could have formed via the segregation of molecules from complex mixtures by phase separation. These droplets could have provided chemical reaction centres. However, whether these droplets could divide and propagate is unclear. Here we examine the behaviour of droplets in systems that are maintained away from thermodynamic equilibrium by an external supply of energy. In these systems, droplets grow by the addition of droplet material generated by chemical reactions. Surprisingly, we find that chemically driven droplet growth can lead to shape instabilities that trigger the division of droplets into two smaller daughters. Therefore, chemically active droplets can exhibit cycles of growth and division that resemble the proliferation of living cells. Dividing active droplets could serve as a model for prebiotic protocells, where chemical reactions in the droplet play the role of a prebiotic metabolism.

  17. The physiology of bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Egan, Alexander J F; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial cell division is facilitated by the divisome, a dynamic multiprotein assembly localizing at mid-cell to synthesize the stress-bearing peptidoglycan and to constrict all cell envelope layers. Divisome assembly occurs in two steps and involves multiple interactions between more than 20 essential and accessory cell division proteins. Well before constriction and while the cell is still elongating, the tubulin-like FtsZ and early cell division proteins form a ring-like structure at mid-cell. Cell division starts once certain peptidoglycan enzymes and their activators have moved to the FtsZ-ring. Gram-negative bacteria like Escherichia coli simultaneously synthesize and cleave the septum peptidoglycan during division leading to a constriction. The outer membrane constricts together with the peptidoglycan layer with the help of the transenvelope spanning Tol-Pal system.

  18. Gravity and the orientation of cell division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    A novel culture system for mammalian cells was used to investigate division orientations in populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells and the influence of gravity on the positioning of division axes. The cells were tethered to adhesive sites, smaller in diameter than a newborn cell, distributed over a nonadhesive substrate positioned vertically. The cells grew and divided while attached to the sites, and the angles and directions of elongation during anaphase, projected in the vertical plane, were found to be random with respect to gravity. However, consecutive divisions of individual cells were generally along the same axis or at 90 degrees to the previous division, with equal probability. Thus, successive divisions were restricted to orthogonal planes, but the choice of plane appeared to be random, unlike the ordered sequence of cleavage orientations seen during early embryo development.

  19. Gravity and the orientation of cell division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    A novel culture system for mammalian cells was used to investigate division orientations in populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells and the influence of gravity on the positioning of division axes. The cells were tethered to adhesive sites, smaller in diameter than a newborn cell, distributed over a nonadhesive substrate positioned vertically. The cells grew and divided while attached to the sites, and the angles and directions of elongation during anaphase, projected in the vertical plane, were found to be random with respect to gravity. However, consecutive divisions of individual cells were generally along the same axis or at 90 degrees to the previous division, with equal probability. Thus, successive divisions were restricted to orthogonal planes, but the choice of plane appeared to be random, unlike the ordered sequence of cleavage orientations seen during early embryo development.

  20. Nucleoid occlusion prevents cell division during replication fork arrest in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Remi; Marquis, Kathleen A.; Rudner, David Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary How bacteria respond to chromosome replication stress has been traditionally studied using temperature-sensitive mutants and chemical inhibitors. These methods inevitably arrest all replication and lead to induction of transcriptional responses and inhibition of cell division. Here, we used repressor proteins bound to operator arrays to generate a single stalled replication fork. These replication roadblocks impeded replisome progression on one arm, leaving replication of the other arm and re-initiation unaffected. Remarkably, despite robust generation of RecA-GFP filaments and a strong block to cell division during the roadblock, patterns of gene expression were not significantly altered. Consistent with these findings, division inhibition was not mediated by the SOS-induced regulator YneA nor by RecA-independent repression of ftsL. In support of the idea that nucleoid occlusion prevents inappropriate cell division during fork arrest, immature FtsZ-rings formed adjacent to the DNA mass but rarely on top of it. Furthermore, mild alterations in chromosome compaction resulted in cell division that guillotined the DNA. Strikingly, the nucleoid occlusion protein Noc had no discernable role in division inhibition. Our data indicate that Noc-independent nucleoid occlusion prevents inappropriate cell division during replication fork arrest. They further suggest that Bacillus subtilis normally manages replication stress rather than inducing a stress-response. PMID:20807205

  1. Physics division annual report 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example of the

  2. Replicating vesicles as models of primitive cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Szostak, Jack W

    2004-12-01

    Primitive cells, lacking the complex bio-machinery present in modern cells, would have had to rely on the self-organizing properties of their components and on interactions with their environment to achieve basic cellular functions such as growth and division. Many bilayer-membrane vesicles, depending on their composition and environment, can exhibit complex morphological changes such as growth, fusion, fission, budding, internal vesicle assembly and vesicle-surface interactions. The rich dynamic properties of these vesicles provide interesting models of how primitive cellular replication might have occurred in response to purely physical and chemical forces.

  3. 49 CFR 1242.03 - Made by accounting divisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Made by accounting divisions. 1242.03 Section 1242... accounting divisions. The separation shall be made by accounting divisions, where such divisions are maintained, and the aggregate of the accounting divisions reported for the quarter and for the year. ...

  4. 49 CFR 1242.03 - Made by accounting divisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Made by accounting divisions. 1242.03 Section 1242... accounting divisions. The separation shall be made by accounting divisions, where such divisions are maintained, and the aggregate of the accounting divisions reported for the quarter and for the year....

  5. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L.

