Science.gov

Sample records for chemical bond overlap

  1. Features of chemical bonds based on the overlap polarizabilities: diatomic and solid-state systems with the frozen-density embedding approach.

    PubMed

    Moura, Renaldo T; Duarte, Gian C S; da Silva, Thiago E; Malta, Oscar L; Longo, Ricardo L

    2015-03-28

    The chemical bond overlap properties were obtained for alkali halides NaY (Y = F, Cl, Br), alkaline-earth chalcogenides MX (M = Ca, Mg and X = O, S, Se) and alkali and alkali-earth metals (Li, Na, and Mg) in diatomic and solid-state systems using an embedding approach based on the frozen density functional theory to simulate the crystalline effects. The computational protocol established provides errors for bond distances smaller than 1%. The results indicate that larger chemical bond covalency leads to larger absorption or scattering by the overlap region. The ionic specific valence and overlap polarizability are closely related to the valence orbital compactness measured by the sum of Mulliken electronegativities. The embedding approach used in this work makes it possible to quantify the effects of the crystalline environment on the chemical bond overlap properties. In the solid-state, the bond overlap charges are less polarizable, in cases of well-known ionic systems (provided by electronegativity differences), leading to smaller chemical bond covalency in solids than in diatomics. The spectroscopic properties of the polarizability of the electron density in the overlap region of a chemical bond could be measured in the 1-20 eV spectral region and could be used to characterize some bands in several spectra whose assignments are ambiguous or not available.

  2. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  3. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  4. Chemical bonding technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plueddemann, E.

    1986-01-01

    Primers employed in bonding together the various material interfaces in a photovoltaic module are being developed. The approach develops interfacial adhesion by generating actual chemical bonds between the various materials bonded together. The current status of the program is described along with the progress toward developing two general purpose primers for ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), one for glass and metals, and another for plastic films.

  5. Chemical Bonds I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical bonding is discussed from a bond energy, rather than a wave mechanics, viewpoint. This approach is considered to be more suitable for the average student. (The second part of the article will appear in a later issue of the journal.) (AL)

  6. Chemical Bonds I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical bonding is discussed from a bond energy, rather than a wave mechanics, viewpoint. This approach is considered to be more suitable for the average student. (The second part of the article will appear in a later issue of the journal.) (AL)

  7. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  8. The source of chemical bonding.

    PubMed

    Needham, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Developments in the application of quantum mechanics to the understanding of the chemical bond are traced with a view to examining the evolving conception of the covalent bond. Beginning with the first quantum mechanical resolution of the apparent paradox in Lewis's conception of a shared electron pair bond by Heitler and London, the ensuing account takes up the challenge molecular orbital theory seemed to pose to the classical conception of the bond. We will see that the threat of delocalisation can be overstated, although it is questionable whether this should be seen as reinstating the issue of the existence of the chemical bond. More salient are some recent developments in a longstanding discussion of how to understand the causal aspects of the bonding interaction--the nature of the force involved in the covalent link--which are taken up in the latter part of the paper.

  9. Clarifying Chemical Bonding. Overcoming Our Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hapkiewicz, Annis

    1991-01-01

    Demonstrations to help students change their misconceptions about chemical bond breaking are presented. Students' misconceptions about chemical bonds in both biological and chemical systems are discussed. A calculation for the release of energy from respiration is presented. (KR)

  10. Clarifying Chemical Bonding. Overcoming Our Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hapkiewicz, Annis

    1991-01-01

    Demonstrations to help students change their misconceptions about chemical bond breaking are presented. Students' misconceptions about chemical bonds in both biological and chemical systems are discussed. A calculation for the release of energy from respiration is presented. (KR)

  11. A Model for the Chemical Bond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2004-01-01

    Bond stereochemistry in polyatomic hydrides is explained in terms of the principle of bond energies maximization, which yields X-H straight bonds and suggests the formation of appropriate sp hybrids on the central atom. An introduction to the electron charge distribution in molecules is given, and atomic, overlap, gross and formal charges are…

  12. A Model for the Chemical Bond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2004-01-01

    Bond stereochemistry in polyatomic hydrides is explained in terms of the principle of bond energies maximization, which yields X-H straight bonds and suggests the formation of appropriate sp hybrids on the central atom. An introduction to the electron charge distribution in molecules is given, and atomic, overlap, gross and formal charges are…

  13. Density Functionals of Chemical Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2008-01-01

    The behavior of electrons in general many-electronic systems throughout the density functionals of energy is reviewed. The basic physico-chemical concepts of density functional theory are employed to highlight the energy role in chemical structure while its extended influence in electronic localization function helps in chemical bonding understanding. In this context the energy functionals accompanied by electronic localization functions may provide a comprehensive description of the global-local levels electronic structures in general and of chemical bonds in special. Becke-Edgecombe and author’s Markovian electronic localization functions are discussed at atomic, molecular and solid state levels. Then, the analytical survey of the main workable kinetic, exchange, and correlation density functionals within local and gradient density approximations is undertaken. The hierarchy of various energy functionals is formulated by employing both the parabolic and statistical correlation degree of them with the electronegativity and chemical hardness indices by means of quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) analysis for basic atomic and molecular systems. PMID:19325846

  14. G. N. Lewis and the Chemical Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the contributions of G. N. Lewis to chemistry, focusing on his formulation of the basic principle of the chemical bond--the idea that the chemical bond consists of a pair of electrons held jointly by two atoms. (JN)

  15. G. N. Lewis and the Chemical Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the contributions of G. N. Lewis to chemistry, focusing on his formulation of the basic principle of the chemical bond--the idea that the chemical bond consists of a pair of electrons held jointly by two atoms. (JN)

  16. Heuristic overlap-exchange model of noble gas chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, Frank J.

    2004-05-01

    It is now generally recognized that overlap-exchange interactions are the primary cause of the medium-dependent magnetic shielding (chemical shift) in all noble gases except helium, although the attractive electrostatic-dispersion (van der Waals) interactions play an indirect role in determining the penetration of the interacting species into the repulsive overlap-exchange region. The short-range nature of these overlap-exchange interactions, combined with the fact that they often can be approximated by simple functions of the overlap of the wave functions of the interacting species, suggests a useful semiempirical model of these chemical shifts. In it the total shielding is the sum of shieldings due to pairwise interactions of the noble gas atom with the individual atoms of the medium, with the "atomic" shielding terms either estimated by simple functions of the atomic overlap integrals averaged over their Boltzmann-weighted separations, or determined by fits to experimental data in systems whose complexity makes the former procedure impractical. Results for 129Xe chemical shifts in the noble gases and in a variety of molecular and condensed systems, including families of n-alkanes, straight-chain alcohols, and the endohedral compounds Xe@C60 and Xe@C70 are encouraging for the applicability of the model to systems of technical and biomedical interest.

  17. Valence-Bond Theory and Chemical Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Douglas J.; Trinajstic, Nenad

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the importance of valence bond theory on the quantum-mechanical theory of chemical structure and the nature of the chemical bond. Described briefly are early VB theory, development of VB theory, modern versions, solid-state applications, models, treatment in textbooks, and flaws in criticisms of valence bond theory. (KR)

  18. Valence-Bond Theory and Chemical Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Douglas J.; Trinajstic, Nenad

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the importance of valence bond theory on the quantum-mechanical theory of chemical structure and the nature of the chemical bond. Described briefly are early VB theory, development of VB theory, modern versions, solid-state applications, models, treatment in textbooks, and flaws in criticisms of valence bond theory. (KR)

  19. The Chemical Bond in C2.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Markus; Frenking, Gernot

    2016-03-14

    Quantum chemical calculations using the complete active space of the valence orbitals have been carried out for Hn CCHn (n=0-3) and N2. The quadratic force constants and the stretching potentials of Hn CCHn have been calculated at the CASSCF/cc-pVTZ level. The bond dissociation energies of the C-C bonds of C2 and HC≡CH were computed using explicitly correlated CASPT2-F12/cc-pVTZ-F12 wave functions. The bond dissociation energies and the force constants suggest that C2 has a weaker C-C bond than acetylene. The analysis of the CASSCF wavefunctions in conjunction with the effective bond orders of the multiple bonds shows that there are four bonding components in C2, while there are only three in acetylene and in N2. The bonding components in C2 consist of two weakly bonding σ bonds and two electron-sharing π bonds. The bonding situation in C2 can be described with the σ bonds in Be2 that are enforced by two π bonds. There is no single Lewis structure that adequately depicts the bonding situation in C2. The assignment of quadruple bonding in C2 is misleading, because the bond is weaker than the triple bond in HC≡CH. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Compares the coulumbic point charge model for hydrogen chloride with the valence bond model. It is not possible to assign either a nonpolar or ionic canonical form of the valence bond model, while the covalent-ionic bond distribution does conform to the point charge model. (JM)

  1. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Compares the coulumbic point charge model for hydrogen chloride with the valence bond model. It is not possible to assign either a nonpolar or ionic canonical form of the valence bond model, while the covalent-ionic bond distribution does conform to the point charge model. (JM)

  2. Evaluating Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kim-Chwee Daniel; Treagust, David F.

    1999-01-01

    Outlines problems students have with understanding the abstract concept of chemical bonding as revealed in previous research. Describes the development of a two-tier multiple-choice diagnostic instrument for assessing alternative conceptions about chemical bonding held by 14-16 year olds. Discusses the instrument and its findings for a group of…

  3. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a bonding theory which provides a framework for the description of a wide range of substances and provides quantitative information of remarkable accuracy with far less computational effort than that required of other approaches. Includes applications, such as calculation of bond energies of two binary hydrides (methane and diborane).…

  4. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a bonding theory which provides a framework for the description of a wide range of substances and provides quantitative information of remarkable accuracy with far less computational effort than that required of other approaches. Includes applications, such as calculation of bond energies of two binary hydrides (methane and diborane).…

  5. Analysis of Bonding between Conjugated Organic Molecules and Noble Metal Surfaces Using Orbital Overlap Populations.

    PubMed

    Rangger, Gerold M; Romaner, Lorenz; Hofmann, Oliver T; Heimel, Georg; Ramsey, Michael G; Zojer, Egbert

    2010-11-09

    The electronic structure of metal-organic interfaces is of paramount importance for the properties of organic electronic and single-molecule devices. Here, we use so-called orbital overlap populations derived from slab-type band-structure calculations to analyze the covalent contribution to the bonding between an adsorbate layer and a metal. Using two prototypical molecules, the strong acceptor 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) on Ag(111) and the strong donor 1H,1'H-[4,4']bipyridinylidene (HV0) on Au(111), we present overlap populations as particularly versatile tools for describing the metal-organic interaction. Going beyond traditional approaches, in which overlap populations are represented in an atomic orbital basis, we also explore the use of a molecular orbital basis to gain significant additional insight. On the basis of the derived quantities, it is possible to identify the parts of the molecules responsible for the bonding and to analyze which of the molecular orbitals and metal bands most strongly contribute to the interaction and where on the energy scale they interact in bonding or antibonding fashion.

  6. Teaching Chemical Bonding: A Resource Book for Senior Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Margaret

    This document presents an instructional strategy for teaching chemical bonding using parables and music. Games, student interactions, and worksheets are included in the lesson plans. Topics include metallic bonding, covalent bonding including molecular and network structure, and ionic bonding. (JRH)

  7. Chemical Bonding Technology: Direct Investigation of Interfacial Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. L.; Boerio, F. J.; Plueddemann, E. P.; Miller, J.; Willis, P. B.; Cuddihy, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    This is the third Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project document reporting on chemical bonding technology for terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) modules. The impetus for this work originated in the late 1970s when PV modules employing silicone encapsulation materials were undergoing delamination during outdoor exposure. At that time, manufacturers were not employing adhesion promoters and, hence, module interfaces in common with the silicone materials were only in physical contact and therefore easily prone to separation if, for example, water were to penetrate to the interfaces. Delamination with silicone materials virtually vanished when adhesion promoters, recommended by silicone manufacturers, were used. The activities related to the direct investigation of chemically bonded interfaces are described.

  8. Teaching Chemical Bonding through Jigsaw Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of jigsaw cooperative learning in teaching chemical bonding at tertiary level. This study was carried out in two different classes in the Department of Primary Science Education of Ataturk University during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was the non-jigsaw group (control) and the other was the…

  9. Learners' Mental Models of Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Richard K.; Treagust, David F.

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a study involving two each year-12, undergraduate and postgraduate Australian students. Elicits learners' mental models for chemical bonding using semi-structured interviews comprising a three-phase interview protocol. Concludes that learners across all three academic levels preferred simple, realistic mental models for chemical…

  10. Constructivist Approach: Removing Misconceptions about Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzuntiryaki, Esen

    The purpose of the present study is to examine the effect of instruction based on constructivist approach on 9th grade students' understanding of chemical bonding concepts (n=41). Also, the effects of gender differences were investigated. Control group students were taught by traditional instruction. Experimental group students were instructed by…

  11. Teaching Chemical Bonding through Jigsaw Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of jigsaw cooperative learning in teaching chemical bonding at tertiary level. This study was carried out in two different classes in the Department of Primary Science Education of Ataturk University during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was the non-jigsaw group (control) and the other was the…

  12. The law of constant rejection. [chemical bonding in crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpotts, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Improvements in analytical technique, study of multielement partitioning in natural systems, and improvements in ionic radius values have permitted construction of Onuma diagrams, in which the logarithm of partition coefficient is plotted versus ionic radius. The optimum radii, corresponding to crystallographic sites, do change in response to changes in major element composition for any particular mineral-type. In natural systems elements compete for sites rather than substituting for another element. It is proposed on empirical grounds, for equilibrium ionic bonding, that Onuma diagram curves for a particular lattice site are parabolic near optimum radius, linear elsewhere, parallel for different valences, and mirror images on opposite sides of optimum. Deviations may be due to overlapping peaks, liquid structure, polyvalence, bonding differences, contamination, kinetics, alteration, etc. However, dominant crystal-chemical control is indicated.

  13. The law of constant rejection. [chemical bonding in crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpotts, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Improvements in analytical technique, study of multielement partitioning in natural systems, and improvements in ionic radius values have permitted construction of Onuma diagrams, in which the logarithm of partition coefficient is plotted versus ionic radius. The optimum radii, corresponding to crystallographic sites, do change in response to changes in major element composition for any particular mineral-type. In natural systems elements compete for sites rather than substituting for another element. It is proposed on empirical grounds, for equilibrium ionic bonding, that Onuma diagram curves for a particular lattice site are parabolic near optimum radius, linear elsewhere, parallel for different valences, and mirror images on opposite sides of optimum. Deviations may be due to overlapping peaks, liquid structure, polyvalence, bonding differences, contamination, kinetics, alteration, etc. However, dominant crystal-chemical control is indicated.

  14. Chemical bonding for precision optical assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Katie; Burke, Jan; Oreb, Bozenko

    2011-02-01

    We report on the optimization of precision optical component assemblies for space application with respect to mechanical resilience and retention of optical tolerances such as flatness and angles. Optimized parameters include: the cleaning method of the surfaces to be joined; type, concentration, and quantity of the chemical bonding agent; and post-bonding and curing conditions. Experimental studies and quality assurance are complicated by the large statistical spread in breaking stress, which requires the preparation of a large number of samples. The results previously reported in literature have focused primarily on fused silica, rather than space-qualifiable materials such as Zerodur® and ULE®, and have typically addressed only one or two of the parameters. This study provides a comprehensive picture and a better general understanding of what makes a bond reliably strong.

  15. Chemical bonding: the orthogonal valence-bond view.

    PubMed

    Sax, Alexander F

    2015-04-21

    Chemical bonding is the stabilization of a molecular system by charge- and spin-reorganization processes in chemical reactions. These processes are said to be local, because the number of atoms involved is very small. With multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) wave functions, these processes can be calculated, but the local information is hidden by the delocalized molecular orbitals (MO) used to construct the wave functions. The transformation of such wave functions into valence bond (VB) wave functions, which are based on localized orbitals, reveals the hidden information; this transformation is called a VB reading of MCSCF wave functions. The two-electron VB wave functions describing the Lewis electron pair that connects two atoms are frequently called covalent or neutral, suggesting that these wave functions describe an electronic situation where two electrons are never located at the same atom; such electronic situations and the wave functions describing them are called ionic. When the distance between two atoms decreases, however, every covalent VB wave function composed of non-orthogonal atomic orbitals changes its character from neutral to ionic. However, this change in the character of conventional VB wave functions is hidden by its mathematical form. Orthogonal VB wave functions composed of orthonormalized orbitals never change their character. When localized fragment orbitals are used instead of atomic orbitals, one can decide which local information is revealed and which remains hidden. In this paper, we analyze four chemical reactions by transforming the MCSCF wave functions into orthogonal VB wave functions; we show how the reactions are influenced by changing the atoms involved or by changing their local symmetry. Using orthogonal instead of non-orthogonal orbitals is not just a technical issue; it also changes the interpretation, revealing the properties of wave functions that remain otherwise undetected.

  16. Chemical Bonding: The Orthogonal Valence-Bond View

    PubMed Central

    Sax, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical bonding is the stabilization of a molecular system by charge- and spin-reorganization processes in chemical reactions. These processes are said to be local, because the number of atoms involved is very small. With multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) wave functions, these processes can be calculated, but the local information is hidden by the delocalized molecular orbitals (MO) used to construct the wave functions. The transformation of such wave functions into valence bond (VB) wave functions, which are based on localized orbitals, reveals the hidden information; this transformation is called a VB reading of MCSCF wave functions. The two-electron VB wave functions describing the Lewis electron pair that connects two atoms are frequently called covalent or neutral, suggesting that these wave functions describe an electronic situation where two electrons are never located at the same atom; such electronic situations and the wave functions describing them are called ionic. When the distance between two atoms decreases, however, every covalent VB wave function composed of non-orthogonal atomic orbitals changes its character from neutral to ionic. However, this change in the character of conventional VB wave functions is hidden by its mathematical form. Orthogonal VB wave functions composed of orthonormalized orbitals never change their character. When localized fragment orbitals are used instead of atomic orbitals, one can decide which local information is revealed and which remains hidden. In this paper, we analyze four chemical reactions by transforming the MCSCF wave functions into orthogonal VB wave functions; we show how the reactions are influenced by changing the atoms involved or by changing their local symmetry. Using orthogonal instead of non-orthogonal orbitals is not just a technical issue; it also changes the interpretation, revealing the properties of wave functions that remain otherwise undetected. PMID:25906476

  17. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung Y.; Lohan, Dirk; Elizabeth, Anne

    2003-01-01

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  18. Chemical bonding technology for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, D. R.; Cuddihy, E. F.; Plueddeman, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Encapsulated photovoltaic modules must hold together for 20 years, reliably resisting delamination and separation of any of the component materials. Delamination of encapsulation materials from each other, or from solar cells and interconnects, can create voids for accumulation of water, promoting corrosive failure. Delamination of silicone elastomers from unprimed surfaces was a common occurrence with early modules, but the incidences of silicone delamination with later modules decreased when adhesion promoters recommended by silicone manufacturers were used. An investigation of silicone delamination from unprimed surfaces successfully identified the mechanism, which was related to atmospheric oxygen and moisture. This early finding indicated that reliance on physical bonding of encapsulation interfaces for long life in an outdoor environment would be risky. For long outdoor life, the material components of a module must therefore be held together by weather-stable adhesion promoters that desirably form strong, interfacial chemical bonds.

  19. Bonding pathways of high-pressure chemical transformations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Anguang; Zhang, Fan

    2013-09-25

    A three-stage bonding pathway towards high-pressure chemical transformations from molecular precursors or intermediate states has been identified by first-principles simulations. With the evolution of principal stress tensor components in the response of chemical bonding to compressive loading, the three stages can be defined as the van der Waals bonding destruction, a bond breaking and forming reaction, and equilibrium of new bonds. The three-stage bonding pathway leads to the establishment of a fundamental principle of chemical bonding under compression. It reveals that during high-pressure chemical transformation, electrons moving away from functional groups follow anti-addition, collision-free paths to form new bonds in counteracting the local stress confinement. In applying this principle, a large number of molecular precursors were identified for high-pressure chemical transformations, resulting in new materials.

  20. Emphasizing the Significance of Electrostatic Interactions in Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a pedagogical approach to help students understand chemical bonding by emphasizing the importance of electrostatic interactions between atoms. The approach draws on prior studies that have indicated many misconceptions among students in understanding the nature of the chemical bond and energetics associated with bond formation…

  1. Journal article overlap among Index Medicus, Science Citation Index, Biological Abstracts, and Chemical Abstracts.

    PubMed Central

    Poyer, R K

    1984-01-01

    Journal article overlap is defined as the same journal article being indexed by two or more services. Using journal references from seventy dissertations written in the preclinical sciences, the extent of journal article overlap among Index Medicus, Science Citation Index, Biological Abstracts, and Chemical Abstracts was examined. Of the 7,969 journal references cited, 92% were indexed by at least two of these services; 591 articles were covered by only one of the services, and 55 articles were not indexed. A discussion of the advantages and costs of journal article overlap is presented. PMID:6388693

  2. Journal article overlap among Index Medicus, Science Citation Index, Biological Abstracts, and Chemical Abstracts.

    PubMed

    Poyer, R K

    1984-10-01

    Journal article overlap is defined as the same journal article being indexed by two or more services. Using journal references from seventy dissertations written in the preclinical sciences, the extent of journal article overlap among Index Medicus, Science Citation Index, Biological Abstracts, and Chemical Abstracts was examined. Of the 7,969 journal references cited, 92% were indexed by at least two of these services; 591 articles were covered by only one of the services, and 55 articles were not indexed. A discussion of the advantages and costs of journal article overlap is presented.

  3. Spontaneous and specific activation of chemical bonds in macromolecular fluids.

    PubMed

    Park, Insun; Shirvanyants, David; Nese, Alper; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S

    2010-09-08

    Mechanical activation of chemical bonds typically involves the application of external forces, which implies a broad distribution of bond tensions. We demonstrate that controlling the flow profile of a macromolecular fluid generates and delineates mechanical force concentration, enabling a hierarchical activation of chemical bonds on different length scales from the macroscopic to the molecular. Bond tension is spontaneously generated within brushlike macromolecules as they spread on a solid substrate. The molecular architecture creates an uneven distribution of tension in the covalent bonds, leading to spatially controlled bond scission. By controlling the flow rate and the gradient of the film pressure, one can sever the flowing macromolecules with high precision. Specific chemical bonds are activated within distinct macromolecules located in a defined area of a thin film. Furthermore, the flow-controlled loading rate enables quantitative analysis of the bond activation parameters.

  4. Chemical Bonding of Polymer on Carbon Nanotube

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    vetIcal displacement of CNT z dl:streched length of C-C bond in polymer .Z dLI: streching of C-C bond within polymer SdL2: streched length Of C-C...bond at interface - dL2: streching of C-C bond at intedace of B of polymer/CNT ’ n polymer-CNT at first bonding site E 1 1 I dL3: streching of C-C bond

  5. The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Ouyang, L.; Randaccio, L.; Rulis, P.; Ching, W. Y.; Bach, M.; Neumann, M.

    2003-05-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) and B12-derivative (methylcobalamin) are studied by means of X-ray emission (XES) and photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The obtained results are compared with ab initio electronic structure calculations using the orthogonalized linear combination of the atomic orbital method (OLCAO). We show that the chemical bonding in vitamin B12 is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and relatively weak axial Co-N bond. It is further confirmed that the Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is stronger than that of methylcobalamin resulting in their different biological activity.

  6. Bioluminescence: from chemical bonds to photons.

    PubMed

    Hastings, J W

    1975-01-01

    The biological transformation of chemical to photic energy involves an enzyme-mediated chemiluminescent reaction, in which one of the products exists in an electronically excited state, emitting a photon as it returns to the ground state. The colour of bioluminescence differs in different organisms, ranging from the deep blue (460 nm) of certain crustacea, through the bluish green (490 nm) of some bacteria, the green (530 nm) of mushrooms to the red (about 600 nm) of the railroad worm. In one case, energy transfer has been demonstrated from the enzyme system to material that emits light with a longer wavelength. The energies involved range from about 165 to 250 kJ/einstein (40 to 60 kcal/einstein). Boyle first showed that air was involved in bioluminescence in 1668 in his experiments with an air pump. Over the past 100 years, it has become clear that most if not all bioluminescent systems require molecular oxygen. The recent isolation and characterization of an oxygen-containing (peroxide) enzyme intermediate from the bacterial system is described and a reaction mechanism is postulated. This scheme is compared with other hypothetical mechanisms, in particular those involving a four-membered ring intermediate, a dioxetane, in which the simultaneous cleavage of two bonds leaves one product in an excited state. I shall discuss the special role of luciferases in bioluminescence, especially in flashing mechanisms involving 'precharged' intermediates.

  7. Upper Secondary Teachers' Knowledge for Teaching Chemical Bonding Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergqvist, Anna; Drechsler, Michal; Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have shown a growing interest in science teachers' professional knowledge in recent decades. The article focuses on how chemistry teachers impart chemical bonding, one of the most important topics covered in upper secondary school chemistry courses. Chemical bonding is primarily taught using models, which are key for understanding…

  8. Teaching and Learning the Concept of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy Nahum, Tami; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi; Taber, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical bonding is one of the key and basic concepts in chemistry. The learning of many of the concepts taught in chemistry, in both secondary schools as well as in the colleges, is dependent upon understanding fundamental ideas related to chemical bonding. Nevertheless, the concept is perceived by teachers, as well as by learners, as difficult,…

  9. Teaching and Learning the Concept of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy Nahum, Tami; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi; Taber, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical bonding is one of the key and basic concepts in chemistry. The learning of many of the concepts taught in chemistry, in both secondary schools as well as in the colleges, is dependent upon understanding fundamental ideas related to chemical bonding. Nevertheless, the concept is perceived by teachers, as well as by learners, as difficult,…

  10. Upper Secondary Teachers' Knowledge for Teaching Chemical Bonding Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergqvist, Anna; Drechsler, Michal; Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have shown a growing interest in science teachers' professional knowledge in recent decades. The article focuses on how chemistry teachers impart chemical bonding, one of the most important topics covered in upper secondary school chemistry courses. Chemical bonding is primarily taught using models, which are key for understanding…

  11. A corpuscular picture of electrons in chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Koji

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a theory of chemical bond with a corpuscular picture of electrons. It employs a minimal set of localized electron wave packets with "floating and breathing" degrees of freedom and the spin-coupling of non-orthogonal valence-bond theory. Its accuracy for describing potential energy curves of chemical bonds in ground and excited states of spin singlet and triplet is examined.

  12. Teaching of Chemical Bonding: A Study of Swedish and South African Students' Conceptions of Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimmermark, Anders; Ohrstrom, Lars; Mårtensson, Jerker; Davidowitz, Bette

    2016-01-01

    Almost 700 Swedish and South African students from the upper secondary school and first-term chemistry university level responded to our survey on concepts of chemical bonding. The national secondary school curricula and most common textbooks for both countries were also surveyed and compared for their content on chemical bonding. Notable…

  13. Teaching of Chemical Bonding: A Study of Swedish and South African Students' Conceptions of Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimmermark, Anders; Ohrstrom, Lars; Mårtensson, Jerker; Davidowitz, Bette

    2016-01-01

    Almost 700 Swedish and South African students from the upper secondary school and first-term chemistry university level responded to our survey on concepts of chemical bonding. The national secondary school curricula and most common textbooks for both countries were also surveyed and compared for their content on chemical bonding. Notable…

  14. Integrated defense system overlaps as a disease model: with examples for multiple chemical sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Rowat, S C

    1998-01-01

    The central nervous, immune, and endocrine systems communicate through multiple common messengers. Over evolutionary time, what may be termed integrated defense system(s) (IDS) have developed to coordinate these communications for specific contexts; these include the stress response, acute-phase response, nonspecific immune response, immune response to antigen, kindling, tolerance, time-dependent sensitization, neurogenic switching, and traumatic dissociation (TD). These IDSs are described and their overlap is examined. Three models of disease production are generated: damage, in which IDSs function incorrectly; inadequate/inappropriate, in which IDS response is outstripped by a changing context; and evolving/learning, in which the IDS learned response to a context is deemed pathologic. Mechanisms of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) are developed from several IDS disease models. Model 1A is pesticide damage to the central nervous system, overlapping with body chemical burdens, TD, and chronic zinc deficiency; model 1B is benzene disruption of interleukin-1, overlapping with childhood developmental windows and hapten-antigenic spreading; and model 1C is autoimmunity to immunoglobulin-G (IgG), overlapping with spreading to other IgG-inducers, sudden spreading of inciters, and food-contaminating chemicals. Model 2A is chemical and stress overload, including comparison with the susceptibility/sensitization/triggering/spreading model; model 2B is genetic mercury allergy, overlapping with: heavy metals/zinc displacement and childhood/gestational mercury exposures; and model 3 is MCS as evolution and learning. Remarks are offered on current MCS research. Problems with clinical measurement are suggested on the basis of IDS models. Large-sample patient self-report epidemiology is described as an alternative or addition to clinical biomarker and animal testing. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9539008

  15. The chemical bond as an emergent phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Jon C.; Ho, Vinh; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2017-05-01

    We first argue that the covalent bond and the various closed-shell interactions can be thought of as symmetry broken versions of one and the same interaction, viz., the multi-center bond. We use specially chosen molecular units to show that the symmetry breaking is controlled by density and electronegativity variation. We show that the bond order changes with bond deformation but in a step-like fashion, regions of near constancy separated by electronic localization transitions. These will often cause displacive transitions as well so that the bond strength, order, and length are established self-consistently. We further argue on the inherent relation of the covalent, closed-shell, and multi-center interactions with ionic and metallic bonding. All of these interactions can be viewed as distinct sectors on a phase diagram with density and electronegativity variation as control variables; the ionic and covalent/secondary sectors are associated with on-site and bond-order charge density wave, respectively, the metallic sector with an electronic fluid. While displaying a contiguity at low densities, the metallic and ionic interactions represent distinct phases separated by discontinuous transitions at sufficiently high densities. Multi-center interactions emerge as a hybrid of the metallic and ionic bond that results from spatial coexistence of delocalized and localized electrons. In the present description, the issue of the stability of a compound is that of the mutual miscibility of electronic fluids with distinct degrees of electron localization, supra-atomic ordering in complex inorganic compounds coming about naturally. The notions of electronic localization advanced hereby suggest a high throughput, automated procedure for screening candidate compounds and structures with regard to stability, without the need for computationally costly geometric optimization.

  16. Closing in on chemical bonds by opening up relativity theory.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Cynthia K

    2008-03-01

    This paper develops a connection between the phenomenology of chemical bonding and the theory of relativity. Empirical correlations between electron numbers in atoms and chemical bond stabilities in molecules are first reviewed and extended. Quantitative chemical bond strengths are then related to ionization potentials in elements. Striking patterns in ionization potentials are revealed when the data are viewed in an element-independent way, where element-specific details are removed via an appropriate scaling law. The scale factor involved is not explained by quantum mechanics; it is revealed only when one goes back further, to the development of Einstein's special relativity theory.

  17. Closing in on Chemical Bonds by Opening up Relativity Theory

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Cynthia Kolb

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops a connection between the phenomenology of chemical bonding and the theory of relativity. Empirical correlations between electron numbers in atoms and chemical bond stabilities in molecules are first reviewed and extended. Quantitative chemical bond strengths are then related to ionization potentials in elements. Striking patterns in ionization potentials are revealed when the data are viewed in an element-independent way, where element-specific details are removed via an appropriate scaling law. The scale factor involved is not explained by quantum mechanics; it is revealed only when one goes back further, to the development of Einstein’s special relativity theory. PMID:19325749

  18. Effects of chemically modified wood on bond durability

    Treesearch

    Rishawn Brandon; Rebecca E. Ibach; Charles R. Frihart

    2005-01-01

    Chemical modification of wood can improve its dimensional stability and resistance to biological degradation and moisture, but modification can also create a new surface for bonding. Acetylation of wood results in the loss of hydroxyl groups, making the wood more hydrophobic and reduces its ability to hydrogen-bond with the adhesive. In contrast, reacting wood with...

  19. Overlap Dirac operator at nonzero chemical potential and random matrix theory.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Jacques; Wettig, Tilo

    2006-07-07

    We show how to introduce a quark chemical potential in the overlap Dirac operator. The resulting operator satisfies a Ginsparg-Wilson relation and has exact zero modes. It is no longer gamma5 Hermitian, but its nonreal eigenvalues still occur in pairs. We compute the spectral density of the operator on the lattice and show that, for small eigenvalues, the data agree with analytical predictions of non-Hermitian chiral random matrix theory for both trivial and nontrivial topology. We also explain an observed change in the number of zero modes as a function of chemical potential.

  20. Overlap Dirac Operator at Nonzero Chemical Potential and Random Matrix Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, Jacques; Wettig, Tilo

    2006-07-07

    We show how to introduce a quark chemical potential in the overlap Dirac operator. The resulting operator satisfies a Ginsparg-Wilson relation and has exact zero modes. It is no longer {gamma}{sub 5} Hermitian, but its nonreal eigenvalues still occur in pairs. We compute the spectral density of the operator on the lattice and show that, for small eigenvalues, the data agree with analytical predictions of non-Hermitian chiral random matrix theory for both trivial and nontrivial topology. We also explain an observed change in the number of zero modes as a function of chemical potential.

  1. Optical filter selection for high confidence discrimination of strongly overlapping infrared chemical spectra.

    PubMed

    Major, Kevin J; Poutous, Menelaos K; Ewing, Kenneth J; Dunnill, Kevin F; Sanghera, Jasbinder S; Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    2015-09-01

    Optical filter-based chemical sensing techniques provide a new avenue to develop low-cost infrared sensors. These methods utilize multiple infrared optical filters to selectively measure different response functions for various chemicals, dependent on each chemical's infrared absorption. Rather than identifying distinct spectral features, which can then be used to determine the identity of a target chemical, optical filter-based approaches rely on measuring differences in the ensemble response between a given filter set and specific chemicals of interest. Therefore, the results of such methods are highly dependent on the original optical filter choice, which will dictate the selectivity, sensitivity, and stability of any filter-based sensing method. Recently, a method has been developed that utilizes unique detection vector operations defined by optical multifilter responses, to discriminate between volatile chemical vapors. This method, comparative-discrimination spectral detection (CDSD), is a technique which employs broadband optical filters to selectively discriminate between chemicals with highly overlapping infrared absorption spectra. CDSD has been shown to correctly distinguish between similar chemicals in the carbon-hydrogen stretch region of the infrared absorption spectra from 2800-3100 cm(-1). A key challenge to this approach is how to determine which optical filter sets should be utilized to achieve the greatest discrimination between target chemicals. Previous studies used empirical approaches to select the optical filter set; however this is insufficient to determine the optimum selectivity between strongly overlapping chemical spectra. Here we present a numerical approach to systematically study the effects of filter positioning and bandwidth on a number of three-chemical systems. We describe how both the filter properties, as well as the chemicals in each set, affect the CDSD results and subsequent discrimination. These results demonstrate the

  2. Electronegativity, Bond Energy, and Chemical Reactivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, R. Thomas

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the Pauling electronegativity concept which rationalizes several kinds of chemical reactions of covalent substances. Electronegativity differences applied to some reactions are demonstrated. (SA)

  3. Electronegativity, Bond Energy, and Chemical Reactivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, R. Thomas

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the Pauling electronegativity concept which rationalizes several kinds of chemical reactions of covalent substances. Electronegativity differences applied to some reactions are demonstrated. (SA)

  4. The Bondons: The Quantum Particles of the Chemical Bond

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2010-01-01

    By employing the combined Bohmian quantum formalism with the U(1) and SU(2) gauge transformations of the non-relativistic wave-function and the relativistic spinor, within the Schrödinger and Dirac quantum pictures of electron motions, the existence of the chemical field is revealed along the associate bondon particle B̶ characterized by its mass (mB̶), velocity (vB̶), charge (eB̶), and life-time (tB̶). This is quantized either in ground or excited states of the chemical bond in terms of reduced Planck constant ħ, the bond energy Ebond and length Xbond, respectively. The mass-velocity-charge-time quaternion properties of bondons’ particles were used in discussing various paradigmatic types of chemical bond towards assessing their covalent, multiple bonding, metallic and ionic features. The bondonic picture was completed by discussing the relativistic charge and life-time (the actual zitterbewegung) problem, i.e., showing that the bondon equals the benchmark electronic charge through moving with almost light velocity. It carries negligible, although non-zero, mass in special bonding conditions and towards observable femtosecond life-time as the bonding length increases in the nanosystems and bonding energy decreases according with the bonding length-energy relationship Ebond[kcal/mol]×Xbond[A0]=182019, providing this way the predictive framework in which the B̶ particle may be observed. Finally, its role in establishing the virtual states in Raman scattering was also established. PMID:21151435

  5. The Nature of the Chemical Bond--1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogilvie, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    Three aspects of quantum mechanics in modern chemistry are stressed: the fundamental structure of quantum mechanics as a basis of chemical applications, the relationship of quantum mechanics to atomic and molecular structure, and the consequent implications for chemical education. A list of 64 references is included. (CW)

  6. Interfacial chemical bonding-mediated ionic resistive switching.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyeongjoo; Zade, Vishal; Kang, Hung-Sen; Han, Jin-Woo; Lee, Eunseok; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Lee, Min Hwan

    2017-04-28

    In this paper, we present a unique resistive switching (RS) mechanism study of Pt/TiO2/Pt cell, one of the most widely studied RS system, by focusing on the role of interfacial bonding at the active TiO2-Pt interface, as opposed to a physico-chemical change within the RS film. This study was enabled by the use of a non-conventional scanning probe-based setup. The nanoscale cell is formed by bringing a Pt/TiO2-coated atomic force microscope tip into contact with a flat substrate coated with Pt. The study reveals that electrical resistance and interfacial bonding status are highly coupled together. An oxygen-mediated chemical bonding at the active interface between TiO2 and Pt is a necessary condition for a non-polar low-resistance state, and a reset switching process disconnects the chemical bonding. Bipolar switching mode did not involve the chemical bonding. The nature of chemical bonding at the TiO2-metal interface is further studied by density functional theory calculations.

  7. Formation mechanism of overlapping grain boundaries in graphene chemical vapor deposition growth.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jichen; Wang, Huan; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Kaili; Ding, Feng

    2017-03-01

    The formation of grain boundaries (GBs) in graphene films is both fundamentally interesting and practically important for many applications. A GB in graphene is known as a linear defect and is formed during the coalescence of two single crystalline graphene domains. The covalent binding between domains is broadly known as the mechanism of GB formation during graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth. Here, we demonstrate another GB formation mechanism, where two graphene domains are connected by weak van der Waals interactions between overlapping graphene layers. The formation mechanism of the overlapping GBs (OLGBs) is systematically explored theoretically and the proposed conditions for forming OLGBs are validated by experimental observations. This discovery leads to a deep understanding of the mechanism of graphene CVD growth and reveals potential means for graphene quality control in CVD synthesis.

  8. In-silico bonding schemes to encode chemical bonds involving sharing of electrons in molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Punnaivanam, Sankar; Sathiadhas, Jerome Pastal Raj; Panneerselvam, Vinoth

    2016-05-01

    Encoding of covalent and coordinate covalent bonds in molecular structures using ground state valence electronic configuration is achieved. The bonding due to electron sharing in the molecular structures is described with five fundamental bonding categories viz. uPair-uPair, lPair-uPair, uPair-lPair, vPair-lPair, and lPair-lPair. The involvement of lone pair electrons and the vacant electron orbitals in chemical bonding are explained with bonding schemes namely "target vacant promotion", "source vacant promotion", "target pairing promotion", "source pairing promotion", "source cation promotion", "source pairing double bond", "target vacant occupation", and "double pairing promotion" schemes. The bonding schemes are verified with a chemical structure editor. The bonding in the structures like ylides, PCl5, SF6, IF7, N-Oxides, BF4(-), AlCl4(-) etc. are explained and encoded unambiguously. The encoding of bonding in the structures of various organic compounds, transition metals compounds, coordination complexes and metal carbonyls is accomplished.

  9. Stainless steel and silicon direct interface synthesis: Chemical bonding effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Michael J.

    Planar stainless steel/stainless steel interfaces, with and without a titanium interlayer and silicon/silicon interfaces have been produced in an ultra high vacuum (UHV) diffusion bonding/deposition instrument. Interface synthesis was accomplished by diffusion bonding two substrates after subjecting the substrate surfaces to a variety of pre-bonding treatments including heat treating, ion-beam sputter cleaning and thin film deposition. Chemical characterization was performed in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) prior to deposition and/or bonding and ex situ by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Additionally, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to study interfaces before and after bonding. Diffusion bonding behavior of stainless steel depends strongly on the chemistry of the surfaces to be bonded. Very smooth, mechanically polished and lapped substrates would bond completely in UHV in 1 hour at 1000°C under 3.5 MPa uniaxial pressure, if the native oxide on the substrates was removed by ion beam cleaning. No voids were observed in these bonded interfaces as studied by TEM and the strength was equal to the unbonded bare material. When an electron beam deposited, 200 A titanium interlayer was added to the stainless steel interface, while bonding under the same conditions, mechanical tensile testing resulted in very low strength when compared with that of chemically clean stainless steel interfaces. Analytical inspection of the interfaces, performed with EELS, EDS, and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) coupled with images from TEM and SEM, showed the reason for the significantly reduced strength is a result of limited contact area and delamination between titanium carbide particles precipitated in the interface. Silicon wafers bicrystals were synthesized by bonding two single-crystal substrates. Silicon wafers were

  10. Upper Secondary Teachers' Knowledge for Teaching Chemical Bonding Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergqvist, Anna; Drechsler, Michal; Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have shown a growing interest in science teachers' professional knowledge in recent decades. The article focuses on how chemistry teachers impart chemical bonding, one of the most important topics covered in upper secondary school chemistry courses. Chemical bonding is primarily taught using models, which are key for understanding science. However, many studies have determined that the use of models in science education can contribute to students' difficulties understanding the topic, and that students generally find chemical bonding a challenging topic. The aim of this study is to investigate teachers' knowledge of teaching chemical bonding. The study focuses on three essential components of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK): (1) the students' understanding, (2) representations, and (3) instructional strategies. We analyzed lesson plans about chemical bonding generated by 10 chemistry teachers with whom we also conducted semi-structured interviews about their teaching. Our results revealed that the teachers were generally unaware of how the representations of models they used affected student comprehension. The teachers had trouble specifying students' difficulties in understanding. Moreover, most of the instructional strategies described were generic and insufficient for promoting student understanding. Additionally, the teachers' rationale for choosing a specific representation or activity was seldom directed at addressing students' understanding. Our results indicate that both PCK components require improvement, and suggest that the two components should be connected. Implications for the professional development of pre-service and in-service teachers are discussed.

  11. Chemical Case Studies: Science-Society "Bonding."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Nae, Nehemia

    1981-01-01

    Describes a unit designed to illustrate the "science-society-technology connection," in which three case studies of the chemical industry in Israel are presented to high school chemistry students. Chosen for the unit are case studies on copper production in Timna, on plastics, and on life from the Dead Sea. (CS)

  12. The nature of chemical bonds from PNOF5 calculations.

    PubMed

    Matxain, Jon M; Piris, Mario; Uranga, Jon; Lopez, Xabier; Merino, Gabriel; Ugalde, Jesus M

    2012-06-18

    Natural orbital functional theory (NOFT) is used for the first time in the analysis of different types of chemical bonds. Concretely, the Piris natural orbital functional PNOF5 is used. It provides a localization scheme that yields an orbital picture which agrees very well with the empirical valence shell electron pair repulsion theory (VSEPR) and Bent's rule, as well as with other theoretical pictures provided by valence bond (VB) or linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) methods. In this context, PNOF5 provides a novel tool for chemical bond analysis. In this work, PNOF5 is applied to selected molecules that have ionic, polar covalent, covalent, multiple (σ and π), 3c-2e, and 3c-4e bonds.

  13. The role of the 5f valence orbitals of early actinides in chemical bonding

    PubMed Central

    Vitova, T.; Pidchenko, I.; Fellhauer, D.; Bagus, P. S.; Joly, Y.; Pruessmann, T.; Bahl, S.; Gonzalez-Robles, E.; Rothe, J.; Altmaier, M.; Denecke, M. A.; Geckeis, H.

    2017-01-01

    One of the long standing debates in actinide chemistry is the level of localization and participation of the actinide 5f valence orbitals in covalent bonds across the actinide series. Here we illuminate the role of the 5f valence orbitals of uranium, neptunium and plutonium in chemical bonding using advanced spectroscopies: actinide M4,5 HR-XANES and 3d4f RIXS. Results reveal that the 5f orbitals are active in the chemical bonding for uranium and neptunium, shown by significant variations in the level of their localization evidenced in the spectra. In contrast, the 5f orbitals of plutonium appear localized and surprisingly insensitive to different bonding environments. We envisage that this report of using relative energy differences between the 5fδ/ϕ and 5fπ*/5fσ* orbitals as a qualitative measure of overlap-driven actinyl bond covalency will spark activity, and extend to numerous applications of RIXS and HR-XANES to gain new insights into the electronic structures of the actinide elements. PMID:28681848

  14. The role of the 5f valence orbitals of early actinides in chemical bonding.

    PubMed

    Vitova, T; Pidchenko, I; Fellhauer, D; Bagus, P S; Joly, Y; Pruessmann, T; Bahl, S; Gonzalez-Robles, E; Rothe, J; Altmaier, M; Denecke, M A; Geckeis, H

    2017-07-06

    One of the long standing debates in actinide chemistry is the level of localization and participation of the actinide 5f valence orbitals in covalent bonds across the actinide series. Here we illuminate the role of the 5f valence orbitals of uranium, neptunium and plutonium in chemical bonding using advanced spectroscopies: actinide M4,5 HR-XANES and 3d4f RIXS. Results reveal that the 5f orbitals are active in the chemical bonding for uranium and neptunium, shown by significant variations in the level of their localization evidenced in the spectra. In contrast, the 5f orbitals of plutonium appear localized and surprisingly insensitive to different bonding environments. We envisage that this report of using relative energy differences between the 5fδ/φ and 5fπ*/5fσ* orbitals as a qualitative measure of overlap-driven actinyl bond covalency will spark activity, and extend to numerous applications of RIXS and HR-XANES to gain new insights into the electronic structures of the actinide elements.

  15. The role of the 5f valence orbitals of early actinides in chemical bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitova, T.; Pidchenko, I.; Fellhauer, D.; Bagus, P. S.; Joly, Y.; Pruessmann, T.; Bahl, S.; Gonzalez-Robles, E.; Rothe, J.; Altmaier, M.; Denecke, M. A.; Geckeis, H.

    2017-07-01

    One of the long standing debates in actinide chemistry is the level of localization and participation of the actinide 5f valence orbitals in covalent bonds across the actinide series. Here we illuminate the role of the 5f valence orbitals of uranium, neptunium and plutonium in chemical bonding using advanced spectroscopies: actinide M4,5 HR-XANES and 3d4f RIXS. Results reveal that the 5f orbitals are active in the chemical bonding for uranium and neptunium, shown by significant variations in the level of their localization evidenced in the spectra. In contrast, the 5f orbitals of plutonium appear localized and surprisingly insensitive to different bonding environments. We envisage that this report of using relative energy differences between the 5fδ/φ and 5fπ*/5fσ* orbitals as a qualitative measure of overlap-driven actinyl bond covalency will spark activity, and extend to numerous applications of RIXS and HR-XANES to gain new insights into the electronic structures of the actinide elements.

  16. Chemical cleaning agents and bonding to glass-fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ana Paula Rodrigues; Ogliari, Aline de Oliveira; Jardim, Patrícia dos Santos; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de

    2013-01-01

    The influence of chemical cleaning agents on the bond strength between resin cement and glass-fiber posts was investigated. The treatments included 10% hydrofluoric acid, 35% phosphoric acid, 50% hydrogen peroxide, acetone, dichloromethane, ethanol, isopropanol, and tetrahydrofuran. Flat glass-fiber epoxy substrates were exposed to the cleaners for 60 s. Resin cement cylinders were formed on the surfaces and tested in shear. All treatments provided increased bond strength compared to untreated control specimens. All failures were interfacial. Although all agents improved the bond strength, dichloromethane and isopropanol were particularly effective.

  17. Stability of Cu-Nb layered nanocomposite from chemical bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Ujjal; Sahariah, Munima B.; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-07-01

    The potential use of layered metallic nanocomposites in radiation-resistant materials has been recognized with ultra-high mechanical strengths. Here we present results on layered Cu-Nb composite examining its stability in terms of chemical bond via charge density and transfer analysis, QTAIM, electron localization function and density of states using DFT. An intermediate character of bonding with a significant amount of charge transfer at the interface has been predicted. Shortening of intraplanar bond length is a good manifestation of their observed structural stability which may be due to electron promotion of 3 d → (4 s, 4 p) orbitals associated with the constituent atoms of the composite.

  18. Electronic stress as a guiding force for chemical bonding.

    PubMed

    Guevara-García, Alfredo; Ayers, Paul W; Jenkins, Samantha; Kirk, Steven R; Echegaray, Eleonora; Toro-Labbe, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    In the electron-preceding picture of chemical change, the paramount problem is identifying favorable changes in electronic structure. The electronic stress tensor provides this information; its eigenvectors represent electronic normal modes, pointing the way towards energetically favorable (or unfavorable) chemical rearrangements. The resulting method is well founded in both density functional theory and the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Stress tensor analysis is a natural way to extend the QTAIM to address chemical reactivity. The definition and basic properties of the electronic stress tensor are reviewed and the inherent ambiguity of the stress tensor is discussed. Extending previous work in which the stress tensor was used to analyze hydrogen-bonding patterns, this work focuses on chemical bonding patterns in organic reactions. Other related material (charge-shift bonding, links to the second-density-derivative tensor) is summarized and reviewed. The stress tensor provides a multifaceted characterization of bonding and can be used to predict and describe bond formation and migration.

  19. Chemical investigations of GaAs wafer bonded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, D. M.; Albaugh, C. E.; Moran, P. D.; Kuech, T. F.

    2001-12-01

    The bonding chemistry of various GaAs-to-oxide/GaAs bonded samples was investigated using multiple internal transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for thermally annealed and thermocompression annealed samples. The oxides used in these investigations included a native GaAs oxide as well as two compositions of borosilicate glass (BSG) deposited by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). For the thermally annealed samples, the hydrogen-bonded H2O/OH groups on the hydrophilic surface form a room temperature bond without the application of pressure. Chemical changes at the wafer-bonded interface occur in two temperature regions. For anneals between 200 and 400 °C for 1 h in N2, the H2O/OH groups react and evolve H that becomes absorbed within the oxide. The LPCVD BSG oxide was chemically unaltered during anneals in this temperature range, however, the GaAs native oxide underwent chemical modification. Initially, the GaAs oxide consisted of As(III)-O and Ga-O related oxides. The As(III)-O oxides react to form free As and Ga-O during annealing between 200 and 400 °C. For anneals between 500 and 600 °C, the reaction of H2O/OH groups continue and the H becomes infrared inactive, most likely forming H2 voids at the bonded interface. In addition, As(V)-O related oxides were observed during thermal annealing in this temperature range. No detectable chemical changes in the BSG were observed over the temperature range investigated. Samples that were annealed under an estimated 1-10 MPa of pressure had similar chemical changes to thermally annealed samples.

  20. The contribution of chemical bonding to the short- and long-term enamel bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenliang; Wang, Xiaomiao; Zhang, Ling; Liang, Bing; Tang, Tian; Fu, Baiping; Hannig, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    MDP (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogenphosphate) has been proven to possess chemical bonding ability to tooth hard tissues, but its contribution to the enamel bond strength has not been recognized. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of chemical bonding to the short- and long-term bovine enamel micro-tensile bond strengths (μTBS). The acid-etched enamel surfaces were treated without any primer (control) or with one of three MDP-containing primers (containing different ratio of MDP/HEMA/Bis-GMA, Kuraray Co.) for 5s, water-sprayed and air-dried. Subsequently, the pretreated enamel surfaces were applied with an etch-and-rinse adhesive Durafill Bond (Heraeus Kulzer) and placed with composite resin Durafill VS (Heraeus Kulzer). The specimens were prepared for μTBS tests after 24-h or 1-yr water storage. The etched enamel surfaces treated with or without MDP-containing primers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The acid-etched enamel treated with the MDP-primers for a very short time could produce the greater enamel μTBS than the control did (p<0.05), and change enamel micromorphology. No significant different μTBS were found between 24-h and 1-yr water storage (p>0.05). The chemical bonding of MDP on the enamel surfaces was re-confirmed by XPS. The additional chemical bonding of MDP around the enamel crystallites of the etched enamel substrate could significantly increase the short- and long-term enamel μTBS, and their μTBS surpass those of the etch-and-rinse adhesive alone. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantum Chemical Modeling of Hydrogen Bonding in Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Patricia A

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) is an important and very general phenomenon. H-bonding is part of the basis of life in DNA, key in controlling the properties of water and ice, and critical to modern applications such as crystal engineering, catalysis applications, pharmaceutical and agrochemical development. H-bonding also plays a significant role for many ionic liquids (IL), determining the secondary structuring and affecting key physical parameters. ILs exhibit a particularly diverse and wide range of traditional as well as non-standard forms of H-bonding, in particular the doubly ionic H-bond is important. Understanding the fundamental nature of the H-bonds that form within ILs is critical, and one way of accessing this information, that cannot be recovered by any other computational method, is through quantum chemical electronic structure calculations. However, an appropriate method and basis set must be employed, and a robust procedure for determining key structures is essential. Modern generalised solvation models have recently been extended to ILs, bringing both advantages and disadvantages. QC can provide a range of information on geometry, IR and Raman spectra, NMR spectra and at a more fundamental level through analysis of the electronic structure.

  2. Chemical strategies for die/wafer submicron alignment and bonding.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Baca, Alicia I.; Chu, Dahwey; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea

    2010-09-01

    This late-start LDRD explores chemical strategies that will enable sub-micron alignment accuracy of dies and wafers by exploiting the interfacial energies of chemical ligands. We have micropatterned commensurate features, such as 2-d arrays of micron-sized gold lines on the die to be bonded. Each gold line is functionalized with alkanethiol ligands before the die are brought into contact. The ligand interfacial energy is minimized when the lines on the die are brought into registration, due to favorable interactions between the complementary ligand tails. After registration is achieved, standard bonding techniques are used to create precision permanent bonds. We have computed the alignment forces and torque between two surfaces patterned with arrays of lines or square pads to illustrate how best to maximize the tendency to align. We also discuss complex, aperiodic patterns such as rectilinear pad assemblies, concentric circles, and spirals that point the way towards extremely precise alignment.

  3. Remediating Misconceptions Concerning Chemical Bonding through Conceptual Change Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabuccu, Aybuke; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of conceptual change texts oriented instruction on 9th grade students' understanding of chemical bonding concepts. In this study, the main aim of the preparation of conceptual change texts was to activate students' prior knowledge and misconceptions and to help them to understand the chemical…

  4. Planning a Teaching Sequence for the Teaching of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibanda, Doras; Hobden, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The current study seeks to examine how teachers plan teaching sequences to teach chemical bonding in the senior secondary phase of schooling. The study employs a learning demand tool as interpretive framework. A mixed method was used to guide the collection of data. Data were collected through a survey instrument with 227 practising physical…

  5. Characterizing and Representing Student's Conceptual Knowledge of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yayon, Malka; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Fortus, David

    2012-01-01

    Chemical bonding knowledge is fundamental and essential to the understanding of almost every topic in chemistry, but it is very difficult to learn. While many studies have characterized some of the central elements of knowledge of this topic, these elements of knowledge have not been systematically organized. We describe the development and…

  6. Remediating Misconceptions Concerning Chemical Bonding through Conceptual Change Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabuccu, Aybuke; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of conceptual change texts oriented instruction on 9th grade students' understanding of chemical bonding concepts. In this study, the main aim of the preparation of conceptual change texts was to activate students' prior knowledge and misconceptions and to help them to understand the chemical…

  7. Characterizing and Representing Student's Conceptual Knowledge of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yayon, Malka; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Fortus, David

    2012-01-01

    Chemical bonding knowledge is fundamental and essential to the understanding of almost every topic in chemistry, but it is very difficult to learn. While many studies have characterized some of the central elements of knowledge of this topic, these elements of knowledge have not been systematically organized. We describe the development and…

  8. Chemical bonds and vibrational properties of ordered (U, Np, Pu) mixed oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu; Zhang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    We use density functional theory +U to investigate the chemical bonding characters and vibrational properties of the ordered (U, Np, Pu) mixed oxides (MOXs), UNpO4,NpPuO4, and UPuO4. It is found that the 5f electronic states of different actinide elements keep their localized characters in all three MOXs. The occupied 5f electronic states of different actinide elements do not overlap with each other and tend to distribute over the energy band gap of the other actinide element's 5f states. As a result, the three ordered MOXs all show smaller band gaps than those of the component dioxides, with values of 0.91, 1.47, and 0.19 eV for UNpO4,NpPuO4, and UPuO4, respectively. Through careful charge density analysis, we further show that the U-O and Pu-O bonds in MOXs show more ionic character than in UO2 and PuO2, while the Np-O bonds show more covalent character than in NpO2. The change in covalencies in the chemical bonds leads to vibrational frequencies of oxygen atoms that are different in MOXs.

