Science.gov

Sample records for chemical kinetics calculations

  1. Trajectory Calculations in Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Gregory L.; White, John M.

    1972-01-01

    This exercise, suitable for an advanced undergraduate physical chemistry lab, examines the detailed theoretical description of a chemical reaction. Mathematical techniques of moderate complexity serve to introduce some aspects of theoretical chemistry. (Author/TS)

  2. Fast algorithm for calculating chemical kinetics in turbulent reacting flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.; Pratt, D. T.

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for a fast batch chemistry solver to perform the kinetics part of a split operator formulation of turbulent reacting flows, with special attention focused on the solution of the ordinary differential equations governing a homogeneous gas-phase chemical reaction. For this purpose, a two-part predictor-corrector algorithm which incorporates an exponentially fitted trapezoidal method was developed. The algorithm performs filtering of ill-posed initial conditions, automatic step-size selection, and automatic selection of Jacobi-Newton or Newton-Raphson iteration for convergence to achieve maximum computational efficiency while observing a prescribed error tolerance. The new algorithm, termed CREK1D (combustion reaction kinetics, one-dimensional), compared favorably with the code LSODE when tested on two representative problems drawn from combustion kinetics, and is faster than LSODE.

  3. APOLLO: A computer program for the calculation of chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics of chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.D.

    1991-11-01

    Several of the technologies being evaluated for the treatment of waste material involve chemical reactions. Our example is the in situ vitrification (ISV) process where electrical energy is used to melt soil and waste into a glass like'' material that immobilizes and encapsulates any residual waste. During the ISV process, various chemical reactions may occur that produce significant amounts of products which must be contained and treated. The APOLLO program was developed to assist in predicting the composition of the gases that are formed. Although the development of this program was directed toward ISV applications, it should be applicable to other technologies where chemical reactions are of interest. This document presents the mathematical methodology of the APOLLO computer code. APOLLO is a computer code that calculates the products of both equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. The current version, written in FORTRAN, is readily adaptable to existing transport programs designed for the analysis of chemically reacting flow systems. Separate subroutines EQREACT and KIREACT for equilibrium ad kinetic chemistry respectively have been developed. A full detailed description of the numerical techniques used, which include both Lagrange multiplies and a third-order integrating scheme is presented. Sample test problems are presented and the results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature.

  4. APOLLO: A computer program for the calculation of chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics of chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.D.

    1991-11-01

    Several of the technologies being evaluated for the treatment of waste material involve chemical reactions. Our example is the in situ vitrification (ISV) process where electrical energy is used to melt soil and waste into a ``glass like`` material that immobilizes and encapsulates any residual waste. During the ISV process, various chemical reactions may occur that produce significant amounts of products which must be contained and treated. The APOLLO program was developed to assist in predicting the composition of the gases that are formed. Although the development of this program was directed toward ISV applications, it should be applicable to other technologies where chemical reactions are of interest. This document presents the mathematical methodology of the APOLLO computer code. APOLLO is a computer code that calculates the products of both equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions. The current version, written in FORTRAN, is readily adaptable to existing transport programs designed for the analysis of chemically reacting flow systems. Separate subroutines EQREACT and KIREACT for equilibrium ad kinetic chemistry respectively have been developed. A full detailed description of the numerical techniques used, which include both Lagrange multiplies and a third-order integrating scheme is presented. Sample test problems are presented and the results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature.

  5. Iteration Scheme for Implicit Calculations of Kinetic and Equilibrium Chemical Reactions in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshaw, J. D.; Chang, C. H.

    1995-02-01

    An iteration scheme for the implicit treatment of equilibrium chemical reactions in partial equilibrium flow has previously been described (J. D. Ramshaw and A. A. Amsden, J. Comput. Phys.59, 484 (1985); 71 , 224 (1987)). Here we generalize this scheme to kinetic reactions as well as equilibrium reactions. This extends the applicability of the scheme to problems with kinetic reactions that are fast in some regions of the flow field but slow in others. The resulting scheme thereby provides a single unified framework for the implicit treatment of an arbitrary number of coupled equilibrium and kinetic reactions in chemically reacting fluid flow.

  6. A Steady-State Approximation to the Two-Dimensional Master Equation for Chemical Kinetics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Stanton, John F

    2015-07-16

    In the field of chemical kinetics, the solution of a two-dimensional master equation that depends explicitly on both total internal energy (E) and total angular momentum (J) is a challenging problem. In this work, a weak-E/fixed-J collisional model (i.e., weak-collisional internal energy relaxation/free-collisional angular momentum relaxation) is used along with the steady-state approach to solve the resulting (simplified) two-dimensional (E,J)-grained master equation. The corresponding solutions give thermal rate constants and product branching ratios as functions of both temperature and pressure. We also have developed a program that can be used to predict and analyze experimental chemical kinetics results. This expedient technique, when combined with highly accurate potential energy surfaces, is cable of providing results that may be meaningfully compared to experiments. The reaction of singlet oxygen with methane proceeding through vibrationally excited methanol is used as an illustrative example.

  7. The effects of consistent chemical kinetics calculations on the pressure-temperature profiles and emission spectra of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, B.; Tremblin, P.; Baraffe, I.; Amundsen, D. S.; Mayne, N. J.; Venot, O.; Goyal, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we investigate the impact of calculating non-equilibrium chemical abundances consistently with the temperature structure for the atmospheres of highly-irradiated, close-in gas giant exoplanets. Chemical kinetics models have been widely used in the literature to investigate the chemical compositions of hot Jupiter atmospheres which are expected to be driven away from chemical equilibrium via processes such as vertical mixing and photochemistry. All of these models have so far used pressure-temperature (P-T) profiles as fixed model input. This results in a decoupling of the chemistry from the radiative and thermal properties of the atmosphere, despite the fact that in nature they are intricately linked. We use a one-dimensional radiative-convective equilibrium model, ATMO, which includes a sophisticated chemistry scheme to calculate P-T profiles which are fully consistent with non-equilibrium chemical abundances, including vertical mixing and photochemistry. Our primary conclusion is that, in cases of strong chemical disequilibrium, consistent calculations can lead to differences in the P-T profile of up to 100 K compared to the P-T profile derived assuming chemical equilibrium. This temperature change can, in turn, have important consequences for the chemical abundances themselves as well as for the simulated emission spectra. In particular, we find that performing the chemical kinetics calculation consistently can reduce the overall impact of non-equilibrium chemistry on the observable emission spectrum of hot Jupiters. Simulated observations derived from non-consistent models could thus yield the wrong interpretation. We show that this behaviour is due to the non-consistent models violating the energy budget balance of the atmosphere.

  8. Chemical and Biological Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel', N. M.

    1981-10-01

    Examples of the application of the methods and ideas of chemical kinetics in various branches of chemistry and biology are considered and the results of studies on the kinetics and mechanisms of autoxidation and inhibited and catalysed oxidation of organic substances in the liquid phase are surveyed. Problems of the kinetics of the ageing of polymers and the principles of their stabilisation are discussed and certain trends in biological kinetics (kinetics of tumour growth, kinetic criteria of the effectiveness of chemotherapy, problems of gerontology, etc.) are considered. The bibliography includes 281 references.

  9. Chemical Kinetics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 17 NIST Chemical Kinetics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemical Kinetics Database includes essentially all reported kinetics results for thermal gas-phase chemical reactions. The database is designed to be searched for kinetics data based on the specific reactants involved, for reactions resulting in specified products, for all the reactions of a particular species, or for various combinations of these. In addition, the bibliography can be searched by author name or combination of names. The database contains in excess of 38,000 separate reaction records for over 11,700 distinct reactant pairs. These data have been abstracted from over 12,000 papers with literature coverage through early 2000.

  10. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  11. Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The current methods of quantum chemical calculations will be reviewed. The accent will be on the accuracy that can be achieved with these methods. The basis set requirements and computer resources for the various methods will be discussed. The utility of the methods will be illustrated with some examples, which include the calculation of accurate bond energies for SiF$_n$ and SiF$_n^+$ and the modeling of chemical data storage.

  12. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  13. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  14. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  15. Chemical kinetics on extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Moses, Julianne I

    2014-04-28

    Chemical kinetics plays an important role in controlling the atmospheric composition of all planetary atmospheres, including those of extrasolar planets. For the hottest exoplanets, the composition can closely follow thermochemical-equilibrium predictions, at least in the visible and infrared photosphere at dayside (eclipse) conditions. However, for atmospheric temperatures approximately <2000K, and in the uppermost atmosphere at any temperature, chemical kinetics matters. The two key mechanisms by which kinetic processes drive an exoplanet atmosphere out of equilibrium are photochemistry and transport-induced quenching. I review these disequilibrium processes in detail, discuss observational consequences and examine some of the current evidence for kinetic processes on extrasolar planets. PMID:24664912

  16. Chemical kinetics on extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Moses, Julianne I

    2014-04-28

    Chemical kinetics plays an important role in controlling the atmospheric composition of all planetary atmospheres, including those of extrasolar planets. For the hottest exoplanets, the composition can closely follow thermochemical-equilibrium predictions, at least in the visible and infrared photosphere at dayside (eclipse) conditions. However, for atmospheric temperatures approximately <2000K, and in the uppermost atmosphere at any temperature, chemical kinetics matters. The two key mechanisms by which kinetic processes drive an exoplanet atmosphere out of equilibrium are photochemistry and transport-induced quenching. I review these disequilibrium processes in detail, discuss observational consequences and examine some of the current evidence for kinetic processes on extrasolar planets.

  17. Computer Simulation in Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jay Martin

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the use of the System Dynamics technique in simulating a chemical reaction for kinetic analysis. Also discusses the use of simulation modelling in biology, ecology, and the social sciences, where experimentation may be impractical or impossible. (MLH)

  18. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  19. Chemical Kinetics Laboratory Discussion Worksheet.

    PubMed

    Demoin, Dustin Wayne; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2013-09-10

    A laboratory discussion worksheet and its answer key provide instructors and students a discussion model to further the students' understanding of chemical kinetics. This discussion worksheet includes a section for students to augment their previous knowledge about chemical kinetics measurements, an initial check on students' understanding of basic concepts, a group participation model where students work on solving complex-conceptual problems, and a conclusion to help students connect this discussion to their laboratory or lecture class. Additionally, the worksheet has a detailed solution to a more advanced problem to help students understand how the concepts they have put together relate to problems they will encounter during later formal assessments.

  20. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  1. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrogen Combustion Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2008-04-02

    A detailed chemical kinetic model is used to explore the flammability and detonability of hydrogen mixtures. In the case of flammability, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for hydrogen is coupled to the CHEMKIN Premix code to compute premixed, laminar flame speeds. The detailed chemical kinetic model reproduces flame speeds in the literature over a range of equivalence ratios, pressures and reactant temperatures. A series of calculation were performed to assess the key parameters determining the flammability of hydrogen mixtures. Increased reactant temperature was found to greatly increase the flame speed and the flammability of the mixture. The effect of added diluents was assessed. Addition of water and carbon dioxide were found to reduce the flame speed and thus the flammability of a hydrogen mixture approximately equally well and much more than the addition of nitrogen. The detailed chemical kinetic model was used to explore the detonability of hydrogen mixtures. A Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) detonation model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics was used to model the detonation. The effectiveness on different diluents was assessed in reducing the detonability of a hydrogen mixture. Carbon dioxide was found to be most effective in reducing the detonability followed by water and nitrogen. The chemical action of chemical inhibitors on reducing the flammability of hydrogen mixtures is discussed. Bromine and organophosphorus inhibitors act through catalytic cycles that recombine H and OH radicals in the flame. The reduction in H and OH radicals reduces chain branching in the flame through the H + O{sub 2} = OH + O chain branching reaction. The reduction in chain branching and radical production reduces the flame speed and thus the flammability of the hydrogen mixture.

  2. Chemical Kinetic Study of Toluene Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Seiser, R; Bozzelli, J W; Seshadri, K; Chen, C-J; Da Costa, I; Fournet, R; Billaud, F; Battin-Leclerc, F; Westbrook, C K

    2001-12-17

    A study was performed to elucidate the chemical-kinetic mechanism of combustion of toluene. A detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for toluene was improved by adding a more accurate description of the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction channels, toluene decomposition reactions and the benzyl + 0 reaction. Results of the chemical kinetic mechanism are compared with experimental data obtained from premixed and nonpremixed systems. Under premixed conditions, predicted ignition delay times are compared with new experimental data obtained in shock tube. Also, calculated species concentration histories are compared to experimental flow reactor data from the literature. Under nonpremixed conditions, critical conditions of extinction and autoignition were measured in strained laminar flows in the counterflow configuration. Numerical calculations are performed using the chemical-kinetic mechanism at conditions corresponding to those in the experiments. Critical conditions of extinction and autoignition are predicted and compared with the experimental data. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental results of ignition delay times in shock tube, and extinction and autoignition in nonpremixed systems show that the chemical-kinetic mechanism predicts that toluene/air is overall less reactive than observed in the experiments. For both premixed and nonpremixed systems, sensitivity analysis was used to identify the reaction rate constants that control the overall rate of oxidation in each of the systems considered. Under shock tube conditions, the reactions that influence ignition delay time are H + O{sub 2} chain branching, the toluene decomposition reaction to give an H atom, and the toluene + H abstraction reaction. The reactions that influence autoignition in nonpremixed systems involve the benzyl + HO{sub 2} reaction and the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction.

  3. Heuristic control of kinetic energy in dynamic reaction coordinate calculations.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Arnim

    2013-08-01

    For the understanding and prediction of chemical reactions, detailed knowledge of the minimum energy path between reactants and transition state is of utmost importance. Stewart et al. (J. Comput. Chem. 1987, 8, 1117) proposed the usage of molecular trajectories calculated from Newton's equations of motion for an efficient reaction path following. Two operational modes are possible thereby: intrinsic (IRC) and dynamic reaction coordinate calculations (DRC). The technical difference between these modes is that in an IRC calculation the kinetic energy of the nuclei is quenched while the total energy is conserved in DRC calculations. In this work, a heuristic control methodology of atomic kinetic energies in DRC calculations using fuzzy logic is proposed. A diversified test set of 10 reactions has been collected to examine the performance of this approach. Fuzzy rule-based models are found to be a convenient way to make the determination of accessible paths of chemical reactions computationally efficient.

  4. The Kinetic Stabilizer: Further Calculations and Options

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    2002-06-19

    The Kinetic Stabilizer, employing injected and mirror-reflected ion beams, represents a method for stabilizing axisymmetric mirror and tandem mirror systems. Building on earlier work, this paper presents further calculations on the concept and explores some new options that promise to enhance its capabilities.

  5. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  6. Updated Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    2005-01-01

    An updated version of the General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis (LSENS) computer code has become available. A prior version of LSENS was described in "Program Helps to Determine Chemical-Reaction Mechanisms" (LEW-15758), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 19, No. 5 (May 1995), page 66. To recapitulate: LSENS solves complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical-kinetics problems (e.g., combustion of fuels) that are represented by sets of many coupled, nonlinear, first-order ordinary differential equations. LSENS has been designed for flexibility, convenience, and computational efficiency. The present version of LSENS incorporates mathematical models for (1) a static system; (2) steady, one-dimensional inviscid flow; (3) reaction behind an incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; (4) a perfectly stirred reactor; and (5) a perfectly stirred reactor followed by a plug-flow reactor. In addition, LSENS can compute equilibrium properties for the following assigned states: enthalpy and pressure, temperature and pressure, internal energy and volume, and temperature and volume. For static and one-dimensional-flow problems, including those behind an incident shock wave and following a perfectly stirred reactor calculation, LSENS can compute sensitivity coefficients of dependent variables and their derivatives, with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate-coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions.

  7. Fast algorithms for combustion kinetics calculations: A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1984-01-01

    To identify the fastest algorithm currently available for the numerical integration of chemical kinetic rate equations, several algorithms were examined. Findings to date are summarized. The algorithms examined include two general-purpose codes EPISODE and LSODE and three special-purpose (for chemical kinetic calculations) codes CHEMEQ, CRK1D, and GCKP84. In addition, an explicit Runge-Kutta-Merson differential equation solver (IMSL Routine DASCRU) is used to illustrate the problems associated with integrating chemical kinetic rate equations by a classical method. Algorithms were applied to two test problems drawn from combustion kinetics. These problems included all three combustion regimes: induction, heat release and equilibration. Variations of the temperature and species mole fraction are given with time for test problems 1 and 2, respectively. Both test problems were integrated over a time interval of 1 ms in order to obtain near-equilibration of all species and temperature. Of the codes examined in this study, only CREK1D and GCDP84 were written explicitly for integrating exothermic, non-isothermal combustion rate equations. These therefore have built-in procedures for calculating the temperature.

  8. Inflation Rates, Car Devaluation, and Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pogliani, Lionello; Berberan-Santos, Mario N.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the inflation rate problem and offers an interesting analogy with chemical kinetics. Presents and solves the car devaluation problem as a normal chemical kinetic problem where the order of the rate law and the value of the rate constant are derived. (JRH)

  9. Enhancing Thai Students' Learning of Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chairam, Sanoe; Somsook, Ekasith; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical kinetics is an extremely important concept for introductory chemistry courses. The literature suggests that instruction in chemical kinetics is often teacher-dominated at both the secondary school and tertiary levels, and this is the case in Thailand--the educational context for this inquiry. The work reported here seeks to shift students…

  10. Chemical kinetics of geminal recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, P.P.; Khudyakov, I.V.; Brin, E.F.; Kuz'min, V.A.

    1988-09-01

    The kinetics of geminal recombination of triplet radical pairs formed in photoreduction of benzophenone by p-cresol in glycerin solution was studied by pulsed laser photolysis. The experiments were conducted at several temperatures and in a constant magnetic field of H = 0.34 T. The parameters in six kinetic equations describing geminal recombination were determined with a computer. The values of the sums of the squares of the residual deviations of the approximation were obtained. It was found that the kinetics are best described by the functions proposed by Noyes and Shushin. It was shown that it is necessary to use the mutual diffusion coefficient of the radicals, which is significantly smaller than the sum of the estimations of the experimental values of the radical diffusion coefficients, for describing the kinetics due to the correlations of the molecular motions of the radicals in the cage.

  11. Chemical Weathering Kinetics of Basalt on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to experimentally measure the kinetics for chemical weathering reactions involving basalt on Venus. The thermochemical reactions being studied are important for the CO2 atmosphere-lithosphere cycle on Venus and for the atmosphere-surface reactions controlling the oxidation state of the surface of Venus. These reactions include the formation of carbonate and scapolite minerals, and the oxidation of Fe-bearing minerals. These experiments and calculations are important for interpreting results from the Pioneer Venus, Magellan, Galileo flyby, Venera, and Vega missions to Venus, for interpreting results from Earth-based telescopic observations, and for the design of new Discovery class (e.g., VESAT) and New Millennium missions to Venus such as geochemical landers making in situ elemental and mineralogical analyses, and orbiters, probes and balloons making spectroscopic observations of the sub-cloud atmosphere of Venus.

  12. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  13. Assessment in the competition between steric and electronic effects in the elimination kinetic of hydrogen in 1,4-cyclohexadienes in the gas phase. Quantum chemical theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Beatriz; Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Ruette, Fernando; Chuchani, Gabriel

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms of gas-phase thermal decomposition of alkyl-substituted cyclohexadienes were studied by the means of quantum chemical calculations with theory levels Møller-Plesset pertubation theory (MP2) and density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP, MPW1PW91, PBEPBE, ωB97XD, CAM-B3LYP, M06, and M062X) with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets. The examination of the reaction pathways of each substrate demonstrated a molecular mechanism through six-membered cyclic boat-like transition state (TS) structure. An alkyl group substituent causes a detrimental effect on the reaction rate, compared to the parent compound 1,4-cyclohexadiene; however, the reaction was favoured in the case of 3,6-dimethyl substitution. The 3,6-dimethyl-1,4-cyclohexadiene compound has activation energy 11.2 kJ/mol lower than the reference compound, which overcomes the effect of the most negative entropy of activation in the series. The effects of alkyl substituents in these reactions suggest a complex combination of electronic and steric influence. These reactions are characterised as highly synchronous concerted, with small predominance of C-H bond breaking in the TS.

  14. Nonlinear response theory in chemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kryvohuz, Maksym; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-21

    A theory of nonlinear response of chemical kinetics, in which multiple perturbations are used to probe the time evolution of nonlinear chemical systems, is developed. Expressions for nonlinear chemical response functions and susceptibilities, which can serve as multidimensional measures of the kinetic pathways and rates, are derived. A new class of multidimensional measures that combine multiple perturbations and measurements is also introduced. Nonlinear fluctuation-dissipation relations for steady-state chemical systems, which replace operations of concentration measurement and perturbations, are proposed. Several applications to the analysis of complex reaction mechanisms are provided.

  15. Using chemical kinetics to model biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Le Novère, Nicolas; Endler, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    Chemical kinetics is the study of the rate of reactions transforming some chemical entities into other chemical entities. Over the twentieth century it has become one of the cornerstones of biochemistry. When in the second half of the century basic knowledge of cellular processes became sufficient to understand quantitatively metabolic networks, chemical kinetics associated with systems theory led to the development of what would become an important branch of systems biology. In this chapter we introduce basic concepts of chemical and enzyme kinetics, and show how the temporal evolution of a reaction system can be described by ordinary differential equations. Finally we present a method to apply this type of approach to model any regulatory network.

  16. Mass Conservation and Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbara, Thomas M.; Corio, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a method for obtaining all mass conservation conditions implied by a given mechanism in which the conditions are used to simplify integration of the rate equations and to derive stoichiometric relations. Discusses possibilities of faulty inference of kinetic information from a given stoichiometry. (CS)

  17. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  18. Inflation Rates, Car Devaluation, and Chemical Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogliani, Lionello; Berberan-Santos, Màrio N.

    1996-10-01

    The inflation rate problem of a modern economy shows quite interesting similarities with chemical kinetics and especially with first-order chemical reactions. In fact, capital devaluation during periods of rather low inflation rates or inflation measured over short periods shows a dynamics formally similar to that followed by first-order chemical reactions and they can thus be treated by the aid of the same mathematical formalism. Deviations from this similarity occurs for higher inflation rates. The dynamics of price devaluation for two different types of car, a compact car and a luxury car, has been followed for seven years long and it has been established that car devaluation is a process that is formally similar to a zeroth-order chemical kinetic process disregarding the type of car, if car devaluation is much faster than money devaluation. In fact, expensive cars devaluate with a faster rate than inexpensive cars.

  19. PACKAGE (Plasma Analysis, Chemical Kinetics and Generator Efficiency): a computer program for the calculation of partial chemical equilibrium/partial chemical rate controlled composition of multiphased mixtures under one dimensional steady flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yousefian, V.; Weinberg, M.H.; Haimes, R.

    1980-02-01

    The NASA CEC Code was the starting point for PACKAGE, whose function is to evaluate the composition of a multiphase combustion product mixture under the following chemical conditions: (1) total equilibrium with pure condensed species; (2) total equilibrium with ideal liquid solution; (3) partial equilibrium/partial finite rate chemistry; and (4) fully finite rate chemistry. The last three conditions were developed to treat the evolution of complex mixtures such as coal combustion products. The thermodynamic variable pairs considered are either pressure (P) and enthalpy, P and entropy, at P and temperature. Minimization of Gibbs free energy is used. This report gives detailed discussions of formulation and input/output information used in the code. Sample problems are given. The code development, description, and current programming constraints are discussed. (DLC)

  20. Chemical Dosing and First-Order Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hladky, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    College students encounter a variety of first-order phenomena in their mathematics and science courses. Introductory chemistry textbooks that discuss first-order processes, usually in conjunction with chemical kinetics or radioactive decay, stop at single, discrete dose events. Although single-dose situations are important, multiple-dose events,…

  1. Chemical, physical, and theoretical kinetics of an ultrafast folding protein.

    PubMed

    Kubelka, Jan; Henry, Eric R; Cellmer, Troy; Hofrichter, James; Eaton, William A

    2008-12-01

    An extensive set of equilibrium and kinetic data is presented and analyzed for an ultrafast folding protein--the villin subdomain. The equilibrium data consist of the excess heat capacity, tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield, and natural circular-dichroism spectrum as a function of temperature, and the kinetic data consist of time courses of the quantum yield from nanosecond-laser temperature-jump experiments. The data are well fit with three kinds of models--a three-state chemical-kinetics model, a physical-kinetics model, and an Ising-like theoretical model that considers 10(5) possible conformations (microstates). In both the physical-kinetics and theoretical models, folding is described as diffusion on a one-dimensional free-energy surface. In the physical-kinetics model the reaction coordinate is unspecified, whereas in the theoretical model, order parameters, either the fraction of native contacts or the number of native residues, are used as reaction coordinates. The validity of these two reaction coordinates is demonstrated from calculation of the splitting probability from the rate matrix of the master equation for all 10(5) microstates. The analysis of the data on site-directed mutants using the chemical-kinetics model provides information on the structure of the transition-state ensemble; the physical-kinetics model allows an estimate of the height of the free-energy barrier separating the folded and unfolded states; and the theoretical model provides a detailed picture of the free-energy surface and a residue-by-residue description of the evolution of the folded structure, yet contains many fewer adjustable parameters than either the chemical- or physical-kinetics models.

  2. Chemical, physical, and theoretical kinetics of an ultrafast folding protein

    PubMed Central

    Kubelka, Jan; Henry, Eric R.; Cellmer, Troy; Hofrichter, James; Eaton, William A.

    2008-01-01

    An extensive set of equilibrium and kinetic data is presented and analyzed for an ultrafast folding protein—the villin subdomain. The equilibrium data consist of the excess heat capacity, tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield, and natural circular-dichroism spectrum as a function of temperature, and the kinetic data consist of time courses of the quantum yield from nanosecond-laser temperature-jump experiments. The data are well fit with three kinds of models—a three-state chemical-kinetics model, a physical-kinetics model, and an Ising-like theoretical model that considers 105 possible conformations (microstates). In both the physical-kinetics and theoretical models, folding is described as diffusion on a one-dimensional free-energy surface. In the physical-kinetics model the reaction coordinate is unspecified, whereas in the theoretical model, order parameters, either the fraction of native contacts or the number of native residues, are used as reaction coordinates. The validity of these two reaction coordinates is demonstrated from calculation of the splitting probability from the rate matrix of the master equation for all 105 microstates. The analysis of the data on site-directed mutants using the chemical-kinetics model provides information on the structure of the transition-state ensemble; the physical-kinetics model allows an estimate of the height of the free-energy barrier separating the folded and unfolded states; and the theoretical model provides a detailed picture of the free-energy surface and a residue-by-residue description of the evolution of the folded structure, yet contains many fewer adjustable parameters than either the chemical- or physical-kinetics models. PMID:19033473

  3. Chemical kinetics and modeling of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    A unified overview is presented for chemical kinetics and chemical modeling in planetary atmospheres. The recent major advances in the understanding of the chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere make the study of planets more interesting and relevant. A deeper understanding suggests that the important chemical cycles have a universal character that connects the different planets and ultimately link together the origin and evolution of the solar system. The completeness (or incompleteness) of the data base for chemical kinetics in planetary atmospheres will always be judged by comparison with that for the terrestrial atmosphere. In the latter case, the chemistry of H, O, N, and Cl species is well understood. S chemistry is poorly understood. In the atmospheres of Jovian planets and Titan, the C-H chemistry of simple species (containing 2 or less C atoms) is fairly well understood. The chemistry of higher hydrocarbons and the C-N, P-N chemistry is much less understood. In the atmosphere of Venus, the dominant chemistry is that of chlorine and sulfur, and very little is known about C1-S coupled chemistry. A new frontier for chemical kinetics both in the Earth and planetary atmospheres is the study of heterogeneous reactions. The formation of the ozone hole on Earth, the ubiquitous photochemical haze on Venus and in the Jovian planets and Titan all testify to the importance of heterogeneous reactions. It remains a challenge to connect the gas phase chemistry to the production of aerosols.

  4. Perspective: Stochastic algorithms for chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Daniel T.; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda R.

    2013-05-01

    We outline our perspective on stochastic chemical kinetics, paying particular attention to numerical simulation algorithms. We first focus on dilute, well-mixed systems, whose description using ordinary differential equations has served as the basis for traditional chemical kinetics for the past 150 years. For such systems, we review the physical and mathematical rationale for a discrete-stochastic approach, and for the approximations that need to be made in order to regain the traditional continuous-deterministic description. We next take note of some of the more promising strategies for dealing stochastically with stiff systems, rare events, and sensitivity analysis. Finally, we review some recent efforts to adapt and extend the discrete-stochastic approach to systems that are not well-mixed. In that currently developing area, we focus mainly on the strategy of subdividing the system into well-mixed subvolumes, and then simulating diffusional transfers of reactant molecules between adjacent subvolumes together with chemical reactions inside the subvolumes.

  5. Perspective: Stochastic algorithms for chemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Daniel T; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda R

    2013-05-01

    We outline our perspective on stochastic chemical kinetics, paying particular attention to numerical simulation algorithms. We first focus on dilute, well-mixed systems, whose description using ordinary differential equations has served as the basis for traditional chemical kinetics for the past 150 years. For such systems, we review the physical and mathematical rationale for a discrete-stochastic approach, and for the approximations that need to be made in order to regain the traditional continuous-deterministic description. We next take note of some of the more promising strategies for dealing stochastically with stiff systems, rare events, and sensitivity analysis. Finally, we review some recent efforts to adapt and extend the discrete-stochastic approach to systems that are not well-mixed. In that currently developing area, we focus mainly on the strategy of subdividing the system into well-mixed subvolumes, and then simulating diffusional transfers of reactant molecules between adjacent subvolumes together with chemical reactions inside the subvolumes.

  6. Detailed chemical kinetic model for ethanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.

    1997-04-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for ethanol oxidation has been developed and validated against a variety of experimental data sets. Laminar flame speed data obtained from a constant volume bomb, ignition delay data behind reflected shock waves, and ethanol oxidation product profiles from a turbulent flow reactor were used in this study. Very good agreement was found in modeling the data sets obtained from the three different experimental systems. The computational modeling results show that high temperature ethanol oxidation exhibits strong sensitivity to the fall-off kinetics of ethanol decomposition, branching ratio selection for c2h5oh+oh=products, and reactions involving the hydroperoxyl (HO2) radical.

  7. Computer-Aided Construction of Chemical Kinetic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2014-12-31

    The combustion chemistry of even simple fuels can be extremely complex, involving hundreds or thousands of kinetically significant species. The most reasonable way to deal with this complexity is to use a computer not only to numerically solve the kinetic model, but also to construct the kinetic model in the first place. Because these large models contain so many numerical parameters (e.g. rate coefficients, thermochemistry) one never has sufficient data to uniquely determine them all experimentally. Instead one must work in “predictive” mode, using theoretical rather than experimental values for many of the numbers in the model, and as appropriate refining the most sensitive numbers through experiments. Predictive chemical kinetics is exactly what is needed for computer-aided design of combustion systems based on proposed alternative fuels, particularly for early assessment of the value and viability of proposed new fuels before those fuels are commercially available. This project was aimed at making accurate predictive chemical kinetics practical; this is a challenging goal which requires a range of science advances. The project spanned a wide range from quantum chemical calculations on individual molecules and elementary-step reactions, through the development of improved rate/thermo calculation procedures, the creation of algorithms and software for constructing and solving kinetic simulations, the invention of methods for model-reduction while maintaining error control, and finally comparisons with experiment. Many of the parameters in the models were derived from quantum chemistry calculations, and the models were compared with experimental data measured in our lab or in collaboration with others.

  8. Promoting Graphical Thinking: Using Temperature and a Graphing Calculator to Teach Kinetics Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.; Moore-Russo, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    A combination of graphical thinking with chemical and physical theories in the classroom is encouraged by using the Calculator-Based Laboratory System (CBL) with a temperature sensor and graphing calculator. The theory of first-order kinetics is logically explained with the aid of the cooling or heating of the metal bead of the CBL's temperature…

  9. Sum over Histories Representation for Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shirong; Zhou, Dingyu; Davis, Michael J; Skodje, Rex T

    2015-01-01

    A new representation for chemical kinetics is introduced that is based on a sum over histories formulation that employs chemical pathways defined at a molecular level. The time evolution of a chemically reactive system is described by enumerating the most important pathways followed by a chemical moiety. An explicit formula for the pathway probabilities is derived and takes the form of an integral over a time-ordered product. When evaluating long pathways, the time-ordered product has a simple Monte Carlo representation that is computationally efficient. A small numerical stochastic simulation was used to identify the most important paths to include in the representation. The method was applied to a realistic H2/O2 combustion problem and is shown to yield accurate results. PMID:26263110

  10. KinChem: A Computational Resource for Teaching and Learning Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Silva, Jose´ Nunes, Jr.; Sousa Lima, Mary Anne; Silva Sousa, Eduardo Henrique; Oliveira Alexandre, Francisco Serra; Melo Leite, Antonio Jose´, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a piece of educational software covering a comprehensive number of topics of chemical kinetics, which is available free of charge in Portuguese and English. The software was developed to support chemistry educators and students in the teaching-learning process of chemical kinetics by using animations, calculations, and…

  11. Point kinetics calculations with fully coupled thermal fluids reactivity feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Andrs, D.; Zhao, H.; Martineau, R.

    2013-07-01

    The point kinetics model has been widely used in the analysis of the transient behavior of a nuclear reactor. In the traditional nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes such as RELAP5, the reactivity feedback effects are calculated in a loosely coupled fashion through operator splitting approach. This paper discusses the point kinetics calculations with the fully coupled thermal fluids and fuel temperature feedback implemented into the RELAP-7 code currently being developed with the MOOSE framework. (authors)

  12. Calculation of Kinetics Parameters for the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2012-03-06

    The delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime have been calculated at different times in the fuel cycle for the NBSR when fueled with both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The best-estimate values for both the delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron lifetime are the result of calculations using MCNP5-1.60 with the most recent ENDFB-VII evaluations. The best-estimate values for the total delayed neutron fraction from fission products are 0.00665 and 0.00661 for the HEU fueled core at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. For the LEU fuel the best estimate values are 0.00650 and 0.00648 at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. The present recommendations for the delayed neutron fractions from fission products are smaller than the value reported previously of 0.00726 for the HEU fuel. The best-estimate values for the contribution from photoneutrons will remain as 0.000316, independent of the fuel or time in the cycle.The values of the prompt neutron lifetime as calculated with MCNP5-1.60 are compared to values calculated with two other independent methods and the results are in reasonable agreement with each other. The recommended, conservative values of the neutron lifetime for the HEU fuel are 650 {micro}s and 750 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. For LEU fuel the recommended, conservative values are 600 {micro}s and 700 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. In all three calculations, the prompt neutron lifetime was determined to be longer for the end-of-cycle equilibrium condition when compared to the startup condition. The results of the three analyses were in agreement that the LEU fuel will exhibit a shorter prompt neutron lifetime when compared to the HEU fuel.

  13. Spreadsheet Templates for Chemical Equilibrium Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Bhairav D.

    1993-01-01

    Describes two general spreadsheet templates to carry out all types of one-equation chemical equilibrium calculations encountered by students in undergraduate chemistry courses. Algorithms, templates, macros, and representative examples are presented to illustrate the approach. (PR)

  14. Perspective: Stochastic algorithms for chemical kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Daniel T.; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda R.

    2013-01-01

    We outline our perspective on stochastic chemical kinetics, paying particular attention to numerical simulation algorithms. We first focus on dilute, well-mixed systems, whose description using ordinary differential equations has served as the basis for traditional chemical kinetics for the past 150 years. For such systems, we review the physical and mathematical rationale for a discrete-stochastic approach, and for the approximations that need to be made in order to regain the traditional continuous-deterministic description. We next take note of some of the more promising strategies for dealing stochastically with stiff systems, rare events, and sensitivity analysis. Finally, we review some recent efforts to adapt and extend the discrete-stochastic approach to systems that are not well-mixed. In that currently developing area, we focus mainly on the strategy of subdividing the system into well-mixed subvolumes, and then simulating diffusional transfers of reactant molecules between adjacent subvolumes together with chemical reactions inside the subvolumes. PMID:23656106

  15. A kinetic model for chemical neurotransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Martinez-Valencia, Alejandro; Fernandez de Miguel, Francisco

    Recent experimental observations in presynaptic terminals at the neuromuscular junction indicate that there are stereotyped patterns of cooperativeness in the fusion of adjacent vesicles. That is, a vesicle in hemifusion process appears on the side of a fused vesicle and which is followed by another vesicle in a priming state while the next one is in a docking state. In this talk we present a kinetic model for this morphological pattern in which each vesicle state previous to the exocytosis is represented by a kinetic state. This chain states kinetic model can be analyzed by means of a Master equation whose solution is simulated with the stochastic Gillespie algorithm. With this approach we have reproduced the responses to the basal release in the absence of stimulation evoked by the electrical activity and the phenomena of facilitation and depression of neuromuscular synapses. This model offers new perspectives to understand the underlying phenomena in chemical neurotransmission based on molecular interactions that result in the cooperativity between vesicles during neurotransmitter release. DGAPA Grants IN118410 and IN200914 and Conacyt Grant 130031.

  16. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  17. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, J. W.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, Z. R.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Manickam, J.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-01

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  18. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Biofuel Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarathy, Subram Maniam

    Bioalcohols, such as bioethanol and biobutanol, are suitable replacements for gasoline, while biodiesel can replace petroleum diesel. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This study's contribution is experimentally validated chemical kinetic combustion mechanisms for biobutanol and biodiesel. Fundamental combustion data and chemical kinetic mechanisms are presented and discussed to improve our understanding of biofuel combustion. The net environmental impact of biobutanol (i.e., n-butanol) has not been studied extensively, so this study first assesses the sustainability of n-butanol derived from corn. The results indicate that technical advances in fuel production are required before commercializing biobutanol. The primary contribution of this research is new experimental data and a novel chemical kinetic mechanism for n-butanol combustion. The results indicate that under the given experimental conditions, n-butanol is consumed primarily via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radical molecules, which subsequently decompose to smaller hydrocarbon and oxygenated species. The hydroxyl moiety in n-butanol results in the direct production of the oxygenated species such as butanal, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde. The formation of these compounds sequesters carbon from forming soot precursors, but they may introduce other adverse environmental and health effects. Biodiesel is a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters derived from fats and oils. This research study presents high quality experimental data for one large fatty acid methyl ester, methyl decanoate, and models its combustion using an improved skeletal mechanism. The results indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which ultimately lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular

  19. Theory of homogeneous nucleation - A chemical kinetic view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. H.; Qiu, H.

    1986-01-01

    A simple function with two undetermined parameters has been used in place of the Thomson-Gibbs relation to relate the activation energy of the vaporization reaction to cluster size. The parameters are iterated to assume optimum values in numerical computation so experimental data may be correlated. Calculations show this approach closely predicts and correlates available data for water, benzene, and ethanol. The nucleation formulism is redeveloped with an emphasis on the chemical kinetic view. Surface tension of the liquid and free energy of droplet formation are not used in its derivation.

  20. Calculating Shocks In Flows At Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Scott; Palmer, Grant

    1988-01-01

    Boundary conditions prove critical. Conference paper describes algorithm for calculation of shocks in hypersonic flows of gases at chemical equilibrium. Although algorithm represents intermediate stage in development of reliable, accurate computer code for two-dimensional flow, research leading up to it contributes to understanding of what is needed to complete task.

  1. [Numerical calculation of coagulation kinetics incorporating fractal theory].

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng-kang; Jing, Min-na; Wang, Xiao-chang

    2008-08-01

    Based on the Smoluchowski equation, a kinetic model was formulated by introducing the fractal dimension. In the kinetic model, fractal dimension at different time is calculated by considering of the void and primary particles contained in the flocs. Using the kinetic model, the coagulation kinetics was calculated by the method of finite difference. The calculation results showed that the characteristics of the structure and collision efficiency play an important role in particle size distribution. The higher of the fractal dimension and the collision efficiency, the broader of the particle size distribution will be obtained, which indicated the flocs with large size were formed. The results also revealed a tendency of decrease in the fractal dimension with the increase of floc size, which is resulted from the unproportionate growth between the floc size and the number of the primary particles contained in the flocs. The validity of the calculation was proved by a series of experiments using aluminum sulfate as coagulant for the flocculation of humic substances.

  2. Chemical kinetic modeling of H{sub 2} applications

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.K.; Marinov, N.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H.

    1996-10-01

    This project is intended to develop detailed and simplified kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of practical systems fueled by hydrogen, and then to use those mechanisms to examine the performance, efficiency, pollutant emissions, and other characteristics of those systems. During the last year, a H2/NOx mechanism has been developed that gives much improved predictions of NOx emissions compared to experimental data. Preliminary chemical kinetic and equilibrium calculations have been performed in support of Br2-H2O experiments to be conducted at NREL. Hydrogen, hydrogen/methane and hydrogen/natural gas mixtures have been investigated in a knock-rating engine to assess their automotive knock characteristics. The authors are currently developing the simplified analog reaction mechanisms that are computationally simple, yet still reproduce many of the macroscopic features of flame propagation.

  3. Quantum mechanical calculations to chemical accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of current molecular-structure calculations is illustrated with examples of quantum mechanical solutions for chemical problems. Two approaches are considered: (1) the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) with a perturbational estimate of the contribution of connected triple excitations, or CCDS(T); and (2) the multireference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approach to the correlation problem. The MRCI approach gains greater applicability by means of size-extensive modifications such as the averaged-coupled pair functional approach. The examples of solutions to chemical problems include those for C-H bond energies, the vibrational frequencies of O3, identifying the ground state of Al2 and Si2, and the Lewis-Rayleigh afterglow and the Hermann IR system of N2. Accurate molecular-wave functions can be derived from a combination of basis-set saturation studies and full configuration-interaction calculations.

  4. Kinetic isotope effects calculated with the instanton method.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jan; Rommel, Judith B; Kästner, Johannes

    2011-12-01

    The ring-opening reaction of the cyclopropylcarbinyl radical proceeds via heavy-atom tunneling at low temperature. We used instanton theory to calculate tunneling rates and kinetic isotope effects with on-the-fly calculation of energies by density functional theory (B3LYP). The accuracy was verified by explicitly correlated coupled-cluster calculations (UCCSD(T)-F12). At cryogenic temperatures, we found protium/deuterium KIEs up to 13 and inverse KIEs down to 0.2. We also studied an intramolecular tautomerization reaction. A simple and computationally efficient method is proposed to calculate KIEs with the instanton method: the instanton path is assumed to be independent of the atomic masses. This results in surprisingly good estimates of the KIEs for the cyclopropylcarbinyl radical and for the secondary KIEs of the tautomerization. Challenges and capabilities of the instanton method for calculating KIEs are discussed.