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as “The Central Dogma in Bacteriology,” is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called “nucleoid complexity,” is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell’s center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  6. Arabidopsis plants perform arithmetic division to prevent starvation at night

    PubMed Central

    Scialdone, Antonio; Mugford, Sam T; Feike, Doreen; Skeffington, Alastair; Borrill, Philippa; Graf, Alexander; Smith, Alison M; Howard, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic starch reserves that accumulate in Arabidopsis leaves during the day decrease approximately linearly with time at night to support metabolism and growth. We find that the rate of decrease is adjusted to accommodate variation in the time of onset of darkness and starch content, such that reserves last almost precisely until dawn. Generation of these dynamics therefore requires an arithmetic division computation between the starch content and expected time to dawn. We introduce two novel chemical kinetic models capable of implementing analog arithmetic division. Predictions from the models are successfully tested in plants perturbed by a night-time light period or by mutations in starch degradation pathways. Our experiments indicate which components of the starch degradation apparatus may be important for appropriate arithmetic division. Our results are potentially relevant for any biological system dependent on a food reserve for survival over a predictable time period. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00669.001 PMID:23805380

  7. Alaska climate divisions based on objective methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeloff, H.; Bieniek, P. A.; Bhatt, U. S.; Thoman, R.; Walsh, J. E.; Daly, C.; Shulski, M.

    2010-12-01

    Alaska is vast geographically, is located at high latitudes, is surrounded on three sides by oceans and has complex topography, encompassing several climate regions. While climate zones exist, there has not been an objective analysis to identify regions of homogeneous climate. In this study we use cluster analysis on a robust set of weather observation stations in Alaska to develop climate divisions for the state. Similar procedures have been employed in the contiguous United States and other parts of the world. Our analysis, based on temperature and precipitation, yielded a set of 10 preliminary climate divisions. These divisions include an eastern and western Arctic (bounded by the Brooks Range to the south), a west coast region along the Bering Sea, and eastern and western Interior regions (bounded to the south by the Alaska Range). South of the Alaska Range there were the following divisions: an area around Cook Inlet (also including Valdez), coastal and inland areas along Bristol Bay including Kodiak and Lake Iliamna, the Aleutians, and Southeast Alaska. To validate the climate divisions based on relatively sparse station data, additional sensitivity analysis was performed. Additional clustering analysis utilizing the gridded North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) was also conducted. In addition, the divisions were evaluated using correlation analysis. These sensitivity tests support the climate divisions based on cluster analysis.

  8. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides (Division...

  9. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides (Division...

  10. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides (Division...

  11. History of the Fluids Engineering Division

    DOE PAGES

    Cooper, Paul; Martin, C. Samuel; O'Hern, Timothy J.

    2016-08-03

    The 90th Anniversary of the Fluids Engineering Division (FED) of ASME will be celebrated on July 10–14, 2016 in Washington, DC. The venue is ASME's Summer Heat Transfer Conference (SHTC), Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting (FEDSM), and International Conference on Nanochannels and Microchannels (ICNMM). The occasion is an opportune time to celebrate and reflect on the origin of FED and its predecessor—the Hydraulic Division (HYD), which existed from 1926–1963. Furthermore, the FED Executive Committee decided that it would be appropriate to publish concurrently a history of the HYD/FED.

  12. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, A.L.; Schwartz, L.L.

    1980-04-30

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1979 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract iself is given only under the name of the first author or the first Earth Sciences Division author. A topical index at the end of the report provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division.

  13. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

  14. Asymmetric stem cell division: lessons from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pao-Shu; Egger, Boris; Brand, Andrea H

    2008-06-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an important and conserved strategy in the generation of cellular diversity during animal development. Many of our insights into the underlying mechanisms of asymmetric cell division have been gained from Drosophila, including the establishment of polarity, orientation of mitotic spindles and segregation of cell fate determinants. Recent studies are also beginning to reveal the connection between the misregulation of asymmetric cell division and cancer. What we are learning from Drosophila as a model system has implication both for stem cell biology and also cancer research.

  15. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division 1990 Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    f D-/a33 773 ! COGNITIVE AND NEURAL SCIENCES -DIVISION 1990 PROGRAMS P .. i I’ • . M,’AR ’ OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH 800 NORTH QUINCY STREET ARLINGTON... Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division 1990 Programs PE 61153N * 6. AUTHOR(S)I Edited by W-illard S. Vaughan 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...NOTES This is a compilation of abstracts representing R&D sponsured by the ONR Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division. 12a. DISTRIBUTION AVAILABILITY

  16. History of the Fluids Engineering Division

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Paul; Martin, C. Samuel; O'Hern, Timothy J.

    2016-08-03

    The 90th Anniversary of the Fluids Engineering Division (FED) of ASME will be celebrated on July 10–14, 2016 in Washington, DC. The venue is ASME's Summer Heat Transfer Conference (SHTC), Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting (FEDSM), and International Conference on Nanochannels and Microchannels (ICNMM). The occasion is an opportune time to celebrate and reflect on the origin of FED and its predecessor—the Hydraulic Division (HYD), which existed from 1926–1963. Furthermore, the FED Executive Committee decided that it would be appropriate to publish concurrently a history of the HYD/FED.

  17. Overview of the Applied Aerodynamics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A major reorganization of the Aeronautics Directorate of the Langley Research Center occurred in early 1989. As a result of this reorganization, the scope of research in the Applied Aeronautics Division is now quite different than that in the past. An overview of the current organization, mission, and facilities of this division is presented. A summary of current research programs and sample highlights of recent research are also presented. This is intended to provide a general view of the scope and capabilities of the division.

  18. 6. Contextual view of Fairbanks Company, looking south along Division ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Contextual view of Fairbanks Company, looking south along Division Street, showing relationship of factory to surrounding area, 213, 215, & 217 Division Street appear on right side of street - Fairbanks Company, 202 Division Street, Rome, Floyd County, GA

  19. 3. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southeast, showing rear (west) facade and north side, Fairbanks Company appears at left and 215 Division Street is visible at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  20. 2. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking northeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking northeast, showing rear (west) facade and south side, 217 Division Street is visible at left and Fairbanks Company appears at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  1. 3. Oblique view of 213 Division Street, looking northeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of 213 Division Street, looking northeast, showing rear (west) facade and south side, 215 Division Street is visible at left and Fairbanks Company appears at right - 213 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  2. 2. JL photographer, summer 1978. View from south of Division ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. JL photographer, summer 1978. View from south of Division Avenue Punting and Filtration plant. - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. Nanoengineering: Super symmetry in cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial cells can be sculpted into different shapes using nanofabricated chambers and then used to explore the spatial adaptation of protein oscillations that play an important role in cell division.