  9. Exploring Chemical Bonds through Variations in Magnetic Shielding.

    PubMed

    Karadakov, Peter B; Horner, Kate E

    2016-02-09

    Differences in nuclear isotropic magnetic shieldings give rise to the chemical shifts measured in NMR experiments. In contrast to existing NMR experimental techniques, quantum chemical methods are capable of calculating isotropic magnetic shieldings not just at nuclei, but also at any point in the space surrounding a molecule. Using s-trans-1,3-butadiene, ethane, ethene, and ethyne as examples, we show that the variations in isotropic magnetic shielding around a molecule, represented as isosurfaces and contour plots, provide an unexpectedly clear picture of chemical bonding, which is much more detailed than the traditional description in terms of the total electron density.

  10. Is There a Need to Discuss Atomic Orbital Overlap When Teaching Hydrogen-Halide Bond Strength and Acidity Trends in Organic Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devarajan, Deepa; Gustafson, Samantha J.; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Ess, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks and Internet websites use a variety of approaches for presenting and explaining the impact of halogen atom size on trends in bond strengths and/or acidity of hydrogen halides. In particular, several textbooks and Internet websites explain these trends by invoking decreasing orbital overlap between the…

  11. Is There a Need to Discuss Atomic Orbital Overlap When Teaching Hydrogen-Halide Bond Strength and Acidity Trends in Organic Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devarajan, Deepa; Gustafson, Samantha J.; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Ess, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks and Internet websites use a variety of approaches for presenting and explaining the impact of halogen atom size on trends in bond strengths and/or acidity of hydrogen halides. In particular, several textbooks and Internet websites explain these trends by invoking decreasing orbital overlap between the…

  12. Benchmarking Density Functionals for Chemical Bonds of Gold.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2017-03-09

    Gold plays a major role in nanochemistry, catalysis, and electrochemistry. Accordingly, hundreds of studies apply density functionals to study chemical bonding with gold, yet there is no systematic attempt to assess the accuracy of these methods applied to gold. This paper reports a benchmark against 51 experimental bond enthalpies of AuX systems and seven additional polyatomic and cationic molecules. Twelve density functionals were tested, covering meta functionals, hybrids with variable HF exchange, double-hybrid, dispersion-corrected, and nonhybrid GGA functionals. The defined benchmark data set probes all types of bonding to gold from very electronegative halides that force Au(+) electronic structure, via covalently bonded systems, hard and soft Lewis acids and bases that either work against or complement the softness of gold, the Au2 molecule probing gold's bond with itself, and weak bonds between gold and noble gases. Zero-point vibrational corrections are relatively small for Au-X bonds, ∼ 11-12 kJ/mol except for Au-H bonds. Dispersion typically provides ∼5 kJ/mol of the total bond enthalpy but grows with system size and is 10 kJ/mol for AuXe and AuKr. HF exchange and LYP correlation produce weaker bonds to gold. Most functionals provide similar trend accuracy, though somewhat lower for M06 and M06L, but very different numerical accuracy. Notably, PBE and TPSS functionals with dispersion display the smallest numerical errors and very small mean signed errors (0-6 kJ/mol), i.e. no bias toward over- or under-binding. Errors are evenly distributed versus atomic number, suggesting that relativistic effects are treated fairly; the mean absolute error is almost halved from B3LYP (45 kJ/mol) to TPSS and PBE (23 kJ/mol, including difficult cases); 23 kJ/mol is quite respectable considering the diverse bonds to gold and the complication of relativistic effects. Thus, studies that use DFT with effective core potentials for gold chemistry, with no alternative due

  13. Morphological and chemical characterization of bonding hydrophobic adhesive to dentin using ethanol wet bonding technique.

    PubMed

    Shin, T Phillip; Yao, Xiaomei; Huenergardt, Robin; Walker, Mary P; Wang, Yong

    2009-08-01

    BisGMA, a widely used component in dentin adhesive has very good mechanical properties after curing, but is relatively hydrophobic and thus, does not adequately infiltrate the water wet demineralized dentin collagen. Developing techniques that would lead to optimum infiltration of the hydrophobic component into the demineralized dentin matrix is very important. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interfacial morphological and chemical characteristics of the resultant adhesive-dentin interface when the ethanol wet bonding technique is used with hydrophobic adhesives. The occlusal one-third of the crown was removed from six unerupted human third molars; a uniform smear layer was created with 600 grit SiC. The dentin surface was etched with 35% phosphoric acid for 15s before applying BisGMA/HEMA model adhesive using either water wet or ethanol wet bonding technique. Five-micro-thick sections of adhesive/dentin interface specimens were cut and stained with Goldner's trichrome for light microscopy. Companion slabs were analyzed with SEM and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The presence of ethanol in the demineralized dentin increased adhesive collagen encapsulation as indicated by trichrome staining. The SEM results confirmed that the ethanol wet bonding improved the quality of the interface. Micro-Raman spectral analysis of the dentin/adhesive interface indicated there was a gradual decrease in penetration of BisGMA component for specimens using water wet bonding, while relatively homogeneous distribution of the hydrophobic BisGMA component was noted in the interface with ethanol wet bonding. Wet bonding with ethanol instead of water permits better BisGMA infiltration improving the quality of interface. We speculate that the higher infiltration of hydrophobic BisGMA and better collagen encapsulation observed from the specimens using ethanol wet bonding would lead to more durable bonds because of improved resistance to hydrolytic attack.

  14. Aspects of glycosidic bond formation in aqueous solution: chemical bonding and the role of water.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, John M; Marx, Dominik

    2005-04-22

    A model of the specific acid-catalyzed glycosidic bond formation in liquid water at ambient conditions is studied based on constrained Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics. Specifically the reaction of alpha-D-glucopyranose and methanol is found to proceed by a D(N)A(N) mechanism. The D(N) step consists of a concerted protonation of the O(1) hydroxyl leaving group; this process results in the breaking of the C(1)-O(1) bond, and oxocarbenium ion formation involving C(1)=O(5). The second step, A(N), is the formation of the C(1)-O(m) glycosidic bond, deprotonation of the methanol hydroxyl group O(m)H(m), and re-formation of the C(1)-O(5) single bond. A focus of this study is the analysis of the electronic structure during this condensed phase reaction relying on both Boys/Wannier localized orbitals and the electron localization function ELF. This analysis allows the clear elucidation of the chemical bonding features of the intermediate bracketed by the D(N) and A(N) steps, which is a non-solvent equilibrated oxocarbenium cation. Most interestingly, it is found that the oxygen in the pyranose ring becomes "desolvated" upon double bond/oxocarbenium formation, whereas it is engaged in the hydrogen-bonded water network before and after this period. This demonstrates that hydrogen bonding and thus the aqueous solvent play an active role in this reaction implying that microsolvation studies in the gas phase, both theoretical and experimental, might lead to qualitatively different reaction mechanisms compared to solution.

  15. Chemical Bonding and Thermodynamics in Superconductivity and Superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Superconductivity and superfluidity are physical states that occur in a variety of chemical and physical systems. These physical states share a common type of real, or virtual, chemical bonding. Each of the systems discussed herein contain at least one real, or effective, coordinate covalent bond. This is formed from an electron pair donor species and an electron pair acceptor species. When the electronegativity difference between the electron pair donor and acceptor species is sufficiently small, the resultant coordinate covalent bond density can be substantial. If delocalized, this bond density can result in a significant increase in the electron pair orbital volume relative to that of the parent species, and an increase in the valence shell orbital entropy. In terms of the normalized Gibbs-Helmholtz equation, this results in a concomitant decrease in free energy of the delocalized electronic system. A decrease in free energy to negative values can support a boson state, and superconductivity. A clear example of these principles is the occurrence of superconductivity in the ceramic material, MgB2. These generalizations apply to superconducting elements, high temperature superconductors, superconducting alloys, and equivalently to superfluid 4He.

  16. Variational Energy Decomposition Analysis of Chemical Bonding. 1. Spin-Pure Analysis of Single Bonds.

    PubMed

    Levine, Daniel S; Horn, Paul R; Mao, Yuezhi; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-10-11

    We have designed an energy decomposition analysis (EDA) to gain a deeper understanding of single chemical bonds, that is, those in which the interacting fragments are doublet open-shell systems but the supersystem is closed-shell. The method is a spin-pure extension of the absolutely localized molecular orbital (ALMO) EDA to the one-pair perfect pairing energy (equivalently to an active space of two electrons in two orbitals). The total interaction energy is broken up into four terms: frozen interactions, spin-coupling, polarization, and charge-transfer. A variety of single bonds are analyzed and, in addition, we use this method to show how solvation changes the nature of bonds, producing different results in the gas-phase and with explicit solvent molecules.

  17. Chemical bonding in hard boron-nitride multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.

    1997-06-01

    The oxides and nitrides of boron show great potential for use as hard, wear resistant materials. However, large intrinsic stresses and poor adhesion often accompany the hard coatings as found for the cubic boron-nitride phase. These effects may be moderated for use of a layered structure. Alternate stiff layers of boron and compliant layers of nitride are formed by modulating the sputter gas composition during deposition of boron target. The B/BN thin films are characterized with transmission electronic microscope to evaluate the microstructure, nanoindentation to measure hardness and ex-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine chemical bonding. The effects of layer pair spacing on chemical bonding and hardness are evaluated for the B/BN films.

  18. Fast and accurate predictions of covalent bonds in chemical space.

    PubMed

    Chang, K Y Samuel; Fias, Stijn; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2016-05-07

    We assess the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated σ bonding to hydrogen, as well as σ and π bonding between main-group elements, occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecules with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order Taylor expansions of covalent bonding potentials can achieve high accuracy if (i) the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry), (ii) it involves elements from the third and fourth rows of the periodic table, and (iii) an optimal reference geometry is used. This leads to near linear changes in the bonding potential, resulting in analytical predictions with chemical accuracy (∼1 kcal/mol). Second order estimates deteriorate the prediction. If initial and final molecules differ not only in composition but also in geometry, all estimates become substantially worse, with second order being slightly more accurate than first order. The independent particle approximation based second order perturbation theory performs poorly when compared to the coupled perturbed or finite difference approach. Taylor series expansions up to fourth order of the potential energy curve of highly symmetric systems indicate a finite radius of convergence, as illustrated for the alchemical stretching of H2 (+). Results are presented for (i) covalent bonds to hydrogen in 12 molecules with 8 valence electrons (CH4, NH3, H2O, HF, SiH4, PH3, H2S, HCl, GeH4, AsH3, H2Se, HBr); (ii) main-group single bonds in 9 molecules with 14 valence electrons (CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3Br, SiH3F, SiH3Cl, SiH3Br, GeH3F, GeH3Cl, GeH3Br); (iii) main-group double bonds in 9 molecules with 12 valence electrons (CH2O, CH2S, CH2Se, SiH2O, SiH2S, SiH2Se, GeH2O, GeH2S, GeH2Se); (iv) main-group triple bonds in 9 molecules with 10 valence electrons (HCN, HCP, HCAs, HSiN, HSi

  19. Fast and accurate predictions of covalent bonds in chemical space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. Y. Samuel; Fias, Stijn; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2016-05-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated σ bonding to hydrogen, as well as σ and π bonding between main-group elements, occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecules with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order Taylor expansions of covalent bonding potentials can achieve high accuracy if (i) the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry), (ii) it involves elements from the third and fourth rows of the periodic table, and (iii) an optimal reference geometry is used. This leads to near linear changes in the bonding potential, resulting in analytical predictions with chemical accuracy (˜1 kcal/mol). Second order estimates deteriorate the prediction. If initial and final molecules differ not only in composition but also in geometry, all estimates become substantially worse, with second order being slightly more accurate than first order. The independent particle approximation based second order perturbation theory performs poorly when compared to the coupled perturbed or finite difference approach. Taylor series expansions up to fourth order of the potential energy curve of highly symmetric systems indicate a finite radius of convergence, as illustrated for the alchemical stretching of H 2+ . Results are presented for (i) covalent bonds to hydrogen in 12 molecules with 8 valence electrons (CH4, NH3, H2O, HF, SiH4, PH3, H2S, HCl, GeH4, AsH3, H2Se, HBr); (ii) main-group single bonds in 9 molecules with 14 valence electrons (CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3Br, SiH3F, SiH3Cl, SiH3Br, GeH3F, GeH3Cl, GeH3Br); (iii) main-group double bonds in 9 molecules with 12 valence electrons (CH2O, CH2S, CH2Se, SiH2O, SiH2S, SiH2Se, GeH2O, GeH2S, GeH2Se); (iv) main-group triple bonds in 9 molecules with 10 valence electrons (HCN, HCP, HCAs, HSiN, HSi

  20. Students' Understandings of Chemical Bonds and the Energetics of Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, Hong Kwen

    1998-01-01

    Investigates Grade 12 students' understandings of the nature of chemical bonds and the energetics elicited across five familiar chemical reactions following a course of instruction. Discusses the many ways in which students can misconstruct concepts and principles. Contains 63 references. (DDR)

  1. Students' Understandings of Chemical Bonds and the Energetics of Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, Hong Kwen

    1998-01-01

    Investigates Grade 12 students' understandings of the nature of chemical bonds and the energetics elicited across five familiar chemical reactions following a course of instruction. Discusses the many ways in which students can misconstruct concepts and principles. Contains 63 references. (DDR)

  2. Topology maps of bond descriptors based on the kinetic energy density and the essence of chemical bonding.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2013-04-14

    Analysis of the kinetic energy density within a molecule identifies patterns in its electronic structure that are intuitively linked to familiar concepts of chemical bonding. The function ν(r), termed localized-orbital locator and based on the positive-definite kinetic energy density τ+, is employed to characterize classes of covalent bonds in terms of its full topology of all critical points of rank three. Not only does ν(r) reveal patterns in chemical bonding, it also discloses features and the influence of extended electronic cores. Gradient paths define the extension of the valence space around an atomic centre; they separate various core level regions from bonding domains, and partition molecules in sensible bonded subunits. Location and ν(r)-values of critical points add a quantitative aspect to the bond characterization; profiles of unconventional chemical linkages such as charge-shift bonds emerge in a natural way.

  3. Toward a consistent interpretation of the QTAIM: tortuous link between chemical bonds, interactions, and bond/line paths.

    PubMed

    Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Shahbazian, Shant; Marek, Radek

    2014-08-04

    Currently, bonding analysis of molecules based on the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) is popular; however, "misinterpretations" of the QTAIM analysis are also very frequent. In this contribution the chemical relevance of the bond path as one of the key topological entities emerging from the QTAIM's topological analysis of the one-electron density is reconsidered. The role of nuclear vibrations on the topological analysis is investigated demonstrating that the bond paths are not indicators of chemical bonds. Also, it is argued that the detection of the bond paths is not necessary for the "interaction" to be present between two atoms in a molecule. The conceptual disentanglement of chemical bonds/interactions from the bonds paths, which are alternatively termed "line paths" in this contribution, dismisses many superficial inconsistencies. Such inconsistencies emerge from the presence/absence of the line paths in places of a molecule in which chemical intuition or alternative bonding analysis does not support the presence/absence of a chemical bond. Moreover, computational QTAIM studies have been performed on some "problematic" molecules, which were considered previously by other authors, and the role of nuclear vibrations on presence/absence of the line paths is studied demonstrating that a bonding pattern consistent with other theoretical schemes appears after a careful QTAIM analysis and a new "interpretation" of data is performed.

  4. Probing the nature of chemical bonding in uranyl(VI) complexes with quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Vallet, Valérie; Wahlgren, Ulf; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2012-12-20

    To assess the nature of chemical bonds in uranyl(VI) complexes with Lewis base ligands, such as F(-), Cl(-), OH(-), CO(3)(2-), and O(2)(2-), we have used quantum chemical observables, such as the bond distances, the internal symmetric/asymmetric uranyl stretch frequencies, and the electron density with its topology analyzed using the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules. This analysis confirms that complex formation induces a weakening of the uranium-axial oxygen bond, reflected by the longer U-O(yl) bond distance and reduced uranyl-stretching frequencies. The strength of the ligand-induced effect increases in the order H(2)O < Cl(-) < F(-) < OH(-) < CO(3)(2-) < O(2)(2-). In-depth analysis reveals that the trend across the series does not always reflect an increasing covalent character of the uranyl-ligand bond. By using a point-charge model for the uranyl tetra-fluoride and tetra-chloride complexes, we show that a significant part of the uranyl bond destabilization arises from purely electrostatic interactions, the remaining part corresponding either to charge-transfer from the negatively charged ligands to the uranyl unit or a covalent interaction. The charge-transfer and the covalent interaction are qualitatively different due to the absence of a charge build up in the uranyl-halide bond region in the latter case. In all the charged complexes, the uranyl-ligand bond is best described as an ionic interaction. However, there are covalent contributions in the very stable peroxide complex and, to some extent, also in the carbonate complex. This study demonstrates that it is possible to describe the nature of chemical bond by observables rather than by ad hoc quantities such as atomic populations or molecular orbitals.

  5. Crystal structure and chemical bonding of Mg3Ru2.

    PubMed

    Pöttgen, Rainer; Hlukhyy, Viktor; Baranov, Aleksey; Grin, Yuri

    2008-07-07

    Mg 3Ru 2 was prepared by a reaction between the elements in the ideal ratio in a sealed tantalum ampule. Its beta-manganese type crystal structure was refined on the basis of the single-crystal data: space group P4 132, a = 693.52(6) pm, wR2 = 0.024, 168 F (2) values, and 10 parameters. The magnesium (CN = 14) and ruthenium (CN = 12) atoms are completely ordered on the 12d and 8c sites of the crystal structure of beta-manganese. Both environments can be considered as Frank-Kasper related polyhedra. A periodic nodal surface P4 132(110) pi (1) P4 132 separates the magnesium and ruthenium positions in two different labyrinths, suggesting different chemical interactions within different parts of the structural motif. Analysis of the chemical bonding with the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) reveals covalently interacting three-bonded ruthenium atoms, forming a 3D network. The network interacts with the magnesium substructure by multicenter bonds.

  6. Investigation of the distinction between van der Waals interaction and chemical bonding based on the PAEM-MO diagram.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2014-05-15

    In recent years, the basic problem of understanding chemical bonding, nonbonded, and/or van der Waals interactions has been intensively debated in terms of various theoretical methods. We propose and construct the potential acting on one electron in a molecule-molecular orbital (PAEM-MO) diagram, which draws the PAEM inserted the MO energy levels with their major atomic orbital components. PAEM-MO diagram is able to show clear distinction of chemical bonding from nonbonded and/or vdW interactions. The rule for this is as follows. Along the line connecting two atoms in a molecule or a complex, the existence of chemical bonding between these two atoms needs to satisfy two conditions: (a) a critical point of PAEM exists and (b) PAEM barrier between the two atoms is lower in energy than the occupied major valence-shell bonding MO which contains in-phase atomic components (positive overlap) of the two considered atoms. In contrast to the chemical bonding, for a nonbonded interaction or van der Waals interaction between two atoms, both conditions (a) and (b) do not be satisfied at the same time. This is demonstrated and discussed by various typical cases, particularly those related to helium atom and H-H bonding in phenanthrene. There are helium bonds in HHeF and HeBeO molecules, whereas no H-H bonding in phenanthrene. The validity and limitation for this rule is demonstrated through the investigations of the curves of the PAEM barrier top and MO energies versus the internuclear distances for He2 , H2 , and He2 (+) systems. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Site-selective chemical cleavage of peptide bonds.

    PubMed

    Elashal, Hader E; Raj, Monika

    2016-05-07

    Site-selective cleavage of extremely unreactive peptide bonds is a very important chemical modification that provides invaluable information regarding protein sequence, and it acts as a modulator of protein structure and function for therapeutic applications. For controlled and selective cleavage, a daunting task, chemical reagents must selectively recognize or bind to one or more amino acid residues in the peptide chain and selectively cleave a peptide bond. Building on this principle, we have developed an approach that utilizes a chemical reagent to selectively modify the serine residue in a peptide chain and leads to the cleavage of a peptide backbone at the N-terminus of the serine residue. After cleavage, modified residues can be converted back to the original fragments. This method exhibits broad substrate scope and selectively cleaves various bioactive peptides with post-translational modifications (e.g. N-acetylation and -methylation) and mutations (d- and β-amino acids), which are a known cause of age related diseases.

  8. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  9. The Role of Chemical Bonding in the Adhesion of Elastomers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-03

    660 S6CUNIIY CLASSIFCATION Of THIS PA69MO Dog 40. gMO The Role of Chemical Bonding in the Adhesion of Elastomers A. N. Gent Introduction Although...Chang and A. N. Gent, submitted to J. Polymer Sci: Polymer Phys. Ed. 9. R.-J. Chang, A. N. Gent, C.-C. Hsu and K. C. Sehgal, J. Appl . Polymer Sci. 25...433 (1969). 14. A. N. Gent and A. J. Kinloch, J. Polymer Sci., Pt. A-2 9, 659 (1971). 15. A. N. Gent and G. R. Hamed, J. Appl . Polymer Sci. 21, 2817

  10. Vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for immobilization of radioisotopes

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-04-05

    A method of immobilizing a radioisotope and vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) articles formed by the method are described. The method comprises combining a radioisotope-containing material, MgO, a source of phosphate, and optionally, a reducing agent, in water at a temperature of less than 100.degree. C. to form a slurry; curing the slurry to form a solid intermediate CBPC article comprising the radioisotope therefrom; comminuting the intermediate CBPC article, mixing the comminuted material with glass frits, and heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of about 900 to about 1500.degree. C. to form a vitrified CBPC article comprising the radioisotope immobilized therein.

  11. Chemical bonding in TiSb(2) and VSb(2): a quantum chemical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Armbrüster, Marc; Schnelle, Walter; Schwarz, Ulrich; Grin, Yuri

    2007-08-06

    The chemical bonding in the isostructural intermetallic compounds TiSb2 and VSb2, crystallizing in the CuAl2 type, was investigated by means of quantum chemical calculations, particularly the electron localization function (ELF), as well as by Raman spectroscopy, Hall effect and conductivity measurements on oriented single crystals, and high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction. The homogeneity ranges of the compounds were determined by powder X-ray diffraction, WDXS, and DSC measurements. TiSb2 exhibits no significant homogeneity range, while VSb2 shows a small homogeneity range of approximately 0.3 at. %. According to the ELF calculations, the Sb atoms form dumbbells via a two-center two-electron bond, while the T atoms (T = Ti, V) build up chains along the crystallographic c-axis. Both building units are connected by covalent T-Sb-T three-center bonds, thus forming a three-dimensional network. The strength of the bonds involving Sb was determined by fitting a force constant model to the vibrational mode frequencies observed by polarized Raman measurements on oriented single crystals. The resulting bond order of the Sb2 dumbbells is 1, while the strength of the three-center bonds resembles a bond order of 1.5. The weak pressure dependence of the c/a ratio confirms the slightly different bonding picture in TiSb2 compared to that in CuAl2. Electrical transport measurements show the presence of free charge carriers, as well as a metal-like temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity.

  12. A bond-topological approach to theoretical mineralogy: crystal structure, chemical composition and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawthorne, Frank C.

    2012-11-01

    Here, I describe a theoretical approach to the structure and chemical composition of minerals based on their bond topology. This approach allows consideration of many aspects of minerals and mineral behaviour that cannot be addressed by current theoretical methods. It consists of combining the bond topology of the structure with aspects of graph theory and bond-valence theory (both long range and short range), and using the moments approach to the electronic energy density-of-states to interpret topological aspects of crystal structures. The structure hierarchy hypothesis states that higher bond-valence polyhedra polymerize to form the (usually anionic) structural unit, the excess charge of which is balanced by the interstitial complex (usually consisting of large low-valence cations and (H2O) groups). This hypothesis may be justified within the framework of bond topology and bond-valence theory, and may be used to hierarchically classify oxysalt minerals. It is the weak interaction between the structural unit and the interstitial complex that controls the stability of the structural arrangement. The principle of correspondence of Lewis acidity-basicity states that stable structures will form when the Lewis-acid strength of the interstitial complex closely matches the Lewis-base strength of the structural unit, and allows us to examine the factors that control the chemical composition and aspects of the structural arrangements of minerals. It also provides a connection between a structure, the speciation of its constituents in aqueous solution and its mechanism of crystallization. The moments approach to the electronic energy density-of-states provides a link between the bond topology of a structure and its thermodynamic properties, as indicated by correlations between average anion coordination number and reduced enthalpy of formation from the oxides for [6]Mg{/m [4]}Si n O( m+2 n) and MgSO4(H2O) n .

  13. The Relation between Chemical Bonding and Ultrafast Crystal Growth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Elliott, Stephen R

    2017-06-01

    Glasses are often described as supercooled liquids, whose structures are topologically disordered like a liquid, but nevertheless retain short-range structural order. Structural complexity is often associated with complicated electron-charge distributions in glassy systems, making a detailed investigation challenging even for short-range structural order, let alone their atomic dynamics. This is particularly problematic for lone-pair-rich, semiconducting materials, such as phase-change materials (PCMs). Here, this study shows that analytical methods for studying bonding, based on the electron-charge density, rather than a conventional atomic pair-correlation-function approach, allows an in-depth investigation into the chemical-bonding network, as well as lone pairs, of the prototypical PCM, Ge2 Sb2 Te5 (GST). It is demonstrated that the structurally flexible building units of the amorphous GST network, intimately linked to the presence of distinctly coexisting weak covalent and lone-pair interactions, give rise to cooperative structural-ordering processes, by which ultrafast crystal growth becomes possible. This finding may universally apply to other PCMs. © 2017 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Topology of electron charge density for chemical bonds from valence bond theory: a probe of bonding types.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixian; Ying, Fuming; Wu, Wei; Hiberty, Philippe C; Shaik, Sason

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the nature of bonding we derive the topological properties of the electron charge density of a variety of bonds based on ab initio valence bond methods. The electron density and its associated Laplacian are partitioned into covalent, ionic, and resonance components in the valence bond spirit. The analysis provides a density-based signature of bonding types and reveals, along with the classical covalent and ionic bonds, the existence of two-electron bonds in which most of the bonding arises from the covalent-ionic resonance energy, so-called charge-shift bonds. As expected, the covalent component of the Laplacian at the bond critical point is found to be largely negative for classical covalent bonds. In contrast, for charge-shift bonds, the covalent part of the Laplacian is small or positive, in agreement with the weakly attractive or repulsive character of the covalent interaction in these bonds. On the other hand, the resonance component of the Laplacian is always negative or nearly zero, and it increases in absolute value with the charge-shift character of the bond, in agreement with the decrease of kinetic energy associated with covalent-ionic mixing. A new interpretation of the topology of the total density at the bond critical point is proposed to characterize covalent, ionic, and charge-shift bonding from the density point of view.

  15. Chemical bond activation observed with an x-ray laser

    DOE PAGES

    Beye, Martin; Öberg, Henrik; Xin, Hongliang; ...

    2016-09-01

    The concept of bonding and anti-bonding orbitals is fundamental in chemistry. The population of those orbitals and the energetic difference between the two reflect the strength of the bonding interaction. Weakening the bond is expected to reduce this energetic splitting, but the transient character of bond-activation has so far prohibited direct experimental access. Lastly, we apply time-resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy at a free-electron laser to directly observe the decreased bonding–anti-bonding splitting following bond-activation using an ultra short optical laser pulse.

  16. Chemical bonding in aqueous hexacyano cobaltate from photon- and electron-detection perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lalithambika, Sreeju Sreekantan Nair; Atak, Kaan; Seidel, Robert; Neubauer, Antje; Brandenburg, Tim; Xiao, Jie; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F.

    2017-01-01

    The electronic structure of the [Co(CN)6]3− complex dissolved in water is studied using X-ray spectroscopy techniques. By combining electron and photon detection methods from the solutions ionized or excited by soft X-rays we experimentally identify chemical bonding between the metal center and the CN ligand. Non-resonant photoelectron spectroscopy provides solute electron binding energies, and nitrogen 1 s and cobalt 2p resonant core-level photoelectron spectroscopy identifies overlap between metal and ligand orbitals. By probing resonances we are able to qualitatively determine the ligand versus metal character of the respective occupied and non-occupied orbitals, purely by experiment. For the same excitations we also detect the emitted X-rays, yielding the complementary resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra. For a quantitative interpretation of the spectra, we perform theoretical electronic-structure calculations. The latter provide both orbital energies and orbital character which are found to be in good agreement with experimental energies and with experimentally inferred orbital mixing. We also report calculated X-ray absorption spectra, which in conjunction with our orbital-structure analysis, enables us to quantify various bonding interactions with a particular focus on the water-solvent – ligand interaction and the strength of π-backbonding between metal and ligand. PMID:28098216

  17. Chemical bonding in aqueous hexacyano cobaltate from photon- and electron-detection perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lalithambika, Sreeju Sreekantan Nair; Atak, Kaan; Seidel, Robert; Neubauer, Antje; Brandenburg, Tim; Xiao, Jie; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F

    2017-01-18

    The electronic structure of the [Co(CN)6](3-) complex dissolved in water is studied using X-ray spectroscopy techniques. By combining electron and photon detection methods from the solutions ionized or excited by soft X-rays we experimentally identify chemical bonding between the metal center and the CN ligand. Non-resonant photoelectron spectroscopy provides solute electron binding energies, and nitrogen 1 s and cobalt 2p resonant core-level photoelectron spectroscopy identifies overlap between metal and ligand orbitals. By probing resonances we are able to qualitatively determine the ligand versus metal character of the respective occupied and non-occupied orbitals, purely by experiment. For the same excitations we also detect the emitted X-rays, yielding the complementary resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra. For a quantitative interpretation of the spectra, we perform theoretical electronic-structure calculations. The latter provide both orbital energies and orbital character which are found to be in good agreement with experimental energies and with experimentally inferred orbital mixing. We also report calculated X-ray absorption spectra, which in conjunction with our orbital-structure analysis, enables us to quantify various bonding interactions with a particular focus on the water-solvent - ligand interaction and the strength of π-backbonding between metal and ligand.

  18. Chemical bonding in aqueous hexacyano cobaltate from photon- and electron-detection perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalithambika, Sreeju Sreekantan Nair; Atak, Kaan; Seidel, Robert; Neubauer, Antje; Brandenburg, Tim; Xiao, Jie; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F.

    2017-01-01

    The electronic structure of the [Co(CN)6]3- complex dissolved in water is studied using X-ray spectroscopy techniques. By combining electron and photon detection methods from the solutions ionized or excited by soft X-rays we experimentally identify chemical bonding between the metal center and the CN ligand. Non-resonant photoelectron spectroscopy provides solute electron binding energies, and nitrogen 1 s and cobalt 2p resonant core-level photoelectron spectroscopy identifies overlap between metal and ligand orbitals. By probing resonances we are able to qualitatively determine the ligand versus metal character of the respective occupied and non-occupied orbitals, purely by experiment. For the same excitations we also detect the emitted X-rays, yielding the complementary resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra. For a quantitative interpretation of the spectra, we perform theoretical electronic-structure calculations. The latter provide both orbital energies and orbital character which are found to be in good agreement with experimental energies and with experimentally inferred orbital mixing. We also report calculated X-ray absorption spectra, which in conjunction with our orbital-structure analysis, enables us to quantify various bonding interactions with a particular focus on the water-solvent - ligand interaction and the strength of π-backbonding between metal and ligand.

  19. Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    AFRL-RQ-ED-TR-2014-0025 Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules P.W. Langhoff J.D. Mills J.A...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Oct 2013 - 15 Oct 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules...atoms in molecules and provide corresponding definitions of atomic energies and of the chemical bonds between atoms from the perspective of

  20. Bond strengths of three chemical adhesive cements adhered to a nickel-chromium alloy for direct bonded retainers.

    PubMed

    Atta, M O; Smith, B G; Brown, D

    1990-02-01

    Sandblasted surfaces of a beryllium-free, nickel-chromium alloy were bonded with one of three chemical adhesives. After either immersion in water for up to 6 months or thermal cycling between 5 degrees and 60 degrees C for 500 cycles, the bonded specimens were tested for both shear and tensile strength. The highest values of tensile and shear bond strengths were found with Panavia Ex material, and these values showed no significant changes after thermal cycling. For ABC cement and for Super-Bond C & B material, the strength of the bond was significantly improved with thermal cycling. However, immersion in water for 6 months caused a significant decrease in the strength of the bond of specimens adhered with ABC cement.

  1. Chemical Bond Activation Observed with an X-ray Laser.

    PubMed

    Beye, Martin; Öberg, Henrik; Xin, Hongliang; Dakovski, Georgi L; Dell'Angela, Martina; Föhlisch, Alexander; Gladh, Jörgen; Hantschmann, Markus; Hieke, Florian; Kaya, Sarp; Kühn, Danilo; LaRue, Jerry; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan P; Ng, May Ling; Nilsson, Anders; Nordlund, Dennis; Nørskov, Jens; Öström, Henrik; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Persson, Mats; Schlotter, William F; Sellberg, Jonas A; Wolf, Martin; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Pettersson, Lars G M; Wurth, Wilfried

    2016-09-15

    The concept of bonding and antibonding orbitals is fundamental in chemistry. The population of those orbitals and the energetic difference between the two reflect the strength of the bonding interaction. Weakening the bond is expected to reduce this energetic splitting, but the transient character of bond-activation has so far prohibited direct experimental access. Here we apply time-resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy at a free-electron laser to directly observe the decreased bonding-antibonding splitting following bond-activation using an ultrashort optical laser pulse.

  2. Effect of silica coating on bond strength between a gold alloy and metal bracket bonded with chemically cured resin

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Min-Ju; Lim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets bonded directly to gold alloy with chemically cured resin. Methods Two hundred ten type III gold alloy specimens were randomly divided into six groups according to the combination of three different surface conditioning methods (aluminum oxide sandblasting only, application of a metal primer after aluminum oxide sandblasting, silica coating and silanation) and thermocycling (with thermocycling, without thermocycling). After performing surface conditioning of specimens in accordance with each experimental condition, metal brackets were bonded to all specimens using a chemically cured resin. The SBS was measured at the moment of bracket debonding, and the resin remnants on the specimen surface were evaluated using the adhesive remnant index. Results Application of metal primer after aluminum oxide sandblasting yielded a higher bond strength than that with aluminum oxide sandblasting alone (p < 0.001), and silica coating and silanation yielded a higher bond strength than that with metal primer after aluminum oxide sandblasting (p < 0.001). There was no significant change in SBS after thermocycling in all groups. Conclusions With silica coating and silanation, clinically satisfactory bond strength can be attained when metal brackets are directly bonded to gold alloys using a chemically cured resin. PMID:24892023

  3. Improvement of wafer-level Cu-to-Cu bonding quality using wet chemical pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Won; Jeon, Seong-Jae; Lee, Hak-Joo; Hyun, Seungmin; Park, Young-Bae

    2012-04-01

    We have evaluated the effect of wet chemical treatment on the interfacial bonding strength of Cu-to-Cu direct bonding. The oxide on a Cu-deposited wafer can be removed by a solution made of hydrofluoric acid and sulfuric acid (HF/H2SO4) or diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl/H2O), which can also improve the bonding quality of Cu-to-Cu bonds. Two 4-inch Cu-deposited wafers were bonded at 250 degrees C via the thermo-compression method. The interfacial adhesion energy of Cu-to-Cu bonding was quantitatively measured by the four-point bending method. After chemical pretreatment for 30 seconds with HF/H2SO4 and HCl:H2O solutions, the measured interfacial adhesion energies were 4.91 J/m2 and 5.51 J/m2, respectively. Microstructural examination of the Cu bonding interfaces showed that the interfacial bonding quality of Cu-to-Cu bonds improved under proper wet chemical etching conditions. Wafer-level cleaning by wet chemical treatment of the Cu surface was found to be a very effective way to improve the bonding quality of Cu bonds, even at bonding temperatures lower than 300 degrees C.

  4. Experimental Observation of the Nature of Weak Chemical Bonds in Labile Compounds.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Daisuke

    2017-02-15

    Accurate single-crystal X-ray diffraction data afford a total electron density distribution for crystalline materials by employing an aspherical atomic model with comparable accuracy to that of theoretical calculations. Chemical bonds and intermolecular interactions in the crystalline state are characterized based on the electron density distribution of valence electrons, as well as structural parameters. Herein, the bonding nature of weak chemical bonds in labile compounds, such as hypervalent bonds and delocalized π-bonds, is explored on the basis of electronic structures derived from experimental electron density distribution analyses. In addition, the visualization of a radicalic orbital distribution on an sp(2) -hydridized carbon atom is demonstrated.

  5. Method of waste stabilization with dewatered chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D.

    2010-06-29

    A method of stabilizing a waste in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC). The method consists of preparing a slurry including the waste, water, an oxide binder, and a phosphate binder. The slurry is then allowed to cure to a solid, hydrated CBPC matrix. Next, bound water within the solid, hydrated CBPC matrix is removed. Typically, the bound water is removed by applying heat to the cured CBPC matrix. Preferably, the quantity of heat applied to the cured CBPC matrix is sufficient to drive off water bound within the hydrated CBPC matrix, but not to volatalize other non-water components of the matrix, such as metals and radioactive components. Typically, a temperature range of between 100.degree. C.-200.degree. C. will be sufficient. In another embodiment of the invention wherein the waste and water have been mixed prior to the preparation of the slurry, a select amount of water may be evaporated from the waste and water mixture prior to preparation of the slurry. Another aspect of the invention is a direct anyhydrous CBPC fabrication method wherein water is removed from the slurry by heating and mixing the slurry while allowing the slurry to cure. Additional aspects of the invention are ceramic matrix waste forms prepared by the methods disclosed above.

  6. Learners' Use of Analogy and Alternative Conceptions for Chemical Bonding: A Cross-Age Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Richard K.; Treagust, David F.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Australian secondary school, undergraduate, and postgraduate students' use of analogy and anthropomorphism along with their alternative conceptions for mental models of chemical bonding. Finds that learners make use of analogy and anthropomorphism to aid their explanations of chemical bonding, and in addition reveals that learners across…

  7. Chemical Reactions and Mechanical Properties of the Directly Bonded Ge-Si Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Ki Yeol; Ferain, Isabelle; Yu, Ran; Colinge, Cindy

    2011-12-01

    In this study, chemical reactions and mechanical properties of directly bonded Ge-Si interfaces are investigated. The Ge-Si bonded interface has been systematically characterized as a function of the thermal budget (200 °C and 300 °C), which demonstrated that the formation of a thin GeO2 cap layer by radical pre-treatment can reduce the generation rate of voids at the bonded interface significantly. Patterning of one of the wafers prior to bonding can help to achieve high bonding quality thanks to enhanced out-diffusion of reaction by-products and stress reduction at the bonded interface. Both numerical modeling and structural analysis show that the presence of diffusion path (channels) at the bonded interfaces result in a maximum bond strength and minimum stress at the bonded interface.

  8. Exploring electron pair behaviour in chemical bonds using the extracule density.

    PubMed

    Proud, Adam J; Mackenzie, Dalton E C K; Pearson, Jason K

    2015-08-21

    We explore explicit electron pair behaviour within the chemical bond (and lone pairs) by calculating the probability distribution for the center-of-mass (extracule) of an electron pair described by single localized orbitals. Using Edmiston-Ruedenberg localized orbitals in a series of 61 chemical systems, we demonstrate the utility of the extracule density as an interpretive tool in chemistry. By accessing localized regions of chemical space we simplify the interpretation of the extracule density and afford a quantum mechanical interpretation of "chemically intuitive" features of electronic structure. Specifically, we describe the localized effects on chemical bonds due to changes in electronegativities of bonded neighbours, bond strain, and non-covalent interactions. We show that the extracule density offers unique insight into electronic structure and allows one to readily quantify the effects of changing the chemical environment.

  9. Intermolecular atom-atom bonds in crystals - a chemical perspective.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-03-01

    Short atom-atom distances between molecules are almost always indicative of specific intermolecular bonding. These distances may be used to assess the significance of all hydrogen bonds, including the C-H⋯O and even weaker C-H⋯F varieties.

  10. An alternative empirical model for the relationship between the bond valence and the thermal expansion rate of chemical bonds.

    PubMed

    Sidey, Vasyl

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between the bond valence s and the thermal expansion rate of chemical bonds (dr/dT) has been closely approximated by using the alternative three-parameter empirical model (dr/dT) = (u + vs)(-1/w), where u, v and w are the refinable parameters. Unlike the s-(dr/dT) model developed by Brown et al. [(1997), Acta Cryst. B53, 750-761], this alternative model can be optimized for particular s-(dr/dT) datasets in the least-squares refinement procedure. For routine calculations of the thermal expansion rates of chemical bonds, the alternative model with the parameters u = -63.9, v = 2581.0 and w = 0.647 can be recommended.

  11. AIScore chemically diverse empirical scoring function employing quantum chemical binding energies of hydrogen-bonded complexes.

    PubMed

    Raub, Stephan; Steffen, Andreas; Kämper, Andreas; Marian, Christel M

    2008-07-01

    In this work we report on a novel scoring function that is based on the LUDI model and focuses on the prediction of binding affinities. AIScore extends the original FlexX scoring function using a chemically diverse set of hydrogen-bonded interactions derived from extensive quantum chemical ab initio calculations. Furthermore, we introduce an algorithmic extension for the treatment of multifurcated hydrogen bonds (XFurcate). Charged and resonance-assisted hydrogen bond energies and hydrophobic interactions as well as a scaling factor for implicit solvation were fitted to experimental data. To this end, we assembled a set of 101 protein-ligand complexes with known experimental binding affinities. Tightly bound water molecules in the active site were considered to be an integral part of the binding pocket. Compared to the original FlexX scoring function, AIScore significantly improves the prediction of the binding free energies of the complexes in their native crystal structures. In combination with XFurcate, AIScore yields a Pearson correlation coefficient of R P = 0.87 on the training set. In a validation run on the PDBbind test set we achieved an R P value of 0.46 for 799 attractively scored complexes, compared to a value of R P = 0.17 and 739 bound complexes obtained with the FlexX original scoring function. The redocking capability of AIScore, on the other hand, does not fully reach the good performance of the original FlexX scoring function. This finding suggests that AIScore should rather be used for postscoring in combination with the standard FlexX incremental ligand construction scheme.

  12. Nature of the chemical bond and origin of the inverted dipole moment in boron fluoride: a generalized valence bond approach.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, Felipe; Cardozo, Thiago Messias; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer

    2015-05-28

    The generalized product function energy partitioning (GPF-EP) method has been applied to investigate the nature of the chemical bond and the origin of the inverted dipole moment of the BF molecule. The calculations were carried out with GPF wave functions treating all of the core electrons as a single Hartree-Fock group and the valence electrons at the generalized valence bond perfect-pairing (GVB-PP) or full GVB levels, with the cc-pVTZ basis set. The results show that the chemical structure of both X (1)Σ(+) and a (3)Π states is composed of a single bond. The lower dissociation energy of the excited state is attributed to a stabilizing intraatomic singlet coupling involving the B 2sp-like lobe orbitals after bond dissociation. An increase of electron density on the B atom caused by the reorientation of the boron 2sp-like lobe orbitals is identified as the main responsible effect for the electric dipole inversion in the ground state of BF. Finally, it is shown that π back-bonding from fluorine to boron plays a minor role in the electron density displacement to the bonding region in both states. Moreover, this effect is associated with changes in the quasi-classical component of the electron density only and does not contribute to covalency in either of the states. Therefore, at least for the case of the BF molecule, the term back-bonding is misleading, since it does not contribute to the bond formation.

  13. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-04

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  14. A combined deuterium NMR and quantum chemical investigation of inequivalent hydrogen bonds in organic solids.

    PubMed

    Webber, Renee; Penner, Glenn H

    2012-01-01

    Deuterium magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations are used to investigate organic solids in which inequivalent hydrogen bonds are present. The use of (2)H MAS allows one to measure the chemical shift, δ, quadrupolar coupling constant, C(Q), and asymmetry in the quadrupolar interaction, η(Q), for each type of hydrogen bond present in the system. Quantum chemical calculations of the magnetic shielding (σ, which can be related to δ) and the electric field gradient (EFG, which can be related to C(Q)) are compared to the experimental results and are discussed with respect to the relative strengths of the hydrogen bonds within each system.

  15. Natural Bond Critical Point analysis: quantitative relationships between natural bond orbital-based and QTAIM-based topological descriptors of chemical bonding.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Frank

    2012-11-15

    We have developed a "Natural Bond Critical Point" (NBCP) module for the natural bond orbital (NBO) program that allows mutual analysis of NBO-based versus Bader-type quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) topological descriptors of chemical bonding interactions. Conventional QTAIM bond path and bond critical point (BCP) descriptors deduced from total electron density ρ(r) can thereby be compared with analogous "natural" (NBCP) descriptors for idealized densities ρ(NAIM)(r) composed solely from NBO-based "natural atoms in molecules" (NAIM) at the terminal nuclei. Standard ρ(r(BCP)) and [nabla](2)ρ(r(BCP)) descriptors can also be decomposed into unique contributions from individual NBOs or other localized, semilocalized, or delocalized orbital components. These results allow one to recognize many relationships between QTAIM and NBO analyses, showing why close correlations are often found between NBO-based versus ρ(r(BCP))-based characterizations of chemical bonding interactions, despite strongly divergent conceptions of "the atom in the molecule."

  16. Analysis of fracture surface of titanium-porcelain bonding by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kannari, Yoshiteru; Endo, Kazuhiko; Ida, Yusuke; Ochi, Morio; Ohno, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Three commercially available porcelains bonded to titanium were evaluated to determine the weakest zone of the titanium-porcelain bonding structures. Tensile bond tests were performed for these specimens (NO, DU, and VI) and for Ni-Cr alloy-porcelain bonding samples that served as controls. The maximum bond strengths between porcelain and titanium and the Ni-Cr alloy subjected to different metal surface treatments were compared. Sand blasting effectively increased bond strengths in titanium-porcelain bonding materials. No statistically significant differences in the maximum bond strengths were found between the NO sample and a control; however, sample NO exhibited greater maximum bond strength than DU and VI samples. The bond strengths increased with increasing area fractions of porcelain failure on fracture surfaces. The weakest zones were investigated based on the oxygen chemical states determined by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include bridging oxygen (Si-O-Si), nonbridging oxygen (Si-O(-) M(+)), and titanium oxide (O(2-)) states. We concluded that the titanium oxide layer is the weakest zone of titanium-porcelain bonding structures.

  17. 8 - N rule and chemical bonding in main-group MgAgAs-type compounds.

    PubMed

    Bende, David; Wagner, Frank R; Grin, Yuri

    2015-04-20

    The chemical bonding of main-group MgAgAs-type compounds is analyzed with quantum chemical direct-space techniques. A new bonding concept is developed that unites the former ionic bonding and polyanionic network models. Polar and nonpolar contributions to the bonding are extracted by the combined analysis of electron density and electron localizability. A direct-space representation of the 8 - N rule is introduced. In this approach, the anions' heteropolar bonds are treated as a superposition of covalent (nonpolar) and lone-pair closed-shell (polar) contributions. The relation between covalent (nonpolar) and lone-pair (polar) character is obtained with the ELI-D/QTAIM basin intersection technique. This ratio depends on the constituting elements. On basis of this approach, MgAgAs-type compounds are compared with Zintl phases, where covalent bonds and lone pairs are spatially separated.

  18. Hydrogen bond migration between molecular sites observed with ultrafast 2D IR chemical exchange spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Daniel E; Kwak, Kyungwon; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Fayer, M D

    2010-02-25

    Hydrogen-bonded complexes between phenol and phenylacetylene are studied using ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) chemical exchange spectroscopy. Phenylacetylene has two possible pi hydrogen bonding acceptor sites (phenyl or acetylene) that compete for hydrogen bond donors in solution at room temperature. The OD stretch frequency of deuterated phenol is sensitive to which acceptor site it is bound. The appearance of off-diagonal peaks between the two vibrational frequencies in the 2D IR spectrum reports on the exchange process between the two competitive hydrogen-bonding sites of phenol-phenylacetylene complexes in the neat phenylacetylene solvent. The chemical exchange process occurs in approximately 5 ps and is assigned to direct hydrogen bond migration along the phenylacetylene molecule. Other nonmigration mechanisms are ruled out by performing 2D IR experiments on phenol dissolved in the phenylacetylene/carbon tetrachloride mixed solvent. The observation of direct hydrogen bond migration can have implications for macromolecular systems.

  19. Electronic structure imperfections and chemical bonding at graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Brian Joseph

    ) fabricate graphene/metal interfaces and metal/graphene/metal sandwich structures evidencing classical anisotropic umpolung chemistry from carbon pz-orbrital charge pinning, and (Chapter 5) engineer graphene/dielectric interfaces showing electron depletion from carbon atoms at the HfO2/graphene interface. The fabrication of graphene interfaces remains a critical gap for successful commercialization of graphene-based devices, yet we demonstrate that interfacial hybridization, anisotropic charge redistribution, local chemical bonding, and discrete electronic hybridization regimes play a critical role in the electronic structure at graphene interfaces.

  20. Bond Order and Chemical Properties of BF, CO, and N[subscript 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinie, Ryan J.; Bultema, Jarred J.; Vander Wal, Mark N.; Burkhart, Brandon J.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2011-01-01

    The traditional chemical approaches, Lewis electron dot structures and molecular orbital theory, predict the relative bond orders of boron monofluoride, carbon monoxide, and dinitrogen to be BF less than CO less than N[subscript 2]. This is quantified by quantum mechanical, theoretical studies that show the bond orders to be approximately 1.4,…

  1. Cleavage enhancement of specific chemical bonds in DNA-Cisplatin complexes induced by X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Yao, Xiaobin; Luo, Xinglan; Fu, Xianzhi

    2014-04-01

    The chemical bond transformation of cisplatin-DNA complexes can be probed efficiently by XPS which provides a concomitant X-ray irradiation source as well. The presence to Pt could considerably increase formation of the SE induced by X-ray and that the further interaction of these LEE with DNA leads to the enhancement of bond cleavages.

  2. Bond Order and Chemical Properties of BF, CO, and N[subscript 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinie, Ryan J.; Bultema, Jarred J.; Vander Wal, Mark N.; Burkhart, Brandon J.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2011-01-01

    The traditional chemical approaches, Lewis electron dot structures and molecular orbital theory, predict the relative bond orders of boron monofluoride, carbon monoxide, and dinitrogen to be BF less than CO less than N[subscript 2]. This is quantified by quantum mechanical, theoretical studies that show the bond orders to be approximately 1.4,…

  3. Representational Classroom Practices that Contribute to Students' Conceptual and Representational Understanding of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Annette; Nichols, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Understanding bonding is fundamental to success in chemistry. A number of alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding have been reported in the literature. Research suggests that many alternative conceptions held by chemistry students result from previous teaching; if teachers are explicit in the use of representations and explain their…

  4. Representational Classroom Practices that Contribute to Students' Conceptual and Representational Understanding of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Annette; Nichols, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Understanding bonding is fundamental to success in chemistry. A number of alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding have been reported in the literature. Research suggests that many alternative conceptions held by chemistry students result from previous teaching; if teachers are explicit in the use of representations and explain their…

  5. EVALUATION OF CHEMICALLY BONDED PHOSPHATE CERAMICS FOR MERCURY STABILIZATION OF A MIXED SYNTHETIC WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This experimental study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization and encapsulation technique developed by Argonne National Laboratory, called the Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics technology for Hg- and HgCl2-contaminated synthetic waste materials. Leachability ...

  6. EVALUATION OF CHEMICALLY BONDED PHOSPHATE CERAMICS FOR MERCURY STABILIZATION OF A MIXED SYNTHETIC WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This experimental study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization and encapsulation technique developed by Argonne National Laboratory, called the Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics technology for Hg- and HgCl2-contaminated synthetic waste materials. Leachability ...

  7. CO Adsorption on GaPd-Unravelling the Chemical Bonding in Real Space.

    PubMed

    Villaseca, Sebastián Alarcón; Ormeci, Alim; Levchenko, Sergey V; Schlögl, Robert; Grin, Yuri; Armbrüster, Marc

    2017-02-17

    The electron localizability indicator-an efficient quantum chemical tool for analysis of chemical bonding-is applied to unveil the chemical bonding behind the CO adsorption on the (1‾ 1‾ 1‾ ) surface of the highly selective semi-hydrogenation catalyst GaPd. Refining the commonly applied Blyholder model, the obtained results are in excellent agreement with previous experimental and theoretical findings. The clean GaPd(1‾ 1‾ 1‾ ) surface presents unshielded negatively charged Pd centers and positively charged Ga species partially shielded by dangling bonds. The CO molecule adsorbs on-top of the Pd centers perperdicular to the surface, while no CO-Ga interaction is observed. The chemical bonding analysis results in deep understanding, thus enabling a cost efficient route to innovative materials by reverse engineering. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. NEXAFS Chemical State and Bond Lengths of p-Aminobenzoic Acid in Solution and Solid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. S.; Gainar, A.; Suljoti, E.; Xiao, J.; Golnak, R.; Aziz, E. F.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state and solution pH-dependent NEXAFS studies allow direct observation of the electronic state of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as a function of its chemical environment, revealing the chemical state and bonding of the chemical species. Variations in the ionization potential (IP) and 1s→π* resonances unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic, or anionic) present and the varying local environment. Shifts in σ* shape resonances relative to the IP in the NEXAFS spectra vary with C-N bond length, and the important effect of minor alterations in bond length is confirmed with nitrogen FEFF calculations, leading to the possibility of bond length determination in solution.

  9. A Descriptive Analysis of the Chemical Bond Approach, the Chemical Education Material Study, and a Representative Traditional Chemistry Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crilly, Alice Roth

    This study compared three one-year courses in high school chemistry. One of these, entitled Modern Chemistry, represents the "traditional" precollegiate chemistry course. The others are the Chemical Bond Approach (CBA) and the Chemical Education Material Study (CHEM Study). These are the two major revisions in high school chemistry which emerged…

  10. A Descriptive Analysis of the Chemical Bond Approach, the Chemical Education Material Study, and a Representative Traditional Chemistry Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crilly, Alice Roth

    This study compared three one-year courses in high school chemistry. One of these, entitled Modern Chemistry, represents the "traditional" precollegiate chemistry course. The others are the Chemical Bond Approach (CBA) and the Chemical Education Material Study (CHEM Study). These are the two major revisions in high school chemistry which emerged…

  11. Novel poly(dimethylsiloxane) bonding strategy via room temperature "chemical gluing".

    PubMed

    Lee, Nae Yoon; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2009-04-09

    Here we propose a new scheme for bonding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), namely, a "chemical gluing", at room temperature by anchoring chemical functionalities on the surfaces of PDMS. Aminosilane and epoxysilane are anchored separately on the surfaces of two PDMS substrates, the reaction of which are well-known to form a strong amine-epoxy bond, therefore acting as a chemical glue. The bonding is performed for 1 h at room temperature without employing heat. We characterize the surface properties and composition by contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, and fluorescence measurement to confirm the formation of surface functionalities and investigate the adhesion strength by means of pulling, tearing, and leakage tests. As confirmed by the above-mentioned analyses and tests, PDMS surfaces were successfully modified with amine and epoxy functionalities, and a bonding based on the amine-epoxy chemical gluing was successfully realized within 1 h at room temperature. The bonding was sufficiently robust to tolerate intense introduction of liquid whose per minute injection volume was almost 2000 times larger than the total internal volume of the microchannel used. In addition to the bonding of PDMS-PDMS homogeneous assembly, the bonding of the PDMS-poly(ethylene terephthalate) heterogeneous assembly was also examined. We also investigate the potential use of the multifunctionalized walls inside the microchannel, generated as a consequence of the chemical gluing, as a platform for the targeted immobilization.

  12. A review on the chemical synthesis of pyrophosphate bonds in bioactive nucleoside diphosphate analogs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong

    2015-09-15

    Currently, there is an ongoing interest in the synthesis of nucleoside diphosphate analogs as important regulators in catabolism/anabolism, and their potential applications as mechanistic probes and chemical tools for bioassays. However, the pyrophosphate bond formation step remains as the bottleneck. In this Digest, the chemical synthesis of the pyrophosphate bonds of representative bioactive nucleoside diphosphate analogs, i.e. phosphorus-modified analogs, nucleoside cyclic diphosphates, and nucleoside diphosphate conjugates, will be described.