  5. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Model for TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2005-01-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for 2,4,6-tri-nitrotoluene (TNT) has been developed to explore problems of explosive performance and soot formation during the destruction of munitions. The TNT mechanism treats only gas-phase reactions. Reactions for the decomposition of TNT and for the consumption of intermediate products formed from TNT are assembled based on information from the literature and on current understanding of aromatic chemistry. Thermodynamic properties of intermediate and radical species are estimated by group additivity. Reaction paths are developed based on similar paths for aromatic hydrocarbons. Reaction-rate constant expressions are estimated from the literature and from analogous reactions where the rate constants are available. The detailed reaction mechanism for TNT is added to existing reaction mechanisms for RDX and for hydrocarbons. Computed results show the effect of oxygen concentration on the amount of soot precursors that are formed in the combustion of RDX and TNT mixtures in N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixtures.

  6. Efficient first-principles calculation of the quantum kinetic energy and momentum distribution of nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E

    2012-09-01

    Light nuclei at room temperature and below exhibit a kinetic energy which significantly deviates from the predictions of classical statistical mechanics. This quantum kinetic energy is responsible for a wide variety of isotope effects of interest in fields ranging from chemistry to climatology. It also furnishes the second moment of the nuclear momentum distribution, which contains subtle information about the chemical environment and has recently become accessible to deep inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Here, we show how, by combining imaginary time path integral dynamics with a carefully designed generalized Langevin equation, it is possible to dramatically reduce the expense of computing the quantum kinetic energy. We also introduce a transient anisotropic Gaussian approximation to the nuclear momentum distribution which can be calculated with negligible additional effort. As an example, we evaluate the structural properties, the quantum kinetic energy, and the nuclear momentum distribution for a first-principles simulation of liquid water.

  7. Efficient first-principles calculation of the quantum kinetic energy and momentum distribution of nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E

    2012-09-01

    Light nuclei at room temperature and below exhibit a kinetic energy which significantly deviates from the predictions of classical statistical mechanics. This quantum kinetic energy is responsible for a wide variety of isotope effects of interest in fields ranging from chemistry to climatology. It also furnishes the second moment of the nuclear momentum distribution, which contains subtle information about the chemical environment and has recently become accessible to deep inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Here, we show how, by combining imaginary time path integral dynamics with a carefully designed generalized Langevin equation, it is possible to dramatically reduce the expense of computing the quantum kinetic energy. We also introduce a transient anisotropic Gaussian approximation to the nuclear momentum distribution which can be calculated with negligible additional effort. As an example, we evaluate the structural properties, the quantum kinetic energy, and the nuclear momentum distribution for a first-principles simulation of liquid water. PMID:23005275

  8. Elimination kinetic model for organic chemicals in earthworms.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, N; Dimitrov, S; Georgieva, D; Van Gestel, C A M; Hankard, P; Spurgeon, D; Li, H; Mekenyan, O

    2010-08-15

    Mechanistic understanding of bioaccumulation in different organisms and environments should take into account the influence of organism and chemical depending factors on the uptake and elimination kinetics of chemicals. Lipophilicity, metabolism, sorption (bioavailability) and biodegradation of chemicals are among the important factors that may significantly affect the bioaccumulation process in soil organisms. This study attempts to model elimination kinetics of organic chemicals in earthworms by accounting for the effects of both chemical and biological properties, including metabolism. The modeling approach that has been developed is based on the concept for simulating metabolism used in the BCF base-line model developed for predicting bioaccumulation in fish. Metabolism was explicitly accounted for by making use of the TIMES engine for simulation of metabolism and a set of principal transformations. Kinetic characteristics of transformations were estimated on the basis of observed kinetics data for the elimination of organic chemicals from earthworms. PMID:20185163

  9. Ligand Affinities Estimated by Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Söderhjelm, Pär; Kongsted, Jacob; Ryde, Ulf

    2010-05-11

    We present quantum chemical estimates of ligand-binding affinities performed, for the first time, at a level of theory for which there is a hope that dispersion and polarization effects are properly accounted for (MP2/cc-pVTZ) and at the same time effects of solvation, entropy, and sampling are included. We have studied the binding of seven biotin analogues to the avidin tetramer. The calculations have been performed by the recently developed PMISP approach (polarizable multipole interactions with supermolecular pairs), which treats electrostatic interactions by multipoles up to quadrupoles, induction by anisotropic polarizabilities, and nonclassical interactions (dispersion, exchange repulsion, etc.) by explicit quantum chemical calculations, using a fragmentation approach, except for long-range interactions that are treated by standard molecular-mechanics Lennard-Jones terms. In order to include effects of sampling, 10 snapshots from a molecular dynamics simulation are studied for each biotin analogue. Solvation energies are estimated by the polarized continuum model (PCM), coupled to the multipole-polarizability model. Entropy effects are estimated from vibrational frequencies, calculated at the molecular mechanics level. We encounter several problems, not previously discussed, illustrating that we are first to apply such a method. For example, the PCM model is, in the present implementation, questionable for large molecules, owing to the use of a surface definition that gives numerous small cavities in a protein. PMID:26615702

  10. The efficient calculation of chemically reacting flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, D. R.; Hassan, H. A.; Drummond, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    A semi-implicit finite volume formulation is used to study flows with chemical reactions. In this formulation the source terms resulting from the chemical reactions are treated implicitly and the resulting system of partial differential equations is solved using two time-stepping schemes. The first is based on the Runge-Kutta method while the second is based on an Adams predictor-corrector method. Results show that improvements in computational efficiency depend to a large extent on the manner in which the source term is treated. Further, analysis and computation indicate that the Runge-Kutta method is more efficient than the Adams methods. Finally, an adaptive time stepping scheme is developed to study problems involving shock ignition. Calculations for a hydrogen-air system agree well with other methods.

  11. Spatial Kinetics Calculations of MOX Fueled Core: Variant 22

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-01-11

    This work is part of a Joint US/Russian Project with Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition in VVER Reactors and presents the results of spatial kinetics calculational benchmarks. The examinations were carried out with the following purposes: to verify one of spatial neutronic kinetics model elaborated in KI, to understand sensibility of the model to neutronics difference of UOX and MOX cores, to compare in future point and spatial kinetics models (on the base of a set of selected accidents) in view of eventual creation of RELAP option with 3D kinetics. The document contains input data and results of model operation of three emergency dynamic processes in the VVER-1000 core: central control rod ejection by pressure drop caused by destroying of the moving mechanism cover; overcooling of the reactor core caused by steam line rupture and non-closure of steam generator stop valve; and the boron dilution of coolant in part of the VVER-1000 core caused by penetration of the distillate slug into the core at start up of non-working loop.

  12. Coupling of chemical kinetics, gas dynamics, and charged particle kinetics models for the analysis of NO reduction from flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Eichwald, O.; Yousfi, M.; Hennad, A.; Benabdessadok, M.D.

    1997-11-01

    A chemical kinetics model is developed to analyze the time evolution of the different main species involved in a flue gas initially stressed by a pulsed corona discharge at the atmospheric pressure and including N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and CO{sub 2} with a few ppm of NO. The present chemical kinetics model is coupled to a gas dynamics model used to analyze the radial expansion of the gas in the ionized channel created during the discharge phase. It is also meant to analyze the gas heating due to the Joule effect. This chemical kinetics model is also coupled to charged particle kinetics models based on a Boltzmann equation model to calculate the electron-molecule reaction coefficients in the flue gas and on a Monte Carlo code to estimate the energy and momentum transfer terms relative to ion-molecule collisions which are the input data for the gas dynamics model. It is shown, in particular, that the evolution of the radicals and the oxides is substantially affected by the gas temperature rise (from the initial value of 300 K up to 750 K near the anode) thus emphasizing the present coupling between gas dynamics, charged particle, and chemical kinetics models. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Coupling of chemical kinetics, gas dynamics, and charged particle kinetics models for the analysis of NO reduction from flue gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichwald, O.; Yousfi, M.; Hennad, A.; Benabdessadok, M. D.

    1997-11-01

    A chemical kinetics model is developed to analyze the time evolution of the different main species involved in a flue gas initially stressed by a pulsed corona discharge at the atmospheric pressure and including N2, O2, H2O, and CO2 with a few ppm of NO. The present chemical kinetics model is coupled to a gas dynamics model used to analyze the radial expansion of the gas in the ionized channel created during the discharge phase. It is also meant to analyze the gas heating due to the Joule effect. This chemical kinetics model is also coupled to charged particle kinetics models based on a Boltzmann equation model to calculate the electron-molecule reaction coefficients in the flue gas and on a Monte Carlo code to estimate the energy and momentum transfer terms relative to ion-molecule collisions which are the input data for the gas dynamics model. It is shown, in particular, that the evolution of the radicals and the oxides is substantially affected by the gas temperature rise (from the initial value of 300 K up to 750 K near the anode) thus emphasizing the present coupling between gas dynamics, charged particle, and chemical kinetics models.

  14. Understanding Chemical Reaction Kinetics and Equilibrium with Interlocking Building Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reaction kinetics and equilibrium are essential core concepts of chemistry but are challenging topics for many students, both at the high school and undergraduate university level. Visualization at the molecular level is valuable to aid understanding of reaction kinetics and equilibrium. This activity provides a discovery-based method to…

  15. Accelerating quantum instanton calculations of the kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Karandashev, Konstantin; Vaníček, Jiří

    2015-11-21

    Path integral implementation of the quantum instanton approximation currently belongs among the most accurate methods for computing quantum rate constants and kinetic isotope effects, but its use has been limited due to the rather high computational cost. Here, we demonstrate that the efficiency of quantum instanton calculations of the kinetic isotope effects can be increased by orders of magnitude by combining two approaches: The convergence to the quantum limit is accelerated by employing high-order path integral factorizations of the Boltzmann operator, while the statistical convergence is improved by implementing virial estimators for relevant quantities. After deriving several new virial estimators for the high-order factorization and evaluating the resulting increase in efficiency, using ⋅H{sub α} + H{sub β}H{sub γ} → H{sub α}H{sub β} + ⋅ H{sub γ} reaction as an example, we apply the proposed method to obtain several kinetic isotope effects on CH{sub 4} + ⋅ H ⇌ ⋅ CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2} forward and backward reactions.

  16. ACFM, A Computational Framework for Magnetofluid and Kinetic Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, Ahmet Y.

    2002-11-01

    We present a general computational framework, ACFM, for continuum calculations that can be used to address many of the computational physics problems in plasma physics/magnetic fusion research. The explicit goal of the project is to bridge the gap between the physical/mathematical formulation of a problem and its computational implementation in a simple and efficient manner, thus removing "computing" from the purview of a few specialists to a more general community of user/theorists. The framework is being developed with modern objected oriented methods with an attempt to provide a full set of tools that would enable a user to write code in a manner that closely resembles the mathematical physics language he is already familiar with. The framework and some of the ideas will be discussed with examples from such disparate topics as collisionless reconnection, kinetic calculations with a Vlasov-Poisson system, magnetofluid "closure" problem and self-organized states.

  17. The Multiplexed Chemical Kinetic Photoionization Mass Spectrometer: A New Approach To Isomer-resolved Chemical Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, David L.; Zou, Peng; Johnsen, Howard; Hayden, Carl C.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Knyazev, Vadim D.; North, Simon W.; Peterka, Darcy S.; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-08-28

    We have developed a multiplexed time- and photon-energy?resolved photoionizationmass spectrometer for the study of the kinetics and isomeric product branching of gasphase, neutral chemical reactions. The instrument utilizes a side-sampled flow tubereactor, continuously tunable synchrotron radiation for photoionization, a multi-massdouble-focusing mass spectrometer with 100percent duty cycle, and a time- and positionsensitive detector for single ion counting. This approach enables multiplexed, universal detection of molecules with high sensitivity and selectivity. In addition to measurement of rate coefficients as a function of temperature and pressure, different structural isomers can be distinguished based on their photoionization efficiency curves, providing a more detailed probe of reaction mechanisms. The multiplexed 3-dimensional data structure (intensity as a function of molecular mass, reaction time, and photoionization energy) provides insights that might not be available in serial acquisition, as well as additional constraints on data interpretation.

  18. A hybrid computer program for rapidly solving flowing or static chemical kinetic problems involving many chemical species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclain, A. G.; Rao, C. S. R.

    1976-01-01

    A hybrid chemical kinetic computer program was assembled which provides a rapid solution to problems involving flowing or static, chemically reacting, gas mixtures. The computer program uses existing subroutines for problem setup, initialization, and preliminary calculations and incorporates a stiff ordinary differential equation solution technique. A number of check cases were recomputed with the hybrid program and the results were almost identical to those previously obtained. The computational time saving was demonstrated with a propane-oxygen-argon shock tube combustion problem involving 31 chemical species and 64 reactions. Information is presented to enable potential users to prepare an input data deck for the calculation of a problem.

  19. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of HMX and TATB Laser Ignition Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2004-03-02

    Recent laser ignition experiments on octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-terrazocine (HMX) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) subjected to laser fluxes ranging from 10 to 800 W/cm{sup 2} produced ignition times from seconds to milliseconds. Global chemical kinetic thermal decomposition models for HMX and TATB have been developed to calculate times to thermal explosion for experiments in the seconds to days time frame. These models are applied to the laser ignition experimental data in this paper. Excellent agreement was obtained for TATB, while the calculated ignition times were longer than experiment for HMX at lower laser fluxes. At the temperatures produced in the laser experiments, HMX melts. Melting generally increases condensed phase reaction rates so faster rates were used for three of the HMX reaction rates. This improved agreement with experiments at the lower laser fluxes but yielded very fast ignition at high fluxes. The calculated times to ignition are in reasonable agreement with the laser ignition experiments, and this justifies the use of these models for estimating reaction times at impact and shock ''hot spot'' temperatures.

  20. Optimization of KINETICS Chemical Computation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donastorg, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    NASA JPL has been creating a code in FORTRAN called KINETICS to model the chemistry of planetary atmospheres. Recently there has been an effort to introduce Message Passing Interface (MPI) into the code so as to cut down the run time of the program. There has been some implementation of MPI into KINETICS; however, the code could still be more efficient than it currently is. One way to increase efficiency is to send only certain variables to all the processes when an MPI subroutine is called and to gather only certain variables when the subroutine is finished. Therefore, all the variables that are used in three of the main subroutines needed to be investigated. Because of the sheer amount of code that there is to comb through this task was given as a ten-week project. I have been able to create flowcharts outlining the subroutines, common blocks, and functions used within the three main subroutines. From these flowcharts I created tables outlining the variables used in each block and important information about each. All this information will be used to determine how to run MPI in KINETICS in the most efficient way possible.

  1. Hungarian University Students' Misunderstandings in Thermodynamics and Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turanyi, Tamas; Toth, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    The misunderstandings related to thermodynamics (including chemical equilibrium) and chemical kinetics of first and second year Hungarian students of chemistry, environmental science, biology and pharmacy were investigated. We demonstrated that Hungarian university students have similar misunderstandings in physical chemistry to those reported in…

  2. Chemical kinetics computer program for static and flow reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Scullin, V. J.

    1972-01-01

    General chemical kinetics computer program for complex gas mixtures has been developed. Program can be used for any homogeneous reaction in either one dimensional flow or static system. It is flexible, accurate, and easy to use. It can be used for any chemical system for which species thermodynamic data and reaction rate constant data are known.

  3. Fluid flow and chemical reaction kinetics in metamorphic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M. )

    1993-05-01

    The treatment and effects of chemical reaction kinetics during metamorphism are developed along with the incorporation of fluid flow, diffusion, and thermal evolution. The interplay of fluid flow and surface reaction rates, the distinction between steady state and equilibrium, and the possible overstepping of metamorphic reactions are discussed using a simple analytic model. This model serves as an introduction to the second part of the paper, which develops a reaction model that solves the coupled temperature-fluid flow-chemical composition differential equations relevant to metamorphic processes. Consideration of stable isotopic evidence requires that such a kinetic model be considered for the chemical evolution of a metamorphic aureole. A general numerical scheme is discussed to handle the solution of the model. The results of this kinetic model allow us to reach several important conclusions regarding the factors controlling the chemical evolution of mineral assemblages during a metamorphic event. 41 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Fourth-Order Vibrational Transition State Theory and Chemical Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, John F.; Matthews, Devin A.; Gong, Justin Z.

    2015-06-01

    Second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) is an enormously successful and well-established theory for treating anharmonic effects on the vibrational levels of semi-rigid molecules. Partially as a consequence of the fact that the theory is exact for the Morse potential (which provides an appropriate qualitative model for stretching anharmonicity), VPT2 calculations for such systems with appropriate ab initio potential functions tend to give fundamental and overtone levels that fall within a handful of wavenumbers of experimentally measured positions. As a consequence, the next non-vanishing level of perturbation theory -- VPT4 -- offers only slight improvements over VPT2 and is not practical for most calculations since it requires information about force constants up through sextic. However, VPT4 (as well as VPT2) can be used for other applications such as the next vibrational correction to rotational constants (the ``gammas'') and other spectroscopic parameters. In addition, the marriage of VPT with the semi-classical transition state theory of Miller (SCTST) has recently proven to be a powerful and accurate treatment for chemical kinetics. In this talk, VPT4-based SCTST tunneling probabilities and cumulative reaction probabilities are give for the first time for selected low-dimensional model systems. The prospects for VPT4, both practical and intrinsic, will also be discussed.

  5. A kinetic-theory approach to turbulent chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the mathematical and physical foundations for the kinetic theory of reactive turbulent flows, discussing the differences and relation between the kinetic and averaged equations, and comparing some solutions of the kinetic equations obtained by the Green's function method with those obtained by the approximate bimodal method. The kinetic method described consists essentially in constructing the probability density functions of the chemical species on the basis of solutions of the Langevin stochastic equation for the influence of eddies on the behavior of fluid elements. When the kinetic equations are solved for the structure of the diffusion flame established in a shear layer by the bimodal method, discontinuities in gradients of the mean concentrations at the two flame edges appear. This is a consequence of the bimodal approximation of all distribution functions by two dissimilar half-Maxwellian functions, which is a very crude approximation. These discontinuities do not appear when the solutions are constructed by the Green's function method described here.

  6. A Gas-Kinetic Scheme for Multimaterial Flows and Its Application in Chemical Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lian, Yongsheng; Xu, Kun

    1999-01-01

    This paper concerns the extension of the multicomponent gas-kinetic BGK-type scheme to multidimensional chemical reactive flow calculations. In the kinetic model, each component satisfies its individual gas-kinetic BGK equation and the equilibrium states of both components are coupled in space and time due to the momentum and energy exchange in the course of particle collisions. At the same time, according to the chemical reaction rule one component can be changed into another component with the release of energy, where the reactant and product could have different gamma. Many numerical test cases are included in this paper, which show the robustness and accuracy of kinetic approach in the description of multicomponent reactive flows.

  7. Ernest Rutherford, Avogadro's Number, and Chemical Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenson, I. A.

    1998-08-01

    The paper presents a way for students to use data from Rutherford's works (1908 - 1911) in order to determine one of the most precise values of Avogadro Constant available at the beginning of the century. A brief discussion of earlier and modern methods for the determination of this fundamental constant is followed by vast quotations from the works of Rutherford, Boltwood and Geiger. Then there are given a dozen of problems and questions for students about these classical experiments; they vary in complexity from rather simple to quite challenging. Additional information and hints are provided to help the students in solving the problems. The last part contains detailed answers and solutions to all problems. The article will be useful for students of general chemistry, radiochemistry and physical chemistry (kinetics).

  8. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Sarathy, S M

    2010-11-15

    Predictive engine simulation models are needed to make rapid progress towards DOE's goals of increasing combustion engine efficiency and reducing pollutant emissions. These engine simulation models require chemical kinetic submodels to allow the prediction of the effect of fuel composition on engine performance and emissions. Chemical kinetic models for conventional and next-generation transportation fuels need to be developed so that engine simulation tools can predict fuel effects. The objectives are to: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  9. The chemical shock tube as a tool for studying high-temperature chemical kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.

    1986-01-01

    Although the combustion of hydrocarbons is our primary source of energy today, the chemical reactions, or pathway, by which even the simplest hydro-carbon reacts with atmospheric oxygen to form CO2 and water may not always be known. Furthermore, even when the reaction pathway is known, the reaction rates are always under discussion. The shock tube has been an important and unique tool for building a data base of reaction rates important in the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The ability of a shock wave to bring the gas sample to reaction conditions rapidly and homogeneously makes shock-tube studies of reaction kinetics extremely attractive. In addition to the control and uniformity of reaction conditions achieved with shock-wave methods, shock compression can produce gas temperatures far in excess of those in conventional reactors. Argon can be heated to well over 10 000 K, and temperatures around 5000 K are easily obtained with conventional shock-tube techniques. Experiments have proven the validity of shock-wave theory; thus, reaction temperatures and pressures can be calculated from a measurement of the incident shock velocity. A description is given of the chemical shock tube and auxiliary equipment and of two examples of kinetic experiments conducted in a shock tube.

  10. Computational methods for multiphase equilibrium and kinetics calculations for geochemical and reactive transport applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Allan; Saar, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Computational methods for geochemical and reactive transport modeling are essential for the understanding of many natural and industrial processes. Most of these processes involve several phases and components, and quite often requires chemical equilibrium and kinetics calculations. We present an overview of novel methods for multiphase equilibrium calculations, based on both the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) approach and on the solution of the law of mass-action (LMA) equations. We also employ kinetics calculations, assuming partial equilibrium (e.g., fluid species in equilibrium while minerals are in disequilibrium) using automatic time stepping to improve simulation efficiency and robustness. These methods are developed specifically for applications that are computationally expensive, such as reactive transport simulations. We show how efficient the new methods are, compared to other algorithms, and how easy it is to use them for geochemical modeling via a simple script language. All methods are available in Reaktoro, a unified open-source framework for modeling chemically reactive systems, which we also briefly describe.

  11. A kinetic and equilibrium analysis of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition on monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical kinetics of atmospheric pressure silicon carbide (SiC) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from dilute silane and propane source gases in hydrogen is numerically analyzed in a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for CVD on monofilaments. The chemical composition of the SiC deposit is assessed both from the calculated total fluxes of carbon and silicon and from chemical equilibrium considerations for the prevailing temperatures and species concentrations at and along the filament surface. The effects of gas and surface chemistry on the evolution of major gas phase species are considered in the analysis.

  12. Upper D region chemical kinetic modeling of LORE relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.; Luque, A.; Haldoupis, C.

    2016-04-01

    The recovery times of upper D region electron density elevations, caused by lightning-induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP), are modeled. The work was motivated from the need to understand a recently identified narrowband VLF perturbation named LOREs, an acronym for LOng Recovery Early VLF events. LOREs associate with long-living electron density perturbations in the upper D region ionosphere; they are generated by strong EMP radiated from large peak current intensities of ±CG (cloud to ground) lightning discharges, known also to be capable of producing elves. Relaxation model scenarios are considered first for a weak enhancement in electron density and then for a much stronger one caused by an intense lightning EMP acting as an impulsive ionization source. The full nonequilibrium kinetic modeling of the perturbed mesosphere in the 76 to 92 km range during LORE-occurring conditions predicts that the electron density relaxation time is controlled by electron attachment at lower altitudes, whereas above 79 km attachment is balanced totally by associative electron detachment so that electron loss at these higher altitudes is controlled mainly by electron recombination with hydrated positive clusters H+(H2O)n and secondarily by dissociative recombination with NO+ ions, a process which gradually dominates at altitudes >88 km. The calculated recovery times agree fairly well with LORE observations. In addition, a simplified (quasi-analytic) model build for the key charged species and chemical reactions is applied, which arrives at similar results with those of the full kinetic model. Finally, the modeled recovery estimates for lower altitudes, that is <79 km, are in good agreement with the observed short recovery times of typical early VLF events, which are known to be associated with sprites.

  13. An efficient chemical kinetics solver using high dimensional model representation

    SciTech Connect

    Shorter, J.A.; Ip, P.C.; Rabitz, H.A.

    1999-09-09

    A high dimensional model representation (HDMR) technique is introduced to capture the input-output behavior of chemical kinetic models. The HDMR expresses the output chemical species concentrations as a rapidly convergent hierarchical correlated function expansion in the input variables. In this paper, the input variables are taken as the species concentrations at time t{sub i} and the output is the concentrations at time t{sub i} + {delta}, where {delta} can be much larger than conventional integration time steps. A specially designed set of model runs is performed to determine the correlated functions making up the HDMR. The resultant HDMR can be used to (1) identify the key input variables acting independently or cooperatively on the output, and (2) create a high speed fully equivalent operational model (FEOM) serving to replace the original kinetic model and its differential equation solver. A demonstration of the HDMR technique is presented for stratospheric chemical kinetics. The FEOM proved to give accurate and stable chemical concentrations out to long times of many years. In addition, the FEOM was found to be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional stiff equation solver. This computational acceleration should have significance in many chemical kinetic applications.

  14. The applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research during the past four decades is presented with an emphasis on chemical equilibrium models and thermochemical kinetics. Several current problems in planetary atmospheres research such as the origin of the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets, atmosphere-surface interactions on Venus and Mars, deep mixing in the atmospheres of the gas giant planets, and the origin of the atmospheres of outer planet satellites all require laboratory data on the kinetics of thermochemical reactions for their solution.

  15. Chemical zonation in garnet: kinetics or chemical equilibrium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ague, Jay; Chu, Xu; Axler, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Chemical zonation in garnet is widely used to reconstruct the pressure (P), temperature (T), time (t), and fluid (f) histories of mountain belts. Zonation is thought to result largely from changing P - T - t - f conditions during growth as well as post-growth intracrystalline diffusion. Chemical zonation is conventionally interpreted to mean that at least some of the garnet interior was out of chemical equilibrium with the matrix during metamorphism. In this case, thermally-activated diffusion in garnet is too slow to equalize chemical potentials. However, in their groundbreaking paper, Tajčmanová et al. (2014) postulate that in high-grade rocks, chemical zonation may actually reflect attainment of equilibrium. In this scenario, diffusion is fast but viscous relaxation is slow such that the zonation patterns directly mirror internal pressure gradients within garnet. Such zoning would likely be very different than typical concentric growth zonation. Furthermore, Baumgartner et al. (2010) hypothesize that given significant variations in the molar volumes of garnet endmembers, diffusional relaxation may produce internal pressure gradients if the garnet behaves as a near constant-volume system. Consequently, growth zoning could be preserved by pressure variations within the garnet that equalize chemical potentials and slow or stop diffusion (i.e., the garnet is chemically heterogeneous but maintains internal chemical equilibrium due to the pressure variations). This mechanism predicts that areas of garnet with small compositional contrasts would undergo more diffusional relaxation than areas with large contrasts. Moreover, generation of large internal pressure gradients approaching 1 GPa would be expected to induce deformation (e.g., fracturing) in regions of large compositional gradients. Strongly growth-zoned amphibolite facies garnet from the Barrovian zones, Scotland (Ague and Baxter, 2007) shows neither of these features. The sharp compositional gradients are

  16. Integration Strategies for Efficient Multizone Chemical Kinetics Models

    SciTech Connect

    McNenly, M J; Havstad, M A; Aceves, S M; Pitz, W J

    2009-10-15

    Three integration strategies are developed and tested for the stiff, ordinary differential equation (ODE) integrators used to solve the fully coupled multizone chemical kinetics model. Two of the strategies tested are found to provide more than an order of magnitude of improvement over the original, basic level of usage for the stiff ODE solver. One of the faster strategies uses a decoupled, or segregated, multizone model to generate an approximate Jacobian. This approach yields a 35-fold reduction in the computational cost for a 20 zone model. Using the same approximate Jacobian as a preconditioner for an iterative Krylov-type linear system solver, the second improved strategy achieves a 75-fold reduction in the computational cost for a 20 zone model. The faster strategies achieve their cost savings with no significant loss of accuracy. The pressure, temperature and major species mass fractions agree with the solution from the original integration approach to within six significant digits; and the radical mass fractions agree with the original solution to within four significant digits. The faster strategies effectively change the cost scaling of the multizone model from cubic to quadratic, with respect to the number of zones. As a consequence of the improved scaling, the 40 zone model offers more than a 250-fold cost savings over the basic calculation.

  17. Chemical Kinetics at the Single-Molecule Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitus, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    For over a century, chemists have investigated the rates of chemical reactions using experimental conditions involving huge numbers of molecules. As a consequence, the description of the kinetics of the reaction in terms of average values was good enough for all practical purposes. From the pedagogical point of view, such a description misses the…

  18. Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Conceptions of Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozbilir, Mustafa; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Canpolat, Nurtac

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying specifically prospective chemistry teachers' difficulties in determining the differences between the concepts of chemical thermodynamics and kinetics. Data were collected from 67 prospective chemistry teachers at Kazim Karabekir Education Faculty of Ataturk University in Turkey during 2005-2006 academic year. Data…

  19. [Study on Chemical Kinetic Effect of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma].

    PubMed

    Zrang, Peng; Hong, Yan-ji; Shen, Shuang-yan; Ding, Xiao-yu; Ma, Di

    2015-03-01

    To reveal the mechanism of plasma (assisted the ignition process of methane/air further, schematic of dielectric barrier discharge plasma system with atmospheric air was designed and set up, the emission spectrum of dielectric barrier discharge plasma with atmospheric air was measured, and the active particles produced by the interaction of dielectric barrier discharge plasma with atmospheric air were analyzed with the spectrum technology, the ignition model and calculation methods of sensitivity analysis and reaction path analysis were given, effects of NO and O3 on the ignition delay time were simulated, and the chemical kinetics mechanism of NO and O3 assisted ignition was revealed via sensitivity analysis and reaction path analysis. The results show that main excited particles of N2 and O3 are generated via effect of plasma on the atmospheric air, which are converted into active particles of NO(ξ) and O3 in the end, the life of which are longer than any other active particles, effects of plasma on the ignition is simplified as effects of NO(ξ) and O3 on the ignition; NO and O3 could reduce the ignition delay time significantly, but the amplitude decrease with increase of the initial temperature, this is because the rate of ignition is decided by the oxidation rate of CH3, the oxidized pathway of CH3 is R155 and R156 for auto-ignition and their rates are slower when temperature is low, so the ignition delay time of methane/air is longer; NO could reduce the ignition delay time significantly because of the oxidized pathway of CH3 is changed to R327 CH3O2 + NO = CH3O + NO2, R328 CH3 + NO2 = CH3O + NO for NO(ξ) (assisted ignition process from R155 and R156 for auto-ignition; and the chemical kinetic effect is the dominating factor of O3 on the ignition and which change the reaction path.

  20. [Study on Chemical Kinetic Effect of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma].

    PubMed

    Zrang, Peng; Hong, Yan-ji; Shen, Shuang-yan; Ding, Xiao-yu; Ma, Di

    2015-03-01

    To reveal the mechanism of plasma (assisted the ignition process of methane/air further, schematic of dielectric barrier discharge plasma system with atmospheric air was designed and set up, the emission spectrum of dielectric barrier discharge plasma with atmospheric air was measured, and the active particles produced by the interaction of dielectric barrier discharge plasma with atmospheric air were analyzed with the spectrum technology, the ignition model and calculation methods of sensitivity analysis and reaction path analysis were given, effects of NO and O3 on the ignition delay time were simulated, and the chemical kinetics mechanism of NO and O3 assisted ignition was revealed via sensitivity analysis and reaction path analysis. The results show that main excited particles of N2 and O3 are generated via effect of plasma on the atmospheric air, which are converted into active particles of NO(ξ) and O3 in the end, the life of which are longer than any other active particles, effects of plasma on the ignition is simplified as effects of NO(ξ) and O3 on the ignition; NO and O3 could reduce the ignition delay time significantly, but the amplitude decrease with increase of the initial temperature, this is because the rate of ignition is decided by the oxidation rate of CH3, the oxidized pathway of CH3 is R155 and R156 for auto-ignition and their rates are slower when temperature is low, so the ignition delay time of methane/air is longer; NO could reduce the ignition delay time significantly because of the oxidized pathway of CH3 is changed to R327 CH3O2 + NO = CH3O + NO2, R328 CH3 + NO2 = CH3O + NO for NO(ξ) (assisted ignition process from R155 and R156 for auto-ignition; and the chemical kinetic effect is the dominating factor of O3 on the ignition and which change the reaction path. PMID:26117883

  1. A multipurpose reduced chemical-kinetic mechanism for methanol combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Tarrazo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Sanz, Mario; Sánchez, Antonio L.; Williams, Forman A.

    2016-07-01

    A multipurpose reduced chemical-kinetic mechanism for methanol combustion comprising 8 overall reactions and 11 reacting chemical species is presented. The development starts by investigating the minimum set of elementary reactions needed to describe methanol combustion with reasonable accuracy over a range of conditions of temperature, pressure, and composition of interest in combustion. Starting from a 27-step mechanism that has been previously tested and found to give accurate predictions of ignition processes for these conditions, it is determined that the addition of 11 elementary reactions taken from its basis (San Diego) mechanism extends the validity of the description to premixed-flame propagation, strain-induced extinction of non-premixed flames, and equilibrium composition and temperatures, giving results that compare favourably with experimental measurements and also with computations using the 247-step detailed San Diego mechanism involving 50 reactive species. Specifically, premixed-flame propagation velocities and extinction strain rates for non-premixed counterflow flames calculated with the 38-step mechanism show departures from experimental measurements and detailed-chemistry computations that are roughly on the order of 10%, comparable with expected experimental uncertainties. Similar accuracy is found in comparisons of autoignition times over the range considered, except at very high temperatures, under which conditions the computations tend to overpredict induction times for all of the chemistry descriptions tested. From this 38-step mechanism, the simplification is continued by introducing steady-state approximations for the intermediate species CH3, CH4, HCO, CH3O, CH2OH, and O, leading to an 8-step reduced mechanism that provides satisfactory accuracy for all conditions tested. The flame computations indicate that thermal diffusion has a negligible influence on methanol combustion in all cases considered and that a mixture-average species

  2. Chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane is presented and discussed. The mechanism consists of 27 chemical species and 83 elementary chemical reactions. Ignition and combustion data as determined in shock tube studies were used to evaluate the mechanism. Numerical simulation of the shock tube experiments showed that the kinetic behavior predicted by the mechanism for stoichiometric mixtures is in good agrement with the experimental results over the entire temperature range examined (1150-2600K). Sensitivity and theoretical studies carried out using the mechanism revealed that hydrocarbon reactions which are involved in the formation of the HO2 radical and the H2O2 molecule are very important in the mechanism and that the observed nonlinear behavior of ignition delay time with decreasing temperature can be interpreted in terms of the increased importance of the HO2 and H2O2 reactions at the lower temperatures.

  3. Chemical kinetic modeling of H{sub 2} applications

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.M.; Westbrook, C.K.; Cloutman, L.D.

    1995-09-01

    Work being carried out at LLNL has concentrated on studies of the role of chemical kinetics in a variety of problems related to hydrogen combustion in practical combustion systems, with an emphasis on vehicle propulsion. Use of hydrogen offers significant advantages over fossil fuels, and computer modeling provides advantages when used in concert with experimental studies. Many numerical {open_quotes}experiments{close_quotes} can be carried out quickly and efficiently, reducing the cost and time of system development, and many new and speculative concepts can be screened to identify those with sufficient promise to pursue experimentally. This project uses chemical kinetic and fluid dynamic computational modeling to examine the combustion characteristics of systems burning hydrogen, either as the only fuel or mixed with natural gas. Oxidation kinetics are combined with pollutant formation kinetics, including formation of oxides of nitrogen but also including air toxics in natural gas combustion. We have refined many of the elementary kinetic reaction steps in the detailed reaction mechanism for hydrogen oxidation. To extend the model to pressures characteristic of internal combustion engines, it was necessary to apply theoretical pressure falloff formalisms for several key steps in the reaction mechanism. We have continued development of simplified reaction mechanisms for hydrogen oxidation, we have implemented those mechanisms into multidimensional computational fluid dynamics models, and we have used models of chemistry and fluid dynamics to address selected application problems. At the present time, we are using computed high pressure flame, and auto-ignition data to further refine the simplified kinetics models that are then to be used in multidimensional fluid mechanics models. Detailed kinetics studies have investigated hydrogen flames and ignition of hydrogen behind shock waves, intended to refine the detailed reactions mechanisms.

  4. Detailed chemical kinetic modeling of diesel combustion with oxygenated fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Fisher, E; Glaude, P A; Marinov, N M; Westbrook, C K

    1999-10-28

    The influence of oxygenated hydrocarbons as additives to diesel fuels on ignition, NOx emissions and soot production has been examined using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. N-heptane was used as a representative diesel fuel, and methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether and dimethoxymethane were used as oxygenated fuel additives. It was found that addition of oxygenated hydrocarbons reduced NOx levels and reduced the production of soot precursors. When the overall oxygen content in the fuel reached approximately 25% by mass, production of soot precursors fell effectively to zero, in agreement with experimental studies. The kinetic factors responsible for these observations are discussed.

  5. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  6. Numerical Simulation of SNCR Technology with Simplified Chemical Kinetics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blejchař, T.; Dolníčková, D.

    2013-04-01

    The paper deals with numerical simulation of SNCR method. For numerical modelling was used CFD code Ansys/CFX. SNCR method was described by dominant chemical reaction, which were look up NIST Chemical database. The reactions including reduction of NOx and concentration change of pollutants, like N2O and CO in flue gas too. Proposed chemical kinetics and CFD model was applied to two boilers. Both simulations were compared with experimental measurements. First simulation was used to validation of chemical mechanism. Second simulation was based on first simulation and it was used to verification of compiled SNCR chemical mechanism. Next the new variant of the reagent penetration lance was proposed and compared with the original variants.

  7. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  8. Chemical Kinetic Study of Toluene Oxidation Under Premixed and Nonpremixed Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, I D; Bozzelli, J W; Seiser, R; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Chen, C -; Fournet, R; Seshadri, K; Battin-Leclerc, F; Billaud, F

    2003-12-10

    A study was performed to elucidate the chemical-kinetic mechanism of combustion of toluene. A detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for toluene was improved by adding a more accurate description of the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction channels, toluene decomposition reactions and the benzyl + O reaction. Results of the chemical kinetic mechanism are compared with experimental data obtained from premixed and non-premixed systems. Under premixed conditions, predicted ignition delay times are compared with new experimental data obtained in shock tube. Also, calculated species concentration histories are compared to experimental flow reactor data from the literature. Under non-premixed conditions, critical conditions of extinction and autoignition were measured in strained laminar flows in the counterflow configuration. Numerical calculations are performed using the chemical-kinetic mechanism at conditions corresponding to those in the experiments. Critical conditions of extinction and autoignition are predicted and compared with the experimental data. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental results of ignition delay times in shock tube, and extinction and autoignition in non-premixed systems show that the chemical-kinetic mechanism predicts that toluene/air is overall less reactive than observed in the experiments. For both premixed and non-premixed systems, sensitivity analysis was used to identify the reaction rate constants that control the overall rate of oxidation in each of the systems considered. Under shock tube conditions, the reactions that influence ignition delay time are H + O{sub 2} chain branching, the toluene decomposition reaction to give an H atom, and the toluene + H abstraction reaction. The reactions that influence autoignition in non-premixed systems involve the benzyl + HO{sub 2} reaction and the phenyl + O{sub 2} reaction.

  9. Chemical-Kinetic Characterization of Autoignition and Combustion of Surrogate Diesel

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, K

    2003-03-03

    A study was performed to elucidate the chemical-kinetic mechanism of combustion of toluene. The research was performed in collaboration Dr. Charles Westbrook and Dr. William Pitz at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A detailed chemical-kinetic mechanism for toluene developed at LLNL was employed. Numerical calculations were performed using this mechanism and the results were compared with experimental data obtained from premixed and nonpremixed systems. Under premixed conditions, predicted ignition delay times were compared with new experimental data obtained by I. Da Costa, R. Fournet, F. Billaud, F. Battin-Leclerc at Departement de Chime Physique des Reactions, CNRS-ENSIC, BP. 451, 1, rue Grandville, 51001 Nancy, France. Also, calculated species concentration histories were compared to experimental flow reactor data from the literature. Under nonpremixed conditions, critical conditions of extinction and autoignition were measured in strained laminar flows in the counterflow configuration. Numerical calculations were performed using the chemical-kinetic mechanism at conditions corresponding to those in the experiments. Critical conditions of extinction and autoignition are predicted and compared with the experimental data. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental results of ignition delay times in shock tube, and extinction and autoignition in nonpremixed systems show that the chemical-kinetic mechanism predicts that toluene/air is overall less reactive than observed in the experiments. The principal objective of this research is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms of autoignition and combustion of Diesel in nonpremixed systems. The major components of Diesel are straight-chain paraffins, branched-chain paraffins, cycloparaffins, and aromatics. The results of this research on toluene are expected to be useful in understanding the role of aromatics in combustion of Diesel.

  10. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Combustion of Automotive Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Silke, E J

    2006-11-10

    The objectives of this report are to: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of fuels, including olefins and cycloalkanes used in diesel, spark-ignition and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate mixtures of hydrocarbon components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on production of emissions from practical automotive engines.

  11. Accelerating the Computation of Detailed Chemical Reaction Kinetics for Simulating Combustion of Complex Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Grout, Ray W

    2012-01-01

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels has been a very challenging scientific and engineering problem due to the complexity of turbulent flows and hydrocarbon reaction kinetics. There is an urgent need to develop an efficient modeling capability to accurately predict the combustion of complex fuels. Detailed chemical kinetic models for the surrogates of fuels such as gasoline, diesel and JP-8 consist of thousands of chemical species and Arrhenius reaction steps. Oxygenated fuels such as bio-fuels and heavier hydrocarbons, such as from newer fossil fuel sources, are expected to have a much more complex chemistry requiring increasingly larger chemical kinetic models. Such models are beyond current computational capability, except for homogeneous or partially stirred reactor type calculations. The advent of highly parallel multi-core processors and graphical processing units (GPUs) promises a steep increase in computational performance in the coming years. This paper will present a software framework that translates the detailed chemical kinetic models to high- performance code targeted for GPU accelerators.

  12. Mission Fuel Kinetics Input and RELAP-like Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    In this document issued according to ''Work Release 02. P. 99-4b'' the neutronics parameters intended for use in 1-point kinetics RELAP model are presented. They are obtained for equilibrium 30% MOX fueled core of VVER-1000 containing boron burnable poison rods.

  13. Single-molecule chemical reaction reveals molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; Song, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Ruan, Mingbo; Xu, Weilin

    2014-06-25

    Understanding the microscopic elementary process of chemical reactions, especially in condensed phase, is highly desirable for improvement of efficiencies in industrial chemical processes. Here we show an approach to gaining new insights into elementary reactions in condensed phase by combining quantum chemical calculations with a single-molecule analysis. Elementary chemical reactions in liquid-phase, revealed from quantum chemical calculations, are studied by tracking the fluorescence of single dye molecules undergoing a reversible redox process. Statistical analyses of single-molecule trajectories reveal molecular reaction kinetics and dynamics of elementary reactions. The reactivity dynamic fluctuations of single molecules are evidenced and probably arise from either or both of the low-frequency approach of the molecule to the internal surface of the SiO2 nanosphere or the molecule diffusion-induced memory effect. This new approach could be applied to other chemical reactions in liquid phase to gain more insight into their molecular reaction kinetics and the dynamics of elementary steps.