  4. About DCP | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) is the primary unit of the National Cancer Institute devoted to cancer prevention research. DCP provides funding and administrative support to clinical and laboratory researchers, community and multidisciplinary teams, and collaborative scientific networks. |

  5. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  6. WESTERN ECOLOGY DIVISION - GENERAL INFORMATION SHEET

    EPA Science Inventory

    abstract for flyer - general information The Western Ecology Division (WED), part of EPAs National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, provides information to EPA offices and regions nationwide to improve understanding of how human activities affect estuarine,...

  7. Synthetic Division, Taylor Polynomials, Partial Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Howard B.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the underpinnings of synthetic division. Shows how to quickly obtain the coefficients of the Taylor expansion of a polynomial about a point, and a partial fraction decomposition of a polynomial. (MVL)

  8. 3. Perspective view of Express Building looking northeast, with Division ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Perspective view of Express Building looking northeast, with Division Street in foreground - American Railway Express Company Freight Building, 1060 Northeast Division Street, Bend, Deschutes County, OR

  9. One hundred years of the Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (AGFD)of the American Chemical Society was 100 years old in 2008. ACS grouped papers into sections at its national meetings starting in 1904, including one dealing with agricultural, biological, and sanitary chemistry. This section became AGFD on Dec...

  10. Multiple-division of self-propelled oil droplets through acetal formation.

    PubMed

    Banno, Taisuke; Kuroha, Rie; Miura, Shingo; Toyota, Taro

    2015-02-28

    We demonstrate a novel system that exhibits both self-propelled motion and division of micrometer-sized oil droplets induced by chemical conversion of the system components. Such unique dynamics were observed in an oil-in-water emulsion of a benzaldehyde derivative, an alkanol and a cationic surfactant at a low pH.

  11. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period October 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berven, B.A.

    1993-09-01

    This is a progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology, Biological and Radiation Physics, Chemical Physics, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis, Risk Analysis, Center for Risk Management, Associate Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT), and Contributions to National and Lead Laboratory Programs and Assignments--Environmental Restoration.

  12. The AAMRL Biodynamics Data Bank

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    including the suffix -M or -F for gender , (5) the unique, permanent subject identification code; (6) the peak acceleration direction as defined by the...birth, (6) the subject’s sex ( gender ); (7) the subject’s weight, height, and sitting height, nineteen anthropometric values considered for convenience...LOCAL AVAILABILITY: BB IDENIT CODES DTIC-ADA148034 54 EXPRMTS (PARENT) ACCN NO, 3367 ORIGINAL INPUT BY- OD(Abramss) ORIGINALINPUTON 87050. FIRST

  13. Plastid Division: Evolution, Mechanism and Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Maple, Jodi; Møller, Simon Geir

    2007-01-01

    Background The continuity of chloroplasts is maintained by division of pre-existing chloroplasts. Chloroplasts originated as bacterial endosymbionts; however, the majority of bacterial division factors are absent from chloroplasts and the eukaryotic host has added several new components. For example, the ftsZ gene has been duplicated and modified, and the Min system has retained MinE and MinD but lost MinC, acquiring at least one new component ARC3. Further, the mechanism has evolved to include two members of the dynamin protein family, ARC5 and FZL, and plastid-dividing (PD) rings were most probably added by the eukaryotic host. Scope Deciphering how the division of plastids is coordinated and controlled by nuclear-encoded factors is key to our understanding of this important biological process. Through a number of molecular-genetic and biochemical approaches, it is evident that FtsZ initiates plastid division where the coordinated action of MinD and MinE ensures correct FtsZ (Z)-ring placement. Although the classical FtsZ antagonist MinC does not exist in plants, ARC3 may fulfil this role. Together with other prokaryotic-derived proteins such as ARC6 and GC1 and key eukaryotic-derived proteins such as ARC5 and FZL, these proteins make up a sophisticated division machinery. The regulation of plastid division in a cellular context is largely unknown; however, recent microarray data shed light on this. Here the current understanding of the mechanism of chloroplast division in higher plants is reviewed with an emphasis on how recent findings are beginning to shape our understanding of the function and evolution of the components. Conclusions Extrapolation from the mechanism of bacterial cell division provides valuable clues as to how the chloroplast division process is achieved in plant cells. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the highly regulated mechanism of plastid division within the host cell has led to the evolution of features unique to the

  14. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This year`s Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE`s core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  15. NRL Radar Division C++ Coding Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-05

    when writing C++ code. It is primarily addressed to all those involved in the production of C++ code for Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Radar Division... writing C++ code for NRL Radar Division applications. The ISO 9000 and the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) state that coding standards are...Naming This section contains a set of conventions on how to choose, write , and administer the names for all entities over which the programmer has

  16. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

  17. Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Laintz, Kenneth E.

    2012-06-19

    Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

  18. Peroxisome division and proliferation in plants.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw; Zhang, Xinchun; Hu, Jianping

    2010-06-01

    Peroxisomes are eukaryotic organelles with crucial functions in development. Plant peroxisomes participate in various metabolic processes, some of which are co-operated by peroxisomes and other organelles, such as mitochondria and chloroplasts. Defining the complete picture of how these essential organelles divide and proliferate will be instrumental in understanding how the dynamics of peroxisome abundance contribute to changes in plant physiology and development. Research in Arabidopsis thaliana has identified several evolutionarily conserved major components of the peroxisome division machinery, including five isoforms of PEROXIN11 proteins (PEX11), two dynamin-related proteins (DRP3A and DRP3B) and two FISSION1 proteins (FIS1A/BIGYIN and FIS1B). Recent studies in our laboratory have also begun to uncover plant-specific factors. DRP5B is a dual-localized protein that is involved in the division of both chloroplasts and peroxisomes, representing an invention of the plant/algal lineage in organelle division. In addition, PMD1 (peroxisomal and mitochondrial division 1) is a plant-specific protein tail anchored to the outer surface of peroxisomes and mitochondria, mediating the division and/or positioning of these organelles. Lastly, light induces peroxisome proliferation in dark-grown Arabidopsis seedlings, at least in part, through activating the PEX11b gene. The far-red light receptor phyA (phytochrome A) and the transcription factor HYH (HY5 homologue) are key components in this signalling pathway. In summary, pathways for the division and proliferation of plant peroxisomes are composed of conserved and plant-specific factors. The sharing of division proteins by peroxisomes, mitochondria and chloroplasts is also suggesting possible co-ordination in the division of these metabolically associated plant organelles.