  13. A New "Bottom-Up" Framework for Teaching Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahum, Tami Levy; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi

    2008-01-01

    Traditional curriculum for teaching bonding often fosters the use of over-simplifications and over-generalizations. Therefore, there is a need for a presentation that is consistent with current scientific knowledge and that provides the student with the proper intellectual infrastructure for further studies. In this article, we present a general…

  14. Scientists Get First Glimpse of a Chemical Bond Being Born

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-02-12

    Scientists have used an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to get the first glimpse of the transition state where two atoms begin to form a weak bond on the way to becoming a molecule.

  15. The Chemical Bond and Solid-state Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, James C.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes a new scale of ionicity, with which the ionic character of bonding in crystals can be predicted and measured. This new scale of ionicity has led to improved understanding of such crystalline properties as lattice structure, heats of formation, elastic constants, and nonlinear optical properties. Bibliography. (LC)

  16. Scientists Get First Glimpse of a Chemical Bond Being Born

    ScienceCinema

    Nilsson, Anders

    2016-07-12

    Scientists have used an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to get the first glimpse of the transition state where two atoms begin to form a weak bond on the way to becoming a molecule.

  17. Chemical bonding of hydrogen molecules to transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kubas, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The complex W(CO){sub 3}(PR{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}) (CO = carbonyl; PR{sub 3} = organophosphine) was prepared and was found to be a stable crystalline solid under ambient conditions from which the hydrogen can be reversibly removed in vacuum or under an inert atmosphere. The weakly bonded H{sub 2} exchanges easily with D{sub 2}. This complex represents the first stable compound containing intermolecular interaction of a sigma-bond (H-H) with a metal. The primary interaction is reported to be donation of electron density from the H{sub 2} bonding electron pair to a vacant metal d-orbital. A series of complexes of molybdenum of the type Mo(CO)(H{sub 2})(R{sub 2}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PR{sub 2}){sub 2} were prepared by varying the organophosphine substitutent to demonstrate that it is possible to bond either dihydrogen or dihydride by adjusting the electron-donating properties of the co-ligands. Results of infrared and NMR spectroscopic studies are reported. 20 refs., 5 fig.

  18. A New "Bottom-Up" Framework for Teaching Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahum, Tami Levy; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi

    2008-01-01

    Traditional curriculum for teaching bonding often fosters the use of over-simplifications and over-generalizations. Therefore, there is a need for a presentation that is consistent with current scientific knowledge and that provides the student with the proper intellectual infrastructure for further studies. In this article, we present a general…

  19. The Chemical Bond and Solid-state Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, James C.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes a new scale of ionicity, with which the ionic character of bonding in crystals can be predicted and measured. This new scale of ionicity has led to improved understanding of such crystalline properties as lattice structure, heats of formation, elastic constants, and nonlinear optical properties. Bibliography. (LC)

  20. A qualitative study of high school students' pre- and post instructional conceptions in chemical bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renhong

    This study investigated high school students' understanding of chemical bonding prior to and after formal chemistry instruction. Two sets of clinical interviews were conducted prior to and after formal instructions on the topic of chemical bonding using a teacher-as-researcher protocol. Twenty-two students enrolled in a New York Regents Chemistry course were interviewed. Six students participated in the pilot study and the other sixteen were involved in the full study. Oral and pictorial data from the interviews were collected and analyzed in two parts; first, the students' conceptual understanding of chemical bonding including common themes, ideas and misconceptions were identified; second, profiles of each student were made to determine conceptual changes due to formal instruction. The findings showed that students were not familiar with the basic components and structure of atoms, especially the electrostatic properties of the sub-atomic particles. Inter-particle distance, rather than the electrostatic forces between particles, was believed to be the determining cause of the state of matter of a substance. The role of repulsive and attractive electrostatic forces in chemical bonding was not recognized. Students were unable to accurately describe the underlying scientific concepts for all types of chemical bonding and revealed a number of misconceptions, which were resistant to change by instruction. Specific areas of difficulty included the accurate descriptions of ionic bonding, covalent bonding and hydrogen bonding. Further, almost all the students could not use electrostatic forces to explain three states of water and phase changes and most students were unable to describe the energy that was released or absorbed due to bond formation or breaking. Student difficulties stemmed from a lack of understanding of some of the underlying, fundamental chemistry, such as the basic atomic structure, the particulate nature of mater and the role of electrostatic forces in

  1. The (15)N NMR chemical shift in the characterization of weak halogen bonding in solution.

    PubMed

    Hakkert, Sebastiaan B; Gräfenstein, Jürgen; Erdelyi, Mate

    2017-07-21

    We have studied the applicability of (15)N NMR spectroscopy in the characterization of the very weak halogen bonds of nonfluorinated halogen bond donors with a nitrogenous Lewis base in solution. The ability of the technique to detect the relative strength of iodine-, bromine- and chlorine-centered halogen bonds, as well as solvent and substituent effects was evaluated. Whereas computations on the DFT level indicate that (15)N NMR chemical shifts reflect the diamagnetic deshielding associated with the formation of a weak halogen bond, the experimentally observed chemical shift differences were on the edge of detectability due to the low molar fraction of halogen-bonded complexes in solution. The formation of the analogous yet stronger hydrogen bond of phenols have induced approximately ten times larger chemical shift changes, and could be detected and correlated to the electronic properties of substituents of the hydrogen bond donors. Overall, (15)N NMR is shown to be a suitable tool for the characterization of comparably strong secondary interactions in solution, but not sufficiently accurate for the detection of the formation of thermodynamically labile, weak halogen bonded complexes.

  2. Valence-bond description of chemical reactions on Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Nao; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2009-04-01

    The nature of chemical bonds on dynamic paths was investigated using the complete active space valence-bond (CASVB) method and the Born-Oppenheimer dynamics. To extract the chemical bond picture during reactions, a scheme to collect contributions from several VB (resonance) structures into a small numbers of indices was introduced. In this scheme, a tree diagram for the VB structures is constructed with the numbers of the ionic bonds treated as generation. A pair of VB structures is related to each other if one VB structure is transferred into the other by changing a covalent bond to an ionic bond. The former and latter VB structures are named parent and child structures, respectively. The weights of the bond pictures are computed as the sum of the CASVB occupation numbers running from the top generation to the bottom along the descent of the VB structures. Thus, a number of CASVB occupation numbers are collected into a small number of indices, and a clear bond picture may be obtained from the CASVB wave function. The scheme was applied to the hydrogen exchange reaction H2+F→H+HF and the Diels-Alder reaction C5H6(cyclopentadiene)+CH2=CH2(ethylene)→C7H10(norbornene). In both the reactions, the scheme gave a clear picture for the Born-Oppenheimer dynamics trajectories. The reconstruction of the bonds during reactions was well described by following the temporal changes in weight.

  3. Valence-bond description of chemical reactions on Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Nao; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2009-04-21

    The nature of chemical bonds on dynamic paths was investigated using the complete active space valence-bond (CASVB) method and the Born-Oppenheimer dynamics. To extract the chemical bond picture during reactions, a scheme to collect contributions from several VB (resonance) structures into a small numbers of indices was introduced. In this scheme, a tree diagram for the VB structures is constructed with the numbers of the ionic bonds treated as generation. A pair of VB structures is related to each other if one VB structure is transferred into the other by changing a covalent bond to an ionic bond. The former and latter VB structures are named parent and child structures, respectively. The weights of the bond pictures are computed as the sum of the CASVB occupation numbers running from the top generation to the bottom along the descent of the VB structures. Thus, a number of CASVB occupation numbers are collected into a small number of indices, and a clear bond picture may be obtained from the CASVB wave function. The scheme was applied to the hydrogen exchange reaction H(2)+F-->H+HF and the Diels-Alder reaction C(5)H(6)(cyclopentadiene)+CH(2)=CH(2)(ethylene)-->C(7)H(10)(norbornene). In both the reactions, the scheme gave a clear picture for the Born-Oppenheimer dynamics trajectories. The reconstruction of the bonds during reactions was well described by following the temporal changes in weight.

  4. Investigation of Chemical Bonding in In Situ Cryocrystallized Organometallic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Sirohiwal, Abhishek; Hathwar, Venkatesha R; Dey, Dhananjay; Chopra, Deepak

    2017-08-02

    This Communication presents the crystal structure of the organometallic complexes (η(4) -1,3-cyclohexadiene) iron tricarbonyl (I) and (methyl cyclopentadienyl) manganese tricarbonyl (II) which are both liquid at room temperature. The crystal structures were determined using a state-of-the-art in situ cryocrystallization technique. The bonding features were elucidated using topological analysis of charge density in the framework of quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and theoretical charge density analysis (multipolar refinement), to decipher the metal-carbonyl, metal-olefin and metal-carbocyclic ligand interactions in these complexes. Complex I displayed a simultaneous interplay of a "synergic effect" (σ-donation and π-back-bonding in the metal and an end-on coordinated carbonyl interaction) as well as consistency with the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson (DCD) model (metal and side-on coordinated π-ligand interactions). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Orbital Exponent Optimization in Elementary VB Calculations of the Chemical Bond in the Ground State of Simple Molecular Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2008-01-01

    Orbital exponent optimization in the elementary ab-initio VB calculation of the ground states of H[subscript 2][superscript +], H[subscript 2], He[subscript 2][superscript +], He[subscript 2] gives a fair description of the exchange-overlap component of the interatomic interaction that is important in the bond region. Correct bond lengths and…

  6. Orbital Exponent Optimization in Elementary VB Calculations of the Chemical Bond in the Ground State of Simple Molecular Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2008-01-01

    Orbital exponent optimization in the elementary ab-initio VB calculation of the ground states of H[subscript 2][superscript +], H[subscript 2], He[subscript 2][superscript +], He[subscript 2] gives a fair description of the exchange-overlap component of the interatomic interaction that is important in the bond region. Correct bond lengths and…

  7. Developing and validating a chemical bonding instrument for Korean high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Nak Han

    The major purpose of this study was to develop a reliable and valid instrument designed to collect and investigate on Korean high school students' understanding about concepts regarding chemical bonding. The Chemical Bonding Diagnostic Test (CBDT) was developed by the procedure by previously relevant researches (Treagust, 1985; Peterson, 1986; Tan, 1994). The final instrument consisted of 15 two-tier items. The reliability coefficient (Cronbach alpha) for the whole test was 0.74. Also, the range of values for the discrimination index was from 0.38 to 0.90 and the overall average difficulty index was 0.38. The test was administered to 716 science declared students in Korean high school. The 37 common misconceptions on chemical bonding were identified through analysis of the items from the CBDT. The grade 11 students had slightly more misconceptions than the grade 12 students for ionic bonding, covalent bonding, and hydrogen bonding while the grade 12 students had more misconceptions about octet rule and hydrogen bonding than the grade 11 students. From the analysis of ANCOVA, there was no significant difference in grades, and between grade levels and gender on the mean score of CBDT. However, there was a significant difference in gender and a significant interaction between grade levels and chemistry preference. In conclusion, Korean high school students had the most common misconception about the electron configuration on ionic bonding and the water density on hydrogen bonding. Korean students' understanding about the chemical bonding was dependent on the interaction between grade levels and the chemistry preference. Consequently, grade 12 chemistry-preferred students had the highest mean scores among student groups concerned by this study.

  8. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future.

  9. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future. PMID:26066349

  10. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-30

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between "static" and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N-. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles.

  11. Chemical bonding in hypervalent molecules: is the octet rule relevant?

    PubMed

    Noury, Stéphane; Silvi, Bernard; Gillespie, Ronald J

    2002-04-22

    The bonding in a large number of hypervalent molecules of P, As, S, Se, Te, Cl, and Br with the ligands F, Cl, O, CH(3), and CH(2) has been studied using the topological analysis of the electron localization function ELF. This function partitions the electron density of a molecule into core and valence basins and further classifies valence basins according to the number of core basins with which they have a contact. The number and geometry of these basins is generally in accord with the VSEPR model. The population of each basin can be obtained by integration, and so, the total population of the valence shell of an atom can be obtained as the sum of the populations of all the valence basins which share a boundary with its core basin. It was found that the population of the V(A, X) disynaptic basin corresponding to the bond, where A is the central atom and X the ligand, varies with the electronegativity of the ligand from approximately 2.0 for a weakly electronegative ligand such as CH(3) to less than 1.0 for a ligand such as F. We find that the total population of the valence shell of a hypervalent atom may vary from close to 10 for a period 15 element and close to 12 for a group 16 element to considerably less than 8 for an electronegative ligand such as F. For example, the phosphorus atom in PF(5) has a population of 5.37 electrons in its valence shell, whereas the arsenic atom in AsMe5 has a population of 9.68 electrons in its valence shell. By definition, hypervalent atoms do not obey the Lewis octet rule. They may or may not obey a modified octet rule that has taken the place of the Lewis octet rule in many recent discussions and according to which an atom in a molecule always has fewer than 8 electrons in its valence shell. We show that the bonds in hypervalent molecules are very similar to those in corresponding nonhypervalent (Lewis octet) molecules. They are all polar bonds ranging from weakly to strongly polar depending on the electronegativity of the

  12. Initiated chemical vapor deposited nanoadhesive for bonding National Ignition Facility's targets

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tom

    2016-05-19

    Currently, the target fabrication scientists in National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is studying the propagation force resulted from laser impulses impacting a target. To best study this, they would like the adhesive used to glue the target substrates to be as thin as possible. The main objective of this research project is to create adhesive glue bonds for NIF’s targets that are ≤ 1 μm thick. Polyglycidylmethacrylate (PGMA) thin films were coated on various substrates using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Film quality studies using white light interferometry reveal that the iCVD PGMA films were smooth. The coated substrates were bonded at 150 °C under vacuum, with low inflow of Nitrogen. Success in bonding most of NIF’s mock targets at thicknesses ≤ 1 μm indicates that our process is feasible in bonding the real targets. Key parameters that are required for successful bonding were concluded from the bonding results. They include inert bonding atmosphere, sufficient contact between the PGMA films, and smooth substrates. Average bond strength of 0.60 MPa was obtained from mechanical shearing tests. The bonding failure mode of the sheared interfaces was observed to be cohesive. Future work on this project will include reattempt to bond silica aerogel to iCVD PGMA coated substrates, stabilize carbon nanotube forests with iCVD PGMA coating, and kinetics study of PGMA thermal crosslinking.

  13. The Trouble with Chemical Energy: Why Understanding Bond Energies Requires an Interdisciplinary Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Helping students understand "chemical energy" is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk…

  14. First-principles simulations on bonding pathways of chemical transformations under hydrostatic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Anguang; Zhang, Fan

    2012-02-01

    High pressure as a thermodynamic parameter provides a strong structural constraint to lead chemical transformations with selective ways. Thus, chemical transformations under pressure can create novel materials which may not be accessible by covalent synthesis. However, bonding evolution toward high pressure chemical transformations can be a complex process and may happen over widely different pressures. To understand bonding evolution pathways of high pressure chemical transformations, first-principles simulations were performed following hydrostatic compression enthalpy minimization paths to obtain experimentally and theoretically established phase transitions of carbon. The results showed that the chemical transformations from hydrostatic compression carbon to single-bonded phases were characterized by a sudden decrease in principal stress components, indicating the onset of chemical transformation. On this basis, a number of hydrostatic compression chemical transformations from molecular precursors to novel materials were predicted, such as hydrocarbon graphane, a hydrogenated carbon nitride sheet, and carbon nitrides. All predicted hydrostatic compression transformations are featured as a sudden change in principal stress components, representing chemical bonding destruction and formation reactions with a cell volume collapse.

  15. The Trouble with Chemical Energy: Why Understanding Bond Energies Requires an Interdisciplinary Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Helping students understand "chemical energy" is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk…

  16. Coulombic Interaction in Finnish Middle School Chemistry: A Systemic Perspective on Students' Conceptual Structure of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joki, Jarkko; Lavonen, Jari; Juuti, Kalle; Aksela, Maija

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design a novel and holistic way to teach chemical bonding at the middle school level according to research on the teaching and learning of bonding. A further aim was to investigate high achieving middle school students' conceptual structures concerning chemical bonding by using a systemic perspective. Students in one…

  17. Coulombic Interaction in Finnish Middle School Chemistry: A Systemic Perspective on Students' Conceptual Structure of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joki, Jarkko; Lavonen, Jari; Juuti, Kalle; Aksela, Maija

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design a novel and holistic way to teach chemical bonding at the middle school level according to research on the teaching and learning of bonding. A further aim was to investigate high achieving middle school students' conceptual structures concerning chemical bonding by using a systemic perspective. Students in one…

  18. Shear bond strength of ceramic brackets with chemical or mechanical retention.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, C M; Hagberg, C

    1992-08-01

    The study was undertaken to measure and compare the shear bond strengths of a ceramic bracket with chemical retention, a ceramic bracket with a new type of textured base providing mechanical retention, and a metal bracket with foil-mesh base. The tests were performed on 51 extracted human premolars which were randomly divided into three equally large groups (n = 17)--one group for each type of bracket. After debonding, the site of failure was noted and the enamel surface inspected with scanning electron microscopy. The ceramic bracket with chemical retention exhibited significantly higher bond strength than the corresponding bracket with textured base. In comparison with the metal bracket significantly higher bond strengths were recorded for both types of ceramic brackets. The ceramic bracket with mechanical retention and the metal bracket were comparable as regards the site of bond failure. In some cases the chemical bond provided very high values of bond strength. Enamel failure were recorded in three teeth which had been bonded with this type of ceramic bracket.

  19. Effect of chemical interaction on the bonding strengths of self-etching adhesives to deproteinised dentine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liqun; Wang, Yake; Yang, HongYe; Guo, Jinxin; Tay, Franklin R; Huang, Cui

    2015-08-01

    The present study examined (1) the chemical interaction between three self-etching adhesives and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)-deproteinised dentine, and (2) the influence of NaOCl treatment on bond strength of self-etching adhesives with/without adhesive functional monomers to dentine. Caries-free dentine disks (control) and those treated with 5.25% NaOCl for 60s were prepared. Xeno V (no functional monomers), G-Bond (containing 4-MET) or S3 Bond (containing 10-MDP) were applied to the NaOCl-treated dentine and either left without further treatment, or rinsed with 100% ethanol or distilled water. Attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to evaluate the affinity of functional monomers with deproteinised dentine. Chemical interaction between the functional monomers and deproteinised dentine was evaluated using thin-film X-ray diffraction (TF-XRD). Microtensile bond strength (MTBS) was used to evaluate the mechanical property of the adhesives, either immediately or after thermo-cycling (5-55°C) for 10,000 cycles. According to the ATR and FE-SEM results, G-Bond and S3 Bond showed stronger affinity to deproteinised dentine than Xeno V even after rinsing with water. TF-XRD showed that chemical interaction between S3 Bond and deproteinised dentine occurred by formation of 10-MDP-Ca salt. Both deproteinisation and thermo-cycling adversely affected the MTBS of Xeno V (P<0.05) but deproteinisation had no significant influence on S3 Bond. When bonding to NaOCl-treated dentine, self-etch adhesives containing functional monomers (10-MDP) can maintain immediate and aged bond strengths after 10,000 thermal cycles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Representational Classroom Practices that Contribute to Students' Conceptual and Representational Understanding of Chemical Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Annette; Nichols, Kim

    2011-11-01

    Understanding bonding is fundamental to success in chemistry. A number of alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding have been reported in the literature. Research suggests that many alternative conceptions held by chemistry students result from previous teaching; if teachers are explicit in the use of representations and explain their content-specific forms and functions, this might be avoided. The development of an understanding of and ability to use multiple representations is crucial to students' understanding of chemical bonding. This paper draws on data from a larger study involving two Year 11 chemistry classes (n = 27, n = 22). It explores the contribution of explicit instruction about multiple representations to students' understanding and representation of chemical bonding. The instructional strategies were documented using audio-recordings and the teacher-researcher's reflection journal. Pre-test-post-test comparisons showed an improvement in conceptual understanding and representational competence. Analysis of the students' texts provided further evidence of the students' ability to use multiple representations to explain macroscopic phenomena on the molecular level. The findings suggest that explicit instruction about representational form and function contributes to the enhancement of representational competence and conceptual understanding of bonding in chemistry. However, the scaffolding strategies employed by the teacher play an important role in the learning process. This research has implications for professional development enhancing teachers' approaches to these aspects of instruction around chemical bonding.

  1. Analytic projection from plane-wave and PAW wavefunctions and application to chemical-bonding analysis in solids.

    PubMed

    Maintz, Stefan; Deringer, Volker L; Tchougréeff, Andrei L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2013-11-05

    Quantum-chemical computations of solids benefit enormously from numerically efficient plane-wave (PW) basis sets, and together with the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method, the latter have risen to one of the predominant standards in computational solid-state sciences. Despite their advantages, plane waves lack local information, which makes the interpretation of local densities-of-states (DOS) difficult and precludes the direct use of atom-resolved chemical bonding indicators such as the crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) and the crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) techniques. Recently, a number of methods have been proposed to overcome this fundamental issue, built around the concept of basis-set projection onto a local auxiliary basis. In this work, we propose a novel computational technique toward this goal by transferring the PW/PAW wavefunctions to a properly chosen local basis using analytically derived expressions. In particular, we describe a general approach to project both PW and PAW eigenstates onto given custom orbitals, which we then exemplify at the hand of contracted multiple-ζ Slater-type orbitals. The validity of the method presented here is illustrated by applications to chemical textbook examples-diamond, gallium arsenide, the transition-metal titanium-as well as nanoscale allotropes of carbon: a nanotube and the C60 fullerene. Remarkably, the analytical approach not only recovers the total and projected electronic DOS with a high degree of confidence, but it also yields a realistic chemical-bonding picture in the framework of the projected COHP method.

  2. Effect of interfacial chemical bonding and surface topography on adhesion in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Drzal, L.T.; Sugiura, N.; Hook, D. |

    1994-12-31

    A series of PAN-based IM6 carbon fibers having varying amounts of surface treatment were, pretreated with compounds representing the constituents encountered in epoxy composites to pre-react any groups on the fiber surface before composite fabrication in order to determine the effect of chemical bonding on fiber-matrix adhesion. Chemical bonding was quantified using XPS. Chemical bonding between reactive groups in amine cured epoxy matrices and the surface groups present on IN46 carbon fibers as a result of commercial surface treatments has been detected although the absolute amount of chemical bonding is low (1-3%). It was found that reaction with monofunctional epoxy groups having hydrocarbon functionalities blocked the surface from further reaction and reduced the adhesion that could be attained to its lowest value. Prereaction with difunctional amines had little effect on adhesion when compared to normal composite fabrication procedures. Prereaction with difunctional epoxy groups did enhance adhesion levels over the level attained in normal composite fabrication methods. These results showed that chemical bonding between epoxy and the carbon fiber surface could increases the adhesion between fiber and matrix about 25% while between the amino group and the carbon fiber surface about 15%. Quantitative measurements of the fiber surface microtopography were made with scanning tunneling microscopy. An increase in roughness was detected with increasing surface treatment. It was concluded that surface roughness also accounted for a significant increase in fiber-matrix adhesion.

  3. The Strength of Chemical Bonds in Solids and Liquids (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    number is Z−∆Z = 11.3 and the fractional enthalpy retained in the broken bonds is 0.942. Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 13 ...Report No. LA -2345, (Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of California, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 1960). 13 Spaepen, F. A survey of energies in...0.976±0.006 Ta 73 -1.16±0.004 Mg 12 -0.254±0.001 Tc 43 -1.17±0.023 W 74 -1.26±0.009 Al 13 -0.572±0.007 Ru 44 -1.12±0.011 Re 75 -1.34±0.011 Si

  4. Relationship between chemical structure and supramolecular effective molarity for formation of intramolecular H-bonds.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongmei; Hunter, Christopher A; Navarro, Cristina; Turega, Simon

    2013-09-04

    Effective molarity (EM) is a key parameter that determines the efficiency of a range of supramolecular phenomena from the folding of macromolecules to multivalent ligand binding. Coordination complexes formed between zinc porphyrins equipped H-bond donor sites and pyridine ligands equipped with H-bond acceptor sites have allowed systematic quantification of EM values for the formation of intramolecular H-bonds in 240 different systems. The results provide insights into the relationship of EM to supramolecular architecture, H-bond strength, and solvent. Previous studies on ligands equipped with phosphonate diester and ether H-bond acceptors were inconclusive, but the experiments described here on ligands equipped with phosphine oxide, amide, and ester H-bond acceptors resolve these ambiguities. Chemical double-mutant cycles were used to dissect the thermodynamic contributions of individual H-bond interactions to the overall stabilities of the complexes and hence determine the values of EM, which fall in the range 1-1000 mM. Solvent has little effect on EM, and the values measured in toluene and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane are similar. For H-bond acceptors that have similar geometries but different H-bond strengths (amide and ester), the values of EM are very similar. For H-bond acceptors that have different geometries but similar H-bond strengths (amide and phosphonate diester), there is little correlation between the values of EM. These results imply that supramolecular EMs are independent of solvent and intrinsic H-bond strength but depend on supramolecular architecture and geometric complementarity.

  5. Covalent bond or noncovalent bond: a supramolecular strategy for the construction of chemically synthesized vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yue; Sun, Zhan-Yi; Huang, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Pu-Guang; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Li, Yan-Mei

    2014-10-13

    A novel noncovalent strategy to construct chemically synthesized vaccines has been designed to trigger a robust immune response and to dramatically improve the efficiency of vaccine preparation. Glycosylated MUC1 tripartite vaccines were constructed through host-guest interactions with cucurbit[8]uril. These vaccines elicited high levels of IgG antibodies that were recognized by transformed cells and induced the secretion of cytokines. The antisera also mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. This noncovalent strategy with good suitability, scalability, and feasibility can be applied as a universal strategy for the construction of chemically synthesized vaccines.

  6. On the chemical bonding features in boron containing compounds: a combined QTAIM/ELF topological analysis.

    PubMed

    Alikhani, M Esmaïl

    2013-08-14

    The nature of chemical bonding in four classes of boron-containing compounds has been investigated using two topological approaches: the "quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM)" and "electron localization function (ELF)". It has been shown that the bonding in these compounds could be described in terms of familiar schemes (covalent single, double or triple bonds, dative bond, etc.) and be rationalized from the QTAIM tools. The ELF analysis is the bridge between two worlds: classical donor-acceptor and delocalization in the one hand, and the quantum chemical concepts obtained from the charge and its Laplacian topology. Particularly, we have shown that: (1) in the case of boron-boron bonding, although the V(B,B) basins are similar to the V(C,C) ones, but the V(B,B) population is always smaller than the corresponding V(C,C). (2) In the planar tetracoordinate boron species, each boron atom is characterized by three chemical bonds despite four neighboring atoms. (3). In the [RuH2(η(2):η(2)-H2BMes)(PCy3)2] compound, the B-Ru bonding belongs to the closed-shell interaction, and there is no BCP between the hydrogen bridge atoms (H(B)) and the ruthenium center despite the close contact of the atoms. (4) In the case of the XH···M···HX hydrogen bonding, we found a complex bonding mode involving not only the two hydrogen atoms, but also the two boron atoms. The presence of an RCP in the center of the B-H-Cr-H-B five-membered cycle confers to the compound the potential to evolve under perturbation.

  7. Fundamental change in the nature of chemical bonding by isotopic substitution.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Donald G; Manz, Jörn; Sato, Kazuma; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-08

    Isotope effects are important in the making and breaking of chemical bonds in chemical reactivity. Here we report on a new discovery, that isotopic substitution can fundamentally alter the nature of chemical bonding. This is established by systematic, rigorous quantum chemistry calculations of the isotopomers BrLBr, where L is an isotope of hydrogen. All the heavier isotopomers of BrHBr, BrDBr, BrTBr, and Br(4)HBr, the latter indicating the muonic He atom, the heaviest isotope of H, can only be stabilized as van der Waals bound states. In contrast, the lightest isotopomer, BrMuBr, with Mu the muonium atom, alone exhibits vibrational bonding, in accord with its possible observation in a recent experiment on the Mu+Br2 reaction. Accordingly, BrMuBr is stabilized at the saddle point of the potential energy surface due to a net decrease in vibrational zero point energy that overcompensates the increase in potential energy.

  8. Effective solidification/stabilisation of mercury-contaminated wastes using zeolites and chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xinyan; Xiong, Ya; Wang, Guoping; Zheng, Na

    2015-02-01

    In this study, two kinds of zeolites materials (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) were added to the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic processes to treat mercury-contaminated wastes. Strong promotion effects of zeolites (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) on the stability of mercury in the wastes were obtained and these technologies showed promising advantages toward the traditional Portland cement process, i.e. using Portland cement as a solidification agent and natural or thiol-functionalised zeolite as a stabilisation agent. Not only is a high stabilisation efficiency (lowered the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Hg by above 10%) obtained, but also a lower dosage of solidification (for thiol-functionalised zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.5 g g(-1) and 0.7 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) and stabilisation agents (for natural zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.35 g g(-1) and 0.4 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) were used compared with the Portland cement process. Treated by thiol-functionalised zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic under optimum parameters, the waste containing 1500 mg Hg kg(-1) passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test. Moreover, stabilisation/solidification technology using natural zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic also passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test (the mercury waste containing 625 mg Hg kg(-1)). Moreover, the presence of chloride and phosphate did not have a negative effect on the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic/thiol-functionalised zeolite treatment process; thus, showing potential for future application in treatment of 'difficult-to-manage' mercury-contaminated wastes or landfill disposal with high phosphate and chloride content. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. The nature of chemical bonding in actinide and lanthanide ferrocyanides determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Thomas; Guillaumont, Dominique; Fillaux, Clara; Scheinost, Andreas; Moisy, Philippe; Petit, Sébastien; Shuh, David K; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2016-01-28

    The electronic properties of actinide cations are of fundamental interest to describe intramolecular interactions and chemical bonding in the context of nuclear waste reprocessing or direct storage. The 5f and 6d orbitals are the first partially or totally vacant states in these elements, and the nature of the actinide ligand bonds is related to their ability to overlap with ligand orbitals. Because of its chemical and orbital selectivities, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an effective probe of actinide species frontier orbitals and for understanding actinide cation reactivity toward chelating ligands. The soft X-ray probes of the light elements provide better resolution than actinide L3-edges to obtain electronic information from the ligand. Thus coupling simulations to experimental soft X-ray spectral measurements and complementary quantum chemical calculations yields quantitative information on chemical bonding. In this study, soft X-ray XAS at the K-edges of C and N, and the L2,3-edges of Fe was used to investigate the electronic structures of the well-known ferrocyanide complexes K4Fe(II)(CN)6, thorium hexacyanoferrate Th(IV)Fe(II)(CN)6, and neodymium hexacyanoferrate KNd(III)Fe(II)(CN)6. The soft X-ray spectra were simulated based on quantum chemical calculations. Our results highlight the orbital overlapping effects and atomic effective charges in the Fe(II)(CN)6 building block. In addition to providing a detailed description of the electronic structure of the ferrocyanide complex (K4Fe(II)(CN)6), the results strongly contribute to confirming the actinide 5f and 6d orbital oddity in comparison to lanthanide 4f and 5d.

  10. Chemical bonding topology of superconductors. 1. Ternary molybdenum chalcogenides (Chevrel phases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, R. B.

    1987-03-01

    Models for the chemical bonding topologies of ternary molybdenum chalcogenides (Chevrel phases) are derived using methods based on graph theory. The molybdenum sulfite Chevrel phases as well as their selenium analogs are viewed as three-dimensional lattices of edge-localized discrete molybdenum octahedra through face-sharing leads successively to the Mo9S11 napthalene analog and the Mo12S14 anathracene analog with increasing fusion leading to increasing delocalization of the chemical bonding topology within individual molybdenum cluster units. The infinite limit of such fusion of molybdenum octahedra corresponds to the infinite chain pseudo-one-dimensional metals which are formulated with globally delocalized octahedral cavities.

  11. Immobilization of RGD peptide on HA coating through a chemical bonding approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunli; Cheng, Kui; Weng, Wenjian; Yang, Chunyu

    2009-11-01

    In this work, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence containing peptide was immobilized on hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings through a chemical bonding approach in two steps, surface modification with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and RGD immobilization. The results indicate that RGD has been successfully immobilized on HA coatings. Comparing with physical adsorption coatings, the chemically bonded RGD on the coatings shows much better anti-wash-out ability. Since RGD is able to recognize cell-membrane integrins on biointerfaces, the present method will be an effective way to favor interaction of cells with HA coatings.

  12. Analysis of Thermal and Chemical Effets on Negative Valve Overlap Period Energy Recovery for Low-Temperature Gasoline Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ekoto, Dr Isaac; Peterson, Dr. Brian; Szybist, James P; Northrop, Dr. William

    2015-01-01

    A central challenge for efficient auto-ignition controlled low-temperature gasoline combustion (LTGC) engines has been achieving the combustion phasing needed to reach stable performance over a wide operating regime. The negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy has been explored as a way to improve combustion stability through a combination of charge heating and altered reactivity via a recompression stroke with a pilot fuel injection. The study objective was to analyze the thermal and chemical effects on NVO-period energy recovery. The analysis leveraged experimental gas sampling results obtained from a single-cylinder LTGC engine along with cylinder pressure measurements and custom data reduction methods used to estimate period thermodynamic properties. The engine was fueled by either iso-octane or ethanol, and operated under sweeps of NVO-period oxygen concentration, injection timing, and fueling rate. Gas sampling at the end of the NVO period was performed via a custom dump-valve apparatus, with detailed sample speciation by in-house gas chromatography. The balance of NVO-period input and output energy flows was calculated in terms of fuel energy, work, heat loss, and change in sensible energy. Experiment results were complemented by detailed chemistry single-zone reactor simulations performed at relevant mixing and thermodynamic conditions, with results used to evaluate ignition behavior and expected energy recovery yields. For the intermediate bulk-gas temperatures present during the NVO period (900-1100 K), weak negative temperature coefficient behavior with iso-octane fueling significantly lengthened ignition delays relative to similar ethanol fueled conditions. Faster ethanol ignition chemistry led to lower recovered fuel intermediate yields relative to similar iso-octane fueled conditions due to more complete fuel oxidation. From the energy analysis it was found that increased NVO-period global equivalence ratio, either from lower NVOperiod oxygen

  13. Chemical bonding, interface strength, and oxygen K electron-energy-loss near-edge structure of the Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Sasaki, Takeo; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Tanaka, Shingo; Kohyama, Masanori; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2006-12-15

    Chemical bondings and oxygen K electron-energy-loss near-edge structures (ELNES) of oxygen terminated Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterointerfaces with hollow and on-top configurations were theoretically investigated by using a first principles orthogonalized linear combination of atomic orbitals method. From the chemical bonding analysis, it was found that the hollow configuration has stronger ionic and covalent bondings as compared with the on-top configuration, and the weakness of the on-top configuration originates from the strong antibonding interactions between an interfacial oxygen and the second near neighbor Cu. Detailed analysis using overlap population diagrams revealed the formation mechanism of the strong antibonding interactions in the on-top configuration. In the oxygen K ELNES calculation, a prepeak feature appears in both configurations and it was predicted that the prepeak for the on-top configuration is larger than that for the hollow configuration. The overlap population diagrams elucidated that the prepeak is mainly composed of the O-Cu antibonding interactions, and the larger prepeak of the on-top configuration originates from the larger O-Cu interactions. The dependence of O-K ELNES on the direction of the momentum transfer vector was also discussed. Knowledge of the responsible direction of the momentum transfer vector in relation to the interface orientation was concluded to be indispensable in order to discuss detailed profiles of the ELNES from metal/ceramic heterointerfaces. This study reveals the effect of the atomic configuration of the interface to the chemical bondings, interface strength, and ELNES.

  14. Quantum chemical studies on Re-Re quadruple-bonded Keggin-type polyoxometalate ([ ? (PW11O39)2]8-): Bonding feature and electron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Guang

    2011-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was employed to calculate the bonding feature, electron spectrum, and redox properties of a dumbbell-shaped polyoxometalate (POM) cluster, [ ? (PW11O39)2]8-. Our DFT calculations confirm that the quadruple bond interaction between two ReIII centers consists of σ, 2π, and δ orbital overlaps, and the strength of the bonding interactions is in the order σ-bond > π-bond>δ-bond. Time-dependent (TD) DFT calculations suggest that this cluster possesses one strong and four weak absorption bands between 0.7 and 2.5 eV. Excited state calculations show that the Re-Re bond length increases when one electron of the Re-Re bonding δ orbital is shifted to the Re-Re δ* antibonding orbital. Molecular orbital predictions and spin unrestricted calculations indicate that the two Re atoms form the reduced center. The Re-Re bond length increases in one- and two-electron reduction processes because the Re-Re δ* antibonding orbital becomes occupied. However, these changes in the Re-Re bond length in excitation and reduction processes are not substantial because of the weak δ bond. The substitution effect of the central tetrahedron heteroatom of the POM ligand affects the Re-Re bond length, with the Re-Re distance decreasing with the substitution of X from Al to S, Al (2.345 Å) > Si (2.310 Å) > P (2.282 Å) > S (2.257 Å).

  15. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of a highly stable and aromatic auro-aluminum oxide cluster.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Gary V; Jian, Tian; Li, Wei-Li; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-07-17

    We have produced an auro-aluminum oxide cluster, Au2(AlO)2(-), as a possible model for an Au-alumina interface and investigated its electronic and structural properties using photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory. An extremely large energy gap (3.44 eV) is observed between the lowest unoccupied and the highest occupied molecular orbitals of Au2(AlO)2, suggesting its high electronic stability. The global minima of both Au2(AlO)2(-) and Au2(AlO)2 are found to have D2h symmetry with the two Au atoms bonded to the Al atoms of a nearly square-planar (AlO)2 unit. Chemical bonding analyses reveal a strong σ bond between Au and Al, as well as a completely delocalized π bond over the (AlO)2 unit, rendering aromatic character to the Au2(AlO)2 cluster. The high electronic stability and novel chemical bonding uncovered for Au2(AlO)2 suggest that it may be susceptible to chemical syntheses as a stable compound if appropriate ligands can be found.

  16. Revisiting Aromaticity and Chemical Bonding of Fluorinated Benzene Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Vega, Juan J; Vásquez-Espinal, Alejandro; Ruiz, Lina; Fernández-Herrera, María A; Alvarez-Thon, Luis; Merino, Gabriel; Tiznado, William

    2015-01-01

    The electron delocalization of benzene (C6H6) and hexafluorobenzene (C6F6) was analyzed in terms of the induced magnetic field, nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS), and ring current strength (RCS). The computed out-of-plane component of the induced magnetic field at a distance (r) greater than or equal to 1.0 Å above the ring center correlates well (R2>0.99) with the RCS value. According to these criteria, fluorination has two effects on the C6 skeleton; concomitantly, the resonant effects diminish the π electron delocalization and the inductive effects decrease the charge density at the ring center and therefore reduce the magnitude of the paratropic current generated in this region. The equilibrium between both effects decreases aromaticity in the fluorinated benzene derivatives. These results can be extrapolated to determine the aromaticity of any derivative within the series of fluorinated benzene derivatives (C6H(6−n)Fn, where n=1–5). PMID:26246992

  17. Limitations of Structural Superlubricity: Chemical Bonds versus Contact Size.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Dirk; Brndiar, Ján; Štich, Ivan; Schirmeisen, André

    2017-08-22

    Structural superlubricity describes the state of virtually frictionless sliding if two atomically flat interfaces are incommensurate, that is, they share no common periodicity. Despite the exciting prospects of this low friction phenomenon, there are physical limitations to the existence of this state. Theory predicts that the contact size is one fundamental limit, where the critical size threshold mainly depends on the interplay between lateral contact compliance and interface interaction energies. Here we provide experimental evidence for this size threshold by measuring the sliding friction force of differently sized antimony particles on MoS2. We find that superlubric sliding with the characteristic linear decrease of shear stress with contact size prevails for small particles with contact areas below 15 000 nm(2). Larger particles, however, show a transition toward constant shear stress behavior. In contrast, Sb particles on graphite show superlubricity over the whole size range. Ab initio simulations reveal that the chemical interaction energies for Sb/MoS2 are much stronger than for Sb/HOPG and can therefore explain the different friction properties as well as the critical size thresholds. These limitations must be considered when designing low friction contacts based on structural superlubricity concepts.

  18. Oscillations in the stability of consecutive chemical bonds revealed by ion-induced desorption.

    PubMed

    Ossowski, Jakub; Rysz, Jakub; Krawiec, Mariusz; Maciazek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Terfort, Andreas; Cyganik, Piotr

    2015-01-19

    While it is a common concept in chemistry that strengthening of one bond results in weakening of the adjacent ones, no results have been published on if and how this effect protrudes further into the molecular backbone. By binding molecules to a surface in the form of a self-assembled monolayer, the strength of a primary bond can be selectively altered. Herein, we report that by using secondary-ion mass spectrometry, we are able to detect for the first time positional oscillations in the stability of consecutive bonds along the adsorbed molecule, with the amplitudes diminishing with increasing distance from the molecule-metal interface. To explain these observations, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations and DFT calculations. These show that the oscillation effects in chemical-bond stability have a very general nature and break the translational symmetry in molecules.

  19. The role of radial nodes of atomic orbitals for chemical bonding and the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Kaupp, Martin

    2007-01-15

    The role of radial nodes, or of their absence, in valence orbitals for chemical bonding and periodic trends is discussed from a unified viewpoint. In particular, we emphasize the special role of the absence of a radial node whenever a shell with angular quantum number l is occupied for the first time (lack of "primogenic repulsion"), as with the 1s, 2p, 3d, and 4f shells. Although the consequences of the very compact 2p shell (e.g. good isovalent hybridization, multiple bonding, high electronegativity, lone-pair repulsion, octet rule) are relatively well known, it seems that some of the aspects of the very compact 3d shell in transition-metal chemistry are less well appreciated, e.g., the often weakened and stretched bonds at equilibrium structure, the frequently colored complexes, and the importance of nondynamical electron-correlation effects in bonding. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Revealing the angular symmetry of chemical bonds by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Welker, Joachim; Giessibl, Franz J

    2012-04-27

    We have measured the angular dependence of chemical bonding forces between a carbon monoxide molecule that is adsorbed to a copper surface and the terminal atom of the metallic tip of a combined scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope. We provide tomographic maps of force and current as a function of distance that revealed the emergence of strongly directional chemical bonds as tip and sample approach. The force maps show pronounced single, dual, or triple minima depending on the orientation of the tip atom, whereas tunneling current maps showed a single minimum for all three tip conditions. We introduce an angular dependent model for the bonding energy that maps the observed experimental data for all observed orientations and distances.

  1. Chemical methods for producing disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins to study folding regulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Shimamoto, Shigeru; Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the folding of secretory and membrane proteins. Oxidative folding reactions of disulfide bond-containing proteins typically require several hours or days, and numerous misbridged disulfide isomers are often observed as intermediates. The rate-determining step in refolding is thought to be the disulfide-exchange reaction from nonnative to native disulfide bonds in folding intermediates, which often precipitate during the refolding process because of their hydrophobic properties. To overcome this, chemical additives or a disulfide catalyst, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), are generally used in refolding experiments to regulate disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding. This unit describes such methods in the context of the thermodynamic and kinetic control of peptide and protein folding, including (1) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptides and protein folding assisted by chemical additives, (2) reductive unfolding of disulfide-containing peptides and proteins, and (3) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding using PDI.

  2. Generating giant and tunable nonlinearity in a macroscopic mechanical resonator from a single chemical bond.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pu; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Dong; Lin, Shaochun; Deng, Wen; Meng, Chao; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Zheng, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-05-26

    Nonlinearity in macroscopic mechanical systems may lead to abundant phenomena for fundamental studies and potential applications. However, it is difficult to generate nonlinearity due to the fact that macroscopic mechanical systems follow Hooke's law and respond linearly to external force, unless strong drive is used. Here we propose and experimentally realize high cubic nonlinear response in a macroscopic mechanical system by exploring the anharmonicity in chemical bonding interactions. We demonstrate the high tunability of nonlinear response by precisely controlling the chemical bonding interaction, and realize, at the single-bond limit, a cubic elastic constant of 1 × 10(20) N m(-3). This enables us to observe the resonator's vibrational bi-states transitions driven by the weak Brownian thermal noise at 6 K. This method can be flexibly applied to a variety of mechanical systems to improve nonlinear responses, and can be used, with further improvements, to explore macroscopic quantum mechanics.

  3. Generating giant and tunable nonlinearity in a macroscopic mechanical resonator from a single chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pu; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Dong; Lin, Shaochun; Deng, Wen; Meng, Chao; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Zheng, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinearity in macroscopic mechanical systems may lead to abundant phenomena for fundamental studies and potential applications. However, it is difficult to generate nonlinearity due to the fact that macroscopic mechanical systems follow Hooke's law and respond linearly to external force, unless strong drive is used. Here we propose and experimentally realize high cubic nonlinear response in a macroscopic mechanical system by exploring the anharmonicity in chemical bonding interactions. We demonstrate the high tunability of nonlinear response by precisely controlling the chemical bonding interaction, and realize, at the single-bond limit, a cubic elastic constant of 1 × 1020 N m-3. This enables us to observe the resonator's vibrational bi-states transitions driven by the weak Brownian thermal noise at 6 K. This method can be flexibly applied to a variety of mechanical systems to improve nonlinear responses, and can be used, with further improvements, to explore macroscopic quantum mechanics.

  4. Generating giant and tunable nonlinearity in a macroscopic mechanical resonator from a single chemical bond

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pu; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Dong; Lin, Shaochun; Deng, Wen; Meng, Chao; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Zheng, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinearity in macroscopic mechanical systems may lead to abundant phenomena for fundamental studies and potential applications. However, it is difficult to generate nonlinearity due to the fact that macroscopic mechanical systems follow Hooke's law and respond linearly to external force, unless strong drive is used. Here we propose and experimentally realize high cubic nonlinear response in a macroscopic mechanical system by exploring the anharmonicity in chemical bonding interactions. We demonstrate the high tunability of nonlinear response by precisely controlling the chemical bonding interaction, and realize, at the single-bond limit, a cubic elastic constant of 1 × 1020 N m−3. This enables us to observe the resonator's vibrational bi-states transitions driven by the weak Brownian thermal noise at 6 K. This method can be flexibly applied to a variety of mechanical systems to improve nonlinear responses, and can be used, with further improvements, to explore macroscopic quantum mechanics. PMID:27225287

  5. Chemical bonding and electronic structures of microcline, orthoclase and the plagioclase series by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kloprogge, J Theo; Wood, Barry J

    2015-02-25

    A detailed analysis was undertaken of the X-ray photoelectron spectra obtained from microcline, orthoclase and several samples of plagioclase with varying Na/Ca ratio. Comparison of the spectra was made based on the chemical bonding and structural differences in the Al- and Si-coordination within each specimen. The spectra for Si 2p and Al 2p vary with the change in symmetry between microcline and orthoclase, while in plagioclase an increase in Al-O-Si linkages results in a small but observable decrease in binding energy. The overall shapes of the O 1s peaks observed in all spectra are similar and show shifts similar to those observed for Si 2p and Al 2p. The lower-VB spectra for microcline and orthoclase are similar intermediate between α-SiO2 and α-Al2O3 in terms of binding energies. In the plagioclase series increasing coupled substitution of Na and Si for Ca and Al results in a change of the overall shape of the spectra, showing a distinct broadening associated with the presence of two separate but overlapping bands similar to the 21 eV band observed for quartz and the 23 eV band observed for corundum. The bonding character for microcline and orthoclase is more covalent than that of α-Al2O3, but less than that of α-SiO2. In contrast, the plagioclase samples show two distinct bonding characters that are comparable with those of α-SiO2 and α-Al2O3. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reflections on the Electron Theory of the Chemical Bond: 1900-1925.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stranges, Anthony N.

    1984-01-01

    Traces the history of the electron theory of the chemical bond. Nineteenth-century ideas on electrical combination, early twentieth-century theories of electrical attraction, and the contribution of G. N. Lewis's shared electron pair are among the topics considered. (JN)

  7. Alternative Conceptions of Chemical Bonding Held by Upper Secondary and Tertiary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Richard K.; Taylor, Neil

    2001-01-01

    Examination of senior secondary and tertiary level chemistry students' descriptions of their mental models for chemical bonding revealed prevalent alternative conceptions. Some 20 alternative conceptions were revealed, the most common being belief that continuous ionic or metallic lattices were molecular in nature, and confusion over ionic size…

  8. The Collaboration of Cooperative Learning and Conceptual Change: Enhancing the Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eymur, Gülüzar; Geban, Ömer

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cooperative learning based on conceptual change approach instruction on ninth-grade students' understanding in chemical bonding concepts compared to traditional instruction. Seventy-two ninth-grade students from two intact chemistry classes taught by the same teacher in a public high…

  9. Bench-Scale Evaluation Of Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Technology To Stabilize Mercury Waste Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    This bench-scale study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization of mercury (Hg) and mercuric chloride-containing surrogate test materials by the chemically bonded phosphate ceramics technology. This study was performed as part of a U.S. EPA program to evaluate treatment and d...

  10. Reflections on the Electron Theory of the Chemical Bond: 1900-1925.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stranges, Anthony N.

    1984-01-01

    Traces the history of the electron theory of the chemical bond. Nineteenth-century ideas on electrical combination, early twentieth-century theories of electrical attraction, and the contribution of G. N. Lewis's shared electron pair are among the topics considered. (JN)

  11. Bench-Scale Evaluation Of Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Technology To Stabilize Mercury Waste Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    This bench-scale study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization of mercury (Hg) and mercuric chloride-containing surrogate test materials by the chemically bonded phosphate ceramics technology. This study was performed as part of a U.S. EPA program to evaluate treatment and d...

  12. Alternative Conceptions of Chemical Bonding Held by Upper Secondary and Tertiary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Richard K.; Taylor, Neil

    2001-01-01

    Examination of senior secondary and tertiary level chemistry students' descriptions of their mental models for chemical bonding revealed prevalent alternative conceptions. Some 20 alternative conceptions were revealed, the most common being belief that continuous ionic or metallic lattices were molecular in nature, and confusion over ionic size…

  13. Students' Reasoning about Basic Chemical Thermodynamics and Chemical Bonding: What Changes Occur during a Context-based Post-16 Chemistry Course?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Vanessa; Millar, Robin

    2000-01-01

    A longitudinal study of students (n=250) following the Salters Advanced Chemistry course probed a range of chemical ideas including the exothermicity of bond formation and the development of thinking about covalent, ionic, and intermolecular bonds. At the start, many students demonstrated misunderstandings about these chemical ideas, but their…

  14. Students' Reasoning about Basic Chemical Thermodynamics and Chemical Bonding: What Changes Occur during a Context-based Post-16 Chemistry Course?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Vanessa; Millar, Robin

    2000-01-01

    A longitudinal study of students (n=250) following the Salters Advanced Chemistry course probed a range of chemical ideas including the exothermicity of bond formation and the development of thinking about covalent, ionic, and intermolecular bonds. At the start, many students demonstrated misunderstandings about these chemical ideas, but their…

  15. Chemical-state-selective X-ray absorption spectroscopy by detecting bond-specific Auger electrons for SiO2/SiC interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Murai, Takaaki; Oji, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Toyokazu; Watanabe, Yukihiko; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2017-08-01

    Chemical-state-selective Si K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements of SiO2 and SiC are demonstrated by detecting bond-specific Auger electrons in SiC coated with a very thin SiO2 film. Differential-electron-yield (DEY) mode is used for the measurements. Each EXAFS spectrum may be subject to the following two spectrally overlapping influences: (i) the background spectrum formed by energy-losing SiC Auger electrons overlaps the SiO2 Auger peak, and (ii) the resonant SiO2 Auger peak overlaps the SiC Auger peak. The SiO2- and SiC-selective DEY-EXAFS spectra differ from each other and are similar to the spectra of bulk SiO2 and SiC, respectively, in the EXAFS regions, indicating that the two influences are negligible, and that this method can be considered valid for selection of chemical states.

  16. Developing a New Teaching Approach for the Chemical Bonding Concept Aligned with Current Scientific and Pedagogical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahum, Tami Levy; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi; Krajcik, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The traditional pedagogical approach for teaching chemical bonding is often overly simplistic and not aligned with the most up-to-date scientific models. As a result, high-school students around the world lack fundamental understanding of chemical bonding. In order to improve students' understanding of this concept, it was essential to propose a…

  17. An Investigation into the Relationship between Students' Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter and Their Understanding of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Othman, Jazilah; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    A thorough understanding of chemical bonding requires familiarity with the particulate nature of matter. In this study, a two-tier multiple-choice diagnostic instrument consisting of ten items (five items involving each of the two concepts) was developed to assess students' understanding of the particulate nature of matter and chemical bonding so…

  18. An Investigation into the Relationship between Students' Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter and Their Understanding of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Othman, Jazilah; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    A thorough understanding of chemical bonding requires familiarity with the particulate nature of matter. In this study, a two-tier multiple-choice diagnostic instrument consisting of ten items (five items involving each of the two concepts) was developed to assess students' understanding of the particulate nature of matter and chemical bonding so…

  19. Developing a New Teaching Approach for the Chemical Bonding Concept Aligned with Current Scientific and Pedagogical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahum, Tami Levy; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi; Krajcik, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The traditional pedagogical approach for teaching chemical bonding is often overly simplistic and not aligned with the most up-to-date scientific models. As a result, high-school students around the world lack fundamental understanding of chemical bonding. In order to improve students' understanding of this concept, it was essential to propose a…

  20. Insights into the retention mechanism of neutral organic compounds on polar chemically bonded stationary phases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zahid; Poole, C F

    2004-10-15

    The solvation parameter model is used to characterize the retention properties of a 3-aminopropylsiloxane-bonded (Alltima amino), three 3-cyanopropylsiloxane-bonded (Ultrasphere CN, Ultremex-CN and Zorbax SB-CN), a spacer bonded propanediol (LiChrospher DIOL) and a multifunctional macrocyclic glycopeptide (Chirobiotic T) silica-based stationary phases with mobile phases containing 10 and 20% (v/v) methanol-water. The low retention on the polar chemically bonded stationary phases compared with alkylsiloxane-bonded silica stationary phases arises from the higher cohesion of the polar chemically bonded phases and an unfavorable phase ratio. The solvated polar chemically bonded stationary phases are considerably more hydrogen-bond acidic and dipolar/polarizable than solvated alkylsiloxane-bonded silica stationary phases. Selectivity differences are not as great among the polar chemically bonded stationary phases as they are between the polar chemically bonded phases and alkylsiloxane-bonded silica stationary phases.

  1. Duration of an intense laser pulse can determine the breakage of multiple chemical bonds.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinhua; Lötstedt, Erik; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus

    2015-08-14

    Control over the breakage of a certain chemical bond in a molecule by an ultrashort laser pulse has been considered for decades. With the availability of intense non-resonant laser fields it became possible to pre-determine femtosecond to picosecond molecular bond breakage dynamics by controlled distortions of the electronic molecular system on sub-femtosecond time scales using field-sensitive processes such as strong-field ionization or excitation. So far, all successful demonstrations in this area considered only fragmentation reactions, where only one bond is broken and the molecule is split into merely two moieties. Here, using ethylene (C2H4) as an example, we experimentally investigate whether complex fragmentation reactions that involve the breakage of more than one chemical bond can be influenced by parameters of an ultrashort intense laser pulse. We show that the dynamics of removing three electrons by strong-field ionization determines the ratio of fragmentation of the molecular trication into two respectively three moieties. We observe a relative increase of two-body fragmentations with the laser pulse duration by almost an order of magnitude. Supported by quantum chemical simulations we explain our experimental results by the interplay between the dynamics of electron removal and nuclear motion.

  2. Duration of an intense laser pulse can determine the breakage of multiple chemical bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinhua; Lötstedt, Erik; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Control over the breakage of a certain chemical bond in a molecule by an ultrashort laser pulse has been considered for decades. With the availability of intense non-resonant laser fields it became possible to pre-determine femtosecond to picosecond molecular bond breakage dynamics by controlled distortions of the electronic molecular system on sub-femtosecond time scales using field-sensitive processes such as strong-field ionization or excitation. So far, all successful demonstrations in this area considered only fragmentation reactions, where only one bond is broken and the molecule is split into merely two moieties. Here, using ethylene (C2H4) as an example, we experimentally investigate whether complex fragmentation reactions that involve the breakage of more than one chemical bond can be influenced by parameters of an ultrashort intense laser pulse. We show that the dynamics of removing three electrons by strong-field ionization determines the ratio of fragmentation of the molecular trication into two respectively three moieties. We observe a relative increase of two-body fragmentations with the laser pulse duration by almost an order of magnitude. Supported by quantum chemical simulations we explain our experimental results by the interplay between the dynamics of electron removal and nuclear motion.