  14. LSENS - GENERAL CHEMICAL KINETICS AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    LSENS has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical kinetics problems. The motivation for the development of this program is the continuing interest in developing detailed chemical reaction mechanisms for complex reactions such as the combustion of fuels and pollutant formation and destruction. A reaction mechanism is the set of all elementary chemical reactions that are required to describe the process of interest. Mathematical descriptions of chemical kinetics problems constitute sets of coupled, nonlinear, first-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The number of ODEs can be very large because of the numerous chemical species involved in the reaction mechanism. Further complicating the situation are the many simultaneous reactions needed to describe the chemical kinetics of practical fuels. For example, the mechanism describing the oxidation of the simplest hydrocarbon fuel, methane, involves over 25 species participating in nearly 100 elementary reaction steps. Validating a chemical reaction mechanism requires repetitive solutions of the governing ODEs for a variety of reaction conditions. Analytical solutions to the systems of ODEs describing chemistry are not possible, except for the simplest cases, which are of little or no practical value. Consequently, there is a need for fast and reliable numerical solution techniques for chemical kinetics problems. In addition to solving the ODEs describing chemical kinetics, it is often necessary to know what effects variations in either initial condition values or chemical reaction mechanism parameters have on the solution. Such a need arises in the development of reaction mechanisms from experimental data. The rate coefficients are often not known with great precision and in general, the experimental data are not sufficiently detailed to accurately estimate the rate coefficient parameters. The development of a reaction mechanism is facilitated by a systematic sensitivity analysis

  15. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-17

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  16. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-20

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  17. Towards cleaner combustion engines through groundbreaking detailed chemical kinetic models

    PubMed Central

    Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Blurock, Edward; Bounaceur, Roda; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Sirjean, Baptiste; Warth, V.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of limiting the environmental impact of transportation, this paper reviews new directions which are being followed in the development of more predictive and more accurate detailed chemical kinetic models for the combustion of fuels. In the first part, the performance of current models, especially in terms of the prediction of pollutant formation, is evaluated. In the next parts, recent methods and ways to improve these models are described. An emphasis is given on the development of detailed models based on elementary reactions, on the production of the related thermochemical and kinetic parameters, and on the experimental techniques available to produce the data necessary to evaluate model predictions under well defined conditions. PMID:21597604

  18. Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold for Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kooshkbaghi, Mahdi; Frouzakis, Christos E; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Karlin, Iliya V

    2016-05-26

    The Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold (SQEM) method is a model reduction technique for chemical kinetics based on entropy maximization under constraints built by the slowest eigenvectors at equilibrium. The method is revisited here and discussed and validated through the Michaelis-Menten kinetic scheme, and the quality of the reduction is related to the temporal evolution and the gap between eigenvalues. SQEM is then applied to detailed reaction mechanisms for the homogeneous combustion of hydrogen, syngas, and methane mixtures with air in adiabatic constant pressure reactors. The system states computed using SQEM are compared with those obtained by direct integration of the detailed mechanism, and good agreement between the reduced and the detailed descriptions is demonstrated. The SQEM reduced model of hydrogen/air combustion is also compared with another similar technique, the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE). For the same number of representative variables, SQEM is found to provide a more accurate description.

  19. Carbon Footprint Calculations: An Application of Chemical Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treptow, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Topics commonly taught in a general chemistry course can be used to calculate the quantity of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere by various human activities. Each calculation begins with the balanced chemical equation for the reaction that produces the CO[subscript 2] gas. Stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the ideal gas law, and dimensional…

  20. Role of substrate inhibition kinetics in enzymatic chemical oscillations.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, P; Larter, R

    1994-01-01

    Two chemical kinetic models are investigated using standard nonlinear dynamics techniques to determine the conditions under which substrate inhibition kinetics can lead to oscillations. The first model is a classical substrate inhibition scheme based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics and involves a single substrate. Only when this reaction takes place in a flow reactor (i.e., both substrate and product are taken to follow reversible flow terms) are oscillations observed; however, the range of parameter values over which such oscillations occur is so narrow it is experimentally unobservable. A second model based on a general mechanism applied to the kinetics of many pH-dependent enzymes is also studied. This second model includes both substrate inhibition kinetics as well as autocatalysis through the activation of the enzyme by hydrogen ion. We find that it is the autocatalysis that is always responsible for oscillatory behavior in this scheme. The substrate inhibition terms affect the steady-state behavior but do not lead to oscillations unless product inhibition or multiple substrates are present; this is a general conclusion we can draw from our studies of both the classical substrate inhibition scheme and the pH-dependent enzyme mechanism. Finally, an analysis of the nullclines for these two models allows us to prove that the nullcline slopes must have a negative value for oscillatory behavior to exist; this proof can explain our results. From our analysis, we conclude with a brief discussion of other enzymes that might be expected to produce oscillatory behavior based on a pH-dependent substrate inhibition mechanism. Images FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:7819481

  1. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-05-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model that offers an alternative to the point kinetics (PK) modelling approach in the analysis of space reactor kinetics and control studies. Modelling effort will focus on the explicit treatment of control drums as reactivity input devices so that the transition to automatic control can be smoothly done. The proposed model is developed for the specific integration of automatic control and the solution of the servo mechanism problem. The integration of the kinetics model with an automatic controller will provide a useful tool for performing space reactor scoping studies for different designs and configurations. Such a tool should prove to be invaluable in the design phase of a space nuclear system from the point of view of kinetics and control limitations.

  2. Reaction Mechanism Generator: Automatic construction of chemical kinetic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Connie W.; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.; West, Richard H.

    2016-06-01

    Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) constructs kinetic models composed of elementary chemical reaction steps using a general understanding of how molecules react. Species thermochemistry is estimated through Benson group additivity and reaction rate coefficients are estimated using a database of known rate rules and reaction templates. At its core, RMG relies on two fundamental data structures: graphs and trees. Graphs are used to represent chemical structures, and trees are used to represent thermodynamic and kinetic data. Models are generated using a rate-based algorithm which excludes species from the model based on reaction fluxes. RMG can generate reaction mechanisms for species involving carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. It also has capabilities for estimating transport and solvation properties, and it automatically computes pressure-dependent rate coefficients and identifies chemically-activated reaction paths. RMG is an object-oriented program written in Python, which provides a stable, robust programming architecture for developing an extensible and modular code base with a large suite of unit tests. Computationally intensive functions are cythonized for speed improvements.

  3. Progress in Chemical Kinetic Modeling for Surrogate Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J

    2008-06-06

    Gasoline, diesel, and other alternative transportation fuels contain hundreds to thousands of compounds. It is currently not possible to represent all these compounds in detailed chemical kinetic models. Instead, these fuels are represented by surrogate fuel models which contain a limited number of representative compounds. We have been extending the list of compounds for detailed chemical models that are available for use in fuel surrogate models. Detailed models for components with larger and more complicated fuel molecular structures are now available. These advancements are allowing a more accurate representation of practical and alternative fuels. We have developed detailed chemical kinetic models for fuels with higher molecular weight fuel molecules such as n-hexadecane (C16). Also, we can consider more complicated fuel molecular structures like cyclic alkanes and aromatics that are found in practical fuels. For alternative fuels, the capability to model large biodiesel fuels that have ester structures is becoming available. These newly addressed cyclic and ester structures in fuels profoundly affect the reaction rate of the fuel predicted by the model. Finally, these surrogate fuel models contain large numbers of species and reactions and must be reduced for use in multi-dimensional models for spark-ignition, HCCI and diesel engines.

  4. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    Renewed interest in space nuclear applications has motivated the study of a specialized reactor kinetics model. Consideration of a kinetics model favorable for study of the feasibility of automatic control of these devices is warranted. The need to bridge this gap between reactor kinetics and automatic control in conjunction with the control drum design characteristic of next generation paper space reactors inspired the development of a new Reflected Kinetics (RK) model. An extension of the conventional point-kinetics (PK) model was done in order to explicitly correlate reactivity and the reflector/absorber control drums characteristic of space nuclear reactor designs. Open-loop computations and numerical comparison to analytic PK equations indicated that the RK model is a functional alternative to equivalent bare point kinetics in the analysis of moderate transients. Variations in the RK reflector-to-core transfer probabilities and coolant flow rate do indeed drive the transient differently than the lumped insertion of equivalent reactivity amounts in the core. These computations illustrated the potential importance of the utilization of variable coolant flow rate to aid control in space reactor systems limited by minimal drum reactivity worth. Additionally the Doppler reactivity shutdown mechanism was concluded to be the primarily reliable means of safety shutdown in such systems. The structure of the RK equations proved to be advantageous for integration of automatic control.

  5. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Diesel Combustion with Oxygenated Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H J; Fisher, E M; Glaude, P-A; Marinov, N M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Flynn, P F; Durrett, R P; zur Loye, A O; Akinyemi, O C; Dryer, F L

    2000-01-11

    Emission standards for diesel engines in vehicles have been steadily reduced in recent years, and a great deal of research and development effort has been focused on reducing particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions. One promising approach to reducing emissions involves the addition of oxygen to the fuel, generally by adding an oxygenated compound to the normal diesel fuel. Miyamoto et al. [1] showed experimentally that particulate levels can be significantly reduced by adding oxygenated species to the fuel. They found the Bosch smoke number (a measure of the particulate or soot levels in diesel exhaust) falls from about 55% for conventional diesel fuel to less than 1% when the oxygen content of the fuel is above about 25% by mass, as shown in Figure 1. It has been well established that addition of oxygenates to automotive fuel, including both diesel fuel as well as gasoline, reduces NOx and CO emissions by reducing flame temperatures. This is the basis for addition of oxygenates to produce reformulated gasoline in selected portions of the country. Of course, this is also accompanied by a slight reduction in fuel economy. A new overall picture of diesel combustion has been developed by Dec [2], in which laser diagnostic studies identified stages in diesel combustion that had not previously been recognized. These stages are summarized in Figure 2. The evolution of the diesel spray is shown, starting as a liquid jet that vaporizes and entrains hot air from the combustion chamber. This relatively steady process continues as long as fuel is being injected. In particular, Dec showed that the fuel spray vaporizes and mixes with air and products of earlier combustion to provide a region in which a gas phase, premixed fuel-rich ignition and burn occurs. The products of this ignition are then observed experimentally to lead rapidly to formation of soot particles, which subsequently are consumed in a diffusion flame. Recently, Flynn et al. [3] used a chemical kinetic and

  6. Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Hydrocarbon and Other Types of Chemical Fuels

    DOE Data Explorer

    The central feature of the Combustion Chemistry project at LLNL is the development, validation, and application of detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of hydrocarbon and other types of chemical fuels. For the past 30 years, LLNL's Chemical Sciences Division has built hydrocarbon mechanisms for fuels from hydrogen and methane through much larger fuels including heptanes and octanes. Other classes of fuels for which models have been developed include flame suppressants such as halons and organophosphates, and air pollutants such as soot and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur. Reaction mechanisms have been tested and validated extensively through comparisons between computed results and measured data from laboratory experiments (e.g., shock tubes, laminar flames, rapid compression machines, flow reactors, stirred reactors) and from practical systems (e.g., diesel engines, spark-ignition engines, homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engines). These kinetic models are used to examine a wide range of combustion systems.

  7. Chemical potential calculations in dense liquids using metadynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, C.; Giberti, F.; Parrinello, M.

    2016-07-01

    The calculation of chemical potential has traditionally been a challenge in atomistic simulations. One of the most used approaches is Widom's insertion method in which the chemical potential is calculated by periodically attempting to insert an extra particle in the system. In dense systems this method fails since the insertion probability is very low. In this paper we show that in a homogeneous fluid the insertion probability can be increased using metadynamics. We test our method on a supercooled high density binary Lennard-Jones fluid. We find that we can obtain efficiently converged results even when Widom's method fails.

  8. CHEMKIN-III: A FORTRAN chemical kinetics package for the analysis of gas-phase chemical and plasma kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.; Miller, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the third-generation CHEMKIN package. CHEMKIN is a software package whose purpose is to facilitate the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary gas-phase chemical kinetics. It provides a flexible and powerful tool for incorporating complex chemical kinetics into simulations of fluid dynamics. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of an elementary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. This library is a collection of about 100 highly modular FORTRAN subroutines that may be called to return information on equations of state, thermodynamic properties, and chemical production rates. CHEMKIN-III includes capabilities for treating multi-fluid plasma systems, that are not in thermal equilibrium. These new capabilities allow researchers to describe chemistry systems that are characterized by more than one temperature, in which reactions may depend on temperatures associated with different species; i.e. reactions may be driven by collisions with electrons, ions, or charge-neutral species. These new features have been implemented in such a way as to require little or no changes to CHEMKIN implementation for systems in thermal equilibrium, where all species share the same gas temperature. CHEMKIN-III now has the capability to handle weakly ionized plasma chemistry, especially for application related to advanced semiconductor processing.

  9. Significance of Xenobiotic Metabolism for Bioaccumulation Kinetics of Organic Chemicals in Gammarus pulex

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bioaccumulation and biotransformation are key toxicokinetic processes that modify toxicity of chemicals and sensitivity of organisms. Bioaccumulation kinetics vary greatly among organisms and chemicals; thus, we investigated the influence of biotransformation kinetics on bioaccumulation in a model aquatic invertebrate using fifteen 14C-labeled organic xenobiotics from diverse chemical classes and physicochemical properties (1,2,3-trichlorobenzene, imidacloprid, 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol, ethylacrylate, malathion, chlorpyrifos, aldicarb, carbofuran, carbaryl, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, 4-nitrobenzyl-chloride, 2,4-dichloroaniline, and sea-nine (4,5-dichloro-2-octyl-3-isothiazolone)). We detected and identified metabolites using HPLC with UV and radio-detection as well as high resolution mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap). Kinetics of uptake, biotransformation, and elimination of parent compounds and metabolites were modeled with a first-order one-compartment model. Bioaccumulation factors were calculated for parent compounds and metabolite enrichment factors for metabolites. Out of 19 detected metabolites, we identified seven by standards or accurate mass measurements and two via pathway analysis and analogies to other compounds. 1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene, imidacloprid, and 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol were not biotransformed. Dietary uptake contributed little to overall uptake. Differentiation between parent and metabolites increased accuracy of bioaccumulation parameters compared to total 14C measurements. Biotransformation dominated toxicokinetics and strongly affected internal concentrations of parent compounds and metabolites. Many metabolites reached higher internal concentrations than their parents, characterized by large metabolite enrichment factors. PMID:22321051

  10. Core Physics and Kinetics Calculations for the Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.; Albright, D.

    2007-01-01

    Highly efficient, compact nuclear reactors would provide high specific impulse spacecraft propulsion. This analysis and numerical simulation effort has focused on the technical feasibility issues related to the nuclear design characteristics of a novel reactor design. The Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor (FPCR) is a shockwave-driven gaseous-core nuclear reactor, which uses Magneto Hydrodynamic effects to generate electric power to be used for propulsion. The nuclear design of the system depends on two major calculations: core physics calculations and kinetics calculations. Presently, core physics calculations have concentrated on the use of the MCNP4C code. However, initial results from other codes such as COMBINE/VENTURE and SCALE4a. are also shown. Several significant modifications were made to the ISR-developed QCALC1 kinetics analysis code. These modifications include testing the state of the core materials, an improvement to the calculation of the material properties of the core, the addition of an adiabatic core temperature model and improvement of the first order reactivity correction model. The accuracy of these modifications has been verified, and the accuracy of the point-core kinetics model used by the QCALC1 code has also been validated. Previously calculated kinetics results for the FPCR were described in the ISR report, "QCALC1: A code for FPCR Kinetics Model Feasibility Analysis" dated June 1, 2002.

  11. Advanced software for the calculation of thermochemistry, kinetics, and dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.; Chemistry

    2007-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer separation of the Schroedinger equation allows the electronic and nuclear motions to be solved in three steps. (1) The solution of the electronic wave function at a discrete set of molecular conformations; (2) the fitting of this discrete set of energy values in order to construct an analytical approximation to the potential energy surface (PES) at all molecular conformations; (3) the use of this analytical PES to solve for the nuclear motion using either time-dependent or time-independent formulations to compute molecular energy values, chemical reaction rates, and cumulative reaction probabilities. This project involves the development of technology to address all three of these steps. This report focuses on our recent work on the optimization of nonlinear wave function parameters for the electronic wave functions.

  12. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from First-Principles Path Sampling Calculations.

    PubMed

    Varga, Matthew J; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-04-12

    In this study, we develop and test a method to determine the rate of particle transfer and kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic reactions, specifically yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), from first-principles. Transition path sampling (TPS) and normal mode centroid dynamics (CMD) are used to simulate these enzymatic reactions without knowledge of their reaction coordinates and with the inclusion of quantum effects, such as zero-point energy and tunneling, on the transferring particle. Though previous studies have used TPS to calculate reaction rate constants in various model and real systems, it has not been applied to a system as large as YADH. The calculated primary H/D kinetic isotope effect agrees with previously reported experimental results, within experimental error. The kinetic isotope effects calculated with this method correspond to the kinetic isotope effect of the transfer event itself. The results reported here show that the kinetic isotope effects calculated from first-principles, purely for barrier passage, can be used to predict experimental kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic systems.

  13. From prelife to life: how chemical kinetics become evolutionary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Irene A.

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Life is that which evolves. Living systems are the products of evolutionary processes and are capable of undergoing further evolution. A crucial question for the origin of life is the following: when do chemical kinetics become evolutionary dynamics? In this paper we review properties of ‘prelife’ and discuss the transition from prelife to life. We describe prelife as a chemical system where activated monomers can co-polymerize into macromolecules (such as RNA). These macromolecules are information carriers. Their physical and chemical properties depend to a certain extent on their particular sequence of monomers. We consider prelife as a logical precursor of life, where macromolecules are formed by copolymerization, but they are not capable of replication. Prelife can undergo ‘prevolutionary dynamics’. There can be mutation, selection and cooperation. Prelife selection, however, is blunt: small differences in rate constants lead to small differences in abundance. Life emerges with the ability of replication. In the resulting evolutionary dynamics selection is sharp: small differences in rate constants can lead to large differences in abundance. We also study the competition of different ‘prelives’ and find that there can be selection for those systems which ultimately give rise to replication. The transition from prelife to life can occur over an extended period of time. There may not have been a single moment which marks the origin of life. Instead prelife seeds many attempts for the origin of life. Eventually life takes over and destroys prelife. PMID:22335792

  14. Parameter Optimization of Nitriding Process Using Chemical Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, İ. Bedii; Akar, Firat; Lippmann, Nils

    2016-09-01

    Using the dynamics of chemical kinetics, an investigation to search for an optimum condition for a gas nitriding process is performed over the solution space spanned by the initial temperature and gas composition of the furnace. For a two-component furnace atmosphere, the results are presented in temporal variations of gas concentrations and the nitrogen coverage on the surface. It seems that the exploitation of the nitriding kinetics can provide important feedback for setting the model-based control algorithms. The present work shows that when the nitrogen gas concentration is not allowed to exceed 6 pct, the Nad coverage can attain maximum values as high as 0.97. The time evolution of the Nad coverage also reveals that, as long as the temperature is above the value where nitrogen poisoning of the surface due to the low-temperature adsorption of excess nitrogen occurs, the initial ammonia content in the furnace atmosphere is much more important in the nitriding process than is the initial temperature.

  15. Thermodynamic and kinetic consistency of calculated binary nucleation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Wilemski, G.; Wyslouzil, B.E.

    1996-04-02

    To establish the accuracy and applicability of analytical expressions for the steady state rate of binary nucleation, we numerically solved the birth-death equations for the vapor-to-liquid transition. These calculations were performed using rate coefficients that are consistent with the principle of detailed balance and a new self-consistent form of the equilibrium distribution function for binary cluster concentrations. We found that the customary saddle point and growth path approximations are almost always valid and can fail only if the nucleating solution phase is significantly nonideal. For example, problems can arise when the vapor composition puts the system on the verge of partial liquid phase miscibility. When this occurs for comparable monomer impingement rates, nucleation still occurs through the saddle point, but the usual quadratic expansion for the cluster free energy is inadequate. When the two impingement rates differ significantly, however, the major particle flux may bypass the saddle point and cross a low ridge on the free energy surface. The dependence of the saddle point location on the gas phase composition is also important in initiating or terminating ridge crossing nucleation.

  16. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, Robert F; Glass, Graham

    2004-11-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching ratios of the reactions of O({sup 1}D) with acetaldehyde and methane, we discovered that hot atom chemistry effects are not negligible at the gas pressures (13 Torr) initially used. Branching ratios of the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} have been measured at a tenfold higher He flow and fivefold higher pressure.

  17. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  18. Chemical-equilibrium calculations for aqueous geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1981-05-01

    Results from four chemical-equilibrium computer programs, REDEQL.EPAK, GEOCHEM, WATEQF, and SENECA2, have been compared with experimental solubility data for some simple systems of interest with geothermal brines. Seven test cases involving solubilities of CaCO/sub 3/, amorphous SiO/sub 2/, CaSO/sub 4/, and BaSO/sub 4/ at various temperatures from 25 to 300/sup 0/C and in NaCl or HCl solutions of 0 to 4 molal have been examined. Significant differences between calculated results and experimental data occurred in some cases. These differences were traced to inaccuracies in free-energy or equilibrium-constant data and in activity coefficients used by the programs. Although currently available chemical-equilibrium programs can give reasonable results for these calculations, considerable care must be taken in the selection of free-energy data and methods of calculating activity coefficients.

  19. An open-source chemical kinetics network: VULCAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shang-Min; Lyons, James; Heng, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    I will present VULCAN, an open-source 1D chemical kinetics code suited for the temperature and pressure range relevant to observable exoplanet atmospheres. The chemical network is based on a set of reduced rate coefficients for C-H-O systems. Most of the rate coefficients are based on the NIST online database, and validated by comparing withthermodynamic equilibrium codes (TEA, STANJAN). The difference between the experimental rates and those from the thermodynamical data is carefully examined and discussed. For the numerical method, a simple, quick, semi-implicit Euler integrator is adopted to solve the stiff chemical reactions, within an operator-splitting scheme for computational efficiency.Several test runs of VULCAN are shown in a hierarchical way: pure H, H+O, H+O+C, including controlled experiments performed with a simple analytical temperature-pressure profiles, so that different parameters, such as the stellar irradiation, atmospheric opacities and albedo can be individually explored to understand how these properties affect the temperaturestructure and hence the chemical abundances. I will also revisit the "transport-induced-quenching” effects, and discuss the limitation of this approximation and its impact on observations. Finally, I will discuss the effects of C/O ratio and compare with published work in the literature.VULCAN is written in Python and is part of the publicly-available set of community tools we call the Exoclimes Simulation Platform (ESP; www.exoclime.org). I am a Ph.D student of Kevin Heng at the University of Bern, Switzerland.

  20. Gompertz kinetics model of fast chemical neurotransmission currents.

    PubMed

    Easton, Dexter M

    2005-10-01

    At a chemical synapse, transmitter molecules ejected from presynaptic terminal(s) bind reversibly with postsynaptic receptors and trigger an increase in channel conductance to specific ions. This paper describes a simple but accurate predictive model for the time course of the synaptic conductance transient, based on Gompertz kinetics. In the model, two simple exponential decay terms set the rates of development and decline of transmitter action. The first, r, triggering conductance activation, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of growth of conductance, G. The second, r', responsible for Y, deactivation of the conductance, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of decline of transmitter action. Therefore, the differential equation for the net conductance change, g, triggered by the transmitter is dg/dt=g(r-r'). The solution of that equation yields the product of G(t), representing activation, and Y(t), which defines the proportional decline (deactivation) of the current. The model fits, over their full-time course, published records of macroscopic ionic current associated with fast chemical transmission. The Gompertz model is a convenient and accurate method for routine analysis and comparison of records of synaptic current and putative transmitter time course. A Gompertz fit requiring only three independent rate constants plus initial current appears indistinguishable from a Markov fit using seven rate constants.

  1. Chemical Kinetics of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Monika; Tran, T.; Chiar, J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2012-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) comprise about 10% of the carbon in the interstellar medium. There is evidence of modification of PAHs in protoplanetary disks. What happens to these molecules as they are incorporated into protoplanetary disks? We address this question by investigating the chemical kinetics of PAHs in the disk environment. Kress et al. (2010) investigated the chemical behavior of PAHs at temperatures from 1000 to 2000 K at a pressure of 1e-6 bar, and proposed the concept of the 'soot line', analogous to the 'snow line' in the solar nebula. Inside of the soot line, PAHs are irreversibly destroyed via thermally-driven reactions. We will extend this study to more realistic disk conditions and timescales. In a related project (see poster by Tran, Chiar, et al.), we are investigating the differences in the PAH physical characteristics in quiescent dense clouds versus the environment around embedded protostars. Together, these studies will help us understand (1) the fate of interstellar PAHs in planet-forming disks and (2) the relationship between interstellar and solar system PAHs. We also will investigate the soot line in disks around sub-solar mass stars (e.g. M dwarfs). This work has been supported by the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory (PI: V. Meadows) and the NASA/EPOESS program (PI: C. Phillips).

  2. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Chemical Equilibrium in Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory of thermodynamics of the equilibrium in solution and dissociation-dimerization kinetics. Describes experimental procedure including determination of molar absorptivity and equilibrium constant, reaction enthalpy, and kinetics of the dissociation-dimerization reaction. (JM)

  3. Chemical kinetic analysis of hydrogen-air ignition and reaction times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. C.; Schexnayder, C. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An anaytical study of hydrogen air kinetics was performed. Calculations were made over a range of pressure from 0.2 to 4.0 atm, temperatures from 850 to 2000 K, and mixture equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 2.0. The finite rate chemistry model included 60 reactions in 20 species of the H2-O2-N2 system. The calculations also included an assessment of how small amounts of the chemicals H2O, NOx, H2O2, and O3 in the initial mixture affect ignition and reaction times, and how the variation of the third body efficiency of H2O relative of N2 in certain key reactions may affect reaction time. The results indicate that for mixture equivalence ratios between 0.5 and 1.7, ignition times are nearly constant; however, the presence of H2O and NO can have significant effects on ignition times, depending on the mixture temperature. Reaction time is dominantly influenced by pressure but is nearly independent of initial temperature, equivalence ratio, and the addition of chemicals. Effects of kinetics on reaction at supersonic combustor conditions are discussed.

  4. A Review of Research on the Teaching and Learning of Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Kinsey; Towns, Marcy H.

    2016-01-01

    We review literature on the teaching and learning of chemical kinetics at both the secondary and tertiary levels. Our aim in doing so is to summarize research literature, synthesize recommendations for future research, and suggest implications for practitioners. Two main bodies of literature emerged from the chemical kinetics education research:…

  5. Exploring Secondary Students' Understanding of Chemical Kinetics through Inquiry-Based Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chairam, Sanoe; Klahan, Nutsuda; Coll, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    This research is trying to evaluate the feedback of Thai secondary school students to inquiry-based teaching and learning methods, exemplified by the study of chemical kinetics. This work used the multiple-choice questions, scientifically practical diagram and questionnaire to assess students' understanding of chemical kinetics. The findings…

  6. Preservice Science Teachers' Attitudes towards Chemistry and Misconceptions about Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çam, Aylin; Topçu, Mustafa Sami; Sülün, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates preservice science teachers' attitudes towards chemistry; their misconceptions about chemical kinetics; and relationships between pre-service science teachers' attitudes toward chemistry and misconceptions about chemical kinetics were examined. The sample of this study consisted of 81 freshman pre-service science…

  7. Identifying Alternative Conceptions of Chemical Kinetics among Secondary School and Undergraduate Students in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakmakci, Gultekin

    2010-01-01

    This study identifies some alternative conceptions of chemical kinetics held by secondary school and undergraduate students (N = 191) in Turkey. Undergraduate students who participated are studying to become chemistry teachers when they graduate. Students' conceptions about chemical kinetics were elicited through a series of written tasks and…

  8. Melting behavior of typical thermoplastic materials--an experimental and chemical kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Tu, Ran; Ma, Xin; Xie, Qiyuan; Jiang, Xi

    2013-11-15

    A medium-scale melting experiment rig was designed and constructed in this study. A detailed experimental study was conducted on the melting behavior and the chemical kinetic characteristics of three typical thermoplastic materials, including polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) and polystyrene (PS). It is observed that the thermal decomposition of the thermoplastic materials mainly consists of three stages: the initial heating stage, the melting-dominated stage and the gasification-dominated stage. Melting of the materials examined takes place within a certain temperature range. The melting temperature of PS is the lowest, moreover, it takes the shortest time to be completely liquefied. To quantitatively represent the chemical kinetics, an nth-order reaction model was employed to interpret the thermal decomposition behavior of the materials. The calculated reaction order is largely in accordance with the small-scale thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The small difference between the results and TGA data suggests that there are some limitations in the small-scale experiments in simulating the behavior of thermoplastic materials in a thermal hazard. Therefore, investigating the thermal physical and chemical properties of the thermoplastic materials and their thermal hazard prevention in medium or large-scale experiments is necessary for the fire safety considerations of polymer materials.

  9. Towards the reliable calculation of residence time for off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Kathleen C.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) methods have the potential to extend the accessible timescales of off-lattice atomistic simulations beyond the limits of molecular dynamics by making use of transition state theory and parallelization. However, it is a challenge to identify a complete catalog of events accessible to an off-lattice system in order to accurately calculate the residence time for KMC. Here we describe possible approaches to some of the key steps needed to address this problem. These include methods to compare and distinguish individual kinetic events, to deterministically search an energy landscape, and to define local atomic environments. When applied to the ground state  ∑5(2 1 0) grain boundary in copper, these methods achieve a converged residence time, accounting for the full set of kinetically relevant events for this off-lattice system, with calculable uncertainty.

  10. Calculation of rates for enzyme and microbial kinetics via a spline technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In biocatalysis research, determination of enzyme kinetics, microbial growth rates, substrate utilization rates, and product accumulation rates sometime require derivatives to be calculated with a method that can be duplicated and yields consistent results. In this paper, several methods that have ...

  11. Kinetic energies to analyze the experimental auger electron spectra by density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Kazunaka

    2016-02-01

    In the Auger electron spectra (AES) simulations, we define theoretical modified kinetic energies of AES in the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The modified kinetic energies correspond to two final-state holes at the ground state and at the transition-state in DFT calculations, respectively. This method is applied to simulate Auger electron spectra (AES) of 2nd periodic atom (Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F)-involving substances (LiF, beryllium, boron, graphite, GaN, SiO2, PTFE) by deMon DFT calculations using the model molecules of the unit cell. Experimental KVV (valence band electrons can fill K-shell core holes or be emitted during KVV-type transitions) AES of the (Li, O) atoms in the substances agree considerably well with simulation of AES obtained with the maximum kinetic energies of the atoms, while, for AES of LiF, and PTFE substance, the experimental F KVV AES is almost in accordance with the spectra from the transitionstate kinetic energy calculations.

  12. Cometary impact and amino acid survival - Chemical kinetics and thermochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    The Arrhenius parameters for the initiating reactions in butane thermolysis and the formation of soot, reliable to at least 3000 K, have been applied to the question of the survival of amino acids in cometary impacts on early Earth. The pressure/temperature/time course employed here was that developed in hydrocode simulations for kilometer-sized comets (Pierazzo and Chyba, 1999), with attention to the track below 3000 K where it is shown that potential stabilizing effects of high pressure become unimportant kinetically. The question of survival can then be considered without the need for assignment of activation volumes and the related uncertainties in their application to extreme conditions. The exercise shows that the characteristic times for soot formation in the interval fall well below the cooling periods for impacts ranging from fully vertical down to about 9?? above horizontal. Decarboxylation, which emerges as more rapid than soot formation below 2000-3000 K, continues further down to extremely narrow impact angles, and accordingly cometa??ry delivery of amino acids to early Earth is highly unlikely. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  13. PLASMAKIN: A chemical kinetics library for plasma physics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinhao, Nuno

    2007-10-01

    PLASMAKIN is a package to handle physical and chemical data used in plasma physics modeling and to compute kinetics data from the reactions taking place in the gas or at the surfaces: particle production and loss rates, photon spectra and energy exchange rates. It has no limits on the number of species and reactions that can be handled, is independent of problem dimensions and can be used in both steady-state and time-dependent problems. A broad range of species properties and reaction types are supported: gas or electron temperature dependent rate coefficients, vibrational and cascade levels, branching ratios, superelastic and other reverse processes, three-body collisions, radiation imprisonment and photoelectric emission. Non-standard rate coefficient functions can be handled by a user-supplied shared library. Reaction data is supplied in text files and is independent of the user's program. Recent additions include the simulation of emission spectra taking line broadening into account; reactions with excited ionic species; 3-body reactions with species with different efficiencies as 3rd body; a species properties database and a Python interface for rapid scripting and debugging.

  14. Approximate method for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales by chemical Langevin equations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuke; Tian, Tianhai; Rawlings, James B; Yin, George

    2016-05-01

    The frequently used reduction technique is based on the chemical master equation for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales, which yields the modified stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). For the chemical reaction processes involving a large number of molecular species and reactions, the collection of slow reactions may still include a large number of molecular species and reactions. Consequently, the SSA is still computationally expensive. Because the chemical Langevin equations (CLEs) can effectively work for a large number of molecular species and reactions, this paper develops a reduction method based on the CLE by the stochastic averaging principle developed in the work of Khasminskii and Yin [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 56, 1766-1793 (1996); ibid. 56, 1794-1819 (1996)] to average out the fast-reacting variables. This reduction method leads to a limit averaging system, which is an approximation of the slow reactions. Because in the stochastic chemical kinetics, the CLE is seen as the approximation of the SSA, the limit averaging system can be treated as the approximation of the slow reactions. As an application, we examine the reduction of computation complexity for the gene regulatory networks with two-time scales driven by intrinsic noise. For linear and nonlinear protein production functions, the simulations show that the sample average (expectation) of the limit averaging system is close to that of the slow-reaction process based on the SSA. It demonstrates that the limit averaging system is an efficient approximation of the slow-reaction process in the sense of the weak convergence. PMID:27155630

  15. Approximate method for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales by chemical Langevin equations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuke; Tian, Tianhai; Rawlings, James B; Yin, George

    2016-05-01

    The frequently used reduction technique is based on the chemical master equation for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales, which yields the modified stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). For the chemical reaction processes involving a large number of molecular species and reactions, the collection of slow reactions may still include a large number of molecular species and reactions. Consequently, the SSA is still computationally expensive. Because the chemical Langevin equations (CLEs) can effectively work for a large number of molecular species and reactions, this paper develops a reduction method based on the CLE by the stochastic averaging principle developed in the work of Khasminskii and Yin [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 56, 1766-1793 (1996); ibid. 56, 1794-1819 (1996)] to average out the fast-reacting variables. This reduction method leads to a limit averaging system, which is an approximation of the slow reactions. Because in the stochastic chemical kinetics, the CLE is seen as the approximation of the SSA, the limit averaging system can be treated as the approximation of the slow reactions. As an application, we examine the reduction of computation complexity for the gene regulatory networks with two-time scales driven by intrinsic noise. For linear and nonlinear protein production functions, the simulations show that the sample average (expectation) of the limit averaging system is close to that of the slow-reaction process based on the SSA. It demonstrates that the limit averaging system is an efficient approximation of the slow-reaction process in the sense of the weak convergence.

  16. Approximate method for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales by chemical Langevin equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fuke; Tian, Tianhai; Rawlings, James B.; Yin, George

    2016-05-01

    The frequently used reduction technique is based on the chemical master equation for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales, which yields the modified stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). For the chemical reaction processes involving a large number of molecular species and reactions, the collection of slow reactions may still include a large number of molecular species and reactions. Consequently, the SSA is still computationally expensive. Because the chemical Langevin equations (CLEs) can effectively work for a large number of molecular species and reactions, this paper develops a reduction method based on the CLE by the stochastic averaging principle developed in the work of Khasminskii and Yin [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 56, 1766-1793 (1996); ibid. 56, 1794-1819 (1996)] to average out the fast-reacting variables. This reduction method leads to a limit averaging system, which is an approximation of the slow reactions. Because in the stochastic chemical kinetics, the CLE is seen as the approximation of the SSA, the limit averaging system can be treated as the approximation of the slow reactions. As an application, we examine the reduction of computation complexity for the gene regulatory networks with two-time scales driven by intrinsic noise. For linear and nonlinear protein production functions, the simulations show that the sample average (expectation) of the limit averaging system is close to that of the slow-reaction process based on the SSA. It demonstrates that the limit averaging system is an efficient approximation of the slow-reaction process in the sense of the weak convergence.

  17. A kinetic model for the metallorganic chemical vapor deposition of CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallotti, C.; Bertani, V.; Masi, M.; Carra, S.

    1999-09-01

    The industrial application of cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconducting layers is still limited by the large amount of defects contained in the films and by the problem of the reproducible control of the level and type of conductivity. Overcoming these difficulties requires a better understanding of the physical and chemical phenomena underlying the deposition process. In particular, in order to improve the quality of the films and to optimize the deposition processes, it is of great importance to understand the elementary kinetic mechanism governing the growth of CdTe. Epitaxial deposition of cadmium telluride through metallorganic chemical vapor deposition was investigated. A detailed elementary kinetic scheme of surface and gas-phase reactions occurring during the deposition process was developed and embedded in a one-dimensional fluid-dynamic model based on the boundary-layer theory. Kinetic constants of gas-phase reactions were either found in the literature or determined through quantum chemistry methods. The most important surface processes were identified and studied through quantum chemistry. Quantum chemistry calculations were performed through the three-parameter Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr hybrid (B3LYP) density functional theory using the 3-21G** basis set. Bond dissociation energies of adsorbed methyl groups were calculated, and according to these data, it was proposed that the growth process proceeds through the adsorption of dimethylcadmium, which successively loses a methyl group to give the adsorbed methylcadmium species. Adsorbed methylcadmium successively reacts with a dimethyltellurium gas-phase molecule to give ethane and methylcadmium telluride, which after the loss of the methyl group becomes part of the film. The effect of the carrier gas on the deposition chemistry was also investigated and a possible reason for the decrease in growth rate observed when the carrier gas is changed from hydrogen to helium was proposed. The productivity of the model

  18. A pressure correction method for the calculation of compressible chemical reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Z. J.; Chen, C. P.; Chen, Y. S.

    1992-01-01

    A recently developed noniterative method for the solution of the transient fluid flow equations at all speed is extended to handle chemical reacting flows. The species conservation equations are loosely coupled into the predictor/multicorrector sequence of the solution procedure. A split-operator method separates the chemical kinetics terms from the fluid-dynamical terms, as well as an implicit differencing method enhance the numerical stability. The method was applied for turbulent diffusion flame calculations and for the analyses of high pressure, axisymmetric turbulent hypersonic nozzle flows. The diffusion flame results were compared with a similar pressure method for fast chemistry integration scheme without operator-splitting. Simulations of the nozzle flow indicated that the nonideal intermolecular effects must be included in the analysis and design of high pressure hypersonic nozzle.

  19. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation of Navy Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect

    S. LeStrange

    1999-11-15

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Waste Package Operations of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Navy (Refs. 1 and 2). The Navy SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. For some waste packages, the containment may breach (Ref. 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the waste package may moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the waste package. The water may gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers out of the waste package. In addition, the accumulation of silica (SiO{sub 2}) in the waste package over time may further affect the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages containing the Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) II inner shell, Navy canister, and basket components. The calculations do not include the Navy SNF in the waste package. The specific study objectives were to determine the chemical composition of the water and the quantity of silicon (Si) and other solid corrosion products in the waste package during the first million years after the waste package is breached. The results of this calculation will be used to ensure that the type and amount of criticality control material used in the waste package design will prevent criticality.

  20. Propene oxidation at low and intermediate temperatures: A detailed chemical kinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Wilk, R.D.; Cernansky, N.P.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1987-03-24

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for propene oxidation is developed and used to model reactions in a static reactor at temperatures of 575-715 K, equivalence ratios of 0.8 - 2.0, and a pressure of 600 torr. Modeling of hydrocarbon oxidation in this temperature range is important for the validation of detailed models to be used for performing calculations related to automotive engine knock. The model predicted induction periods and species concentrations for all the species and all conditions measured experimentally in the static reactor. Overall, the calculated concentrations of carbon monoxide, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and propane oxide agreed well with those measured. The calculated concentrations of ethane are low compared to the experimental measurements, and the calculated concentrations of formaldehyde are high. Agreement for concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, and methanol is mixed. The characteristic s-shape of the fuel concentration history is well predicted. Modeling calculations identified some of the key reaction steps at the present conditions. Addition of OH to propene and H atom abstraction by OH from propene are important steps in determining the subsequent distributions of intermediate products, such as acetaldehyde, acrolein and formaldehyde. Allyl radicals are very abundant in propene oxidation, and the primary steps found to be responsible for their consumption are reaction with CH/sub 3/O/sub 2/ and HO/sub 2/. 37 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Propene oxidation at low and intermediate temperatures: A detailed chemical kinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Wilk, R.D.; Gernansky, N.P.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for propene oxidation is developed and used to model reactions in a static reactor at temperatures of 575-715 K, equivalence ratios of 0.8 - 2.0, and a pressure of 600 torr. Modeling of hydrocarbon oxidation in this temperature range is important for the validation of detailed models to be used for performing calculations related to automotive engine knock. The model predicted induction periods and species concentrations for all the species and all conditions measured experimentally in the static reactor. Overall, the calculated concentrations of carbon monoxide, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and propene oxide agreed well with those measured. The calculated concentrations of ethene are low compared to the experimental measurements, and the calculated concentrations of formaldehyde are high. Agreement for concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, and methanol is mixed. The characteristic s-shape of the fuel concentration history is well predicted. Modeling calculations identified some of the key reaction steps at the present conditions. Addition of OH to propene and H atom abstraction by OH from propene are important steps in determining the subsequent distributions of intermediate products, such as acetaldehyde, acrolein and formaldehyde. Allyl radicals are very abundant in propene oxidation, and the primary steps found to be responsible for their consumption are reaction with CH/sub 3/O/sub 2/ and HO/sub 2/.

  2. Innovative Laser Techniques in Chemical Kinetics: A Pedagogical Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalenko, Laurie J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    Considers two types of laser applications in kinetics. Explores short laser pulses to prepare a reactant in a known state and a continuous laser as a probe to monitor specific species in a reaction. Describes how lasers work and provides several examples of kinetic reactions. (ML)

  3. Application of Chemical Kinetics to Deterioration of Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labuza, T. P.