  19. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, A.L.; Hornady, B.F.

    1981-10-15

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, reports, and talks presented during 1980 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract itself is given only under the name of the first author (indicated in capital letters) or the first Earth Sciences Division author.

  20. Network evaluation for F-Division

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.K.; Carr, R.B.; Lee, F.D.

    1986-05-16

    This report contains an evaluation of the computer and computer network needs of F-Division. The main intent is to identify ways in which all computational aspects of F-Division might interact more effectively. This includes the physics, engineering, and clerical staffs. Consideration is given to usage of the Octopus computer system, computer control of experiments, data analysis, computer aided design (CAD) and word processing issues.

  1. The fencing problem and Coleochaete cell division.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuandi; Dou, Mingya; Zhou, Zhigang

    2015-03-01

    The findings in this study suggest that the solution of a boundary value problem for differential equation system can be used to discuss the fencing problem in mathematics and Coleochaete, a green algae, cell division. This differential equation model in parametric expression is used to simulate the two kinds of cell division process, one is for the usual case and the case with a "dead" daughter cell.

  2. Division II: Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Scrijver, Karel J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2015-08-01

    The Business Meeting of Commission 10 was held as part of the Business Meeting of Division II (Sun and Heliosphere), chaired by Valentin Martínez-Pillet, the President of the Division. The President of Commission 10 (C10; Solar activity), Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, took the chair for the business meeting of C10. She summarised the activities of C10 over the triennium and the election of the incoming OC.

  3. Friday's Agenda | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    TimeAgenda8:00 am - 8:10 amWelcome and Opening RemarksLeslie Ford, MDAssociate Director for Clinical ResearchDivision of Cancer Prevention, NCIEva Szabo, MD Chief, Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research GroupDivision of Cancer Prevention, NCI8:10 am - 8:40 amClinical Trials Statistical Concepts for Non-StatisticiansKevin Dodd, PhD |

  4. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  5. Structure, function and controls in microbial division.

    PubMed

    Vicente, M; Errington, J

    1996-04-01

    Several crucial genes required for bacterial division lie close together in a region called the dcw cluster. Within the cluster, gene expression is subject to complex transcriptional regulation, which serves to adjust the cell cycle in response to growth rate. The pivotally important FtsZ protein, which is needed to initiate division, is now known to interact with many other components of the division machinery in Escherichia coli. Some biochemical properties of FtsZ, and of another division protein called FtsA, suggest that they are similar to the eukaryotic proteins tubulin and actin respectively. Cell division needs to be closely co-ordinated with chromosome partitioning. The mechanism of partitioning is poorly understood, though several genes involved in this process, including several muk genes, have been identified. The min genes may participate in both septum positioning and chromosome partitioning. Coupled transcription and translation of membrane-associated proteins might also be important for partitioning. In the event of a failure in the normal partitioning process, Bacillus subtilis, at least, has a mechanism for removing a bisected nucleoid from the division septum.

  6. Signaling Pathways that Regulate Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Rhind, Nicholas; Russell, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Cell division requires careful orchestration of three major events: entry into mitosis, chromosomal segregation, and cytokinesis. Signaling within and between the molecules that control these events allows for their coordination via checkpoints, a specific class of signaling pathways that ensure the dependency of cell-cycle events on the successful completion of preceding events. Multiple positive- and negative-feedback loops ensure that a cell is fully committed to division and that the events occur in the proper order. Unlike other signaling pathways, which integrate external inputs to decide whether to execute a given process, signaling at cell division is largely dedicated to completing a decision made in G1 phase—to initiate and complete a round of mitotic cell division. Instead of deciding if the events of cell division will take place, these signaling pathways entrain these events to the activation of the cell-cycle kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and provide the opportunity for checkpoint proteins to arrest cell division if things go wrong. PMID:23028116

  7. Mechanics and Dynamics of Plant Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumais, Jacques

    2012-02-01

    The division of eukaryotic cells involves the assembly of complex cytoskeletal structures to exert the forces required for chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. In plants, tensional forces within the cytoskeleton constrain cells to divide according to a small number of area minimizing configurations. We have shown that the probability of observing a particular division configuration increases inversely with its relative area according to an exponential probability distribution known as the Gibbs measure. The distribution is universal up to experimental accuracy with a unique constant that applies for all plants studied irrespective of the shape and size of their cells. Using a maximum entropy formulation, we were able to demonstrate that the empirically observed division rule is predicted by the dynamics of the tense cytoskeletal elements controlling the positioning of the division plane. Finally, by framing this division rule as a dynamical system, we identified a broad class of attractors that are predictive of cell patterns observed in plants. Plant cell division thus offers a remarkable example of how interactions at the molecular level can lead to strikingly complex behaviors at the cellular and multicellular levels.

  8. American Chemical Society, Preprints symposia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Division of Petroleum Chemistry of the American Chemical Society met August 30-September 4, 1987, in New Orleans and presented symposia on advances in fluid cracking catalysts, advances in naphtha reforming, refinery waste cleanup, hydrocarbon oxidation, and methane conversion. Forty-two abstracts were prepared.