  3. Duration of an intense laser pulse can determine the breakage of multiple chemical bonds

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xinhua; Lötstedt, Erik; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Control over the breakage of a certain chemical bond in a molecule by an ultrashort laser pulse has been considered for decades. With the availability of intense non-resonant laser fields it became possible to pre-determine femtosecond to picosecond molecular bond breakage dynamics by controlled distortions of the electronic molecular system on sub-femtosecond time scales using field-sensitive processes such as strong-field ionization or excitation. So far, all successful demonstrations in this area considered only fragmentation reactions, where only one bond is broken and the molecule is split into merely two moieties. Here, using ethylene (C2H4) as an example, we experimentally investigate whether complex fragmentation reactions that involve the breakage of more than one chemical bond can be influenced by parameters of an ultrashort intense laser pulse. We show that the dynamics of removing three electrons by strong-field ionization determines the ratio of fragmentation of the molecular trication into two respectively three moieties. We observe a relative increase of two-body fragmentations with the laser pulse duration by almost an order of magnitude. Supported by quantum chemical simulations we explain our experimental results by the interplay between the dynamics of electron removal and nuclear motion. PMID:26271602

  4. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde: IR spectrum and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Taherian, Fatemeh; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2016-05-01

    The structural parameters, and vibrational frequencies of 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5NSA) were studied by the FT-IR and Raman spectra and the quantum chemical calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in order to investigate the intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) present in its structure. The strength and nature of IHB in the optimized structure of 5NSA were studied in detail by means of the atoms in molecules (AIM) and the natural bond orbital (NBO) approaches. The results obtained were then compared with the corresponding data for its parent molecule, salicylaldehyde (SA). Comparisons made between the geometrical structures for 5NSA and SA, their OH/OD stretching and out-of-plane bending modes, their enthalpies for the hydrogen bond, and their AIM parameters demonstrated a stronger H-bonding in 5NSA compared with that in SA. The calculated binding enthalpy (ΔHbind) for 5NSA was -10.92 kcal mol-1. The observed νOH and γOH appeared at about 3120 cm-1 and 786 cm-1 respectively. The stretching frequency shift of H-bond formation was 426 cm-1 which is consistent with ΔHbind and the strength of H-bond in 5NSA. The delocalization energies and electron delocalization indices derived by the NBO and AIM approaches indicate that the resonance effects were responsible for the stronger IHB in 5NSA than in SA.

  5. Adjusting the Chemical Bonding of SnO2 @CNT Composite for Enhanced Conversion Reaction Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yayi; Huang, Jianfeng; Qi, Hui; Cao, Liyun; Yang, Jun; Xi, Qiao; Luo, Xiaomin; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Li, Jiayin

    2017-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with excellent electron conductivity are widely used to improve the electrochemical performance of the SnO2 anode. However, the chemical bonding between SnO2 and CNTs is not clearly elucidated despite it may affect the lithiation/delithiation behavior greatly. In this work, an SnO2 @CNT composite with SnC and SnOC bonds as a linkage bridge is reported and the influence of the SnC and SnOC bonds on the lithium storage properties is revealed. It is found that the SnC bond can act as an ultrafast electron transfer path, facilitating the reversible conversion reaction between Sn and Li2 O to form SnO2 . Therefore, the SnO2 @CNT composite with more SnC bond shows high reversible capacity and nearly half capacity contributes from conversion reaction. It is opposite for the SnO2 @CNT composite with more SnOC bond that the electrons cannot be transferred directly to CNTs, resulting in depressed conversion reaction kinetics. Consequently, this work can provide new insight for exploration and design of metal oxide/carbon composite anode materials in lithium-ion battery. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Purpose of this research program is to obtain experimental information on the different fundamental ways metals bond and activate organic molecules. Our approach has been to directly probe the electronic interactions between metals and molecules through a wide variety of ionization spectroscopies and other techniques, and to investigate the relationships with bonding modes, structures, and chemical behavior. During this period, we have (1) characterized the electronic features of diphosphines and monophosphines in their coordination to metals, (2) carried out theoretical and experimental investigations of the bonding capabilities of C[sub 60] to transition metals, (3) developed techniques for the imaging of single molecules on gold substrates that emphasizes the electronic backbonding from the metal to the molecule, (4) obtained the high resolution photoelectron spectrum of pure C[sub 70] in the gas phase, (5) compared the bonding of [eta][sup 3]- acetylide ligands to the bonding of other small organic molecules with metals, and (6) reported the photoelectron spectra and bonding of [eta][sup 3]-cyclopropenyl groups to metals.

  7. Characterization of luminescent silicon carbide nanocrystals prepared by reactive bonding and subsequent wet chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beke, David; Szekrényes, Zsolt; Balogh, István; Veres, Miklós; Fazakas, Éva; Varga, Lajos K.; Kamarás, Katalin; Czigány, Zsolt; Gali, Adam

    2011-11-01

    Fabrication of nanosized silicon carbide crystals is a crucial aspect for many biomedical applications. Here, we report an effective fabrication method of silicon carbide nanocrystals based on the reactive bonding method followed by electroless wet chemical etching. Our samples show strong violet-blue emission in the 410-450 nm region depending on the used solvents. Raman and infrared measurements unraveled the surface bonding structure of the fabricated nanoparticles being different from silicon carbide microcrystals. This might give an opportunity to use standard chemistry methods for biological functionalization of such nanoparticles.

  8. [Influence of primers ' chemical composition on shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic].

    PubMed

    Łagodzińska, Paulina; Bociong, Kinga; Dejak, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Resin cements establish a strong durable bond between zirconia ceramic and hard tissues of teeth. It is essential to use primers with proper chemical composition before cementation. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of primer's chemical composition on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to resin cements. 132 zirconia specimens were randomly assigned to four groups. There were four resin systems used. They included resin cement and respective primer, dedicated to zirconia: Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F2.0, Monobond Plus/Multilink Automix, AZ - Primer/ResiCem, Z - Prime Plus/Duo-Link. In each group the protocol of cementation was as follows: application of primer to the zirconia surface and application of the respective resin cement in cylindric mold (dimensions: 3.0 mm height and 3.0 mm diameter). Then, the shear bond strength was evaluated and the failure type was assessed in lupes (×2.5 magnification), also random specimens under SEM. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the data, the level of significance was α = 0.05. Finally, the known chemical composition of each primer was analysed in reference to probable chemical bonds, which may occure between primers and zirconia. The mean shear bond strength between resin cements and zirconia was the highest for Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link (8.24 ± 3,21 MPa) and lowest for Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 (4.60 ± 2.21 MPa). The analysis revealed significant difference between all groups, except pair Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem. The failure type in groups of Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem was mainly adhesive, in groups Monobond Plus/ /Multilink Automix and Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link mainly mixed. The chemical composition of primers affects different bond mechanisms between resin cements and zirconia. The highest shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia can be obtained for the primer composed of 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen

  9. Contraction stress and bond strength to dentinfor compatible and incompatible combinations of bonding systems and chemical and light-cured core build-up resin composites.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Peter B; de Gee, Anton J; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; El Zohairy, Ahmed A; Feilzer, Albert J

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that adhesives containing acidic monomers combined with composites can adversely effect the polymerization reaction producing low bond strengths. This phenomenon may also occur in making composite build-ups, jeopardizing one of the key factors for a successful core build-up restoration. The aim of this study was to investigate the contraction stress development and bond strength to dentin of core build-up resin composites combined with adhesives of various acidities. In addition the hypothesis tested was that light irradiation through chemical-cured composites during curing does not influence contraction stress or bond strength to dentin. The chemical-cured (Clearfil Core) and light-cured (Clearfil Photo Core) core build-up resin composites were combined with two light-cured adhesives, Clearfil SE Bond (pH=1.8) and One-Step Bond (pH=4.3) and two dual-cured adhesives, Clearfil Photo Bond (pH=2.5) and All-Bond 2 (pH=6.1). Contraction stress development (at C=3) was determined for a period of 30 min in a universal testing machine where the opposing bonding surfaces were glass and dentin. After the 30 min period, the specimens were loaded in tension to determine the bond strength to dentin. To test the hypothesis, the combinations of the chemical-cured composites with the four bonding systems were also light irradiated for 40s right at the start of curing. For all composite-adhesive combinations tested, the adhesion to dentin resisted the developing polymerization contraction stresses. Both, dentin as a substrate to bond at and the use of adhesives, were showed to play an important role in keeping the contraction stresses low. The chemical-cured composite (Clearfil Core) combined with the light-cured adhesive SE Bond (pH=1.8) showed for both contraction stress and bond strength significant lower values than the other combinations. The hypothesis was accepted for combinations of the chemical-cured composite with All-Bond 2 and One-Step Bond

  10. Topological Properties of Chemical Bonds from Static and Dynamic Electron Densities.

    PubMed

    Jagannatha Prathapa, Siriyara; Held, Jeanette; van Smaalen, Sander

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic and static electron densities (EDs) based on the independent spherical atom model (IAM) and multipole (MP) models of crambin were successfully computed, holding no series-termination effects. The densities are compared to EDs of small biological molecules at diverse temperatures. It is outlined that proteins exhibit an intrinsic flexibility, present as frozen disorder at 100 K, in contrast to small molecules. The flexibility of the proteins is reflected by atomic displacement parameters (B-factors), which are considerably larger than for small molecules at 298 K. Thus, an optimal deconvolution of deformation density and thermal motion is not guaranteed, which prevents a free refinement of MP parameters but allows an application of transferable, fixed MP parameters. The analysis of the topological properties, such as the density at bond critical points (BCPs) and the Laplacian, reveals systematic differences between static and dynamic EDs. Zero-point-vibrations, yet present in dynamic EDs at low temperature, affect but marginally the EDs of small molecules. The zero-point-vibrations cause a smearing of the ED, which becomes more pronounced with increasing temperature. Topological properties, primarily the Laplacian, of covalent bonds appear to be more sensitive to effects by temperature and the polarity of the bonds. However, dynamic EDs at ca. 20 K based on MP models provide a good characterization of chemical bonding. Both the density at BCPs and the Laplacian of hydrogen bonds constitute similar values from static and dynamic EDs for all studied temperatures. Deformation densities demonstrate the necessity of the employment of MP parameters in order to comprise the nature of covalent bonds. The character of hydrogen bonds can be roughly pictured by IAM, whereas MP parameters are recommended for a classification of hydrogen bonds beyond a solely interpretation of topological properties.

  11. Topological Properties of Chemical Bonds from Static and Dynamic Electron Densities

    PubMed Central

    Jagannatha Prathapa, Siriyara; Held, Jeanette; van Smaalen, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic and static electron densities (EDs) based on the independent spherical atom model (IAM) and multipole (MP) models of crambin were successfully computed, holding no series-termination effects. The densities are compared to EDs of small biological molecules at diverse temperatures. It is outlined that proteins exhibit an intrinsic flexibility, present as frozen disorder at 100 K, in contrast to small molecules. The flexibility of the proteins is reflected by atomic displacement parameters (B-factors), which are considerably larger than for small molecules at 298 K. Thus, an optimal deconvolution of deformation density and thermal motion is not guaranteed, which prevents a free refinement of MP parameters but allows an application of transferable, fixed MP parameters. The analysis of the topological properties, such as the density at bond critical points (BCPs) and the Laplacian, reveals systematic differences between static and dynamic EDs. Zero-point-vibrations, yet present in dynamic EDs at low temperature, affect but marginally the EDs of small molecules. The zero-point-vibrations cause a smearing of the ED, which becomes more pronounced with increasing temperature. Topological properties, primarily the Laplacian, of covalent bonds appear to be more sensitive to effects by temperature and the polarity of the bonds. However, dynamic EDs at ca. 20 K based on MP models provide a good characterization of chemical bonding. Both the density at BCPs and the Laplacian of hydrogen bonds constitute similar values from static and dynamic EDs for all studied temperatures. Deformation densities demonstrate the necessity of the employment of MP parameters in order to comprise the nature of covalent bonds. The character of hydrogen bonds can be roughly pictured by IAM, whereas MP parameters are recommended for a classification of hydrogen bonds beyond a solely interpretation of topological properties. PMID:25995522

  12. Nucleation-dependant chemical bonding paradigm: the effect of rare earth ions on the nucleation of urea in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Sun, Congting; Wu, Sixin; Xue, Dongfeng

    2017-03-29

    Rare earth ions can be used to construct a variety of novel structures and are favorable to chemical bonding regulation and design. In this study, the chemical bonding paradigm between rare earth ions (Ln(3+)) and urea molecules in an aqueous solution can be tracked by the evolution of C[double bond, length as m-dash]O, NH2, and CN vibration bands during the urea nucleation stage. Rare earth ions such as La(3+), Gd(3+), and Lu(3+) can manipulate the nucleation time of urea via regulating the nucleation-dependant N-C[double bond, length as m-dash]OH-N hydrogen-bonding between urea molecules. Two types of chemical bondings between Ln(3+) and urea molecules have been confirmed, which are Ln(3+)O[double bond, length as m-dash]C-N and Ln(3+)NH2-C. Compared with Ln(3+)NH2-C, Ln(3+) prefers to coordinate with the O[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond in urea. With a higher concentration of rare earth ions in the solution, some N-C[double bond, length as m-dash]OH-N hydrogen bonds are broken as a consequence of the incorporation of Ln(3+) into the lattice, resulting in the decreased symmetry of local urea molecules in the crystalline nuclei and the consequent Ln(3+) concentration-dependent nucleation time of urea. Moreover, using the ionic electronegativity scale of Ln(3+), the different effects of La(3+), Gd(3+), and Lu(3+) on urea nucleation can be further distinguished. The present study provides basic data for unrevealing the chemical bonding regulation role of rare earth ions in the formation of hydrogen bonded materials, which may give insight into the design and fabrication of novel materials utilizing rare earth ions to adjust the chemical bonding process.

  13. Physical and chemical transformations of highly compressed carbon dioxide at bond energies.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-06-07

    Carbon dioxide exhibits a richness of high-pressure polymorphs with a great diversity in intermolecular interaction, chemical bonding, and crystal structures. It ranges from typical molecular solids to fully extended covalent solids with crystal structures similar to those of SiO2. These extended solids of carbon dioxide are fundamentally new materials exhibiting interesting optical nonlinearity, low compressibility and high energy density. Furthermore, the large disparity in chemical bonding between the extended network and molecular structures results in a broad metastability domain for these phases to room temperature and almost to ambient pressure and thereby offers enhanced opportunities for novel materials developments. Broadly speaking, these molecular-to-non-molecular transitions occur due to electron delocalization manifested as a rapid increase in electron kinetic energy at high density. The detailed mechanisms, however, are more complex with phase metastabilities, path-dependent phases and phase boundaries, and large lattice strains and structural distortions - all of which are controlled by well beyond thermodynamic constraints to chemical kinetics associated with the governing phases and transitions. As a result, the equilibrium phase boundary is difficult to locate precisely (experimentally or theoretically) and is often obscured by the presence of metastable phases (ordered or disordered). This paper will review the pressure-induced transformations observed in highly compressed carbon dioxide and present chemistry perspectives on those molecular-to-non-molecular transformations that can be applied to other low-Z molecular solids at Mbar pressures where the compression energy rivals the chemical bond energies.

  14. Mapping lipid and collagen by multispectral photoacoustic imaging of chemical bond vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pu; Wang, Ping; Wang, Han-Wei; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2012-09-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy using vibrational overtone absorption as a contrast mechanism allows bond-selective imaging of deep tissues. Due to the spectral similarity of molecules in the region of overtone vibration, it is difficult to interrogate chemical components using photoacoustic signal at single excitation wavelength. Here we demonstrate that lipids and collagen, two critical markers for many kinds of diseases, can be distinguished by multispectral photoacoustic imaging of the first overtone of C-H bond. A phantom consisting of rat-tail tendon and fat was constructed to demonstrate this technique. Wavelengths between 1650 and 1850 nm were scanned to excite both the first overtone and combination bands of C-H bonds. B-scan multispectral photoacoustic images, in which each pixel contains a spectrum, were analyzed by a multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares algorithm to recover the spatial distribution of collagen and lipids in the phantom.

  15. Studying Chemical Reactions, One Bond at a Time, with Single Molecule AFM Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Julio M.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mechanical forces regulate the kinetics of a chemical reaction are unknown. In my lecture I will demonstrate how we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy and protein engineering to study the effect of force on the kinetics of thiol/disulfide exchange. Reduction of disulfide bond via the thiol/disulfide exchange chemical reaction is crucial in regulating protein function and is of common occurrence in mechanically stressed proteins. While reduction is thought to proceed through a substitution nucleophilic bimolecular (SN2) reaction, the role of a mechanical force in modulating this chemical reaction is unknown. We apply a constant stretching force to single engineered disulfide bonds and measure their rate of reduction by dithiothreitol (DTT). We find that while the reduction rate is linearly dependent on the concentration of DTT, it is exponentially dependent on the applied force, increasing 10-fold over a 300 pN range. This result predicts that the disulfide bond lengthens by 0.34 å at the transition state of the thiol/disulfide exchange reaction. In addition to DTT, we also study the reduction of the engineered disulfide bond by the E. coli enzyme thioredoxin (Trx). Thioredoxins are enzymes that catalyze disulfide bond reduction in all organisms. As before, we apply a mechanical force in the range of 25-450 pN to the engineered disulfide bond substrate and monitor the reduction of these bonds by individual enzymes. In sharp contrast with the data obtained with DTT, we now observe two alternative forms of the catalytic reaction, the first requiring a reorientation of the substrate disulfide bond, causing a shortening of the substrate polypeptide by 0.76±0.07 å, and the second elongating the substrate disulfide bond by 0.21±0.01 å. These results support the view that the Trx active site regulates the geometry of the participating sulfur atoms, with sub-ångström precision, in order to achieve efficient catalysis. Single molecule

  16. Evidence for chemical bond formation at rubber-brass interface: Photoelectron spectroscopy study of bonding interaction between copper sulfide and model molecules of natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kenichi; Mase, Kazuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Strong adhesion between rubber and brass has been considered to arise mainly from the mechanical interaction, which is characterized by dendritic interlocking at the interface. In order to examine a possible contribution of the chemical interaction, chemical state analysis was carried out for model molecules of natural rubber (2-methyl-2-butene and isoprene) adsorbed on Cu2S, a key chemical species for adhesion, by means of photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Absence of a C 1s PES component associated with C=C bonds and the appearance of adsorption-induced components in the S 2p region indicate that the molecules interact with the Cu2S surface via the C=C bond to form C-S covalent bonds. This proves that the chemical interaction certainly plays a role in rubber-brass adhesion along with the mechanical interaction.

  17. Advances in understanding of chemical bonding: inputs from experimental and theoretical charge density analysis.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Deepak

    2012-10-11

    The development of charge density analysis has undergone a major renaissance in the last two decades. In recent years, the characterization of bonding features associated with atoms in molecules and in crystals has been explored using high-resolution X-ray diffraction data (laboratory or synchrotron) complemented by high level ab initio theoretical calculations. The extraction of one electron topological properties, namely, electrostatic charges, dipole moment and higher moments, electrostatic potential, electric field gradients, in addition to evaluation of the local kinetic and potential energy densities, have contributed toward an understanding of the electron density distributions in molecular solids. New topological descriptors, namely, the source function (SF) and electron localization function (ELF) provide additional information as regards characterization of the topology of the electron density. In addition, delocalization indices have also been developed to account for bonding features pertinent to M-M bonds. The evaluation of these properties have contributed significantly toward the understanding of intra- and intermolecular bonding features in organic, inorganic, and biomolecules in the crystalline phase, with concomitant applications in the understanding of chemical reactivity and material/biological properties. In recent years, the focus has strongly shifted toward the understanding of structure-property relationships in organometallic complexes containing labile M-C bonds in the crystal structure with subsequent implications in catalysis. This perspective aims to highlight the major developments in electron density measurements in the past few years and provides pointers directed toward the potential use of this technique in future applications for an improved understanding of chemical bonding in systems that have been unexplored.

  18. Chemical role of oxygen plasma in wafer bonding using borosilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, D. M.; Albaugh, C. E.; Moran, P. D.; Kuech, T. F.

    2001-11-01

    Plasma-treated oxide layers are commonly used in wafer bonding applications. Borosilicate glass (BSG) layers deposited by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition treated with an O2 plasma in reactive ion etching mode for 5 min at 0.6 W/cm2 and rinsed with DI H2O readily bond to GaAs and Si. The chemical role of this prebonding treatment was investigated using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The peak intensities for both the Si-O and B-O absorbance bands decreased in intensity as a result of the plasma treatment is consistent with the uniform sputtering of 9.8 nm±0.8 nm of BSG. Polarization dependent ATR-FTIR revealed that the H2O/OH absorbance bands decreased in peak intensity with the OH groups being preferentially oriented perpendicular to the sample surface after the plasma treatment. The subsequent DI H2O rinse restores the water to the surface while removing B2O3 from the BSG layer. This prebonding treatment, therefore, results in a hydrophilic bond, but alters the composition of the BSG film at the bonded interface.

  19. Aromatic thiol-mediated cleavage of N-O bonds enables chemical ubiquitylation of folded proteins.

    PubMed

    Weller, Caroline E; Dhall, Abhinav; Ding, Feizhi; Linares, Edlaine; Whedon, Samuel D; Senger, Nicholas A; Tyson, Elizabeth L; Bagert, John D; Li, Xiaosong; Augusto, Ohara; Chatterjee, Champak

    2016-09-29

    Access to protein substrates homogenously modified by ubiquitin (Ub) is critical for biophysical and biochemical investigations aimed at deconvoluting the myriad biological roles for Ub. Current chemical strategies for protein ubiquitylation, however, employ temporary ligation auxiliaries that are removed under harsh denaturing conditions and have limited applicability. We report an unprecedented aromatic thiol-mediated N-O bond cleavage and its application towards native chemical ubiquitylation with the ligation auxiliary 2-aminooxyethanethiol. Our interrogation of the reaction mechanism suggests a disulfide radical anion as the active species capable of cleaving the N-O bond. The successful semisynthesis of full-length histone H2B modified by the small ubiquitin-like modifier-3 (SUMO-3) protein further demonstrates the generalizability and compatibility of our strategy with folded proteins.

  20. Detection of sub-GeV dark matter and solar neutrinos via chemical-bond breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essig, Rouven; Mardon, Jeremy; Slone, Oren; Volansky, Tomer

    2017-03-01

    We explore a new low-threshold direct-detection concept for dark matter, based on the breaking of chemical bonds between atoms. This includes the dissociation of molecules and the creation of defects in a lattice. With thresholds of a few to 10s of eV, such an experiment could probe the nuclear couplings of dark matter particles as light as a few MeV. We calculate the expected rates for dark matter to break apart diatomic molecules, which we take as a case study for more general systems. We briefly mention ideas for how chemical-bond breaking might be detected in practice. We also discuss the possibility of detecting solar neutrinos, including pp neutrinos, with this experimental concept. With an event rate of O (0.1 /kg -year ) , large exposures are required, but measuring low-energy solar neutrinos would provide a crucial test of the solar model.

  1. Chemical bonding and aromaticity in trinuclear transition-metal halide clusters.

    PubMed

    Weck, Philippe F; Sergeeva, Alina P; Kim, Eunja; Boldyrev, Alexander I; Czerwinski, Kenneth R

    2011-02-07

    Trinuclear transition-metal complexes such as Re(3)X(9) (X = Cl, Br, I), with their uniquely featured structure among metal halides, have posed intriguing questions related to multicenter electron delocalization for several decades. Here we report a comprehensive study of the technetium halide clusters [Tc(3)(μ-X)(3)X(6)](0/1-/2-) (X = F, Cl, Br, I), isomorphous with their rhenium congeners, predicted from density functional theory calculations. The chemical bonding and aromaticity in these clusters are analyzed using the recently developed adaptive natural density partitioning method, which indicates that only [Tc(3)X(9)](2-) clusters exhibit aromatic character, stemming from a d-orbital-based π bond delocalized over the three metal centers. We also show that standard methods founded on the nucleus-independent chemical shift concept incorrectly predict the neutral Tc(3)X(9) clusters to be aromatic.

  2. Developing density functional theory for Bose-Einstein condensates. The case of chemical bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2015-01-22

    Since the nowadays growing interest in Bose-Einstein condensates due to the expanded experimental evidence on various atomic systems within optical lattices in weak and strong coupling regimes, the connection with Density Functional Theory is firstly advanced within the mean field framework at three levels of comprehension: the many-body normalization condition, Thomas-Fermi limit, and the chemical hardness closure with the inter-bosonic strength and universal Hohenberg-Kohn functional. As an application the traditional Heitler-London quantum mechanical description of the chemical bonding for homopolar atomic systems is reloaded within the non-linear Schrödinger (Gross-Pitaevsky) Hamiltonian; the results show that a two-fold energetic solution is registered either for bonding and antibonding states, with the bosonic contribution being driven by the square of the order parameter for the Bose-Einstein condensate density in free (gas) motion, while the associate wave functions remain as in classical molecular orbital model.

  3. Direct imaging of covalent bond structure in single-molecule chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    de Oteyza, Dimas G; Gorman, Patrick; Chen, Yen-Chia; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Riss, Alexander; Mowbray, Duncan J; Etkin, Grisha; Pedramrazi, Zahra; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Rubio, Angel; Crommie, Michael F; Fischer, Felix R

    2013-06-21

    Observing the intricate chemical transformation of an individual molecule as it undergoes a complex reaction is a long-standing challenge in molecular imaging. Advances in scanning probe microscopy now provide the tools to visualize not only the frontier orbitals of chemical reaction partners and products, but their internal covalent bond configurations as well. We used noncontact atomic force microscopy to investigate reaction-induced changes in the detailed internal bond structure of individual oligo-(phenylene-1,2-ethynylenes) on a (100) oriented silver surface as they underwent a series of cyclization processes. Our images reveal the complex surface reaction mechanisms underlying thermally induced cyclization cascades of enediynes. Calculations using ab initio density functional theory provide additional support for the proposed reaction pathways.

  4. Aromatic thiol-mediated cleavage of N-O bonds enables chemical ubiquitylation of folded proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Caroline E.; Dhall, Abhinav; Ding, Feizhi; Linares, Edlaine; Whedon, Samuel D.; Senger, Nicholas A.; Tyson, Elizabeth L.; Bagert, John D.; Li, Xiaosong; Augusto, Ohara; Chatterjee, Champak

    2016-09-01

    Access to protein substrates homogenously modified by ubiquitin (Ub) is critical for biophysical and biochemical investigations aimed at deconvoluting the myriad biological roles for Ub. Current chemical strategies for protein ubiquitylation, however, employ temporary ligation auxiliaries that are removed under harsh denaturing conditions and have limited applicability. We report an unprecedented aromatic thiol-mediated N-O bond cleavage and its application towards native chemical ubiquitylation with the ligation auxiliary 2-aminooxyethanethiol. Our interrogation of the reaction mechanism suggests a disulfide radical anion as the active species capable of cleaving the N-O bond. The successful semisynthesis of full-length histone H2B modified by the small ubiquitin-like modifier-3 (SUMO-3) protein further demonstrates the generalizability and compatibility of our strategy with folded proteins.

  5. Aromatic thiol-mediated cleavage of N–O bonds enables chemical ubiquitylation of folded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Caroline E.; Dhall, Abhinav; Ding, Feizhi; Linares, Edlaine; Whedon, Samuel D.; Senger, Nicholas A.; Tyson, Elizabeth L.; Bagert, John D.; Li, Xiaosong; Augusto, Ohara; Chatterjee, Champak

    2016-01-01

    Access to protein substrates homogenously modified by ubiquitin (Ub) is critical for biophysical and biochemical investigations aimed at deconvoluting the myriad biological roles for Ub. Current chemical strategies for protein ubiquitylation, however, employ temporary ligation auxiliaries that are removed under harsh denaturing conditions and have limited applicability. We report an unprecedented aromatic thiol-mediated N–O bond cleavage and its application towards native chemical ubiquitylation with the ligation auxiliary 2-aminooxyethanethiol. Our interrogation of the reaction mechanism suggests a disulfide radical anion as the active species capable of cleaving the N–O bond. The successful semisynthesis of full-length histone H2B modified by the small ubiquitin-like modifier-3 (SUMO-3) protein further demonstrates the generalizability and compatibility of our strategy with folded proteins. PMID:27680493

  6. Ultraviolet-curable polymers with chemically bonded carbon nanotubes for microelectromechanical system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jining; Zhang, Nanyan; Guers, Manton; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2002-08-01

    Current UV-curable polymer techniques for microelectromechanical system fabrication pose certain challenges due to the electrical and mechanical properties of the polymer. A novel UV-curable polymer uniformly bonded with functionalized nanotubes was synthesized via a modified three-step in situ polymerization. Purified multi-walled nanotubes, obtained by the microwave chemical vapor deposition method, were functionalized by oxidation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to identify the -OH and -COOH groups attached to the nanotube surface. The UV-curable polymer was prepared from toluene diisocyanate (TDI), functionalized nanotubes, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The chemical bonds between the -NCO groups of TDI and the -OH, -COOH groups of functionalized nanotubes were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. This new UV-curable polymer is expected to be a cost-effective solution with a variety of applications in UV coating, phase shifters for telecommunications and global positioning systems, and polymer and BioMEMS devices.

  7. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of ({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}X)Rh(CO){sub 2} complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C{sub 60} molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C{sub 60} reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs.

  8. Description of Polar Chemical Bonds from the Quantum Mechanical Interference Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, Felipe; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer

    2014-06-10

    The Generalized Product Function Energy Partitioning (GPF-EP) method has been applied to a set of molecules, AH (A = Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F), CO and LiF with quite different dipole moments, in order to investigate the role played by the quantum interference effect in the formation of polar chemical bonds. The calculations were carried out with GPF wave functions treating all the core electrons as a single Hartree-Fock group and the bonding electrons at the Generalized Valence Bond Perfect-Pairing (GVB-PP) level, with the cc-pVTZ basis set. The results of the energy partitioning into interference and quasi-classical contributions along the respective Potential Energy Surfaces (PES) show that the main contribution to the depth of the potential wells comes from the interference term, which is an indication that all the molecules mentioned above form typical covalent bonds. In all cases, the stabilization promoted by the interference term comes from the kinetic contribution, in agreement with previous results. The analysis of the effect of quantum interference on the electron density reveals that while polarization effects (quasi-classical) tend to displace electronic density from the most polarizable atom toward the less polarizable one, interference (quantum effects) counteracts by displacing electronic density to the bond region, giving rise to the right electronic density and dipole moment.

  9. The nature of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds: a quantum chemical topology perspective.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Romero-Montalvo, Eduardo; Costales, Aurora; Pendás, Ángel Martín; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás

    2016-10-14

    Resonance Assisted Hydrogen Bonds (RAHBs) are particularly strong H-Bonds (HBs) which are relevant in several fields of chemistry. The traditional explanation for the occurrence of these HBs is built on mesomeric structures evocative of electron delocalisation in the system. Nonetheless, there are several theoretical studies which have found no evidence of such electron delocalisation. We considered the origin of RAHBs by employing Quantum Chemical Topology tools, more specifically, the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and the Interacting Quantum Atoms energy partition. Our results indicate that the π-conjugated bonds allow for a larger adjustment of electron density throughout the H-bonded system as compared with non-conjugated carbonyl molecules. This rearrangement of charge distribution is a response to the electric field due to the H atom involved in the hydrogen bonding of the considered compounds. As opposed to the usual description of RAHB interactions, these HBs lead to a larger electron localisation in the system, and concomitantly to larger QTAIM charges which in turn lead to stronger electrostatic, polarization and charge transfer components of the interaction. Overall, the results presented here offer a new perspective on the cause of strengthening of these important interactions.

  10. Wetting Properties of Chemically Modified Surfaces: The role of hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Selemon; Tsige, Mesfin

    2015-03-01

    Many industrial processing operations involve the spreading of a liquid on a solid material. Controlling the wetting of one material by another is of crucial importance in such applications as adhesion, coating and oil recovery. A strategy often employed to control the wettability of solid surfaces is a combination of surface patterning and chemical surface modification. In order to understand the effect of surface chemistry on the wetting process, we have carried out all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a water droplet spreading on pure and oxidized polystyrene surfaces. Our previous results show that the contact angle generally decreases with increasing oxygen concentration and there is a correlation between the spreading and hydrogen bonding. In this talk, we will present results on the structure and dynamics of the hydrogen bonds in the interfacial region between water and the polystyrene substrate. We will discuss our findings on hydrogen bond lifetimes, time correlations functions and number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule for the hydrogen bonds around the water/polystyrene interface which are found to play a role in the spreading process. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR0847580.

  11. Dielectric Methods of Studying the Chemical Bond and the Concept of Electronegativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batsanov, Stepan S.

    1982-07-01

    The history and contemporary theories of the polarisation of molecules and crystals are considered and a systematic survey is given of dipole moments and bond ionicities in molecular chemical compounds and also of the effective charges of atoms in crystals. An interpretation of these results is given from the standpoint of the electronegativity concept. Views concerning the effective valencies and coordination numbers of atoms in crystals are considered. Bibliography of 207 references.

  12. Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2014-05-13

    Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

  13. Effect of raw material ratios on the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-juan; Yuan, Zhi-long; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Lin-tao; Li, Jun-ming; Liu, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics is important in biomedical field. In this work, the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics was investigated with different liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios. X-ray diffractometer was applied to characterize its phase composition. The microstructure was imaged using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the compressive strength of the chemically bonded ceramics increased with the decrease of liquid-to-solid ratio due to the change of the packing density and the crystallinity of hydrated product. However, with the increase of MgO-to-KH2PO4 weight ratio, its compressive strength increased firstly and then decreased. The low compressive strength in lower MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be explained by the existence of the weak phase KH2PO4. However, the low value of compressive strength with the higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be caused by lack of the joined phase in the hydrated product. Besides, it has been found that the microstructures were different in these two cases by the scanning electron microscope. Colloidal structure appeared for the samples with lower liquid-to-solid and higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios possibly because of the existence of amorphous hydrated products. The optimization of both liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios was important to improve the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics.

  14. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voroshilov, Ivan; Endzhievskaya, Irina; Vasilovskaya, Nina

    2016-01-01

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg m3, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W m * °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  15. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Voroshilov, Ivan Endzhievskaya, Irina Vasilovskaya, Nina

    2016-01-15

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg \\ m{sup 3}, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W \\ m {sup *} °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  16. Development of chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seung-Young

    1997-11-01

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramics have been developed by acid-base reactions between magnesium oxide and an acid phosphate at room temperature for stabilizing U.S. Department of Energy's low-level mixed waste streams that include hazardous chemicals and radioactive elements. Newberyite (MgHPOsb4.3Hsb2O)-rich magnesium phosphate ceramic was formed by an acid-base reaction between phosphoric acid and magnesium oxide. The reaction slurry, formed at room-temperature, sets rapidly and forms stable mineral phases of newberyite, lunebergite, and residual MgO. Rapid setting also generates heat due to exothermic acid-base reaction. The reaction was retarded by partially neutralizing the phosphoric acid solution by adding sodium or potassium hydroxide. This reduced the rate of reaction and heat generation and led to a practical way of producing novel magnesium potassium phosphate ceramic. This ceramic was formed by reacting stoichiometric amount of monopotassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals, MgO, and water, forming pure-phase of MgKPOsb4.6Hsb2O (MKP) with moderate exothermic reaction. Using this chemically bonded phosphate ceramic matrix, low-level mixed waste streams were stabilized, and superior waste forms in a monolithic structure were developed. The final waste forms showed low open porosity and permeability, and higher compression strength than the Land Disposal Requirements (LDRs). The novel MKP ceramic technology allowed us to develop operational size waste forms of 55 gal with good physical integrity. In this improved waste form, the hazardous contaminants such as RCRA heavy metals (Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, etc) were chemically fixed by their conversion into insoluble phosphate forms and physically encapsulated by the phosphate ceramic. In addition, chemically bonded phosphate ceramics stabilized radioactive elements such U and Pu. This was demonstrated with a detailed stabilization study on cerium used as a surrogate (chemically equivalent but nonradioactive

  17. Four chemical methods of porcelain conditioning and their influence over bond strength and surface integrity

    PubMed Central

    Stella, João Paulo Fragomeni; Oliveira, Andrea Becker; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Marquezan, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess four different chemical surface conditioning methods for ceramic material before bracket bonding, and their impact on shear bond strength and surface integrity at debonding. METHODS: Four experimental groups (n = 13) were set up according to the ceramic conditioning method: G1 = 37% phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application; G2 = 37% liquid phosphoric acid etching, no rinsing, followed by silane application; G3 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching alone; and G4 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching followed by silane application. After surface conditioning, metal brackets were bonded to porcelain by means of the Transbond XP system (3M Unitek). Samples were submitted to shear bond strength tests in a universal testing machine and the surfaces were later assessed with a microscope under 8 X magnification. ANOVA/Tukey tests were performed to establish the difference between groups (α= 5%). RESULTS: The highest shear bond strength values were found in groups G3 and G4 (22.01 ± 2.15 MPa and 22.83 ± 3.32 Mpa, respectively), followed by G1 (16.42 ± 3.61 MPa) and G2 (9.29 ± 1.95 MPa). As regards surface evaluation after bracket debonding, the use of liquid phosphoric acid followed by silane application (G2) produced the least damage to porcelain. When hydrofluoric acid and silane were applied, the risk of ceramic fracture increased. CONCLUSIONS: Acceptable levels of bond strength for clinical use were reached by all methods tested; however, liquid phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application (G2) resulted in the least damage to the ceramic surface. PMID:26352845

  18. Tensile Bond Strength between Soft Liners and Two Chemically Different Denture Base Materials: Effect of Thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Tugut, Faik; Coskun, Mehmet Emre; Dogan, Derya Ozdemir; Kirmali, Omer; Akin, Hakan

    2016-06-01

    The bond strength of soft denture liner to a recently introduced denture base resin after thermocycling has not been compared to traditional denture base materials. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of thermocycling on the tensile bond strength of soft denture liners to two chemically different denture base resins, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA). A total of 48 PMMA and UDMA tensile test specimens were fabricated by attaching two different soft denture liners (Molloplast-B, Permaflex) according to the manufacturers' instructions and assigned to two groups. Half of the specimens for each group were stored in water for 1 week, and the other half were thermocycled (5000 cycles) between baths of 5°C and 55°C. Specimens were mounted on a universal testing machine with a 5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α = 0.05). The highest bond strength was measured in the specimens from the UDMA/Molloplast groups, and the lowest was seen in the PMMA/Permaflex group. No significant difference in bond strength was detected in PMMA/Permaflex groups after thermocycling (p = 0.082), whereas other groups exhibited significant differences after thermocycling (p < 0.05). Thermocycling decreased the bond strength values in both the PMMA and UDMA groups. Regardless of types of soft liners, PMMA specimens presented lower bond strength values than UDMA specimens, both before and after thermocycling. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Revealing halogen bonding interactions with anomeric systems: an ab initio quantum chemical studies.

    PubMed

    Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2015-02-01

    A computational study has been performed using MP2 and CCSD(T) methods on a series of O⋯X (X=Br, Cl and I) halogen bonds to evaluate the strength and characteristic of such highly directional noncovalent interactions. The study has been carried out on a series of dimeric complexes formed between interhalogen compounds (such as BrF, BrCl and BrI) and oxygen containing electron donor molecule. The existence and consequences of the anomeric effect of the electron donor molecule has also been investigated through an exploration of halogen bonding interactions in this halogen bonded complexes. The ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been employed to study both the nature and directionality of the halogen molecules toward the sp(3) oxygen atom in anomeric systems. The presence of anomeric nO→σ*CN interaction involves a dominant role for the availability of the axial and equatorial lone pairs of donor O atom to participate with interhalogen compounds in the halogen-bonded complexes. The energy difference between the axial and equatorial conformers with interhalogen compounds reaches up to 4.60 kJ/mol, which however depends upon the interacting halogen atoms and its attaching atoms. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the total halogen bond interaction energies are mainly contributed by the attractive electrostatic and dispersion components. The role of substituents attached with the halogen atoms has also been evaluated in this study. With the increase of halogen atom size and the positive nature of σ-hole, the halogen atom interacted more with the electron donor atom and the electrostatic contribution to the total interaction energy enhances appreciably. Further, noncovalent interaction (NCI) studies have been carried out to locate the noncovalent halogen bonding interactions in real space.

  20. The Trouble with Chemical Energy: Why Understanding Bond Energies Requires an Interdisciplinary Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Helping students understand “chemical energy” is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk about chemical energy (which is also the way we talk about energy in everyday life); 2) the macroscopic approach to energy concepts that is common in physics and physical sciences; and 3) the failure of chemistry courses to explicitly link molecular with macroscopic energy ideas. From a constructivist perspective, it is unlikely that students can, without a coherent understanding of such a central concept, attain a robust and accurate understanding of new concepts. However, changes are on the horizon, guided by the increasing understanding that difficult concepts require coherent, well-designed learning progressions and the new National Research Council Framework for K–12 Science Education. We provide supporting evidence for our assertions and suggestions for an interdisciplinary learning progression designed to better approach the concept of bond energies, a first step in an understanding chemical energy and behavior of reaction systems that is central to biological systems. PMID:23737636

  1. Intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving fluorine atoms: implications for recognition, selectivity, and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Dalvit, Claudio; Vulpetti, Anna

    2012-02-06

    A correlation between 19F NMR isotropic chemical shift and close intermolecular F⋅⋅⋅H-X contacts (with X=N or O) has been identified upon analysis of the X-ray crystal structures of fluorinated molecules listed in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). An optimal F⋅⋅⋅X distance involving primary and shielded secondary fluorine atoms in hydrogen-bond formation along with a correlation between F⋅⋅⋅H distance and F⋅⋅⋅H-X angle were also derived from the analysis. The hydrogen bonds involving fluorine are relevant, not only for the recognition mechanism and stabilization of a preferred conformation, but also for improvement in the permeability of the molecules, as shown with examples taken from a proprietary database. Results of an analysis of the small number of fluorine-containing natural products listed in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) appear to strengthen the derived correlation between 19F NMR isotropic chemical shift and interactions involving fluorine (also known as the "rule of shielding") and provides a hypothesis for the recognition mechanism and catalytic activity of specific enzymes. Novel chemical scaffolds, based on the rule of shielding, have been designed for recognizing distinct structural motifs present in proteins. It is envisaged that this approach could find useful applications in drug design for the efficient optimization of chemical fragments or promising compounds by increasing potency and selectivity against the desired biomolecular target.

  2. The trouble with chemical energy: why understanding bond energies requires an interdisciplinary systems approach.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Melanie M; Klymkowsky, Michael W

    2013-06-01

    Helping students understand "chemical energy" is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk about chemical energy (which is also the way we talk about energy in everyday life); 2) the macroscopic approach to energy concepts that is common in physics and physical sciences; and 3) the failure of chemistry courses to explicitly link molecular with macroscopic energy ideas. From a constructivist perspective, it is unlikely that students can, without a coherent understanding of such a central concept, attain a robust and accurate understanding of new concepts. However, changes are on the horizon, guided by the increasing understanding that difficult concepts require coherent, well-designed learning progressions and the new National Research Council Framework for K-12 Science Education. We provide supporting evidence for our assertions and suggestions for an interdisciplinary learning progression designed to better approach the concept of bond energies, a first step in an understanding chemical energy and behavior of reaction systems that is central to biological systems.

  3. Chemical bonding in electron-deficient boron oxide clusters: core boronyl groups, dual 3c-4e hypervalent bonds, and rhombic 4c-4e bonds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lu, Haigang; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2014-04-28

    We explore the structural and bonding properties of the electron-deficient boron oxide clusters, using a series of B3On(-/0/+) (n = 2-4) clusters as examples. Global-minimum structures of these boron oxide clusters are identified via unbiased Coalescence Kick and Basin Hopping searches, which show a remarkable size and charge-state dependence. An array of new bonding elements are revealed: core boronyl groups, dual 3c-4e hypervalent bonds (ω-bonds), and rhombic 4c-4e bonds (o-bonds). In favorable cases, oxygen can exhaust all its 2s/2p electrons to facilitate the formation of B-O bonds. The current findings should help understand the bonding nature of low-dimensional boron oxide nanomaterials and bulk boron oxides.

  4. A theoretical study of the structures and chemical bonds of neptunium (III) molecules by a density functional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yao-Peng; Dong, Chen-Zhong; Du, Lei-Qiang; Wu, Fang-Xian; Ding, Xiao-Bin

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, equilibrium structures and chemical bond characteristics of neptunium trihalide molecules NpX3 (X = F, Cl, Br and I) have been investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). The influences of the size of the relativistic effective core potential (RECP) have been examined on the molecular structures. The chemical bond characteristics have also been systematically studied by calculating the density of states (DOS), bond length differences and electronic charge distributions. We have determined that the chemical bonds are mainly ionic in those molecules, and the covalency is enhancing while ionicity decreases from NpF3 to NpI3. The calculated bond energies show that the interaction strength in NpX3 molecules becomes weaker as the halogen atoms becoming heavier.

  5. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Jeanette Smaalen, Sander van

    2014-04-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  6. A topological study of chemical bonds under pressure: solid hydrogen as a model case.

    PubMed

    Riffet, Vanessa; Labet, Vanessa; Contreras-García, Julia

    2017-09-25

    It is now well recognized that a fundamental understanding of the rules that govern chemistry under pressure is still lacking. Hydrogen being the "simplest" element as well as a central core to high pressure physics, we undertake a general study of the changes in the chemical bonding under pressure. We start from a simple trimer unit that has been found in high pressure phases, whose behavior has been found to reveal the basics of hydrogen polymerization under pressure. Making use of bond analysis tools, mainly the NCI (noncovalent interactions) index, we show that polymerization takes place in three steps: dipolar attraction, repulsion and bond formation. The use of a 1D Wigner-Seitz radius allowed us to extend the conclusions to 3D networks and to analyze their degree of polymerization. On the one hand, this approach provides new insight into the polymerization of hydrogen. On the other hand, it shows that complicated molecular solids can be understood from cluster models, where correlated methods can be applied, main differences in solid state arising at the transition points, where breaking/forming of bonds happens at once instead of continuously like in the cluster model.

  7. Weak Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds with Fluorine: Detection and Implications for Enzymatic/Chemical Reactions, Chemical Properties, and Ligand/Protein Fluorine NMR Screening.

    PubMed

    Dalvit, Claudio; Vulpetti, Anna

    2016-05-23

    It is known that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. However, weak or very weak hydrogen bonds, which are often difficult to detect and characterize, may also be relevant in many recognition and reaction processes. Fluorine serving as a hydrogen-bond acceptor has been the subject of many controversial discussions and there are different opinions about it. It now appears that there is compelling experimental evidence for the involvement of fluorine in weak intramolecular or intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Using established NMR methods, we have previously characterized and measured the strengths of intermolecular hydrogen-bond complexes involving the fluorine moieties CH2 F, CHF2 , and CF3 , and have compared them with the well-known hydrogen-bond complex formed between acetophenone and the strong hydrogen-bond donor p-fluorophenol. We now report evidence for the formation of hydrogen bonds involving fluorine with significantly weaker donors, namely 5-fluoroindole and water. A simple NMR method is proposed for the simultaneous measurement of the strengths of hydrogen bonds between an acceptor and a donor or water. Important implications of these results for enzymatic/chemical reactions involving fluorine, for chemical and physical properties, and for ligand/protein (19) F NMR screening are analyzed through experiments and theoretical simulations.

  8. A two-step chemical mechanism for ribosome-catalysed peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, David A; Singh, Vipender; Zhong, Minghong; Strobel, Scott A

    2011-07-17

    The chemical step of natural protein synthesis, peptide bond formation, is catalysed by the large subunit of the ribosome. Crystal structures have shown that the active site for peptide bond formation is composed entirely of RNA. Recent work has focused on how an RNA active site is able to catalyse this fundamental biological reaction at a suitable rate for protein synthesis. On the basis of the absence of important ribosomal functional groups, lack of a dependence on pH, and the dominant contribution of entropy to catalysis, it has been suggested that the role of the ribosome is limited to bringing the substrates into close proximity. Alternatively, the importance of the 2'-hydroxyl of the peptidyl-transfer RNA and a Brønsted coefficient near zero have been taken as evidence that the ribosome coordinates a proton-transfer network. Here we report the transition state of peptide bond formation, based on analysis of the kinetic isotope effect at five positions within the reaction centre of a peptidyl-transfer RNA mimic. Our results indicate that in contrast to the uncatalysed reaction, formation of the tetrahedral intermediate and proton transfer from the nucleophilic nitrogen both occur in the rate-limiting step. Unlike in previous proposals, the reaction is not fully concerted; instead, breakdown of the tetrahedral intermediate occurs in a separate fast step. This suggests that in addition to substrate positioning, the ribosome is contributing to chemical catalysis by changing the rate-limiting transition state.

  9. Hybrid density functional study on lattice vibration, thermodynamic properties, and chemical bonding of plutonium monocarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Yang; Bin, Tang; Tao, Gao; BingYun, Ao

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid density functional theory is employed to systematically investigate the structural, magnetic, vibrational, thermodynamic properties of plutonium monocarbide (PuC and PuC0.75). For comparison, the results obtained by DFT, DFT + U are also given. For PuC and PuC0.75, Fock-0.25 hybrid functional gives the best lattice constants and predicts the correct ground states of antiferromagnetic (AFM) structure. The calculated phonon spectra suggest that PuC and PuC0.75 are dynamically stable. Values of the Helmholtz free energy ΔF, internal energy ΔE, entropy S, and constant-volume specific heat C v of PuC and PuC0.75 are given. The results are in good agreement with available experimental or theoretical data. As for the chemical bonding nature, the difference charge densities, the partial densities of states and the Bader charge analysis suggest that the Pu-C bonds of PuC and PuC0.75 have a mixture of covalent character and ionic character. The effect of carbon vacancy on the chemical bonding is also discussed in detail. We expect that our study can provide some useful reference for further experimental research on the phonon density of states, thermodynamic properties of the plutonium monocarbide. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21371160 and 21401173).

  10. Conceptual quantum chemical analysis of bonding and noncovalent interactions in the formation of frustrated Lewis pairs.

    PubMed

    Skara, Gabriella; Pinter, Balazs; Top, Jens; Geerlings, Paul; De Proft, Frank; De Vleeschouwer, Freija

    2015-03-27

    The contributions of covalent and noncovalent interactions to the formation of classical adducts of bulky Lewis acids and bases and frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) were scrutinized by using various conceptual quantum chemical techniques. Significantly negative complexation energies were calculated for fourteen investigated Lewis pairs containing bases and acids with substituents of various sizes. A Ziegler-Rauk-type energy decomposition analysis confirmed that two types of Lewis pairs can be distinguished on the basis of the nature of the primary interactions between reactants; dative-bond formation and concomitant charge transfer from the Lewis base to the acid is the dominant and most stabilizing factor in the formation of Lewis acid-base adducts, whereas weak interactions are the main thermodynamic driving force (>50 %) for FLPs. Moreover, the ease and extent of structural deformation of the monomers appears to be a key component in the formation of the former type of Lewis pairs. A Natural Orbital for Chemical Valence (NOCV) analysis, which was used to visualize and quantify the charge transfer between the base and the acid, clearly showed the importance and lack of this type of interaction for adducts and FLPs, respectively. The Noncovalent Interaction (NCI) method revealed several kinds of weak interactions between the acid and base components, such as dispersion, π-π stacking, C-H⋅⋅⋅π interaction, weak hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding, and weak acid-base interactions, whereas the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) provided further conceptual insight into strong acid-base interactions.

  11. Enhancement of chemical stability and crystallinity in porphyrin-containing covalent organic frameworks by intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Kandambeth, Sharath; Shinde, Digambar Balaji; Panda, Manas K; Lukose, Binit; Heine, Thomas; Banerjee, Rahul

    2013-12-02

    A strong bond: A strategy based on intramolecular hydrogen-binding interactions in 2D covalent organic frameworks (COFs) is shown to improve the crystallinity, porosity, and chemical stability of the material. The concept is validated by removing the hydrogen-bonding interaction in the methoxy analog which showed a lower stability and crystallinity.

  12. Chemical methods and approaches to the regioselective formation of multiple disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Shigeru; Katayama, Hidekazu; Okumura, Masaki; Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide-bond formation plays an important role in the stabilization of the native conformation of peptides and proteins. In the case of multidisulfide-containing peptides and proteins, numerous folding intermediates are produced, including molecules that contain non-native and native disulfide bonds during in vitro folding. These intermediates can frequently be trapped covalently during folding and subsequently analyzed. The structural characterization of these kinetically trapped disulfide intermediates provides a clue to understanding the oxidative folding pathway. To investigate the folding of disulfide-containing peptides and proteins, in this unit, chemical methods are described for regulating regioselective disulfide formation (1) by using a combination of several types of thiol protecting groups, (2) by incorporating unique SeCys residues into a protein or peptide molecule, and (3) by combining with post-translational modification.

  13. Nitrogen implantation effects on the chemical bonding and hardness of boron and boron nitride coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S; Felter, T; Hayes, J; Jankowski, A F; Patterson, R; Poker, D; Stamler, T

    1999-02-08

    Boron nitride (BN) coatings are deposited by the reactive sputtering of fully dense, boron (B) targets utilizing an argon-nitrogen (Ar-N{sub 2}) reactive gas mixture. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis reveals features of chemical bonding in the B 1s photoabsorption spectrum. Hardness is measured at the film surface using nanoindentation. The BN coatings prepared at low, sputter gas pressure with substrate heating are found to have bonding characteristic of a defected hexagonal phase. The coatings are subjected to post-deposition nitrogen (N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +}) implantation at different energies and current densities. The changes in film hardness attributed to the implantation can be correlated to changes observed in the B 1s NEXAFS spectra.

  14. Biasing hydrogen bond donating host systems towards chemical warfare agent recognition.

    PubMed

    Hiscock, Jennifer R; Wells, Neil J; Ede, Jayne A; Gale, Philip A; Sambrook, Mark R

    2016-10-12

    A series of neutral ditopic and negatively charged, monotopic host molecules have been evaluated for their ability to bind chloride and dihydrogen phosphate anions, and neutral organophosphorus species dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP) and the chemical warfare agent (CWA) pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GD, soman) in organic solvent via hydrogen bonding. Urea, thiourea and boronic acid groups are shown to bind anions and neutral guests through the formation of hydrogen bonds, with the urea and thiourea groups typically exhibiting higher affinity interactions. The introduction of a negative charge on the host structure is shown to decrease anion affinity, whilst still allowing for high stability host-GD complex formation. Importantly, the affinity of the host for the neutral CWA GD is greater than for anionic guests, thus demonstrating the potential for selectivity reversal based on charge repulsion.

  15. High-Temperature Crystal Structure and Chemical Bonding in Thermoelectric Germanium Selenide (GeSe).

    PubMed

    Sist, Mattia; Gatti, Carlo; Nørby, Peter; Cenedese, Simone; Kasai, Hidetaka; Kato, Kenichi; Iversen, Bo B

    2017-05-17

    The discovery of the ultra-high thermoelectric figure of merit of 2.6 in SnSe has drawn attention to other lead-free IV-VI orthorhombic semiconductors. GeSe has been predicted to possess thermoelectric performances comparable to SnSe. Here, a complete structural study is reported of GeSe with temperature by means of high-resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. In the orthorhombic phase, the evolution of the bond distances with temperature is shown to deviate significantly with respect to SnSe. Analysis of the chemical bonding within the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules shows that GeSe is ionic with van der Waals interlayer interactions. The signature of the N shell lone pair of Ge is also evident from both the electron density Laplacian and the ELF topologies. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. LOBSTER: A tool to extract chemical bonding from plane-wave based DFT.

    PubMed

    Maintz, Stefan; Deringer, Volker L; Tchougréeff, Andrei L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-04-30

    The computer program LOBSTER (Local Orbital Basis Suite Towards Electronic-Structure Reconstruction) enables chemical-bonding analysis based on periodic plane-wave (PAW) density-functional theory (DFT) output and is applicable to a wide range of first-principles simulations in solid-state and materials chemistry. LOBSTER incorporates analytic projection routines described previously in this very journal [J. Comput. Chem. 2013, 34, 2557] and offers improved functionality. It calculates, among others, atom-projected densities of states (pDOS), projected crystal orbital Hamilton population (pCOHP) curves, and the recently introduced bond-weighted distribution function (BWDF). The software is offered free-of-charge for non-commercial research. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A constitutive model for bonded geomaterials subject to mechanical and/or chemical degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nova, R.; Castellanza, R.; Tamagnini, C.

    2003-08-01

    The mechanical behaviour of bonded geomaterials is described by means of an elastoplastic strain-hardening model. The internal variables, taking into account the history of the material, depend on the plastic strains experienced and on a conveniently defined scalar measure of damage induced by weathering and/or chemical degradation.For the sake of simplicity, it is assumed that only internal variables are affected by mechanical and chemical history of the material. Despite this simplifying assumption, it can be shown that many interesting phenomena exhibited by weathered bonded geomaterials can be successfully described. For instance, (i) the transition from brittle to ductile behaviour with increasing pressure of a calcarenite with collapsing internal structure, (ii) the complex behaviour of chalk and other calcareous materials in oedometric tests, (iii) the chemically induced variation of the stress and strain state of such kind of materials, are all phenomena that can be qualitatively reproduced. Several comparisons with experimental data show that the model can capture the observed behaviour also quantitatively.