    1984-01-01

    Possible modes of food deterioration (such as microbial decay, nonenzymatic browning, senescence, lipid oxidation) are reviewed. A basic mathematical approach to the kinetics of food deterioration, kinetic approach to accelerating shelf-life deterioration, and shelf-life predictions are discussed. (JN)

  4. Chemical kinetic simulation of kerosene combustion in an individual flame tube

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wen; Liang, Shuang; Li, Hai-xia; Ma, Hong-an

    2013-01-01

    The use of detailed chemical reaction mechanisms of kerosene is still very limited in analyzing the combustion process in the combustion chamber of the aircraft engine. In this work, a new reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for fuel n-decane, which selected as a surrogate fuel for kerosene, containing 210 elemental reactions (including 92 reversible reactions and 26 irreversible reactions) and 50 species was developed, and the ignition and combustion characteristics of this fuel in both shock tube and flat-flame burner were kinetic simulated using this reduced reaction mechanism. Moreover, the computed results were validated by experimental data. The calculated values of ignition delay times at pressures of 12, 50 bar and equivalence ratio is 1.0, 2.0, respectively, and the main reactants and main products mole fractions using this reduced reaction mechanism agree well with experimental data. The combustion processes in the individual flame tube of a heavy duty gas turbine combustor were simulated by coupling this reduced reaction mechanism of surrogate fuel n-decane and one step reaction mechanism of surrogate fuel C12H23 into the computational fluid dynamics software. It was found that this reduced reaction mechanism is shown clear advantages in simulating the ignition and combustion processes in the individual flame tube over the one step reaction mechanism. PMID:25685503

  5. Chemical kinetic simulation of kerosene combustion in an individual flame tube.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wen; Liang, Shuang; Li, Hai-Xia; Ma, Hong-An

    2014-05-01

    The use of detailed chemical reaction mechanisms of kerosene is still very limited in analyzing the combustion process in the combustion chamber of the aircraft engine. In this work, a new reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for fuel n-decane, which selected as a surrogate fuel for kerosene, containing 210 elemental reactions (including 92 reversible reactions and 26 irreversible reactions) and 50 species was developed, and the ignition and combustion characteristics of this fuel in both shock tube and flat-flame burner were kinetic simulated using this reduced reaction mechanism. Moreover, the computed results were validated by experimental data. The calculated values of ignition delay times at pressures of 12, 50 bar and equivalence ratio is 1.0, 2.0, respectively, and the main reactants and main products mole fractions using this reduced reaction mechanism agree well with experimental data. The combustion processes in the individual flame tube of a heavy duty gas turbine combustor were simulated by coupling this reduced reaction mechanism of surrogate fuel n-decane and one step reaction mechanism of surrogate fuel C12H23 into the computational fluid dynamics software. It was found that this reduced reaction mechanism is shown clear advantages in simulating the ignition and combustion processes in the individual flame tube over the one step reaction mechanism. PMID:25685503

  6. Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Dooley, S; Westbrook, C K

    2008-05-29

    Detailed kinetic models of pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels are nowadays widely used in the design of internal combustion engines and these models are effectively applied to help meet the increasingly stringent environmental and energetic standards. In previous studies by the combustion community, such models not only contributed to the understanding of pure component combustion, but also provided a deeper insight into the combustion behavior of complex mixtures. One of the major challenges in this field is now the definition and the development of appropriate surrogate models able to mimic the actual features of real fuels. Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. Their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. Aside the most commonly used surrogates containing iso-octane and n-heptane only, the so called Primary Reference Fuels (PRF), new mixtures have recently been suggested to extend the reference components in surrogate mixtures to also include alkenes and aromatics. It is generally agreed that, including representative species for all the main classes of hydrocarbons which can be found in real fuels, it is possible to reproduce very effectively in a wide range of operating conditions not just the auto-ignition propensity of gasoline or Diesel fuels, but also their physical properties and their combustion residuals [1]. In this work, the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation is computationally examined. The attention is focused on the autoignition of iso-octane, hexene and their mixtures. Some important issues relevant to the experimental and modeling investigation of such fuels are discussed with the help of rapid compression machine data and calculations. Following the model validation, the behavior of mixtures is discussed on the

  7. A Shock Tube and Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of the Oxidation of 2,5-Dimethylfuran

    PubMed Central

    Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Wang, Weijing; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed kinetic model describing the oxidation of 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF), a potential second-generation biofuel, is proposed. The kinetic model is based upon quantum chemical calculations for the initial DMF consumption reactions and important reactions of intermediates. The model is validated by comparison to new DMF shock tube ignition delay time measurements (over the temperature range 1300 – 1831 K and at nominal pressures of 1 and 4 bar) and the DMF pyrolysis speciation measurements of Lifshitz et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 102 (52) (1998) 10655-10670] Globally, modeling predictions are in good agreement with the considered experimental targets. In particular, ignition delay times are predicted well by the new model, with model experiment deviations of at most a factor of two, and DMF pyrolysis conversion is predicted well, to within experimental scatter of the Lifshitz et al. data. Additionally, comparisons of measured and model predicted pyrolysis speciation provides validation of theoretically calculated channels for the oxidation of DMF. Sensitivity and reaction flux analyses highlight important reactions as well as the primary reaction pathways responsible for the decomposition of DMF and formation and destruction of key intermediate and product species. PMID:23327724

  8. Spectroscopic analysis of cinnamic acid using quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, K. S.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, FT-IR, FT-Raman, 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectra for cinnamic acid have been recorded for the vibrational and spectroscopic analysis. The observed fundamental frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The computed frequencies and optimized parameters have been calculated by using HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods and the corresponding results are tabulated. On the basis of the comparison between computed and experimental results assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes are examined. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The alternation of the vibration pattern of the pedestal molecule related to the substitutions was analyzed. The 13C and 1H NMR spectra have been recorded and the chemical shifts have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Mulliken charges, UV spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis of have been calculated and reported. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was constructed.

  9. Spectroscopic analysis of cinnamic acid using quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Vinod, K S; Periandy, S; Govindarajan, M

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, FT-IR, FT-Raman, (13)C NMR and (1)H NMR spectra for cinnamic acid have been recorded for the vibrational and spectroscopic analysis. The observed fundamental frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The computed frequencies and optimized parameters have been calculated by using HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods and the corresponding results are tabulated. On the basis of the comparison between computed and experimental results assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes are examined. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The alternation of the vibration pattern of the pedestal molecule related to the substitutions was analyzed. The (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra have been recorded and the chemical shifts have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Mulliken charges, UV spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis of have been calculated and reported. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was constructed.

  10. The pyrolysis of 2-methylfuran: a quantum chemical, statistical rate theory and kinetic modelling study.

    PubMed

    Somers, Kieran P; Simmie, John M; Metcalfe, Wayne K; Curran, Henry J

    2014-03-21

    Due to the rapidly growing interest in the use of biomass derived furanic compounds as potential platform chemicals and fossil fuel replacements, there is a simultaneous need to understand the pyrolysis and combustion properties of such molecules. To this end, the potential energy surfaces for the pyrolysis relevant reactions of the biofuel candidate 2-methylfuran have been characterized using quantum chemical methods (CBS-QB3, CBS-APNO and G3). Canonical transition state theory is employed to determine the high-pressure limiting kinetics, k(T), of elementary reactions. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory with an energy grained master equation is used to compute pressure-dependent rate constants, k(T,p), and product branching fractions for the multiple-well, multiple-channel reaction pathways which typify the pyrolysis reactions of the title species. The unimolecular decomposition of 2-methylfuran is shown to proceed via hydrogen atom transfer reactions through singlet carbene intermediates which readily undergo ring opening to form collisionally stabilised acyclic C5H6O isomers before further decomposition to C1-C4 species. Rate constants for abstraction by the hydrogen atom and methyl radical are reported, with abstraction from the alkyl side chain calculated to dominate. The fate of the primary abstraction product, 2-furanylmethyl radical, is shown to be thermal decomposition to the n-butadienyl radical and carbon monoxide through a series of ring opening and hydrogen atom transfer reactions. The dominant bimolecular products of hydrogen atom addition reactions are found to be furan and methyl radical, 1-butene-1-yl radical and carbon monoxide and vinyl ketene and methyl radical. A kinetic mechanism is assembled with computer simulations in good agreement with shock tube speciation profiles taken from the literature. The kinetic mechanism developed herein can be used in future chemical kinetic modelling studies on the pyrolysis and oxidation of 2-methylfuran

  11. Numerical simulation of Jet-A combustion approximated by improved propane chemical kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ying, Shuh-Jing; Nguyen, Hung Lee

    1991-01-01

    Through the effort devoted to the chemical kinetics for propane air combustion, three mechanisms are developed. The full mechanism consists of 131 reactions. This mechanism is used as a guide for the evaluation of other mechanisms, but because of the long expected cpu time, it is not to be incorporated into the computer code KIVA-II for actual simulation. Through the sensitivity analysis, a reduced mechanism of 45 reactions is produced. But the calculated results from the 45 reaction mechanism are always low in temperature. Some efforts are devoted to correct this situation and details are included in this report. A simplified mechanism of reactions is successfully improved and computed results are compared with experimental data. Contour plots of physical parameters and species concentrations and results for emission indices of CO and NOx are presented.

  12. Chemical TOPAZ: Modifications to the heat transfer code TOPAZ: The addition of chemical reaction kinetics and chemical mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A.L. III.

    1990-06-07

    This is a report describing the modifications which have been made to the heat flow code TOPAZ to allow the inclusion of thermally controlled chemical kinetics. This report is broken into parts. The first part is an introduction to the general assumptions and theoretical underpinning that were used to develop the model. The second section describes the changes that have been implemented into the code. The third section is the users manual for the input for the code. The fourth section is a compilation of hints, common errors, and things to be aware of while you are getting started. The fifth section gives a sample problem using the new code. This manual addenda is written with the presumption that most readers are not fluent with chemical concepts. Therefore, we shall in this section endeavor to describe the requirements that must be met before chemistry can occur and how we have modeled the chemistry in the code.

  13. A generalized Fisher equation and its utility in chemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ross, John; Fernández Villaverde, Alejandro; Banga, Julio R; Vázquez, Sara; Morán, Federico

    2010-07-20

    A generalized Fisher equation (GFE) relates the time derivative of the average of the intrinsic rate of growth to its variance. The GFE is an exact mathematical result that has been widely used in population dynamics and genetics, where it originated. Here we demonstrate that the GFE can also be useful in other fields, specifically in chemistry, with models of two chemical reaction systems for which the mechanisms and rate coefficients correspond reasonably well to experiments. A bad fit of the GFE can be a sign of high levels of measurement noise; for low or moderate levels of noise, fulfillment of the GFE is not degraded. Hence, the GFE presents a noise threshold that may be used to test the validity of experimental measurements without requiring any additional information. In a different approach information about the system (model) is included in the calculations. In that case, the discrepancy with the GFE can be used as an optimization criterion for the determination of rate coefficients in a given reaction mechanism.

  14. Recent Advances in Detailed Chemical Kinetic Models for Large Hydrocarbon and Biodiesel Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Herbinet, O; Mehl, M

    2009-03-30

    n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for these two primary reference fuels for diesel, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Also, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. Methyl decanoate and methyl stearate are large methyl esters that are closely related to biodiesel fuels, and kinetic models for these molecules have also been developed. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the fuel molecule size and structure on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  15. CHEMSODE: A stiff ODE solver for the equations of chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Aro, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the CHEMSODE package: a collection of FORTRAN subroutines for the automatic integration of systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) arising in atmospheric chemical kinetics. The mathematical basis and code are presented here.

  16. Chemical kinetics parameters and model validation for the gasification of PCEA nuclear graphite

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, Mohamed S; Tournier, Jean-Michel; Contescu, Cristian I

    2014-01-01

    A series of gasification experiments, using two right cylinder specimens (~ 12.7 x 25.4 mm and 25.4 x 25.4 mm) of PCEA nuclear graphite in ambient airflow, measured the total gasification flux at weight losses up to 41.5% and temperatures (893-1015 K) characteristics of those for in-pores gasification Mode (a) and in-pores diffusion-limited Mode (b). The chemical kinetics parameters for the gasification of PCEA graphite are determined using a multi-parameters optimization algorithm from the measurements of the total gasification rate and transient weight loss in experiments. These parameters are: (i) the pre-exponential rate coefficients and the Gaussian distributions and values of specific activation energies for adsorption of oxygen and desorption of CO gas; (ii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential rate coefficient for the breakup of stable un-dissociated C(O2) oxygen radicals to form stable (CO) complexes; (iii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential coefficient for desorption of CO2 gas and; (iv) the initial surface area of reactive free sites per unit mass. This area is consistently 13.5% higher than that for nuclear graphite grades of NBG-25 and IG-110 and decreases inversely proportional with the square root of the initial mass of the graphite specimens in the experiments. Experimental measurements successfully validate the chemical-reactions kinetics model that calculates continuous Arrhenius curves of the total gasification flux and the production rates of CO and CO2 gases. The model results at different total weight losses agree well with measurements and expand beyond the temperatures in the experiments to the diffusion-limited mode of gasification. Also calculated are the production rates of CO and CO2 gases and their relative contributions to the total gasification rate in the experiments as functions of temperature, for total weight losses of 5% and 10%.

  17. Chemical kinetics parameters and model validation for the gasification of PCEA nuclear graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel P.; Contescu, Cristian I.

    2014-01-01

    A series of gasification experiments, using two right cylinder specimens (∼12.7 × 25.4 mm and 25.4 × 25.4 mm) of PCEA nuclear graphite in ambient airflow, measured the total gasification flux at weight losses up to 41.5% and temperatures (893-1015 K) characteristics of those for in-pores gasification Mode (a) and in-pores diffusion-limited Mode (b). The chemical kinetics parameters for the gasification of PCEA graphite are determined using a multi-parameters optimization algorithm from the measurements of the total gasification rate and transient weight loss in experiments. These parameters are: (i) the pre-exponential rate coefficients and the Gaussian distributions and values of specific activation energies for adsorption of oxygen and desorption of CO gas; (ii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential rate coefficient for the breakup of stable un-dissociated C(O2) oxygen radicals to form stable (CO) complexes; (iii) the specific activation energy and pre-exponential coefficient for desorption of CO2 gas and; (iv) the initial surface area of reactive free sites per unit mass. This area is consistently 13.5% higher than that for nuclear graphite grades of NBG-25 and IG-110 and decreases inversely proportional with the square root of the initial mass of the graphite specimens in the experiments. Experimental measurements successfully validate the chemical-reactions kinetics model that calculates continuous Arrhenius curves of the total gasification flux and the production rates of CO and CO2 gases. The model results at different total weight losses agree well with measurements and expand beyond the temperatures in the experiments to the diffusion-limited mode of gasification. Also calculated are the production rates of CO and CO2 gases and their relative contributions to the total gasification rate in the experiments as functions of temperature, for total weight losses of 5% and 10%.

  18. Spectroscopic, quantum chemical calculation and molecular docking of dipfluzine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Karnica; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Sinha, Kirti; Wang, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Molecular structure and vibrational analysis of dipfluzine (C27H29FN2O) were presented using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The theoretical ground state geometry and electronic structure of dipfluzine are optimized by the DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) method and compared with those of the crystal data. The 1D potential energy scan was performed by varying the dihedral angle using B3LYP functional at 6-31G(d,p) level of theory and thus the most stable conformer of the compound were determined. Molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPS), frontier orbital analysis and electronic reactivity descriptor were used to predict the chemical reactivity of molecule. Energies of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds in molecule and their electronic aspects were investigated by natural bond orbital (NBO). To find out the anti-apoptotic activity of the title compound molecular docking studies have been performed against protein Fas.

  19. Testing for supply-limited and kinetic-limited chemical erosion in field measurements of regolith production and chemical depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, Ken L.; Riebe, Clifford S.; Jesse Hahm, W.

    2016-06-01

    Chemical erosion contributes solutes to oceans, influencing atmospheric CO2 and thus global climate via the greenhouse effect. Quantifying how chemical erosion rates vary with climate and tectonics is therefore vital to understanding feedbacks that have maintained Earth's environment within a habitable range over geologic time. If chemical erosion rates are strongly influenced by the availability of fresh minerals for dissolution, then there should be strong connections between climate, which is modulated by chemical erosion, and tectonic uplift, which supplies fresh minerals to Earth's surface. This condition, referred to as supply-limited chemical erosion, implies strong tectonic control of chemical erosion rates. It differs from kinetic-limited chemical erosion, in which dissolution kinetics and thus climatic factors are the dominant regulators of chemical erosion rates. Here we present a statistical method for determining whether chemical erosion of silicate-rich bedrock is supply limited or kinetic limited, as an approach for revealing the relative importance of tectonics and climate in Earth's silicate weathering thermostat. We applied this method to published data sets of mineral supply rates and regolith chemical depletion and were unable to reject the null hypothesis that chemical erosion is supply limited in 8 of 16 cases. In seven of the remaining eight cases, we found behavior that is closer to supply limited than kinetic limited, suggesting that tectonics may often dominate over climate in regulating chemical erosion rates. However, statistical power analysis shows that new measurements across a wider range of supply rates are needed to help quantify feedbacks between climate and tectonics in Earth's long-term climatic evolution.

  20. Dominant particles and reactions in a two-temperature chemical kinetic model of a decaying SF6 arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Gao, Qingqing; Fu, Yuwei; Yang, Aijun; Rong, Mingzhe; Wu, Yi; Niu, Chunping; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the computation of the non-equilibrium composition of an SF6 plasma, and determination of the dominant particles and reactions, at conditions relevant to high-voltage circuit breakers after current zero (temperatures from 12 000 K to 1000 K and a pressure of 4 atm). The non-equilibrium composition is characterized by departures from both thermal and chemical equilibrium. In thermal non-equilibrium process, the electron temperature (T e) is not equal to the heavy-particle temperature (T h), while for chemical non-equilibrium, a chemical kinetic model is adopted. In order to evaluate the reasonableness and reliability of the non-equilibrium composition, calculation methods for equilibrium composition based on Gibbs free energy minimization and kinetic composition in a one-temperature kinetic model are first considered. Based on the one-temperature kinetic model, a two-temperature kinetic model with the ratio T e/T h varying as a function of the logarithm of electron density ratio (n e/n\\text{e}\\max ) was established. In this model, T* is introduced to allow a smooth transition between T h and T e and to determine the temperatures for the rate constants. The initial composition in the kinetic models is obtained from the asymptotic composition as infinite time is approached at 12 000 K. The molar fractions of neutral particles and ions in the two-temperature kinetic model are consistent with the equilibrium composition and the composition obtained from the one-temperature kinetic model above 10 000 K, while significant differences appear below 10 000 K. Based on the dependence of the particle distributions on temperature in the two-temperature kinetic model, three temperature ranges, and the dominant particles and reactions in the respective ranges, are determined. The full model is then simplified into three models and the accuracy of the simplified models is assessed. The simplified models reduce the number of species and

  1. Mechanistic, kinetic, and processing aspects of tungsten chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, David

    This dissertation presents an investigation into tungsten chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). CMP is the industrially predominant unit operation that removes excess tungsten after non-selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) during sub-micron integrated circuit (IC) manufacture. This work explores the CMP process from process engineering and fundamental mechanistic perspectives. The process engineering study optimized an existing CMP process to address issues of polish pad and wafer carrier life. Polish rates, post-CMP metrology of patterned wafers, electrical test data, and synergy with a thermal endpoint technique were used to determine the optimal process. The oxidation rate of tungsten during CMP is significantly lower than the removal rate under identical conditions. Tungsten polished without inhibition during cathodic potentiostatic control. Hertzian indenter model calculations preclude colloids of the size used in tungsten CMP slurries from indenting the tungsten surface. AFM surface topography maps and TEM images of post-CMP tungsten do not show evidence of plow marks or intergranular fracture. Polish rate is dependent on potassium iodate concentration; process temperature is not. The colloid species significantly affects the polish rate and process temperature. Process temperature is not a predictor of polish rate. A process energy balance indicates that the process temperature is predominantly due to shaft work, and that any heat of reaction evolved during the CMP process is negligible. Friction and adhesion between alumina and tungsten were studied using modified AFM techniques. Friction was constant with potassium iodate concentration, but varied with applied pressure. This corroborates the results from the energy balance. Adhesion between the alumina and the tungsten was proportional to the potassium iodate concentration. A heuristic mechanism, which captures the relationship between polish rate, pressure, velocity, and slurry chemistry, is presented

  2. Chemical kinetic considerations for postflame synthesis of carbon nanotubes in premixed flames using a support catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Gopinath, Prarthana; Gore, Jay

    2007-11-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a grid supported cobalt nanocatalyst were grown, by exposing it to combustion gases from ethylene/air rich premixed flames. Ten equivalence ratios ({phi}) were investigated, as follows: 1.37, 1.44, 1.47, 1.50, 1.55, 1.57, 1.62, 1.75, 1.82, and 1.91. MWCNT growth could be observed for the range of equivalence ratios between 1.45 and 1.75, with the best yield restricted to the range 1.5-1.6. A one-dimensional premixed flame code with a postflame heat loss model, including detailed chemistry, was used to estimate the gas phase chemical composition that favors MWCNT growth. The results of the calculations show that the mixture, including the water gas shift reaction, is not even in partial chemical equilibrium. Therefore, past discussions of compositional parameters that relate to optimum carbon nanotube (CNT) growth are revised to include chemical kinetic effects. Specifically, rapid departures of the water gas shift reaction from partial equilibrium and changes in mole fraction ratios of unburned C{sub 2} hydrocarbons to hydrogen correlate well with experimentally observed CNT yields. (author)

  3. Leaching Kinetics of Atrazine and Inorganic Chemicals in Tilled and Orchard Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajdak, Lech W.; Lipiec, Jerzy; Siczek, Anna; Nosalewicz, Artur; Majewska, Urszula

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to verify first-order kinetic reaction rate model performance in predicting of leaching of atrazine and inorganic compounds (K+1, Fe+3, Mg+2, Mn+2, NH4 +, NO3 - and PO4 -3) from tilled and orchard silty loam soils. This model provided an excellent fit to the experimental concentration changes of the compounds vs. time data during leaching. Calculated values of the first-order reaction rate constants for the changes of all chemicals were from 3.8 to 19.0 times higher in orchard than in tilled soil. Higher first-order reaction constants for orchard than tilled soil correspond with both higher total porosity and contribution of biological pores in the former. The first order reaction constants for the leaching of chemical compounds enables prediction of the actual compound concentration and the interactions between compound and soil as affected by management system. The study demonstrates the effectiveness of simultaneous chemical and physical analyses as a tool for the understanding of leaching in variously managed soils.

  4. Critical evaluation of Jet-A spray combustion using propane chemical kinetics in gas turbine combustion simulated by KIVA-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Ying, S.-J.

    1990-01-01

    Jet-A spray combustion has been evaluated in gas turbine combustion with the use of propane chemical kinetics as the first approximation for the chemical reactions. Here, the numerical solutions are obtained by using the KIVA-2 computer code. The KIVA-2 code is the most developed of the available multidimensional combustion computer programs for application of the in-cylinder combustion dynamics of internal combustion engines. The released version of KIVA-2 assumes that 12 chemical species are present; the code uses an Arrhenius kinetic-controlled combustion model governed by a four-step global chemical reaction and six equilibrium reactions. Researchers efforts involve the addition of Jet-A thermophysical properties and the implementation of detailed reaction mechanisms for propane oxidation. Three different detailed reaction mechanism models are considered. The first model consists of 131 reactions and 45 species. This is considered as the full mechanism which is developed through the study of chemical kinetics of propane combustion in an enclosed chamber. The full mechanism is evaluated by comparing calculated ignition delay times with available shock tube data. However, these detailed reactions occupy too much computer memory and CPU time for the computation. Therefore, it only serves as a benchmark case by which to evaluate other simplified models. Two possible simplified models were tested in the existing computer code KIVA-2 for the same conditions as used with the full mechanism. One model is obtained through a sensitivity analysis using LSENS, the general kinetics and sensitivity analysis program code of D. A. Bittker and K. Radhakrishnan. This model consists of 45 chemical reactions and 27 species. The other model is based on the work published by C. K. Westbrook and F. L. Dryer.

  5. Local Dynamics of Chemical Kinetics at Different Phases of Nitriding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, İ. Bedii; Akar, Firat

    2015-08-01

    The local dynamics of chemical kinetics at different phases of the nitriding process have been studied. The calculations are performed under the conditions where the temperature and composition data are provided experimentally from an in-service furnace. Results are presented in temporal variations of gas concentrations and the nitrogen coverage on the surface. It is shown that if it is available in the furnace, the adsorption of the N2 gas can seemingly start at temperatures as low as 200 °C. However, at such low temperatures, as the diffusion into the material is very unlikely, this results in the surface poisoning. It becomes clear that, contrary to common knowledge, the nitriding heat treatment with ammonia as a nitrogen-providing medium is possible at temperatures like 400 °C. Under these conditions, however, the presence of excess amounts of product gas N2 in the furnace atmosphere suppresses the forward kinetics in the nitriding process. It seems that the best operating point in the nitriding heat treatment is achieved with a mixture of 6% N2. When the major nitriding species NH3 is substituted by N2 and the N2 fraction increases above 30%, the rate of the forward reaction decreases drastically, so that there is no point to continue the furnace operation any further. Hence, during the initial heating phase, the N2 gas must be purged from the furnace to keep its fraction less than 30% before the furnace reaches the temperature where the reaction starts.

  6. A Case Study in Chemical Kinetics: The OH + CO Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Ralph E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews some important properties of the bimolecular reaction between the hydroxyl radical and carbon monoxide. Investigates the kinetics of the reaction, the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate constant, the state-to-state dynamics of the reaction, and the reverse reaction. (MVL)

  7. Clouds Composition in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Mbarek, Rostom

    2015-12-01

    Attempts to determine the composition of super-Earth atmospheres have so far been plagued by the presence of clouds. Yet the theoretical framework to understand these clouds is still in its infancy. For the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b, KCl, Na2S, and ZnS have been proposed as condensates that would form under the condition of chemical equilibrium, if the planet’s atmosphere has a bulk composition near solar. Condensation chemistry calculations have not been presented for a wider range of atmospheric bulk composition that is to be expected for super-Earth exoplanets. Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds in atmospheres of varied composition by determining which condensates are likely to form, under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We model super-Earth atmospheres assuming they are formed by degassing of volatiles from a solid planetary core of chondritic material. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temperature range of 350-3,000 K. Clouds should form along the temperature-pressure boundaries where the condensed species appear in our calculations. The super-Earth atmospheres that we study range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both sub-solar and super-solar, thereby spanning a diverse range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Some condensates appear across all of our models. However, the majority of condensed species appear only over specific ranges of H:O and C:O ratios. We find that for GJ 1214b, KCl is the primary cloud-forming condensate at solar composition, in agreement with previous work. However, for oxidizing atmospheres, where H:O is less than unity, K2SO4 clouds form instead. For carbon-rich atmospheres with super-solar C:O ratios, graphite clouds additionally appear. At

  8. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Incineration of Organophosphorus and Fluoro-Organophosphorus Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Glaude, P A; Melius, C; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2001-12-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed to describe incineration of the chemical warfare nerve agent sarin (GB), based on commonly used principles of bond additivity and hierarchical reaction mechanisms. The mechanism is based on previous kinetic models of organophosphorus compounds such as TMP, DMMP and DIMP that are often used as surrogates to predict incineration of GB. Kinetic models of the three surrogates and GB are then used to predict their consumption in a perfectly stirred reactor fueled by natural gas to simulate incineration of these chemicals. Computed results indicate that DIMP is the only one of these surrogates that adequately describes combustion of GB under comparable conditions. The kinetic pathways responsible for these differences in reactivity are identified and discussed. The most important reaction in GB and DIMP that makes them more reactive than TMP or DMMP is found to be a six-center molecular elimination reaction producing propene.

  9. Solutions of the chemical kinetic equations for initially inhomogeneous mixtures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilst, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Following the recent discussions by O'Brien (1971) and Donaldson and Hilst (1972) of the effects of inhomogeneous mixing and turbulent diffusion on simple chemical reaction rates, the present report provides a more extensive analysis of when inhomogeneous mixing has a significant effect on chemical reaction rates. The analysis is then extended to the development of an approximate chemical sub-model which provides much improved predictions of chemical reaction rates over a wide range of inhomogeneities and pathological distributions of the concentrations of the reacting chemical species. In particular, the development of an approximate representation of the third-order correlations of the joint concentration fluctuations permits closure of the chemical sub-model at the level of the second-order moments of these fluctuations and the mean concentrations.

  10. Optimization of Ethanol Autothermal Reforming Process with Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markova, D.; Valters, K.; Bažbauers, G.

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of carbon formation, hydrogen yield and efficiency of the ethanol autothermal reforming process on critical process factors is studied in the work by using chemical equilibrium calculations with a process simulation model made in the ChemCAD environment. The studied process factors are carbon-to-steam ratio S/C, air-to-fuel ratio λ and temperature in the reactor TATR. Since the goal of the reforming process is to achieve possibly higher values of H2 concentration in the reforming gas, by operating reformer at the maximum efficiency at the same time, the optimization of the reforming process was done by using objective functions which include hydrogen yield and the amount of heat supplied to the process. As a result it was found that the maximum process efficiency, which is defined as the ratio of obtained hydrogen energy to the energy supplied to the process in the studied range of process factors is 0,61, and this value can be achieved at λ value of 0,1, S/C values of 2,5-3 and temperatures in the reactor TATR 680 - 695°C. Hydrogen yield under these conditions is 4,41-4,55 mol/molC2H5OH.

  11. Chemical gas-dynamics beyond Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck's kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, Evgeniy G.; Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2014-12-01

    Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck equation does not give possibility to take into account intermolecular processes such as redistribution of the energy among different degrees of freedom. The modification of the generalized Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck equation including such processes is proposed. It allows to study for instance the kinetics of non-radiative transitions. Limitations of this approach are connected with the requirements of absence of polarization of rotational momentum and phases of intermolecular vibrations.

  12. Chemical gas-dynamics beyond Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck's kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, Evgeniy G.; Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2014-12-09

    Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck equation does not give possibility to take into account intermolecular processes such as redistribution of the energy among different degrees of freedom. The modification of the generalized Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck equation including such processes is proposed. It allows to study for instance the kinetics of non-radiative transitions. Limitations of this approach are connected with the requirements of absence of polarization of rotational momentum and phases of intermolecular vibrations.

  13. General chemical kinetics computer program for static and flow reactions, with application to combustion and shock-tube kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Scullin, V. J.

    1972-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics program is described for complex, homogeneous ideal-gas reactions in any chemical system. Its main features are flexibility and convenience in treating many different reaction conditions. The program solves numerically the differential equations describing complex reaction in either a static system or one-dimensional inviscid flow. Applications include ignition and combustion, shock wave reactions, and general reactions in a flowing or static system. An implicit numerical solution method is used which works efficiently for the extreme conditions of a very slow or a very fast reaction. The theory is described, and the computer program and users' manual are included.

  14. Atmospheric chemical reactions of monoethanolamine initiated by OH radical: mechanistic and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-Bin; Li, Chao; He, Ning; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Shaowen; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    Monoethanolamine (MEA) is a benchmark and widely utilized solvent in amine-based postcombustion CO2 capture (PCCC), a leading technology for reducing CO2 emission from fossil fuel power plants. The large-scale implementation of PCCC would lead to inevitable discharges of amines to the atmosphere. Therefore, understanding the kinetics and mechanisms of the transformation of representative amine MEA in the atmosphere is of great significance for risk assessment of the amine-based PCCC. In this study, the H-abstraction reaction of MEA with ·OH, and ensuing reactions of produced MEA-radicals, including isomerization, dissociation, and bimolecular reaction MEA-radicals+O2, were investigated by quantum chemical calculation [M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p)] and kinetic modeling. The calculated overall rate constant [(7.27 × 10(-11)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)] for H-abstraction is in excellent agreement with the experimental value [(7.02 ± 0.46) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)]. The results show that the product branching ratio of NH2CH2 · CHOH (MEA-β) (43%) is higher than that of NH2 · CHCH2OH (MEA-α) (39%), clarifying that MEA-α is not an exclusive product. On the basis of the unveiled reaction mechanisms of MEA-radicals + O2, the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry signal (m/z 60.044), not recognized in the experiment, was identified.

  15. Atmospheric chemical reactions of monoethanolamine initiated by OH radical: mechanistic and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-Bin; Li, Chao; He, Ning; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Shaowen; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    Monoethanolamine (MEA) is a benchmark and widely utilized solvent in amine-based postcombustion CO2 capture (PCCC), a leading technology for reducing CO2 emission from fossil fuel power plants. The large-scale implementation of PCCC would lead to inevitable discharges of amines to the atmosphere. Therefore, understanding the kinetics and mechanisms of the transformation of representative amine MEA in the atmosphere is of great significance for risk assessment of the amine-based PCCC. In this study, the H-abstraction reaction of MEA with ·OH, and ensuing reactions of produced MEA-radicals, including isomerization, dissociation, and bimolecular reaction MEA-radicals+O2, were investigated by quantum chemical calculation [M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p)] and kinetic modeling. The calculated overall rate constant [(7.27 × 10(-11)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)] for H-abstraction is in excellent agreement with the experimental value [(7.02 ± 0.46) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)]. The results show that the product branching ratio of NH2CH2 · CHOH (MEA-β) (43%) is higher than that of NH2 · CHCH2OH (MEA-α) (39%), clarifying that MEA-α is not an exclusive product. On the basis of the unveiled reaction mechanisms of MEA-radicals + O2, the proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry signal (m/z 60.044), not recognized in the experiment, was identified. PMID:24438015

  16. Improved kinetic neoclassical transport calculation for a low-collisionality QH-mode pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, D. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; deGrassie, J. S.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Hager, R.

    2016-08-01

    The role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL) structure in an ELM-free QH-mode discharge on DIII-D is explored using XGC0, a 5D full-f multi-species particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. The work in this paper builds on previous work aimed at achieving quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles. Improved quantitative agreement is achieved by performing the calculations with a more realistic electron mass, larger neutral density and including finite-Larmor-radius corrections self-consistently in the drift-kinetic motion of the particles. Consequently, the simulations provide stronger evidence that the radial electric field ({{E}\\text{r}} ) in the pedestal is primarily established by the required balance between the loss of high-energy tail main ions against a pinch of colder main ions and impurities. The kinetic loss of a small population of ions carrying a large proportion of energy and momentum leads to a separation of the particle and energy transport rates and introduces a source of intrinsic edge torque. Ion orbit loss and finite orbit width effects drive the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describe the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the {{T}i} profile.

  17. Dynamics and Kinetics Study of "In-Water" Chemical Reactions by Enhanced Sampling of Reactive Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Y Isaac; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-11-12

    High potential energy barriers and engagement of solvent coordinates set challenges for in silico studies of chemical reactions, and one is quite commonly limited to study reactions along predefined reaction coordinate(s). A systematic protocol, QM/MM MD simulations using enhanced sampling of reactive trajectories (ESoRT), is established to quantitatively study chemical transitions in complex systems. A number of trajectories for Claisen rearrangement in water and toluene were collected and analyzed, respectively. Evidence was found that the bond making and breaking during this reaction are concerted processes in solutions, preferentially through a chairlike configuration. Water plays an important dynamic role that helps stabilize the transition sate, and the dipole-dipole interaction between water and the solute also lowers the transition barrier. The calculated rate coefficient is consistent with the experimental measurement. Compared with water, the reaction pathway in toluene is "narrower" and the reaction rate is slower by almost three orders of magnitude due to the absence of proper interactions to stabilize the transition state. This study suggests that the "in-water" nature of the Claisen rearrangement in aqueous solution influences its thermodynamics, kinetics, as well as dynamics.

  18. Uncovering Oscillations, Complexity, and Chaos in Chemical Kinetics Using Mathematica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, M. M. C.; Ferreira, W. C., Jr.; Lino, A. C. S.; Porto, M. E. G.

    1999-06-01

    Unlike reactions with no peculiar temporal behavior, in oscillatory reactions concentrations can rise and fall spontaneously in a cyclic or disorganized fashion. In this article, the software Mathematica is used for a theoretical study of kinetic mechanisms of oscillating and chaotic reactions. A first simple example is introduced through a three-step reaction, called the Lotka model, which exhibits a temporal behavior characterized by damped oscillations. The phase plane method of dynamic systems theory is introduced for a geometric interpretation of the reaction kinetics without solving the differential rate equations. The equations are later numerically solved using the built-in routine NDSolve and the results are plotted. The next example, still with a very simple mechanism, is the Lotka-Volterra model reaction, which oscillates indefinitely. The kinetic process and rate equations are also represented by a three-step reaction mechanism. The most important difference between this and the former reaction is that the undamped oscillation has two autocatalytic steps instead of one. The periods of oscillations are obtained by using the discrete Fourier transform (DFT)-a well-known tool in spectroscopy, although not so common in this context. In the last section, it is shown how a simple model of biochemical interactions can be useful to understand the complex behavior of important biological systems. The model consists of two allosteric enzymes coupled in series and activated by its own products. This reaction scheme is important for explaining many metabolic mechanisms, such as the glycolytic oscillations in muscles, yeast glycolysis, and the periodic synthesis of cyclic AMP. A few of many possible dynamic behaviors are exemplified through a prototype glycolytic enzymatic reaction proposed by Decroly and Goldbeter. By simply modifying the initial concentrations, limit cycles, chaos, and birhythmicity are computationally obtained and visualized.

  19. Validity conditions for moment closure approximations in stochastic chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Schnoerr, David; Sanguinetti, Guido; Grima, Ramon

    2014-08-28

    Approximations based on moment-closure (MA) are commonly used to obtain estimates of the mean molecule numbers and of the variance of fluctuations in the number of molecules of chemical systems. The advantage of this approach is that it can be far less computationally expensive than exact stochastic simulations of the chemical master equation. Here, we numerically study the conditions under which the MA equations yield results reflecting the true stochastic dynamics of the system. We show that for bistable and oscillatory chemical systems with deterministic initial conditions, the solution of the MA equations can be interpreted as a valid approximation to the true moments of the chemical master equation, only when the steady-state mean molecule numbers obtained from the chemical master equation fall within a certain finite range. The same validity criterion for monostable systems implies that the steady-state mean molecule numbers obtained from the chemical master equation must be above a certain threshold. For mean molecule numbers outside of this range of validity, the MA equations lead to either qualitatively wrong oscillatory dynamics or to unphysical predictions such as negative variances in the molecule numbers or multiple steady-state moments of the stationary distribution as the initial conditions are varied. Our results clarify the range of validity of the MA approach and show that pitfalls in the interpretation of the results can only be overcome through the systematic comparison of the solutions of the MA equations of a certain order with those of higher orders.

  20. Chemical Kinetics in Support of Syngas Turbine Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Dryer, Frederick

    2007-07-31

    This document is the final report on an overall program formulated to extend our prior work in developing and validating kinetic models for the CO/hydrogen/oxygen reaction by carefully analyzing the individual and interactive behavior of specific elementary and subsets of elementary reactions at conditions of interest to syngas combustion in gas turbines. A summary of the tasks performed under this work are: 1. Determine experimentally the third body efficiencies in H+O{sub 2}+M = HO{sub 2}+M (R1) for CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. 2. Using published literature data and the results in this program, further develop the present H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent and CO/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent mechanisms for dilution with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} through comparisons with new experimental validation targets for H{sub 2}-CO-O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} reaction kinetics in the presence of significant diluent fractions of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}O, at high pressures. (task amplified to especially address ignition delay issues, see below). 3. Analyze and demonstrate issues related to NOx interactions with syngas combustion chemistry (task amplified to include interactions of iron pentacarbonyl with syngas combustion chemistry, see below). 4. Publish results, including updated syngas kinetic model. Results are summarized in this document and its appendices. Three archival papers which contain a majority of the research results have appeared. Those results not published elsewhere are highlighted here, and will appear as part of future publications. Portions of the work appearing in the above publications were also supported in part by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER-13503. As a result of and during the research under the present contract, we became aware of other reported results that revealed substantial differences between experimental characterizations of ignition delays for syngas mixtures and ignition delay predictions based upon homogenous kinetic modeling. We

  1. Clouds in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbarek, Rostom; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have unequivocally proven the existence of clouds in super-Earth atmospheres. Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds by determining which condensates are likely to form under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We study super-Earth atmospheres of diverse bulk composition, which are assumed to form by outgassing from a solid core of chondritic material, following Schaefer & Fegley. The super-Earth atmospheres that we study arise from planetary cores made up of individual types of chondritic meteorites. They range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both sub-solar and super-solar, thereby spanning a range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of formation for over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temperature range of 350-3000 K. Clouds should form along the temperature-pressure boundaries where the condensed species appear in our calculation. We find that the composition of condensate clouds depends strongly on both the H:O and C:O ratios. For the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b, KCl and ZnS are the primary cloud-forming condensates at solar composition, in agreement with previous work. However, for oxidizing atmospheres, K2SO4 and ZnO condensates are favored instead, and for carbon-rich atmospheres with super-solar C:O ratios, graphite clouds appear. For even hotter planets, clouds form from a wide variety of rock-forming and metallic species.

  2. Clouds in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbarek, Rostom; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have unequivocally proven the existence of clouds in super-Earth atmospheres. Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds by determining which condensates are likely to form under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We study super-Earth atmospheres of diverse bulk composition, which are assumed to form by outgassing from a solid core of chondritic material, following Schaefer & Fegley. The super-Earth atmospheres that we study arise from planetary cores made up of individual types of chondritic meteorites. They range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both sub-solar and super-solar, thereby spanning a range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of formation for over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temperature range of 350–3000 K. Clouds should form along the temperature–pressure boundaries where the condensed species appear in our calculation. We find that the composition of condensate clouds depends strongly on both the H:O and C:O ratios. For the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b, KCl and ZnS are the primary cloud-forming condensates at solar composition, in agreement with previous work. However, for oxidizing atmospheres, K2SO4 and ZnO condensates are favored instead, and for carbon-rich atmospheres with super-solar C:O ratios, graphite clouds appear. For even hotter planets, clouds form from a wide variety of rock-forming and metallic species.

  3. Non-LTE kinetics modeling of krypton ions: Calculations of radiative cooling coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H.-K.; Fournier, K. B.; Lee, R. W.