  9. Novel division level bacterial diversity in a Yellowstone hot spring.

    PubMed

    Hugenholtz, P; Pitulle, C; Hershberger, K L; Pace, N R

    1998-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic survey was carried out for the bacterial community in Obsidian Pool (OP), a Yellowstone National Park hot spring previously shown to contain remarkable archaeal diversity (S. M. Barns, R. E. Fundyga, M. W. Jeffries, and N. R. Page, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:1609-1613, 1994). Small-subunit rRNA genes (rDNA) were amplified directly from OP sediment DNA by PCR with universally conserved or Bacteria-specific rDNA primers and cloned. Unique rDNA types among > 300 clones were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism, and 122 representative rDNA sequences were determined. These were found to represent 54 distinct bacterial sequence types or clusters (> or = 98% identity) of sequences. A majority (70%) of the sequence types were affiliated with 14 previously recognized bacterial divisions (main phyla; kingdoms); 30% were unaffiliated with recognized bacterial divisions. The unaffiliated sequence types (represented by 38 sequences) nominally comprise 12 novel, division level lineages termed candidate divisions. Several OP sequences were nearly identical to those of cultivated chemolithotrophic thermophiles, including the hydrogen-oxidizing Calderobacterium and the sulfate reducers Thermodesulfovibrio and Thermodesulfobacterium, or belonged to monophyletic assemblages recognized for a particular type of metabolism, such as the hydrogen-oxidizing Aquificales and the sulfate-reducing delta-Proteobacteria. The occurrence of such organisms is consistent with the chemical composition of OP (high in reduced iron and sulfur) and suggests a lithotrophic base for primary productivity in this hot spring, through hydrogen oxidation and sulfate reduction. Unexpectedly, no archaeal sequences were encountered in OP clone libraries made with universal primers. Hybridization analysis of amplified OP DNA with domain-specific probes confirmed that the analyzed community rDNA from OP sediment was predominantly bacterial. These

  10. Novel Division Level Bacterial Diversity in a Yellowstone Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Hugenholtz, Philip; Pitulle, Christian; Hershberger, Karen L.; Pace, Norman R.

    1998-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic survey was carried out for the bacterial community in Obsidian Pool (OP), a Yellowstone National Park hot spring previously shown to contain remarkable archaeal diversity (S. M. Barns, R. E. Fundyga, M. W. Jeffries, and N. R. Page, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:1609–1613, 1994). Small-subunit rRNA genes (rDNA) were amplified directly from OP sediment DNA by PCR with universally conserved or Bacteria-specific rDNA primers and cloned. Unique rDNA types among >300 clones were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism, and 122 representative rDNA sequences were determined. These were found to represent 54 distinct bacterial sequence types or clusters (≥98% identity) of sequences. A majority (70%) of the sequence types were affiliated with 14 previously recognized bacterial divisions (main phyla; kingdoms); 30% were unaffiliated with recognized bacterial divisions. The unaffiliated sequence types (represented by 38 sequences) nominally comprise 12 novel, division level lineages termed candidate divisions. Several OP sequences were nearly identical to those of cultivated chemolithotrophic thermophiles, including the hydrogen-oxidizing Calderobacterium and the sulfate reducers Thermodesulfovibrio and Thermodesulfobacterium, or belonged to monophyletic assemblages recognized for a particular type of metabolism, such as the hydrogen-oxidizing Aquificales and the sulfate-reducing δ-Proteobacteria. The occurrence of such organisms is consistent with the chemical composition of OP (high in reduced iron and sulfur) and suggests a lithotrophic base for primary productivity in this hot spring, through hydrogen oxidation and sulfate reduction. Unexpectedly, no archaeal sequences were encountered in OP clone libraries made with universal primers. Hybridization analysis of amplified OP DNA with domain-specific probes confirmed that the analyzed community rDNA from OP sediment was predominantly bacterial. These results

  11. Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-31

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

  12. The History of Metals and Ceramics Division

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    The division was formed in 1946 at the suggestion of Dr. Eugene P. Wigner to attack the problem of the distortion of graphite in the early reactors due to exposure to reactor neutrons, and the consequent radiation damage. It was called the Metallurgy Division and assembled the metallurgical and solid state physics activities of the time which were not directly related to nuclear weapons production. William A. Johnson, a Westinghouse employee, was named Division Director in 1946. In 1949 he was replaced by John H Frye Jr. when the Division consisted of 45 people. He was director during most of what is called the Reactor Project Years until 1973 and his retirement. During this period the Division evolved into three organizational areas: basic research, applied research in nuclear reactor materials, and reactor programs directly related to a specific reactor(s) being designed or built. The Division (Metals and Ceramics) consisted of 204 staff members in 1973 when James R. Weir, Jr., became Director. This was the period of the oil embargo, the formation of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) by combining the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) with the Office of Coal Research, and subsequent formation of the Department of Energy (DOE). The diversification process continued when James O. Stiegler became Director in 1984, partially as a result of the pressure of legislation encouraging the national laboratories to work with U.S. industries on their problems. During that time the Division staff grew from 265 to 330. Douglas F. Craig became Director in 1992.

  13. Lack of Resources Hampers Graduation Rates in Division II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Welch

    2001-01-01

    A recent report by the National Collegiate Athletic Association on graduation rates indicates that athletes in Division II schools face as many challenges completing college as do their peers in Division I. Division II institutions are further hampered by lack of resources causing Division II students less likely to graduate in general. (SLD)

  14. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

  15. Energy Technology Division research summary -- 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Research funded primarily by the NRC is directed toward assessing the roles of cyclic fatigue, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking on failures in light water reactor (LWR) piping systems, pressure vessels, and various core components. In support of the fast reactor program, the Division has responsibility for fuel-performance modeling and irradiation testing. The Division has major responsibilities in several design areas of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The Division supports the DOE in ensuring safe shipment of nuclear materials by providing extensive review of the Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs). Finally, in the nuclear area they are investigating the safe disposal of spent fuel and waste. In work funded by DOE`s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the high-temperature superconductivity program continues to be a major focal point for industrial interactions. Coatings and lubricants developed in the division`s Tribology Section are intended for use in transportation systems of the future. Continuous fiber ceramic composites are being developed for high-performance heat engines. Nondestructive testing techniques are being developed to evaluate fiber distribution and to detect flaws. A wide variety of coatings for corrosion protection of metal alloys are being studied. These can increase lifetimes significant in a wide variety of coal combustion and gasification environments.