  18. An unexpected bridge between chemical bonding indicators and electrical conductivity through the localization tensor.

    PubMed

    Pendás, Ángel Martín; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Crespo, Daniel Menéndez; Costales, Aurora; Francisco, Evelio

    2017-01-18

    While the modern theory of the insulating state shows that the conducting or insulating properties of a system can be extracted solely from the ground state properties via the so-called localization tensor (LT), no chemical reading of this important quantity has ever been offered. Here, a remarkable link between the LT and the bond orders as described by the delocalization indices (DIs) of chemical bonding theory is reported. This is achieved through a real space partition of the LT into intra- and interatomic contributions. We show that the convergence or divergence of the LT in the thermodynamic limit, which signals the insulating or conducting nature of an extended system, respectively, can be nailed down to DIs. This allows for the exploitation of traditional chemical intuition to identify essential and spectator atomic groups in determining electrical conductivity. The thermodynamic limit of the LT is controlled by the spatial decay rate of the interatomic DIs, exponential in insulators and power-law in conductors. Computational data of a few selected toy systems corroborate our results.

  19. Ab-initio Study of NMR Chemical Shifts in Hydrogen-bonded Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Mauri, Francesco; Louie, Steven G.

    1997-03-01

    We present first applications of a recently developed method to compute NMR chemical shifts of periodic systems[1]. The method is based on density functional theory in the local density approximation, and utilizes pseudopotentials and a plane-wave basis set. Using second order perturbation theory, we can compute the chemical shift tensor, which gives the shielding of an applied magnetic field. This new method is applied to two important hydrogen-bonded systems with short, strong hydrogen bonds: hexagonal ice Ih and hydrogen fluoride. For ice, we reproduce the large anisotropy of the chemical shift tensor observed in experiment[2], and find the isotropic shift to be very sensitive to the geometry of the crystal. For hydrogen fluoride, we calculate the isotropic shift between the solid and the gas phase, and find it similar to the liquid-gas phase shifts reported in experiments. *[0cm] [1] F. Mauri, B.G. Pfrommer, S.G. Louie, Phys. Rev. Lett., to be published. *[0cm] [2] A. Pines, D.J. Ruben, S. Vega, and M. Mehring, Phys. Rev. Lett. 36, 110 (1976)

  20. Bergman Clusters, Multiple Bonds, and Defect Planes: Synthetic Outcomes of Chemical Frustration in Ternary Intermetallic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadler, Amelia Beth

    Intermetallics crystallize in a variety of complex structures, many of which show unusual bonding or intriguing properties. Understanding what factors drive this structural chemistry would be a valuable step towards designing new intermetallics with specific structures or properties. One pathway towards understanding and predicting the structures of complex intermetallics is chemical frustration, a design tool which harnesses competition between incompatible bonding or packing modes to induce complexity in ternary intermetallic systems. The research outlined in this thesis focuses on developing chemical frustration through exploratory synthesis in ternary systems designed to induce frustration between the tetrahedral close packing of many intermetallics and the simple cubic packing seen for ionic salts or elemental metals. Syntheses in three systems yielded six new ternary intermetallics, four of which crystallize in novel structure types. Three were discovered in the Ca-Cu-Cd system: Ca5Cu2Cd and Ca2Cu 2Cd9, which adopt ternary variants of binary structures, and Ca10Cu2Cd27, which crystallizes in a new structure built from Bergman clusters. All three structures can be traced to electronic packing frustration induced by the similar electronegativities but different metallic radii of Cu and Cd. The Gd-Fe-C system yielded the new carbometalate Gd13Fe 10C13 and an oxycarbide derivative. These phases crystallize in structures built from Gd tricapped trigonal prisms interpenetrated by an Fe-C network. Theoretical analyses reveal that Fe-Fe and Fe-C multiple bonding is found throughout this network. A theoretical investigation of similar carbides uncovers additional metal-metal, metal-carbon, and carbon-carbon multiple bonding. This unusual bonding stabilizes the carbides by satisfying preferred electron counts for their transition metal sites. One new phase, Mg4.5Pd5Ge1.5, was found in the Mg-Pd-Ge system. Its structure is closely related to the CsCl-type structure of

  1. The use of dialogic electronic journal writing to develop students' understanding of chemical bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Sarah Collard

    The intent of this study is to examine how the implementation of a dialogic electronic journal writing environment continues the development of students' understanding of chemistry, specifically chemical bonding, through written communication between the individual students and their chemistry teacher. This study is framed within a constructivist theoretical context where students' understanding is constructed through written discussions with the educator, the students' interaction with the classroom environment, and his/her interaction with the computer environment. The research design of collective case study was employed to allow multiple perspectives and processes conveyed by the participants to be examined in the context in which they occurred while considering multiple sources of information. Data sources included electronic journal entries, classroom artifacts, and semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method, which involved coding, categorizing, and interpreting for patterns and relationships. Four cases were reported in detail. This study found that the dialogic electronic journal-writing environment was an effective venue in revealing previously undiscovered students' alternative conceptions of chemical bonding. Opportunities to actively confront and reconcile such conceptions were afforded through educator/student dialogic written interaction. The dialogic electronic journal-writing environment was also critical in the identification of gaps in students' conceptual understanding linked to improper sequencing of chemistry content. This study also found that the on-line environment provided the educator the opportunity to scaffold chemical bonding concepts to meet the needs of the students involved in the study. This study concluded that the dialogic electronic journal-writing environment positively contributed to the development of student understanding. These findings may have practical implications for teachers in

  2. Peptide Bond Synthesis by a Mechanism Involving an Enzymatic Reaction and a Subsequent Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Zhuang, Ye; Ge, Yin; Kumano, Takuto; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that an amide bond is unexpectedly formed by an acyl-CoA synthetase (which catalyzes the formation of a carbon-sulfur bond) when a suitable acid and l-cysteine are used as substrates. DltA, which is homologous to the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetase, belongs to the same superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, which includes many kinds of enzymes, including the acyl-CoA synthetases. Here, we demonstrate that DltA synthesizes not only N-(d-alanyl)-l-cysteine (a dipeptide) but also various oligopeptides. We propose that this enzyme catalyzes peptide synthesis by the following unprecedented mechanism: (i) the formation of S-acyl-l-cysteine as an intermediate via its "enzymatic activity" and (ii) subsequent "chemical" S → N acyl transfer in the intermediate, resulting in peptide formation. Step ii is identical to the corresponding reaction in native chemical ligation, a method of chemical peptide synthesis, whereas step i is not. To the best of our knowledge, our discovery of this peptide synthesis mechanism involving an enzymatic reaction and a subsequent chemical reaction is the first such one to be reported. This new process yields peptides without the use of a thioesterified fragment, which is required in native chemical ligation. Together with these findings, the same mechanism-dependent formation of N-acyl compounds by other members of the above-mentioned superfamily demonstrated that all members most likely form peptide/amide compounds by using this novel mechanism. Each member enzyme acts on a specific substrate; thus, not only the corresponding peptides but also new types of amide compounds can be formed. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. ELECTRONIC AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF PD IN BIMETALLIC SYSTEMS: HOW MUCH DO WE KNOW ABOUT HETERONUCLEAR METAL-METAL BONDING?

    SciTech Connect

    RODRIGUEZ,J.A.

    2001-09-27

    The experimental and theoretical studies described above illustrate the complex nature of the heteronuclear metal-metal bond. In many cases, bimetallic bonding induces a significant redistribution of charge around the bonded metals. This redistribution of charge is usually linked to the strength of the bimetallic bond, affects the position of the core and valence levels of the metals, and can determine the chemical reactivity of the system under study. New concepts are emerging [22,23,34,36] and eventually the coupling of experiment and theory can be useful for designing more efficient bimetallic catalysts [98,106,107].

  4. An Effective Hamiltonian Molecular Orbital-Valence Bond (MOVB) Approach for Chemical Reactions Applied to the Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction of Hydrosulfide Ion and Chloromethane.

    PubMed

    Song, Lingchun; Mo, Yirong; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    An effective Hamiltonian mixed molecular orbital and valence bond (EH-MOVB) method is described to obtain an accurate potential energy surface for chemical reactions. Building upon previous results on the construction of diabatic and adiabatic potential surfaces using ab initio MOVB theory, we introduce a diabatic-coupling scaling factor to uniformly scale the ab initio off-diagonal matrix element H(12) such that the computed energy of reaction from the EH-MOVB method is in agreement with the target value. The scaling factor is very close to unity, resulting in minimal alteration of the potential energy surface of the original MOVB model. Furthermore, the relative energy between the reactant and product diabatic states in the EH-MOVB method can be improved to match the experimental energy of reaction. A key ingredient in the EH-MOVB theory is that the off-diagonal matrix elements are functions of all degrees of freedom of the system and the overlap matrix is explicitly evaluated. The EH-MOVB method has been applied to the nucleophilic substitution reaction between hydrosulfide and chloromethane to illustrate the methodology and the results were matched to reproduce the results from ab initio valence bond self-consistent valence bond (VBSCF) calculations. The diabatic coupling (the off-diagonal matrix element in the generalized secular equation) has small variations along the minimum energy reaction path in the EH-MOVB model, whereas it shows a maximum value at the transition state and has nearly zero values in the regions of the ion-dipole complexes from VBSCF calculations. The difference in the diabatic coupling stabilization is attributed to the large overlap integral in the computationally efficient MOVB method.

  5. A tutorial for understanding chemical reactivity through the valence bond approach.

    PubMed

    Usharani, Dandamudi; Lai, Wenzhen; Li, Chunsen; Chen, Hui; Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason

    2014-07-21

    This is a tutorial on the usage of valence bond (VB) diagrams for understanding chemical reactivity in general, and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactivity in particular. The tutorial instructs the reader how to construct the VB diagrams and how to estimate HAT barriers from raw data, starting with the simplest reaction H + H2 and going all the way to HAT in the enzyme cytochrome P450. Other reactions are treated as well, and some unifying principles are outlined. The tutorial projects the unity of reactivity treatments, following Coulson's dictum "give me insight, not numbers", albeit with its modern twist: giving numbers and insight.

  6. Effect of various chemicals on the bond strength of acrylic tooth and denture base -An Invitro comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, V Pridhvi; Premalatha, Averneni; Babu, P Jithendra; Raju, D Srinivasa; Kumar, M Praveen; Rao, D Bheemalingeswara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Debonding of acrylic teeth from the denture base is a common problem. Certain clinical conditions like ridge prominence leads to excess trimming of acrylic teeth and base, resulting in a weak interface. The denture base polymer debonds adhesively in the region of the highly cross –linked matrix of the teeth. To compare the effect of different chemical surface treatments on the bond between cross-linked acrylic teeth and different types of denture base material. Materials & Methods: A total of 180 wax specimens were fabricated and divided into 3 groups: Heat-cure, high impact heat-cure, flexible denture base material bonded to acrylic teeth. Each group was further subdivided into 6 subgroups with 10 specimens each according to the surface treatment ofthe ridge lap area: control, monomer, acetone 99%, chloroform 99%, acrylic adhesive cyanoacrylate, ethyl acetate 99%. After processing, specimens were tested for bond strength using a universal testing machine. The resulting bond strengths were recorded, statistically analyzed and compared. Results: Among all the 3types of denture base resins, highimpact heat-cure denture base resin gave highest bond strength. There was no bonding of teeth with flexible denture base material. Chemical surface treatment of acrylic teeth with ethyl acetate gave highest bond strength followed by control, chloroform, acetone and cyanoacrylate groups. Conclusion: Among all the 3types of denture base materials, high-impact heat-cure denture base resin gave highest bond strength with ethyl acetate surface treatment. Simple and quick tooth chemical surface treatment with ethylacetate could be an effective option in decreasing bonding failures and also avoid repeated denture repairs improving patient satisfaction. How to cite the article: Krishna VP, Premalatha A, Babu PJ, Raju DS, Kumar MP, Rao DB. Effect of various chemicals on the bond strength of acrylic tooth and denture base -An In-vitro comparative study. J Int Oral Health

  7. Cleavage enhancement of specific chemical bonds in DNA by cisplatin radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fangxing; Luo, Xinglan; Fu, Xianzhi; Zheng, Yi

    2013-05-02

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is harnessed as an in situ efficient characterization technique for monitoring chemical bond transformation in DNA and cisplatin-DNA complexes under synergic X-ray irradiation. By analyzing the variation of relative peak area of core elements of DNA as a function of irradiation time, we find that the most vulnerable scission sites in DNA are those containing phosphate and glycosidic bonds. Compared to DNA, the effective rate constants of the corresponding phosphodiester and glycosidic bond cleavages for cisplatin-DNA complexes are 1.8 and 1.9 folds larger. These damages and their enhancements are similar to those induced by low energy electrons (LEE). Consistently, the magnitude of the secondary electron distribution produced by the X-rays on the cisplatin-DNA complexes is considerably increased compared to that of pristine DNA. The data suggest that DNA radiosensization by cisplatin results not only from the sensitization of DNA to the action of LEE, but also from an increase the production of LEE at the site of binding of the cisplatin. The results provide new insights into the mechanisms of cisplatin-induced sensitization of DNA under X-ray irradiation, which could be helpful in the design of new cisplatin-based antitumor drugs.

  8. Development of a method to accurately calculate the Dpb and quickly predict the strength of a chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xia; Zhao, Dong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2013-02-01

    A new approach to characterize and measure bond strength has been developed. First, we propose a method to accurately calculate the potential acting on an electron in a molecule (PAEM) at the saddle point along a chemical bond in situ, denoted by Dpb. Then, a direct method to quickly evaluate bond strength is established. We choose some familiar molecules as models for benchmarking this method. As a practical application, the Dpb of base pairs in DNA along C-H and N-H bonds are obtained for the first time. All results show that C7-H of A-T and C8-H of G-C are the relatively weak bonds that are the injured positions in DNA damage. The significance of this work is twofold: (i) A method is developed to calculate Dpb of various sizable molecules in situ quickly and accurately; (ii) This work demonstrates the feasibility to quickly predict the bond strength in macromolecules.

  9. The influence of chemical bonding configuration on atomic identification by force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Welker, Joachim; Weymouth, Alfred John; Giessibl, Franz J

    2013-08-27

    The force between two atoms depends not only on their chemical species and distance, but also on the configuration of their chemical bonds to other atoms. This strongly affects atomic force spectroscopy, in which the force between the tip of an atomic force microscope and a sample is measured as a function of distance. We show that the short-range forces between tip and sample atoms depend strongly on the configuration of the tip, to the point of preventing atom identification with a poorly defined tip. Our solution is to control the tip apex before using it for spectroscopy. We demonstrate a method by which a CO molecule on Cu can be used to characterize the tip. In combination with gentle pokes, this can be used to engineer a specific tip apex. This CO Front atom Identification (COFI) method allows us to use a well-defined tip to conduct force spectroscopy.

  10. A chemical-bond approach to doping, compensation and photo-induced degradation in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Gerhard; Kalbitzer, S.; Mannsperger, H.

    A model for the generalization of the doping theories of Street and Robertson is proposed. The basic idea is that during deposition of an Si:H film, a chemical equilibrium is established, relating the density of dangling-bond defects near mid-gap to the densities of electrons and holes in the conduction and valence band states. The appropriate chemical reaction formalism was developed. It is shown that the model allows doping, compensation, and photo-induced degradation to be treated within a single and unifying approach. The model can easily explain the existence of a low defect density in fully compensated material. By reducing the model to the intrinsic reactions (I-III), the bias-induced effects in p-i-n junctions and the photo-induced degradation in Si:H films are explained.

  11. Chemical bonding in equiatomic cerium intermetallics - The case of CeMgSn, CePdSn, and CeMgPb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Samir F.; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    The electronic and magnetic structures and the properties of chemical bonding in isopointal CeMgSn and CePdSn (both phases belong to the family of TiNiSi related intermetallics, space group Pnma) and CeMgPb belonging to the family of CeScSi intermetallics, space group I4/mmm, have been investigated within the density functional theory (DFT). The charge analyses indicate negatively charged tin and lead leading to assign the compounds as stannides and plumbides, as also illustrated by the mapping of the electron localization function ELF. Calculations within spin-degenerate non-magnetic spin-polarized ferro- (SP-F) and SP-antiferromagnetic configurations led to assign a major role of Ce 4f states in the onset of ordered moments within SP-AF ground states from energy differences. Chemical bonding analyses from crystal orbital overlap populations revealed the strongest interactions for Ce-Sn in CeMgSn, Ce-Pb in CeMgPb, and Ce-Pd in CePdSn.

  12. Two functions of the density matrix and their relation to the chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmider, Hartmut L.; Becke, Axel D.

    2002-02-01

    We examine and compare two previously introduced functions of the one-particle density matrix that are suitable to represent its off-diagonal structure in a condensed form and that have illustrative connections to the nature of the chemical bond. One of them, the Localized-Orbital Locator (LOL) [J. Molec. Struct. (THEOCHEM) 527, 51 (2000)], is based only on the noninteracting kinetic-energy density τ and the charge density ρ at a point, and gives an intuitive measure of the relative speed of electrons in its vicinity. Alternatively, LOL focuses on regions that are dominated by single localized orbitals. The other one, the Parity Function P [J. Chem. Phys. 105, 11134 (1996)], is a section through the Wigner phase-space function at zero momentum, and contains information about the phase of the interference of atomiclike orbital contributions from bound centers. In this paper, we discuss the way in which these functions condense information in the density matrix, and illustrate on a variety of examples of unusual chemical bonds how they can help to understand the nature of "covalence."

  13. Stabilization of hazardous ash waste with newberyite-rich chemically bonded magnesium phosphate ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Jeong, S.Y.

    1995-11-01

    A novel newberyite-rich magnesium-phosphate ceramic, intended for the stabilization of the US Department of Energy`s low-level mixed-waste streams, has been developed by an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and a phosphoric acid solution. The reaction slurry, formed at room temperature, sets rapidly and forms a lightweight hard ceramic with low open porosity and a high compression strength of {approx} 6,200 psi. It is a composite of stable mineral phases of newberyite, luenebergite, and residual Mg oxide. Using this matrix, the authors developed superior waste forms for a surrogate ash waste stream. The final waste form is a low-permeability structural-quality ceramic, in which hazardous contaminants are chemically fixed and physically encapsulated. The compression strength of the waste form is an order of magnitude higher than the land disposal requirement, even at high waste loading. The high compression strength is attributed to stronger bonds in the waste form that result from participation of ash waste in the setting reactions. Long-term leaching studies show that the waste form is stable in an aqueous environment. The chemically bonded phosphate ceramic approach in this study may be a simple, inexpensive, and efficient method for fabricating high-performance waste forms either for stabilizing waste streams or for developing value-added construction materials from high-volume benign waste streams.

  14. Effect of surface moisture on chemically bonded phosphor for thermographic phosphor thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tao; Kim, Dong; Kim, Mirae; Liu, Ying Zheng; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the effect of surface moisture on the calibration lifetime in chemically bonded phosphor paint preparation. Mg4FGeO6:Mn was used as a sensor material, which was excited by a pulsed UV LED. A high-speed camera with a frequency of 8000 Hz was used to conduct phosphor thermometry. Five samples with different degrees of surface moisture were selected during the preparation process, and each sample was calibrated 40 times at room temperature. A conventional post-processing method was used to acquire the phosphorescent lifetime for different samples with a 4  ×  4-pixel interrogation window. The measurement error and paint uniformity were also studied. The results showed that there was no obvious phosphorescence boundary between the wet parts and dry parts of phosphor paint. The lifetime increased by about 0.0345% per hour during the preparation process, showing the degree of surface moisture had almost no influence on the lifetime measurement. The lifetime changed only after annealing treatment. There was also no effect on the measurement error and uniformity. These results provide a reference for developing a real-time measurement method using thermographic phosphor thermometry. This study also provides a feasible basis for chemically bonded phosphor thermometry applications in humid and low-temperature environments.

  15. Experimental evidence of chemical components in the bonding of helium and neon with neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, David; Bartocci, Alessio; Grandinetti, Felice; Falcinelli, Stefano; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-04-13

    The complexes of helium and neon with gaseous neutral molecules are generally perceived to be van der Waals adducts held together by physical (non-covalent) forces, owing to the combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. Molecular beam experiments confirm that this is the case for He-CF4 , Ne-CF4 adducts, but revealed that the interaction of He and Ne with CCl4 features an appreciable contribution of chemical components that arise from the anisotropy of the electron density of CCl4 that enhances a charge transfer from Ng (Ng=He, Ne). These findings furnish a novel assay of the bonding capabilities of helium and neon, and invite to revisit the neutral complexes of these elements as systems of chemical relevance. The CCl4 -Ng are also peculiar examples of halogen bonds, a group of interactions of major current concern. Finally, this investigation is a prelude to the development of semi-empirical models for force fields aimed to the unified description of static and dynamical properties of systems of comparable or higher complexity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Chemical bonding and the equilibrium composition of Grignard reagents in ethereal solutions.

    PubMed

    Henriques, André M; Barbosa, André G H

    2011-11-10

    A thorough analysis of the electronic structure and thermodynamic aspects of Grignard reagents and its associated equilibrium composition in ethereal solutions is performed. Considering methylmagnesium halides containing fluorine, chlorine, and bromine, we studied the neutral, charged, and radical species associated with their chemical equilibrium in solution. The ethereal solvents considered, tetrahydrofuran (THF) and ethyl ether (Et(2)O), were modeled using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) and also by explicit coordination to the Mg atoms in a cluster. The chemical bonding of the species that constitute the Grignard reagent is analyzed in detail with generalized valence bond (GVB) wave functions. Equilibrium constants were calculated with the DFT/M06 functional and GVB wave functions, yielding similar results. According to our calculations and existing kinetic and electrochemical evidence, the species R(•), R(-), (•)MgX, and RMgX(2)(-) must be present in low concentration in the equilibrium. We conclude that depending on the halogen, a different route must be followed to produce the relevant equilibrium species in each case. Chloride and bromide must preferably follow a "radical-based" pathway, and fluoride must follow a "carbanionic-based" pathway. These different mechanisms are contrasted against the available experimental results and are proven to be consistent with the existing thermodynamic data on the Grignard reagent equilibria.

  17. Chemical bonding and humidity sensing properties of amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) by acetylene gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Siti Aisyah Abd; Purhanudin, Noorain; Awang, Rozidawati

    2017-05-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films were deposited by radio frequency plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) using a fixed mixture of acetylene (C2H2) at 20 sccm and nitrogen (N2) gases at 50 sccm. The films were deposited at different RF power of 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 W. The deposition pressure, deposition time and substrate temperature were kept constant at 0.8 mbar, 30 minutes and 100°C, respectively. The chemical bonding of the a-CNx thin films was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and its sensing properties was determined using a home built humidity sensor system. The increase of RF powers leads to an increment of formation of double (C=N) and triple (C≡N) bonds as compared to a-CNx deposited using methane (CH4) or ethane (C2H6) gas. This is due to a higher ratio of C to H atoms in C2H2. The humidity sensing performance show the sensitivity of the films is the highest at low deposition power in changes of relative humidity (%RH). The a-CNx thin film show good repeatability and high sensitivity as a humidity sensing materials which prepared at low RF power.

  18. Chemically bonded phosphorus/graphene hybrid as a high performance anode for sodium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiangxuan; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail L; Hu, Shi; Yi, Ran; Tang, Duihai; Walter, Timothy; Regula, Michael; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Xiaolin; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Wang, Donghai

    2014-11-12

    Room temperature sodium-ion batteries are of great interest for high-energy-density energy storage systems because of low-cost and natural abundance of sodium. Here, we report a novel phosphorus/graphene nanosheet hybrid as a high performance anode for sodium-ion batteries through facile ball milling of red phosphorus and graphene stacks. The graphene stacks are mechanically exfoliated to nanosheets that chemically bond with the surfaces of phosphorus particles. This chemical bonding can facilitate robust and intimate contact between phosphorus and graphene nanosheets, and the graphene at the particle surfaces can help maintain electrical contact and stabilize the solid electrolyte interphase upon the large volume change of phosphorus during cycling. As a result, the phosphorus/graphene nanosheet hybrid nanostructured anode delivers a high reversible capacity of 2077 mAh/g with excellent cycling stability (1700 mAh/g after 60 cycles) and high Coulombic efficiency (>98%). This simple synthesis approach and unique nanostructure can potentially be applied to other phosphorus-based alloy anode materials for sodium-ion batteries.

  19. Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Yasuhiro; Sun, Yun; Kuzum, Duygu; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2008-10-31

    Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

  20. Load and Time Dependence of Interfacial Chemical Bond-Induced Friction at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kaiwen; Gosvami, Nitya N.; Goldsby, David L.; Liu, Yun; Szlufarska, Izabela; Carpick, Robert W.

    2017-02-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are widely used empirical relationships that describe the macroscale frictional behavior of a broad range of materials, including rocks found in the seismogenic zone of Earth's crust. A fundamental aspect of the RSF laws is frictional "aging," where friction increases with the time of stationary contact due to asperity creep and/or interfacial strengthening. Recent atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments and simulations found that nanoscale silica contacts exhibit aging due to the progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds. The role of normal load (and, thus, normal stress) on this interfacial chemical bond-induced (ICBI) friction is predicted to be significant but has not been examined experimentally. Here, we show using AFM that, for nanoscale ICBI friction of silica-silica interfaces, aging (the difference between the maximum static friction and the kinetic friction) increases approximately linearly with the product of the normal load and the log of the hold time. This behavior is attributed to the approximately linear dependence of the contact area on the load in the positive load regime before significant wear occurs, as inferred from sliding friction measurements. This implies that the average pressure, and thus the average bond formation rate, is load independent within the accessible load range. We also consider a more accurate nonlinear model for the contact area, from which we extract the activation volume and the average stress-free energy barrier to the aging process. Our work provides an approach for studying the load and time dependence of contact aging at the nanoscale and further establishes RSF laws for nanoscale asperity contacts.

  1. Electronic structure and anisotropic chemical bonding in TiNF from ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Matar, Samir F.

    2012-01-15

    Accounting for disorder in anatase titanium nitride fluoride TiNF is done through atoms re-distributions based on geometry optimizations using ultra soft pseudo potentials within density functional theory DFT. The fully geometry relaxed structures are found to keep the body centering of anatase (I4{sub 1}/amd No. 141). The new structural setups are identified with space groups I-4m2 No. 119 and Imm2 No. 44 which obey the 'group to subgroup' relationships with respect to anatase. In the ground state Imm2 structure identified from energy differences, TiNF is found semi-conducting with similar density of states features to anatase TiO{sub 2} and a chemical bonding differentiated between covalent like Ti-N versus ionic like Ti-F. Inter-anion N-F bonding is also identified. - Graphical Abstract: The geometry optimized ground state anatase derived TiNF structure with arrangement of open faceted TiN3F3 distorted octahedra. The insert shows the arrangement of octahedra in anatase TiO{sub 2}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Original approach of TiNF structure for addressing the electronic band structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Based on anatase, two different ordering scheme models with geometry optimization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New structures obeying the group{yields}subgroup relationships with Imm2 ground state from energy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the ground state TiNF is found semi-conducting with similar density of states to anatase TiO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical bonding differentiated between covalent like Ti-N and ionic Ti-F.

  2. A cluster-based strategy for assessing the overlap between large chemical libraries and its application to a recent acquisition.

    PubMed

    Engels, Michael F M; Gibbs, Alan C; Jaeger, Edward P; Verbinnen, Danny; Lobanov, Victor S; Agrafiotis, Dimitris K

    2006-01-01

    We report on the structural comparison of the corporate collections of Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development (JNJPRD) and 3-Dimensional Pharmaceuticals (3DP), performed in the context of the recent acquisition of 3DP by JNJPRD. The main objective of the study was to assess the druglikeness of the 3DP library and the extent to which it enriched the chemical diversity of the JNJPRD corporate collection. The two databases, at the time of acquisition, collectively contained more than 1.1 million compounds with a clearly defined structural description. The analysis was based on a clustering approach and aimed at providing an intuitive quantitative estimate and visual representation of this enrichment. A novel hierarchical clustering algorithm called divisive k-means was employed in combination with Kelley's cluster-level selection method to partition the combined data set into clusters, and the diversity contribution of each library was evaluated as a function of the relative occupancy of these clusters. Typical 3DP chemotypes enriching the diversity of the JNJPRD collection were catalogued and visualized using a modified maximum common substructure algorithm. The joint collection of JNJPRD and 3DP compounds was also compared to other databases of known medicinally active or druglike compounds. The potential of the methodology for the analysis of very large chemical databases is discussed.

  3. A numerical method to compute derivatives of functions of large complex matrices and its application to the overlap Dirac operator at finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhr, Matthias; Buividovich, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    We present a method for the numerical calculation of derivatives of functions of general complex matrices. The method can be used in combination with any algorithm that evaluates or approximates the desired matrix function, in particular with implicit Krylov-Ritz-type approximations. An important use case for the method is the evaluation of the overlap Dirac operator in lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at finite chemical potential, which requires the application of the sign function of a non-Hermitian matrix to some source vector. While the sign function of non-Hermitian matrices in practice cannot be efficiently approximated with source-independent polynomials or rational functions, sufficiently good approximating polynomials can still be constructed for each particular source vector. Our method allows for an efficient calculation of the derivatives of such implicit approximations with respect to the gauge field or other external parameters, which is necessary for the calculation of conserved lattice currents or the fermionic force in Hybrid Monte-Carlo or Langevin simulations. We also give an explicit deflation prescription for the case when one knows several eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrix being the argument of the differentiated function. We test the method for the two-sided Lanczos approximation of the finite-density overlap Dirac operator on realistic SU(3) gauge field configurations on lattices with sizes as large as 14 ×143 and 6 ×183.

  4. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  5. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation and sandblasting treatment on bond strengths between polyamide and chemical-cured resin.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yuya; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Kobayashi, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation and sandblasting treatment on the shear bond strength between polyamide and chemical-cured resin. Three types of commercial polyamides were treated using UV irradiation, sandblasting treatment, and a combining sandblasting and UV irradiation. The shear bond strength was measured and analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Comparing shear bond strengths without surface treatment, from 4.1 to 5.7 MPa, the UV irradiation significantly increased the shear bond strengths except for Valplast, whose shear bond strengths ranged from 5.2 to 9.3 MPa. The sandblasting treatment also significantly increased the shear bond strengths (8.0 to 11.4 MPa). The combining sandblasting and UV irradiation significantly increased the shear bond strengths (15.2 to 18.3 MPa) comparing without surface treatment. This combined treatment was considered the most effective at improving the shear bond strength between polyamide and chemical-cured resin.

  6. Coupling epitaxy, chemical bonding, and work function at the local scale in transition metal-supported graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Caffio, Marco; Bromley, Catherine; Früchtl, Herbert; Schaub, Renald

    2010-10-26

    Resonance tunneling spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations are employed to explore local variations in the electronic surface potential of a single graphene layer grown on Rh(111). A work function modulation of 220 meV is experimentally measured, indicating that the chemical bonding strength varies significantly across the supercell of the Moiré pattern formed when graphene is bonded to Rh(111). In combination with high-resolution images, which provide precise knowledge of the local atomic registry at the carbon-metal interface, we identify experimentally, and confirm theoretically, the atomic configuration of maximum chemical bonding to the substrate. Our observations are at odds with reported trends for other transition metal substrates. We explain why this is the case by considering the various factors that contribute to the bonding at the graphene/metal interface.

  7. Simultaneous determination of interfacial molarities of amide bonds, carboxylate groups, and water by chemical trapping in micelles of amphiphiles containing peptide bond models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Romsted, Laurence S; Zhuang, Lanzhen; de Jong, Sander

    2013-01-15

    Chemical trapping is a powerful approach for obtaining experimental estimates of interfacial molarities of weakly basic nucleophiles in the interfacial regions of amphiphile aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that the chemical probe 4-hexadecyl-2,6-dimethylbenzenediazonium ion (16-ArN(2)(+)) reacts competitively with interfacial water, with the amide carbonyl followed by cleavage of the headgroups from the tail at the amide oxygen, and with the terminal carboxylate groups in micelles of two N-acyl amino-acid amphiphiles, sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate (SLS) and sodium N-lauroylglycinate (SLG), simple peptide bond model amphiphiles. Interfacial molarities (in moles per liter of interfacial volume) of these three groups were obtained from product yields, assuming that selectivity toward a particular nucleophile compared to water is the same in an aqueous reference solution and in the interfacial region. Interfacial carboxylate group molarities are ~1.5 M in both SLS and SLG micelles, but the concentration of the amide carbonyl for SLS micelles is ~4.6-5 times less (ca. 0.7 M) than that of SLG micelles (~3 M). The proton on the secondary N of SLG helps solubilize the amide bond in the aqueous region, but the methyl on the tertiary N of SLS helps solubilize the amide bond in the micellar core, reducing its reaction with 16-ArN(2)(+). Application of chemical trapping to proteins in membrane mimetic interfaces should provide insight into the topology of the protein within the interface because trapping of the amide carbonyl and cleavage at the C-N bond occurs only within the interface, and fragment characterization marks those peptide bonds located within the interface.

  8. Halogen-enriched fragment libraries as chemical probes for harnessing halogen bonding in fragment-based lead discovery.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Markus O; Lange, Andreas; Wilcken, Rainer; Cieslik, Markus B; Exner, Thomas E; Joerger, Andreas C; Koch, Pierre; Boeckler, Frank M

    2014-04-01

    Halogen bonding has recently experienced a renaissance, gaining increased recognition as a useful molecular interaction in the life sciences. Halogen bonds are favorable, fairly directional interactions between an electropositive region on the halogen (the σ-hole) and a number of different nucleophilic interaction partners. Some aspects of halogen bonding are not yet understood well enough to take full advantage of its potential in drug discovery. We describe and present the concept of halogen-enriched fragment libraries. These libraries consist of unique chemical probes, facilitating the identification of favorable halogen bonds by sharing the advantages of classical fragment-based screening. Besides providing insights into the nature and applicability of halogen bonding, halogen-enriched fragment libraries provide smart starting points for hit-to-lead evolution.

  9. Theory of chemical bonds in metalloenzymes IV: Hybrid-DFT study of Rieske-type [2Fe bond 2S] clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Mitsuo; Koizumi, Kenichi; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    The Rieske-type [2Fe bond 2S] cores of electron-transfer (ET) proteins in the mitochondrial respiratory chain have unusual properties, such as redox potentials and spectroscopy. In this study, part IV of a series, the inherent molecular structures and characteristic electronic structures of the Rieske-type [2Fe bond 2S] clusters are investigated using broken-symmetry hybrid density functional theory (BS-HDFT). Geometry optimizations for the oxidized and reduced states were performed and their characteristic vibrational modes are assigned. Magnetic properties are investigated using model Hamiltonians to describe the electron delocalization and the unsymmetric property. The parameters of the model Hamiltonian, such as exchange coupling J, valence delocalization B, and potential energy difference ?, are evaluated from the BS-HDFT calculations. The valence localization and excitation energy (?E) of the Rieske-type [2Fe bond 2S] cluster are discussed. The chemical bond nature is characterized by chemical indices from natural orbital analysis. Our theoretical results are reasonably consistent with experimental results.

  10. Investigation of 1H NMR chemical shifts of organic dye with hydrogen bonds and ring currents.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Soo; Won, Yong Sun; Lee, Woojin; Kim, Jae Hong

    2011-04-07

    The (1)H NMR chemical shifts were theoretically computed for the organic dyes 2-(2,6-dimethyl-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-malononitrile (1), cyano-(2,6-dimethyl-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-acetic acid methyl ester (2), 2-(2,6-bis(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-malononitrile (3), and methyl 2-(2,6-bis(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-2-cyanoacetate (4) at the GIAO/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Moreover, the intramolecular rotational barriers of the molecules were calculated to evaluate the internal flexibility with respect to the torsional degrees of freedom, and the nuclear-independent chemical shifts (NICS) were employed to analyze the ring currents. The difference was explained in terms of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and ring currents of the molecules. The (1)H NMR spectra were reproduced by experiments for the comparison with computationally constructed data. Our results suggest a good guideline in interpreting (1)H NMR chemical shifts using computational methods and furthermore a reliable perspective for designing molecular structures.

  11. New chemical insights using weakly supported voltammetry: the reductive cleavage of Aryl-Br bonds is reversible.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijun; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G

    2012-10-22

    Cyclic voltammetry carried out at a wide range of supporting electrolyte concentrations and compositions can elucidate additional kinetic and mechanistic details of the electrochemical reduction of aryl halides. The cleavage of the C-Br bond is reversible, driven by H abstraction and the second electron transfer. This is a new chemical insight, as the cleavage of such bonds has usually been regarded as irreversible.

  12. Comparison of Marginal Gap and Microleakage in Copy-Milled and Cad-Milled Zirconia Copings Bonded Using Light Cure and Chemical Cure Resin Bonding Systems.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Manoj; Rajalakshmi, S; Krishna Prasad, D

    2014-12-01

    This in vitro study assessed the marginal gap and marginal microleakage in zirconia copings fabricated using two computer aided techniques- CAD milling and Copy milling and cemented to respective tooth preparations using two resin bonding systems, light cure and self-cure resin bonding systems. 32 extracted premolars were prepared to receive zirconia copings fabricated using CAD/CAM and Copy milling techniques. Once the copings were fabricated, the samples were evaluated for marginal fit prior to cementation through microscopic observation. Evaluation of marginal gap was done again after cementation, in order to incorporate the influence of the resin bonding system on the marginal microgap. The specimens were evaluated under the stereomicroscope for micro-leakage using commercial software. A comparative statistical analysis was done following data collection using Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon test and chi-square test. The data collected regarding marginal gap was well within 120 µ, which is in accordance with previous studies. However, Copy milled specimens showed statistically lesser marginal gap when compared to CAD milled specimens. While comparing microleakage, it was observed that the microleakage in Copy milled specimens bonded with light cure resin bonded cement was statistically lesser than that of specimens cemented with chemical cure resin cement.(P = 0.003). This in vitro study concluded that Copy milling technique fabricated zirconia restorations with lesser marginal gap and microleakage score in comparison to CAD milled samples. Light cure resin bonding system also proved to be more effective option compared to self cure resin bonding systems. However, the limitations of this study should be taken into concern and further research should be aimed at a larger sample size to validate the results.

  13. Theoretical Prediction of Hydrogen-Bond Basicity pKBHX Using Quantum Chemical Topology Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding plays an important role in the interaction of biological molecules and their local environment. Hydrogen-bond strengths have been described in terms of basicities by several different scales. The pKBHX scale has been developed with the interests of medicinal chemists in mind. The scale uses equilibrium constants of acid···base complexes to describe basicity and is therefore linked to Gibbs free energy. Site specific data for polyfunctional bases are also available. The pKBHX scale applies to all hydrogen-bond donors (HBDs) where the HBD functional group is either OH, NH, or NH+. It has been found that pKBHX can be described in terms of a descriptor defined by quantum chemical topology, ΔE(H), which is the change in atomic energy of the hydrogen atom upon complexation. Essentially the computed energy of the HBD hydrogen atom correlates with a set of 41 HBAs for five common HBDs, water (r2 = 0.96), methanol (r2 = 0.95), 4-fluorophenol (r2 = 0.91), serine (r2 = 0.93), and methylamine (r2 = 0.97). The connection between experiment and computation was strengthened with the finding that there is no relationship between ΔE(H) and pKBHX when hydrogen fluoride was used as the HBD. Using the methanol model, pKBHX predictions were made for an external set of bases yielding r2 = 0.90. Furthermore, the basicities of polyfunctional bases correlate with ΔE(H), giving r2 = 0.93. This model is promising for the future of computation in fragment-based drug design. Not only has a model been established that links computation to experiment, but the model may also be extrapolated to predict external experimental pKBHX values. PMID:24460383

  14. Theoretical prediction of hydrogen-bond basicity pKBHX using quantum chemical topology descriptors.

    PubMed

    Green, Anthony J; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-02-24

    Hydrogen bonding plays an important role in the interaction of biological molecules and their local environment. Hydrogen-bond strengths have been described in terms of basicities by several different scales. The pKBHX scale has been developed with the interests of medicinal chemists in mind. The scale uses equilibrium constants of acid···base complexes to describe basicity and is therefore linked to Gibbs free energy. Site specific data for polyfunctional bases are also available. The pKBHX scale applies to all hydrogen-bond donors (HBDs) where the HBD functional group is either OH, NH, or NH+. It has been found that pKBHX can be described in terms of a descriptor defined by quantum chemical topology, ΔE(H), which is the change in atomic energy of the hydrogen atom upon complexation. Essentially the computed energy of the HBD hydrogen atom correlates with a set of 41 HBAs for five common HBDs, water (r2=0.96), methanol (r2=0.95), 4-fluorophenol (r2=0.91), serine (r2=0.93), and methylamine (r2=0.97). The connection between experiment and computation was strengthened with the finding that there is no relationship between ΔE(H) and pKBHX when hydrogen fluoride was used as the HBD. Using the methanol model, pKBHX predictions were made for an external set of bases yielding r2=0.90. Furthermore, the basicities of polyfunctional bases correlate with ΔE(H), giving r2=0.93. This model is promising for the future of computation in fragment-based drug design. Not only has a model been established that links computation to experiment, but the model may also be extrapolated to predict external experimental pKBHX values.

  15. Effects of hydrogen bonding on amide-proton chemical shift anisotropy in a proline-containing model peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichumani, Kumar; George, Gijo; Hebbar, Sankeerth; Chatterjee, Bhaswati; Raghothama, Srinivasarao

    2015-05-01

    Longitudinal relaxation due to cross-correlation between dipolar (1HN-1Hα) and amide-proton chemical shift anisotropy (1HN CSA) has been measured in a model tripeptide Piv-LPro-LPro-LPhe-OMe. The peptide bond across diproline segment is known to undergo cis/trans isomerization and only in the cis form does the lone Phe amide-proton become involved in intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The strength of the cross correlated relaxation interference is found to be significantly different between cis and trans forms, and this difference is shown as an influence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding on the amide-proton CSA.

  16. Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion Batteries: A XANES Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jigang; Hu, Yongfeng; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Chong M.; Zuin, Lucia

    2014-03-11

    The chemical bonding nature and its evolution upon electrochemical cycling in amorphous Si coated-carbon nanotube (Si-CNT) anode has been investigated using comprehensive X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) at Si L- and K-edges along with C and O K-edges. The Si nanolayer on CNT is found to be anchored to CNT via Si-O-C bonding. This bond weakens upon electrochemical cycling accompanied with generation of Li2CO3 on the surface of Si-CNT. Those findings are crucial in designing further improved Si-C composite anode for lithium ion battery.

  17. Four-bond deuterium isotope effects on the chemical shifts of amide nitrogens in proteins.

    PubMed

    Tugarinov, Vitali

    2013-11-01

    An approach towards precision NMR measurements of four-bond deuterium isotope effects on the chemical shifts of backbone amide nitrogen nuclei in proteins is described. Three types of four-bond (15) N deuterium isotope effects are distinguished depending on the site of proton-to-deuterium substitution: (4)ΔN(N(i-1)D), (4)ΔN(N(i+1)D) and (4)ΔN(Cβ,(i-1)D). All the three types of isotope shifts are quantified in the (partially) deuterated protein ubiquitin. The (4)ΔN(N(i+1)D) and (4)ΔN(C(β,i-1)D) effects are by far the largest in magnitude and vary between 16 and 75 ppb and -18 and 46 ppb, respectively. A semi-quantitative correlation between experimental (4)ΔN(N(i+1)D) and (4)ΔN(C(β,i-1)D) values and the distances between nitrogen nuclei and the sites of (1)H-to-D substitution is noted. The largest isotope shifts in both cases correspond to the shortest inter-nuclear distances. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Charge distribution and chemical bonding in B-O complexes in Cz-Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yuliang; Caliste, Damien; Pochet, Pascal

    2013-10-01

    Density functional calculations based on wavelet basis set are performed to investigate charge distribution and chemical bonding in possible BiOi (interstitial boron and interstitial oxygen), BsO2i (substitutional boron and interstitial oxygen dimer), and BiO2i (interstitial boron and interstitial oxygen dimer) complexes in Cz-Si solar cells. It is confirmed that the BsO2ist complex composed by Bs and staggered oxygen dimer (O2ist) at second nearest site to boron has the lowest formation energy, resulting in better agreement with experiment. This is resulted by Coulomb attraction between Si-Oi and Si-Bs and consequently a decreased Coulomb repulsion between Bs-Oi in BsO2ist complex. A more physical description of the localized nature on bonding has been analyzed by maximally localized Wannier functions. It is found through the predicted Wannier centers that a doubly negative charge state of interstitial oxygen exists, which is consistent with our Bader charge analysis.

  19. Formation of chemical bonds and morphological studies of a-CNx : Effects of PECVD deposition pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purhanudin, Noorain; Awang, Rozidawati

    2016-11-01

    We report the structural difference and film properties of amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films as a function of PECVD deposition pressure using precursor gases of ethane (C2H6) and nitrogen (N2). The Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectra reveal peaks of single C-N (1100 cm-1), double C=C (1500 cm-1), double C=N (1670 cm-1) and triple C≡N (2340 cm-1). A systematic change in the preferential peaks correspond to the C=N and C≡N triple bonds were found to increase as deposition pressure increased. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) provides morphological structure of the film. From the samples prepare at low deposition pressure, the particles tend to agglomerate into clusters with non-homogenous grains distributed over the surface. Higher deposition pressure results in coalescence process of the film, reflecting the formation of grains evenly distributed on the film. The film morphology is increased in voids structure with increase in deposition pressure. Finally, the samples were successfully prepared by PECVD technique with deposition pressure in varied, and the effect of deposition pressure on the chemical bonding and the morphology of the films had been studied.

  20. Chemical bonding and electronic-structure in MAX phases as viewed by X-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, Martin; Mattesini, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This is a critical review of MAX-phase carbides and nitrides from an electronic-structure and chemical bonding perspective. This large group of nanolaminated materials is of great scientific and technological interest and exhibit a combination of metallic and ceramic features. These properties are related to the special crystal structure and bonding characteristics with alternating strong M-C bonds in high-density MC slabs, and relatively weak M-A bonds between the slabs. Here, we review the trend and relationship between the chemical bonding, conductivity, elastic and magnetic properties of the MAX phases in comparison to the parent binary MX compounds with the underlying electronic structure probed by polarized X-ray spectroscopy. Spectroscopic studies constitute important tests of the results of state-of-the-art electronic structure density functional theory that is extensively discussed and are generally consistent. By replacing the elements on the M, A, or X-sites in the crystal structure, the corresponding changes in the conductivity, elasticity, magnetism and other materials properties makes it possible to tailor the characteristics of this class of materials by controlling the strengths of their chemical bonds.

  1. Carol Anne Bond v the United States of America: how a woman scorned threatened the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Anna; Kornblet, Sarah; Katz, Rebecca

    2011-09-01

    The case of Carol Anne Bond v the United States of America stemmed from a domestic dispute when Ms. Bond attempted to retaliate against her best friend by attacking her with chemical agents. What has emerged is a much greater issue--a test of standing on whether a private citizen can challenge the Tenth Amendment. Instead of being prosecuted in state court for assault, Ms. Bond was charged and tried in district court under a federal criminal statute passed as part of implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Ms. Bond's argument rests on the claim that the statute exceeded the federal government's enumerated powers in criminalizing her behavior and violated the Constitution, while the government contends legislation implementing treaty obligations is well within its purview. This question remains unanswered because there is dispute among the lower courts as to whether Ms. Bond, as a citizen, even has the right to challenge an amendment guaranteeing states rights when a state is not a party to the action. The Supreme Court heard the case on February 22, 2011, and, if it decides to grant Ms. Bond standing to challenge her conviction, the case will be returned to the lower courts. Should the court decide Ms. Bond has the standing to challenge her conviction and further questions the constitutionality of the law, it would be a significant blow to implementation of the CWC in the U.S. and the effort of the federal government to ensure we are meeting our international obligations.

  2. Chemical bonding in aqueous ferrocyanide: experimental and theoretical X-ray spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Engel, Nicholas; Bokarev, Sergey I; Suljoti, Edlira; Garcia-Diez, Raul; Lange, Kathrin M; Atak, Kaan; Golnak, Ronny; Kothe, Alexander; Dantz, Marcus; Kühn, Oliver; Aziz, Emad F

    2014-02-13

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and X-ray absorption (XA) experiments at the iron L- and nitrogen K-edge are combined with high-level first-principles restricted active space self-consistent field (RASSCF) calculations for a systematic investigation of the nature of the chemical bond in potassium ferrocyanide in aqueous solution. The atom- and site-specific RIXS excitations allow for direct observation of ligand-to-metal (Fe L-edge) and metal-to-ligand (N K-edge) charge-transfer bands and thereby evidence for strong σ-donation and π-backdonation. The effects are identified by comparing experimental and simulated spectra related to both the unoccupied and occupied molecular orbitals in solution.

  3. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in myricetin and myricitrin. Quantum chemical calculations and vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojta, Danijela; Dominković, Katarina; Miljanić, Snežana; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2017-03-01

    The molecular structures of myricetin (3,3‧,4‧,5,5‧,7-hexahydroxyflavone; MCE) and myricitrin (myricetin 3-O-rhamnoside; MCI) are investigated by quantum chemical calculations (B3LYP/6-311G**). Two preferred molecular rotamers of MCI are predicted, corresponding to different conformations of the O-rhamnoside subunit. The rotamers are characterized by different hydrogen bonded cross-links between the hydroxy groups of the rhamnoside substituent and the parent MCE moiety. The predicted OH stretching frequencies are compared with vibrational spectra of MCE and MCI recorded for the sake of this investigation (IR and Raman). In addition, a reassignment of the Cdbnd O stretching bands is suggested.

  4. Chemically Bonded Phases for the Analysis of Trace Amounts of Organic Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Rykowska, I.; Wasiak, W.; Szymański, A.; Szyrwińska, K.; Lulek, J.

    2008-01-01

    This work describes some results of identification and determination of bisphenol A (BPA) in powdered milk by applying the gas chromatography. To determine BPA contents in the milk and to reduce the matrix interference associated with the constituents of the powdered milk, we performed the following activities. First, we ultra-centrifuged the dissolved milk solutions. Next, we preconcentrated the analyte in the supernatant using a C18 and new sorbent with chemically bonded ketoimine group solid phase extraction column. Finally, we used gas chromatography for the determination of BPA in the samples under study. A recovery of bisphenol A from spiked milk samples was also performed, with recovery result located at 91% ± 3%/94% ± 2%. PMID:19710916

  5. Dynamics of chemical bonding mapped by energy-resolved 4D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Fabrizio; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-07-10

    Chemical bonding dynamics are fundamental to the understanding of properties and behavior of materials and molecules. Here, we demonstrate the potential of time-resolved, femtosecond electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for mapping electronic structural changes in the course of nuclear motions. For graphite, it is found that changes of milli-electron volts in the energy range of up to 50 electron volts reveal the compression and expansion of layers on the subpicometer scale (for surface and bulk atoms). These nonequilibrium structural features are correlated with the direction of change from sp2 [two-dimensional (2D) graphene] to sp3 (3D-diamond) electronic hybridization, and the results are compared with theoretical charge-density calculations. The reported femtosecond time resolution of four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy represents an advance of 10 orders of magnitude over that of conventional EELS methods.

  6. Method for Producing Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics and for Stabilizing Contaminants Encapsulated therein Utilizing Reducing Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    1999-05-05

    Known phosphate ceramic formulations are improved and the ability to produce iron-based phosphate ceramic systems is enabled by the addition of an oxidizing or reducing step during the acid-base reactions that form the phosphate ceramic products. The additives allow control of the rate of the acid-base reactions and concomitant heat generation. In an alternate embodiment, waste containing metal anions is stabilized in phosphate ceramic products by the addition of a reducing agent to the phosphate ceramic mixture. The reduced metal ions are more stable and/or reactive with the phosphate ions, resulting in the formation of insoluble metal species within the phosphate ceramic matrix, such that the resulting chemically bonded phosphate ceramic product has greater leach resistance.

  7. Hot spot initiation and chemical reaction in shocked polymeric bonded explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qi; Zybin, Sergey; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William; Materials; Process Simulation Center, Caltech Team

    2011-06-01

    A polymer bonded explosive (PBX) model based on PBXN-106 is studied via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using reactive force field (ReaxFF) under shock loading conditions. Hotspot is observed when shock waves pass through the non-planar interface of explosives and elastomers. Adiabatic shear localization is proposed as the main mechanism of hotspot ignition in PBX for high velocity impact. Our simulation also shows that the coupling of shear localization and chemical reactions at hotspot region play important rules at stress relaxtion for explosives. The phenomenon that shock waves are obsorbed by elastomers is also observed in the MD simulations. This research received supports from ARO (W911NF-05-1-0345; W911NF-08-1-0124), ONR (N00014-05-1-0778), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  8. Electronic structure, chemical bonding, and geometry of pure and Sr-doped CaCO3.

    PubMed

    Stashans, Arvids; Chamba, Gaston; Pinto, Henry

    2008-02-01

    The electronic structure, chemical bonding, geometry, and effects produced by Sr-doping in CaCO(3) have been studied on the basis of density-functional theory using the VASP simulation package and molecular-orbital theory utilizing the CLUSTERD computer code. Two calcium carbonate structures which occur naturally in anhydrous crystalline forms, calcite and aragonite, were considered in the present investigation. The obtained diagrams of density of states show similar patterns for both materials. The spatial structures are computed and analyzed in comparison to the available experimental data. The electronic properties and atomic displacements because of the trace element Sr-incorporation are discussed in a comparative manner for the two crystalline structures. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Collision-free spatial hash functions for structural analysis of billion-vertex chemical bond networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Bansal, Bhupesh; Branicio, Paulo S.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Sharma, Ashish; Vashishta, Priya

    2006-09-01

    State-of-the-art molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generate massive datasets involving billion-vertex chemical bond networks, which makes data mining based on graph algorithms such as K-ring analysis a challenge. This paper proposes an algorithm to improve the efficiency of ring analysis of large graphs, exploiting properties of K-rings and spatial correlations of vertices in the graph. The algorithm uses dual-tree expansion (DTE) and spatial hash-function tagging (SHAFT) to optimize computation and memory access. Numerical tests show nearly perfect linear scaling of the algorithm. Also a parallel implementation of the DTE + SHAFT algorithm achieves high scalability. The algorithm has been successfully employed to analyze large MD simulations involving up to 500 million atoms.

  10. Novel Chemically-Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Borehole Sealants (Ceramicretes) for Arctic Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Godwin A. Chukwu; Gang Chen; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramic borehole sealant, i.e. Ceramicrete, has many advantages over conventionally used permafrost cement at Alaska North Slope (ANS). However, in normal field practices when Ceramicrete is mixed with water in blenders, it has a chance of being contaminated with leftover Portland cement. In order to identify the effect of Portland cement contamination, recent tests have been conducted at BJ services in Tomball, TX as well as at the University of Alaska Fairbanks with Ceramicrete formulations proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory. The tests conducted at BJ Services with proposed Ceramicrete formulations and Portland cement contamination have shown significant drawbacks which has caused these formulations to be rejected. However, the newly developed Ceramicrete formulation at the University of Alaska Fairbanks has shown positive results with Portland cement contamination as well as without Portland cement contamination for its effective use in oil well cementing operations at ANS.

  11. Wollastonite based-Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics with lead oxide contents under gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colorado, H. A.; Pleitt, J.; Hiel, C.; Yang, J. M.; Hahn, H. T.; Castano, C. H.

    2012-06-01

    The shielding properties to gamma rays as well as the effect of lead concentration incorporated into Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics (CBPCs) composites are presented. The Wollastonite-based CBPC was fabricated by mixing a patented aqueous phosphoric acid formulation with Wollastonite powder. CBPC has been proved to be good structural material, with excellent thermal resistant properties, and research already showed their potential for radiation shielding applications. Wollastonite-based CBPC is a composite material itself with several crystalline and amorphous phases. Irradiation experiments were conducted on different Wollastonite-based CBPCs with lead oxide. Radiation shielding potential, attenuation coefficients in a broad range of energies pertinent to engineering applications and density experiments showing the effect of the PbO additions (to improve gamma shielding capabilities) are also presented. Microstructure was identified by using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  12. Method for producing chemically bonded phosphate ceramics and for stabilizing contaminants encapsulated therein utilizing reducing agents

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2000-01-01

    Known phosphate ceramic formulations are improved and the ability to produce iron-based phosphate ceramic systems is enabled by the addition of an oxidizing or reducing step during the acid-base reactions that form the phosphate ceramic products. The additives allow control of the rate of the acid-base reactions and concomitant heat generation. In an alternate embodiment, waste containing metal anions are stabilized in phosphate ceramic products by the addition of a reducing agent to the phosphate ceramic mixture. The reduced metal ions are more stable and/or reactive with the phosphate ions, resulting in the formation of insoluble metal species within the phosphate ceramic matrix, such that the resulting chemically bonded phosphate ceramic product has greater leach resistance.