    2006-06-01

    For plasmas containing high-Z ions the energy loss due to radiative processes can be important in understanding energy distributions and spectral characteristics. Since high-Z plasmas occur over a wide range of temperature and density conditions, a general non-LTE population kinetics description is required to provide a qualitative and quantitative description for radiative energy loss. We investigate radiative properties of non-LTE krypton plasmas with a collisional-radiative (CR) model constructed from detailed atomic data. This work makes two extensions beyond previous non-LTE kinetics models. First, this model explicitly treats the dielectronic recombination (DR) channels. Second, this model allows one to investigate the higher electron density regimes found commonly in laboratory plasmas. This more comprehensive approach enables the study of population kinetics in a general manner and will provide a systematic guide for reducing a complex model to a simpler one. Specifically, we present the calculations of radiative cooling coefficients of krypton ions as a function of electron density in the optically thin limit. Total, soft X-ray (1.6 keV ≤ E ≤ 12 keV), and hard X-ray ( E ≥ 12 keV) radiative cooling coefficients are given for the plasma conditions of 0.6 keV ≤ Te ≤ 10 keV and 10 14 cm -3 ≤ Ne ≤ 10 24 cm -3. The ionic radiative cooling coefficients provided are sufficient to allow users to construct the total rate from given charge state distributions. Steady-state calculations of the average charge state at given Te and Ne values are also presented.

  4. CERENA: ChEmical REaction Network Analyzer--A Toolbox for the Simulation and Analysis of Stochastic Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kazeroonian, Atefeh; Fröhlich, Fabian; Raue, Andreas; Theis, Fabian J; Hasenauer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression, signal transduction and many other cellular processes are subject to stochastic fluctuations. The analysis of these stochastic chemical kinetics is important for understanding cell-to-cell variability and its functional implications, but it is also challenging. A multitude of exact and approximate descriptions of stochastic chemical kinetics have been developed, however, tools to automatically generate the descriptions and compare their accuracy and computational efficiency are missing. In this manuscript we introduced CERENA, a toolbox for the analysis of stochastic chemical kinetics using Approximations of the Chemical Master Equation solution statistics. CERENA implements stochastic simulation algorithms and the finite state projection for microscopic descriptions of processes, the system size expansion and moment equations for meso- and macroscopic descriptions, as well as the novel conditional moment equations for a hybrid description. This unique collection of descriptions in a single toolbox facilitates the selection of appropriate modeling approaches. Unlike other software packages, the implementation of CERENA is completely general and allows, e.g., for time-dependent propensities and non-mass action kinetics. By providing SBML import, symbolic model generation and simulation using MEX-files, CERENA is user-friendly and computationally efficient. The availability of forward and adjoint sensitivity analyses allows for further studies such as parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. The MATLAB code implementing CERENA is freely available from http://cerenadevelopers.github.io/CERENA/. PMID:26807911

  5. CERENA: ChEmical REaction Network Analyzer—A Toolbox for the Simulation and Analysis of Stochastic Chemical Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kazeroonian, Atefeh; Fröhlich, Fabian; Raue, Andreas; Theis, Fabian J.; Hasenauer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression, signal transduction and many other cellular processes are subject to stochastic fluctuations. The analysis of these stochastic chemical kinetics is important for understanding cell-to-cell variability and its functional implications, but it is also challenging. A multitude of exact and approximate descriptions of stochastic chemical kinetics have been developed, however, tools to automatically generate the descriptions and compare their accuracy and computational efficiency are missing. In this manuscript we introduced CERENA, a toolbox for the analysis of stochastic chemical kinetics using Approximations of the Chemical Master Equation solution statistics. CERENA implements stochastic simulation algorithms and the finite state projection for microscopic descriptions of processes, the system size expansion and moment equations for meso- and macroscopic descriptions, as well as the novel conditional moment equations for a hybrid description. This unique collection of descriptions in a single toolbox facilitates the selection of appropriate modeling approaches. Unlike other software packages, the implementation of CERENA is completely general and allows, e.g., for time-dependent propensities and non-mass action kinetics. By providing SBML import, symbolic model generation and simulation using MEX-files, CERENA is user-friendly and computationally efficient. The availability of forward and adjoint sensitivity analyses allows for further studies such as parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. The MATLAB code implementing CERENA is freely available from http://cerenadevelopers.github.io/CERENA/. PMID:26807911

  6. CERENA: ChEmical REaction Network Analyzer--A Toolbox for the Simulation and Analysis of Stochastic Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kazeroonian, Atefeh; Fröhlich, Fabian; Raue, Andreas; Theis, Fabian J; Hasenauer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression, signal transduction and many other cellular processes are subject to stochastic fluctuations. The analysis of these stochastic chemical kinetics is important for understanding cell-to-cell variability and its functional implications, but it is also challenging. A multitude of exact and approximate descriptions of stochastic chemical kinetics have been developed, however, tools to automatically generate the descriptions and compare their accuracy and computational efficiency are missing. In this manuscript we introduced CERENA, a toolbox for the analysis of stochastic chemical kinetics using Approximations of the Chemical Master Equation solution statistics. CERENA implements stochastic simulation algorithms and the finite state projection for microscopic descriptions of processes, the system size expansion and moment equations for meso- and macroscopic descriptions, as well as the novel conditional moment equations for a hybrid description. This unique collection of descriptions in a single toolbox facilitates the selection of appropriate modeling approaches. Unlike other software packages, the implementation of CERENA is completely general and allows, e.g., for time-dependent propensities and non-mass action kinetics. By providing SBML import, symbolic model generation and simulation using MEX-files, CERENA is user-friendly and computationally efficient. The availability of forward and adjoint sensitivity analyses allows for further studies such as parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. The MATLAB code implementing CERENA is freely available from http://cerenadevelopers.github.io/CERENA/.

  7. Kinetic-quantum chemical model for catalytic cycles: the Haber-Bosch process and the effect of reagent concentration.

    PubMed

    Kozuch, Sebastian; Shaik, Sason

    2008-07-01

    A combined kinetic-quantum chemical model is developed with the goal of estimating in a straightforward way the turnover frequency (TOF) of catalytic cycles, based on the state energies obtained by quantum chemical calculations. We describe how the apparent activation energy of the whole cycle, so-called energetic span (delta E), is influenced by the energy levels of two species: the TOF determining transition state (TDTS) and the TOF determining intermediate (TDI). Because these key species need not be adjoining states, we conclude that for catalysis there are no rate-determining steps, only rate determining states. In addition, we add here the influence of reactants concentrations. And, finally, the model is applied to the Haber-Bosch process of ammonia synthesis, for which we show how to calculate which catalyst will be the most effective under specific reagents conditions.

  8. Ab Initio Calculation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors 1. Influence of Basis Set on the Calculation of 31P Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.

    1998-09-01

    The influence of changes in the contracted Gaussian basis set used for ab initio calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phosphorous chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors was investigated. The isotropic chemical shitl and chemical shift anisotropy were found to converge with increasing complexity of the basis set at the Hartree-Fock @IF) level. The addition of d polarization function on the phosphorous nucIei was found to have a major impact of the calculated chemical shi~ but diminished with increasing number of polarization fimctions. At least 2 d polarization fimctions are required for accurate calculations of the isotropic phosphorous chemical shift. The introduction of density fictional theory (DFT) techniques through tie use of hybrid B3LYP methods for the calculation of the phosphorous chemical shift tensor resulted in a poorer estimation of the NMR values, even though DFT techniques result in improved energy and force constant calculations. The convergence of the W parametem with increasing basis set complexity was also observed for the DFT calculations, but produced results with consistent large deviations from experiment. The use of a HF 6-31 l++G(242p) basis set represents a good compromise between accuracy of the simulation and the complexity of the calculation for future ab initio calculations of 31P NMR parameters in larger complexes.

  9. Chemical oscillations arise solely from kinetic nonlinearity and hence can occur near equilibrium.

    PubMed Central

    Walz, D; Caplan, S R

    1995-01-01

    A minimal kinetic scheme for a system displaying sustained chemical oscillations is presented. The system is isothermal, and all steps in the scheme are kinetically reversible. The oscillations are analyzed and the crucial points elucidated. Both positive and negative feedback, if properly introduced, support oscillations, provided the state responsible for feedback is optimally buffered. It is shown that the requisite nonlinearity is introduced at the kinetic level because of feedback regulation and not, as is usually assumed, by large affinities that introduce nonlinearity at the thermodynamic level. Hence, sustained oscillations may occur near equilibrium. PMID:8580313

  10. Integrating chemical kinetic rate equations by selective use of stiff and nonstiff methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of switching between nonstiff and stiff methods on the efficiency of algorithms for integrating chemical kinetic rate equations is presented. Different integration methods are tested by application of the packaged code LSODE to four practical combustion kinetics problems. The problems describe adiabatic, homogeneous gas-phase combustion reactions. It is shown that selective use of nonstiff and stiff methods in different regimes of a typical batch combustion problem is faster than the use of either method for the entire problem. The implications of this result to the development of fast integration techniques for combustion kinetic rate equations are discussed.

  11. Integrating chemical kinetic rate equations by selective use of stiff and nonstiff methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of switching between nonstiff and stiff methods on the efficiency of algorithms for integrating chemical kinetic rate equations was examined. Different integration methods were tested by application of the packaged code LSODE to four practical combustion kinetics problems. The problems describe adiabatic, and homogeneous gas phase combustion reactions. It is shown that selective use of nonstiff and stiff methods in different regimes of a typical batch combustion problem is faster than the use of either method for the entire problem. The implications which result in the development of fast integration techniques for combustion kinetic rate equations are discussed.

  12. A comparison of the efficiency of numerical methods for integrating chemical kinetic rate equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of several algorithms used for numerical integration of stiff ordinary differential equations was compared. The methods examined included two general purpose codes EPISODE and LSODE and three codes (CHEMEQ, CREK1D and GCKP84) developed specifically to integrate chemical kinetic rate equations. The codes were applied to two test problems drawn from combustion kinetics. The comparisons show that LSODE is the fastest code available for the integration of combustion kinetic rate equations. It is shown that an iterative solution of the algebraic energy conservation equation to compute the temperature can be more efficient then evaluating the temperature by integrating its time-derivative.

  13. Recent Results in Quantum Chemical Kinetics from High Resolution Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Quack, Martin

    2007-12-26

    We outline the approach of our group to derive intramolecular kinetic primary processes from high resolution spectroscopy. We then review recent results on intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) and on tunneling processes. Examples are the quantum dynamics of the C-H-chromophore in organic molecules, hydrogen bond dynamics in (HF){sub 2} and stereomutation dynamics in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and related chiral molecules. We finally discuss the time scales for these and further processes which range from 10 fs to more than seconds in terms of successive symmetry breakings, leading to the question of nuclear spin symmetry and parity violation as well as the question of CPT symmetry.

  14. Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-02-13

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  15. A Piagetian Learning Cycle for Introductory Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batt, Russell H.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a Piagetian learning cycle based on Monte Carlo modeling of several simple reaction mechanisms. Included are descriptions of learning cycle phases (exploration, invention, and discovery) and four BASIC-PLUS computer programs to be used in the explanation of chemical reacting systems. (Author/DS)

  16. Parameter Estimates in Differential Equation Models for Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the need for devoting time in differential equations courses to modelling and the completion of the modelling process with efforts to estimate the parameters in the models using data. We estimate the parameters present in several differential equation models of chemical reactions of order n, where n = 0, 1, 2, and apply more general…

  17. The subtle business of model reduction for stochastic chemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Dan T; Cao, Yang; Sanft, Kevin R; Petzold, Linda R

    2009-02-14

    This paper addresses the problem of simplifying chemical reaction networks by adroitly reducing the number of reaction channels and chemical species. The analysis adopts a discrete-stochastic point of view and focuses on the model reaction set S(1)<=>S(2)-->S(3), whose simplicity allows all the mathematics to be done exactly. The advantages and disadvantages of replacing this reaction set with a single S(3)-producing reaction are analyzed quantitatively using novel criteria for measuring simulation accuracy and simulation efficiency. It is shown that in all cases in which such a model reduction can be accomplished accurately and with a significant gain in simulation efficiency, a procedure called the slow-scale stochastic simulation algorithm provides a robust and theoretically transparent way of implementing the reduction.

  18. Selecting the optimum quasi-steady-state species for reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms using a genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Christopher J.; Yang, Chongguan; Parkinson, Alan R.; Chen, J.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    A genetic optimization algorithm has been applied to the selection of quasi-steady-state (QSS) species in reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms. The algorithm seeks to minimize the error between reduced and detailed chemistry for simple reactor calculations approximating conditions of interest for a computational fluid dynamics simulation. The genetic algorithm does not guarantee that the global optimum will be found, but much greater accuracy can be obtained than by choosing QSS species through a simple kinetic criterion or by human trial and error. The algorithm is demonstrated for methane-air combustion over a range of temperatures and stoichiometries and for homogeneous charge compression ignition engine combustion. The results are in excellent agreement with those predicted by the baseline mechanism. A factor of two reduction in the number of species was obtained for a skeletal mechanism that had already been greatly reduced from the parent detailed mechanism.

  19. Improved kinetic neoclassical transport calculation for a low-collisionality QH-mode pedestal

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Battaglia, D. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; deGrassie, J. S.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Hager, R.

    2016-07-15

    The role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL) structure in an ELM-free QH-mode discharge on DIII-D is explored using XGC0, a 5D full-f multi-species particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. The work in this paper builds on previous work aimed at achieving quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles. Improved quantitative agreement is achieved by performing the calculations with a more realistic electron mass, larger neutral density and including finite-Larmor-radius corrections self-consistentlymore » in the drift-kinetic motion of the particles. Consequently, the simulations provide stronger evidence that the radial electric field (E-r) in the pedestal is primarily established by the required balance between the loss of high-energy tail main ions against a pinch of colder main ions and impurities. The kinetic loss of a small population of ions carrying a large proportion of energy and momentum leads to a separation of the particle and energy transport rates and introduces a source of intrinsic edge torque. Ion orbit loss and finite orbit width effects drive the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describe the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the T-i profile.« less

  20. Momentum or kinetic energy - How do substrate properties influence the calculation of rainfall erosivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebes, Philipp; Seitz, Steffen; Geißler, Christian; Lassu, Tamás; Peters, Piet; Seeger, Manuel; Nadrowski, Karin; Scholten, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Rainfall erosivity is a key component in soil erosion by water. While kinetic energy and momentum are used to describe the erosivity of rainfall, and both are derived from mass and velocity of raindrops, it is not clear how different substrates transform this energy. In our study we conducted rainfall simulation experiments to determine splash detachment amounts of five substrates (coarse sand, medium sand, fine sand, PE balls, silt) for seven different rainfall intensities (52-116 mm h-1). We used linear mixed-effect modeling (LME) to calculate erosivity predictors for each substrate. Additionally, we separated drop-size-velocity relationship into lower left and upper right quarter to investigate the effect of small and slow just as big and fast raindrops on splash detachment amounts. We suggest using momentum divided by drop diameter as a substrate-independent erosivity predictor. To consider different substrates specific erosivity parameters are needed. Heavier substrates like sand are best described by kinetic energy multiplied by diameter whereas lighter substrates like silt point to momentum divided by diameter to the power of 1.5. Furthermore, our results show that substrates are differently affected by the size and velocity of drops. While splash detachment of light substances can be reliably predicted by drop size and velocity for small and slow drops, drop size and velocity loses its predictive power in heavier substrates like sand.

  1. Momentum or kinetic energy - how do substrate properties influence the calculation of rainfall erosivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebes, Philipp; Seitz, Steffen; Geißler, Christian; Lassu, Tamás; Peters, Piet; Seeger, Manuel; Nadrowski, Karin; Scholten, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall erosivity is a key component in soil erosion by water. In principle, two ways exist to describe erosivity, namely kinetic energy and momentum. However, the role of mass and velocity of raindrops in relation to properties of the substrates to be eroded is not yet clear. In our study we conducted rainfall simulation experiments to determine splash detachment amounts of five substrates (coarse sand, medium sand, fine sand, PE balls, silt) for seven different rainfall intensities (52-116 mm/h). We used linear mixed-effect modeling (LME) to calculate erosivity predictors for each substrate. Additionally, we separated drop size distribution into 1st and 3rd quartile to investigate the effect of small and slow respectively big and fast raindrops on splash detachment amounts. We suggest using momentum divided by drop diameter as a substrate-independent erosivity predictor. To consider different substrates specific erosivity parameters are needed. Heavier substrates like sand are best described by kinetic energy multiplied by diameter whereas lighter substrates like silt point to momentum divided by diameter to the power of 1.5. Further, our results show that the first quartile of the drop size distribution is best in describing splash detachment rates of light substrates whereas for heavier substrates like sand the influence of drop size distribution is indifferent.

  2. The Role of Comprehensive Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms in Combustion Research

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

    2008-07-16

    Recent developments by the authors in the field of comprehensive detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for hydrocarbon fuels are reviewed. Examples are given of how these mechanisms provide fundamental chemical insights into a range of combustion applications. Practical combustion consists primarily of chemical heat release from reactions between a fuel and an oxidizer, and computer simulations of practical combustion systems have become an essential tool of combustion research (Westbrook et al., 2005). At the heart of most combustion simulations, the chemical kinetic submodel frequently is the most detailed, complex and computationally costly part of a system model. Historically, the chemical submodel equations are solved using time-implicit numerical algorithms, due to the extreme stiffness of the coupled rate equations, with a computational cost that varies roughly with the cube of the number of chemical species in the model. While early mechanisms (c. 1980) for apparently simple fuels such as methane (Warnatz, 1980) or methanol (Westbrook and Dryer, 1979) included perhaps 25 species, current detailed mechanisms for much larger, more complex fuels such as hexadecane (Fournet et al., 2001; Ristori et al., 2001; Westbrook et al., 2008) or methyl ester methyl decanoate (Herbinet et al., 2008) have as many as 2000 or even 3000 species. Rapid growth in capabilities of modern computers has been an essential feature in this rapid growth in the size and complexity of chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms.

  3. Calculation of Reactor Kinetics Parameters βeff and Λ with Monte Carlo Differential Operator Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Yasunobu

    2014-06-01

    The methods to calculate the kinetics parameters of βeff and Λ with the differential operator sampling have been reviewed. The comparison of the results obtained with the differential operator sampling and iterated fission probability approaches has been performed. It is shown that the differential operator sampling approach gives the same results as the iterated fission probability approach within the statistical uncertainty. In addition, the prediction accuracy of the evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-4.0 for the measured βeff/Λ and βeff values is also examined. It is shown that JENDL-4.0 gives a good prediction except for the uranium-233 systems. The present results imply the need for revisiting the uranium-233 nuclear data evaluation and performing the detailed sensitivity analysis.

  4. Kinetics analysis and quantitative calculations for the successive radioactive decay process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiping; Yan, Deyue; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2015-01-01

    The general radioactive decay kinetics equations with branching were developed and the analytical solutions were derived by Laplace transform method. The time dependence of all the nuclide concentrations can be easily obtained by applying the equations to any known radioactive decay series. Taking the example of thorium radioactive decay series, the concentration evolution over time of various nuclide members in the family has been given by the quantitative numerical calculations with a computer. The method can be applied to the quantitative prediction and analysis for the daughter nuclides in the successive decay with branching of the complicated radioactive processes, such as the natural radioactive decay series, nuclear reactor, nuclear waste disposal, nuclear spallation, synthesis and identification of superheavy nuclides, radioactive ion beam physics and chemistry, etc.

  5. Quantum chemical calculations for polymers and organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, J.; Yang, C.

    1982-01-01

    The relativistic effects of the orbiting electrons on a model compound were calculated. The computational method used was based on 'Modified Neglect of Differential Overlap' (MNDO). The compound tetracyanoplatinate was used since empirical measurement and calculations along "classical" lines had yielded many known properties. The purpose was to show that for large molecules relativity effects could not be ignored and that these effects could be calculated and yield data in closer agreement to empirical measurements. Both the energy band structure and molecular orbitals are depicted.

  6. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Biodiesel Components Methyl Stearate and Methyl Oleate

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, C; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2010-01-22

    New chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for two of the five major components of biodiesel fuel, methyl stearate and methyl oleate. The mechanisms are produced using existing reaction classes and rules for reaction rates, with additional reaction classes to describe other reactions unique to methyl ester species. Mechanism capabilities were examined by computing fuel/air autoignition delay times and comparing the results with more conventional hydrocarbon fuels for which experimental results are available. Additional comparisons were carried out with measured results taken from jet-stirred reactor experiments for rapeseed methyl ester fuels. In both sets of computational tests, methyl oleate was found to be slightly less reactive than methyl stearate, and an explanation of this observation is made showing that the double bond in methyl oleate inhibits certain low temperature chain branching reaction pathways important in methyl stearate. The resulting detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism includes more approximately 3500 chemical species and more than 17,000 chemical reactions.

  7. Thermochemical analysis and kinetics aspects for a chemical model for camphene ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R C de M; Bauerfeldt, G F

    2012-10-01

    In this work, a chemical model for the camphene ozonolysis, leading to carbonyl final products, is proposed and discussed on the basis of the thermochemical properties and kinetic data obtained at density functional theory levels of calculation. The mechanism is initiated by the electrophilic attack of ozone to the double bond in camphene leading to a 1,2,3-trioxolane intermediate, which decomposes to peroxy radicals and carbonyl compounds in a total of 10 elementary reactions. The thermodynamic properties (enthalpy and entropies differences) are calculated at 298 K. For the thermochemical evaluation, theoretical calculations are performed with the B3LYP, MPW1PW91, and mPW1K density functionals and the basis sets 6-31G(d), 6-31G(2d,2p), 6-31+G(d,p), and 6-31+G(2d,2p). Eventually, single point calculations adopting the 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis set are performed in order to improve the electronic energies. The enthalpy profiles suggest highly exothermic reactions for the individual steps, with a global enthalpy difference of -179.18 kcal mol(-1), determined at the B3LYP∕6-31+G(2d,2p) level. The Gibbs free energy differences for each step, at 298 K, calculated at the B3LYP∕6-311++G(2d,2p)∕∕B3LYP∕6-31+G(2d,2p) level, are used to estimate the composition of a final product mixture under equilibrium conditions as 58% of camphenilone and 42% of 6,6-dimethyl-ɛ-caprolactone-2,5-methylene. For the reaction kinetics, the bimolecular O(3) + camphene step is assumed to be rate determining in the global mechanism. A saddle point for the ozone addition to the double bond is located and rate constants are determined on the basis of the transition state theory. This saddle point is well represented by a loosely bound structure and corrections for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) are calculated, either by considering the effect over the geometry optimization procedure (here referred as CP1 procedure), or the effect of the BSSE over the electronic energy of a

  8. Kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions in Li/SOCl2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Lee D.; Frank, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    Work is described that was designed to determine the kinetic constants necessary to extrapolate kinetic data on Li/SOCl2 cells over the temperature range from 25 to 75 C. A second objective was to characterize as far as possible the chemical reactions that occur in the cells since these reactions may be important in understanding the potential hazards of these cells. The kinetics of the corrosion processes in undischarged Li/SOCl2 cells were determined and separated according to their occurrence at the anode and cathode; the effects that switching the current on and off has on the corrosion reactions was determined; and the effects of discharge state on the kinetics of the corrosion process were found. A thermodynamic analysis of the current-producing reactions in the cell was done and is included.

  9. Inactivation kinetics of various chemical disinfectants on Aeromonas hydrophila planktonic cells and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Jahid, Iqbal Kabir; Ha, Sang-Do

    2014-05-01

    The present article focuses on the inactivation kinetics of various disinfectants including ethanol, sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, and benzalkonium chloride against Aeromonas hydrophila biofilms and planktonic cells. Efficacy was determined by viable plate count and compared using a modified Weibull model. The removal of the biofilms matrix was determined by the crystal violet assay and was confirmed by field-emission scanning electron microscope. The results revealed that all the experimental data and calculated Weibull α (scale) and β (shape) parameters had a good fit, as the R(2) values were between 0.88 and 0.99. Biofilms are more resistant to disinfectants than planktonic cells. Ethanol (70%) was the most effective in killing cells in the biofilms and significantly reduced (p<0.05) the biofilms matrix. The Weibull parameter b-value correlated (R(2)=0.6835) with the biofilms matrix removal. The present findings deduce that the Weibull model is suitable to determine biofilms matrix reduction as well as the effectiveness of chemical disinfectants on biofilms. The study showed that the Weibull model could successfully be used on food and food contact surfaces to determine the exact contact time for killing biofilms-forming foodborne pathogens.

  10. Inactivation kinetics of various chemical disinfectants on Aeromonas hydrophila planktonic cells and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Jahid, Iqbal Kabir; Ha, Sang-Do

    2014-05-01

    The present article focuses on the inactivation kinetics of various disinfectants including ethanol, sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, and benzalkonium chloride against Aeromonas hydrophila biofilms and planktonic cells. Efficacy was determined by viable plate count and compared using a modified Weibull model. The removal of the biofilms matrix was determined by the crystal violet assay and was confirmed by field-emission scanning electron microscope. The results revealed that all the experimental data and calculated Weibull α (scale) and β (shape) parameters had a good fit, as the R(2) values were between 0.88 and 0.99. Biofilms are more resistant to disinfectants than planktonic cells. Ethanol (70%) was the most effective in killing cells in the biofilms and significantly reduced (p<0.05) the biofilms matrix. The Weibull parameter b-value correlated (R(2)=0.6835) with the biofilms matrix removal. The present findings deduce that the Weibull model is suitable to determine biofilms matrix reduction as well as the effectiveness of chemical disinfectants on biofilms. The study showed that the Weibull model could successfully be used on food and food contact surfaces to determine the exact contact time for killing biofilms-forming foodborne pathogens. PMID:24552163

  11. The Teaching and Learning of Chemical Kinetics Supported with MS Excel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abdul; Chin, Lee Sui

    2013-01-01

    Students in 12 secondary schools in three states of Malaysia were taught to use worksheets on the chemical kinetics topic which had been pre-created using the MS Excel worksheets. After the teaching, an opinion survey of 612 Form Six students from these schools was conducted. The results showed that almost all the students felt that MS Excel…

  12. Cooperative Learning Instruction for Conceptual Change in the Concepts of Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirik, Ozgecan Tastan; Boz, Yezdan

    2012-01-01

    Learning is a social event and so the students need learning environments that enable them to work with their peers so that they can learn through their interactions. This study discusses the effectiveness of cooperative learning compared to traditional instruction in terms of students' motivation and understanding of chemical kinetics in a high…

  13. New integration techniques for chemical kinetic rate equations. I - Efficiency comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of the efficiency of several recently developed numerical techniques for solving chemical kinetic rate equations is presented. The solution procedures examined include two general-purpose codes, EPISODE and LSODE, developed as multipurpose differential equation solvers, and three specialzed codes, CHEMEQ, CREK1D, and GCKP84, developed specifically for chemical kinetics. The efficiency comparison is made by applying these codes to two practical combustion kinetics problems. Both problems describe adiabatic, constant-pressure, gas-phase chemical reactions and include all three combustion regimes: induction, heat release, and equilibration. The comparison shows that LSODE is the fastest routine currently available for solving chemical kinetic rate equations. An important finding is that an iterative solution of the algebraic enthalpy conservation equation for temperature can be significantly faster than evaluation of the temperature by integration of its time derivative. Significant increases in computational speed are realized by updating the reaction rate constants only when the temperature change exceeds an amount Delta-T that is problem dependent. An approximate expression for the automatic evaluation of Delta-T is presented and is shown to result in increased computational speed.

  14. A. G. Vernon Harcourt: A Founder of Chemical Kinetics and a Friend of "Lewis Carroll."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorter, John

    1980-01-01

    Outlines the life of A. G. Vernon Harcourt, a founder of chemical kinetics, contributor to the purification of coal gas from sulfur compounds, inventor of the percentage chloroform inhaler, friend to Lewis Carroll, and instructor to the Prince of Wales. (CS)

  15. Research in chemical kinetics. Progress report, August 1, 1987--July 20, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, F.S.

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes chemical kinetics research in the following areas: reactions of thermalized tritium atoms with organo-tin compounds; studies on the hydrolysis of OCS and CS{sub 2}; thermal chlorine 38 reactions with 2,3-dichloro-hexafluoro-2-butene; and thermal T reactions with fluoroethylenes.

  16. Designing and Evaluating an Evidence-Informed Instruction in Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakmakci, Gultekin; Aydogdu, Cemil

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of a teaching intervention based on evidence from educational theories and research data, on students' ideas in chemical kinetics. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare the outcomes for the intervention. The subjects of the study were 83 university first-year students, who were in two different classes in…

  17. INFLUENCE OF ORGANIC COSOLVENTS ON THE SORPTION KINETICS OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative examination of the kinetics of sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals by soils from mixed solvents reveals that the reverse sorption rate constant (k2) increases log-linearly with increasing volume fraction of organic cosolvent (fc). This relationship was expec...

  18. [A generalized chemical-kinetic method for modeling gene networks].

    PubMed

    Likhoshvaĭ, V A; Matushkin, Iu G; Ratushnyĭ, A V; Anan'ko, E A; Ignat'eva, E V; Podkolodnaia, O A

    2001-01-01

    Development of methods for mathematical simulation of biological systems and building specific simulations is an important trend of bioinformatics development. Here we describe the method of generalized chemokinetic simulation generating flexible and adequate simulations of various biological systems. Adequate simulations of complex nonlinear gene networks--control system of cholesterol by synthesis in the cell and erythrocyte differentiation and maturation--are given as the examples. The simulations were expressed in terms of unit processes--biochemical reactions. Optimal sets of parameters were determined and the systems were numerically simulated under various conditions. The simulations allow us to study possible functional conditions of these gene networks, calculate consequences of mutations, and define optimal strategies for their correction including therapeutic ones. Graphical user interface for these simulations is available at http://wwwmgs.bionet.nsc.ru/systems/MGL/GeneNet/. PMID:11771132

  19. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Dimethyl Carbonate in an Opposed-Flow Diffusion Flame

    SciTech Connect

    Glaude, P A; Pitz, W J; Thomson, M J

    2003-12-08

    Dimethyl carbonate (DMC) has been of interest as an oxygenate additive to diesel fuel because of its high oxygen content. In this study, a chemical kinetic mechanism for DMC was developed for the first time and used to understand its combustion under conditions in an opposed flow diffusion flame. Computed results were compared to experimental results from an opposed flow diffusion flame. It was found that the decomposition rate DMC {yields} H{sub 3}COC(=O)O. + CH{sub 3} in the flame was much slower than originally thought because resonance stabilization in the H{sub 3}COC(=O)O. radical was less than expected. Also, a new molecular elimination path for DMC is proposed and its rate calculated by quantum chemical methods. In the simulations of DMC in the flame, it was determined that much of the oxygen in dimethyl carbonate goes directly to CO{sub 2}. This characteristic indicates that DMC would not be an effective oxygenate additive for reducing soot emissions from diesel engines. In an ideal oxygenate additive for diesel fuel, each oxygen atom stays bonded to one carbon atom in the products thereby preventing the formation of carbon-carbon bonds that can lead to soot. When CO2 is formed directly, two oxygen atoms are bonded to one carbon atom thereby wasting one oxygen atom in the oxygenate additive. To determine how much CO{sub 2} is formed directly, the branching ratio of the key reaction, CH{sub 3}OC.=O going to the products CH{sub 3} + CO{sub 2} or CH{sub 3}O + CO was determined by ab initio methods. The A-factors of the rate constant of this reaction were found to be about 20 times higher than previous factors estimates. The new reaction rate constants obtained can be used as reaction rate rules for all oxygenates that contain the ester moiety including biodiesel.

  20. Ab initio path-integral calculations of kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects on base-catalyzed RNA transphosphorylation models.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Xu, Yuqing; York, Darrin M

    2014-06-30

    Detailed understandings of the reaction mechanisms of RNA catalysis in various environments can have profound importance for many applications, ranging from the design of new biotechnologies to the unraveling of the evolutionary origin of life. An integral step in the nucleolytic RNA catalysis is self-cleavage of RNA strands by 2'-O-transphosphorylation. Key to elucidating a reaction mechanism is determining the molecular structure and bonding characteristics of transition state. A direct and powerful probe of transition state is measuring isotope effects on biochemical reactions, particularly if we can reproduce isotope effect values from quantum calculations. This article significantly extends the scope of our previous joint experimental and theoretical work in examining isotope effects on enzymatic and nonenzymatic 2'-O-transphosphorylation reaction models that mimic reactions catalyzed by RNA enzymes (ribozymes), and protein enzymes such as ribonuclease A (RNase A). Native reactions are studied, as well as reactions with thio substitutions representing chemical modifications often used in experiments to probe mechanism. Here, we report and compare results from eight levels of electronic-structure calculations for constructing the potential energy surfaces in kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects (KIE and EIE) computations, including a "gold-standard" coupled-cluster level of theory [CCSD(T)]. In addition to the widely used Bigeleisen equation for estimating KIE and EIE values, internuclear anharmonicity and quantum tunneling effects were also computed using our recently developed ab initio path-integral method, that is, automated integration-free path-integral method. The results of this work establish an important set of benchmarks that serve to guide calculations of KIE and EIE for RNA catalysis.

  1. Ab Initio Path-Integral Calculations of Kinetic and Equilibrium Isotope Effects on Base-Catalyzed RNA Transphosphorylation Models

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Yuqing, Xu; York, Darrin M.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed understandings of the reaction mechanisms of RNA catalysis in various environments can have profound importance for many applications, ranging from the design of new biotechnologies to the unraveling of the evolutionary origin of life. An integral step in the nucleolytic RNA catalysis is self-cleavage of RNA strands by 2′-O-transphosphorylation. Key to elucidating a reaction mechanism is determining the molecular structure and bonding characteristics of transition state. A direct and powerful probe of transition state is measuring isotope effects on biochemical reactions, particularly if we can reproduce isotope effect values from quantum calculations. This paper significantly extends the scope of our previous joint experimental and theoretical work in examining isotope effects on enzymatic and non-enzymatic 2′-O-transphosphorylation reaction models that mimic reactions catalyzed by RNA enzymes (ribozymes), and protein enzymes such as ribonuclease A (RNase A). Native reactions are studied, as well as reactions with thio substitutions representing chemical modifications often used in experiments to probe mechanism. Here, we report and compare results from eight levels of electronic-structure calculations for constructing the potential energy surfaces in kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects (KIE and EIE) computations, including a “gold-standard” coupled-cluster level of theory [CCSD(T)]. In addition to the widely-used Bigeleisen equation for estimating KIE and EIE values, internuclear anharmonicity and quantum tunneling effects were also computed using our recently-developed ab initio path-integral method, i.e., automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method. The results of this work establish an important set of benchmarks that serve to guide calculations of KIE and EIE for RNA catalysis. PMID:24841935

  2. Large eddy simulation of extinction and reignition with artificial neural networks based chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Baris Ali; Menon, Suresh; Hawkes, Evatt R.

    2010-03-15

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of a non-premixed, temporally evolving, syngas/air flame is performed with special emphasis on speeding-up the sub-grid chemistry computations using an artificial neural networks (ANN) approach. The numerical setup for the LES is identical to a previous direct numerical simulation (DNS) study, which reported considerable local extinction and reignition physics, and hence, offers a challenging test case. The chemical kinetics modeling with ANN is based on a recent approach, and replaces the stiff ODE solver (DI) to predict the species reaction rates in the subgrid linear eddy mixing (LEM) model based LES (LEMLES). In order to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the current approach, additional information on conditional statistics of some of the key species and temperature are extracted from the previous DNS study and are compared with the LEMLES using ANN (ANN-LEMLES, hereafter). The results show that the current approach can detect the correct extinction and reignition physics with reasonable accuracy compared to the DNS. The syngas flame structure and the scalar dissipation rate statistics obtained by the current ANN-LEMLES are provided to further probe the flame physics. It is observed that, in contrast to H{sub 2}, CO exhibits a smooth variation within the region enclosed by the stoichiometric mixture fraction. The probability density functions (PDFs) of the scalar dissipation rates calculated based on the mixture fraction and CO demonstrate that the mean value of the PDF is insensitive to extinction and reignition. However, this is not the case for the scalar dissipation rate calculated by the OH mass fraction. Overall, ANN provides considerable computational speed-up and memory saving compared to DI, and can be used to investigate turbulent flames in a computationally affordable manner. (author)

  3. The nature of chemical bonds from PNOF5 calculations.

    PubMed

    Matxain, Jon M; Piris, Mario; Uranga, Jon; Lopez, Xabier; Merino, Gabriel; Ugalde, Jesus M

    2012-06-18

    Natural orbital functional theory (NOFT) is used for the first time in the analysis of different types of chemical bonds. Concretely, the Piris natural orbital functional PNOF5 is used. It provides a localization scheme that yields an orbital picture which agrees very well with the empirical valence shell electron pair repulsion theory (VSEPR) and Bent's rule, as well as with other theoretical pictures provided by valence bond (VB) or linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) methods. In this context, PNOF5 provides a novel tool for chemical bond analysis. In this work, PNOF5 is applied to selected molecules that have ionic, polar covalent, covalent, multiple (σ and π), 3c-2e, and 3c-4e bonds.

  4. Chemically reacting supersonic flow calculation using an assumed PDF model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farshchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to develop accurate models for chemically reacting compressible turbulent flow fields that are present in a typical supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine. In this paper the development of a new assumed probability density function (PDF) reaction model for supersonic turbulent diffusion flames and its implementation into an efficient Navier-Stokes solver are discussed. The application of this model to a supersonic hydrogen-air flame will be considered.

  5. Can accurate kinetic laws be created to describe chemical weathering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Jacques; Oelkers, Eric H.; Bénézeth, Pascale; Goddéris, Yves; François, Louis

    2012-11-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms and rates of mineral dissolution and growth, especially close to equilibrium, is essential for describing the temporal and spatial evolution of natural processes like weathering and its impact on CO2 budget and climate. The Surface Complexation approach (SC) combined with Transition State Theory (TST) provides an efficient framework for describing mineral dissolution over wide ranges of solution composition, chemical affinity, and temperature. There has been a large debate for several years, however, about the comparative merits of SC/TS versus classical growth theories for describing mineral dissolution and growth at near-to-equilibrium conditions. This study considers recent results obtained in our laboratory on oxides, hydroxides, silicates, and carbonates on near-equilibrium dissolution and growth via the combination of complementary microscopic and macroscopic techniques including hydrothermal atomic force microscopy, hydrogen-electrode concentration cell, mixed flow and batch reactors. Results show that the dissolution and precipitation of hydroxides, kaolinite, and hydromagnesite powders of relatively high BET surface area closely follow SC/TST rate laws with a linear dependence of both dissolution and growth rates on fluid saturation state (Ω) even at very close to equilibrium conditions (|ΔG| < 500 J/mol). This occurs because sufficient reactive sites (e.g. at kink, steps, and edges) are available at the exposed faces for dissolution and/or growth, allowing reactions to proceed via the direct and reversible detachment/attachment of reactants at the surface. In contrast, for magnesite and quartz, which have low surface areas, fewer active sites are available for growth and dissolution. Such minerals exhibit rates dependencies on Ω at near equilibrium conditions ranging from linear to highly non-linear functions of Ω, depending on the treatment of the crystals before the reaction. It follows that the form of the f

  6. Chemical kinetic modeling of a methane opposed flow diffusion flame and comparison to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.M., Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Vincitore, A.M.; Senka, S.M.; Lutz, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical structure of an opposed flow, methane diffusion flame is studied using a chemical kinetic model and the results are compared to experimental measurements. The chemical kinetic paths leading to aromatics and polycyclic aromatics hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the diffusion flame are identified. These paths all involve resonantly stabilized radicals which include propargyl, allyl, cyclopentadienyl, and benzyl radicals. The modeling results show reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements for the large hydrocarbon aliphatic compounds, aromatics, and PAHs. the benzene was predicted to be formed primarily by the reaction sequence of Allyl plus Propargyl equals Fulvene plus H plus H followed by fulvene isomerization to benzene. Naphthalene was modeled using the reaction of benzyl with propargyl, while the combination of cyclopentadienyl radicals were shown to be a minor contributor in the diffusion flame. The agreement between the model and experiment for the four-ring PAHs was poor.

  7. LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for gas-phase reactions: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1993-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS, are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include static system, steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow, shock initiated reaction, and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method, which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reaction, is used for solving the 'stiff' differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, sensitivity coefficients of all dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters can be computed. This paper presents descriptions of the code and its usage, and includes several illustrative example problems.

  8. Quantum Chemical Calculations Resolved Identification of Methylnitrocatechols in Atmospheric Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Frka, Sanja; Šala, Martin; Kroflič, Ana; Huš, Matej; Čusak, Alen; Grgić, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Methylnitrocatechols (MNCs) are secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers and major contributors to atmospheric brown carbon; however, their formation and aging processes in atmospheric waters are unknown. To investigate the importance of aqueous-phase electrophilic substitution of 3-methylcatechol with nitronium ion (NO2(+)), we performed quantum calculations of their favorable pathways. The calculations predicted the formation of 3-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (3M5NC), 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol (3M4NC), and a negligible amount of 3-methyl-6-nitrocatechol (3M6NC). MNCs in atmospheric PM2 samples were further inspected by LC/(-)ESI-MS/MS using commercial as well as de novo synthesized authentic standards. We detected 3M5NC and, for the first time, 3M4NC. In contrast to previous reports, 3M6NC was not observed. Agreement between calculated and observed 3M5NC/3M4NC ratios cannot unambiguously confirm the electrophilic mechanism as the exclusive formation pathway of MNCs in aerosol water. However, the examined nitration by NO2(+) is supported by (1) the absence of 3M6NC in the ambient aerosols analyzed and (2) the constant 3M5NC/3M4NC ratio in field aerosol samples, which indicates their common formation pathway. The magnitude of error one could make by incorrectly identifying 3M4NC as 3M6NC in ambient aerosols was also assessed, suggesting the importance of evaluating the literature regarding MNCs with special care.

  9. Quantum Chemical Calculations Resolved Identification of Methylnitrocatechols in Atmospheric Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Frka, Sanja; Šala, Martin; Kroflič, Ana; Huš, Matej; Čusak, Alen; Grgić, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Methylnitrocatechols (MNCs) are secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers and major contributors to atmospheric brown carbon; however, their formation and aging processes in atmospheric waters are unknown. To investigate the importance of aqueous-phase electrophilic substitution of 3-methylcatechol with nitronium ion (NO2(+)), we performed quantum calculations of their favorable pathways. The calculations predicted the formation of 3-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (3M5NC), 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol (3M4NC), and a negligible amount of 3-methyl-6-nitrocatechol (3M6NC). MNCs in atmospheric PM2 samples were further inspected by LC/(-)ESI-MS/MS using commercial as well as de novo synthesized authentic standards. We detected 3M5NC and, for the first time, 3M4NC. In contrast to previous reports, 3M6NC was not observed. Agreement between calculated and observed 3M5NC/3M4NC ratios cannot unambiguously confirm the electrophilic mechanism as the exclusive formation pathway of MNCs in aerosol water. However, the examined nitration by NO2(+) is supported by (1) the absence of 3M6NC in the ambient aerosols analyzed and (2) the constant 3M5NC/3M4NC ratio in field aerosol samples, which indicates their common formation pathway. The magnitude of error one could make by incorrectly identifying 3M4NC as 3M6NC in ambient aerosols was also assessed, suggesting the importance of evaluating the literature regarding MNCs with special care. PMID:27136117

  10. Two-dimensional calculation of chemical species and electrical properties in rocket plume flowfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Cui, Jisong; Liu, Qingyun

    1993-08-01

    A computational modeling technique and prediction method are presented for calculating two-dimensional profiles of chemical species mole fraction and electrical properties of rocket exhaust plumes. A comprehensive computer code has been programmed. The chemical reactions and radar attenuation which occur in a rocket plume can be predicted more truly by using this code. It is suitable to calculating parameters of rocket plumes under a near complete-expansion condition and for smokeless (or reduced smoke) propellant application. The calculation results indicate that evident errors will occur for prediction of chemical and electrical parameters in the plume flowfield if the chemical reactions in the plume are ignored.