  16. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets.

    PubMed

    den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Andreu, José M; Monasterio, Octavio

    2014-08-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of proteins and the availability of crystal structures has increased our knowledge on bacterial cell division considerably in this century. Consequently, bacterial cell division proteins are more and more recognized as potential new antibiotic targets. An international effort to find small molecules that inhibit the cell division initiating protein FtsZ has yielded many compounds of which some are promising as leads for preclinical use. The essential transglycosylase activity of peptidoglycan synthases has recently become accessible to inhibitor screening. Enzymatic assays for and structural information on essential integral membrane proteins such as MraY and FtsW involved in lipid II (the peptidoglycan building block precursor) biosynthesis have put these proteins on the list of potential new targets. This review summarises and discusses the results and approaches to the development of lead compounds that inhibit bacterial cell division.

  17. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of asymmetric division in oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shao-Chen; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2013-08-01

    In contrast to symmetric division in mitosis, mammalian oocyte maturation is characterized by asymmetric cell division that produces a large egg and a small polar body. The asymmetry results from oocyte polarization, which includes spindle positioning, migration, and cortical reorganization, and this process is critical for fertilization and the retention of maternal components for early embryo development. Although actin dynamics are involved in this process, the molecular mechanism underlying this remained unclear until the use of confocal microscopy and live cell imaging became widespread in recent years. Information obtained through a PubMed database search of all articles published in English between 2000 and 2012 that included the phrases "oocyte, actin, spindle migration," "oocyte, actin, polar body," or "oocyte, actin, asymmetric division" was reviewed. The actin nucleation factor actin-related protein 2/3 complex and its nucleation-promoting factors, formins and Spire, and regulators such as small GTPases, partitioning-defective/protein kinase C, Fyn, microRNAs, cis-Golgi apparatus components, myosin/myosin light-chain kinase, spindle stability regulators, and spindle assembly checkpoint regulators, play critical roles in asymmetric cell division in oocytes. This review summarizes recent findings on these actin-related regulators in mammalian oocyte asymmetric division and outlines a complete signaling pathway.

  19. Laboratory Planning for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Harry F., Ed.

    This study is the result of a project of the Committee on Design, Construction and Equipment of Laboratories, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, of the National Academy of Sciences. The problems and methods of planning, designing and constructing varying types of chemical laboratories for research and developmental buildings are…

  20. Laboratory Planning for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Harry F., Ed.

    This study is the result of a project of the Committee on Design, Construction and Equipment of Laboratories, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, of the National Academy of Sciences. The problems and methods of planning, designing and constructing varying types of chemical laboratories for research and developmental buildings are…

  1. Section III, Division 5 - Development And Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Dana K.; Jetter, Robert I; Nestell, James E.; Burchell, Timothy D; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development.

  2. Division V: Commission 42: Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, Ignasi; Richards, Mercedes T.; Rucinski, Slavek; Bradstreet, David H.; Harmanec, Petr; Kaluzny, Janusz; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Munari, Ulisse; Niarchos, Panagiotis; Olah, Katalin; Pribulla, Theodor; Scarfe, Colin D.; Torres, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    Commission 42 (C42) co-organized, together with Commission 27 (C27) and Division V (Div V) as a whole, a full day of science and business sessions that were held on 24 August 2012. The program included time slots for discussion of business matters related to Div V, C27 and C42, and two sessions of 2 hours each devoted to science talks of interest to both C42 and C27. In addition, we had a joint session between Div IV and Div V motivated by the proposal to reformulate the division structure of the IAU and the possible merger of the two divisions into a new Div G. The current report gives an account of the matters discussed during the business session of C42.

  3. Cytoskeleton assembly in Toxoplasma gondii cell division

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-White, Brooke; Beck, Josh R.; Chen, Chun-Ti; Meissner, Markus; Bradley, Peter J.; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cell division across members of the protozoan parasite phylum Apicomplexa displays a surprising diversity between different species as well as between different life stages of the same parasite. In most cases, infection of a host cell by a single parasite results in the formation of a polyploid cell from which individual daughters bud in a process dependent on a final round of mitosis. Unlike other apicomplexans, Toxoplasma gondii divides by a binary process consisting of internal budding that results in only two daughter cells per round of division. Since T. gondii is experimentally accessible and displays the simplest division mode, it has manifested itself as a model for apicomplexan daughter formation. Here we review newly emerging insights in the prominent role that assembly of the cortical cytoskeletal scaffold plays in the process of daughter parasite formation. PMID:22878103

  4. Family division in China's transitional economy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feinian

    2009-03-01

    Using a longitudinal data-set (the China Health and Nutrition Survey) we explored the effect of various economic factors, including household wealth, employment sector, and involvement in a household business on the division of extended families in China's transitional economy. Results from event history analyses suggest that these economic factors act as either a dividing or a unifying force on the extended family. Household wealth reduces the risk of family division, but the effect is weaker for families in which parents have upper secondary education. In addition, an extended family is more likely to divide when married children work in the state sector. Further, the probability of family division is higher in families where daughters-in-law work in the state sector than in those with sons in this sector. Finally, involvement in a household business for married children increases family stability.