  13. Effect of cross-linking with riboflavin and ultraviolet A on the chemical bonds and ultrastructure of human sclera.

    PubMed

    Jung, Gyeong-Bok; Lee, Hui-Jae; Kim, Ji-Hye; Lim, Jin Ik; Choi, Samjin; Jin, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effect of the cross-linking with riboflavin-ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation on the chemical bonds and ultrastructural changes of human sclera tissues using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Raman spectroscopy of the normal and cross-linked human sclera tissue revealed different types of the riboflavin-UVA and collagen interactions, which could be identified from their unique peaks, intensity, and shape. Raman spectroscopy can prove to be a powerful tool for examining the chemical bond of collagenous tissues at the molecular level. After riboflavin-UVA treatment, unlike a regular parallel arrangement of normal collagen fibrils, the AFM image revealed interlocking arrangements of collagen fibrils. The observed changes in the surface topography of the collagen fibrils, as well as in their chemical bonds in the sclera tissue, support the formation of interfibrilar cross-links in sclera tissues.

  14. Effect of cross-linking with riboflavin and ultraviolet A on the chemical bonds and ultrastructure of human sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Gyeong-Bok; Lee, Hui-Jae; Kim, Ji-Hye; Lim, Jin Ik; Choi, Samjin; Jin, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effect of the cross-linking with riboflavin-ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation on the chemical bonds and ultrastructural changes of human sclera tissues using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Raman spectroscopy of the normal and cross-linked human sclera tissue revealed different types of the riboflavin-UVA and collagen interactions, which could be identified from their unique peaks, intensity, and shape. Raman spectroscopy can prove to be a powerful tool for examining the chemical bond of collagenous tissues at the molecular level. After riboflavin-UVA treatment, unlike a regular parallel arrangement of normal collagen fibrils, the AFM image revealed interlocking arrangements of collagen fibrils. The observed changes in the surface topography of the collagen fibrils, as well as in their chemical bonds in the sclera tissue, support the formation of interfibrilar cross-links in sclera tissues.

  15. Demonstration of packaging of Fernald Silo I waste in chemically bonded phosphate ceramic.

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A. S.

    1999-01-27

    This paper summarizes our experience in bench-scale packaging of Fernald Silo I waste in chemically bonded phosphate ceramics. The waste was received from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and its treatability was studied in our laboratory. This waste contained As{sup 5+}, Ba, Cr{sup 6+}, Ni, Pb, Se{sup 4+}, and Zn as the hazardous contaminants. In addition, the total specific activity of all the radioactive isotopes in the waste was 3.85 {micro}Ci/g, of which that of radium alone was 0.477 {micro}Ci/g. This indicated that radon (a daughter product of the radium) in the waste could present a serious handling problem during this study. For this reason, the waste was handled and stored in a flowing-air glovebox. We made waste form samples with an actual waste loading of 66.05 wt.% and subjected them to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The results showed excellent stabilization of all contaminants. Actual levels detected in the leachate were well below the EPA's most stringent Universal Treatment Standards and in almost all cases were one order of magnitude below this limit. Radioactivity in the leachate was also very low. Alpha activity was 25 {+-} 2.5 pCi/mL, while beta activity was 9.81 {+-} 0.98 pCi/mL. This very low activity was attributed to the efficient stabilization of radium as insoluble radium phosphate in the waste form, thus prohibiting its leaching. This study indicates that the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic process may be a very suitable way to package Silo I waste for transportation and storage or disposal.

  16. Ligand effects on metal-R bonding, where R is hydrogen or alkyl. A quantum chemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Blomberg, M.R.A.; Schuele, J.; Siegbahn, P.E.M. )

    1989-08-02

    Ligand effects on the metal-hydrogen and metal-methyl binding energies are studied by using quantum chemical methods including near degeneracy and dynamical correlation effects. The metals studied are nickel and palladium, and the ligands used are olefins (C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}F{sub 4}), carbonyl, phosphine, dinitrogen, water, and chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}). These types of lone-pair ligands can have both destabilizing and stabilizing effects on the metal-R bonds. Using a valence-bond description of the bonding, they show that these ligands have a varying amount of covalent bonding to the metal and that there is a correlation between the amount of covalency in the metal-ligand bonding and the destabilizing effect of the ligand on the metal-R bond. Since the maximum number of covalent bonds is only two for nickel and palladium and these are already used in the ligand-free complexes, there will be a competition for the covalent bonding between the R groups and the ligands, which explains the observed trend. the stabilizing effects of the ligands, on the other hand, vary much less among the ligands.

  17. The variational subspace valence bond method

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Graham D.

    2015-04-07

    The variational subspace valence bond (VSVB) method based on overlapping orbitals is introduced. VSVB provides variational support against collapse for the optimization of overlapping linear combinations of atomic orbitals (OLCAOs) using modified orbital expansions, without recourse to orthogonalization. OLCAO have the advantage of being naturally localized, chemically intuitive (to individually model bonds and lone pairs, for example), and transferrable between different molecular systems. Such features are exploited to avoid key computational bottlenecks. Since the OLCAO can be doubly occupied, VSVB can access very large problems, and calculations on systems with several hundred atoms are presented.

  18. The variational subspace valence bond method.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Graham D

    2015-04-07

    The variational subspace valence bond (VSVB) method based on overlapping orbitals is introduced. VSVB provides variational support against collapse for the optimization of overlapping linear combinations of atomic orbitals (OLCAOs) using modified orbital expansions, without recourse to orthogonalization. OLCAO have the advantage of being naturally localized, chemically intuitive (to individually model bonds and lone pairs, for example), and transferrable between different molecular systems. Such features are exploited to avoid key computational bottlenecks. Since the OLCAO can be doubly occupied, VSVB can access very large problems, and calculations on systems with several hundred atoms are presented.

  19. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING

    SciTech Connect

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-03-26

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems.

  20. On the chemical bonding effects in the Raman response: benzenethiol adsorbed on silver clusters.

    PubMed

    Saikin, Semion K; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Stopa, Michael; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2009-11-07

    We study the effects of chemical bonding on Raman scattering from benzenethiol chemisorbed on silver clusters using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Raman scattering cross sections are computed using a formalism that employs analytical derivatives of frequency-dependent electronic polarizabilities, which treats both off-resonant and resonant enhancement within the same scheme. In the off-resonant regime, Raman scattering into molecular vibrational modes is enhanced by one order of magnitude and shows pronounced dependence on the orientation and the local symmetry of the molecule. Additional strong enhancement of the order of 10(2) arises from resonant transitions to mixed metal-molecular electronic states. The Raman enhancement is analyzed using Raman excitation profiles (REPs) for the range of excitation energies 1.6-3.0 eV, in which isolated benzenethiol does not have electronic transitions. The computed vibrational frequency shifts and relative Raman scattering cross sections of the metal-molecular complexes are in good agreement with experimental data on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from benzenethiol adsorbed on silver surfaces. Characterization and understanding of these effects, associated with chemical enhancement mechanism, may be used to improve the detection sensitivity in molecular Raman scattering.

  1. Stabilization of lead-rich low-level mixed wastes in chemically bonded phosphate ceramic.

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S.-Y.

    1999-08-10

    A chemically bonded magnesium potassium phosphate ceramic has been developed by an acid-base reaction at room temperature, for use in stabilizing U.S. Department of Energy low-level mixed waste streams that include hazardous metals and low-level radioactive elements. Using this ceramic, we solidified, in monolithic waste forms, low-level mixed waste streams containing various levels of PbCl{sub 2} and PbCO{sub 3}. These final waste forms were evaluated for their land disposal suitability. The results showed low open porosity (1.48-4.61 vol.%); hence, low permeability, and higher compression strengths (4310-6734 psi) that were one order of magnitude above that required. The level of lead in the leachate following the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test was reduced from 50,000 to <0.1 ppm. Leachability indexes from the long-term leaching test (ANS 16.1 test) were between 11.9 and 13.6. This excellent lead retention is due to its chemical fixation as insoluble lead phosphate and to physical encapsulation by the phosphate matrix.

  2. Characteristics of chemical bonding of pentavalent uranium in La-doped UO2.

    PubMed

    Butorin, Sergei M; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Prieur, Damien; Rivenet, Murielle; Martin, Philippe M

    2016-12-20

    The effect of La doping on the electronic structure of U in UO2 was studied using an advanced technique, namely, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in the high-energy-resolution fluorescence-detection (HERFD) mode, at the U 3d3/2 (M4) edge. Thanks to a significant reduction of the core-hole lifetime broadening and distinct chemical shifts of the HERFD-XAS lines, the U(v) formation as a result of La doping was identified. The isolated contribution of U(v) in the M4 HERFD-XAS spectrum reveals the so-called charge-transfer satellites due to the U 5f-O 2p hybridization. The analysis of the experimental data within the framework of the Anderson impurity model (AIM) indicates a significant change in the characteristics and degree of covalency for the chemical bonding in the U(v) subsystem of UO2 as compared to undoped UO2, which is a Mott-Hubbard system. The results are also supported by AIM calculations of X-ray photoelectron and optical absorption data.

  3. Atmospheric Black Carbon: Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Individual Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles, M. K.; Tivanski, A. V.; Hopkins, R. J.; Marten, B. D.

    2006-12-01

    The formation of aerosols from both natural and anthropogenic sources affects the Earth's temperature and climate by altering the radiative properties of the atmosphere. Aerosols containing black carbon (BC) that are released into the atmosphere from the burning of biomass, natural fires and the combustion of coals, diesel and jet fuels, contribute a large positive component to this radiative forcing, thus causing a heating of the atmosphere. A distinct type of biomass burn aerosol referred to as "tar balls" has recently been reported in the literature and is characterized by a spherical morphology, high carbon content and ability to efficiently scatter and absorb light. At present, very little is known about the exact nature and variation of the range of BC aerosols in the atmosphere with regards to optical, chemical and physical properties. Additionally, the similarity of these aerosols to surrogates used in the laboratory as atmospheric mimics remains unclear. The local chemical bonding, structural ordering and carbon-to-oxygen ratios of a plethora of black carbon standard reference materials (BC SRMs), high molecular mass humic-like substances (HULIS) and atmospheric aerosols from a variety of sources are examined using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. STXM/NEXAFS enables single aerosol particles of diameter upwards of 100 nm to be studied, which allows the diversity of atmospheric aerosol collected during a variety of field missions to be assessed. We apply a semi-quantitative peak fitting method to the recorded NEXAFS spectral fingerprints allowing comparison of BC SRMs and HULIS to BC aerosol originating from anthropogenic combustion and biomass burning events. This method allows us to distinguish between anthropogenic combustion and biomass burn aerosol using both chemical bonding and structural ordering information. The STXM/NEXAFS technique has also been utilized to

  4. Shake for Sigma, Pray for Pi: Classroom Orbital Overlap Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    An introductory organic classroom demonstration is discussed where analogies are made between common societal hand contact and covalent bond formation. A handshake signifies creation of a [sigma] bond ("head-on" orbital overlap), whereas the action of praying illustrates "sideways" overlap and generation of a [pi] bond. The nature of orbital and…

  5. Shake for Sigma, Pray for Pi: Classroom Orbital Overlap Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    An introductory organic classroom demonstration is discussed where analogies are made between common societal hand contact and covalent bond formation. A handshake signifies creation of a [sigma] bond ("head-on" orbital overlap), whereas the action of praying illustrates "sideways" overlap and generation of a [pi] bond. The nature of orbital and…

  6. Site of metabolism prediction for oxidation reactions mediated by oxidoreductases based on chemical bond.

    PubMed

    He, Shuaibing; Li, Manman; Ye, Xiaotong; Wang, Hongyu; Yu, Wenkang; He, Wenjing; Wang, Yun; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2017-02-01

    The metabolites of exogenous and endogenous compounds play a pivotal role in the domain of metabolism research. However, they are still unclear for most chemicals in our environment. The in silico methods for predicting the site of metabolism (SOM) are considered to be efficient and low-cost in SOM discovery. However, many in silico methods are focused on metabolism processes catalyzed by several specified Cytochromes P450s, and only apply to substrates with special skeleton. A SOM prediction model always deserves more attention, which demands no special requirements to structures of substrates and applies to more metabolic enzymes. By incorporating the use of hybrid feature selection techniques (CHI, IG, GR, Relief) and multiple classification procedures (KStar, BN, IBK, J48, RF, SVM, AdaBoostM1, Bagging), SOM prediction models for six oxidation reactions mediated by oxidoreductases were established by the integration of enzyme data and chemical bond information. The advantage of the method is the introduction of unlabeled SOM. We defined the SOM which not reported in the literature as unlabeled SOM, where negative SOM was filtered. Consequently, for each type of reaction, a series of SOM prediction models were built based on information about metabolism of 1237 heterogeneous chemicals. Then optimal models were attained through comparisons among these models. Finally, independent test set was used to validate optimal models. It demonstrated that all models gave accuracies above 0.90. For receiver operating characteristic analysis, the area under curve values of all these models over 0.906. The results suggested that these models showed good predicting power. All the models will be available when contact with wangyun@bucm.edu.cn. wangyun@bucm.edu.cn or yjqiao@yahoo.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites.

    PubMed

    Meng, X F; Yoshida, K; Gu, N

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C&B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R(a) and R(y) values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  8. Energetics and chemical bonding of the 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical and its protonated form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hue Minh Thi; Höltzl, Tibor; Gopakumar, G.; Veszprémi, Tamás; Peeters, Jozef; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2005-09-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were applied to investigate the electronic structure of the parent 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical (C 6H 3, TDB) and its anion (C6H3-), cation (C6H3+) and protonated form (C6H4+). Our results obtained using the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by second-order multi-state multi-configuration perturbation theory, MS-CASPT2, and MRMP2 in conjunction with the large ANO-L and 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set, confirm and reveal the followings: (i) TDB has a doublet 2A 1 ground state with a 4B 2- 2A 1 energy gap of 29 kcal/mol, (ii) the ground state of the C6H3- anion in the triplet 3B 2 being 4 kcal/mol below the 1A 1 state. (iii) the electron affinity (EA), ionization energy (IE) and proton affinity (PA) are computed to be: EA = 1.6 eV, IE = 7.2 eV, PA = 227 kcal/mol using UB3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) + ZPE; standard heat of formation Δ Hf(298 K, 1 atm) (TDB) = 179 ± 2 kcal/mol was calculated with CBS-QB3 method. An atoms-in-molecules (AIM) analysis of the structure reveals that the topology of the electron density is similar in all compounds: hydrogens connect to a six-membered ring, except for the case of the 2A 2 state of C6H4+ (MBZ +) which is bicyclic with fused five- and three-membered rings. Properties of the chemical bonds were characterized with Electron Localization Function (ELF) analysis, as well as Wiberg indices, Laplacian and spin density maps. We found that the radicals form separate monosynaptic basins on the ELF space, however its pair character remains high. In the 2A 1 state of TDB, the radical center is mainly localized on the C1 atom, while in the 2B 2 state it is equally distributed between the C3 and C5 atoms and, due to the symmetry, in the 4B 2 state the C1, C2 and C3 atoms have the same radical character. There is no C3-C5 bond in the 2A 1 state of TDB, but the interaction between these atoms is strong. The ground state of cation C6H3+ (DHP), 1A 1, is not a diradical and has

  9. Understanding boron through size-selected clusters: structure, chemical bonding, and fluxionality.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Alina P; Popov, Ivan A; Piazza, Zachary A; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2014-04-15

    Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center-two-electron (2c-2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter-two-electron (nc-2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron's electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13(+) and B19(-). A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B(-), formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B(-)/C analogy. It is

  10. Understanding Boron through Size-Selected Clusters: Structure, Chemical Bonding, and Fluxionality

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeeva, Alina P.; Popov, Ivan A.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2014-04-15

    Conspectus Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center–two-electron (2c–2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter–two-electron (nc–2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron’s electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13+ and B19–. A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B–, formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B

  11. Real-space imaging of molecular structure and chemical bonding by single-molecule inelastic tunneling probe.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chi-lun; Xu, Chen; Han, Zhumin; Ho, W

    2014-05-23

    The arrangement of atoms and bonds in a molecule influences its physical and chemical properties. The scanning tunneling microscope can provide electronic and vibrational signatures of single molecules. However, these signatures do not relate simply to the molecular structure and bonding. We constructed an inelastic tunneling probe based on the scanning tunneling microscope to sense the local potential energy landscape of an adsorbed molecule with a carbon monoxide (CO)-terminated tip. The skeletal structure and bonding of the molecule are revealed from imaging the spatial variations of a CO vibration as the CO-terminated tip probes the core of the interactions between adjacent atoms. An application of the inelastic tunneling probe reveals the sharing of hydrogen atoms among multiple centers in intramolecular and extramolecular bonding.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of metal diboride and metal oxide thin films from borohydride-bonded precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu

    Metal borohydrides denotes the type of metal complex in which the metals are connected to the surrounding ligands through boron-hydrogen bridge bonds. They are excellent CVD precursors owning to their outstanding volatility and high reactivity. Transition metal diboride and metal oxide thin films suitable for various technological applications are deposited from these novel precursors. In this dissertation, comprehensive investigations of thin film growth rate, composition, and properties as a function of precursor pressure and substrate temperature were carried out for the CVD of HfB2 and MgO. It is determined that their CVD growth kinetics can be well explained with a Langmuir surface reaction mechanism. A structure zone model is proposed to explain the microstructure-process relationship of the CVD thin films in general. In future generations of microelectronics fabrication, materials need to be deposited into recess features with smaller dimensions and higher aspect ratios. A new approach is developed to obtain super-conformal coating (bottom-up filling) of such high aspect ratio features. The super-conformal growth is demonstrated in the CVD of CrB2 and HfB2 films from the corresponding borohydride precursors with atomic and molecular growth suppressors. Computer simulation is employed to understand the mechanism of the super-conformal deposition. The high Tc superconductor MgB2 were deposited at low temperatures (T = 300°C--400°C) from a recently developed highly volatile borohydride-bonded Mg precursor, by means of catalyst-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The films are stoichiometric and highly crystallized, however, the lattice constants shift away from the MgB2 structure to the diboride structure of the catalyst metal, suggesting that Mg is partially substituted by the corresponding metals.

  13. Prediction of the Intrinsic Hydrogen Bond Acceptor Strength of Chemical Substances from Molecular Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwöbel, Johannes; Ebert, Ralf-Uwe; Kühne, Ralph; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2009-08-01

    Hydrogen bonding affects the partitioning of organic compounds between environmental and biological compartments as well as the three-dimensional shape of macromolecules. Using the semiempirical quantum chemical AM1 level of calculation, we have developed a model to predict the site-specific hydrogen bond (HB) acceptor strength from ground-state properties of the individual compounds. At present, the model parametrization is confined to compounds with one HB acceptor site of the following atom types: N, O, S, F, Cl, and Br that act as lone-pair HB acceptors, and π-electron (aromatic or conjugated) systems with the associated C atoms as particularly weak HB acceptors. The HB acceptor strength is expressed in terms of the Abraham parameter B and calculated from local molecular parameters, taking into account electrostatic, polarizability, and charge transfer contributions according to the Morokuma concept. For a data set of 383 compounds, the squared correlation coefficient r2 is 0.97 when electrostatic potential (ESP) derived net atomic charges are employed, and the root-mean-square (rms) error is 0.04 that is in the range of experimental uncertainty. The model is validated using an extended leave-50%-out approach, and its performance is comparatively analyzed with the ones of earlier introduced ab initio (HF/6-31G**) and density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31G**) models as well as of two increment methods with respect to the total compound set as well as HB acceptor type subsets. The discussion includes an explorative model application to amides and organophosphates that demonstrates the robustness of the approach, and further opportunities for model extensions.

  14. Characterization and intramolecular bonding patterns of busulfan: Experimental and quantum chemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, T.; Tandon, Poonam; Singh, Swapnil; Agarwal, Parag; Srivastava, Anubha

    2017-02-01

    The investigations of structural conformers, molecular interactions and vibrational characterization of pharmaceutical drug are helpful to understand their behaviour. In the present work, the 2D potential energy surface (PES) scan has been performed on the dihedral angles C6sbnd O4sbnd S1sbnd C5 and C25sbnd S22sbnd O19sbnd C16 to find the stable conformers of busulfan. In order to show the effects of long range interactions, the structures on the global minima of PES scan have been further optimized by B3LYP/6-311 ++G(d,p) method with and without empirical dispersion functional in Gaussian 09W package. The presence of n → σ* and σ → σ* interactions which lead to stability of the molecule have been predicted by natural bond orbital analysis. The strong and weak hydrogen bonds between the functional groups of busulfan were analyzed using quantum topological atoms in molecules analysis. In order to study the long-range forces, such as van der Waals interactions, steric effect in busulfan, the reduced density gradient as well as isosurface defining these interactions has been plotted using Multiwfn software. The spectroscopic characterization on the solid phase of busulfan has been studied by experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. From the 13C and 1H NMR spectra, the chemical shifts of individual C and H atoms of busulfan have been predicted. The maximum absorption wavelengths corresponding to the electronic transitions between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of busulfan have been found by UV-vis spectrum.

  15. Diversity of Chemical Bonding and Oxidation States in MS4 Molecules of Group 8 Elements.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Jiang, Ning; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Yang, Ping; Li, Jun

    2017-08-04

    The geometric and electronic ground-state structures of 30 isomers of six MS4 molecules (M=Group 8 metals Fe, Ru, Os, Hs, Sm, and Pu) have been studied by using quantum-chemical density functional theory and correlated wavefunction approaches. The MS4 species were compared to analogous MO4 species recently investigated (W. Huang, W.-H. Xu, W. H. E. Schwarz, J. Li, Inorg. Chem. 2016, 55, 4616). A metal oxidation state (MOS) with a high value of eight appeared in the low-spin singlet Td geometric species (Os,Hs)S4 and (Ru,Os,Hs)O4 , whereas a low MOS of two appeared in the high-spin septet D2d species Fe(S2 )2 and (slightly excited) metastable Fe(O2 )2 . The ground states of all other molecules had intermediate MOS values, with S(2-) , S2(2-) , S2(1-) (and O(2-) , O(1-) , O2(2-) , O2(1-) ) ligands bonded by ionic, covalent, and correlative contributions. The known tendencies toward lower MOS on going from oxides to sulfides, from Hs to Os to Ru, and from Pu to Sm, and the specific behavior of Fe, were found to arise from the different atomic orbital energies and radii of the (n-1)p core and (n-1)d and (n-2)f valence shells of the metal atoms in row n of the periodic table. The comparative results of the electronic and geometric structures of the MO4 and MS4 species provides insight into the periodicity of oxidation states and bonding. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Organometallic Bonding in an Ullmann-Type On-Surface Chemical Reaction Studied by High-Resolution Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shigeki; Sadeghi, Ali; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Pawlak, Rémy; Meier, Tobias; Takeya, Jun; Goedecker, Stefan; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-10-01

    The on-surface Ullmann-type chemical reaction synthesizes polymers by linking carbons of adjacent molecules on solid surfaces. Although an organometallic compound is recently identified as the reaction intermediate, little is known about the detailed structure of the bonded organometallic species and its influence on the molecule and the reaction. Herein atomic force microscopy at low temperature is used to study the reaction with 3,9-diiododinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-d]thiophene (I-DNT-VW), which is polymerized on Ag(111) in vacuum. Thermally sublimated I-DNT-VW picks up a Ag surface atom, forming a CAg bond at one end after removing an iodine. The CAg bond is usually short-lived, and a CAgC organometallic bond immediately forms with an adjacent molecule. The existence of the bonded Ag atoms strongly affects the bending angle and adsorption height of the molecular unit. Density functional theory calculations reveal the bending mechanism, which reveals that charge from the terminus of the molecule is transferred via the Ag atom into the organometallic bond and strengths the local adsorption to the substrate. Such deformations vanish when the Ag atoms are removed by annealing and CC bonds are established. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A Review of Chemical Bonding Studies: Needs, Aims, Methods of Exploring Students' Conceptions, General Knowledge Claims and Students' Alternative Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unal, Suat; Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper presents a detailed thematic review of chemical bonding studies. To achieve this, a matrix is developed to summarize and present the findings by focusing on insights derived from the related studies. The matrix incorporates the following themes: needs, aims, methods of exploring students' conceptions, general knowledge claims,…

  18. Learning about Atoms, Molecules, and Chemical Bonds: A Case Study of Multiple-Model Use in Grade 11 Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Allan G.; Treagust, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Reports in detail on a year-long case study of multiple-model use at grade 11. Suggests that students who socially negotiated the shared and unshared attributes of common analogical models for atoms, molecules, and chemical bonds used these models more consistently in their explanations. (Author/CCM)

  19. Enhancing Students' Understanding of the Concept of "Chemical Bonding" by Using Activities Provided on an Interactive Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frailich, Marcel; Kesner, Miri; Hofstein, Avi

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a web-based learning environment in enhancing 10th grade high-school students' understanding of the concept of "chemical bonding". Two groups participated in this study: an experimental group (N = 161) and a comparison one (N = 93). The teachers in the experimental group were asked to implement four…

  20. Enhancing Students' Understanding of the Concept of "Chemical Bonding" by Using Activities Provided on an Interactive Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frailich, Marcel; Kesner, Miri; Hofstein, Avi

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a web-based learning environment in enhancing 10th grade high-school students' understanding of the concept of "chemical bonding". Two groups participated in this study: an experimental group (N = 161) and a comparison one (N = 93). The teachers in the experimental group were asked to implement four…

  1. The Effects of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied with Animations on Overcoming 11th Grade Students' Alternative Conceptions of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Hulya; Demircioglu, Gokhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to determine the effect of conceptual change texts accompanied with computer animations on 11th grade students' understanding and alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding. One experimental group (EG; N = 28) and one comparison group (CG; N = 30) were used in the study. While the comparison group taught traditional…

  2. A Review of Chemical Bonding Studies: Needs, Aims, Methods of Exploring Students' Conceptions, General Knowledge Claims and Students' Alternative Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unal, Suat; Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper presents a detailed thematic review of chemical bonding studies. To achieve this, a matrix is developed to summarize and present the findings by focusing on insights derived from the related studies. The matrix incorporates the following themes: needs, aims, methods of exploring students' conceptions, general knowledge claims,…

  3. Hydrolytic stability of the Si-O-Ti bonds in the chemical assembly of titania nanostructures on silica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnov, Evgeni A.; Malkov, A. A.; Malygin, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    The hydrolytic stability of the Si-O-Ti bonds in titania nanostructures on the surface of silica materials of different genesis is analyzed. The mechanism of hydrolysis is considered and the decisive role of structural and chemical features of silicas in the stability of titania nanostructures on their surface is demonstrated.

  4. Learning about Atoms, Molecules, and Chemical Bonds: A Case Study of Multiple-Model Use in Grade 11 Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Allan G.; Treagust, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Reports in detail on a year-long case study of multiple-model use at grade 11. Suggests that students who socially negotiated the shared and unshared attributes of common analogical models for atoms, molecules, and chemical bonds used these models more consistently in their explanations. (Author/CCM)

  5. Difference in chemical bonding between lithium and sodium salts: influence of covalency on their solubility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su; Ishii, Jun; Horiuchi, Shunsuke; Yoshizawa-Fujita, Masahiro; Izgorodina, Ekaterina I

    2017-07-14

    Recent thermal runaways in lithium-ion batteries have reinforced the focus on the research of safer electrolytes based on ionic liquids. A simple switch from organic solvents to ionic liquids has been proven difficult due to the decreased efficiency of batteries caused by decreased conductivity and increased viscosity of ionic liquids upon addition of lithium salts. The new trend in replacing lithium salts with a cheaper alternative, sodium salts, has resulted in rather poor solubility of sodium salts in commonly used ionic liquids. This phenomenon has been left largely unexplained. Herein, we present a high-level quantum chemical study of the chemical bonding of lithium and sodium salts coupled with ionic liquid anions. Due to their proximity to the anion, the 1s(2) electrons on the lithium cation are found to become strongly polarized by the presence of the anion such that they start participating in the bonding, making it more covalent than originally thought. In sodium salts the 2s(2) orbitals are rather removed from the anion, making its influence weaker. This polarization results in 90 kJ mol(-1) of difference in the interaction magnitude between lithium and sodium salts. Theoretical results have confirmed that increasing covalency in lithium salts results in their excellent solubility since these dissolve as ion-paired complexes. The downside of this ability is decreased conductivity as lithium salts are unlikely to easily dissociate in ionic liquids. Sodium salts are shown to maintain a high degree of ionicity, thus decreasing their chances of being solvated by ionic liquids as a result of their low concentration of ions per unit volume. The theoretical results are further underpinned by solubility studies of MX salts, where M = Li or Na and X = bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (NTf2), BF4(-) or PF6(-), conducted in six different ionic liquids. Lithium salts consisting of BF4(-) or PF6(-) exhibited significantly better solubility than their sodium

  6. Chemical bonding, optical constants, and electrical resistivity of sputter-deposited gallium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, C. V.; Rubio, E. J.; Barraza, C. D.; Miranda Gallardo, A.; McPeak, Samantha; Kotru, Sushma; Grant, J. T.

    2014-01-01

    Gallium oxide (Ga2O3) thin films were made by sputter deposition employing a Ga2O3 ceramic target for sputtering. The depositions were made over a wide range of substrate temperatures (Ts), from 25 to 600 °C. The effect of Ts on the chemical bonding, surface morphological characteristics, optical constants, and electrical properties of the grown films was evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), and four-point probe measurements. XPS analyses indicate the binding energies (BE) of the Ga 2p doublet, i.e., the Ga 2p3/2 and Ga 2p1/2 peaks, are located at 1118.0 and 1145.0 eV, respectively, characterizing gallium in its highest chemical oxidation state (Ga3+) in the grown films. The core level XPS spectra of O 1s indicate that the peak is centered at a BE ˜ 531 eV, which is also characteristic of Ga-O bonds in the Ga2O3 phase. The granular morphology of the nanocrystalline Ga2O3 films was evident from AFM measurements, which also indicate that the surface roughness of the films increases from 0.5 nm to 3.0 nm with increasing Ts. The SE analyses indicate that the index of refraction (n) of Ga2O3 films increases with increasing Ts due to improved structural quality and packing density of the films. The n(λ) of all the Ga2O3 films follows the Cauchy's dispersion relation. The room temperature electrical resistivity was high (˜200 Ω-cm) for amorphous Ga2O3 films grown at Ts = RT-300 °C and decreased to ˜1 Ω-cm for nanocrystalline Ga2O3 films grown at Ts ≥ 500-600 °C. A correlation between growth conditions, microstructure, optical constants, and electrical properties of Ga2O3 films is derived.

  7. Chemical bonding, optical constants, and electrical resistivity of sputter-deposited gallium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ramana, C. V. Rubio, E. J.; Barraza, C. D.; Miranda Gallardo, A.; McPeak, Samantha; Kotru, Sushma; Grant, J. T.

    2014-01-28

    Gallium oxide (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films were made by sputter deposition employing a Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic target for sputtering. The depositions were made over a wide range of substrate temperatures (T{sub s}), from 25 to 600 °C. The effect of T{sub s} on the chemical bonding, surface morphological characteristics, optical constants, and electrical properties of the grown films was evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), and four-point probe measurements. XPS analyses indicate the binding energies (BE) of the Ga 2p doublet, i.e., the Ga 2p{sub 3/2} and Ga 2p{sub 1/2} peaks, are located at 1118.0 and 1145.0 eV, respectively, characterizing gallium in its highest chemical oxidation state (Ga{sup 3+}) in the grown films. The core level XPS spectra of O 1s indicate that the peak is centered at a BE ∼ 531 eV, which is also characteristic of Ga-O bonds in the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase. The granular morphology of the nanocrystalline Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films was evident from AFM measurements, which also indicate that the surface roughness of the films increases from 0.5 nm to 3.0 nm with increasing T{sub s}. The SE analyses indicate that the index of refraction (n) of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films increases with increasing T{sub s} due to improved structural quality and packing density of the films. The n(λ) of all the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films follows the Cauchy's dispersion relation. The room temperature electrical resistivity was high (∼200 Ω-cm) for amorphous Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown at T{sub s} = RT-300 °C and decreased to ∼1 Ω-cm for nanocrystalline Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown at T{sub s} ≥ 500–600 °C. A correlation between growth conditions, microstructure, optical constants, and electrical properties of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is derived.

  8. Chemical reactivity of C-F bonds attached to graphene with diamines depending on their nature and location.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoyin; He, Taijun; Wang, Zaoming; Cheng, Zheng; Liu, Yang; Chen, Teng; Lai, Wenchuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-06-29

    The attachment of fluorine to graphene is a facile means to activate the carbon bonds for subsequent covalent bonding to other molecules for the preparation of desired graphene derivatives. Therefore, an insight into the chemical reactivity of fluorinated graphene (FG) is very essential to enable precise control of the composition and structure of the final products. In this study, FG has been treated with various mass amounts of poly(oxypropylene)diamine (PEA) ranging from starvation to saturation to explore the dependence of a substitution reaction of diamines on the nature and location (attached onto the basal planes or along defects or edges) of C-F bonds. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy directly tracked the atomic percentage of fluorine present and the carbon 1s bonding state, showing that the grafting ratio of diamines gradually increases with increased diamine mass ratio. The varying of the types and orientation of C-F bonds characterized by polarized attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that "covalent" C-F bonds are more sensitive to the substitution reaction of diamines than ''semi-ionic'' C-F bonds, and the C-F bonds attached onto basal planes more preferably participate in the functionalization reaction of diamines than that of C-F bonded on non-coplanar regions (edges or defects). The one-dimensional expansion along the graphene c-axis shown by wide angle X-ray diffraction provides further evidence on the preferred functionalization reaction of C-F attached on the basal planes, resulting in a change of the average intersheet distance by various magnitudes.

  9. Development of a Fundamental Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Electronic Structure in Spinel Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.-P.; Terry, J.H., Jr.; Hartmann, T.; Sheldon, R.I.

    1999-05-14

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos national Laboratory (LANL). Hundreds of ceramic compounds possess the spinel crystal structure and exhibit a remarkable variety of properties, ranging from compounds that are electrical insulators to compounds that are superconducting, or from compounds with ferri- and antiferromagnetic behavior to materials with colossal magnetoresistive characteristics. The unique crystal structure of spinel compounds is in many ways responsible for the widely varying physical properties of spinels. The objective of this project is to investigate the nature of chemical bonding, point defects, and electronic structure in compounds with the spinel crystal structure. Our goal is to understand and predict the stability of the spinel structure as a function of chemical composition, stoichiometry, and cation disorder. The consequences of cation disorder in spinel materials can be profound . The ferromagnetic characteristics of magnesioferrite, for instance, are entirely attributable to disorder on the cation sublattices. Our studies provide insight into the mechanisms of point defect formation and cation disorder and their effects on the electronic band structure and crystal structure of spinel-structure materials. our ultimate objective is to develop a more substantive knowledge of the spinel crystal structure and to promote new and novel uses for spinel compounds. The technical approach to achieve our goals is to combine first-principles calculations with experimental measurements. The structural and electronic properties of spinel samples were experimentally determined primarily with X-ray and neutron scattering, optical and X-ray absorption, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Total energy electronic structure calculations were performed to determine structural stability, band structure, density of states, and electron distribution. We also used shell

  10. Development of a Fundamental Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Electronic Structure in Spinel Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.-P.; Terry, J.H., Jr.; Hartmann, T.; Sheldon, R.I.

    1999-06-03

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Hundreds of ceramic compounds possess the spinel crystal structure and exhibit a remarkable variety of properties, ranging from compounds that are electrical insulators to compounds that are superconducting, or from compounds with ferri- and antiferromagnetic behavior to materials with colossal magnetoresistive characteristics. The unique crystal structure of spinel compounds is in many ways responsible for the widely varying physical properties of spinels. The objective of this project is to investigate the nature of chemical bonding, point defects, and electronic structure in compounds with the spinel crystal structure. Our goal is to understand and predict the stability of the spinel structure as a function of chemical composition, stoichiometry, and cation disorder. The consequences of cation disorder in spinel materials can be profound . The ferromagnetic characteristics of magnesioferrite, for instance, are entirely attributable to disorder on the cation sublattices. Our studies provide insight into the mechanisms of point defect formation and cation disorder and their effects on the electronic band structure and crystal structure of spinel-structure materials. Our ultimate objective is to develop a more substantive knowledge of the spinel crystal structure and to promote new and novel uses for spinel compounds. The technical approach to achieve our goals is to combine first-principles calculations with experimental measurements. The structural and electronic properties of spinel samples were experimentally determined primarily with X-ray and neutron scattering, optical and X-ray absorption, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Total energy electronic structure calculations were performed to determine structural stability, band structure, density of states, and electron distribution. We also used shell

  11. On The Electronic Structure and Chemical Bonding in the Tantalum Trimer Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; Zhai, Hua Jin; Huang, Xin; Wang, Lai S.

    2008-10-03

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding in the Ta3- cluster are investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Photoelectron spectra are obtained for Ta3- at four photon energies: 532, 355, 266 and 193 nm. While congested spectra are observed at high electron binding energies, several low-lying electronic transitions are well resolved and compared with the theoretical calculations. The electron affinity of Ta3 is determined to be 1.35±0.03 eV. Extensive density functional calculations are performed at the B3LYP/Stuttgart +2f1g level to locate the ground state and low-lying isomers for Ta3 and Ta3-. The ground state for the Ta3- anion is shown to be a quintet (5A1') with D3h symmetry, whereas two nearly isoenergetic states, C2v (4A1) and D3h (6A1'), are found to compete for the ground state for neutral Ta3. A detailed molecular orbital analysis is performed to elucidate the chemical boding in Ta3-, which is found to possess multiple d-orbital aromaticity, commensurate with its highly symmetric D3h structure.

  12. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of chemically-bonded phosphate ceramics containing TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Monize Aparecida; de Lima, Bruna de Oliveira; Ferreira, Leticia Patrício; Colonetti, Emerson; Feltrin, Jucilene; De Noni, Agenor

    2017-05-01

    Titanium dioxide was incorporated into chemically-bonded phosphate ceramic for use as photocatalytic inorganic coating. The coatings obtained were applied to unglazed ceramic tiles and cured at 350 °C. The surfaces were characterized by photocatalytic activity, determined in aqueous medium, based on the degradation of methylene blue dye. The effects of the percentage of TiO2 and the thickness of the layer on the photocatalytic efficiency were evaluated. The influence of the incorporation of TiO2 on the consolidation of the phosphate matrix coating was investigated using the wear resistance test. The crystalline phases of the coatings obtained were determined by XRD. The microstructure of the surfaces was analyzed by SEM. The thermal curing treatment did not cause a phase transition from anatase to rutile. An increase in the photocatalytic activity of the coating was observed with an increase in the TiO2 content. The dye degradation indices ranged from 14.9 to 44.0%. The photocatalytic efficiency was not correlated with the thickness of the coating layer deposited. The resistance to wear decreased with an increase in the TiO2 content. Comparison with a commercial photocatalytic ceramic coating indicated that there is a range of values for the TiO2 contents which offer potential for photocatalytic applications.

  13. Chemical bonding in excited states: Energy transfer and charge redistribution from a real space perspective.

    PubMed

    Jara-Cortés, Jesús; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Martín Pendás, Ángel; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús

    2017-05-15

    This work provides a novel interpretation of elementary processes of photophysical relevance from the standpoint of the electron density using simple model reactions. These include excited states of H2 taken as a prototype for a covalent bond, excimer formation of He2 to analyze non-covalent interactions, charge transfer by an avoided crossing of electronic states in LiF and conical interesections involved in the intramolecular scrambling in C2 H4 . The changes of the atomic and interaction energy components along the potential energy profiles are described by the interacting quantum atoms approach and the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Additionally, the topological analysis of one- and two-electron density functions is used to explore basic reaction mechanisms involving excited and degenerate states in connection with the virial theorem. This real space approach allows to describe these processes in a unified way, showing its versatility and utility in the study of chemical systems in excited states. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Use of novel chitosan hydrogels for chemical tissue bonding of autologous chondral transplants.

    PubMed

    Gittens, Jamila; Haleem, Amgad M; Grenier, Stephanie; Smyth, Niall A; Hannon, Charles P; Ross, Keir A; Torzilli, Peter A; Kennedy, John G

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of chemical tissue bonding (CTB) on adhesion strength, fluid permeability, and cell viability across a cartilaginous graft-host interface in an in vitro autologous chondral transplant (ACT) model. Chitosan-based cross-linkers; Chitosan-Rose Bengal [Chi-RB (Ch-ABC)], Chitosan-Genipin [Chi-GP (Ch-ABC)], and Chitosan-Rose Bengal-Genipin [Chi-RB-GP (Ch-ABC)] were applied to bovine immature cartilage explants after pre-treatment with surface degrading enzyme, Chondroitinase-ABC (Ch-ABC). Adhesion strength, fluid permeability and cell viability were assessed via mechanical push-out shear testing, fluid transport and live/dead cell staining, respectively. All three chitosan-based cross-linkers significantly increased the adhesion strength at the graft-host interface, however, only a statistically significant decrease in fluid permeability was noted in Chi-GP (Ch-ABC) specimen compared to untreated controls. Cell viability was maintained for 7 days of culture across all three treatment groups. These results show the potential clinical relevance of novel chitosan-based hydrogels in enhancing tissue integration and reducing synovial fluid penetration after ACT procedures in diarthoidal joints such as the knee and ankle. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1139-1146, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Structural transformation with "negative volume expansion": chemical bonding and physical behavior of TiGePt.

    PubMed

    Ackerbauer, S-V; Senyshyn, A; Borrmann, H; Burkhardt, U; Ormeci, A; Rosner, H; Schnelle, W; Gamża, M; Gumeniuk, R; Ramlau, R; Bischoff, E; Schuster, J C; Weitzer, F; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tjeng, L H; Grin, Yu

    2012-05-14

    The synthesis and a joint experimental and theoretical study of the crystal structure and physical properties of the new ternary intermetallic compound TiGePt are presented. Upon heating, TiGePt exhibits an unusual structural phase transition with a huge volume contraction of about 10 %. The transformation is characterized by a strong change in the physical properties, in particular, by an insulator-metal transition. At temperatures below 885 °C TiGePt crystallizes in the cubic MgAgAs (half-Heusler) type (LT phase, space group F43m, a = 5.9349(2) Å). At elevated temperatures, the crystal structure of TiGePt transforms into the TiNiSi structure type (HT phase, space group Pnma, a = 6.38134(9) Å, b = 3.89081(5) Å, c = 7.5034(1) Å). The reversible, temperature-dependent structural transition was investigated by in-situ neutron powder diffraction and dilatometry measurements. The insulator-metal transition, indicated by resistivity measurements, is in accord with band structure calculations yielding a gap of about 0.9 eV for the LT phase and a metallic HT phase. Detailed analysis of the chemical bonding in both modifications revealed an essential change of the Ti-Pt and Ti-Ge interactions as the origin of the dramatic changes in the physical properties.

  16. Principles of Chemical Bonding and Band Gap Engineering in Hybrid Organic–Inorganic Halide Perovskites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The performance of solar cells based on hybrid halide perovskites has seen an unparalleled rate of progress, while our understanding of the underlying physical chemistry of these materials trails behind. Superficially, CH3NH3PbI3 is similar to other thin-film photovoltaic materials: a semiconductor with an optical band gap in the optimal region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Microscopically, the material is more unconventional. Progress in our understanding of the local and long-range chemical bonding of hybrid perovskites is discussed here, drawing from a series of computational studies involving electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo simulation techniques. The orientational freedom of the dipolar methylammonium ion gives rise to temperature-dependent dielectric screening and the possibility for the formation of polar (ferroelectric) domains. The ability to independently substitute on the A, B, and X lattice sites provides the means to tune the optoelectronic properties. Finally, ten critical challenges and opportunities for physical chemists are highlighted. PMID:25838846

  17. Coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin: the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korlyukov, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The review is devoted to analysis and generalization of the results of (i) quantum chemical studies on the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin in crystals, in solutions and in the gas phase and (ii) experimental investigations of the electron density distribution in these systems. The bibliography includes 147 references. In memoriam of Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences M Yu Antipin (1951 - 2013), Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences M G Voronkov (1921 - 2014) and Dr. S P Knyazev, Lomonosov Moscow University of Fine Chemical Technology (1949 - 2012).

  18. The Influence of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Students' Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Attitude toward Chemistry: A Case for Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmen, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the effect of computer-assisted instruction on conceptual understanding of chemical bonding and attitude toward chemistry was investigated. The study employed a quasi-experimental design involving 11 grade students; 25 in an experimental and 25 in a control group. The Chemical Bonding Achievement Test (CBAT) consisting of 15…

  19. From Common Sense Concepts to Scientifically Conditioned Concepts of Chemical Bonding: An Historical and Textbook Approach Designed to Address Learning and Teaching Issues at the Secondary School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croft, Michael; de Berg, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper selects six key alternative conceptions identified in the literature on student understandings of chemical bonding and illustrates how a historical analysis and a textbook analysis can inform these conceptions and lead to recommendations for improving the teaching and learning of chemical bonding at the secondary school level. The…

  20. From Common Sense Concepts to Scientifically Conditioned Concepts of Chemical Bonding: An Historical and Textbook Approach Designed to Address Learning and Teaching Issues at the Secondary School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croft, Michael; de Berg, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper selects six key alternative conceptions identified in the literature on student understandings of chemical bonding and illustrates how a historical analysis and a textbook analysis can inform these conceptions and lead to recommendations for improving the teaching and learning of chemical bonding at the secondary school level. The…

  1. Proteolysis approach without chemical modification for a simple and rapid analysis of disulfide bonds using thermostable protease-immobilized microreactors.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya; Maeda, Hideaki

    2010-08-01

    Disulfide bonds in proteins are important not only for the conformational stability of the protein but also for the regulation of oxidation-reduction in signal transduction. The conventional method for the assignment of disulfide bond by chemical cleavage and/or proteolysis is a time-consuming multi-step procedure. In this study, we report a simple and rapid analysis of disulfide bond from protein digests that were prepared by the thermostable protease-immobilized microreactors. The feasibility and performance of this approach were evaluated by digesting lysozyme and BSA at several temperatures. The proteins which stabilize their conformations by disulfide bonds were thermally denatured during proteolysis and were efficiently digested by the immobilized protease but not by free protease. The digests were directly analyzed by ESI-TOF MS without any purification or concentration step. All four disulfide bonds on lysozyme and 10 of 17 on BSA were assigned from the digests by the trypsin-immobilized microreactor at 50 degrees C. The procedure for proteolysis and the assignment were achieved within 2 h without any reduction and alkylation procedure. From the present results, the proteolysis approach by the thermostable protease-immobilized microreactor provides a strategy for the high-throughput analysis of disulfide bond in proteomics.

  2. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  3. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  4. Cutting a chemical bond with demon's scissors: Mode- and bond-selective reactivity of methane on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, A.; Shen, X. J.; Moiraghi, R.; Dong, W.; Busnengo, H. F.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we discuss several aspects of methane reactive sticking on Pt(111) in the light of supersonic molecular beam experiments (including state-resolved measurements) and quasi-classical trajectory calculations based on an accurate reaction specific reactive force field constructed from Density Functional Theory (DFT) data. With the aim of understanding the origin of the full bond selectivity recently achieved experimentally and to predict how selectivity depends on the collision conditions, we discuss in detail, the role of initial translational and (mode-specific) vibrational energy of CH4 and all its deuterated isotopomers, as well as surface temperature effects. Last but not least, the systematic and detailed theoretical analysis presented here serves as an illustration of the possibilities and usefulness of accurate reaction specific reactive force fields built from DFT data. This approach allows investigating dynamical aspects of the interaction of polyatomic molecules on surfaces through quasi-classical trajectory calculations accounting for the full dimensionality of the system (including both molecular and surface degrees of freedom): something that a few years ago was just a dream for the gas-surface dynamics community.

  5. Insight into shock-induced chemical reaction from the perspective of ring strain and rotation of chemical bonds.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bisheng; Long, Xinping; Li, Jinshan; Nie, Fude; Huang, Jinglun

    2012-12-01

    Density functional theory BLYP/DNP and hyperhomodesmotic equations were employed to calculate ring strain energy, the bond dissociation energy of X-NO(2) (X=C, N) and the charges on the nitro groups of several four-membered and six-membered heterocycle compounds. BLYP/DNP and LST/QST + CG method were also applied to calculate bond rotational energy of X-NO(2) (X=C, N) of above mentioned compounds. It indicated that ring strain energy of four-membered heterocycle nitro compounds is apparently higher than that of six-membered heterocycle nitro compounds. Predictably, ring-opening reactions may preferentially occur for those compounds containing higher ring strain energy under shock. In addition, C-NO(2) bonds in these compounds may rotate easier than N-NO(2) bonds in response to the external shock. As for N-NO(2) bonds in these compounds, they also respond to the external shock by the rotation of N-NO(2) bonds, once to the saddle point of the rotational energy barrier, the whole molecule will become relaxed, N-NO(2) bond becomes weaker and eventually leads to the breakage. When one -C=O, -C=NH or -NH(2) group is introduced to the six-membered heterocycle, the charges on the nitro groups of the new compound decrease drastically, and ring strains increase remarkably. It can be predicted that the new compounds will be more sensitive to shock, and the viewpoint is confirmed by the experimental results of shock sensitivity (small scale gap test) of several explosives.

  6. Electronic structure of β-RbSm(MoO₄)₂ and chemical bonding in molybdates.

    PubMed

    Atuchin, V V; Aleksandrovsky, A S; Chimitova, O D; Diao, Cheng-Peng; Gavrilova, T A; Kesler, V G; Molokeev, M S; Krylov, A S; Bazarov, B G; Bazarova, J G; Lin, Zheshuai

    2015-01-28

    Microcrystals of orthorhombic rubidium samarium molybdate, β-RbSm(MoO4)2, have been fabricated by solid state synthesis at T = 450 °C, 70 h, and at T = 600 °C, 150 h. The crystal structure has been refined by the Rietveld method in space group Pbcn with cell parameters a = 5.0984(2), b = 18.9742(6) and c = 8.0449(3) Å (R(B) = 1.72%). Thermal properties of β-RbSm(MoO4)2 were traced by DSC over the temperature range of T = 20-965 °C, and the earlier reported β ↔ α phase transition at T ∼ 860-910 °C was not verified. The electronic structure of β-RbSm(MoO4)2 was studied by employing theoretical calculations and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It has been established that the O 2p-like states contribute mainly to the upper part of the valence band and occupy the valence band maximum, whereas the Mo 4d-like states contribute mainly to the lower part of the valence band. Chemical bonding effects have been analysed from the element core level binding energy data. In addition, it was found that the luminescence spectrum of β-RbSm(MoO4)2 is rather peculiar among the Sm(3+) containing materials. The optical refractive index dispersion in β-RbSm(MoO4)2 was also predicted by the first-principles calculations.

  7. Crystallization characteristics and chemical bonding properties of nickel carbide thin film nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Andrej; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf; Magnuson, Martin

    2014-10-15

    The crystal structure and chemical bonding of magnetron-sputtering deposited nickel carbide Ni₁-xCx (0.05 ⩽ x⩽0.62) thin films have been investigated by high-resolution x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. By using x-ray as well as electron diffraction, we found carbon-containing hcp-Ni (hcp-NiCy phase), instead of the expected rhombohedral-Ni₃C. At low carbon content (4.9 at%), the thin film consists of hcp-NiCy nanocrystallites mixed with a smaller amount of fcc-NiCx. The average grain size is about 10-20 nm. With the increase of carbon content to 16.3 at%, the film contains single-phase hcp-NiCy nanocrystallites with expanded lattice parameters. With a further increase of carbon content to 38 at%, and 62 at%, the films transform to x-ray amorphous materials with hcp-NiCy and fcc-NiCx nanodomain structures in an amorphous carbon-rich matrix. Raman spectra of carbon indicate dominant sp(2) hybridization, consistent with photoelectron spectra that show a decreasing amount of C-Ni phase with increasing carbon content. The Ni 3d-C 2p hybridization in the hexagonal structure gives rise to the salient double-peak structure in Ni 2p soft x-ray absorption spectra at 16.3 at% that changes with carbon content. We also show that the resistivity is not only governed by the amount of carbon, but increases by more than a factor of two when the samples transform from crystalline to amorphous.

  8. X-ray photoelectron spectra structure and chemical bond nature in NpO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teterin, Yu. A.; Teterin, A. Yu.; Ivanov, K. E.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Maslakov, K. I.; Kalmykov, St. N.; Petrov, V. G.; Enina, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis was done of the x-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy (BE) range of 0 to ˜35 eV for neptunium dioxide (NpO2) valence electrons. The BEs and structure of the core electronic shells (˜35-1250 eV) as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the finite fragment of the NpO2 lattice and the data of other authors were taken into account. The experimental data show that the many-body effects and the multiplet splitting contribute to the spectral structure much less than the effects of formation of the outer (0-˜15 eV) and the inner (˜15-˜35 eV) valence molecular orbitals (OVMO and IVMO, respectively). The filled Np 5f electronic states were shown to form in the NpO2 valence band. The Np 6p electrons participate in formation of both the IVMO and the OVMO (bands). The filled Np 6p3/2 and the O 2s electronic shells were found to take the maximum part in the IVMO formation. The MO composition and the sequence order in the BE range 0-˜35 eV in NpO2 were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative MO scheme for NpO2, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in neptunium dioxide and the interpretation of other x-ray spectra of NpO2.

  9. Overlap in Bibliographic Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, William W.; Wilson, Concepcion S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the topic of Fuzzy Set Theory to determine the overlap of coverage in bibliographic databases. Highlights include examples of comparisons of database coverage; frequency distribution of the degree of overlap; records with maximum overlap; records unique to one database; intra-database duplicates; and overlap in the top ten databases.…

  10. A Simple Visualization of Double Bond Properties: Chemical Reactivity and UV Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    A simple, easily visualized thin-layer chromatography (TLC) staining experiment is presented that highlights the difference in reactivity between aromatic double bonds and nonaromatic double bonds. Although the stability of aromatic systems is a major theme in organic chemistry, the concept is rarely reinforced "visually" in the undergraduate…

  11. A Simple Visualization of Double Bond Properties: Chemical Reactivity and UV Fluorescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    A simple, easily visualized thin-layer chromatography (TLC) staining experiment is presented that highlights the difference in reactivity between aromatic double bonds and nonaromatic double bonds. Although the stability of aromatic systems is a major theme in organic chemistry, the concept is rarely reinforced "visually" in the undergraduate…

  12. Crystal chemical information to be obtained from the bond-number equality concept.

    PubMed

    Parthé, Erwin

    2006-04-01

    Based on the bond-number equality concept an equation is derived for anion complexes of normal valence compounds with triangularly and/or tetrahedrally coordinated central atoms and anions having one, two, three and four bonds to central atoms: %delta = 4 - (n/m') x [2 - %A[1] + %A[3] + 2 x %A[4

  13. Orbital interpretation of kinetic energy density and a direct space comparison of chemical bonding in tetrahedral network solids.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Weng, Chang'e

    2008-08-21

    We present how the kinetic energy density (KED) can be interpreted on the basis of the orbital interactions within the Kohn-Sham theory and propose how to utilize a direct space function in chemical bonding analysis, the relative entropy density (RED), which is constructed from the KED, the Thomas-Fermi KED (TF-KED), and the electron density. From the detailed analysis of the KED of wave functions and the TF-KED from the free electron model, it is shown that the RED can reveal the nodal properties of individual wave functions and provide a variationally meaningful way of accumulating chemical bonding information from the wave functions, hence allowing quantitative bonding analysis in direct space. To substantiate the proposal, the RED function has been tested on the tetrahedral network solids, including the group 14 elements and the III-V binary compounds with the zinc blende structure. The direct space maps of the RED quantitatively reflect the trend in metallicity and the polarity of their two-center, two-electron bonds in terms of the absolute values of the RED, the location of the minimum values, and the behavior of the deformation from the spherical symmetry of the atomic RED.

  14. Anisotropy of chemical bonds in collagen molecules studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond S K; Metzler, Rebecca A; Gilbert, Pupa U P A; Beniash, Elia

    2012-03-16

    Collagen type I fibrils are the major building blocks of connective tissues. Collagen fibrils are anisotropic supramolecular structures, and their orientation can be revealed by polarized light microscopy and vibrational microspectroscopy. We hypothesized that the anisotropy of chemical bonds in the collagen molecules, and hence their orientation, might also be detected by X-ray photoemission electron spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, which use linearly polarized synchrotron light. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed sections of rat-tail tendon, composed of parallel arrays of collagen fibrils. The results clearly indicate that XANES-PEEM is sensitive to collagen fibril orientation and, more specifically, to the orientations of carbonyl and amide bonds in collagen molecules. These data suggest that XANES-PEEM is a promising technique for characterizing the chemical composition and structural organization at the nanoscale of collagen-based connective tissues, including tendons, cartilage, and bone.