  11. An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, Robers; Dryer, Frederick; Ju, Yiguang

    2013-09-30

    An integrated and collaborative effort involving experiments and complementary chemical kinetic modeling investigated the effects of significant concentrations of water and CO2 and minor contaminant species (methane [CH4], ethane [C2H6], NOX, etc.) on the ignition and combustion of HHC fuels. The research effort specifically addressed broadening the experimental data base for ignition delay, burning rate, and oxidation kinetics at high pressures, and further refinement of chemical kinetic models so as to develop compositional specifications related to the above major and minor species. The foundation for the chemical kinetic modeling was the well validated mechanism for hydrogen and carbon monoxide developed over the last 25 years by Professor Frederick Dryer and his co-workers at Princeton University. This research furthered advance the understanding needed to develop practical guidelines for realistic composition limits and operating characteristics for HHC fuels. A suite of experiments was utilized that that involved a high-pressure laminar flow reactor, a pressure-release type high-pressure combustion chamber and a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor.

  12. TACK—a program coupling chemical kinetics with a two-dimensional transport model in geochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Källvenius, Göran; Ekberg, Christian

    2003-05-01

    The Transport And Chemical Kinetics (TACK) program has been designed to make predictions of the chemistry in the vicinity of a planned repository for nuclear waste, i.e. SFL 3-5, where SFL is the Swedish abbreviation for "Swedish repository for long-lived waste". This implies modelling transport and chemistry in fractured rock. The system concerned in the modelling of SFL is leaching water from decommissioning waste in concrete. The concrete will raise the pH in the water to between 12 and 13.5. So far, only a few calculations have been made on such systems. Coupled transport and chemical reaction programs should be used, since the system is important for safety assessments of the repository. At least two of programs can be used for this kind of problem, for example OS3D/GIMRT and PHAST. As it is also important to consider the uncertainty of the model, the TACK program fills an important purpose here. A slightly different approach to the problem may give significantly different results. Because validation is generally not possible, using several programs is the only key to identifying conceptual uncertainties. To illustrate this point, comparative calculations have been made between TACK and the PHAST program. The calculations gave qualitatively similar result but quantitatively somewhat differing results. The TACK program couples the well known PHREEQC geochemical program with a two-dimensional transport model. The PHREEQC calculations include speciation of solutions and mineral reactions involving kinetics. The reasons for choosing this program are that it is quite a general one and is relatively stable at the high pH values present in the systems used. The transport phenomena taken into account in the model are advection, diffusion and dispersion in two dimensions.

  13. Errors in the Calculation of 27Al Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianlong; Wang, Chengfei; Zhao, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Computational chemistry is an important tool for signal assignment of 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectra in order to elucidate the species of aluminum(III) in aqueous solutions. The accuracy of the popular theoretical models for computing the 27Al chemical shifts was evaluated by comparing the calculated and experimental chemical shifts in more than one hundred aluminum(III) complexes. In order to differentiate the error due to the chemical shielding tensor calculation from that due to the inadequacy of the molecular geometry prediction, single-crystal X-ray diffraction determined structures were used to build the isolated molecule models for calculating the chemical shifts. The results were compared with those obtained using the calculated geometries at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The isotropic chemical shielding constants computed at different levels have strong linear correlations even though the absolute values differ in tens of ppm. The root-mean-square difference between the experimental chemical shifts and the calculated values is approximately 5 ppm for the calculations based on the X-ray structures, but more than 10 ppm for the calculations based on the computed geometries. The result indicates that the popular theoretical models are adequate in calculating the chemical shifts while an accurate molecular geometry is more critical. PMID:23203134

  14. PDF calculation of scalar mixing layer with simple chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzaki, Takao; Pope, Stephen B.

    1999-11-01

    A joint velocity-composition-turbulent frequency PDF(JPDF) model is used to simulate reactive mixing layer in a grid-generated turbulence with the influence of second-order irreversible chemical reactions. To investigate the effects of molecular mixing, a gas flow and a liquid flow are simulated. For a gas flow, the oxidation reaction (NO+ O3 arrow NO2 +O2 ) between nitricoxide (NO) and ozone (O3 ) is used. For a liquid flow, the saponification reaction(NaOH+HCOOCH3 arrow HCOONa+CH_3OH) between sodiumhydroxide(NaOH) and methylformate(HCOOCH_3) is used. The both cases are moderately fast reactions. Therefore, reactive scalar statistics are affected by turbulent mixing. The results of caliculation are compared with experimental data of Komori et al.(1994) and Bilger et al.(1991)

  15. Cobalt-mediated radical polymerization of acrylonitrile: kinetics investigations and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Debuigne, Antoine; Michaux, Catherine; Jérôme, Christine; Jérôme, Robert; Poli, Rinaldo; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    The successful controlled homopolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) by cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP) is reported for the first time. As a rule, initiation of the polymerization was carried out starting from a conventional azo-initiator (V-70) in the presence of bis(acetylacetonato)cobalt(II) ([Co(acac)(2)]) but also by using organocobalt(III) adducts. Molar concentration ratios of the reactants, the temperature, and the solvent were tuned, and the effect of these parameters on the course of the polymerization is discussed in detail. The best level of control was observed when the AN polymerization was initiated by an organocobalt(III) adduct at 0 degrees C in dimethyl sulfoxide. Under these conditions, poly(acrylonitrile) with a predictable molar mass and molar mass distribution as low as 1.1 was prepared. A combination of kinetic data, X-ray analyses, and DFT calculations were used to rationalize the results and to draw conclusions on the key role played by the solvent molecules in the process. These important mechanistic insights also permit an explanation of the unexpected "solvent effect" that allows the preparation of well-defined poly(vinyl acetate)-b-poly(acrylonitrile) by CMRP.

  16. Perspective on Free-Energy Perturbation Calculations for Chemical Equilibria

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, William L.; Thomas, Laura L.

    2009-01-01

    An overview is provided on the computation of free energy changes in solution using perturbation theory, overlap sampling, and related approximate methods. As a specific application, extensive results are provided for free energies of hydration of substituted benzenes using the OPLS-AA force field in explicit TIP4P water. For a similar amount of computer time, the double-wide sampling and overlap sampling methods yield very similar results in the free-energy perturbation calculations. With standard protocols, the average statistical uncertainty in computed differences in free energies of hydration is 0.1 – 0.2 kcal/mol. Application of the power-series expansion in the Peierls equation was also tested. Use of the first-order term is generally reliable, while inclusion of the slowly-convergent, second-order fluctuation term causes deterioration in the results for strongly hydrogen-bonded solutes. PMID:19936324

  17. Modeling of Scale-Dependent Bacterial Growth by Chemical Kinetics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Haydee; Cruz, José-Manuel; Ayala, Guadalupe; Rivera, Marco; Buhse, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We applied the so-called chemical kinetics approach to complex bacterial growth patterns that were dependent on the liquid-surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA/V) of the bacterial cultures. The kinetic modeling was based on current experimental knowledge in terms of autocatalytic bacterial growth, its inhibition by the metabolite CO2, and the relief of inhibition through the physical escape of the inhibitor. The model quantitatively reproduces kinetic data of SA/V-dependent bacterial growth and can discriminate between differences in the growth dynamics of enteropathogenic E. coli, E. coli  JM83, and Salmonella typhimurium on one hand and Vibrio cholerae on the other hand. Furthermore, the data fitting procedures allowed predictions about the velocities of the involved key processes and the potential behavior in an open-flow bacterial chemostat, revealing an oscillatory approach to the stationary states. PMID:25105169

  18. Modeling of scale-dependent bacterial growth by chemical kinetics approach.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Haydee; Sánchez, Joaquín; Cruz, José-Manuel; Ayala, Guadalupe; Rivera, Marco; Buhse, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We applied the so-called chemical kinetics approach to complex bacterial growth patterns that were dependent on the liquid-surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA/V) of the bacterial cultures. The kinetic modeling was based on current experimental knowledge in terms of autocatalytic bacterial growth, its inhibition by the metabolite CO2, and the relief of inhibition through the physical escape of the inhibitor. The model quantitatively reproduces kinetic data of SA/V-dependent bacterial growth and can discriminate between differences in the growth dynamics of enteropathogenic E. coli, E. coli JM83, and Salmonella typhimurium on one hand and Vibrio cholerae on the other hand. Furthermore, the data fitting procedures allowed predictions about the velocities of the involved key processes and the potential behavior in an open-flow bacterial chemostat, revealing an oscillatory approach to the stationary states.

  19. A comparison of the efficiency of numerical methods for integrating chemical kinetic rate equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison of the efficiency of several algorithms recently developed for the efficient numerical integration of stiff ordinary differential equations is presented. The methods examined include two general-purpose codes EPISODE and LSODE and three codes (CHEMEQ, CREK1D, and GCKP84) developed specifically to integrate chemical kinetic rate equations. The codes are applied to two test problems drawn from combustion kinetics. The comparisons show that LSODE is the fastest code currently available for the integration of combustion kinetic rate equations. An important finding is that an iterative solution of the algebraic energy conservation equation to compute the temperature can be more efficient than evaluating the temperature by integrating its time-derivative.

  20. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  1. Calculation of eddy viscosity in a compressible turbulent boundary layer with mass injection and chemical reaction, volume 2. [computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, S.

    1973-01-01

    As described in Vol. 1, the eddy viscosity is calculated through the turbulent kinetic energy, in order to include the history of the flow and the effect of chemical reaction on boundary layer characteristics. Calculations can be performed for two different cooling concepts; that is, transpiration and regeneratively cooled wall cases. For the regenerative cooling option, coolant and gas side wall temperature and coolant bulk temperature in a rocket engine can be computed along the nozzle axis. Thus, this computer program is useful in designing coolant flow rate and cooling tube geometry, including the tube wall thickness as well as in predicting the effects of boundary layers along the gas side wall on thrust performances.

  2. New integration techniques for chemical kinetic rate equations. 2: Accuracy comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of the accuracy of several techniques recently developed for solving stiff differential equations is presented. The techniques examined include two general purpose codes EEPISODE and LSODE developed for an arbitrary system of ordinary differential equations, and three specialized codes CHEMEQ, CREKID, and GCKP84 developed specifically to solve chemical kinetic rate equations. The accuracy comparisons are made by applying these solution procedures to two practical combustion kinetics problems. Both problems describe adiabatic, homogeneous, gas phase chemical reactions at constant pressure, and include all three combustion regimes: induction, heat release, and equilibration. The comparisons show that LSODE is the most efficient code - in the sense that it requires the least computational work to attain a specified accuracy level. An important finding is that an iterative solution of the algebraic enthalpy conservation equation for the temperature can be more accurate and efficient than computing the temperature by integrating its time derivative.

  3. New integration techniques for chemical kinetic rate equations. II - Accuracy comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of the accuracy of several techniques recently developed for solving stiff differential equations is presented. The techniques examined include two general purpose codes EEPISODE and LSODE developed for an arbitrary system of ordinary differential equations, and three specialized codes CHEMEQ, CREKID, and GCKP84 developed specifically to solve chemical kinetic rate equations. The accuracy comparisons are made by applying these solution procedures to two practical combustion kinetics problems. Both problems describe adiabatic, homogeneous, gas phase chemical reactions at constant pressure, and include all three combustion regimes: induction heat release, and equilibration. The comparisons show that LSODE is the most efficient code - in the sense that it requires the least computational work to attain a specified accuracy level. An important finding is that an iterative solution of the algebraic enthalpy conservation equation for the temperature can be more accurate and efficient than computing the temperature by integrating its time derivative.

  4. Double-focusing mixing jet for XFEL study of chemical kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Pollack, Lois; Spence, John

    2014-01-01

    Several liquid sample injection methods have been developed to satisfy the requirements for serial femtosecond X-ray nanocrystallography, which enables radiation-damage-free determination of molecular structure at room temperature. Time-resolved nanocrystallography would combine structure analysis with chemical kinetics by determining the structures of the transient states and chemical kinetic mechanisms simultaneously. A windowless liquid mixing jet device has been designed for this purpose. It achieves fast uniform mixing of substrates and enzymes in the jet within 250 µs, with an adjustable delay between mixing and probing by the X-ray free-electron laser beam of up to 1 s for each frame of a ‘movie’. The principle of the liquid mixing jet device is illustrated using numerical simulation, and experimental results are presented using a fluorescent dye. PMID:25343806

  5. Thermoreversible associating polymer networks. I. Interplay of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and polymer physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoy, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.

    2009-12-01

    Hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo simulations are used to study melts of unentangled, thermoreversibly associating supramolecular polymers. In this first of a series of papers, we describe and validate a model that is effective in separating the effects of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics on the dynamics and mechanics of these systems, and is extensible to arbitrarily nonequilibrium situations and nonlinear mechanical properties. We examine the model's quiescent (and heterogeneous) dynamics, nonequilibrium chemical dynamics, and mechanical properties. Many of our results may be understood in terms of the crossover from diffusion-limited to kinetically limited sticky bond recombination, which both influences and is influenced by polymer physics, i.e., the connectivity of the parent chains.

  6. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Autoignition of Isomers of Heptane Under Rapid Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Boercker, J E; Curran, H J; Griffiths, J F; Mohamed, C; Ribaucour, M

    2001-12-17

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for combustion of all nine isomers of heptane (C{sub 7}H{sub 16}), and these mechanisms are tested by simulating autoignition of each isomer under rapid compression machine conditions. The reaction mechanisms focus on the manner in which the molecular structure of each isomer determines the rates and product distributions of possible classes of reactions. The reaction pathways emphasize the importance of alkylperoxy radical isomerizations and addition reactions of molecular oxygen to alkyl and hydroperoxyalkyl radicals. A new reaction group has been added to past models, in which hydroperoxyalkyl radicals that originated with abstraction of an H atom from a tertiary site in the parent heptane molecule are assigned new reaction sequences involving additional internal H atom abstractions not previously allowed. This process accelerates autoignition in fuels with tertiary C-H bonds in the parent fuel. In addition, the rates of hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radical isomerization reactions have all been reduced so that they are now equal to rates of analogous alkylperoxy radical isomerizations, significantly improving agreement between computed and experimental ignition delay times in the rapid compression machine. Computed ignition delay times agree well with experimental results in the few cases where experiments have been carried out for specific heptane isomers, and predictive model calculations are reported for the remaining isomers. The computed results fall into three general groups; the first consists of the most reactive isomers, including n-heptane, 2-methyl hexane and 3-methyl hexane. The second group consists of the least reactive isomers, including 2,2-dimethyl pentane, 3,3-dimethyl pentane, 2,3-dimethyl pentane, 2,4-dimethyl pentane and 2,2,3-trimethyl butane. The remaining isomer, 3-ethyl pentane, was observed computationally to have an intermediate level of reactivity. These observations are generally

  7. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-12-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K ( D )) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K ( D ) value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of (1)H-(15)N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k ( off )). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k ( off ) ~ 3,000 s(-1) in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k ( off ) from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k ( off ) values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s(-1). The validity of line shape analysis for k ( off ) values approaching intermediate exchange (~100 s(-1)), may be facilitated by more accurate K ( D ) measurements

  8. Measurement and chemical kinetic model predictions of detonation cell size in methanol-oxygen mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, R.; Zhang, B.; Bergthorson, J. M.; Ng, H. D.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, detonation cell sizes of methanol-oxygen mixtures are experimentally measured at different initial pressures and compositions. Good agreement is found between the experiment data and predictions based on the chemical length scales obtained from a detailed chemical kinetic model. To assess the detonation sensitivity in methanol-oxygen mixtures, the results are compared with those of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures. Based on the cell size comparison, it is shown that methanol-oxygen is more detonation sensitive than methane-oxygen but less sensitive than hydrogen-oxygen.

  9. Reduced and simplified chemical kinetics for air dissociation using Computational Singular Perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goussis, D. A.; Lam, S. H.; Gnoffo, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Computational Singular Perturbation CSP methods is employed (1) in the modeling of a homogeneous isothermal reacting system and (2) in the numerical simulation of the chemical reactions in a hypersonic flowfield. Reduced and simplified mechanisms are constructed. The solutions obtained on the basis of these approximate mechanisms are shown to be in very good agreement with the exact solution based on the full mechanism. Physically meaningful approximations are derived. It is demonstrated that the deduction of these approximations from CSP is independent of the complexity of the problem and requires no intuition or experience in chemical kinetics.

  10. Modelling transport and degradation of de-icing chemicals in soil, assuming Monod kinetics with multiple electron-acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schotanus, D.; Meeussen, J. C. L.; van der Ploeg, M. J.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.

    2012-04-01

    De-icing chemicals that contain propylene glycol are used at Oslo airport during winter time. A fraction of these chemicals is spilled on the runway and can be transported rapidly in the sandy soil in spring during snowmelt. Better insight into the chemical and physical processes that govern the fate of these chemicals in soil will help to estimate potential effects on the large unconfined aquifer in this area, and makes it possible to evaluate potential remedial actions. Micro-organisms in the soil can degrade propylene glycol, for which they need electron-acceptors. Under aerobic conditions, oxygen will be used as an electron-acceptor. From experiments, it is known that also anaerobic degradation occurs in this soil. During snowmelt, high infiltration rates can lead to locally saturated soil. In these parts, oxygen diffusion is limited and thus anaerobic conditions will occur. In these anaerobic regions, other electron-acceptors, such as manganese-oxides that are present in this soil, are used. However, frequent propylene glycol application may lead to a depletion of manganese-oxides and so to increased persistence and migration of propylene glycol in soil. To prevent this depletion and to enhance biodegradation, other electron-acceptors can be applied at the soil surface. Examples are the application of nitrate to the soil surface, and air injection. Model calculations could help to estimate required concentrations. The objectives of this study are 1) to create the reactive model, 2) to use this model to evaluate which parameters are determining leaching fluxes of propylene glycol from the soil, and 3) to evaluate the effectiveness of the different remediation strategies. Therefore, transient water flow, kinetic degradation, and redox chemistry were combined in one model. Degradation is modelled with Monod kinetics using multiple electron-acceptors. Oxygen diffusion in the gas phase, biomass growth, and oxidation and reduction of the important electron

  11. Quantum calculation of protein NMR chemical shifts based on the automated fragmentation method.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tong; Zhang, John Z H; He, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The performance of quantum mechanical methods on the calculation of protein NMR chemical shifts is reviewed based on the recently developed automatic fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (AF-QM/MM) approach. By using the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) model and first solvation water molecules, the influence of solvent effect is also discussed. Benefiting from the fragmentation algorithm, the AF-QM/MM approach is computationally efficient, linear-scaling with a low pre-factor, and thus can be applied to routinely calculate the ab initio NMR chemical shifts for proteins of any size. The results calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) show that when the solvent effect is included, this method can accurately reproduce the experimental ¹H NMR chemical shifts, while the ¹³C NMR chemical shifts are less affected by the solvent. However, although the inclusion of solvent effect shows significant improvement for ¹⁵N chemical shifts, the calculated values still have large deviations from the experimental observations. Our study further demonstrates that AF-QM/MM calculated results accurately reflect the dependence of ¹³C(α) NMR chemical shifts on the secondary structure of proteins, and the calculated ¹H chemical shift can be utilized to discriminate the native structure of proteins from decoys.

  12. CYANOMETHANIMINE ISOMERS IN COLD INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS: INSIGHTS FROM ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE AND KINETIC CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vazart, Fanny; Latouche, Camille; Skouteris, Dimitrios; Barone, Vincenzo; Balucani, Nadia

    2015-09-10

    New insights into the formation of interstellar cyanomethanimine, a species of great relevance in prebiotic chemistry, are provided by electronic structure and kinetic calculations for the reaction CN + CH{sub 2} = NH. This reaction is a facile formation route of Z,E-C-cyanomethanimine, even under the extreme conditions of density and temperature typical of cold interstellar clouds. E-C-cyanomethanimine has been recently identified in Sgr B2(N) in the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) PRIMOS survey by P. Zaleski et al. and no efficient formation routes have been envisaged so far. The rate coefficient expression for the reaction channel leading to the observed isomer E-C-cyanomethanimine is 3.15 × 10-10 × (T/300){sup 0.152} × e{sup (−0.0948/T)}. According to the present study, the more stable Z-C-cyanomethanimine isomer is formed with a slightly larger yield (4.59 × 10{sup −10} × (T/300){sup 0.153} × e{sup (−0.0871/T)}. As the detection of E-isomer is favored due to its larger dipole moment, the missing detection of the Z-isomer can be due to the sensitivity limit of the GBT PRIMOS survey and the detection of the Z-isomer should be attempted with more sensitive instrumentation. The CN + CH{sub 2} = NH reaction can also play a role in the chemistry of the upper atmosphere of Titan where the cyanomethanimine products can contribute to the buildup of the observed nitrogen-rich organic aerosols that cover the moon.

  13. A Computer Generated Reduced Iso-Octane Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Applied to Simulation of HCCI Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Flowers, D; Smith, J R; Dibble, R; Chen, J Y

    2002-08-12

    This paper shows how a computer can systematically remove non-essential chemical reactions from a large chemical kinetic mechanism. The computer removes the reactions based upon a single solution using a detailed mechanism. The resulting reduced chemical mechanism produces similar numerical predictions significantly faster than predictions that use the detailed mechanism. Specifically, a reduced chemical kinetics mechanism for iso-octane has been derived from a detailed mechanism by eliminating unimportant reaction steps and species. The reduced mechanism has been developed for the specific purpose of fast and accurate prediction of ignition timing in an HCCI engine. The reduced mechanism contains 199 species and 383 reactions, while the detailed mechanism contains 859 species and 3606 reactions. Both mechanisms have been used in numerical simulation of HCCI combustion. The simulations show that the reduced mechanism predicts pressure traces and heat release with good accuracy, similar to the accuracy obtained with the detailed mechanism. As may be expected, emissions of hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide are not as well predicted with the reduced mechanism as with the detailed mechanism, since the reduced mechanism was targeted for predicting HCCI ignition and not HC and CO emissions. Considering that the reduced mechanism requires about 25 times less computational time than the detailed mechanism (2 hours vs. 2 days), the ability to automatically generate a problem specific reduced mechanism is an important new tool for combustion research in general.

  14. Equilibration Kinetics and Chemical Diffusion of Indium-Doped TiO2.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Janusz; Alim, Mohammad A

    2015-04-30

    The present work reports the gas/solid equilibration kinetics for In-doped TiO2 (0.4 atom % In) at elevated temperatures (1023-1273 K) in the gas phase of controlled oxygen activity [10(-13) Pa < p(O2) < 10(5) Pa]. Thus, the determined chemical diffusion coefficient is considered in terms of a microdiffusion coefficient that is reflective of the transport kinetics within very narrow ranges of oxygen activities. In analogy to pure TiO2, the chemical diffusion coefficient for In-doped TiO2 exhibits a maximum at the n-p transition point. The activation energy of the chemical diffusion exhibits a decrease with temperature from 200 kJ/mol at 1023 K to an insignificant value at 1273 K. This effect is reflective of a segregation-induced electrical potential barrier blocking the transport of defects. The absolute value of the chemical diffusion coefficient for In-doped TiO2 is larger from that of pure TiO2 by a factor of approximately 10. The effect of indium on the diffusion rate is considered in terms of the associated concentration of oxygen vacancies, which are formed in order to satisfy the charge neutrality for In-doped TiO2.

  15. An Alternative Treatment of Trace Chemical Constituents in Calculated Chemical Source Terms for Hanford Tank Farms Safety Analsyes

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, James L.

    2006-09-26

    Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank accident analyses require chemical waste toxicity source terms to assess potential accident consequences. Recent reviews of the current methodology used to generate source terms and the need to periodically update the sources terms has brought scrutiny to the manner in which trace waste constituents are included in the source terms. This report examines the importance of trace constituents to the chemical waste source terms, which are calculated as sums of fractions (SOFs), and recommends three changes to the manner in which trace constituents are included in the calculation SOFs.

  16. Calibration of Chemical Kinetic Models Using Simulations of Small-Scale Cookoff Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wemhoff, A P; Becker, R C; Burnham, A K

    2008-02-26

    Establishing safe handling limits for explosives in elevated temperature environments is a difficult problem that often requires extensive simulation. The largest influence on predicting thermal cookoff safety lies in the chemical kinetic model used in these simulations, and these kinetic model reaction sequences often contain multiple steps. Several small-scale cookoff experiments, notably Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), One-Dimensional Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), and the Scaled Thermal Explosion (STEX) have been performed on various explosives to aid in cookoff behavior determination. Past work has used a single test from this group to create a cookoff model, which does not guarantee agreement with the other experiments. In this study, we update the kinetic parameters of an existing model for the common explosive 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) using DSC and ODTX experimental data at the same time by minimizing a global Figure of Merit based on hydrodynamic simulated data. We then show that the new kinetic model maintains STEX agreement, reduces DSC agreement, and improves ODTX and TGA agreement when compared to the original model. In addition, we describe a means to use implicit hydrodynamic simulations of DSC experiments to develop a reaction model for TNT melting.

  17. Chemical Kinetics of the TPS and Base Bleeding During Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osipov, Viatcheslav; Ponizhovskaya, Ekaterina; Hafiychuck, Halyna; Luchinsky, Dmitry; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Dagostino, Mark; Canabal, Francisco; Mobley, Brandon L.

    2012-01-01

    The present research deals with thermal degradation of polyurethane foam (PUF) during flight test. Model of thermal decomposition was developed that accounts for polyurethane kinetics parameters extracted from thermogravimetric analyses and radial heat losses to the surrounding environment. The model predicts mass loss of foam, the temperature and kinetic of release of the exhaust gases and char as function of heat and radiation loads. When PUF is heated, urethane bond break into polyol and isocyanate. In the first stage, isocyanate pyrolyses and oxidizes. As a result, the thermo-char and oil droplets (yellow smoke) are released. In the second decomposition stage, pyrolysis and oxidization of liquid polyol occur. Next, the kinetics of chemical compound release and the information about the reactions occurring in the base area are coupled to the CFD simulations of the base flow in a single first stage motor vertically stacked vehicle configuration. The CFD simulations are performed to estimate the contribution of the hot out-gassing, chemical reactions, and char oxidation to the temperature rise of the base flow. The results of simulations are compared with the flight test data.

  18. Two-scale large deviations for chemical reaction kinetics through second quantization path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiejun; Lin, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by the study of rare events for a typical genetic switching model in systems biology, in this paper we aim to establish the general two-scale large deviations for chemical reaction systems. We build a formal approach to explicitly obtain the large deviation rate functionals for the considered two-scale processes based upon the second quantization path integral technique. We get three important types of large deviation results when the underlying two timescales are in three different regimes. This is realized by singular perturbation analysis to the rate functionals obtained by the path integral. We find that the three regimes possess the same deterministic mean-field limit but completely different chemical Langevin approximations. The obtained results are natural extensions of the classical large volume limit for chemical reactions. We also discuss its implication on the single-molecule Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Our framework and results can be applied to understand general multi-scale systems including diffusion processes.

  19. Communication: Kinetics of chemical ordering in Ag-Au and Ag-Ni nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, F.; Fortunelli, A.; Negreiros, F.; Wales, D. J.

    2013-09-01

    The energy landscape and kinetics of medium-sized Ag-Au and Ag-Ni nanoalloy particles are explored via a discrete path sampling approach, focusing on rearrangements connecting regions differing in chemical order. The highly miscible Ag27Au28 supports a large number of nearly degenerate icosahedral homotops. The transformation from reverse core-shell to core-shell involves large displacements away from the icosahedron through elementary steps corresponding to surface diffusion and vacancy formation. The immiscible Ag42Ni13 naturally forms an asymmetric core-shell structure, and about 10 eV is required to extrude the nickel core to the surface. The corresponding transformation occurs via a long and smooth sequence of surface displacements. For both systems the rearrangement kinetics exhibit Arrhenius behavior. These results are discussed in the light of experimental observations.

  20. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate.

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-07-21

    Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines.

  1. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, Olivier; Pitz, William J.; Westbrook, Charles K.

    2010-05-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet-stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. (author)

  2. Chemical reactions involved in penicillin allergy: kinetics and mechanism of penicillin aminolysis.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, A; Yamana, T; Miyamoto, E; Kiya, E

    1975-08-01

    In view of the fundamental importance of the reaction of penicillins with amino groups of proteins to the penicillin allergy, the aminolysis of benzylpenicillin by various amines was kinetically investigated. The formation rate constants, kamide, of benzylpenicilloylamides were determined at 35 degrees, 45 degrees and 60 degrees (mu equals 0.5), and found to obey the general rate law: kamide equals k1[amine] + k2[amine H+] [amine] + k3[amine]2 + k4[amine]aoh. All of the amines exhibited the unassisted nucleophilic rate constant, k1. The relative importance of the other kinetic terms depends on the basicity and the chemical structure of amines. The reaction mechanism of penicillin aminolysis was discussed. Bronsted relations for k1, k2 and k3, except for hydrazines, were satisfactory.

  3. Controls on chemical weathering kinetics: Implications from modelling of stable isotope fractionations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickle, M. J.; Tipper, E.; De La Rocha, C. L.; Galy, A.; Li, S.

    2013-12-01

    The kinetic controls on silicate chemical weathering rates are thought central to the feedback process that regulates global climate on geological time scales. However the nature and magnitude of these kinetic controls are controversial. In particular the importance of physical erosion rates is uncertain with some arguing that there is an upper limit on chemical weathering fluxes irrespective of physical erosion rates (e.g. Dixon and von Blackenburg, 2012). Others argue that it is the hydrology of catchments which determines flow path lengths and fluid residence times which are critical to chemical weathering fluxes (e.g. Maher, 2011). Understanding these physical controls is essential to predicting how chemical weathering fluxes will respond the key climatic controls. Chemical weathering fluxes are best estimated by the integrated riverine outputs from catchments as soil profiles may not integrate all the flow paths. However the interpretation of chemical weathering processes based solely on flux data is difficult, because of both the multiple processes acting and multiple phases dissolving that contribute to these fluxes. Fractionations of stable isotopes of the soluble elements including Li, Mg, Si and Ca should place additional constraints on chemical weathering processes. Here we use a simple reactive-transport model to interpret stable isotope fractionations. Although still a simplification of the natural system, this offers a much closer representation than simple batch and Rayleigh models. The isotopic fractionations are shown to be a function of the ratio of the amount of the element supplied by mineral dissolution to that lost to secondary mineral formation and the extent of reaction down the flow path. The modelling is used to interpret the evolution of dissolved Li, Mg and Si-isotope ratios in Ganges river system. The evolution of Si isotopic ratios in the rapidly eroding Himalayan catchments is distinct from that in the flood planes. Critically the

  4. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts in organic solids: accounting for motional effects.

    PubMed

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Pickard, Chris J

    2009-03-14

    NMR chemical shifts were calculated from first principles for well defined crystalline organic solids. These density functional theory calculations were carried out within the plane-wave pseudopotential framework, in which truly extended systems are implicitly considered. The influence of motional effects was assessed by averaging over vibrational modes or over snapshots taken from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It is observed that the zero-point correction to chemical shifts can be significant, and that thermal effects are particularly noticeable for shielding anisotropies and for a temperature-dependent chemical shift. This study provides insight into the development of highly accurate first principles calculations of chemical shifts in solids, highlighting the role of motional effects on well defined systems.

  5. Chemical Equilibrium, Unit 3: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Cynthia J.

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student materials for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student manual for this unit on chemical equilibrium calculations includes objectives, prerequisites, a discussion of the equilibrium constant (K), and ten…

  6. Chemical Kinetic Simulation of the Combustion of Bio-based Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ashen, Ms. Refuyat; Cushman, Ms. Katherine C.

    2007-10-01

    Due to environmental and economic issues, there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative fuels. However, before widespread use of biofuels is feasible, the compatibility of these fuels with specific engines needs to be examined. More accurate models of the chemical combustion of alternative fuels in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines are necessary, and this project evaluates the performance of emissions models and uses the information gathered to study the chemical kinetics involved. The computer simulations for each alternative fuel were executed using the Chemkin chemical kinetics program, and results from the runs were compared with data gathered from an actual engine that was run under similar conditions. A new heat transfer mechanism was added to the existing model's subroutine, and simulations were then conducted using the heat transfer mechanism. Results from the simulation proved to be accurate when compared with the data taken from the actual engine. The addition of heat transfer produced more realistic temperature and pressure data for biodiesel when biodiesel's combustion was simulated in an HCCI engine. The addition of the heat transfer mechanism essentially lowered the peak pressures and peak temperatures during combustion of all fuels simulated in this project.

  7. Integration of large chemical kinetic mechanisms via exponential methods with Krylov approximations to Jacobian matrix functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2012-06-01

    Recent trends in hydrocarbon fuel research indicate that the number of species and reactions in chemical kinetic mechanisms is rapidly increasing in an effort to provide predictive capabilities for fuels of practical interest. In order to cope with the computational cost associated with the time integration of stiff, large chemical systems, a novel approach is proposed. The approach combines an exponential integrator and Krylov subspace approximations to the exponential function of the Jacobian matrix. The components of the approach are described in detail and applied to the ignition of stoichiometric methane-air and iso-octane-air mixtures, here described by two widely adopted chemical kinetic mechanisms. The approach is found to be robust even at relatively large time steps and the global error displays a nominal third-order convergence. The performance of the approach is improved by utilising an adaptive algorithm for the selection of the Krylov subspace size, which guarantees an approximation to the matrix exponential within user-defined error tolerance. The Krylov projection of the Jacobian matrix onto a low-dimensional space is interpreted as a local model reduction with a well-defined error control strategy. Finally, the performance of the approach is discussed with regard to the optimal selection of the parameters governing the accuracy of its individual components.

  8. Theory of chemical kinetics and charge transfer based on nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bazant, Martin Z

    2013-05-21

    Advances in the fields of catalysis and electrochemical energy conversion often involve nanoparticles, which can have kinetics surprisingly different from the bulk material. Classical theories of chemical kinetics assume independent reactions in dilute solutions, whose rates are determined by mean concentrations. In condensed matter, strong interactions alter chemical activities and create variations that can dramatically affect the reaction rate. The extreme case is that of a reaction coupled to a phase transformation, whose kinetics must depend not only on the order parameter but also on its gradients at phase boundaries. Reaction-driven phase transformations are common in electrochemistry, when charge transfer is accompanied by ion intercalation or deposition in a solid phase. Examples abound in Li-ion, metal-air, and lead-acid batteries, as well as metal electrodeposition-dissolution. Despite complex thermodynamics, however, the standard kinetic model is the Butler-Volmer equation, based on a dilute solution approximation. The Marcus theory of charge transfer likewise considers isolated reactants and neglects elastic stress, configurational entropy, and other nonidealities in condensed phases. The limitations of existing theories recently became apparent for the Li-ion battery material LixFePO4 (LFP). It has a strong tendency to separate into Li-rich and Li-poor solid phases, which scientists believe limits its performance. Chemists first modeled phase separation in LFP as an isotropic "shrinking core" within each particle, but experiments later revealed striped phase boundaries on the active crystal facet. This raised the question: What is the reaction rate at a surface undergoing a phase transformation? Meanwhile, dramatic rate enhancement was attained with LFP nanoparticles, and classical battery models could not predict the roles of phase separation and surface modification. In this Account, I present a general theory of chemical kinetics, developed over

  9. Theory of chemical kinetics and charge transfer based on nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bazant, Martin Z

    2013-05-21

    Advances in the fields of catalysis and electrochemical energy conversion often involve nanoparticles, which can have kinetics surprisingly different from the bulk material. Classical theories of chemical kinetics assume independent reactions in dilute solutions, whose rates are determined by mean concentrations. In condensed matter, strong interactions alter chemical activities and create variations that can dramatically affect the reaction rate. The extreme case is that of a reaction coupled to a phase transformation, whose kinetics must depend not only on the order parameter but also on its gradients at phase boundaries. Reaction-driven phase transformations are common in electrochemistry, when charge transfer is accompanied by ion intercalation or deposition in a solid phase. Examples abound in Li-ion, metal-air, and lead-acid batteries, as well as metal electrodeposition-dissolution. Despite complex thermodynamics, however, the standard kinetic model is the Butler-Volmer equation, based on a dilute solution approximation. The Marcus theory of charge transfer likewise considers isolated reactants and neglects elastic stress, configurational entropy, and other nonidealities in condensed phases. The limitations of existing theories recently became apparent for the Li-ion battery material LixFePO4 (LFP). It has a strong tendency to separate into Li-rich and Li-poor solid phases, which scientists believe limits its performance. Chemists first modeled phase separation in LFP as an isotropic "shrinking core" within each particle, but experiments later revealed striped phase boundaries on the active crystal facet. This raised the question: What is the reaction rate at a surface undergoing a phase transformation? Meanwhile, dramatic rate enhancement was attained with LFP nanoparticles, and classical battery models could not predict the roles of phase separation and surface modification. In this Account, I present a general theory of chemical kinetics, developed over

  10. Effects of correlated parameters and uncertainty in electronic-structure-based chemical kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Jonathan E; Guo, Wei; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic models based on first principles are becoming common place in heterogeneous catalysis because of their ability to interpret experimental data, identify the rate-controlling step, guide experiments and predict novel materials. To overcome the tremendous computational cost of estimating parameters of complex networks on metal catalysts, approximate quantum mechanical calculations are employed that render models potentially inaccurate. Here, by introducing correlative global sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, we show that neglecting correlations in the energies of species and reactions can lead to an incorrect identification of influential parameters and key reaction intermediates and reactions. We rationalize why models often underpredict reaction rates and show that, despite the uncertainty being large, the method can, in conjunction with experimental data, identify influential missing reaction pathways and provide insights into the catalyst active site and the kinetic reliability of a model. The method is demonstrated in ethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production for fuel cells. PMID:27001728

  11. Effects of correlated parameters and uncertainty in electronic-structure-based chemical kinetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Jonathan E.; Guo, Wei; Katsoulakis, Markos A.; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic models based on first principles are becoming common place in heterogeneous catalysis because of their ability to interpret experimental data, identify the rate-controlling step, guide experiments and predict novel materials. To overcome the tremendous computational cost of estimating parameters of complex networks on metal catalysts, approximate quantum mechanical calculations are employed that render models potentially inaccurate. Here, by introducing correlative global sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, we show that neglecting correlations in the energies of species and reactions can lead to an incorrect identification of influential parameters and key reaction intermediates and reactions. We rationalize why models often underpredict reaction rates and show that, despite the uncertainty being large, the method can, in conjunction with experimental data, identify influential missing reaction pathways and provide insights into the catalyst active site and the kinetic reliability of a model. The method is demonstrated in ethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production for fuel cells.

  12. Iron oxidation kinetics for H-2 and CO production via chemical looping

    SciTech Connect

    Stehle, RC; Bobek, MM; Hahn, DW

    2015-01-30

    Solar driven production of fuels by means of an intermediate reactive metal for species splitting has provided a practical and potentially efficient pathway for disassociating molecules at significantly lower thermal energies. The fuels of interest are of or derive from the separation of oxygen from H2O and CO2 to form hydrogen and carbon monoxide, respectively. The following study focuses on iron oxidation through water and CO2 splitting to explore the fundamental reaction kinetics and kinetic rates that are relevant to these processes. In order to properly characterize the reactive metal potential and to optimize a scaled-up solar reactor system, a monolith-based laboratory reactor was implemented to investigate reaction temperatures over a range from 990 to 1400 K. The presence of a single, solid monolith as a reacting surface allowed for a limitation in mass transport effects in order to monitor kinetically driven reaction steps. The formation of oxide layers on the iron monoliths followed Cabrera-Mott models for oxidation of metals with kinetic rates being measured using real-time mass spectrometry to calculate kinetic constants and estimate oxide layer thicknesses. Activation energies of 47.3 kJ/mol and 32.8 kJ/mol were found for water-splitting and CO2 splitting, respectively, and the conclusions of the independent oxidation reactions where applied to experimental results for syngas (H-2-CO) production to explore ideal process characteristics. Copyright (C) 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Analysis of Low Temperature Non-Sooting Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

    2004-10-01

    We have developed a model of the diesel fuel injection process for application to analysis of low temperature non-sooting combustion. The model uses a simplified mixing correlation and detailed chemical kinetics, and analyzes a parcel of fuel as it moves along the fuel jet, from injection into evaporation and ignition. The model predicts chemical composition and soot precursors, and is applied at conditions that result in low temperature non-sooting combustion. Production of soot precursors is the first step toward production of soot, and modeling precursor production is expected to give insight into the overall evolution of soot inside the engine. The results of the analysis show that the model has been successful in describing many of the observed characteristics of low temperature combustion. The model predicts results that are qualitatively similar to those obtained for soot formation experiments at conditions in which the EGR rate is increased from zero to very high values as the fueling rate is kept constant. The model also describes the two paths to achieve non-sooting combustion. The first is smokeless rich combustion and the second is modulated kinetics (MK). The importance of the temperature after ignition and the equivalence ratio at the time of ignition is demonstrated, as these parameters can be used to collapse onto a single line all the results for soot precursors for multiple fueling rates. A parametric analysis indicates that precursor formation increases considerably as the gas temperature in the combustion chamber and the characteristic mixing time are increased. The model provides a chemical kinetic description of low temperature diesel combustion that improves the understanding of this clean and efficient regime of operation.

  14. Sum over Histories Representation for Kinetic Sensitivity Analysis: How Chemical Pathways Change When Reaction Rate Coefficients Are Varied.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shirong; Davis, Michael J; Skodje, Rex T

    2015-11-12

    The sensitivity of kinetic observables is analyzed using a newly developed sum over histories representation of chemical kinetics. In the sum over histories representation, the concentrations of the chemical species are decomposed into the sum of probabilities for chemical pathways that follow molecules from reactants to products or intermediates. Unlike static flux methods for reaction path analysis, the sum over histories approach includes the explicit time dependence of the pathway probabilities. Using the sum over histories representation, the sensitivity of an observable with respect to a kinetic parameter such as a rate coefficient is then analyzed in terms of how that parameter affects the chemical pathway probabilities. The method is illustrated for species concentration target functions in H2 combustion where the rate coefficients are allowed to vary over their associated uncertainty ranges. It is found that large sensitivities are often associated with rate limiting steps along important chemical pathways or by reactions that control the branching of reactive flux.