  5. Cell Division and Evolution of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivier, Nicolas; Arcenegui-Siemens, Xavier; Schliecker, Gudrun

    A tissue is a geometrical, space-filling, random cellular network; it remains in this steady state while individual cells divide. Cell division (fragmentation) is a local, elementary topological transformation which establishes statistical equilibrium of the structure. Statistical equilibrium is characterized by observable relations (Lewis, Aboav) between cell shapes, sizes and those of their neighbours, obtained through maximum entropy and topological correlation extending to nearest neighbours only, i.e. maximal randomness. For a two-dimensional tissue (epithelium), the distribution of cell shapes and that of mother and daughter cells can be obtained from elementary geometrical and physical arguments, except for an exponential factor favouring division of larger cells, and exponential and combinatorial factors encouraging a most symmetric division. The resulting distributions are very narrow, and stationarity severely restricts the range of an adjustable structural parameter

  6. The centrosome and asymmetric cell division

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric stem cell division is a mechanism widely employed by the cell to maintain tissue homeostasis, resulting in the production of one stem cell and one differentiating cell. However, asymmetric cell division is not limited to stem cells and is widely observed even in unicellular organisms as well as in cells that make up highly complex tissues. In asymmetric cell division, cells must organize their intracellular components along the axis of asymmetry (sometimes in the context of extracellular architecture). Recent studies have described cell asymmetry in many cell types and in many cases such asymmetry involves the centrosome (or spindle pole body in yeast) as the center of cytoskeleton organization. In this review, I summarize recent discoveries in cellular polarity that lead to an asymmetric outcome, with a focus on centrosome function. PMID:19458491

  7. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. This report includes the Division's activities during 2008.

  8. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Cook, J.S.

    1993-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report.

  9. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides...

  10. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides...

  11. Moonlet Wakes in Saturn's Cassini Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L. J.; Showalter, M. R.

    1997-07-01

    We have detected several features with wavelike characteristics in the Voyager Radio Science (RSS) earth occultation data and Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) stellar occultation data of Saturn's Cassini Division. We identified these structures using a non-linear autoregressive power spectral algorithm called Burg. This method is powerful for detecting short sections of quasiperiodic structure. We successfully used this same technique to identify six previously unseen Pan wakes in the Voyager PPS and Voyager RSS occultation data (Horn, Showalter and Russell, 1996, {/it Icarus} {/bf 124}, 663). Applying the Burg technique to the RSS data we find a number of wavelike structures in the Cassini Division. We see three distinct features that look like moonlet wakes. Two are Cassini Division features detected by Marouf and Tyler (1986, {/it Nature} {/bf 323}, 120) in the Voyager RSS data. Flynn and Cuzzi (1989, {/it Icarus} {/bf 82}, 180) determined that these features were azimuthally symmetric in the Voyager images and were most likely not moonlet wakes. The third wavelike structure resembles an outer moonlet wake. If it is a wake it may correspond to a previously undetected moonlet located in a Cassini Division gap between 118,929 km and 118,966 km. We see at least one wavelike feature in the PPS data. This feature falls close to the outer edge of the Huygens gap in the Cassini Division. It is consistent with an outer moonlet wake. If it is a wake it may correspond to a previously undetected moonlet inside the Huygens gap. Several other wavelike features in the Cassini Division resemble moonlet wakes. We plan to pursue these structures further in the future. This work was performed at JPL/Caltech under contract with NASA.

  12. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Madhuparna Itoh, Kie Iijima, Miho Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson’s disease-associated protein—parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1—in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. -- Highlights: •A Drp1-mediated mechanism accounts for ∼95% of mitochondrial division. •Parkin controls the connectivity of mitochondria via a mechanism that is independent of Drp1. •In the absence of Drp1, connected mitochondria transiently depolarize. •The transient depolarization is independent of calcium signaling and uncoupling protein 2.

  13. Chemical exchange program analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Waffelaert, Pascale

    2007-09-01

    As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of

  14. Life Sciences Division annual report, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Cram, L.S.

    1989-04-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Life Sciences Division for the calendar year 1988. Technical reports related to the current status of projects are presented in sufficient detail to permit the informed reader to assess their scope and significance. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the Group Leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  15. Quantum internet using code division multiple access.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu-xi; Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya; Wu, Re-Bing; Gao, Feifei; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels.

  16. Quantum internet using code division multiple access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu-Xi; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Wu, Re-Bing; Gao, Feifei; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2013-07-01

    A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels.

  17. Division XII: Commission 6: Astronomical Telegrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, N. N.; Yamaoka, H.; Gilmore, A. C.; Aksnes, K.; Green, D. W. E.; Marsden, B. G.; Nakano, S.; Lara, Martin; Pitjeva, Elena V.; Sphar, T.; Ticha, J.; Williams, G.

    2015-08-01

    IAU Commission 6 ``Astronomical Telegrams'' had a single business meeting during the Beijing General Assembly of the IAU. It took place on Friday, August 24, 2012. The meeting was attended by five C6 members (N. N. Samus; D. W. E. Green; S. Nakano; J. Ticha; and H. Yamaoka). Also present was Prof. F. Genova as a representative of the IAU Division B. She told the audience about the current restructuring of IAU Commissions and Divisions and consequences for the future of C6.

  18. Quantum internet using code division multiple access

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu-xi; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Wu, Re-Bing; Gao, Feifei; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels. PMID:23860488

  19. Positive effects, side effects, and adverse events of clinical holistic medicine. A review of Gerda Boyesen's nonpharmaceutical mind-body medicine (biodynamic body-psychotherapy) at two centers in the United Kingdom and Germany.

    PubMed

    Allmer, Charlotte; Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2009-01-01

    To review adverse events of intensive, clinical holistic medicine (CHM) as it is practiced in holistic body-psychotherapy in England and Germany. Gerda Boyesen's "biodynamic body-psychotherapy" (BBP) is an intensive type of holistic mind-body medicine used by Boyesen at two centers. About 13,500 patients were treated during 1985-2005 period and studied for side effects and adverse events. The first author worked closely with Boyesen 1995-2005 with full insight in all aspects of the therapy and provided the data on side-effects. Therapy helped chronic patients with physical, psychological, sexual, psychiatric and existential problems to improve health, ability, and quality of life (NNT (number needed to treat) = 1-3). Effective in the treatment of mentally ill patients (schizophrenia, anxiety, poor mental health, low general ability). For retraumatization, brief reactive psychosis, depression, depersonalization and derealization, implanted memories, side effects from manipulations of the body, suicide/suicide attempts, hospitalization for physical and mental health problem during or 90 days after treatment, NNH (number needed to harm) > 13,500. Intensive, holistic non-drug medicine is helpful for physical, sexual, psychological, psychiatric and existential problems and is completely safe for the patient. The therapeutic value TV = NNH/NNT > 5,000. Altogether about 18,000 patients treated with different subtypes of CHM in four different countries have now been evaluated for effects, side effects and adverse events, with similar results.