  15. Temperature-dependent structures and chemical bonding states of the calcium chlorapatite powders doped with rare-earth-ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kyong-Soo; Yang, Ho-Soon

    2017-02-01

    Calcium chlorapatite powders doped with rare-earth-ions are synthesized by using the solid-state reaction method and sintering at 1,100 °C and 1,300 °C, respectively. This study focuses on the crystal structures and the chemical bonding states of calcium chlorapatite powders for different sintering temperatures, doping elements, and doping concentrations. The characterized physical properties show that the apatite powders exhibit two phases based on the sintering temperatures: the powders sintered at temperatures below 1,100 °C have a hexagonal structure while those sintered at 1,300 °C have a monoclinic structure. That is, the apatite compounds sintered at higher temperatures show a structure with a lower space symmetry. The chemical bonding states of the synthesized powders remain unchanged regardless of the amount of doped rare-earths and the sintering temperature.

  16. In vivo study of the early bone-bonding ability of Ti meshes formed with calcium titanate via chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yi; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-12-01

    Alkali and heat (AH) treatment forming sodium titanate has been shown to connect bioinert Ti metal and bone tissue. Artificial joints treated with this method have achieved extensive clinical application. Recently a new chemical treatment of Alkali-Calcium-Heat-Water (ACaHW) treatment forming calcium titanate was proposed. Notably, the apatite-forming ability of this treatment is greater than that of AH treatment, as verified in vitro. However, the early bone-bonding abilities of the two treatments have not been compared in vivo. To simulate clinical application, we treated a commercially pure Ti (Cp-Ti) mesh implant with AH or ACaHW. Then, using mechanical and histological methods, we compared the bone-bonding abilities of the two treatments early during the implantation process (2-4 weeks); untreated Cp-Ti mesh was used as a control. Because the mesh structure might influence bone-bonding ability, we compared these bonding abilities with values obtained at 4 and 8 weeks using a Cp-Ti implant with a plate structure. In the mesh group, histological comparisons at 2 and 3 weeks indicated that ACaHW treatment resulted in a bone-bonding ability similar to that of AH treatment; ACaHW exhibited a greater bonding ability than AH at 4 weeks. However, in tests of the plate group at later time points, such differences were not apparent. The results obtained here indicate that during the early stage of embedment, ACaHW treatment of Cp-Ti mesh implants yields a higher bone-bonding ability than AH treatment, thus providing a positive reference for future clinical applications.

  17. Characteristics of hydrogen bond revealed from water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yan; Chen, Hongshan; Zhang, Cairong; Zhang, Yan; Yin, Yuehong

    2014-09-01

    The hydrogen bond network is responsible for the exceptional physical and chemical properties of water, however, the description of hydrogen bond remains a challenge for the studies of condensed water. The investigation of structural and binding properties of water clusters provides a key for understanding the H-bonds in bulk water. In this paper, a new set of geometric parameters are defined to describe the extent of the overlap between the bonding orbital of the donor OH and the nonbonding orbital of the lone-pair of the acceptor molecule. This orbital overlap plays a dominant role for the strength of H-bonds. The dependences of the binding energy of the water dimer on these parameters are studied. The results show that these parameters properly describe the H-bond strength. The ring, book, cage and prism isomers of water hexamer form 6, 7, 8 and 9 H-bonds, and the strength of the bonding in these isomers changes markedly. The internally-solvated and the all-surface structures of (H2O) n for n = 17, 19 and 21 are nearly isoenergetic. The internally-solvated isomers form fewer but stronger H-bonds. The hydrogen bonding in the above clusters are investigated in detail. The geometric parameters can well describe the characters of the H-bonds, and they correlate well with the H-bond strength. For the structures forming stronger H-bonds, the H-bond lengths are shorter, the angle parameters are closer to the optimum values, and their rms deviations are smaller. The H-bonds emanating from DDAA and DDA molecules as H-donor are relatively weak. The vibrational spectra of (H2O) n ( n = 17, 19 and 21) are studied as well. The stretching vibration of the intramolecular OH bond is sensitive to its bonding environment. The H-bond strength judged from the geometric parameters is in good agreement with the bonding strength judged from the stretching frequencies.

  18. The Load and Time Dependence of Chemical Bonding-Induced Frictional Ageing of Silica at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, K.; Gosvami, N. N.; Goldsby, D. L.; Carpick, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are empirical relationships that describe the frictional behavior of rocks and other materials in experiments, and reproduce a variety of observed natural behavior when employed in earthquake models. A pervasive observation from rock friction experiments is the linear increase of static friction with the log of contact time, or 'ageing'. Ageing is usually attributed to an increase in real area of contact associated with asperity creep. However, recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrate that ageing of nanoscale silica-silica contacts is due to progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds in the absence of plastic deformation, in a manner consistent with the multi-contact ageing behavior of rocks [Li et al., 2011]. To further investigate chemical bonding-induced ageing, we explored the influence of normal load (and thus contact normal stress) and contact time on ageing. Experiments that mimic slide-hold-slide rock friction experiments were conducted in the AFM for contact loads and hold times ranging from 23 to 393 nN and 0.1 to 100 s, respectively, all in humid air (~50% RH) at room temperature. Experiments were conducted by sequentially sliding the AFM tip on the sample at a velocity V of 0.5 μm/s, setting V to zero and holding the tip stationary for a given time, and finally resuming sliding at 0.5 μm/s to yield a peak value of friction followed by a drop to the sliding friction value. Chemical bonding-induced ageing, as measured by the peak friction minus the sliding friction, increases approximately linearly with the product of normal load and the log of the hold time. Theoretical studies of the roles of reaction energy barriers in nanoscale ageing indicate that frictional ageing depends on the total number of reaction sites and the hold time [Liu & Szlufarska, 2012]. We combine chemical kinetics analyses with contact mechanics models to explain our results, and develop a new approach for curve

  19. Determining chemical reactivity driving biological activity from SMILES transformations: the bonding mechanism of anti-HIV pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Dudaş, Nicoleta A

    2013-07-30

    Assessing the molecular mechanism of a chemical-biological interaction and bonding stands as the ultimate goal of any modern quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study. To this end the present work employs the main chemical reactivity structural descriptors (electronegativity, chemical hardness, chemical power, electrophilicity) to unfold the variational QSAR though their min-max correspondence principles as applied to the Simplified Molecular Input Line Entry System (SMILES) transformation of selected uracil derivatives with anti-HIV potential with the aim of establishing the main stages whereby the given compounds may inhibit HIV infection. The bonding can be completely described by explicitly considering by means of basic indices and chemical reactivity principles two forms of SMILES structures of the pyrimidines, the Longest SMILES Molecular Chain (LoSMoC) and the Branching SMILES (BraS), respectively, as the effective forms involved in the anti-HIV activity mechanism and according to the present work, also necessary intermediates in molecular pathways targeting/docking biological sites of interest.

  20. Comparison of a 4000-reaction chemical mechanism with the carbon bond IV and an adjusted carbon bond IV-EX mechanism using SMVGEAR II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinyou; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    The well-known carbon bond IV (CBIV) chemical mechanism (33 species, 81 reactions) is compared with an adjusted carbon bond mechanism (ACBM) (109 species, 233 reactions) and a more explicit master chemical mechanism (MCM) (1427 species, 3911 reactions) in tests of their predictions of O 3, NO x(=NO+NO 2), HCHO, HNO 3, H 2O 2, and peroxyacetlynitrate (PAN). The ACBM was developed from a fourth mechanism, the expanded carbon bond mechanism (CBM-EX), by explicitly including the decomposition of C 2H 6, C 3H 8, and C 3H 6. All three mechanisms tested were updated with the inorganic chemistry from the ACBM and implemented into the sparse-matrix, ordinary differential equation solver, SMVGEAR II. Sparse-matrix treatment in SMVGEAR II reduced the number of calculations during matrix decomposition for the MCM by a factor of 15,000 (99.995%), or from an estimated 154 h to 37 s of cpu time per simulation day in one grid cell on an SGI origin 2000, in comparison with a full-matrix solution. Computer time for each mechanism was linearly proportional to the number of species in the mechanism. It is shown that the three mechanisms agreed closely when aromatic concentrations were initially low in comparison with alkane, alkene, and aldehyde initial concentrations. When aromatic concentrations were initially high (higher than that observed in urban air), the yields of O 3, HCHO, and PAN differed significantly among the three mechanisms although the daily maximum concentrations of these species agreed better. The aromatic representation in MCM appears to lead to systematic overprediction of ozone, according to a comparison with smog chamber data. For initial conditions taken from measurements at nine sites in Los Angeles, the daily maximum concentrations of O 3, HCHO, PAN, and H 2O 2 predicted by the three mechanisms differed by 30-50%, 10-40%, 15-40%, and 60-80%, respectively. The relative differences between the daytime series of O 3, HCHO, H 2O 2, and PAN predicted by the three

  1. Indications of chemical bond contrast in AFM images of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface

    PubMed Central

    Labidi, Hatem; Koleini, Mohammad; Huff, Taleana; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Pitters, Jason; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    The origin of bond-resolved atomic force microscope images remains controversial. Moreover, most work to date has involved planar, conjugated hydrocarbon molecules on a metal substrate thereby limiting knowledge of the generality of findings made about the imaging mechanism. Here we report the study of a very different sample; a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface. A procedure to obtain a passivated hydrogen-functionalized tip is defined and evolution of atomic force microscopy images at different tip elevations are shown. At relatively large tip-sample distances, the topmost atoms appear as distinct protrusions. However, on decreasing the tip-sample distance, features consistent with the silicon covalent bonds of the surface emerge. Using a density functional tight-binding-based method to simulate atomic force microscopy images, we reproduce the experimental results. The role of the tip flexibility and the nature of bonds and false bond-like features are discussed. PMID:28194036

  2. Indications of chemical bond contrast in AFM images of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labidi, Hatem; Koleini, Mohammad; Huff, Taleana; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Pitters, Jason; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2017-02-01

    The origin of bond-resolved atomic force microscope images remains controversial. Moreover, most work to date has involved planar, conjugated hydrocarbon molecules on a metal substrate thereby limiting knowledge of the generality of findings made about the imaging mechanism. Here we report the study of a very different sample; a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface. A procedure to obtain a passivated hydrogen-functionalized tip is defined and evolution of atomic force microscopy images at different tip elevations are shown. At relatively large tip-sample distances, the topmost atoms appear as distinct protrusions. However, on decreasing the tip-sample distance, features consistent with the silicon covalent bonds of the surface emerge. Using a density functional tight-binding-based method to simulate atomic force microscopy images, we reproduce the experimental results. The role of the tip flexibility and the nature of bonds and false bond-like features are discussed.

  3. Promoting Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Spontaneity through Student Explanation and Integration of Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teichert, Melonie A.; Stacy, Angelica M.

    2002-01-01

    Explores the effectiveness of intervention discussion sections for a college general chemistry course designed to apply research on student preconceptions, knowledge integration, and student explanations. Describes the testing of two interventions on bond energy and spontaneity. (Contains 44 references.) (DDR)

  4. Influence of the chemical bond on the K emission spectrum of oxygen and fluorine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, A. S.

    1971-01-01

    The K emission spectrum of oxygen and fluorine from a number of simple oxides and fluorides is divided into three to six sub-peaks. The spectra of many of these oxides and fluorides resemble one another owing to their basically ionic bonding. Certain sub-peaks, however, are ascribed to cross-over transitions and partially covalent energy levels. The different fluorine spectrum of Teflon is due to the hybrid nature of its covalent bonds.

  5. Chemically distinct transition states govern rapid dissociation of single L-selectin bonds under force

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Evan; Leung, Andrew; Hammer, Dan; Simon, Scott

    2001-01-01

    Carbohydrate–protein bonds interrupt the rapid flow of leukocytes in the circulation by initiation of rolling and tethering at vessel walls. The cell surface carbohydrate ligands are glycosylated proteins like the mucin P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), which bind ubiquitously to the family of E-, P-, and L-selectin proteins in membranes of leukocytes and endothelium. The current view is that carbohydrate–selectin bonds dissociate a few times per second, and the unbinding rate increases weakly with force. However, such studies have provided little insight into how numerous hydrogen bonds, a Ca2+ metal ion bond, and other interactions contribute to the mechanical strength of these attachments. Decorating a force probe with very dilute ligands and controlling touch to achieve rare single-bond events, we have varied the unbinding rates of carbohydrate–selectin bonds by detachment with ramps of force/time from 10 to 100,000 pN/sec. Testing PSGL-1, its outer 19 aa (19FT), and sialyl LewisX (sLeX) against L-selectin in vitro on glass microspheres and in situ on neutrophils, we found that the unbinding rates followed the same dependence on force and increased by nearly 1,000-fold as rupture forces rose from a few to ≈200 pN. Plotted on a logarithmic scale of loading rate, the rupture forces reveal two prominent energy barriers along the unbinding pathway. Strengths above 75 pN arise from rapid detachment (<0.01 sec) impeded by an inner barrier that requires a Ca2+ bond between a single sLeX and the lectin domain. Strengths below 75 pN occur under slow detachment (>0.01 sec) impeded by the outer barrier, which appears to involve an array of weak (putatively hydrogen) bonds. PMID:11274395

  6. Influence of the chemical bond on the K emission spectrum of oxygen and fluorine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, A. S.

    1971-01-01

    The K emission spectrum of oxygen and fluorine from a number of simple oxides and fluorides is divided into three to six sub-peaks. The spectra of many of these oxides and fluorides resemble one another owing to their basically ionic bonding. Certain sub-peaks, however, are ascribed to cross-over transitions and partially covalent energy levels. The different fluorine spectrum of Teflon is due to the hybrid nature of its covalent bonds.

  7. A photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio study of the structures and chemical bonding of the B25(-) cluster.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Zachary A; Popov, Ivan A; Li, Wei-Li; Pal, Rhitankar; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Boldyrev, Alexander I; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-07-21

    Photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations are used to investigate the structures and chemical bonding of the B25(-) cluster. Global minimum searches reveal a dense potential energy landscape with 13 quasi-planar structures within 10 kcal/mol at the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(d) level of theory. Three quasi-planar isomers (I, II, and III) are lowest in energy and nearly degenerate at the CCSD(T) level of theory, with II and III being 0.8 and 0.9 kcal/mol higher, respectively, whereas at two density functional levels of theory isomer III is the lowest in energy (8.4 kcal/mol more stable than I at PBE0/6-311+G(2df) level). Comparison with experimental photoelectron spectroscopic data shows isomer II to be the major contributor while isomers I and III cannot be ruled out as minor contributors to the observed spectrum. Theoretical analyses reveal similar chemical bonding in I and II, both involving peripheral 2c-2e B-B σ-bonding and delocalized interior σ- and π-bonding. Isomer III has an interesting elongated ribbon-like structure with a π-bonding pattern analogous to those of dibenzopentalene. The high density of low-lying isomers indicates the complexity of the medium-sized boron clusters; the method dependency of predicting relative energies of the low-lying structures for B25(-) suggests the importance of comparison with experiment in determining the global minima of boron clusters at this size range. The appearance of many low-lying quasi-planar structures containing a hexagonal hole in B25(-) suggests the importance of this structural feature in maintaining planarity of larger boron clusters.

  8. Accurate Dissociation of Chemical Bonds Using DFT-in-DFT Embedding Theory with External Orbital Orthogonality.

    PubMed

    Tamukong, Patrick K; Khait, Yuriy G; Hoffmann, Mark R

    2017-01-12

    Our recent density functional theory (DFT)-in-DFT embedding protocol, which enforces intersubsystem (or external orbital) orthogonality, is used for the first time to investigate covalent bond dissociation and is shown to do so accurately. Full potential energy curves for the dissociation of a H-O bond in H2O and the C-C bond in H3C-CH3 have been constructed using the new embedding method, as have the challenging ionic bonds in LiH and LiF, and were found to match the reference Kohn-Sham (KS)-DFT curves to at least one part in 10(6). The added constraint of external orbital orthogonality allows for the formulation of an embedding protocol that does not rely on approximate kinetic energy functionals for the evaluation of the so-called nonadditive kinetic potential, does not introduce compensatory potentials, and does not require a total system calculation at any stage. The present work extends the demonstrated applicability of the external orthogonality variant of embedding theory by more than a factor of 2 to the interaction strength range of strong single bonds. In particular, it is demonstrated that homolytic cleavage of both covalent and ionic bonds into radicals can be accomplished.

  9. Chemical-Assisted Bonding of Thermoplastics/Elastomer for Fabricating Microfluidic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Pan; Liu, Ke; Chen, Hong; Nishida, Toshikazu; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Thermoplastics such as cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) have been increasingly used in fabricating microfluidic devices. However, the state-of-the-art microvalve technology is a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based three-layer structure. In order to integrate such a valve with a thermoplastics-based microfluidic device, a bonding method for thermoplastics/PDMS must be developed. We report here a method to bond COC with PDMS through surface activation by corona discharge, surface modification using 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TMSPMA), and thermal annealing. The method is also applicable to PMMA. The bonding strength between thermoplastics and PDMS was represented by the peeling force, which was measured using a method established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The bonding strength measurement offered an objective and quantitative indicator for protocol optimization, as well as comparison with other PDMS-associated bonding methods. Using optimized bonding conditions, two valve arrays were fabricated in a COC/PDMS/COC device and cyclic operations of valve closing/opening were successfully demonstrated. The valve-containing devices withstood 100 psi (~689 KPa) without delamination. Further, we integrated such valve arrays in a device for protein separation and demonstrated isoelectric focusing in the presence of valves. PMID:21121689

  10. Experimental and theoretical charge density study of chemical bonding in a Co dimer complex.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Jacob; Clausen, Henrik F; Platts, Jamie A; Iversen, Bo B

    2008-03-26

    The charge density of Co2(CO)6(HC[triple bond]CC6H10OH) (1) in the crystalline state has been determined using multipolar refinement of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected (i) with a synchrotron source at very low temperatures (15 K) and (ii) using a conventional source with the crystal at intermediate temperature (100 K). The X-ray charge density model is augmented by complete active space and density functional theory calculations. Topological analyses of the different charge distributions show that the two Co atoms are not bonded to each other in the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) sense of the word. However, the behavior of the source function and the total energy density indicate that there is some bond-like character in the Co-Co interaction. The bridging alkyne fragment provides an unusual bonding situation, with extremely small electron density differences between the two Co-C bond critical points and the "CoC2" ring critical point. Thus, the structure is close to a topological catastrophe point. Comparison of the results obtained from the two diffraction data sets and ab initio theory suggests that the topology of the experimental electron density in this special atomic environment is highly sensitive to subtle effects of measurement errors and potential shortcomings of the multipole model, or to effects of the crystal field. Thus, even the two identical molecules in the asymmetric unit show altered bonding patterns.

  11. The pure rotational spectrum of HPS (X~1A'): Chemical bonding in second-row elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfen, D. T.; Clouthier, D. J.; Ziurys, L. M.; Lattanzi, V.; McCarthy, M. C.; Thaddeus, P.; Thorwirth, S.

    2011-04-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of HPS, as well as its 34S and D isotopologues, has been recorded at microwave, millimeter, and submillimeter wavelengths, the first observation of this molecule in the gas phase. The data were obtained using a combination of millimeter direct absorption, Fourier transform microwave (FTMW), and microwave-microwave double-resonance techniques, which cover the total frequency range from 15 to 419 GHz. Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP and CCSD(T) levels were also performed to aid in spectral identification. HPS was created in the direct absorption experiment from a mixture of elemental phosphorus, H2S, and Ar carrier gas; DPS was produced by adding D2. In the FTMW study, these species were generated in a pulsed discharge nozzle from PH3 and H2S or D2S, diluted in neon. The spectra recorded for HPS and its isotopologues exhibit clear asymmetric top patterns indicating bent structures; phosphorus hyperfine splittings were also observed in HPS, but not DPS. Analysis of the data yielded rotation, centrifugal distortion, and phosphorus nuclear spin-rotation parameters for the individual species. The rm(1) structure for HPS, calculated from the rotational constants, is r(H-P) = 1.438(1) Å, r(P-S) = 1.9320(1) Å, and θ(H-P-S) = 101.85(9)°. Empirically correcting for zero-point vibrational effects yields the geometry re(H-P) = 1.4321(2) Å, re(P-S) = 1.9287(1) Å, and θe(H-P-S) = 101.78(1)°, in close agreement with the rm(1) structure. A small inertial defect was found for HPS indicating a relatively rigid molecule. Based on these data, the bonding in this species is best represented as H-P=S, similar to the first-row analog HNO, as well as HNS and HPO. Therefore, substitution of phosphorus and sulfur for nitrogen and oxygen does not result in a dramatic structural change.

  12. The formation of new phase and chemical bonds in N-doped diamond films induced by swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. M.; Song, Y.; Liu, J.; Sun, Y. M.; Zhang, C. H.; Duan, J. L.; Jin, Y. F.

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, the formation of the new phase and chemical bonds in N-doped diamond films after swift heavy ion irradiations was studied. The original samples were diamond films grown on (1 1 1) oriented p-Si by CVD deposition. These samples were implanted with 100 keV N-ions at room temperature to 5 × 10 17, 1 × 10 18 and 5 × 10 18 N/cm 2, irradiated with 345 MeV Xe or 2.64 GeV U ions, and then analyzed by means of RBS, micro-FTIR, micro-Raman and XRD spectroscopy. The obtained results suggested that N-sp 2C and N-sp 3C bonds formed in all N-doped diamond films, CN bond exists in all 5 × 10 18 N/cm 2 doped samples but could not form in the 5 × 10 17 N/cm 2 doped samples. In the 1 × 10 18 N/cm 2 doped sample, CN bond could form only after swift heavy ion irradiation. Intense energy deposition from the incident swift heavy ions induces the increase of sp 3/sp 2 bonding ratio and thus enhances the formation of N-sp 3C bonds in the samples. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that there existed new phases, α- and β-C 3N 4 in the N-doped diamond samples after irradiation by swift heavy ions.

  13. Chemical bonding in phosphane and amine complexes of main group elements and transition metals.

    PubMed

    Bessac, Fabienne; Frenking, Gernot

    2006-08-21

    The geometries and bond dissociation energies of the main group complexes X3B-NX3, X3B-PX3, X3Al-NX3, and X3Al-PX3 (X = H, Me, Cl) and the transition metal complexes (CO)5M-NX3 and (CO)5M-PX3 (M = Cr, Mo, W) have been calculated using gradient-corrected density functional theory at the BP86/TZ2P level. The nature of the donor-acceptor bonds was investigated with an energy decomposition analysis. It is found that the bond dissociation energy is not a good measure for the intrinsic strength of Lewis acidity and basicity because the preparation energies of the fragments may significantly change the trend of the bond strength. The interaction energies between the frozen fragments of the borane complexes are in most cases larger than the interaction energies of the alane complexes. The bond dissociation energy of the alane complexes is sometimes higher than that of the borane analogues because the energy for distorting the planar equilibrium geometry of BX3 to the pyramidal from in the complexes is higher than for AlX3. Inspection of the three energy terms, DeltaE(Pauli), DeltaE(orb), and DeltaE(elstat), shows that all three of them must be considered to understand the trends of the Lewis acid and base strength. The orbital term of the donor-acceptor bonds with the Lewis bases NCl3 and PCl3 have a higher pi character than the bonds of EH3 and EMe3, but NCl3 and PCl3 are weaker Lewis bases because the lone-pair orbital at the donor atoms N and P has a high percent s character. The calculated DeltaE(int) values suggest that the trends of the intrinsic Lewis bases' strengths in the main-group complexes with BX3 and AlX3 are NMe3 > NH3 > NCl3 and PMe3 > PH3 > PCl3. The transition metal complexes exhibit a somewhat different order with NH3 > NMe3 > NCl3 and PMe3 > PH3 > PCl3. The slightly weaker bonding of NMe3 than that of NH3 comes from stronger Pauli repulsion. The bond length does not always correlate with the bond dissociation energy, nor does it always correlate with

  14. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE I REPORT AUGUST 1997 - JULY 1998

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.; YAGER,K.A.

    2002-08-05

    In exploring methods to recycle boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS), by-products generated from Keyspan's power plants, into commercially viable materials, we synthesized chemically bonded cements (CBC) offering the following three specific characteristics; (1) immobilization of hazardous heavy metals, such as Pb, Ni, and V, (2) rapid hardening and setting properties, and (3) development of high mechanical strength. The CBCs were prepared through an acid-base reaction between these by-products acting as the solid base reactants and the sodium polyphosphate solution as the cement-forming acid reactant, followed by a hydrating reaction. Furthermore, two additives, the calcium aluminate cements (CAC) and the calcium silicate cements (CSC) were incorporated into the CBC systems to improve their properties. Using a CBC formulation consisting of 53.8 wt% WWTS, 23.1 wt% CSC, and 23.1 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}]{sub 2} the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) tests showed that the concentrations of Pb, Ni, and V metals leached out from the specimens were minimal. This formulation originally contained {approx} 28800 mg/kg of Pb, {approx} 6300 mg/kg of Ni, and {approx} 11130 mg/kg of V; the amounts leaching into the acid extraction fluid were only 0.15 mg/L of Pb, 0.15 mg/L of Ni, and 4.63 mgiL of V. On the other hand, CBC specimens derived from a formulation consisting of 42 wt% BA, 18 wt% CAC and 40 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}] displayed an excellent compressive strength of 10.8 MPa at an early curing age of 2 hours after mixing at room temperature. The reason for its rapid hardening was due to a high exothermic energy evolved by the acid-base reaction. Furthermore, when these specimens were immersed for 28 days in water at 25 C, and exposed for 20 hours to steam at 80 C, a very high compressive strength of 3.32 MPa developed. Two physico-chemical factors played an important role in improving the mechanical strength of

  15. Geometries and tautomerism of OHN hydrogen bonds in aprotic solution probed by H/D isotope effects on (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, Peter M; Guo, Jing; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-10-14

    The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of 17 OHN hydrogen-bonded complexes formed by CH(3)(13)COOH(D) with 14 substituted pyridines, 2 amines, and N-methylimidazole have been measured in the temperature region between 110 and 150 K using CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl mixture as solvent. The slow proton and hydrogen bond exchange regime was reached, and the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group were measured. In combination with the analysis of the corresponding (1)H chemical shifts, it was possible to distinguish between OHN hydrogen bonds exhibiting a single proton position and those exhibiting a fast proton tautomerism between molecular and zwitterionic forms. Using H-bond correlations, we relate the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group with the OHN hydrogen bond geometries.

  16. Comparison of shear bond strength of resin reinforced chemical cure glass ionomer, conventional chemical cure glass ionomer and chemical cure composite resin in direct bonding systems: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kolasani Srinivasa; Reddy, T Praveen Kumar; Yugandhar, Garlapati; Kumar, B Sunil; Reddy, S N Chandrasekhar; Babu, Devatha Ashok

    2013-01-01

    The acid pretreatment and use of composite resins as the bonding medium has disadvantages like scratching and loss of surface enamel, decalcification, etc. To overcome disadvantages of composite resins, glass ionomers and its modifications are being used for bonding. The study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of resin reinforced glass ionomer as a direct bonding system with conventional glass ionomer cement and composite resin. The study showed that shear bond strength of composite resin has the higher value than both resin reinforced glass ionomer and conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration and it increased from 1 to 24 hours in all groups. The shear bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement was higher than the conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration. Conditioning with polyacrylic acid improved the bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement significantly but not statistically significant in the case of conventional glass ionomer cement.

  17. Chemical Warfare Agent Surface Adsorption: Hydrogen Bonding of Sarin and Soman to Amorphous Silica.

    PubMed

    Davis, Erin Durke; Gordon, Wesley O; Wilmsmeyer, Amanda R; Troya, Diego; Morris, John R

    2014-04-17

    Sarin and soman are warfare nerve agents that represent some of the most toxic compounds ever synthesized. The extreme risk in handling such molecules has, until now, precluded detailed research into the surface chemistry of agents. We have developed a surface science approach to explore the fundamental nature of hydrogen bonding forces between these agents and a hydroxylated surface. Infrared spectroscopy revealed that both agents adsorb to amorphous silica through the formation of surprisingly strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with primarily isolated silanol groups (SiOH). Comparisons with previous theoretical results reveal that this bonding occurs almost exclusively through the phosphoryl oxygen (P═O) of the agent. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments determined that the activation energy for hydrogen bond rupture and desorption of sarin and soman was 50 ± 2 and 52 ± 2 kJ/mol, respectively. Together with results from previous studies involving other phosphoryl-containing molecules, we have constructed a detailed understanding of the structure-function relationship for nerve agent hydrogen bonding at the gas-surface interface.

  18. Advanced Sodium Ion Battery Anode Constructed via Chemical Bonding between Phosphorus, Carbon Nanotube, and Cross-Linked Polymer Binder.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiangxuan; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail L; Li, Xiaolin; Peng, Huisheng; Wang, Donghai

    2015-12-22

    Maintaining structural stability is a great challenge for high-capacity conversion electrodes with large volume change but is necessary for the development of high-energy-density, long-cycling batteries. Here, we report a stable phosphorus anode for sodium ion batteries by the synergistic use of chemically bonded phosphorus-carbon nanotube (P-CNT) hybrid and cross-linked polymer binder. The P-CNT hybrid was synthesized through ball-milling of red phosphorus and carboxylic group functionalized carbon nanotubes. The P-O-C bonds formed in this process help maintain contact between phosphorus and CNTs, leading to a durable hybrid. In addition, cross-linked carboxymethyl cellulose-citric acid binder was used to form a robust electrode. As a result, this anode delivers a stable cycling capacity of 1586.2 mAh/g after 100 cycles, along with high initial Coulombic efficiency of 84.7% and subsequent cycling efficiency of ∼99%. The unique electrode framework through chemical bonding strategy reported here is potentially inspirable for other electrode materials with large volume change in use.

  19. Decay Rate of Correlated Real-Space Delocalization Measures: Insights into Chemical Bonding and Mott Transitions from Hydrogen Chains.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Bueno, A; Kohout, M; Martı́n Pendás, A

    2016-07-12

    We study in this contribution the spatial decay rate of real-space localization and delocalization indices in correlated systems. To that end, we examine Hubbard and quantum chemical models of simple cyclic hydrogen chains, showing that all descriptors of delocalization converge quickly toward the infinite chain limits. It is then shown that the localization index may be understood as a generalization of the standard order parameter in Mott insulator transitions and that the origin of the enigmatic sigmoidal profile of delocalization indices in chemical bond-breaking processes lies in the nonlinear mapping between intersite distances and correlation parameters. Although the long-range asymptotic decay of delocalization indices is exponential, we show that as the correlation parameter decreases quantum mechanical interference sets in and a switch to an oscillating pattern, related to core chemical concepts such as resonance or mesomerism, appears.

  20. Anisotropic chemical etching of semipolar [1011]/[101+1] ZnO crystallographic planes: polarity versus dangling bonds.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Lidón, E; Pérez-García, B; Vennéguès, P; Colchero, J; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V; Zúñiga-Pérez, J

    2009-02-11

    ZnO thin films grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy along the nonpolar [formula: see text] direction and exhibiting semipolar [formula: see text] facets have been chemically etched with HCl. In order to get an insight into the influence of the ZnO wurtzite structure in the chemical reactivity of the material, Kelvin probe microscopy and convergent beam electron diffraction have been employed to unambiguously determine the absolute polarity of the facets, showing that [formula: see text] facets are unstable upon etching in an HCl solution and transform into [formula: see text] planes. In contrast, [formula: see text] facets undergo homogeneous chemical etching perpendicular to the initial crystallographic plane. The observed etching behavior has been explained in terms of surface oxygen dangling bond density, suggesting that the macroscopic polarity plays a secondary role in the etching process.

  1. Peroxidasin Forms Sulfilimine Chemical Bonds Using Hypohalous Acids In Tissue Genesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, G.; Cummings, C.F.; Vanacore, R.M.; Kumagai-Cresse, C.; Ero-Tolliver, I.A.; Rafi, M.; Kang, J.-S.; Pedchenko, V.P.; Fessler, L.I.; Fessler, J.H.; Hudson, B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen IV is the predominant protein network of basement membranes, a specialized extracellular matrix, which underlie epithelia and endothelia. These networks assemble through oligomerization and covalent cross-linking to endow mechanical strength and shape cell behavior through interactions with cell surface receptors. A novel sulfilimine (S=N) bond between a methionine sulfur and hydroxylysine nitrogen reinforces the collagen IV network. We demonstrate that peroxidasin, an enzyme found in basement membranes, catalyzes formation of the sulfilimine bond. Drosophila peroxidasin mutants exhibit disorganized collagen IV networks and torn visceral muscle basement membranes pointing to a critical role for the enzyme in tissue biogenesis. Peroxidasin generates hypohalous acids as reaction intermediates suggesting a paradoxically anabolic role for these usually destructive oxidants. This work highlights sulfilimine bond formation as the first known physiologic function for peroxidasin, a role for hypohalous oxidants in tissue biogenesis, and a possible role for peroxidasin in inflammatory diseases. PMID:22842973

  2. Plasmon-driven dimerization via S-S chemical bond in an aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lin; Wang, Peijie; Chen, Xiaowei; Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenglong; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-11-27

    The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of thioanisole are experimentally investigated in an electrochemical environment in this study. Two Raman peaks, which depend strongly not only on electric potential but also on the local surface plasmon resonances (LSPR), have been observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that thioanisole is first dissociated from thiophenol via the S-CH3 bond; plasmons then drive the dimerisation of thiophenol via the S-S bond, which is strongly potential dependent. One Raman peak corresponds to the S-S vibrational mode of the thiophenol dimer, and the other corresponds to the asymmetric C-C stretching modes of the benzenyl of the thiophenol dimer. The potential-dependent two Raman modes is the potential-dependent dimerisation dynamics of thiophenol via the S-S bond. Our experimental findings provide insight into the structural elucidation of adsorbed molecules and molecular surface reaction dynamics.

  3. Some considerations about equations correlating valence and length of a chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocchi, Fernando

    2001-03-01

    It is confirmed that the Zachariasen equation is more accurate than the Brown-Shannon equation. Moreover, it is shown that, given the value of the parameter R1 relative to the MoO bond in MoO 6 octahedra, the calculated valence of molybdenum in Mo(V)O 6 octahedra remains very close to 5 v.u. by varying the other bond parameter B in a wide range. For other oxidation states of molybdenum in MoO 6 octahedra, the difference between the calculated valence and the formal oxidation state shows different types of dependence on B. These behaviours could explain some errors in valence data of the literature. The parameters for the MoO bond in MoO 6 octahedra are recalculated as R1=1.8788 Å and B=0.3046 Å for all molybdenum oxidation states from +3 to +6.

  4. Theoretical investigations on electronics structure and chemical bonding on iridathiabenzene and iridaoxabenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiasi, Reza; Amini, Elaheh

    2013-10-01

    The electronic structure and properties of the iridathiabenzene and iridaoxabenzene isomers have been investigated using the hybrid density functional mpw1pw91 theory. The energetic aspect shows that trans- ortho-isomer is the most stable isomer. This is compatible with principles of minimum energy and minimum polarizability. Molecular orbital analysis shows a linear correlation between hardness and anisotropic polarizability values for Iridathiabenzene and iridaoxabenzene isomers. The structural and natural bond analysis (NBO) results illustrate electronic delocalization in these rings. Also, the study of non linear optical properties of these molecules indicate a good correlation between βtot and E(HOMO) for iridathiabenzene. The results from natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis have provided insights into Ir—ligand, P—Hapical and P—Hbasal bonding.

  5. Mapping Chemical Bonds in Semiconductor Devices by Monitoring the Shifts of EELS Edges.

    PubMed

    Potapov, Pavel; Svistunova, Elena L; Gulyaev, Alexander A

    2017-08-29

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) can deliver information about variations of bonding at the nm scale. This is typically performed by analyzing the electron-loss near edge structure (ELNES) of given EELS edges. The present paper demonstrates an alternative way of a bonding examination through monitoring the EELS onset positions. Two conditions are essential for their accurate measurement. One (hardware) is using the dual EELS instrumentation that provides near simultaneous acquisition of low-loss and core-loss spectra. Another (software) is the least-square fitting of observed spectra to a reference spectrum. The combination of these hardware and software techniques reveals the positions of EELS onsets with the precision sufficient for mapping tiny variations of bonding. The paper shows that the method is capable of helping to solve practical tasks of nanoscale engineering like the analysis of modern CMOS devices.

  6. Plasmon-driven dimerization via S-S chemical bond in an aqueous environment

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lin; Wang, Peijie; Chen, Xiaowei; Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenglong; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of thioanisole are experimentally investigated in an electrochemical environment in this study. Two Raman peaks, which depend strongly not only on electric potential but also on the local surface plasmon resonances (LSPR), have been observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that thioanisole is first dissociated from thiophenol via the S-CH3 bond; plasmons then drive the dimerisation of thiophenol via the S-S bond, which is strongly potential dependent. One Raman peak corresponds to the S-S vibrational mode of the thiophenol dimer, and the other corresponds to the asymmetric C-C stretching modes of the benzenyl of the thiophenol dimer. The potential-dependent two Raman modes is the potential-dependent dimerisation dynamics of thiophenol via the S-S bond. Our experimental findings provide insight into the structural elucidation of adsorbed molecules and molecular surface reaction dynamics. PMID:25427897

  7. A periodic energy decomposition analysis method for the investigation of chemical bonding in extended systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf

    2015-05-21

    The development and first applications of a new periodic energy decomposition analysis (pEDA) scheme for extended systems based on the Kohn-Sham approach to density functional theory are described. The pEDA decomposes the bonding energy between two fragments (e.g., the adsorption energy of a molecule on a surface) into several well-defined terms: preparation, electrostatic, Pauli repulsion, and orbital relaxation energies. This is complemented by consideration of dispersion interactions via a pairwise scheme. One major extension toward a previous implementation [Philipsen and Baerends, J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 12470 (2006)] lies in the separate discussion of electrostatic and Pauli and the addition of a dispersion term. The pEDA presented here for an implementation based on atomic orbitals can handle restricted and unrestricted fragments for 0D to 3D systems considering periodic boundary conditions with and without the determination of fragment occupations. For the latter case, reciprocal space sampling is enabled. The new method gives comparable results to established schemes for molecular systems and shows good convergence with respect to the basis set (TZ2P), the integration accuracy, and k-space sampling. Four typical bonding scenarios for surface-adsorbate complexes were chosen to highlight the performance of the method representing insulating (CO on MgO(001)), metallic (H{sub 2} on M(001), M = Pd, Cu), and semiconducting (CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} on Si(001)) substrates. These examples cover diverse substrates as well as bonding scenarios ranging from weakly interacting to covalent (shared electron and donor acceptor) bonding. The results presented lend confidence that the pEDA will be a powerful tool for the analysis of surface-adsorbate bonding in the future, enabling the transfer of concepts like ionic and covalent bonding, donor-acceptor interaction, steric repulsion, and others to extended systems.

  8. A periodic energy decomposition analysis method for the investigation of chemical bonding in extended systems.

    PubMed

    Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf

    2015-05-21

    The development and first applications of a new periodic energy decomposition analysis (pEDA) scheme for extended systems based on the Kohn-Sham approach to density functional theory are described. The pEDA decomposes the bonding energy between two fragments (e.g., the adsorption energy of a molecule on a surface) into several well-defined terms: preparation, electrostatic, Pauli repulsion, and orbital relaxation energies. This is complemented by consideration of dispersion interactions via a pairwise scheme. One major extension toward a previous implementation [Philipsen and Baerends, J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 12470 (2006)] lies in the separate discussion of electrostatic and Pauli and the addition of a dispersion term. The pEDA presented here for an implementation based on atomic orbitals can handle restricted and unrestricted fragments for 0D to 3D systems considering periodic boundary conditions with and without the determination of fragment occupations. For the latter case, reciprocal space sampling is enabled. The new method gives comparable results to established schemes for molecular systems and shows good convergence with respect to the basis set (TZ2P), the integration accuracy, and k-space sampling. Four typical bonding scenarios for surface-adsorbate complexes were chosen to highlight the performance of the method representing insulating (CO on MgO(001)), metallic (H2 on M(001), M = Pd, Cu), and semiconducting (CO and C2H2 on Si(001)) substrates. These examples cover diverse substrates as well as bonding scenarios ranging from weakly interacting to covalent (shared electron and donor acceptor) bonding. The results presented lend confidence that the pEDA will be a powerful tool for the analysis of surface-adsorbate bonding in the future, enabling the transfer of concepts like ionic and covalent bonding, donor-acceptor interaction, steric repulsion, and others to extended systems.

  9. Quantifying weak hydrogen bonding in uracil and 4-cyano-4'-ethynylbiphenyl: a combined computational and experimental investigation of NMR chemical shifts in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Uldry, Anne-Christine; Griffin, John M; Yates, Jonathan R; Pérez-Torralba, Marta; María, M Dolores Santa; Webber, Amy L; Beaumont, Maximus L L; Samoson, Ago; Claramunt, Rosa María; Pickard, Chris J; Brown, Steven P

    2008-01-23

    Weak hydrogen bonding in uracil and 4-cyano-4'-ethynylbiphenyl, for which single-crystal diffraction structures reveal close CH...O=C and C[triple bond]CH...N[triple bond]C distances, is investigated in a study that combines the experimental determination of 1H, 13C, and 15N chemical shifts by magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR with first-principles calculations using plane-wave basis sets. An optimized synthetic route, including the isolation and characterization of intermediates, to 4-cyano-4'-ethynylbiphenyl at natural abundance and with 13C[triple bond]13CH and 15N[triple bond]C labeling is described. The difference in chemical shifts calculated, on the one hand, for the full crystal structure and, on the other hand, for an isolated molecule depends on both intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions and aromatic ring current effects. In this study, the two effects are separated computationally by, first, determining the difference in chemical shift between that calculated for a plane (uracil) or an isolated chain (4-cyano-4'-ethynylbiphenyl) and that calculated for an isolated molecule and by, second, calculating intraplane or intrachain nucleus-independent chemical shifts that quantify the ring current effects caused by neighboring molecules. For uracil, isolated molecule to plane changes in the 1H chemical shift of 2.0 and 2.2 ppm are determined for the CH protons involved in CH...O weak hydrogen bonding; this compares to changes of 5.1 and 5.4 ppm for the NH protons involved in conventional NH...O hydrogen bonding. A comparison of CH bond lengths for geometrically relaxed uracil molecules in the crystal structure and for geometrically relaxed isolated molecules reveals differences of no more than 0.002 A, which corresponds to changes in the calculated 1H chemical shifts of at most 0.1 ppm. For the C[triple bond]CH...N[triple bond]C weak hydrogen bonds in 4-cyano-4'-ethynylbiphenyl, the calculated molecule to chain changes are of similar magnitude

  10. Critical surface energy of composite cement containing MDP (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate) and chemical bonding to hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Dabsie, Firas; Grégoire, Geneviève; Sharrock, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Self-adhesive composite cements are increasingly used for cementing inlays/onlays, intraradicular posts, crowns and laminate veneers. Wider clinical acceptance is driven by simpler and faster handling procedures, much like observed for self-etching adhesives. 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) is a bi-functional monomer incorporated as the reactive ingredient in a contemporary self-adhesive cement. We have examined the surface free energy parameters of this cement and studied the mode of action of the cement on dentine substrate by contact angle measurements to determine the critical surface energy of the cement. Retention of the infrared absorption bands characteristic of the acrylate moieties on the surface of hydroxyapatite particles suggests that MDP contributes to the overall bonding to dentine by forming ionic chemical bonds with surface calcium ions in dentine crystalites.

  11. Band alignment and chemical bonding at the GaAs/Al2O3 interface: A hybrid functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, Davide; Miceli, Giacomo; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2015-11-01

    The band alignment at the interface between GaAs and amorphous Al2O3 is studied through the use of hybrid functionals. For the oxide component, a disordered model is generated through density-functional molecular dynamics. The achieved structure shows good agreement with the experimental characterization. The potential line-up across the interface is obtained for two atomistic GaAs/Al2O3 interface models, which differ by the GaAs substrate termination. The calculated valence band offset amounts to 3.9 eV for an interface characterized by the occurrence of Ga-O bonds as dominant chemical bonding, favoring the high-energy side in the range of experimental values (2.6-3.8 eV). The effect of As antisite and As-As dimer defects on the band alignment is shown to be negligible.

  12. Chemical bond structure and MOSFET device damages of electron beam cured siloxane spin-on-dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, Sung Gyu

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the properties of electron beam cured SOG (spin-on-glass) films in terms of the chemical bond structure and accompanying device damages. It is observed that e-beam cured SOG films do not show the Si-CH bonds in the FT-IR spectra but still have the carbons in the film which are thermally stable. As for the device damage, the experimental result shows that the threshold voltage of nMOSFET decreases by positive charging of gate oxide after e-beam curing process and it shows antenna ratio independence. Also, the variation of threshold voltage is largely affected by the cathode voltage, which determines the electron energy and interlayer dielectric thickness. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Marked influence of the nature of the chemical bond on CP-violating signature in molecular ions HBr(+) and HI(+).

    PubMed

    Ravaine, Boris; Porsev, Sergey G; Derevianko, Andrei

    2005-01-14

    Heavy polar molecules offer a great sensitivity to the electron electric dipole moment (EDM). To guide emerging searches for EDMs with molecular ions, we estimate the EDM-induced energy corrections for hydrogen halide ions HBr(+) and HI(+) in their respective ground X (2)Pi(3/2) states. We find that the energy corrections due to EDM for the two ions differ by an unexpectedly large factor of 15. We demonstrate that a major part of this enhancement is due to a dissimilarity in the nature of the chemical bond for the two ions: the bond that is nearly of ionic character in HBr(+) exhibits predominantly a covalent nature in HI(+). We conclude that because of this enhancement the HI(+) ion may be a potentially competitive candidate for the EDM search.

  14. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF{sub 2}/hydrogen-terminated diamond heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Imura, M.; Koide, Y.

    2013-03-28

    CaF{sub 2} films are deposited on hydrogen-terminated diamond (H-diamond) by a radio-frequency sputter-deposition technique at room temperature. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunction are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is confirmed that there are only C-Ca bonds at the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterointerface. Valence and conductance band offsets of the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunciton are determined to be 3.7 {+-} 0.2 and 0.3 {+-} 0.2 eV, respectively. It shows a type I straddling band configuration. The large valence band offset suggests advantage of the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunciton for the development of high power and high frequency field effect transistors.

  15. Identification of the Chemical Bonding Prompting Adhesion of a-C:H Thin Films on Ferrous Alloy Intermediated by a SiCx:H Buffer Layer.

    PubMed

    Cemin, F; Bim, L T; Leidens, L M; Morales, M; Baumvol, I J R; Alvarez, F; Figueroa, C A

    2015-07-29

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) and several related materials (DLCs) may have ultralow friction coefficients that can be used for saving-energy applications. However, poor chemical bonding of a-C/DLC films on metallic alloys is expected, due to the stability of carbon-carbon bonds. Silicon-based intermediate layers are employed to enhance the adherence of a-C:H films on ferrous alloys, although the role of such buffer layers is not yet fully understood in chemical terms. The chemical bonding of a-C:H thin films on ferrous alloy intermediated by a nanometric SiCx:H buffer layer was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The chemical profile was inspected by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), and the chemical structure was evaluated by Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The nature of adhesion is discussed by analyzing the chemical bonding at the interfaces of the a-C:H/SiCx:H/ferrous alloy sandwich structure. The adhesion phenomenon is ascribed to specifically chemical bonding character at the buffer layer. Whereas carbon-carbon (C-C) and carbon-silicon (C-Si) bonds are formed at the outermost interface, the innermost interface is constituted mainly by silicon-iron (Si-Fe) bonds. The oxygen presence degrades the adhesion up to totally delaminate the a-C:H thin films. The SiCx:H deposition temperature determines the type of chemical bonding and the amount of oxygen contained in the buffer layer.

  16. A theory of adhesion at a bimetallic interface - Overlap effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary calculation of the chemical bonding adhesive interaction between metal surfaces is provided. In this first theory the Hohenberg and Kohn formalism is used to give the bimetallic adhesive binding energy versus separation. The close-packed planes of Al, Mg, and Zn are considered. The effect of simple overlap of the metal-vacuum distributions is determined. The importance of registry between contact surfaces is ascertained. A minimum in the binding energy curve is exhibited for all combinations. The theoretical predictions agree with trends in bond strengths taken from available experimental data. An insight into the mechanisms involved in metallic transfer is given. The relationship between adhesive energies, cohesive energies, and surface energies is discussed.

  17. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE II REPORT, SEPT.1998-JULY 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.YAGER,K.A.BLANKENHORN,D.

    1999-08-01

    Based upon the previous Phase I research program aimed at looking for ways of recycling the KeySpan-generated wastes, such as waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) and bottom ash (BA), into the potentially useful cementitious materials called chemically bonded cement (CBC) materials, the emphasis of this Phase II program done at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a period of September 1998 through July 1999, was directed towards the two major subjects: One was to assess the technical feasibility of WWTS-based CBC material for use as Pb-exchange adsorbent (PEA) which remediates Pb-contaminated soils in the field; and the other was related to the establishment of the optimum-packaging storage system of dry BA-based CBC components that make it a promising matrix material for the steam-cured concrete products containing sand and coarse aggregate. To achieve the goal of the first subject, a small-scale field demonstration test was carried out. Using the PEA material consisting of 30 wt% WWTS, 13 wt% Type I cement and 57 wt% water, the PES slurry was prepared using a rotary shear concrete mixer, and then poured on the Pb-contaminated soil. The PEA-to-soil ratio by weight was a factor of 2.0. The placed PEA slurry was blended with soil using hand mixing tools such as claws and shovels. The wettability of soils with the PEA was very good, thereby facilitating the soil-PEA mix procedures. A very promising result was obtained from this field test; in fact, the mount of Pb leached out from the 25-day-aged PEA-treated soil specimen was only 0.74 mg/l, meeting the requirement for EPA safe regulation of < 5 mg/l. In contrast, a large amount (26.4 mg/l) of Pb was detected from the untreated soil of the same age. Thus, this finding demonstrated that the WWTS-based CBC has a potential for use as PEA material. Regarding the second subject, the dry-packed storage system consisting of 68.7 wt% BA, 13.0 wt% calcium aluminate cement (CAC), 13.0 wt% Type I portland cement and 5.3 wt

  18. The interplay between interface structure, energy level alignment and chemical bonding strength at organic-metal interfaces.

    PubMed

    Willenbockel, M; Lüftner, D; Stadtmüller, B; Koller, G; Kumpf, C; Soubatch, S; Puschnig, P; Ramsey, M G; Tautz, F S

    2015-01-21

    What do energy level alignments at metal-organic interfaces reveal about the metal-molecule bonding strength? Is it permissible to take vertical adsorption heights as indicators of bonding strengths? In this paper we analyse 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on the three canonical low index Ag surfaces to provide exemplary answers to these questions. Specifically, we employ angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy for a systematic study of the energy level alignments of the two uppermost frontier states in ordered monolayer phases of PTCDA. Data are analysed using the orbital tomography approach. This allows the unambiguous identification of the orbital character of these states, and also the discrimination between inequivalent species. Combining this experimental information with DFT calculations and the generic Newns-Anderson chemisorption model, we analyse the alignments of highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) with respect to the vacuum levels of bare and molecule-covered surfaces. This reveals clear differences between the two frontier states. In particular, on all surfaces the LUMO is subject to considerable bond stabilization through the interaction between the molecular π-electron system and the metal, as a consequence of which it also becomes occupied. Moreover, we observe a larger bond stabilization for the more open surfaces. Most importantly, our analysis shows that both the orbital binding energies of the LUMO and the overall adsorption heights of the molecule are linked to the strength of the chemical interaction between the molecular π-electron system and the metal, in the sense that stronger bonding leads to shorter adsorption heights and larger orbital binding energies.

  19. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding as a synthetic tool to induce chemical selectivity in acid catalyzed porphyrin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Megiatto, Jackson D; Patterson, Dustin; Sherman, Benjamin D; Moore, Thomas A; Gust, Devens; Moore, Ana L

    2012-05-14

    A straightforward procedure based on the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds to impart selectivity in the preparation of multi-functionalized porphyrins has been developed. To illustrate the concept, the synthesis of a biomimetic artificial photosynthetic model able to undergo electron and proton transfer reactions upon irradiation is reported. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  20. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, J.P.; Levy, M.; Painter, G.S.; Wei, S.; Lagowski, J.B.

    1988-01-15

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al. and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N/sub 2/ and F/sub 2/, which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules.

  1. Probing Chemical Bonding and Electronic Structures in ThO(-) by Anion Photoelectron Imaging and Theoretical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanli; Zou, Jinghan; Xiong, Xiao-Gen; Su, Jing; Xie, Hua; Fei, Zejie; Tang, Zichao; Liu, Hongtao

    2017-03-16

    Because of renewed research on thorium-based molten salt reactors, there is growing demand and interest in enhancing the knowledge of thorium chemistry both experimentally and theoretically. Compared with uranium, thorium has few chemical studies reported up to the present. Here we report the vibrationally resolved photoelectron imaging of the thorium monoxide anion. The electron affinity of ThO is first reported to be 0.707 ± 0.020 eV. Vibrational frequencies of the ThO molecule and its anion are determined from Franck-Condon simulation. Spectroscopic evidence is obtained for the two-electron transition in ThO(-), indicating the strong electron correlation among the (7sσ)(2)(6dδ)(1) electrons in ThO(-) and the (7sσ)(2) electrons in ThO. These findings are explained by using quantum-chemical calculations including spin-orbit coupling, and the chemical bonding of gaseous ThO molecules is analyzed. The present work will enrich our understanding of bonding capacities with the 6d valence shell.

  2. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Co-Based Single and Mixed Valence Oxides: A Quantum Chemical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Major, Dan Thomas

    2016-04-04

    The mixed valence cobalt oxide, Co3O4, is a potential candidate as a photovoltaic (PV) material, which also exhibits intriguing chemical and catalytic properties. Here, we present a comparative study of the electronic, magnetic, and chemical bonding properties of mixed valence Co3O4 (i.e., Co(2+/3+)) with the related single valence CoO (i.e., Co(2+)) and Co2O3 (i.e., Co(3+)) oxides using density functional theory (DFT). We have employed a range of theoretical methods, including pure DFT, DFT+U, and a range-separated exchange-correlation functional (HSE06). We compare the electronic structure and band gap of the oxide materials, with available photoemission spectroscopy and optical band gaps. Our calculations suggest that the bonding between Co(3+) and O(2-) ions in Co2O3 and Co3O4 and Co(2+) and O(2-) ions in CoO and Co3O4 are rather different. We find that Co2O3 and Co3O4 are weakly correlated materials, whereas CoO is a strongly correlated material. Furthermore, our computed one-electron energy level diagrams reveal that strong Co-O antibonding states are present at the top of the valence band for all the cobalt oxides, hinting at a defect tolerant capacity in these materials. These results, which give a detailed picture of the chemical bonding in related single and mixed valence cobalt oxides, may serve as a guide to enhance the PV or photoelectrochemical activity of Co3O4, by reducing its internal defect states or changing its electronic structure by doping or alloying with suitable elements.

  3. Formation of Lamellar Pores for Splats via Interfacial or Sub-interfacial Delamination at Chemically Bonded Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin

    2017-02-01

    To comprehensively understand the formation mechanism of lamellar pores in splats, the delamination morphologies and crack patterns of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and lanthanum zirconia splats were examined. Results showed that both types of splats grew epitaxially on well-polished YSZ substrates, evidently confirming the formation of chemical bonding between splats and substrate. However, the interfacial or sub-interfacial delamination was observed in all kinds of splats in this study. Residual vertical cracks passing through delaminated domains (on bare substrate) were also observed, which clearly indicated that transverse delamination followed vertical cracking. Mechanical analysis about delamination was addressed, and the results were consistent with the experimental data.

  4. Ab initio study of electron-ion structure factors in binary liquids with different types of chemical bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Klevets, Ivan; Bryk, Taras

    2014-12-07

    Electron-ion structure factors, calculated in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, are reported for several binary liquids with different kinds of chemical bonding: metallic liquid alloy Bi–Pb, molten salt RbF, and liquid water. We derive analytical expressions for the long-wavelength asymptotes of the partial electron-ion structure factors of binary systems and show that the analytical results are in good agreement with the ab initio simulation data. The long-wavelength behaviour of the total charge structure factors for the three binary liquids is discussed.