  15. A detailed chemical kinetic model of high-temperature ethylene glycol gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Simon; Rashidi, Arash; Baldea, Georgiana; Riedel, Uwe

    2011-08-01

    In recent experimental investigations, ethylene glycol is used as a model substance for biomass-based pyrolysis oil in an entrained flow gasifier. In order to gain a deeper insight into process sequences and to conduct parametric analysis, this study describes the development and validation of a detailed chemical kinetic model of high-temperature ethylene glycol gasification. A detailed reaction mechanism based on elementary reactions has been developed considering 80 species and 1243 reactions for application in CFD software. In addition to mechanism validation based on ignition delay times, laminar flame speeds and concentration profiles, simulation results are compared to experimental data of ethylene glycol gasification under complex turbulent reactive flow conditions.

  16. A numerical scheme for optimal transition paths of stochastic chemical kinetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Di

    2008-10-01

    We present a new framework for finding the optimal transition paths of metastable stochastic chemical kinetic systems with large system size. The optimal transition paths are identified to be the most probable paths according to the Large Deviation Theory of stochastic processes. Dynamical equations for the optimal transition paths are derived using the variational principle. A modified Minimum Action Method (MAM) is proposed as a numerical scheme to solve the optimal transition paths. Applications to Gene Regulatory Networks such as the toggle switch model and the Lactose Operon Model in Escherichia coli are presented as numerical examples.

  17. A Chemical Kinetic Mechanism for the Ignition of Silane/Hydrogen Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.; Mclain, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the oxidation of silane/hydrogen mixtures is presented and discussed. Shock-tube ignition delay time data were used to evaluate and refine the mechanism. Good agreement between experimental results and the results predicted by the mechanism was obtained by adjusting the rate coefficient for the reaction SiH3 + O2 yields SiH2O + OH. The reaction mechanism was used to theoretically investigate the ignition characteristics of silane/hydrogen mixtures. The results revealed that over the entire range of temperature examined (800 K to 1200 K), substantial reduction in ignition delay times is obtained when silane is added to hydrogen.

  18. The efficiency of driving chemical reactions by a physical non-equilibrium is kinetically controlled.

    PubMed

    Göppel, Tobias; Palyulin, Vladimir V; Gerland, Ulrich

    2016-07-27

    An out-of-equilibrium physical environment can drive chemical reactions into thermodynamically unfavorable regimes. Under prebiotic conditions such a coupling between physical and chemical non-equilibria may have enabled the spontaneous emergence of primitive evolutionary processes. Here, we study the coupling efficiency within a theoretical model that is inspired by recent laboratory experiments, but focuses on generic effects arising whenever reactant and product molecules have different transport coefficients in a flow-through system. In our model, the physical non-equilibrium is represented by a drift-diffusion process, which is a valid coarse-grained description for the interplay between thermophoresis and convection, as well as for many other molecular transport processes. As a simple chemical reaction, we consider a reversible dimerization process, which is coupled to the transport process by different drift velocities for monomers and dimers. Within this minimal model, the coupling efficiency between the non-equilibrium transport process and the chemical reaction can be analyzed in all parameter regimes. The analysis shows that the efficiency depends strongly on the Damköhler number, a parameter that measures the relative timescales associated with the transport and reaction kinetics. Our model and results will be useful for a better understanding of the conditions for which non-equilibrium environments can provide a significant driving force for chemical reactions in a prebiotic setting.

  19. FORTRAN 4 computer program for calculation of thermodynamic and transport properties of complex chemical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, R. A.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program for the calculation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of complex mixtures is described. The program has the capability of performing calculations such as:(1) chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states, (2) theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion, (3) incident and reflected shock properties, and (4) Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties. Condensed species, as well as gaseous species, are considered in the thermodynamic calculation; but only the gaseous species are considered in the transport calculations.

  20. High-Pressure Turbulent Flame Speeds and Chemical Kinetics of Syngas Blends with and without Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Eric; Mathieu, Olivier; Morones, Anibal; Ravi, Sankar; Keesee, Charles; Hargis, Joshua; Vivanco, Jose

    2014-12-01

    This Topical Report documents the first year of the project, from October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2014. Efforts for this project included experiments to characterize the atmospheric-pressure turbulent flame speed vessel over a range of operating conditions (fan speeds and turbulent length scales). To this end, a new LDV system was acquired and set up for the detailed characterization of the turbulence field. Much progress was made in the area of impurity kinetics, which included a numerical study of the effect of impurities such as NO2, NO, H2S, and NH3 on ignition delay times and laminar flame speeds of syngas blends at engine conditions. Experiments included a series of laminar flame speed measurements for syngas (CO/H2) blends with various levels of CH4 and C2H6 addition, and the results were compared to the chemical kinetics model of NUI Galway. Also, a final NOx kinetics mechanism including ammonia was assembled, and a journal paper was written and is now in press. Overall, three journal papers and six conference papers related to this project were published this year. Finally, much progress was made on the design of the new high-pressure turbulent flame speed facility. An overall design that includes a venting system was decided upon, and the detailed design is in progress.

  1. Chemical kinetic study of the oxidation of toluene and related cyclic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Frassoldati, A; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W; Ranzi, E

    2009-10-01

    Chemical kinetic models of hydrocarbons found in transportation fuels are needed to simulate combustion in engines and to improve engine performance. The study of the combustion of practical fuels, however, has to deal with their complex compositions, which generally involve hundreds of compounds. To provide a simplified approach for practical fuels, surrogate fuels including few relevant components are used instead of including all components. Among those components, toluene, the simplest of the alkyl benzenes, is one of the most prevalent aromatic compounds in gasoline in the U.S. (up to 30%) and is a promising candidate for formulating gasoline surrogates. Unfortunately, even though the combustion of aromatics been studied for a long time, the oxidation processes relevant to this class of compounds are still matter of discussion. In this work, the combustion of toluene is systematically approached through the analysis of the kinetics of some important intermediates contained in its kinetic submechanism. After discussing the combustion chemistry of cyclopentadiene, benzene, phenol and, finally, of toluene, the model is validated against literature experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions.

  2. Decay-ratio calculation in the frequency domain with the LAPUR code using 1D-kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Escriva, A.; Garcia, C.; Berna, C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper deals with the problem of computing the Decay Ratio in the frequency domain codes as the LAPUR code. First, it is explained how to calculate the feedback reactivity in the frequency domain using slab-geometry i.e. 1D kinetics, also we show how to perform the coupling of the 1D kinetics with the thermal-hydraulic part of the LAPUR code in order to obtain the reactivity feedback coefficients for the different channels. In addition, we show how to obtain the reactivity variation in the complex domain by solving the eigenvalue equation in the frequency domain and we compare this result with the reactivity variation obtained in first order perturbation theory using the 1D neutron fluxes of the base case. Because LAPUR works in the linear regime, it is assumed that in general the perturbations are small. There is also a section devoted to the reactivity weighting factors used to couple the reactivity contribution from the different channels to the reactivity of the entire reactor core in point kinetics and 1D kinetics. Finally we analyze the effects of the different approaches on the DR value. (authors)

  3. Physically consistent simulation of mesoscale chemical kinetics: The non-negative FIS-{alpha} method

    SciTech Connect

    Dana, Saswati; Raha, Soumyendu

    2011-10-01

    Biochemical pathways involving chemical kinetics in medium concentrations (i.e., at mesoscale) of the reacting molecules can be approximated as chemical Langevin equations (CLE) systems. We address the physically consistent non-negative simulation of the CLE sample paths as well as the issue of non-Lipschitz diffusion coefficients when a species approaches depletion and any stiffness due to faster reactions. The non-negative Fully Implicit Stochastic {alpha} (FIS {alpha}) method in which stopped reaction channels due to depleted reactants are deleted until a reactant concentration rises again, for non-negativity preservation and in which a positive definite Jacobian is maintained to deal with possible stiffness, is proposed and analysed. The method is illustrated with the computation of active Protein Kinase C response in the Protein Kinase C pathway.

  4. Kinetic isotope effects for Cl + CH4 ⇌ HCl + CH3 calculated using ab initio semiclassical transition state theory.

    PubMed

    Barker, John R; Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Stanton, John F

    2012-06-21

    Calculations were carried out for 25 isotopologues of the title reaction for various combinations of (35)Cl, (37)Cl, (12)C, (13)C, (14)C, H, and D. The computed rate constants are based on harmonic vibrational frequencies calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory and X(ij) vibrational anharmonicity coefficients calculated at the CCSD(T) /aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. For some reactions, anharmonicity coefficients were also computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The classical reaction barrier was taken from Eskola et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 7391-7401], who extrapolated CCSD(T) calculations to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants were calculated for temperatures from ∼100 to ∼2000 K. The computed ab initio rate constant for the normal isotopologue is in good agreement with experiments over the entire temperature range (∼10% lower than the recommended experimental value at 298 K). The ab initio H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for CH(3)D, CH(2)D(2), CHD(3), and CD(4) are in very good agreement with literature experimental data. The ab initio (12)C/(13)C KIE is in error by ∼2% at 298 K for calculations using X(ij) coefficients computed with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set, but the error is reduced to ∼1% when X(ij) coefficients computed with the larger aug-cc-pVTZ basis set are used. Systematic improvements appear to be possible. The present SCTST results are found to be more accurate than those from other theoretical calculations. Overall, this is a very promising method for computing ab initio kinetic isotope effects.

  5. Structure, Kinetic, and Chemical Mechanism of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-1 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Quartararo, Christine E.; Hazra, Saugata; Hadi, Timin; Blanchard, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the leading cause of death due to a bacterial infection. The success of the Mtb pathogen has largely been attributed to the nonreplicating, persistence phase of the life cycle, for which the glyoxylate shunt is required. In Escherichia coli flux through the shunt is controlled by regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH). In Mtb, the mechanism of regulation is unknown, and currently there is no mechanistic or structural information on ICDH. We optimized expression and purification to a yield high enough to perform the first detailed kinetic and structural studies for Mtb ICDH-1. A large solvent kinetic isotope effect (D2OV = 3.0 ± 0.2, D2O[V/Kisocitrate] = 1.5 ± 0.3) and a smaller primary kinetic isotope effect (DV = 1.3 ± 0.1, D[V/K[2R-2H]isocitrate] = 1.5 ± 0.2) allowed us to perform the first multiple kinetic isotope effect studies on any ICDH and suggest a chemical mechanism. In this mechanism, protonation of the enolate to form product α-ketoglutarate is the rate-limiting step. We report the first structure of Mtb ICDH-1 to 2.18 Å by X-ray crystallography with NADPH and Mn2+ bound. It is a homodimer in which each subunit has a Rossmann fold, and a common top domain of interlocking beta sheets. Mtb ICDH-1 is most structurally similar to the R132H mutant human ICDH found in glioblastomas. Similar to human R132H ICDH, Mtb ICDH-1 also catalyses the formation of α-hydroxyglutarate. Our data suggest that regulation of Mtb ICDH-1 is novel. PMID:23409873

  6. Edge-controlled growth and kinetics of single-crystal graphene domains by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Ren, Wencai; Zhang, Xiuyun; Liu, Zhibo; Gao, Yang; Yin, Li-Chang; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Ding, Feng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2013-12-17

    The controlled growth of large-area, high-quality, single-crystal graphene is highly desired for applications in electronics and optoelectronics; however, the production of this material remains challenging because the atomistic mechanism that governs graphene growth is not well understood. The edges of graphene, which are the sites at which carbon accumulates in the two-dimensional honeycomb lattice, influence many properties, including the electronic properties and chemical reactivity of graphene, and they are expected to significantly influence its growth. We demonstrate the growth of single-crystal graphene domains with controlled edges that range from zigzag to armchair orientations via growth-etching-regrowth in a chemical vapor deposition process. We have observed that both the growth and the etching rates of a single-crystal graphene domain increase linearly with the slanted angle of its edges from 0° to ∼19° and that the rates for an armchair edge are faster than those for a zigzag edge. Such edge-structure-dependent growth/etching kinetics of graphene can be well explained at the atomic level based on the concentrations of the kinks on various edges and allow the evolution and control of the edge and morphology in single-crystal graphene following the classical kinetic Wulff construction theory. Using these findings, we propose several strategies for the fabrication of wafer-sized, high-quality, single-crystal graphene.

  7. Isobutane ignition delay time measurements at high pressure and detailed chemical kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, D.; Curran, H.J.; Donato, N.S.; Aul, C.J.; Petersen, E.L.; Zinner, C.M.; Bourque, G.

    2010-08-15

    Rapid compression machine and shock-tube ignition experiments were performed for real fuel/air isobutane mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2. The wide range of experimental conditions included temperatures from 590 to 1567 K at pressures of approximately 1, 10, 20, and 30 atm. These data represent the most comprehensive set of experiments currently available for isobutane oxidation and further accentuate the complementary attributes of the two techniques toward high-pressure oxidation experiments over a wide range of temperatures. The experimental results were used to validate a detailed chemical kinetic model composed of 1328 reactions involving 230 species. This mechanism has been successfully used to simulate previously published ignition delay times as well. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed to gain further insight to the chemical processes occurring at various conditions. Additionally, useful ignition delay time correlations were developed for temperatures greater than 1025 K. Comparisons are also made with available isobutane data from the literature, as well as with 100% n-butane and 50-50% n-butane-isobutane mixtures in air that were presented by the authors in recent studies. In general, the kinetic model shows excellent agreement with the data over the wide range of conditions of the present study. (author)

  8. Accelerating moderately stiff chemical kinetics in reactive-flow simulations using GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Kyle E.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The chemical kinetics ODEs arising from operator-split reactive-flow simulations were solved on GPUs using explicit integration algorithms. Nonstiff chemical kinetics of a hydrogen oxidation mechanism (9 species and 38 irreversible reactions) were computed using the explicit fifth-order Runge-Kutta-Cash-Karp method, and the GPU-accelerated version performed faster than single- and six-core CPU versions by factors of 126 and 25, respectively, for 524,288 ODEs. Moderately stiff kinetics, represented with mechanisms for hydrogen/carbon-monoxide (13 species and 54 irreversible reactions) and methane (53 species and 634 irreversible reactions) oxidation, were computed using the stabilized explicit second-order Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev (RKC) algorithm. The GPU-based RKC implementation demonstrated an increase in performance of nearly 59 and 10 times, for problem sizes consisting of 262,144 ODEs and larger, than the single- and six-core CPU-based RKC algorithms using the hydrogen/carbon-monoxide mechanism. With the methane mechanism, RKC-GPU performed more than 65 and 11 times faster, for problem sizes consisting of 131,072 ODEs and larger, than the single- and six-core RKC-CPU versions, and up to 57 times faster than the six-core CPU-based implicit VODE algorithm on 65,536 ODEs. In the presence of more severe stiffness, such as ethylene oxidation (111 species and 1566 irreversible reactions), RKC-GPU performed more than 17 times faster than RKC-CPU on six cores for 32,768 ODEs and larger, and at best 4.5 times faster than VODE on six CPU cores for 65,536 ODEs. With a larger time step size, RKC-GPU performed at best 2.5 times slower than six-core VODE for 8192 ODEs and larger. Therefore, the need for developing new strategies for integrating stiff chemistry on GPUs was discussed.

  9. Kinetic Formulation of the Kohn-Sham Equations for ab initio Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    We introduce a new connection between density functional theory and kinetic theory. In particular, we show that the Kohn-Sham equations can be reformulated as a macroscopic limit of the steady-state solution of a suitable single-particle kinetic equation. We derive a Boltzmann-like equation for a gas of quasiparticles, where the potential plays the role of an external source that generates and destroys particles, so as to drive the system towards its ground state. The ions are treated as classical particles by using either the Born-Oppenheimer dynamics or by imposing concurrent evolution with the electronic orbitals. In order to provide quantitative support to our approach, we implement a discrete (lattice) kinetic model and compute the exchange and correlation energies of simple atoms and the geometrical configuration of the methane molecule. Moreover, we also compute the first vibrational mode of the hydrogen molecule, with both Born-Oppenheimer and concurrent dynamics. Excellent agreement with values in the literature is found in all cases.

  10. Kinetic formulation of the Kohn-Sham Equations for ab initio electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2014-08-29

    We introduce a new connection between density functional theory and kinetic theory. In particular, we show that the Kohn-Sham equations can be reformulated as a macroscopic limit of the steady-state solution of a suitable single-particle kinetic equation. We derive a Boltzmann-like equation for a gas of quasiparticles, where the potential plays the role of an external source that generates and destroys particles, so as to drive the system towards its ground state. The ions are treated as classical particles by using either the Born-Oppenheimer dynamics or by imposing concurrent evolution with the electronic orbitals. In order to provide quantitative support to our approach, we implement a discrete (lattice) kinetic model and compute the exchange and correlation energies of simple atoms and the geometrical configuration of the methane molecule. Moreover, we also compute the first vibrational mode of the hydrogen molecule, with both Born-Oppenheimer and concurrent dynamics. Excellent agreement with values in the literature is found in all cases.

  11. A new equation for calculation of chemical hardness of groups and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Savaş; Kaya, Cemal

    2015-06-01

    Chemical hardness is considered to be a useful theoretical descriptor in many experimental and theoretical studies and this concept has several important applications in chemistry. In this study, an equation for atomic hardness is proposed. Following the equation for atomic hardness which is based on charges, ionisation energies and electron affinities of atoms, a new equation is obtained for the calculation of the chemical hardness of groups and molecules using the atomic hardness equation and the principle of chemical hardness equalisation. Molecular chemical hardness may be calculated using α and β parameters of atoms in a molecule or group through the use of the obtained molecular hardness equation. Furthermore, the advantage of this equation over other equations in the literature is that using this equation the chemical hardness of the charged groups and molecules can also be calculated. Besides, the relationship between molecular hardness and charge of molecule is examined using the results obtained from the new molecular hardness equation, and the partial charges of atoms in molecules are calculated with the help of derived equations.

  12. Benchmarking quantum mechanical calculations with experimental NMR chemical shifts of 2-HADNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuemin; Junk, Thomas; Liu, Yucheng; Tzeng, Nianfeng; Perkins, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In this study, both GIAO-DFT and GIAO-MP2 calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were benchmarked with experimental chemical shifts. The experimental chemical shifts were determined experimentally for carbon-13 (C-13) of seven carbon atoms for the TNT degradation product 2-hydroxylamino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-HADNT). Quantum mechanics GIAO calculations were implemented using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) and other six hybrid DFT methods (Becke-1-Lee-Yang-Parr (B1LYP), Becke-half-and-half-Lee-Yang-Parr (BH and HLYP), Cohen-Handy-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (O3LYP), Coulomb-attenuating-B3LYP (CAM-B3LYP), modified-Perdew-Wang-91-Lee-Yang-Parr (mPW1LYP), and Xu-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (X3LYP)) which use the same correlation functional LYP. Calculation results showed that the GIAO-MP2 method gives the most accurate chemical shift values, and O3LYP method provides the best prediction of chemical shifts among the B3LYP and other five DFT methods. Three types of atomic partial charges, Mulliken (MK), electrostatic potential (ESP), and natural bond orbital (NBO), were also calculated using MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ method. A reasonable correlation was discovered between NBO partial charges and experimental chemical shifts of carbon-13 (C-13).

  13. Extracting chemical information from plane wave calculations by a 3D 'fuzzy atoms' analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakó, I.; Stirling, A.; Seitsonen, A. P.; Mayer, I.

    2013-03-01

    Bond order and valence indices have been calculated by the method of the three-dimensional 'fuzzy atoms' analysis, using the numerical molecular orbitals obtained from plane wave DFT calculations, i.e., without introducing any external atom-centered functions. Weight functions of both Hirshfeld and Becke types have been applied. The results are rather close to the similar 'fuzzy atoms' ones obtained by using atom-centered basis sets and agree well with the chemical expectations, stressing the power of the genuine chemical concepts.

  14. Gas phase chemical kinetics at high temperature of carbonaceous molecules: application to circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biennier, L.; Gardez, A.; Saidani, G.; Georges, R.; Rowe, B.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar shells of evolved stars are a theater of extremely rich physical and chemical processes. More than seventy molecules of varied nature have been identified in the envelopes through their spectral fingerprints in the microwave or far infrared regions. Many of them are carbon chain molecules and radicals and a significant number are unique to the circumstellar medium. However, observational data remain scarce and more than half of the detected species have been observed in only one object, the nearby carbon star IRC + 10216. Chemical kinetic models are needed to describe the formation of molecules in evolved circumstellar outflows. Upcoming terrestrial telescopes such as ALMA will increase the spatial resolution by several orders of magnitude and provide a wealth of data. The determination of relevant laboratory kinetics data is critical to keep up with the development of the observations and of the refinement of chemical models. Today, the majority of reactions studied in the laboratory are the ones involved in combustion and concerning light hydrocarbons. Our objective is to provide the scientific community with rate coefficients of reactions between abundant species in these warm environments. Cyanopolyynes from HC_2N to HC_9N have all been detected in carbon rich circumstellar envelopes in up to 10 sources for HC_3N. Neutral-neutral reactions of the CN radical with unsaturated hydrocarbons could be a dominant route in the formation of cyanopolyynes, even at low temperatures. Our approach aims to bridge the temperature gap between resistively heated flow tubes and shock tubes. The present kinetic measurements are obtained using a new reactor combining a high enthalpy source (Moudens et al. 2011) with a flow tube and a pulsed laser photolysis and laser induced fluorescence system to probe the undergoing chemical reactions. The high enthalpy flow tube has been used to measure the rate constant of the reaction of the CN radical with propane, propene

  15. The invariant constrained equilibrium edge preimage curve method for the dimension reduction of chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhuyin; Pope, Stephen B.; Vladimirsky, Alexander; Guckenheimer, John M.

    2006-03-01

    This work addresses the construction and use of low-dimensional invariant manifolds to simplify complex chemical kinetics. Typically, chemical kinetic systems have a wide range of time scales. As a consequence, reaction trajectories rapidly approach a hierarchy of attracting manifolds of decreasing dimension in the full composition space. In previous research, several different methods have been proposed to identify these low-dimensional attracting manifolds. Here we propose a new method based on an invariant constrained equilibrium edge (ICE) manifold. This manifold (of dimension nr) is generated by the reaction trajectories emanating from its (nr-1)-dimensional edge, on which the composition is in a constrained equilibrium state. A reasonable choice of the nr represented variables (e.g., nr "major" species) ensures that there exists a unique point on the ICE manifold corresponding to each realizable value of the represented variables. The process of identifying this point is referred to as species reconstruction. A second contribution of this work is a local method of species reconstruction, called ICE-PIC, which is based on the ICE manifold and uses preimage curves (PICs). The ICE-PIC method is local in the sense that species reconstruction can be performed without generating the whole of the manifold (or a significant portion thereof). The ICE-PIC method is the first approach that locally determines points on a low-dimensional invariant manifold, and its application to high-dimensional chemical systems is straightforward. The "inputs" to the method are the detailed kinetic mechanism and the chosen reduced representation (e.g., some major species). The ICE-PIC method is illustrated and demonstrated using an idealized H2/O system with six chemical species. It is then tested and compared to three other dimension-reduction methods for the test case of a one-dimensional premixed laminar flame of stoichiometric hydrogen/air, which is described by a detailed mechanism

  16. Finite volume method for the calculation of compressible chemically reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bussing, T.R.A.; Murman, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    Several efficient pseudo time techniques have been developed for calculating steady state chemically reacting flows. The techniques include the implicit treatment of the chemical source term, point implicit multiple grid accelerator and a constant CFL condition. It turns out that these methods can be viewed as ways of rescaling the equations in time such that all chemical and convective phenomena evolve at comparable pseudo time scales. Consequently the number of iterations needed to solve reacting problems is approximately the same as for non-reacting problems. The techniques are demonstrated for a simple dissociation model and a nontrivial H2 - Air combustion model.

  17. Protein NMR chemical shift calculations based on the automated fragmentation QM/MM approach.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao; Wang, Bing; Merz, Kenneth M

    2009-07-30

    An automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (AF-QM/MM) approach has been developed to routinely calculate ab initio protein NMR chemical shielding constants. The AF-QM/MM method is linear-scaling and trivially parallel. A general fragmentation scheme is employed to generate each residue-centric region which is treated by quantum mechanics, and the environmental electrostatic field is described with molecular mechanics. The AF-QM/MM method shows good agreement with standard self-consistent field (SCF) calculations of the NMR chemical shieldings for the mini-protein Trp cage. The root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) for 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR chemical shieldings are equal to or less than 0.09, 0.32, and 0.78 ppm, respectively, for all Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations reported in this work. The environmental electrostatic potential is necessary to accurately reproduce the NMR chemical shieldings using the AF-QM/MM approach. The point-charge models provided by AMBER, AM1/CM2, PM3/CM1, and PM3/CM2 all effectively model the electrostatic field. The latter three point-charge models are generated via semiempirical linear-scaling SCF calculations of the entire protein system. The correlations between experimental 1H NMR chemical shifts and theoretical predictions are >0.95 for AF-QM/MM calculations using B3LYP with the 6-31G**, 6-311G**, and 6-311++G** basis sets. Our study, not unexpectedly, finds that conformational changes within a protein structure play an important role in the accurate prediction of experimental NMR chemical shifts from theory.

  18. Reaction between Chromium(III) and EDTA Ions: an Overlooked Mechanism of Case Study Reaction of Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cerar, Janez

    2015-01-01

    Widely cited and accepted explanation of reaction mechanism of the case study reaction of chemical kinetics between Cr(III) ions and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) contradicts modern chromium(III) coordination chemistry data. Absorption UV and visible light spectra were recorded during the reaction between aqueous solution of Cr(NO(3))(3) and EDTA in order to obtain new information about this reaction. Analysis of the spectra showed that only very small fraction of intermediates may be present in solution during the course of the reaction. The reaction scheme was established and according to it calculations based on a simplified model were carried out. Literature data for constants were used if known, otherwise, adjusted values of their sound estimates were applied. Reasonable agreement of the model calculations with the experimental data was obtained for pH values 3.8 and 4.5 but the model failed to reproduce measured rate of reaction at pH 5.5, probably due to the use of the oversimplified model. PMID:26454587

  19. Reaction between Chromium(III) and EDTA Ions: an Overlooked Mechanism of Case Study Reaction of Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cerar, Janez

    2015-01-01

    Widely cited and accepted explanation of reaction mechanism of the case study reaction of chemical kinetics between Cr(III) ions and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) contradicts modern chromium(III) coordination chemistry data. Absorption UV and visible light spectra were recorded during the reaction between aqueous solution of Cr(NO(3))(3) and EDTA in order to obtain new information about this reaction. Analysis of the spectra showed that only very small fraction of intermediates may be present in solution during the course of the reaction. The reaction scheme was established and according to it calculations based on a simplified model were carried out. Literature data for constants were used if known, otherwise, adjusted values of their sound estimates were applied. Reasonable agreement of the model calculations with the experimental data was obtained for pH values 3.8 and 4.5 but the model failed to reproduce measured rate of reaction at pH 5.5, probably due to the use of the oversimplified model.

  20. Quantum vs. classical models of the nitro group for proton chemical shift calculations and conformational analysis.

    PubMed

    Mobli, Mehdi; Abraham, Raymond J

    2005-03-01

    A model based on classical concepts is derived to describe the effect of the nitro group on proton chemical shifts. The calculated chemical shifts are then compared to ab initio (GIAO) calculated chemical shifts. The accuracy of the two models is assessed using proton chemical shifts of a set of rigid organic nitro compounds that are fully assigned in CDCl3 at 700 MHz. The two methods are then used to evaluate the accuracy of different popular post-SCF methods (B3LYP and MP2) and molecular mechanics methods (MMX and MMFF94) in calculating the molecular structure of a set of sterically crowded nitro aromatic compounds. Both models perform well on the rigid molecules used as a test set, although when using the GIAO method a general overestimation of the deshielding of protons near the nitro group is observed. The analysis of the sterically crowded molecules shows that the very popular B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method produces very poor twist angles for these, and that using a larger basis set [6-311++G(2d,p)] gives much more reasonable results. The MP2 calculations, on the other hand, overestimate the twist angles, which for these compounds compensates for the deshielding effect generally observed for protons near electronegative atoms when using the GIAO method at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) level. The most accurate results are found when the structures are calculated using B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) level of theory, and the chemical shifts are calculated using the CHARGE program based on classical models.

  1. Molecular corridors and kinetic regimes in the multiphase chemical evolution of secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Berkemeier, T.; Schilling-Fahnestock, K. A.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Pöschl, U.

    2014-08-01

    The dominant component of atmospheric, organic aerosol is that derived from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). SOA consists of a multitude of organic compounds, only a small fraction of which has historically been identified. Formation and evolution of SOA is a complex process involving coupled chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases. Current SOA models do not embody the full spectrum of reaction and transport processes, nor do they identify the dominant rate-limiting steps in SOA formation. Based on molecular identification of SOA oxidation products, we show here that the chemical evolution of SOA from a variety of VOC precursors adheres to characteristic "molecular corridors" with a tight inverse correlation between volatility and molar mass. The slope of these corridors corresponds to the increase in molar mass required to decrease volatility by one order of magnitude (-dM / dlogC0). It varies in the range of 10-30 g mol-1, depending on the molecular size of the SOA precursor and the O : C ratio of the reaction products. Sequential and parallel reaction pathways of oxidation and dimerization or oligomerization progressing along these corridors pass through characteristic regimes of reaction-, diffusion-, or accommodation-limited multiphase chemical kinetics that can be classified according to reaction location, degree of saturation, and extent of heterogeneity of gas and particle phases. The molecular corridors and kinetic regimes help to constrain and describe the properties of the products, pathways, and rates of SOA evolution, thereby facilitating the further development of aerosol models for air quality and climate.

  2. Molecular corridors and kinetic regimes in the multiphase chemical evolution of secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Berkemeier, T.; Schilling-Fahnestock, K.; Seinfeld, J.; Poeschl, U.

    2014-12-01

    The dominant component of atmospheric organic aerosol is that derived from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). SOA consists of a multitude of organic compounds, only a small fraction of which has historically been identified. Formation and evolution of SOA is a complex process involving coupled chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases. Current SOA models do not embody the full spectrum of reaction and transport processes nor do they identify the dominant rate-limiting steps in SOA formation. Based on molecular identification of SOA oxidation products, we show here that the chemical evolution of SOA from a variety of VOC precursors adheres to characteristic "molecular corridors" with a tight inverse correlation between volatility and molar mass. The slope of these corridors corresponds to the increase in molar mass required to decrease volatility by one order of magnitude (-dM/dlogC0). It varies in the range of 10-30 g mol-1 depending on the molecular size of the SOA precursor and the O:C ratio of the reaction products. Sequential and parallel reaction pathways of oxidation and dimerization or oligomerization progressing along these corridors pass through characteristic regimes of reaction-, diffusion-, or accommodation-limited multiphase chemical kinetics that can be classified according to reaction location, degree of saturation, and extent of heterogeneity of gas and particle phases. The molecular corridors and kinetic regimes help to constrain and described the properties of the products, pathways and rates of SOA evolution, thereby facilitating the further development of aerosol models for air quality and climate.

  3. Modeling Multiphase Chemical Kinetics of OH Radical Reacting with Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arangio, Andrea; Slade, Jonathan H.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Knopf, Daniel A.; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2014-05-01

    Levoglucosan, abietic acid and nitroguaiacol are commonly used as molecular tracers of biomass burning in source apportionment. Recent studies have demonstrated the decay of levoglucosan when the particles were exposed to atmospherically relevant concentration of OH radicals [1-3]. However, multiphase chemical kinetics of OH radical reacting with such compounds has not fully understood. Here we apply the kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions (KM-GAP) [4] to experimental data of OH exposure to levoglucosan, abietic acid and nitroguaiacol [1]. KM-GAP resolves the following mass transport and chemical reactions explicitly: gas-phase diffusion, reversible surface adsorption, surface reaction, surface-bulk transport, bulk diffusion and reaction. The particle shrink due to the evaporation of volatile reaction products is also considered. The time- and concentration-dependence of reactive uptake coefficient of OH radicals were simulated by KM-GAP. The measured OH uptake coefficients were fitted by a Monte Carlo (MC) filtering coupled with a genetic algorithm (GA) to derive physicochemical parameters such as bulk diffusion coefficient, Henry's law coefficient and desorption lifetime of OH radicals. We assessed the relative contribution of surface and bulk reactions to the overall uptake of OH radicals. Chemical half-life and the evaporation time scale of these compounds are estimated in different scenarios (dry, humid and cloud processing conditions) and at different OH concentrations. REFERENCES [1] J. H. Slade, D. A. Knopf, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013, 15, 5898. [2] S. H. Kessler, J. D. Smith, D.L. Che, D.R. Worsnop, K. R. Wilson, J. H. Kroll, Environ. Sci. Technol., 2010, 44, 7005. [3] C. J. Hennigan, A. P. Sullivan, J. L. Collett Jr, A. L. Robinson, Geophys. Res. Lett., 2010, 37, L09806. [4] M. Shiraiwa, C. Pfrang, T. Koop, U. Pöschl, Atmos. Chem. Phys, 2012, 12, 2777.

  4. A Chemical-Adsorption Strategy to Enhance the Reaction Kinetics of Lithium-Rich Layered Cathodes via Double-Shell Surface Modification.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lichao; Li, Jiajun; Cao, Tingting; Wang, Huayu; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Liu, Enzuo

    2016-09-21

    Sluggish surface reaction kinetics hinders the power density of Li-ion battery. Thus, various surface modification techniques have been applied to enhance the electronic/ionic transfer kinetics. However, it is challenging to obtain a continuous and uniform surface modification layer on the prime particles with structure integration at the interface. Instead of classic physical-adsorption/deposition techniques, we propose a novel chemical-adsorption strategy to synthesize double-shell modified lithium-rich layered cathodes with enhanced mass transfer kinetics. On the basis of experimental measurement and first-principles calculation, MoO2S2 ions are proved to joint the layered phase via chemical bonding. Specifically, the Mo-O or Mo-S bonds can flexibly rotate to bond with the cations in the layered phase, leading to the good compatibility between the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and layered cathode. Followed by annealing treatment, the lithium-excess-spinel inner shell forms under the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and functions as favorable pathways for lithium and electron. Meanwhile, the nanothick MoO3-x(SO4)x outer shell protects the transition metal from dissolution and restrains electrolyte decomposition. The double-shell modified sample delivers an enhanced discharge capacity almost twice as much as that of the unmodified one at 1 A g(-1) after 100 cycles, demonstrating the superiority of the surface modification based on chemical adsorption. PMID:27582053

  5. A Chemical-Adsorption Strategy to Enhance the Reaction Kinetics of Lithium-Rich Layered Cathodes via Double-Shell Surface Modification.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lichao; Li, Jiajun; Cao, Tingting; Wang, Huayu; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Liu, Enzuo

    2016-09-21

    Sluggish surface reaction kinetics hinders the power density of Li-ion battery. Thus, various surface modification techniques have been applied to enhance the electronic/ionic transfer kinetics. However, it is challenging to obtain a continuous and uniform surface modification layer on the prime particles with structure integration at the interface. Instead of classic physical-adsorption/deposition techniques, we propose a novel chemical-adsorption strategy to synthesize double-shell modified lithium-rich layered cathodes with enhanced mass transfer kinetics. On the basis of experimental measurement and first-principles calculation, MoO2S2 ions are proved to joint the layered phase via chemical bonding. Specifically, the Mo-O or Mo-S bonds can flexibly rotate to bond with the cations in the layered phase, leading to the good compatibility between the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and layered cathode. Followed by annealing treatment, the lithium-excess-spinel inner shell forms under the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and functions as favorable pathways for lithium and electron. Meanwhile, the nanothick MoO3-x(SO4)x outer shell protects the transition metal from dissolution and restrains electrolyte decomposition. The double-shell modified sample delivers an enhanced discharge capacity almost twice as much as that of the unmodified one at 1 A g(-1) after 100 cycles, demonstrating the superiority of the surface modification based on chemical adsorption.

  6. Calculated half-lives and kinetic energies for spontaneous emission of heavy ions from nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poenaru, D.N.; Greiner, W.; Depta, K.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Sandulescu, A.

    1986-05-01

    The most probable decays by spontaneous emission of heavy ions are listed for nuclides with Z = 47--106 and total half-lives>1 ..mu..sec. Partial half-lives, branching ratios relative to ..cap alpha.. decay, kinetic energies, and Q values are estimated by using the analytical superasymmetric fission model, a semiempirical formula for those ..cap alpha..-decay lifetimes which have not been measured, and the new Wapstra--Audi mass tables. Numerous ''stable'' nuclides with Z>40 are found to be metastable with respect to the new decay modes. The current experimental status is briefly reviewed.

  7. Calculation and comparison with experiment on the kinetics of methane conversion in a glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Yu.A.; Soldatova, I.V.; Epshtein, I.L.

    1987-03-01

    The results of a numerical and experimental study of the kinetics of methane conversion in a low-pressure dc glow discharge are presented. This article is a continuation of an earlier paper in which the models for these processes are examined in detail and justified. Agreement is obtained as to order of magnitude and within the characteristic dependences on the discharge parameters between the experimental and computational results for the densities of gaseous-phase stable particles and atomic hydrogen, as well as for the rate of growth of the polymer product on the vessel walls.

  8. Chemical kinetics and relaxation of non-equilibrium air plasma generated by energetic photon and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulois, Melissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The comprehension of electromagnetic perturbations of electronic devices, due to air plasma-induced electromagnetic field, requires a thorough study on air plasma. In the aim to understand the phenomena at the origin of the formation of non-equilibrium air plasma, we simulate, using a volume average chemical kinetics model (0D model), the time evolution of a non-equilibrium air plasma generated by an energetic X-ray flash. The simulation is undertaken in synthetic air (80% N2 and 20% O2) at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. When the X-ray flash crosses the gas, non-relativistic Compton electrons (low energy) and a relativistic Compton electron beam (high energy) are simultaneously generated and interact with the gas. The considered chemical kinetics scheme involves 26 influent species (electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and neutral atoms and molecules in their ground or metastable excited states) reacting following 164 selected reactions. The kinetics model describing the plasma chemistry was coupled to the conservation equation of the electron mean energy, in order to calculate at each time step of the non-equilibrium plasma evolution, the coefficients of reactions involving electrons while the energy of the heavy species (positive and negative ions and neutral atoms and molecules) is assumed remaining close to ambient temperature. It has been shown that it is the relativistic Compton electron beam directly created by the X-ray flash which is mainly responsible for the non-equilibrium plasma formation. Indeed, the low energy electrons (i.e., the non-relativistic ones) directly ejected from molecules by Compton collisions contribute to less than 1% on the creation of electrons in the plasma. In our simulation conditions, a non-equilibrium plasma with a low electron mean energy close to 1 eV and a concentration of charged species close to 1013 cm-3 is formed a few nanoseconds after the peak of X-ray flash intensity. 200 ns after the flash

  9. Systematic Approach to Calculate the Concentration of Chemical Species in Multi-Equilibrium Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeza-Baeza, Juan Jose; Garcia-Alvarez-Coque, Maria Celia

    2011-01-01

    A general systematic approach is proposed for the numerical calculation of multi-equilibrium problems. The approach involves several steps: (i) the establishment of balances involving the chemical species in solution (e.g., mass balances, charge balance, and stoichiometric balance for the reaction products), (ii) the selection of the unknowns (the…

  10. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  11. Programming chemical kinetics: engineering dynamic reaction networks with DNA strand displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Niranjan

    Over the last century, the silicon revolution has enabled us to build faster, smaller and more sophisticated computers. Today, these computers control phones, cars, satellites, assembly lines, and other electromechanical devices. Just as electrical wiring controls electromechanical devices, living organisms employ "chemical wiring" to make decisions about their environment and control physical processes. Currently, the big difference between these two substrates is that while we have the abstractions, design principles, verification and fabrication techniques in place for programming with silicon, we have no comparable understanding or expertise for programming chemistry. In this thesis we take a small step towards the goal of learning how to systematically engineer prescribed non-equilibrium dynamical behaviors in chemical systems. We use the formalism of chemical reaction networks (CRNs), combined with mass-action kinetics, as our programming language for specifying dynamical behaviors. Leveraging the tools of nucleic acid nanotechnology (introduced in Chapter 1), we employ synthetic DNA molecules as our molecular architecture and toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement as our reaction primitive. Abstraction, modular design and systematic fabrication can work only with well-understood and quantitatively characterized tools. Therefore, we embark on a detailed study of the "device physics" of DNA strand displacement (Chapter 2). We present a unified view of strand displacement biophysics and kinetics by studying the process at multiple levels of detail, using an intuitive model of a random walk on a 1-dimensional energy landscape, a secondary structure kinetics model with single base-pair steps, and a coarse-grained molecular model that incorporates three-dimensional geometric and steric effects. Further, we experimentally investigate the thermodynamics of three-way branch migration. Our findings are consistent with previously measured or inferred rates for

  12. Computer program for calculation of complex chemical equilibrium compositions and applications. Part 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Mcbride, Bonnie J.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the latest in a number of versions of chemical equilibrium and applications programs developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center over more than 40 years. These programs have changed over the years to include additional features and improved calculation techniques and to take advantage of constantly improving computer capabilities. The minimization-of-free-energy approach to chemical equilibrium calculations has been used in all versions of the program since 1967. The two principal purposes of this report are presented in two parts. The first purpose, which is accomplished here in part 1, is to present in detail a number of topics of general interest in complex equilibrium calculations. These topics include mathematical analyses and techniques for obtaining chemical equilibrium; formulas for obtaining thermodynamic and transport mixture properties and thermodynamic derivatives; criteria for inclusion of condensed phases; calculations at a triple point; inclusion of ionized species; and various applications, such as constant-pressure or constant-volume combustion, rocket performance based on either a finite- or infinite-chamber-area model, shock wave calculations, and Chapman-Jouguet detonations. The second purpose of this report, to facilitate the use of the computer code, is accomplished in part 2, entitled 'Users Manual and Program Description'. Various aspects of the computer code are discussed, and a number of examples are given to illustrate its versatility.