  20. General view of site. Chemical House is in the distance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of site. Chemical House is in the distance at left, Administration/Filter Building at right. Looking northwest. Baldwin Reservoir lies beneath the greensward - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  1. 77 FR 32021 - Significant New Use Rule on a Certain Chemical Substance; Withdrawal of Significant New Use Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... Substances Control Act (TSCA) for a chemical substance identified generically as C15 olefins, which was the...: Kenneth Moss, Chemical Control Division (7405M), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, Environmental... recordkeeping requirements. Dated: May 18, 2012. Maria J. Doa, Director, Chemical Control Division, Office...

  2. Predicting Partitioning and Diffusion Properties of Nonpolar Chemicals in Biotic Media and Passive Sampler Phases by GC × GC.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Deedar; Arey, J Samuel

    2017-02-14

    The chemical parameters needed to explain and predict bioavailability, biodynamics, and baseline toxicity are not readily available for most nonpolar chemicals detected in the environment. Here, we demonstrate that comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) retention times can be used to predict 26 relevant properties for nonpolar chemicals, specifically: partition coefficients for diverse biotic media and passive sampler phases; aquatic baseline toxicity; and relevant diffusion coefficients. The considered biotic and passive sampler phases include membrane and storage lipids, serum and muscle proteins, carbohydrates, algae, mussels, polydimethylsiloxane, polyethylene, polyoxymethylene, polyacrylate, polyurethane, and semipermeable membrane devices. GC × GC-based chemical property predictions are validated with a compilation of 1038 experimental property data collected from the literature. As an example application, we overlay a map of baseline toxicity to fathead minnows onto the separated analyte signal of a polychlorinated alkanes (chlorinated paraffins) technical mixture that contains 7820 congeners. In a second application, GC × GC-estimated properties are used to parametrize multiphase partitioning models for mammalian tissues and organs. In a third example, we estimate chemical depuration kinetics for mussels. Finally, we illustrate an approach to screen the GC × GC chromatogram for nonpolar chemicals of potentially high concern, defined based on their GC × GC-estimated biopartitioning properties, diffusion properties, and baseline toxicity.

  3. Trial NCT02095145 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Trial NCT02326805 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Clinical Trials Node | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. 2013 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Problems on Divisibility of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.; Smoak, James

    2004-01-01

    Twelve unusual problems involving divisibility of the binomial coefficients are represented in this article. The problems are listed in "The Problems" section. All twelve problems have short solutions which are listed in "The Solutions" section. These problems could be assigned to students in any course in which the binomial theorem and Pascal's…

  8. 7 CFR 29.16 - Division.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Division. 29.16 Section 29.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  9. Trial NCT02063698 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. 2015 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. 2016 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. 2014 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Trial NCT01169259 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. King County Division of Parks and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

    Presented are duplications of the responses given by the King County Division of Parks and Recreation (Seattle, Washington) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client…

  15. Keeping Children Safe: OJJDP's Child Protection Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas

    More than two decades of research have pointed to the connection between childhood maltreatment and delinquency. In addition, recent research confirms that harm is inflicted on children who are subjected to family and community violence. The Child Protection Division was created in an effort to bring child protection to the forefront and to…

  16. Physics Division activities report, 1986--1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the research activities of the Physics Division for the years 1986 and 1987. Areas of research discussed in this paper are: research on e/sup +/e/sup /minus// interactions; research on p/bar p/ interactions; experiment at TRIUMF; double beta decay; high energy astrophysics; interdisciplinary research; and advanced technology development and the SSC.

  17. Trial NCT01849250 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Kara Smigel Croker | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Kara Smigel Croker is the Communications Manager for the National Cancer Institute Division of Cancer Prevention. She coordinates and supports all aspects of communication, including media contacts, writing and editing of reports and responses, divisional websites, and social media. |

  19. Thursday's Agenda | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    TimeAgenda8:30 am - 8:50 amRegistration - Networking8:50 am - 8:55 amWelcome and Opening RemarksLeslie Ford, MDAssociate Director for Clinical ResearchDivision of Cancer Prevention, NCIEva Szabo, MD Chief, Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group |

  20. Trial NCT00917735 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Trial NCT02134925 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Active Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Trial NCT01968798 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Administrative Resource Center | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Trial NCT01238172 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Trial NCT01391689 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Trial NCT02581137 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Trial NCT01594502 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Force Integration Doctrine and Division Staff Organization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-06

    Procedures ......................... 15 End Notes ................................... 16 q -- .- N -’ . -- - . - , - , ga’ . ’ , . . , .w...3o -Managing Change in a Division ............. 39 End Notes ................................... 43 3. THE ARMY AND CHANGE A. The Necessity For...8217; -. V AY VA~’ ’% % % . Z Tt ’ -.1 -- ~w.r~ K. A Historical Perspective- The US Army ........ 65 End Notes ................................... 69 4

  11. Trial NCT01728571 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Trial NCT01793233 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Trial NCT01661764 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Trial NCT01141231 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Origins of the Sexual Division of Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibowitz, Lila

    An interactive, biosocial model of early hominids presents evidence that physical sex differences are not the basis for the sexual division of labor as is commonly believed. Production (the deliberate collection and distribution of food) developed among early hominids as a prerequisite for survival. Although the population appears to have had…

  16. Shizuko Sei, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Staff Directory | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Annalisa Gnoleba, MSA | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Mrs. Annalisa Gnoleba is the Public Health Analyst for the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute. In this position, Mrs. Gnoleba serves as the analyst for developing and formulating short and long range public health program goals, objectives and policies. |

  19. Early Detection Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Trial NCT00392561 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.