  5. From Common Sense Concepts to Scientifically Conditioned Concepts of Chemical Bonding: An Historical and Textbook Approach Designed to Address Learning and Teaching Issues at the Secondary School Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Michael; de Berg, Kevin

    2014-09-01

    This paper selects six key alternative conceptions identified in the literature on student understandings of chemical bonding and illustrates how a historical analysis and a textbook analysis can inform these conceptions and lead to recommendations for improving the teaching and learning of chemical bonding at the secondary school level. The historical analysis and the textbook analysis focus on the concepts of charge, octet, electron pair, ionic, covalent and metallic bonding. Finally, a table of recommendations is made for teacher and student in the light of four fundamental questions and the six alternative conceptions to enhance the quality of the curriculum resources available and the level of student engagement.

  6. Chemical synthesis of La1 isolated from the venom of the scorpion Liocheles australasiae and determination of its disulfide bonding pattern.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Junya; Miyashita, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    La1 is a 73-residue cysteine-rich peptide isolated from the scorpion Liocheles australasiae venom. Although La1 is the most abundant peptide in the venom, its biological function remains unknown. Here, we describe a method for efficient chemical synthesis of La1 using the native chemical ligation (NCL) strategy, in which three peptide components of less than 40 residues were sequentially ligated. The peptide thioester necessary for NCL was synthesized using an aromatic N-acylurea approach with Fmoc-SPPS. After completion of sequential NCL, disulfide bond formation was carried out using a dialysis method, in which the linear peptide dissolved in an acidic solution was dialyzed against a slightly alkaline buffer to obtain correctly folded La1. Next, we determined the disulfide bonding pattern of La1. Enzymatic and chemical digests of La1 without reduction of disulfide bonds were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), which revealed two of four disulfide bond linkages. The remaining two linkages were assigned based on MS/MS analysis of a peptide fragment containing two disulfide bonds. Consequently, the disulfide bonding pattern of La1 was found to be similar to that of a von Willebrand factor type C (VWC) domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the experimental determination of the disulfide bonding pattern of peptides having a single VWC domain as well as their chemical synthesis. La1 synthesized in this study will be useful for investigation of its biological role in the venom.

  7. Simple and surprisingly accurate approach to the chemical bond obtained from dimensional scaling.

    PubMed

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A; Scully, Marlan O; Herschbach, Dudley R

    2005-08-19

    We present a new dimensional scaling transformation of the Schrödinger equation for the two electron bond. This yields, for the first time, a good description of the bond via D scaling. There also emerges, in the large-D limit, an intuitively appealing semiclassical picture, akin to a molecular model proposed by Bohr in 1913. In this limit, the electrons are confined to specific orbits in the scaled space, yet the uncertainty principle is maintained. A first-order perturbation correction, proportional to 1/D, substantially improves the agreement with the exact ground state potential energy curve. The present treatment is very simple mathematically, yet provides a strikingly accurate description of the potential curves for the lowest singlet, triplet, and excited states of H2. We find the modified D-scaling method also gives good results for other molecules. It can be combined advantageously with Hartree-Fock and other conventional methods.

  8. Improvement in reinforcing bond strength in reinforced concrete with self-repairing chemical adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn M.

    1997-05-01

    Self-healing concretes have embedded adhesives which are released from hollow fibers inside the concrete when and where cracking of the matrix and the fibers occurs. It was found that the adhesive improves the strength of the cracked portions of the concrete and increases its ability to deflect under load. Structural materials subjected to dynamic events such as earthquakes and impacts can have improved response by the noise of adhesive type which can impart improved damping, lateral stiffness, or deflection. Testing also assessed the improvement of the bond strength in structures. In laboratory tests the internal adhesive repair system improved the bond between the reinforcing steel and the concrete to prevent pullout failure or debonding at the interface.

  9. Controllable synthesis of silver and silver sulfide nanocrystals via selective cleavage of chemical bonds.

    PubMed

    Tang, Aiwei; Wang, Yu; Ye, Haihang; Zhou, Chao; Yang, Chunhe; Li, Xu; Peng, Hongshang; Zhang, Fujun; Hou, Yanbing; Teng, Feng

    2013-09-06

    A one-step colloidal process has been adopted to prepare silver (Ag) and silver sulfide (Ag₂S) nanocrystals, thus avoiding presynthesis of an organometallic precursor and the injection of a toxic phosphine agent. During the reaction, a layered intermediate compound is first formed, which then acts as a precursor, decomposing into the nanocrystals. The composition of the as-obtained products can be controlled by selective cleavage of S-C bonds or Ag-S bonds. Pure Ag₂S nanocrystals can be obtained by directly heating silver acetate (Ag(OAc)) and n-dodecanethiol (DDT) at 200 ° C without any surfactant, and pure Ag nanocrystals can be synthesized successfully if the reaction temperature is reduced to 190 ° C and the amount of DDT is decreased to 1 ml in the presence of a non-coordinating organic solvent (1-octadecene, ODE). Otherwise, the mixture of Ag and Ag₂S is obtained by directly heating Ag(OAc) in DDT by increasing the reaction temperature or in a mixture of DDT and ODE at 200 ° C. The formation mechanism has been discussed in detail in terms of selective S-C and Ag-S bond dissociation due to the nucleophilic attack of DDT and the lower bonding energy of Ag-S. Interestingly, some products can easily self-assemble into two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) highly ordered superlattice structures on a copper grid without any additional steps. The excess DDT plays a key role in the superlattice structure due to the bundling and interdigitation of the thiolate molecules adsorbed on the as-obtained nanocrystals.

  10. Controllable synthesis of silver and silver sulfide nanocrystals via selective cleavage of chemical bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Aiwei; Wang, Yu; Ye, Haihang; Zhou, Chao; Yang, Chunhe; Li, Xu; Peng, Hongshang; Zhang, Fujun; Hou, Yanbing; Teng, Feng

    2013-09-01

    A one-step colloidal process has been adopted to prepare silver (Ag) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals, thus avoiding presynthesis of an organometallic precursor and the injection of a toxic phosphine agent. During the reaction, a layered intermediate compound is first formed, which then acts as a precursor, decomposing into the nanocrystals. The composition of the as-obtained products can be controlled by selective cleavage of S-C bonds or Ag-S bonds. Pure Ag2S nanocrystals can be obtained by directly heating silver acetate (Ag(OAc)) and n-dodecanethiol (DDT) at 200 ° C without any surfactant, and pure Ag nanocrystals can be synthesized successfully if the reaction temperature is reduced to 190 ° C and the amount of DDT is decreased to 1 ml in the presence of a non-coordinating organic solvent (1-octadecene, ODE). Otherwise, the mixture of Ag and Ag2S is obtained by directly heating Ag(OAc) in DDT by increasing the reaction temperature or in a mixture of DDT and ODE at 200 ° C. The formation mechanism has been discussed in detail in terms of selective S-C and Ag-S bond dissociation due to the nucleophilic attack of DDT and the lower bonding energy of Ag-S. Interestingly, some products can easily self-assemble into two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) highly ordered superlattice structures on a copper grid without any additional steps. The excess DDT plays a key role in the superlattice structure due to the bundling and interdigitation of the thiolate molecules adsorbed on the as-obtained nanocrystals.

  11. Evaluation of molecular assembly, spectroscopic interpretation, intra-/inter molecular hydrogen bonding and chemical reactivity of two pyrrole precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Poonam; Singh, R. N.

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of conformational, spectroscopic, hydrogen bonding and chemical reactivity of pyrrole precursor: ethyl 3,5 dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EDPC) and ethyl 3,4-dimethyl-4-acetyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EDAPC) for the convenient characterization, synthetic usefulness and comparative evaluations. All experimental spectral values of 1H NMR, UV-Vis and FT-IR spectra coincide well with calculated values by DFT. The orbital interactions in EDPC and EDAPC are found to lengthen their Nsbnd H and Cdbnd O bonds and lowers their vibrational frequencies (red shift) resulting to dimer formation. The QTAIM and NBO analyses provide the strength of interactions and charge transfer in the hydrogen bonding unit and stability of dimers. The binding energy of EDPC and EDPAC dimer are found to be 9.92, 10.22 kcal/mol, respectively. In EDPAC and EDPC dimer, hyperconjugative interactions between monomer units is due to n1(O) → σ*(Nsbnd H) that stabilize the molecule up to 9.7 and 9.3 kcal/mol, respectively. On evaluation of molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and electronic descriptors for EDPC it has been found that it is a good precursor for synthesis of formyl and acetyl derivatives whereas EDAPC has been found to be a good precursor for synthesis of schiff base, hydrazones, hydrazide-hydrazones and chalcones.

  12. Exploring the chemical bonding, infrared and UV-vis absorption spectra of OH radicals adsorption on the smallest fullerene.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Ren, Hongjiang; Yang, Xiaohui; Song, Jing

    2015-06-05

    In the present work, the density-functional theory calculations were performed on C20 hydroxylated fullerene. B3LYP functionals with 6-31G(d,p) basis set were utilized to gain insight into the bonding characters and intramolecular interactions of hydroxyl groups adsorbed on the cage. Interestingly, we observed that the C20 cage has the bonding patterns with spherical orbitals configuration [1S(2)1P(6)1D(10)1F(2)], and the adsorbed hydroxyl groups significantly affect the chemical bonding of the cage surface. Analysis of vertical electron affinities and vertical ionization potentials indicates that the polyhydroxylated derivative with eight hydroxyl groups is more stable than others. The intramolecular interaction of these derivatives considered here reveals that the more the hydroxyl groups in derivatives, the stronger the interaction in stabilizing structures. On the basis of theoretical studies, the hydroxyl groups largely enhance the infrared intensities, especially for the polyhydroxylated derivatives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bond-based global and local (bond, group and bond-type) quadratic indices and their applications to computer-aided molecular design. 1. QSPR studies of diverse sets of organic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Torrens, Francisco; Alvarado, Ysaias J.; Rotondo, Richard

    2006-10-01

    The concept of atom-based quadratic indices is extended to a series of molecular descriptors (MDs) (both total and local) based on adjacency between edges. The kth edge-adjacency matrix ( E k ) denotes the matrix of bond-based quadratic indices (non-stochastic) with respect to the canonical basis set. The kth "stochastic" edge-adjacency matrix, ES k , is here proposed as a new molecular representation easily calculated from E k . Then, the kth stochastic bond-based quadratic indices are calculated using ES k as operators of quadratic transformations. The study of six representative physicochemical properties of octane isomers was used to compare the ability of both series of MDs to produce significant quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models. Moreover, the general performance of the new MDs in this QSPR study has been evaluated with respect to other 2D/3D well-known sets of indices and the obtained results shown a quite satisfactory behavior of the present method. The novel bond-level MDs were also used for the description and prediction of the boiling point of 28 alkyl-alcohols and to the modeling of the specific rate constant (log k) of 34 derivatives of 2-furylethylenes. These models were statistically significant and showed very good stability to data variation in leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation experiment. The comparison with other approaches (edge- and vertices-based connectivity indices, total and local spectral moments, and quantum chemical descriptors as well as E-state/biomolecular encounter parameters) expose a good behavior of our method in this QSPR studies. The approach described in this report appears to be a very promising structural invariant, useful for QSPR/QSAR studies, similarity/diversity analysis, and computer-aided "rational" molecular (drug) design.

  14. Theory of chemical bonds in metalloenzymes V: Hybrid-DFT studies of the inorganic [8Fe-7S] core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, M.; Koizumi, K.; Kitagawa, Y.; Yamanaka, S.; Okumura, M.; Yamaguchi, K.; Ohki, Y.; Sunada, Y.; Honda, M.; Tatsumi, K.

    The electronic and spin structures of the [8Fe-7S] inorganic model complex (1) have been investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) UB3LYP and UBLYP methods. The experimental geometry of 1 was used to calculate the sets of exchange interactions (J values) between Fe-spin centers within spin Hamiltonian models. The experimental temperature-dependent paramagnetism is well reproduced on the basis of the calculated J values. The calculated low-lying energy levels are also consistent with those of the experiments. This indicates that the ground spin state of 1 is singlet (S = 0) for the weak antiferromagnetic coupling between two [4Fe-3S] cubane units, which take the Fe(III)Fe(II)3 formal charge and S = 7/2 spin states. The first-order density matrix of the most stable broken-symmetry (BS) solution has been diagonalized to elucidate the natural molecular orbitals (MOs) and their occupation number of 1, which are hardly obtained by the symmetry-adapted (SA) CASSCF approach. Several chemical indices such as the effective bond orders before and after spin projection are also calculated by using the occupation numbers to provide the SA MO picture of labile chemical bonds of 1. It is found that the BS MO calculation followed by spin-projected SA analysis is an effective and practical alternative to the CASSCF MO approach for the multinuclear transition metal clusters.

  15. Formation mechanism of overlapping grain boundaries in graphene chemical vapor deposition growth† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1, Table S1, calculation of formation energies of different graphene edges, calculation of the Gibbs free energy variation during the overlapping of two H terminated graphene edges, calculations on the chemical potential of H2 and thermodynamic diagrams. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc04535a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jichen; Wang, Huan; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2017-01-01

    The formation of grain boundaries (GBs) in graphene films is both fundamentally interesting and practically important for many applications. A GB in graphene is known as a linear defect and is formed during the coalescence of two single crystalline graphene domains. The covalent binding between domains is broadly known as the mechanism of GB formation during graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth. Here, we demonstrate another GB formation mechanism, where two graphene domains are connected by weak van der Waals interactions between overlapping graphene layers. The formation mechanism of the overlapping GBs (OLGBs) is systematically explored theoretically and the proposed conditions for forming OLGBs are validated by experimental observations. This discovery leads to a deep understanding of the mechanism of graphene CVD growth and reveals potential means for graphene quality control in CVD synthesis. PMID:28507676

  16. Structure-property relationships in cubic cuprous iodide: A novel view on stability, chemical bonding, and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishtshev, A.; Karazhanov, S. Zh.

    2017-02-01

    Based on the combination of density functional theory and theory-group methods, we performed systematic modeling of γ-CuI structural design at the atomistic level. Being started from the metallic copper lattice, we treated a crystal assembly as a stepwise iodination process characterized in terms of a sequence of intermediate lattice geometries. These geometries were selected and validated via screening of possible structural transformations. The genesis of chemical bonding was studied for three structural transformations by analyzing the relevant changes in the topology of valence electron densities. We determined structural trends driven by metal-ligand coupling. This allowed us to suggest the improved scenario of chemical bonding in γ-CuI. In particular, the unconventional effect of spatial separation of metallic and covalent interactions was found to be very important with respect to the preferred arrangements of valence electrons in the iodination process. We rigorously showed that useful electronic and optical properties of γ-CuI originate from the combination of two separated bonding patterns—strong covalency established in I-Cu tetrahedral connections and noncovalent interactions of copper cores is caused by the 3d10 closed-shell electron configurations. The other finding of ours is that the self-consistency of the GW calculations is crucial for correctly determining the dynamic electronic correlations in γ-CuI. Detail reinvestigation of the quasi-particle energy structure by means of the self-consistent GW approach allowed us to explain how p-type electrical conductivity can be engineered in the material.

  17. Structure-property relationships in cubic cuprous iodide: A novel view on stability, chemical bonding, and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Pishtshev, A; Karazhanov, S Zh

    2017-02-14

    Based on the combination of density functional theory and theory-group methods, we performed systematic modeling of γ-CuI structural design at the atomistic level. Being started from the metallic copper lattice, we treated a crystal assembly as a stepwise iodination process characterized in terms of a sequence of intermediate lattice geometries. These geometries were selected and validated via screening of possible structural transformations. The genesis of chemical bonding was studied for three structural transformations by analyzing the relevant changes in the topology of valence electron densities. We determined structural trends driven by metal-ligand coupling. This allowed us to suggest the improved scenario of chemical bonding in γ-CuI. In particular, the unconventional effect of spatial separation of metallic and covalent interactions was found to be very important with respect to the preferred arrangements of valence electrons in the iodination process. We rigorously showed that useful electronic and optical properties of γ-CuI originate from the combination of two separated bonding patterns-strong covalency established in I-Cu tetrahedral connections and noncovalent interactions of copper cores is caused by the 3d(10) closed-shell electron configurations. The other finding of ours is that the self-consistency of the GW calculations is crucial for correctly determining the dynamic electronic correlations in γ-CuI. Detail reinvestigation of the quasi-particle energy structure by means of the self-consistent GW approach allowed us to explain how p-type electrical conductivity can be engineered in the material.

  18. Textbook Errors: 137. Physical and Chemical Properties and Bonding of Metallic Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, R. Thomas

    1979-01-01

    Focuses attention on the almost universal practice of discussing all metals as malleable. The author points out that some are brittle and then he presents the variation in chemical properties of metals. (SA)

  19. Bone bonding ability of a chemically and thermally treated low elastic modulus Ti alloy: gum metal.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masashi; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Kawai, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Kizuki, Takashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2014-03-01

    The gum metal with composition Ti-36Nb-2Ta-3Zr-0.3O, is free from cytotoxic elements and exhibits a low elastic modulus as well as high mechanical strength. We have previously demonstrated that this gum metal, once subjected to a series of surface treatments--immersion in 1 M NaOH (alkali treatment) and then 100 mM CaCl2, before heating at 700 °C (sample: ACaH-GM), with an optional final hot water immersion (sample: ACaHW-GM)--has apatite-forming ability in simulated body fluid. To confirm the in vivo bioactivity of these treated alloys, failure loads between implants and bone at 4, 8, 16, and 26 weeks after implantation in rabbits' tibiae were measured for untreated gum metal (UT-GM), ACaH-GM and ACaHW-GM, as well as pure titanium plates after alkali and heat treatment (AH-Ti). The ACaH-GM and UT-GM plates showed almost no bonding, whereas ACaHW-GM and AH-Ti plates showed successful bonding by 4 weeks, and their failure loads subsequently increased with time. The histological findings showed a large amount of new bone in contact with the surface of ACaHW-GM and AH-Ti plates, suggesting that the ACaHW treatment could impart bone-bonding bioactivity to a gum metal in vivo. Thus, with this improved bioactive treatment, these advantageous gum metals become useful candidates for orthopedic and dental devices.

  20. Carbosilane polymers with hydrogen bond acidic functionalization for chemical preconcentrator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, Duane L.; McGill, R. Andrew; Higgins, Bernadette A.

    2008-04-01

    Vapor collection systems, including solid phase microextraction (SPME), require the ability to selectively collect and concentrate a sample from a large volume of air. In the case of SPME, polymers are needed to adhere to the fiber for greater reproducibility and longer lasting fibers. The polymerization of carbosilanes was investigated and produced polymers with molecular weights over 500,000. This polymer class was then functionalized with hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) end groups that will selectively sorb hydrogen bond basic vapors. The results of vapor testing with these polymers utilizing a variety of platforms such as preconcentrators, Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors, and microcantilevers will be discussed.

  1. Unusual chemical bonding in the beryllium dimer and its twelve vibrational levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    The ab initio calculations have shown that the atoms in the beryllium dimer are covalently bound at the low-lying vibrational energy levels with ν = 0-4, while at the higher levels with ν = 5-11 the atoms are bonded by the van der Waals forces near the right turning points. The developed ab initio modified EMO potential function, in distinction with the original EMO function, which was used for a description of the experimental vibrational levels, not only has the correct dissociation energy, but also describes all twelve vibrational energy levels with a smaller RMS error of less than 0.4 cm-1.

  2. Coverage and chemical dependence of adsorbate-induced bond weakening in metal substrate surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sette, F.; Hashizume, T.; Comin, F.; MacDowell, A.A.; Citrin, P.H.

    1988-09-19

    Strongly coverage-dependent outward relaxation and enhanced in-plane vibrational amplitudes of metal surface atoms have been observed from S- and Cl-covered Ni(001) and Cu(001) by means of temperature- and polarization-dependent surface extended-x-ray-absorption fine-structure measurements. These results explicitly demonstrate the weakening of both interlayer and intralayer metal-metal substrate bonds. A model based on adsorbate-metal charge rearrangement explains these chemisorption-induced changes in the geometric and dynamic properties of the metal surface.

  3. Research on the interaction of hydrogen-bond acidic polymer sensitive sensor materials with chemical warfare agents simulants by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-06-02

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper.

  4. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26043177

  5. Mechanical and chemical bonding properties of ground state BeH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.-T.; Zhang, P.; Shi, H.-L.; Sun, B.; Li, W.-D.

    2010-04-01

    The crystal structure, mechanical properties and electronic structure of ground state BeH2 are calculated employing the first-principles methods based on the density functional theory. Our calculated structural parameters at equilibrium volume are well consistent with experimental results. Elastic constants, which well obey the mechanical stability criteria, are firstly theoretically acquired. The bulk modulus B, Shear modulus G, Young's modulus E, and Poisson's ratio υ are deduced from the elastic constants. The bonding nature in BeH2 is fully interpreted by combining characteristics in band structure, density of states, and charge distribution. The ionicity in the Be-H bond is mainly featured by charge transfer from Be 2s to H 1s atomic orbitals while its covalency is dominated by the hybridization of H 1s and Be 2p states. The Bader analysis of BeH2 and MgH2 are performed to describe the ionic/covalent character quantitatively and we find that about 1.61 (1.6) electrons transfer from each Be (Mg) atom to H atoms.

  6. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes covalently bonded cellulose composite for chemical vapor sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sungryul; Yang, Sang Yeol; Kim, Jaehwan

    2010-04-01

    A cellulose solution was prepared by dissolving cotton pulp in LiCl/ N,N-Dimethylacetamide (DMAc) solution, and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were reacted with N, N-Carbonyldiimidazoles to obtain MWCNTs-imidazolides. By acylation of cellulose with MWCNTs-imidazolides, MWCNTs were covalently bonded with cellulose chains. Using the product, MWCNTs covalently bonded cellulose composite (M/C) composite was fabricated with mechanical stretching to align MWCNTs with cellulose. Finally, inter-digital comb electrode was formed on the composite via lift-off process. Chemo-electrical properties of the M/C composite in response of absorption of the volatile vapors corresponding to 1-propanol, 1-butanol, methanol and ethanol were investigated. Due to sensitive and reversible expansion/contraction of the M/C composite matrix in response to absorption of each analyte, the M/C composite showed fast and reversible change in chemo-electrical property. The ranking of relative resistance response of the composite was methanol < ethanol < 1-propanol < 1-butanol.

  7. Chemically bonded hybrid systems from functionalized hydroxypyridine molecular bridge: characterization and photophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing; Qian, Kai

    2009-01-01

    A series of novel photoactive hybrid materials with organic parts covalently linked to inorganic parts via the acylamino group have been assembled by sol-gel process. The organic parts as molecular bridge derive from alpha-hydroxypyridine (HP) functionalized by 3-(triethoxysilyl)-propyl isocyanate (TESPIC). Finally homogeneous, molecular-based hybrid materials with different microstructure (uniform spherical or clubbed) are obtained, in which no phase separation is observed. This may be ascribed as the different coordination behavior of metal ions (Eu3+ (Tb3+) or Zn2+). Red emission of Eu-HP-Si, green emission of Tb-HP-Si and violet-blue luminescence of Zn-HP-Si hybrids can be achieved within these molecular-based hybrid materials. Besides, both Eu(Tb) and Zn are introduced into the same hybrid systems (Eu(Zn)-HP-Si or Tb(Zn)-HP-Si) through the covalent Si-O bond, whose sphere particle size can be modified. Especially the photoluminescence behavior can be enhanced, suggesting that intramolecular energy transfer takes place between inert Zn2+ and Eu3+ (Tb3+) in the covalently bonded hybrid systems.

  8. Characterization of Interfacial Chemistry of Adhesive/Dentin Bond Using FTIR Chemical Imaging With Univariate and Multivariate Data Processing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yao, Xiaomei; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan

    2008-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) chemical imaging can be used to investigate molecular chemical features of the adhesive/dentin interfaces. However, the information is not straightforward, and is not easily extracted. The objective of this study was to use multivariate analysis methods, principal component analysis and fuzzy c-means clustering, to analyze spectral data in comparison with univariate analysis. The spectral imaging data collected from both the adhesive/healthy dentin and adhesive/caries-affected dentin specimens were used and compared. The univariate statistical methods such as mapping of intensities of specific functional group do not always accurately identify functional group locations and concentrations due to more or less band overlapping in adhesive and dentin. Apart from the ease with which information can be extracted, multivariate methods highlight subtle and often important changes in the spectra that are difficult to observe using univariate methods. The results showed that the multivariate methods gave more satisfactory, interpretable results than univariate methods and were conclusive in showing that they can discriminate and classify differences between healthy dentin and caries-affected dentin within the interfacial regions. It is demonstrated that the multivariate FTIR imaging approaches can be used in the rapid characterization of heterogeneous, complex structure. PMID:18980198

  9. Effects of Jigsaw Cooperative Learning and Animation Techniques on Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Their Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karacop, Ataman; Doymus, Kemal

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of jigsaw cooperative learning and computer animation techniques on academic achievements of first year university students attending classes in which the unit of chemical bonding is taught within the general chemistry course and these students' learning of the particulate nature of matter of this unit. The sample of this study consisted of 115 first-year science education students who attended the classes in which the unit of chemical bonding was taught in a university faculty of education during the 2009-2010 academic year. The data collection instruments used were the Test of Scientific Reasoning, the Purdue Spatial Visualization Test: Rotations, the Chemical Bonding Academic Achievement Test, and the Particulate Nature of Matter Test in Chemical Bonding (CbPNMT). The study was carried out in three different groups. One of the groups was randomly assigned to the jigsaw group, the second was assigned to the animation group (AG), and the third was assigned to the control group, in which the traditional teaching method was applied. The data obtained with the instruments were evaluated using descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and MANCOVA. The results indicate that the teaching of chemical bonding via the animation and jigsaw techniques was more effective than the traditional teaching method in increasing academic achievement. In addition, according to findings from the CbPNMT, the students from the AG were more successful in terms of correct understanding of the particulate nature of matter.

  10. Three-dimensional H-bonding and ferroelectric transition in KDP. Quantum-chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolin, S. P.; Mikhailova, T. Yu; Solin, M. V.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Levin, A. A.

    On basis of the nonempirical methods (SCF, B3LYP, MP2-MP4) and several cluster models, the ferroelectric KH2PO4 (KDP) and its deuteroanalogue are studied. The tunneling integralsΩ and the parameters of the effective coupling of protons/deuterons U,V (the Ising parameters) are calculated for these materials with the 3d network of H/D-bonds. Using the obtained U,V andΩ values in the frames of molecular field approximation, it is found that the structural phase (ferroelectric) transition occurs for both crystals within the lowering of temperature. Such low-temperature behavior differs the 3d KDP-family materials from 0d systems, where the low-temperature phase transition takes place only upon deuteration. It is demonstrated that this difference is associated with an abrupt Ising parameters growth for KDP if compared with the nondeuterated 0d materials.

  11. [Atomic volume, packing density of the atoms, and chemical bonds in nonmetallic elements].

    PubMed

    Trömel, M

    2007-08-01

    The atomic volume of crystalline elements is largely determined by the packing density of atoms in the respective modification. The determination of packing density is improved by assuming that the atomic distances depend on bond valences according to Pauling's equation. With the additional assumption of equal valence in different modifications, the experimental atomic volume of an element in any given structure is reduced to its volume in close-packed structures, e.g. f.c.c. The ratio of this reduced atomic volume and the experimental atomic volume is a measure of packing density. Reduced atomic volumes of C, Si, Ge, P, As, S and Se, as calculated from different modifications, correspond in most cases to within less than +/-1% for each element, even if calculated from extremely different structures like diamond and buckminsterfullerene in the case of carbon, or from numerous modifications of sulfur with annular molecules of different sizes. Exceptions (graphite, white phosphorus, tin and selenium) indicate deviating valences.

  12. Electronic structure and chemical bonding in the lowest electronic states of TcN.

    PubMed

    Borin, Antonio Carlos; Gobbo, João Paulo

    2009-11-12

    Multiconfiguration second-order perturbation theory, with the inclusion of relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling, was employed to investigate the nature of the ground and low-lying Lambda-S and Omega states of the TcN molecule. Spectroscopic constants, effective bond order, and potential energy curves for 13 low-lying Lambda-S states and 5 Omega states are given. The computed ground state of TcN is of Omega = 3 symmetry (R(e) = 1.605 A and omega(e) = 1085 cm(-1)), originating mainly from the (3)Delta Lambda-S ground state. This result is contrasted with the nature of the ground state for other VIIB transtion-metal mononitrides, including X(3)Sigma(-) symmetry for MnN and Omega = 0(+) symmetry for ReN, derived also from a X(3)Sigma(-) state.

  13. TECHNICAL NOTE: Chemical analysis of bonded and debonded silicon-glass interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, M. M.; Plaza, J. A.; Wang, D. T.; Hanneborg, A. B.

    2001-09-01

    We report on the nature of the interface of anodically bonded glass wafers (Pyrex 7740, Hoya SD-2) and silicon wafers, after having reversed the voltage across the wafer couples. The reaction products and defects discovered at the interface of the wafers are studied with scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and with an electron microprobe. An accumulation, especially of sodium, is found to be closely related to the presence of defects appearing as brown/yellow-brown spots and cracks. Gradients in potassium and zinc concentrations are also observed in regions containing defects. Some of the processes that are believed to take place in the interface region are discussed. ane{abstract

  14. LOBSTER: A tool to extract chemical bonding from plane‐wave based DFT

    PubMed Central

    Maintz, Stefan; Deringer, Volker L.; Tchougréeff, Andrei L.

    2016-01-01

    The computer program LOBSTER (Local Orbital Basis Suite Towards Electronic‐Structure Reconstruction) enables chemical‐bonding analysis based on periodic plane‐wave (PAW) density‐functional theory (DFT) output and is applicable to a wide range of first‐principles simulations in solid‐state and materials chemistry. LOBSTER incorporates analytic projection routines described previously in this very journal [J. Comput. Chem. 2013, 34, 2557] and offers improved functionality. It calculates, among others, atom‐projected densities of states (pDOS), projected crystal orbital Hamilton population (pCOHP) curves, and the recently introduced bond‐weighted distribution function (BWDF). The software is offered free‐of‐charge for non‐commercial research. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914535

  15. Using Concept Mapping to Uncover Students' Knowledge Structures of Chemical Bonding Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Nikita L.; Mooring, Suazette Reid

    2015-01-01

    General chemistry is the first undergraduate course in which students further develop their understanding of fundamental chemical concepts. Many of these fundamental topics highlight the numerous conceptual interconnections present in chemistry. However, many students possess incoherent knowledge structures regarding these topics. Therefore,…

  16. All about that Amide Bond: The Sixth Chemical Protein Synthesis (CPS) Meeting.

    PubMed

    Weller, Caroline E; Chatterjee, Champak

    2015-11-01

    Endless potential: The sixth Chemical Protein Synthesis Meeting, held recently in St. Augustine, Florida, showed the potential of peptide and protein chemistry when applied toward understanding and controlling complex biological processes. This report highlights the diverse and cutting-edge protein chemistry presented at the meeting.

  17. Using Concept Mapping to Uncover Students' Knowledge Structures of Chemical Bonding Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Nikita L.; Mooring, Suazette Reid

    2015-01-01

    General chemistry is the first undergraduate course in which students further develop their understanding of fundamental chemical concepts. Many of these fundamental topics highlight the numerous conceptual interconnections present in chemistry. However, many students possess incoherent knowledge structures regarding these topics. Therefore,…

  18. Chemical and mechanical aspects of HMR primer in relationship to wood bonding

    Treesearch

    Alfred W. Christiansen

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism by which hydroxymethylated resorcinol (HMR) primer improves the durability of various adhesives to wood has been hypothesized as covalent chemical links between the adhesive and primer and possibly between the primer and wood. The present work presents experiments to test this hypothesis. In the first test, some resorcinol was displaced by 2- methylres-...

  19. The Synthesis, Structures, and Chemical Properties of Macrocyclic Ligands Covalently Bonded into Layered Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Clearfield, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    In this part of the proposal we have concentrated on the surface functionalization of α-zirconium phosphate of composition Zr(O3POH)2•H2O. It is a layered compound that can be prepared as particles as small as 30 nm to single crystals in the range of cm. This compound is an ion exchanger with a capacity of 6.64 meq per gram. It finds use as a catalyst, proton conductor, sensors, biosensors, in kidney dialysis and drug delivery. By functionalizing the surface additional uses are contemplated as will be described. The layers consist of the metal, with 4+ charge, that is positioned slightly above and below the mean layer plane and bridged by three of the four phosphate oxygens. The remaining POH groups point into the interlayer space creating double rows of POH groups but single arrays on the surface layers. The surface groups are reactive and we were able to bond silanes, isocyanates, epoxides, acrylates ` and phosphates to the surface POH groups. The layers are easily exfoliated or filled with ions by ion exchange or molecules by intercalation reactions. Highlights of our work include, in addition to direct functionalization of the surfaces, replacement of the protons on the surface with ions of different charge. This allows us to bond phosphates, biophosphates, phosphonic acids and alcohols to the surface. By variation of the ion charge of the ions that replace the surface protons, different surface structures are obtained. We have already shown that polymer fillers, catalysts and Janus particles may be prepared. The combination of surface functionalization with the ability to insert molecules and ions between the layers allow for a rich development of numerous useful other applications as well as nano-surface chemistry.

  20. The mystery of gold's chemical activity: local bonding, morphology and reactivity of atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Baker, Thomas A; Liu, Xiaoying; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-01-07

    Recently, gold has been intensely studied as a catalyst for key synthetic reactions. Gold is an attractive catalyst because, surprisingly, it is highly active and very selective for partial oxidation processes suggesting promise for energy-efficient "green" chemistry. The underlying origin of the high activity of Au is a controversial subject since metallic gold is commonly thought to be inert. Herein, we establish that one origin of the high activity for gold catalysis is the extremely reactive nature of atomic oxygen bound in 3-fold coordination sites on metallic gold. This is the predominant form of O at low concentrations on the surface, which is a strong indication that it is most relevant to catalytic conditions. Atomic oxygen bound to metallic Au in 3-fold sites has high activity for CO oxidation, oxidation of olefins, and oxidative transformations of alcohols and amines. Among the factors identified as important in Au-O interaction are the morphology of the surface, the local binding site of oxygen, and the degree of order of the oxygen overlayer. In this Perspective, we present an overview of both theory and experiments that identify the reactive forms of O and their associated charge density distributions and bond strengths. We also analyze and model the release of Au atoms induced by O binding to the surface. This rough surface also has the potential for O(2) dissociation, which is a critical step if Au is to be activated catalytically. We further show the strong parallels between product distributions and reactivity for O-covered Au at low pressure (ultrahigh vacuum) and for nanoporous Au catalysts operating at atmospheric pressure as evidence that atomic O is the active species under working catalytic conditions when metallic Au is present. We briefly discuss the possible contributions of oxidants that may contain intact O-O bonds and of the Au-metal oxide support interface in Au catalysis. Finally, the challenges and future directions for fully

  1. Construction of hybrid material with double chemical bond from functional bridge ligand: Molecular modification, lotus root-like micromorphology and strong luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Sui, Yu-Long

    2006-07-01

    Modifying benzoic acid with a cross-linking molecule (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (abbreviated as APES), a fictional molecular bridge with double reactivity was achieved by the amidation reaction between them. Then the modified functional molecule, which behaving as a bridge, both coordinate with terbium ion through amide's oxygen atom and form the Si-O chemical bond in an in situ sol-gel process with matrix precursor (tetraethoxysilane, TEOS). As a result, a novel molecular hybrid material (Tb-BA-APES) with double chemical bond (Tb-O coordination bond and Si-O covalent bond) was constructed. The strong luminescence of Tb 3+ substantiates optimum energy couple and effective intramolecular energy transfer between the triplet state energy of modified ligand bridge and emissive energy level of Tb 3+. Especially SEM of the molecular hybrid material exhibits unexpected microlotus root-like pore morphology.

  2. The protein amide ¹H(N) chemical shift temperature coefficient reflects thermal expansion of the N-H···O=C hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jingbo; Jing, Qingqing; Yao, Lishan

    2013-01-01

    The protein amide (1)H(N) chemical shift temperature coefficient can be determined with high accuracy by recording spectra at different temperatures, but the physical mechanism responsible for this temperature dependence is not well understood. In this work, we find that this coefficient strongly correlates with the temperature coefficient of the through-hydrogen-bond coupling, (3h)J(NC'), based on NMR measurements of protein GB3. Parallel tempering molecular dynamics simulation suggests that the hydrogen bond distance variation at different temperatures/replicas is largely responsible for the (1)H(N) chemical shift temperature dependence, from which an empirical equation is proposed to predict the hydrogen bond thermal expansion coefficient, revealing responses of individual hydrogen bonds to temperature changes. Different expansion patterns have been observed for various networks formed by β strands.

  3. The electrical properties of low pressure chemical vapor deposition Ga doped ZnO thin films depending on chemical bonding configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hanearl; Kim, Doyoung; Kim, Hyungjun

    2014-04-01

    The electrical and chemical properties of low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LP-CVD) Ga doped ZnO (ZnO:Ga) films were systematically investigated using Hall measurement and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Diethylzinc (DEZ) and O2 gas were used as precursor and reactant gas, respectively, and trimethyl gallium (TMGa) was used as a Ga doping source. Initially, the electrical properties of undoped LP-CVD ZnO films depending on the partial pressure of DEZ and O2 ratio were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) by changing partial pressure of DEZ from 40 to 140 mTorr and that of O2 from 40 to 80 mTorr. The resistivity was reduced by Ga doping from 7.24 × 10-3 Ω cm for undoped ZnO to 2.05 × 10-3 Ω cm for Ga doped ZnO at the TMG pressure of 8 mTorr. The change of electric properties of Ga doped ZnO with varying the amount of Ga dopants was systematically discussed based on the structural crystallinity and chemical bonding configuration, analyzed by XRD and XPS, respectively.

  4. Thermal-mechanical-chemical responses of polymer-bonded explosives using a mesoscopic reactive model under impact loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, XinJie; Wu, YanQing; Huang, FengLei

    2017-01-05

    A mesoscopic framework is developed to quantify the thermal-mechanical-chemical responses of polymer-bonded explosive (PBX) samples under impact loading. A mesoscopic reactive model is developed for the cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) crystal, which incorporates nonlinear elasticity, crystal plasticity, and temperature-dependent chemical reaction. The proposed model was implemented in the finite element code ABAQUS by the user subroutine VUMAT. A series of three-dimensional mesoscale models were constructed and calculated under low-strength impact loading scenarios from 100m/s to 600m/s where only the first wave transit is studied. Crystal anisotropy and microstructural heterogeneity are responsible for the nonuniform stress field and fluctuations of the stress wave front. At a critical impact velocity (≥300m/s), a chemical reaction is triggered because the temperature contributed by the volumetric and plastic works is sufficiently high. Physical quantities, including stress, temperature, and extent of reaction, are homogenized from those across the microstructure at the mesoscale to compare with macroscale measurements, which will advance the continuum-level models. The framework presented in this study has important implications in understanding hot spot ignition processes and improving predictive capabilities in energetic materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The bonding picture in hypervalent XF3 (X = Cl, Br, I, At) fluorides revisited with quantum chemical topology.

    PubMed

    Amaouch, Mohamed; Sergentu, Dumitru-Claudiu; Steinmetz, David; Maurice, Rémi; Galland, Nicolas; Pilmé, Julien

    2017-08-03

    Hypervalent XF3 (X = Cl, Br, I, At) fluorides exhibit T-shaped C2V equilibrium structures with the heavier of them, AtF3 , also revealing an almost isoenergetic planar D3h structure. Factors explaining this behavior based on simple "chemical intuition" are currently missing. In this work, we combine non-relativistic (ClF3 ), scalar-relativistic and two-component (X = Br - At) density functional theory calculations, and bonding analyses based on the electron localization function and the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Typical signatures of charge-shift bonding have been identified at the bent T-shaped structures of ClF3 and BrF3 , while the bonds of the other structures exhibit a dominant ionic character. With the aim of explaining the D3h structure of AtF3 , we extend the multipole expansion analysis to the framework of two-component single-reference calculations. This methodological advance enables us to rationalize the relative stability of the T-shaped C2v and the planar D3h structures: the Coulomb repulsions between the two lone-pairs of the central atom and between each lone-pair and each fluorine ligand are found significantly larger at the D3h structures than at the C2v ones for X = Cl - I, but not with X = At. This comes with the increasing stabilization, along the XF3 series, of the planar D3h structure with respect to the global T-shaped C2v minima. Hence, we show that the careful use of principles that are at the heart of the valence shell electron pair repulsion model provides reasonable justifications for stable planar D3h structures in AX3 E2 systems. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Barrelane-like germanium clusters in Eu 3Ge 5: Crystal structure, chemical bonding and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnyk, Sergij; Weitzer, Franz; Kubata, Christof; Prots, Yurii; Akselrud, Lev G.; Schnelle, Walter; Hiebl, Kurt; Nesper, Reinhard; Wagner, Frank R.; Grin, Yuri

    2006-08-01

    Formation and crystal structure of the binary germanide Eu 3Ge 5 were investigated in detail. The compound forms peritectically at 1008 °C and does not undergo any phase transition down to room temperature. The crystal structure was determined first from X-ray powder diffraction data and was later confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction: structure type Pu 3Pd 5, space group Cmcm (no. 63), a=9.7675(4) Å, b=7.9681(3) Å, c=9.8562(3) Å. The main building blocks are Ge 56- cluster anions surrounded by Eu 2+ cations. The nearly tetragonal-pyramidal shape is suggested by the interatomic distances. Contrary to that, the bonding analysis with the electron localization function (ELF) reveals only two- and three-bonded germanium atoms forming a strongly distorted [1.1.1]-barrelane-like cluster. Despite the formal electron deficiency, compared to the barrelane C 5H 8, the electron counting in the cluster anion and its conformation cannot be interpreted applying the Wade's rules. In accordance with the calculated electronic density of states, Eu 3Ge 5 shows a metal-like temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity with a sharp change of ρ(T) slope at the Néel point. Above the Néel point the inverse magnetic susceptibility reveals Curie-Weiss behavior with an effective moment of 8.11 μB (Eu 2+, 4 f7 configuration) in agreement with the analysis of the chemical bonding. The 4 f7 electronic configuration of europium is confirmed by Eu- LIII X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  7. Chemical bond imaging using higher eigenmodes of tuning fork sensors in atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Daniel; Zhong, Qigang; Ahles, Sebastian; Chi, Lifeng; Wegner, Hermann A.; Schirmeisen, André

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the ability of resolving the chemical structure of single organic molecules using non-contact atomic force microscopy with higher normal eigenmodes of quartz tuning fork sensors. In order to achieve submolecular resolution, CO-functionalized tips at low temperatures are used. The tuning fork sensors are operated in ultrahigh vacuum in the frequency modulation mode by exciting either their first or second eigenmode. Despite the high effective spring constant of the second eigenmode (on the order of several tens of kN/m), the force sensitivity is sufficiently high to achieve atomic resolution above the organic molecules. This is observed for two different tuning fork sensors with different tip geometries (small tip vs. large tip). These results represent an important step towards resolving the chemical structure of single molecules with multifrequency atomic force microscopy techniques where two or more eigenmodes are driven simultaneously.

  8. Determining hydrogen-bond interactions in spider silk with 1H-13C HETCOR fast MAS solid-state NMR and DFT proton chemical shift calculations.

    PubMed

    Holland, Gregory P; Mou, Qiushi; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2013-07-28

    Two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) solid-state NMR spectra collected with fast magic angle spinning (MAS) are used in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) proton chemical shift calculations to determine the hydrogen-bonding strength for ordered β-sheet and disordered 310-helical structures in spider dragline silk. The hydrogen-bond strength is determined to be identical for both structures in spider silk with a 1.83-1.84 Å NH···OC hydrogen-bond distance.

  9. Nature of the chemical bond of aqueous Fe2+ probed by soft X-ray spectroscopies and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Atak, Kaan; Bokarev, Sergey I; Gotz, Malte; Golnak, Ronny; Lange, Kathrin M; Engel, Nicholas; Dantz, Marcus; Suljoti, Edlira; Kühn, Oliver; Aziz, Emad F

    2013-10-17

    Aqueous iron(II) chloride is studied by soft X-ray absorption, emission, and resonant inelastic Raman scattering techniques on the Fe L-edge and O K-edge using the liquid-jet technique. Soft X-ray spectroscopies allow in situ and atom-specific probing of the electronic structure of the aqueous complex and thus open the door for the investigation of chemical bonding and molecular orbital mixing. In this work, we combine theoretical ab initio restricted active space self-consistent field and local atomic multiplet calculations with experimental soft X-ray spectroscopic methods for a description of the local electronic structure of the aqueous ferrous ion complex. We demonstrate that the atomic iron valence final states dominate the resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra of the complex over the ligand-to-metal charge transfer transitions, which indicates a weak interaction of Fe(2+) ion with surrounding water molecules. Moreover, the oxygen K-edge also shows only minor changes due to the presence of Fe(2+) implying a small influence on the hydrogen-bond network of water.

  10. Mechanical control of the plasmon coupling with Au nanoparticle arrays fixed on the elastomeric film via chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, Elena; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-03-01

    We have fabricated Au nanoparticle arrays on the flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) film. The nanoparticles were bound to the film via a covalent bond by a ligand exchange reaction. Thanks to the strong chemical bonding, highly stable and uniformly dispersed Au nanoparticle arrays were fixed on the PDMS film. The Au nanoparticle arrays were characterized by the UV–vis, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The UV–vis and SEM measurements showed the uniformity of the surface-dispersed Au nanoparticles, and SERS measurement confirmed the chemistry of the PDMS film. Reflecting the high stability and the uniformity of the Au nanoparticle arrays, the plasmon wavelength of the Au nanoparticles reversely changed with modulation of the interparticle distance, which was induced by the stretching of the PDMS film. The plasmon wavelength linearly decreased from 664 to 591 nm by stretching of 60%. The plasmon wavelength shift can be explained by the change in the strength of the plasmon coupling which is mechanically controlled by the mechanical strain.

  11. Structure, vibrations and quantum chemical investigations of hydrogen bonded complex of bis(1-hydroxy-2-methylpropan-2-aminium)selenate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunarayanan, S.; Arjunan, V.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2017-04-01

    The hydrogen bonded molecular complex bis(1-hydroxy-2-methylpropan-2-aminium)selenate (C8H24N2O6Se) has been prepared by the reaction of 2-amino-2-methyl propanol and selenic acid. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the intermolecular proton transfer from selenic acid (SeO4H2) to 2-amino-2-methylpropanol results in the formation of bis(1-hydroxy-2-methylpropan-2-aminium)selenate (HMPAS) salt and the fragments are connected through H-bonding and ion pairing. The N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O interactions between 2-amino-2-methylpropanol and selenic acid determine the supramolecular arrangement in three-dimensional space. The salt crystallises in the space group P121/n1 of monoclinic system. The complete vibrational assignments of HMPAS have been performed by FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopy. The experimental data are correlated with the structural properties namely the energy, thermodynamic parameters, atomic charges, hybridization concepts and vibrational frequencies determined by quantum chemical studies performed with B3LYP method using 6-311++G*, 6-31+G* and 6-31G** basis sets.

  12. Part-crystalline part-liquid state and rattling-like thermal damping in materials with chemical-bond hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Lili; Wei, Ping; Ke, Xuezhi; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Understanding thermal and phonon transport in solids has been of great importance in many disciplines such as thermoelectric materials, which usually requires an extremely low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC). By analyzing the finite-temperature structural and vibrational characteristics of typical thermoelectric compounds such as filled skutterudites and Cu3SbSe3, we demonstrate a concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state in the compounds with chemical-bond hierarchy, in which certain constituent species weakly bond to other part of the crystal. Such a material could intrinsically manifest the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and other fluctuating noncrystalline sublattices with thermally induced large-amplitude vibrations and even flow of the group of species atoms, leading to atomic-level heterogeneity, mixed part-crystalline part-liquid structure, and thus rattling-like thermal damping due to the collective soft-mode vibrations similar to the Boson peak in amorphous materials. The observed abnormal LTC close to the amorphous limit in these materials can only be described by an effective approach that approximately treats the rattling-like damping as a “resonant” phonon scattering. PMID:25288751

  13. Part-crystalline part-liquid state and rattling-like thermal damping in materials with chemical-bond hierarchy

    DOE PAGES

    Qiu, Wujie; Xi, Lili; Wei, Ping; ...

    2014-10-06

    Understanding thermal and phonon transport in solids has been of great importance in many disciplines such as thermoelectric materials, which usually requires an extremely low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC). Here, by analyzing the finite-temperature structural and vibrational characteristics of typical thermoelectric compounds such as filled skutterudites and Cu3SbSe3, we demonstrate a concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state in the compounds with chemical-bond hierarchy, in which certain constituent species weakly bond to other part of the crystal. Such a material could intrinsically manifest the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and other fluctuating noncrystalline sublattices with thermally induced large-amplitude vibrations and even flowmore » of the group of species atoms, leading to atomic-level heterogeneity, mixed part-crystalline part-liquid structure, and thus rattling-like thermal damping due to the collective soft-mode vibrations similar to the Boson peak in amorphous materials. Lastly, the observed abnormal LTC close to the amorphous limit in these materials can only be described by an effective approach that approximately treats the rattling-like damping as a “resonant” phonon scattering.« less

  14. Part-crystalline part-liquid state and rattling-like thermal damping in materials with chemical-bond hierarchy

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Wujie; Xi, Lili; Wei, Ping; Ke, Xuezhi; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-10-06

    Understanding thermal and phonon transport in solids has been of great importance in many disciplines such as thermoelectric materials, which usually requires an extremely low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC). Here, by analyzing the finite-temperature structural and vibrational characteristics of typical thermoelectric compounds such as filled skutterudites and Cu3SbSe3, we demonstrate a concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state in the compounds with chemical-bond hierarchy, in which certain constituent species weakly bond to other part of the crystal. Such a material could intrinsically manifest the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and other fluctuating noncrystalline sublattices with thermally induced large-amplitude vibrations and even flow of the group of species atoms, leading to atomic-level heterogeneity, mixed part-crystalline part-liquid structure, and thus rattling-like thermal damping due to the collective soft-mode vibrations similar to the Boson peak in amorphous materials. Lastly, the observed abnormal LTC close to the amorphous limit in these materials can only be described by an effective approach that approximately treats the rattling-like damping as a “resonant” phonon scattering.

  15. Part-crystalline part-liquid state and rattling-like thermal damping in materials with chemical-bond hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wujie; Xi, Lili; Wei, Ping; Ke, Xuezhi; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-10-21

    Understanding thermal and phonon transport in solids has been of great importance in many disciplines such as thermoelectric materials, which usually requires an extremely low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC). By analyzing the finite-temperature structural and vibrational characteristics of typical thermoelectric compounds such as filled skutterudites and Cu3SbSe3, we demonstrate a concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state in the compounds with chemical-bond hierarchy, in which certain constituent species weakly bond to other part of the crystal. Such a material could intrinsically manifest the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and other fluctuating noncrystalline sublattices with thermally induced large-amplitude vibrations and even flow of the group of species atoms, leading to atomic-level heterogeneity, mixed part-crystalline part-liquid structure, and thus rattling-like thermal damping due to the collective soft-mode vibrations similar to the Boson peak in amorphous materials. The observed abnormal LTC close to the amorphous limit in these materials can only be described by an effective approach that approximately treats the rattling-like damping as a "resonant" phonon scattering.

  16. Hydrogen trapping in MAX phase Ti3SiC2: Insight from chemical bonding by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. F.; Ren, X. L.; Zhang, J. Y.; Huang, J.; Xu, C. H.; Du, A. J.; Wang, Y. X.

    2017-05-01

    Understanding hydrogen (H) isotope trapping in materials is essential to optimize the material performance in a nuclear environment for the fabrication of nuclear devices. By using the density functional theory (DFT), herein we have systematically investigated the behaviour of hydrogen in the MAX phase Ti3SiC2 in the presence and absence of a vacancy (V). When a vacancy is generated in a favorable plane for hydrogen accumulating (Si plane), two distinct behavours of hydrogen in the Si plane have been identified by chemical bond analysis, i.e., the Ti-H and Si-H bonding, which synergistically results in VH2 complexes prevailing in the host matrix. Different from metals and other ceramics, the trapping mechanism of H in Ti3SiC2 essentially originates from the spatially inhomogeneous distribution of free-charge density and large discrepancy of electronegativity between the host atoms. Our theoretical results offer great insights into the rational design of new high-performance nuclear materials.

  17. Effects of carbon vacancies on the structures, mechanical properties, and chemical bonding of zirconium carbides: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Congwei; Oganov, Artem R; Li, Duan; Debela, Tekalign Terfa; Liu, Ning; Dong, Dong; Zeng, Qingfeng

    2016-04-28

    Interstitial carbides are able to maintain structural stability even with a high concentration of carbon vacancies. This feature provides them with tunable properties through the design of carbon vacancies, and thus making it important to reveal how carbon vacancies affect their properties. In the present study, using first-principles, we have calculated the properties of a number of stable and metastable zirconium carbides ZrC1-x (x = 0 and 1/n, n = 2-8) which were predicted by the evolutionary algorithm USPEX. Effects of carbon vacancies on the structures, mechanical properties, and chemical bonding of these zirconium carbides were systematically investigated. The distribution of carbon vacancies has significant influence on mechanical properties, especially Pugh's ratio. Nonadjacent carbon vacancies enhance Pugh's ratio, while grouped carbon vacancies decrease Pugh's ratio. This is explained by the changes in strength of Zr-C and Zr-Zr bonding around differently distributed carbon vacancies. We further explored the mechanical properties of zirconium carbides with impurities (N and O) by inserting N and O atoms into the sites of carbon vacancies. The enhanced mechanical properties of zirconium carbides were found.

  18. A Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Different Chemical Solvents on the Shear Bond Strength of Glass Fiber reinforced Post to Core Material.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish; Samadi, Firoza; Jaiswal, Jn; Saha, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    To compare the effect of different chemical solvents on glass fiber reinforced posts and to study the effect of these solvents on the shear bond strength of glass fiber reinforced post to core material. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three chemical solvents, i.e. silane coupling agent, 6% H2O2 and 37% phosphoric acid on the shear bond strength of glass fiber post to a composite resin restorative material. The changes in post surface characteristics after different treatments were also observed, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and shear bond strength was analyzed using universal testing machine (UTM). Surface treatment with hydrogen peroxide had greatest impact on the post surface followed by 37% phosphoric acid and silane. On evaluation of the shear bond strength, 6% H2O2 exhibited the maximum shear bond strength followed in descending order by 37% phosphoric acid and silane respectively. The surface treatment of glass fiber post enhances the adhesion between the post and composite resin which is used as core material. Failure of a fiber post and composite resin core often occurs at the junction between the two materials. This failure process requires better characterization. How to cite this article: Sharma A, Samadi F, Jaiswal JN, Saha S. A Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Different Chemical Solvents on the Shear Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Reinforced Post to Core Material. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):192-196.

  19. A Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Different Chemical Solvents on the Shear Bond Strength of Glass Fiber reinforced Post to Core Material

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Firoza; Jaiswal, JN; Saha, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Aim: To compare the effect of different chemical solvents on glass fiber reinforced posts and to study the effect of these solvents on the shear bond strength of glass fiber reinforced post to core material. Materials and methods: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three chemical solvents, i.e. silane coupling agent, 6% H2O2 and 37% phosphoric acid on the shear bond strength of glass fiber post to a composite resin restorative material. The changes in post surface characteristics after different treatments were also observed, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and shear bond strength was analyzed using universal testing machine (UTM). Results: Surface treatment with hydrogen peroxide had greatest impact on the post surface followed by 37% phosphoric acid and silane. On evaluation of the shear bond strength, 6% H2O2 exhibited the maximum shear bond strength followed in descending order by 37% phosphoric acid and silane respectively. Conclusion: The surface treatment of glass fiber post enhances the adhesion between the post and composite resin which is used as core material. Failure of a fiber post and composite resin core often occurs at the junction between the two materials. This failure process requires better characterization. How to cite this article: Sharma A, Samadi F, Jaiswal JN, Saha S. A Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Different Chemical Solvents on the Shear Bond Strength of Glass Fiber Reinforced Post to Core Material. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):192-196. PMID:25709300

  20. Use of chemical auxiliaries to control p450 enzymes for predictable oxidations at unactivated C-h bonds of substrates.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Karine; Polic, Vanja

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s) have the ability to oxidize unactivated C-H bonds of substrates with remarkable regio- and stereoselectivity. Comparable selectivity for chemical oxidizing agents is typically difficult to achieve. Hence, there is an interest in exploiting P450s as potential biocatalysts. Despite their impressive attributes, the current use of P450s as biocatalysts is limited. While bacterial P450 enzymes typically show higher activity, they tend to be highly selective for one or a few substrates. On the other hand, mammalian P450s, especially the drug-metabolizing enzymes, display astonishing substrate promiscuity. However, product prediction continues to be challenging. This review discusses the use of small molecules for controlling P450 substrate specificity and product selectivity. The focus will be on two approaches in the area: (1) the use of decoy molecules, and (2) the application of substrate engineering to control oxidation by the enzyme.