  13. A consistent calculation of the chemical potential for dense simple fluids.

    PubMed

    Bomont, Jean-Marc

    2006-05-28

    A general method to calculate the excess chemical potential betamuex, that is based on the Kirkwood coupling parameter's dependence of the correlation functions, is presented. The expression for the one particle bridge function B(1)r is derived for simple fluids with spherical interactions. Only the knowledge of the bridge function B(2)r is required. The accuracy of our approach is illustrated for a dense hard sphere fluid. As far as B(2)r is considered as exact, B(1)r is found to be, at high densities, the normalized bridge function -B(2)rB(2)(r=0). This expression ensures a consistent calculation of the excess chemical potential by satisfying implicitly the Gibbs-Duhem constraint. Only the pressure-consistency condition is necessary to calculate the structural and thermodynamic properties of the fluid.

  14. The PubChemQC project: A large chemical database from the first principle calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maho, Nakata

    2015-12-01

    In this research, we have been constructing a large database of molecules by ab initio calculations. Currently, we have over 1.53 million entries of 6-31G* B3LYP optimized geometries and ten excited states by 6-31+G* TDDFT calculations. To calculate molecules, we only refer the InChI (International Chemical Identifier) representation of chemical formula by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), thus, no reference to experimental data. These results are open to public at http://pubchemqc.riken.jp/. The molecular data have been taken from the PubChem Project (http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) which is one of the largest in the world (approximately 63 million molecules are listed) and free (public domain) database. Our final goal is, using these data, to develop a molecular search engine or molecular expert system to find molecules which have desired properties.

  15. A Chemical Kinetics Network for Lightning and Life in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmer, P. B.; Helling, Ch

    2016-05-01

    There are many open questions about prebiotic chemistry in both planetary and exoplanetary environments. The increasing number of known exoplanets and other ultra-cool, substellar objects has propelled the desire to detect life and prebiotic chemistry outside the solar system. We present an ion-neutral chemical network constructed from scratch, Stand2015, that treats hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen chemistry accurately within a temperature range between 100 and 30,000 K. Formation pathways for glycine and other organic molecules are included. The network is complete up to H6C2N2O3. Stand2015 is successfully tested against atmospheric chemistry models for HD 209458b, Jupiter, and the present-day Earth using a simple one-dimensional photochemistry/diffusion code. Our results for the early Earth agree with those of Kasting for CO2, H2, CO, and O2, but do not agree for water and atomic oxygen. We use the network to simulate an experiment where varied chemical initial conditions are irradiated by UV light. The result from our simulation is that more glycine is produced when more ammonia and methane is present. Very little glycine is produced in the absence of any molecular nitrogen and oxygen. This suggests that the production of glycine is inhibited if a gas is too strongly reducing. Possible applications and limitations of the chemical kinetics network are also discussed.

  16. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. I. Chemical kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Gokcen, Tahir; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    A chemical kinetic model is developed to help understand and optimize the production of single-walled carbon nanotubes via the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, which employs iron pentacarbonyl as the catalyst precursor and carbon monoxide as the carbon feedstock. The model separates the HiPco process into three steps, precursor decomposition, catalyst growth and evaporation, and carbon nanotube production resulting from the catalyst-enhanced disproportionation of carbon monoxide, known as the Boudouard reaction: 2 CO(g)-->C(s) + CO2(g). The resulting detailed model contains 971 species and 1948 chemical reactions. A second model with a reduced reaction set containing 14 species and 22 chemical reactions is developed on the basis of the detailed model and reproduces the chemistry of the major species. Results showing the parametric dependence of temperature, total pressure, and initial precursor partial pressures are presented, with comparison between the two models. The reduced model is more amenable to coupled reacting flow-field simulations, presented in the following article.

  17. An efficient error-propagation-based reduction method for large chemical kinetic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pepiot-Desjardins, P.; Pitsch, H.

    2008-07-15

    Production rates obtained from a detailed chemical mechanism are analyzed in order to quantify the coupling between the various species and reactions involved. These interactions can be represented by a directed relation graph. A geometric error propagation strategy applied to this graph accurately identifies the dependencies of specified targets and creates a set of increasingly simplified kinetic schemes containing only the chemical paths deemed the most important for the targets. An integrity check is performed concurrently with the reduction process to avoid truncated chemical paths and mass accumulation in intermediate species. The quality of a given skeletal model is assessed through the magnitude of the errors introduced in the target predictions. The applied error evaluation is variable-dependent and unambiguous for unsteady problems. The technique yields overall monotonically increasing errors, and the smallest skeletal mechanism that satisfies a user-defined error tolerance over a selected domain of applicability is readily obtained. An additional module based on life-time analysis identifies a set of species that can be modeled accurately by quasi-steady state relations. An application of the reduction procedure is presented for autoignition using a large iso-octane mechanism. The whole process is automatic, is fast, has moderate CPU and memory requirements, and compares favorably to other existing techniques. (author)

  18. Chemical kinetics with electrical and gas dynamics modelization for NOx removal in an air corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichwald, O.; Guntoro, N. A.; Yousfi, M.; Benhenni, M.

    2002-03-01

    A non-stationary reactive gas dynamics model in a mono-dimensional geometry, including radial mass diffusion, gas temperature variation and chemical kinetics, is developed in this paper. The aim is to analyse the spatio-temporal evolution of the main neutral species involved in a corona discharge used for NO pollution control in polluted air at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. The present reactive gas dynamics model takes into account 16 neutral chemical species (including certain metastable species) reacting following 110 selected chemical reactions. The initial concentration of each neutral species is obtained from a 1.5D electrical discharge model. The gas temperature variations are due to direct Joule heating during the discharge phase, and also result from the delayed heating due to the relaxation of the vibrational energy into a random thermal energy during the post-discharge phase. The simulation conditions are those of an existing experimental setup (anode voltage of 10 kV in the case of a point to plane geometry with an interelectrode distance of 10 mm). The obtained results show that the diffusion phenomena and the gas temperature rise affect quite well the gas reactivity and the neutral species evolution. This allows us to better understand the different reaction processes and transport phenomena affecting the NO concentration magnitude inside the discharge channel.

  19. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. I. Chemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Dateo, Christopher E; Gökçen, Tahir; Meyyappan, M

    2002-10-01

    A chemical kinetic model is developed to help understand and optimize the production of single-walled carbon nanotubes via the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, which employs iron pentacarbonyl as the catalyst precursor and carbon monoxide as the carbon feedstock. The model separates the HiPco process into three steps, precursor decomposition, catalyst growth and evaporation, and carbon nanotube production resulting from the catalyst-enhanced disproportionation of carbon monoxide, known as the Boudouard reaction: 2 CO(g)-->C(s) + CO2(g). The resulting detailed model contains 971 species and 1948 chemical reactions. A second model with a reduced reaction set containing 14 species and 22 chemical reactions is developed on the basis of the detailed model and reproduces the chemistry of the major species. Results showing the parametric dependence of temperature, total pressure, and initial precursor partial pressures are presented, with comparison between the two models. The reduced model is more amenable to coupled reacting flow-field simulations, presented in the following article. PMID:12908291

  20. Reactibodies generated by kinetic selection couple chemical reactivity with favorable protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Ivan; Carletti, Eugénie; Kurkova, Inna; Nachon, Florian; Nicolet, Yvain; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Débat, Hélène; Avalle, Bérangère; Belogurov, Alexey A; Kuznetsov, Nikita; Reshetnyak, Andrey; Masson, Patrick; Tonevitsky, Alexander G; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Makarov, Alexander A; Friboulet, Alain; Tramontano, Alfonso; Gabibov, Alexander

    2011-09-20

    Igs offer a versatile template for combinatorial and rational design approaches to the de novo creation of catalytically active proteins. We have used a covalent capture selection strategy to identify biocatalysts from within a human semisynthetic antibody variable fragment library that uses a nucleophilic mechanism. Specific phosphonylation at a single tyrosine within the variable light-chain framework was confirmed in a recombinant IgG construct. High-resolution crystallographic structures of unmodified and phosphonylated Fabs display a 15-Å-deep two-chamber cavity at the interface of variable light (V(L)) and variable heavy (V(H)) fragments having a nucleophilic tyrosine at the base of the site. The depth and structure of the pocket are atypical of antibodies in general but can be compared qualitatively with the catalytic site of cholinesterases. A structurally disordered heavy chain complementary determining region 3 loop, constituting a wall of the cleft, is stabilized after covalent modification by hydrogen bonding to the phosphonate tropinol moiety. These features and presteady state kinetics analysis indicate that an induced fit mechanism operates in this reaction. Mutations of residues located in this stabilized loop do not interfere with direct contacts to the organophosphate ligand but can interrogate second shell interactions, because the H3 loop has a conformation adjusted for binding. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters along with computational docking support the active site model, including plasticity and simple catalytic components. Although relatively uncomplicated, this catalytic machinery displays both stereo- and chemical selectivity. The organophosphate pesticide paraoxon is hydrolyzed by covalent catalysis with rate-limiting dephosphorylation. This reactibody is, therefore, a kinetically selected protein template that has enzyme-like catalytic attributes. PMID:21896761

  1. An efficient method for energy levels calculation using full symmetry and exact kinetic energy operator: Tetrahedral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. V.; Rey, M.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2015-03-07

    A simultaneous use of the full molecular symmetry and of an exact kinetic energy operator (KEO) is of key importance for accurate predictions of vibrational levels at a high energy range from a potential energy surface (PES). An efficient method that permits a fast convergence of variational calculations would allow iterative optimization of the PES parameters using experimental data. In this work, we propose such a method applied to tetrahedral AB{sub 4} molecules for which a use of high symmetry is crucial for vibrational calculations. A symmetry-adapted contracted angular basis set for six redundant angles is introduced. Simple formulas using this basis set for explicit calculation of the angular matrix elements of KEO and PES are reported. The symmetric form (six redundant angles) of vibrational KEO without the sin(q){sup −2} type singularity is derived. The efficient recursive algorithm based on the tensorial formalism is used for the calculation of vibrational matrix elements. A good basis set convergence for the calculations of vibrational levels of the CH{sub 4} molecule is demonstrated.

  2. n-Butane: Ignition delay measurements at high pressure and detailed chemical kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, D.; Curran, H.J.; Donato, N.S.; Aul, C.J.; Petersen, E.L.; Zinner, C.M.; Bourque, G.

    2010-08-15

    Ignition delay time measurements were recorded at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2 for n-butane at pressures of approximately 1, 10, 20, 30 and 45 atm at temperatures from 690 to 1430 K in both a rapid compression machine and in a shock tube. A detailed chemical kinetic model consisting of 1328 reactions involving 230 species was constructed and used to validate the delay times. Moreover, this mechanism has been used to simulate previously published ignition delay times at atmospheric and higher pressure. Arrhenius-type ignition delay correlations were developed for temperatures greater than 1025 K which relate ignition delay time to temperature and concentration of the mixture. Furthermore, a detailed sensitivity analysis and a reaction pathway analysis were performed to give further insight to the chemistry at various conditions. When compared to existing data from the literature, the model performs quite well, and in several instances the conditions of earlier experiments were duplicated in the laboratory with overall good agreement. To the authors' knowledge, the present paper presents the most comprehensive set of ignition delay time experiments and kinetic model validation for n-butane oxidation in air. (author)

  3. Deuterium isotope effects during HMX combustion: Chemical kinetic burn-rate control mechanism verified

    SciTech Connect

    Shackelford, S.A.; Goshgarian, B.B.; Chapman, R.D.; Askins, R.E.; Flanigan, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The appearance of a significant deuterium isotope effect during the combustion of the solid HMX compound verifies that the chemical reaction kinetics is a major contributor in determining the experimentally observed or global burn rate. Burn rate comparison of HMX and its deuterium labeled HMX-d(8) analogue reveals a primary kinetic deuterium isotope effect (1 deg. KDIE) at 500 psig (3.55 MPa) and 1000 psig (6.99 MPa) pressure and selectively identifies covalent carbon-hydrogen bond rupture as the mechanistic step which ultimately controls the further HMX burn rate under the static combustion conditions of this experiment. The 1 deg. KDIE value further suggests the rate-limiting C-H bond rupture occurs during the solid state HMX decomposition/deflagration portion of the overall combustion event and is supported by other independently published studies. A possible anomalous KDIE result at 1500 psig (10.4 MPa) is addressed. This condensed phase KDIE approach illustrates a direct link between lower temperature/pressure thermal decomposition and deflagration processes and their potential applicability to the combustion regime. Most importantly, a new general method is demonstrated for mechanistic combustion investigations which selectively permits an in-situ identification of the compound's burn rate-controlling step.

  4. Kinetic Detection of Orthogonal Protein and Chemical Coordinates in Enzyme Catalysis: Double Mutants of Soybean Lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Klinman, Judith P

    2015-09-01

    Soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1) is a paradigmatic enzyme system for studying the contribution of hydrogen tunneling to enzymatic proton-coupled electron transfer processes. In this study, the impact of pairs of double mutants on the properties of SLO-1 is presented. Steady-state rates and their deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) have been measured for the bimolecular reaction of enzyme with free substrate (kcat/Km) and compared to the unimolecular rate constant, kcat. A key kinetic finding is that the competitive KIEs on the second-order rate constant (kcat/Km) are all reduced from (D)kcat and, despite large changes in rate and activation parameters, remain essentially unaltered under a variety of conditions. These data implicate a protein reaction coordinate that is orthogonal to the chemical reaction coordinate and controls the concentration of the active enzyme. This study introduces a new means to interrogate the alteration of conformational landscapes that can occur following site-specific mutagenesis.

  5. Insitu Measurements and Modeling of Carbon Nanotube Array Growth Kinetics during Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Jesse, Stephen; Ivanov, Ilia N; Eres, Gyula

    2005-01-01

    Direct measurements of carbon nanotube growth kinetics are described based upon time-resolved reflectivity (TRR) of a HeNe laser beam from vertically aligned nanotube arrays (VANTAs) as they grow during chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Growth rates and terminal lengths were measured in situ for VANTAs growing during CVD between 535 C and 900 C on Si substrates with evaporated Al/Fe/Mo multi-layered catalysts and acetylene feedstock at different feedstock partial pressures. Methods of analysis of the TRR signals are presented to interpret catalyst particle formation and oxidation, as well as the porosity of the VANTAs. A rate-equation model is developed to describe the measured kinetics in terms of activation energies and rate constants for surface carbon formation and diffusion on the catalyst nanoparticle, nanotube growth, and catalyst over-coating. Taken together with the TRR data, this model enables basic understanding and optimization of growth conditions for any catalyst/feedstock combination. The model lends insight into the main processes responsible for the growth of VANTAs, the measured number of walls in the nanotubes at different temperatures, conditions for growth of single-wall carbon nanotube arrays, and likely catalyst poisoning mechanisms responsible for the sharp decline in growth rates observed at high temperatures.

  6. Code System for 2-Group, 3D Neutronic Kinetics Calculations Coupled to Core Thermal Hydraulics.

    2000-05-12

    Version 00 QUARK is a combined computer program comprising a revised version of the QUANDRY three-dimensional, two-group neutron kinetics code and an upgraded version of the COBRA transient core analysis code (COBRA-EN). Starting from either a critical steady-state (k-effective or critical dilute Boron problem) or a subcritical steady-state (fixed source problem) in a PWR plant, the code allows one to simulate the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic core transient response to reactivity accidents initiated both inside themore » vessel (such as a control rod ejection) and outside the vessel (such as the sudden change of the Boron concentration in the coolant). QUARK output can be used as input to PSR-470/NORMA-FP to perform a subchannel analysis from converged coarse-mesh nodal solutions.« less

  7. The Chemical Kinetics of Alkaline Extraction of Tellurium from Lead-Bismuth Eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence E. Auman; Eric P. Loewen; Thomas F. Gesell; Shuji Ohno

    2005-07-01

    Polonium-210 is an important radioactive product of neutron activation of molten lead-bismuth eutectic, a promising candidate coolant for advanced fast nuclear reactors. The radiological hazard potential associated with polonium can be significantly reduced by continuous online removal of polonium from the coolant. The removal method under investigation in this research is alkaline extraction. Chemical kinetic measurements were made to determine first and second order rate constants, activation energy, and heat of reaction at various temperatures using tellurium as a surrogate. First and second order alkaline extraction rate constants were measured to be: k1 = 10.05 e –52,274/RT and k2 = 167 e –97,224/RT. Alkaline extraction is dependent on temperature and was found to follow the Arrhenius rate law. The activation energy (Ea) ranged between 52,274 – 97,224 J mol-1. With a strong foundation of surrogate work completed, this work should be validated using polonium-210.

  8. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals, Final Technical Report

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Curl, Robert F.; Glass, Graham P.

    2004-11-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching ratios of the reactions of O({sup 1}D) with acetaldehyde and methane, we discovered that hot atom chemistry effects are not negligible at the gas pressures (13 Torr) initially used. Branching ratios of the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} have been measured at a tenfold higher He flow and fivefold higher pressure.

  9. Optimization of chemical reactor feed by simulations based on a kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Guinand, Charles; Dabros, Michal; Roduit, Bertrand; Meyer, Thierry; Stoessel, Francis

    2014-10-01

    Chemical incidents are typically caused by loss of control, resulting in runaway reactions or process deviations in different stages of the production. In the case of fed-batch reactors, the problem generally encountered is the accumulation of heat. This is directly related to the temperature of the process, the reaction kinetics and adiabatic temperature rise, which is the maximum temperature attainable in the event of cooling failure. The main possibility to control the heat accumulation is the use of a well-controlled adapted feed. The feed rate can be adjusted by using reaction and reactor dynamic models coupled to Model Predictive Control. Thereby, it is possible to predict the best feed profile respecting the safety constraints.

  10. A quantitative study of chemical kinetics for the synthesis of doped oxide nanocrystals using FTIR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Wang, Xin; Ye, Zhizhen; Jin, Yizheng

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of Mg-doped ZnO nanocrystals was employed as a model system to quantitatively study the chemical kinetics of the precursor conversion reactions at synthetic conditions and the correlations with the formation of doped nanocrystals. An accurate method using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was developed to explore the alcoholysis reactions of the cationic precursors. Our study showed that three independent factors, molar ratio of dopant precursor, reaction temperature and coordination ligands of cationic precursors influenced the relative reactivity of magnesium to zinc precursor, and in turn the formation of Mg-doped ZnO nanocrystals with defined shapes and properties. This understanding underpins the advancement of the syntheses of doped nanocrystals and should be useful for future rational design of new synthetic systems. PMID:24619066

  11. Time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for chemical kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheps, Leonid; Chandler, David W.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental measurements of elementary reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios are essential to our understanding of many fundamentally important processes in Combustion Chemistry. However, such measurements are often impossible because of a lack of adequate detection techniques. Some of the largest gaps in our knowledge concern some of the most important radical species, because their short lifetimes and low steady-state concentrations make them particularly difficult to detect. To address this challenge, we propose a novel general detection method for gas-phase chemical kinetics: time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (TR-BB-CEAS). This all-optical, non-intrusive, multiplexed method enables sensitive direct probing of transient reaction intermediates in a simple, inexpensive, and robust experimental package.

  12. XCHEM-1D: A Heat Transfer/Chemical Kinetics Computer Program for multilayered reactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, R.J.; Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.

    1993-10-01

    An eXplosive CHEMical kinetics code, XCHEM, has been developed to solve the reactive diffusion equations associated with thermal ignition of energetic materials. This method-of-lines code uses stiff numerical methods and adaptive meshing to resolve relevant combustion physics. Solution accuracy is maintained between multilayered materials consisting of blends of reactive components and/or inert materials. Phase change and variable properties are included in one-dimensional slab, cylindrical and spherical geometries. Temperature-dependent thermal properties have been incorporated and the modification of thermal conductivities to include decomposition effects are estimated using solid/gas volume fractions determined by species fractions. Gas transport properties, including high pressure corrections, have also been included. Time varying temperature, heat flux, convective and thermal radiation boundary conditions, and layer to layer contact resistances have also been implemented.

  13. Time-resolved simplified chemical kinetics modelling using computational singular perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, S. H.; Goussis, D. A.; Konopka, D.

    1989-01-01

    A CO-CH4-air reaction system is used to demonstrate the computational singular perturbation (CSP) method for deriving time-resolved simplified chemical kinetics models. CSP provides a programmable algorithm to group the given collection of elementary reactions into reaction groups which are ordered according to their speed. The concept of Importance Index k(m)exp s is introduced: k(m)exp s is defined to be a number between 0 and 1 which measures the importance of the m-th reaction group to the s-th reactant and can readily be computed from data generated by CSP. It is suggested that the robustness of the solutions of the reaction system can be qualitatively assessed by inspecting the Importance Index data.

  14. Desorption kinetics of hydrophobic organic chemicals from sediment to water: a review of data and models.

    PubMed

    Birdwell, Justin; Cook, Robert L; Thibodeaux, Louis J

    2007-03-01

    Resuspension of contaminated sediment can lead to the release of toxic compounds to surface waters where they are more bioavailable and mobile. Because the timeframe of particle resettling during such events is shorter than that needed to reach equilibrium, a kinetic approach is required for modeling the release process. Due to the current inability of common theoretical approaches to predict site-specific release rates, empirical algorithms incorporating the phenomenological assumption of biphasic, or fast and slow, release dominate the descriptions of nonpolar organic chemical release in the literature. Two first-order rate constants and one fraction are sufficient to characterize practically all of the data sets studied. These rate constants were compared to theoretical model parameters and functionalities, including chemical properties of the contaminants and physical properties of the sorbents, to determine if the trends incorporated into the hindered diffusion model are consistent with the parameters used in curve fitting. The results did not correspond to the parameter dependence of the hindered diffusion model. No trend in desorption rate constants, for either fast or slow release, was observed to be dependent on K(OC) or aqueous solubility for six and seven orders of magnitude, respectively. The same was observed for aqueous diffusivity and sediment fraction organic carbon. The distribution of kinetic rate constant values was approximately log-normal, ranging from 0.1 to 50 d(-1) for the fast release (average approximately 5 d(-1)) and 0.0001 to 0.1 d(-1) for the slow release (average approximately 0.03 d(-1)). The implications of these findings with regard to laboratory studies, theoretical desorption process mechanisms, and water quality modeling needs are presented and discussed. PMID:17373505

  15. Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect cadmium uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice?

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Luo, Na; Zhang, Li Jun; Zhao, Hai Ming; Li, Yan Wen; Cai, Quan Ying; Wong, Ming Hung; Mo, Ce Hui

    2016-11-15

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were inoculated with two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) - Rhizophagus intraradices (RI) and Funneliformis mosseae (FM) and grown for 60days to ensure strong colonization. Subsequently, a short-term hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of AMF on cadmium (Cd) uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice exposed to six Cd levels (0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1mM) for three days. The results showed that the uptake kinetics of Cd fitted the Michaelis-Menten model well (R(2)>0.89). AMF significantly decreased the Cd concentrations both in shoots and roots in Cd solutions. Furthermore, the decrement of Cd concentrations by FM was significantly higher than RI treatment in roots. AMF reduced the Cd concentrations markedly in the cell wall fractions at high Cd substrate (≥0.025mM). The main subcellular fraction contributed to Cd detoxification was cell wall at low Cd substrate (<0.05mM), while vacuoles at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM). Moreover, the concentrations and proportions of Cd in inorganic and water-soluble form also reduced by AMF colonization at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM), both in shoots and roots. This suggested that AMF could convert Cd into inactive forms which were less toxic. Therefore, AMF could enhance rice resistance to Cd through altering subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in rice. PMID:27450963

  16. Chemical reactivation and aging kinetics of organophosphorus-inhibited cholinesterases from two earthworm species.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castellanos, Laura; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C

    2007-09-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the ability of pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride (2-PAM) to recover organophosphorus (OP)-inhibited cholinesterase (ChE) activity of two earthworm species (Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris). After inhibition of ChE activity by OP pesticides, an alkyl group may be released from the OP-ChE complex. This reaction is termed aging, and the esterase cannot be reactivated either spontaneously or by the action of reactivating agents, such as 2-PAM. We also examined the aging kinetics of OP-inhibited ChE activity to evaluate the suitability of 2-PAM reactivation methodology for field monitoring. A 2-PAM concentration of 5 x 10(-4) M was enough to reactivate the OP-inhibited ChE activity after 60 min of incubation at 25 degrees C. Chemical reactivation kinetics followed an exponential rise to a maximum of 70 to 80% of normal enzyme activity when ChEs were inhibited with methyl paraoxon or dichlorvos and up to 60% for the chlorpyrifos-inhibited ChE of E. fetida. The aging rates (ka) of the inhibited ChEs were strongly affected by the OP type, and these rates decreased for both earthworm species in the following order: Methyl paraoxon (ka = 0.023-0.033/h) > dichlorvos (ka = 0.008-0.009/h) > chlorpyrifos oxon (ka = 0.003-0.006/h). In particular, chlorpyrifos-inhibited ChE activity of L. terrestris aged slowly (median aging time, 190 h), which means that chemical reactivation of esterase activity with 2-PAM seems feasible one week after exposure to OP pesticides. We conclude that reactivation of earthworm ChE activity by treatment with 2-PAM is a complementary and specific methodology for assessing exposure to OP pesticides. PMID:17705652

  17. Coherent chemical kinetics as quantum walks. I. Reaction operators for radical pairs.

    PubMed

    Chia, A; Tan, K C; Pawela, Ł; Kurzyński, P; Paterek, T; Kaszlikowski, D

    2016-03-01

    Classical chemical kinetics uses rate-equation models to describe how a reaction proceeds in time. Such models are sufficient for describing state transitions in a reaction where coherences between different states do not arise, in other words, a reaction that contains only incoherent transitions. A prominent example of a reaction containing coherent transitions is the radical-pair model. The kinetics of such reactions is defined by the so-called reaction operator that determines the radical-pair state as a function of intermediate transition rates. We argue that the well-known concept of quantum walks from quantum information theory is a natural and apt framework for describing multisite chemical reactions. By composing Kraus maps that act only on two sites at a time, we show how the quantum-walk formalism can be applied to derive a reaction operator for the standard avian radical-pair reaction. Our reaction operator predicts the same recombination dephasing rate as the conventional Haberkorn model, which is consistent with recent experiments [K. Maeda et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234309 (2013)], in contrast to previous work by Jones and Hore [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. The standard radical-pair reaction has conventionally been described by either a normalized density operator incorporating both the radical pair and reaction products or a trace-decreasing density operator that considers only the radical pair. We demonstrate a density operator that is both normalized and refers only to radical-pair states. Generalizations to include additional dephasing processes and an arbitrary number of sites are also discussed.

  18. Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect cadmium uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice?

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Luo, Na; Zhang, Li Jun; Zhao, Hai Ming; Li, Yan Wen; Cai, Quan Ying; Wong, Ming Hung; Mo, Ce Hui

    2016-11-15

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were inoculated with two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) - Rhizophagus intraradices (RI) and Funneliformis mosseae (FM) and grown for 60days to ensure strong colonization. Subsequently, a short-term hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of AMF on cadmium (Cd) uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice exposed to six Cd levels (0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1mM) for three days. The results showed that the uptake kinetics of Cd fitted the Michaelis-Menten model well (R(2)>0.89). AMF significantly decreased the Cd concentrations both in shoots and roots in Cd solutions. Furthermore, the decrement of Cd concentrations by FM was significantly higher than RI treatment in roots. AMF reduced the Cd concentrations markedly in the cell wall fractions at high Cd substrate (≥0.025mM). The main subcellular fraction contributed to Cd detoxification was cell wall at low Cd substrate (<0.05mM), while vacuoles at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM). Moreover, the concentrations and proportions of Cd in inorganic and water-soluble form also reduced by AMF colonization at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM), both in shoots and roots. This suggested that AMF could convert Cd into inactive forms which were less toxic. Therefore, AMF could enhance rice resistance to Cd through altering subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in rice.

  19. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, J.P.; Levy, M.; Painter, G.S.; Wei, S.; Lagowski, J.B.

    1988-01-15

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al. and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N/sub 2/ and F/sub 2/, which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules.

  20. Colloidal chemical synthesis and formation kinetics of uniformly sized nanocrystals of metals, oxides, and chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Gu; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2008-12-01

    Nanocrystals exhibit interesting electrical, optical, magnetic, and chemical properties not achieved by their bulk counterparts. Consequently, to fully exploit the potential of nanocrystals, the synthesis of nanocrystals must focus on producing materials with uniform size and shape. Top-down physical processes can produce large quantities of nanocrystals, but controlling the size is difficult with these methods. On the other hand, colloidal chemical synthetic methods can produce uniform nanocrystals with a controlled particle size. In this Account, we present our synthesis of uniform nanocrystals of various shapes and materials, and we discuss the kinetics of nanocrystal formation. We employed four different synthetic approaches including thermal decomposition, nonhydrolytic sol-gel reactions, thermal reduction, and use of reactive chalcogen reagents. We synthesized uniform oxide nanocrystals via heat-up methods. This method involved slowly heat-up reaction mixtures composed of metal precursors, surfactants, and solvents from room temperature to high temperature. We then held reaction mixtures at an aging temperature for a few minutes to a few hours. Kinetics studies revealed a three-step mechanism for the synthesis of nanocrystals through the heat-up method with size distribution control. First, as metal precursors thermally decompose, monomers accumulate. At the aging temperature, burst nucleation occurs rapidly; at the end of this second phase, nucleation stops, but continued diffusion-controlled growth leads to size focusing to produce uniform nanocrystals. We used nonhydrolytic sol-gel reactions to synthesize various transition metal oxide nanocrystals. We employed ester elimination reactions for the synthesis of ZnO and TiO(2) nanocrystals. Uniform Pd nanoparticles were synthesized via a thermal reduction reaction induced by heating up a mixture of Pd(acac)(2), tri-n-octylphosphine, and oleylamine to the aging temperature. Similarly, we synthesized

  1. Use of a pressuremeter to measure the kinetics of carbon dioxide evolution in chemically leavened wheat flour dough.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Guillermo G; Scanlon, Martin G; Sapirstein, Harry D; Page, John H

    2008-11-12

    Among a number of impediments to a wider use of chemical leavening agents in bakery applications is the lack of standardized instrumentation capable of providing information on the rates of CO2 production from chemical leaveners in a format that is meaningful to both the technologist (i.e., the dough rate of reaction or DRR) and the researcher (e.g., in terms of fundamental unitskmol CO2 per kg of dough per s). This paper presents an original methodology to carry out the DRR test using a commercial pressuremeter, the Gassmart apparatus, and to model the kinetics of CO2 evolution of chemically leavened dough. Lean formula doughs were leavened at 27 and 39 degrees C with four chemical leavening systems containing sodium bicarbonate and one of four leavening acids, sodium acid pyrophosphate 40 (SAPP), adipic acid (ADA), potassium acid tartrate (KAT), and glucono-delta-lactone (GDL). Chemical kinetics theory was used to gain an insight into the reaction mechanisms responsible for the evolution of carbon dioxide from the leaveners. A first-order reaction kinetics model was found to be suitable for describing the neutralizing properties of GDL and ADA leavening systems, whereas a first-order reaction kinetics model for irreversible parallel reactions better described the leavening properties of the acidic salts KAT and SAPP.

  2. Use of a pressuremeter to measure the kinetics of carbon dioxide evolution in chemically leavened wheat flour dough.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Guillermo G; Scanlon, Martin G; Sapirstein, Harry D; Page, John H

    2008-11-12

    Among a number of impediments to a wider use of chemical leavening agents in bakery applications is the lack of standardized instrumentation capable of providing information on the rates of CO2 production from chemical leaveners in a format that is meaningful to both the technologist (i.e., the dough rate of reaction or DRR) and the researcher (e.g., in terms of fundamental unitskmol CO2 per kg of dough per s). This paper presents an original methodology to carry out the DRR test using a commercial pressuremeter, the Gassmart apparatus, and to model the kinetics of CO2 evolution of chemically leavened dough. Lean formula doughs were leavened at 27 and 39 degrees C with four chemical leavening systems containing sodium bicarbonate and one of four leavening acids, sodium acid pyrophosphate 40 (SAPP), adipic acid (ADA), potassium acid tartrate (KAT), and glucono-delta-lactone (GDL). Chemical kinetics theory was used to gain an insight into the reaction mechanisms responsible for the evolution of carbon dioxide from the leaveners. A first-order reaction kinetics model was found to be suitable for describing the neutralizing properties of GDL and ADA leavening systems, whereas a first-order reaction kinetics model for irreversible parallel reactions better described the leavening properties of the acidic salts KAT and SAPP. PMID:18841986

  3. A comparative study of chemical kinetics models for HMX in mesoscale simulations of shock initiation due to void collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Nirmal; Schweigert, Igor; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    The development of chemical kinetics schemes for use in modeling the reactive mechanics of energetic materials such as HMX has been an active area of research. Decomposition, deflagration and detonation models need to predict time to ignition and locations of onset of chemical reaction in energetic materials when used in meso- and macro-scale simulations. Modeling the chemical processes and development of appropriate kinetic law is challenging work because of lack of experimental data. However, significant work has been done in this area. Multistep kinetic models by Tarver and Tran, Henson and Smilowitz have provided plausible chemical kinetic rate laws for HMX. These models vary in the way they model the details of the decomposition process. Hence, a comparative study of different models will provide an understanding of the uncertainties involved in predicting ignition in HMX. In the current work, hot-spot ignition due to void collapse in shock compressed HMX has been analyzed using several reaction rate models, including the Tarver-Tran 4-equation model, the Henson-Smilowitz 7-equation model, and a new rate model that combines the condensed-phase decomposition rates measured by Brill et al and the detailed mechanism of nitramine flame chemistry due to Yetter et al. The chemical models have been incorporated in a massively parallel Eulerian code SCIMITAR3D. The variations in the predicted thresholds due to differences in the rate models will be discussed.

  4. LSENS: A General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code for homogeneous gas-phase reactions. Part 3: Illustrative test problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part 3 of a series of three reference publications that describe LSENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part 3 explains the kinetics and kinetics-plus-sensitivity analysis problems supplied with LSENS and presents sample results. These problems illustrate the various capabilities of, and reaction models that can be solved by, the code and may provide a convenient starting point for the user to construct the problem data file required to execute LSENS. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions.

  5. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule-Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-04-18

    The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide-and-conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction-type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre-exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude).

  6. Ab initio calculations of free energy barriers for chemical reactions in solution: proton transfer in [FHF]-.

    PubMed

    Muller, R P; Warshel, A

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method for calculating activation free energies of chemical reactions in solution, using molecular mechanics force fields for the solvent and an ab initio technique that incorporates the potential from the solvent in its Hamiltonian for the solute. The empirical valence bond (EVB) method is used as a reference potential for the ab initio free energy calculation, and drives the reaction along the proper coordinate, thus overcoming problems encountered by direct attempts to use molecular orbital methods in calculations of activation free energies. The utility of our method is illustrated by calculating the activation free energy for proton transfer between fluoride ions in the [FHF]-system, in both polar and nonpolar solution.

  7. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule–Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide‐and‐conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction‐type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre‐exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude). PMID:27008460

  8. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    A decomposition of the molecular energy is presented that is motivated by the atom superposition and electron delocalization physical model of chemical binding. The energy appears in physically transparent form consisting of a classical electrostatic interaction, a zero order two electron exchange interaction, a relaxation energy, and the atomic energies. Detailed formulae are derived in zero and first order of approximation. The formulation extends beyond first order to any chosen level of approximation leading, in principle, to the exact energy. The structure of this energy decomposition lends itself to the fullest utilization of the solutions to the atomic sub problems to simplify the calculation of the molecular energy. If nonlinear relaxation effects remain minor, the molecular energy calculation requires at most the calculation of two center, two electron integrals. This scheme thus affords the prospects of substantially reducing the computational effort required for the calculation of molecular energies.

  9. Equivalence of on-Lattice Stochastic Chemical Kinetics with the Well-Mixed Chemical Master Equation in the Limit of Fast Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, Michail; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2011-12-14

    Well-mixed and lattice-based descriptions of stochastic chemical kinetics have been extensively used in the literature. Realizations of the corresponding stochastic processes are obtained by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and lattice kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms, respectively. However, the two frameworks have remained disconnected. We show the equivalence of these frameworks whereby the stochastic lattice kinetics reduces to effective well-mixed kinetics in the limit of fast diffusion. In the latter, the lattice structure appears implicitly, as the lumped rate of bimolecular reactions depends on the number of neighbors of a site on the lattice. Moreover, we propose a mapping between the stochastic propensities and the deterministic rates of the well-mixed vessel and lattice dynamics that illustrates the hierarchy of models and the key parameters that enable model reduction.

  10. Forming NCO(-) in Dense Molecular Clouds: Possible Gas-Phase Chemical Paths From Quantum Calculations.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, E; Gianturco, F A; Wester, R

    2016-07-14

    The existence of NCO(-) anions in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been suggested and searched for over the years but without any formal definitive sighting of that molecule. We discuss in this work the possible formation of either NCO(-) directly or of NCO neutral as a precursor to NCO(-) formation by electron attachment. We follow simple, gas-phase chemical reactions for which the general features are obtained from accurate quantum calculations. The results are shedding some additional light on the likely presence of this anion in the ISM environment, drawing further information from the specific features of the considered reactions on the additional chemical options that exist for its formation.

  11. Forming NCO– in Dense Molecular Clouds: Possible Gas-Phase Chemical Paths From Quantum Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The existence of NCO– anions in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been suggested and searched for over the years but without any formal definitive sighting of that molecule. We discuss in this work the possible formation of either NCO– directly or of NCO neutral as a precursor to NCO– formation by electron attachment. We follow simple, gas-phase chemical reactions for which the general features are obtained from accurate quantum calculations. The results are shedding some additional light on the likely presence of this anion in the ISM environment, drawing further information from the specific features of the considered reactions on the additional chemical options that exist for its formation. PMID:26696323

  12. Projected and hidden Markov models for calculating kinetics and metastable states of complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Noé, Frank; Wu, Hao; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Plattner, Nuria

    2013-11-14

    Markov state models (MSMs) have been successful in computing metastable states, slow relaxation timescales and associated structural changes, and stationary or kinetic experimental observables of complex molecules from large amounts of molecular dynamics simulation data. However, MSMs approximate the true dynamics by assuming a Markov chain on a clusters discretization of the state space. This approximation is difficult to make for high-dimensional biomolecular systems, and the quality and reproducibility of MSMs has, therefore, been limited. Here, we discard the assumption that dynamics are Markovian on the discrete clusters. Instead, we only assume that the full phase-space molecular dynamics is Markovian, and a projection of this full dynamics is observed on the discrete states, leading to the concept of Projected Markov Models (PMMs). Robust estimation methods for PMMs are not yet available, but we derive a practically feasible approximation via Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). It is shown how various molecular observables of interest that are often computed from MSMs can be computed from HMMs/PMMs. The new framework is applicable to both, simulation and single-molecule experimental data. We demonstrate its versatility by applications to educative model systems, a 1 ms Anton MD simulation of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor protein, and an optical tweezer force probe trajectory of an RNA hairpin. PMID:24320261

  13. Projected and hidden Markov models for calculating kinetics and metastable states of complex molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noé, Frank; Wu, Hao; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Plattner, Nuria

    2013-11-01

    Markov state models (MSMs) have been successful in computing metastable states, slow relaxation timescales and associated structural changes, and stationary or kinetic experimental observables of complex molecules from large amounts of molecular dynamics simulation data. However, MSMs approximate the true dynamics by assuming a Markov chain on a clusters discretization of the state space. This approximation is difficult to make for high-dimensional biomolecular systems, and the quality and reproducibility of MSMs has, therefore, been limited. Here, we discard the assumption that dynamics are Markovian on the discrete clusters. Instead, we only assume that the full phase-space molecular dynamics is Markovian, and a projection of this full dynamics is observed on the discrete states, leading to the concept of Projected Markov Models (PMMs). Robust estimation methods for PMMs are not yet available, but we derive a practically feasible approximation via Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). It is shown how various molecular observables of interest that are often computed from MSMs can be computed from HMMs/PMMs. The new framework is applicable to both, simulation and single-molecule experimental data. We demonstrate its versatility by applications to educative model systems, a 1 ms Anton MD simulation of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor protein, and an optical tweezer force probe trajectory of an RNA hairpin.

  14. On the transferability of a parametrized kinetic functional for orbital-free density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Alexander; Espinosa Leal, Leonardo; Caro, Miguel; Lehtomaki, Jouko; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga

    Because of issues with accuracy and transferability of existing orbital-free (OF) density functionals, OF functional development remains an active research area. Due to numerical difficulties, all-electron self-consistent assessment of OF functionals is limited. Using the projector augmented wave method we compute OFDFT all-electron values and we evaluate the performance of a parametrized OF functional for atoms and molecules. We combine the parametrized Thomas-Fermi-Weizsäcker (TF-W) kinetic model λ and γ for the fractions of Weizsäcker and TF functionals, respectively, with LDA for atoms. We found that one-to-one relation between λ and γ values defines a region in parameter space that allows the atomic energies and eigenvalues to be approximated with a small average error with respect to the Kohn-Sham values. The optimum values is however different for every property and for every atom. Recently, these results have been combined to test parameter transferability from atoms to molecules and we expect will help for further systematic improvement of OF density functionals. Karpenko et al., in preparation.

  15. Development of Quantum Chemical Method to Calculate Half Maximal Inhibitory Concentration (IC50 ).

    PubMed

    Bag, Arijit; Ghorai, Pradip Kr

    2016-05-01

    Till date theoretical calculation of the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) of a compound is based on different Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) models which are empirical methods. By using the Cheng-Prusoff equation it may be possible to compute IC50 , but this will be computationally very expensive as it requires explicit calculation of binding free energy of an inhibitor with respective protein or enzyme. In this article, for the first time we report an ab initio method to compute IC50 of a compound based only on the inhibitor itself where the effect of the protein is reflected through a proportionality constant. By using basic enzyme inhibition kinetics and thermodynamic relations, we derive an expression of IC50 in terms of hydrophobicity, electric dipole moment (μ) and reactivity descriptor (ω) of an inhibitor. We implement this theory to compute IC50 of 15 HIV-1 capsid inhibitors and compared them with experimental results and available other QASR based empirical results. Calculated values using our method are in very good agreement with the experimental values compared to the values calculated using other methods. PMID:27492086

  16. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts. 7. Gauge-invariant INDO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, H.; Miura, K.; Hirai, A.

    A gauge-invariant INDO method based on the coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory is presented and applied to the calculation of 1H and 13C chemical shifts of hydrocarbons including ring compounds. Invariance of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic shieldings with respect to displacement of the coordinate origin is discussed. Comparison between calculated and experimental results exhibits fairly good agreement, provided that the INDO parameters of Ellis et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.94, 4069 (1972)) are used with the inclusion of all multicenter one-electron integrals.

  17. On inelastic reactive collisions in kinetic theory of chemically reacting gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Gilberto M.; Silva, Adriano W.; Alves, Giselle M.

    2010-07-01

    A kinetic theory for a simple reversible reaction-characterized by a binary mixture of ideal gases whose constituents denoted by A and B undergo a reaction of the type A+A⇌B+B-is developed by considering the reactive collisions as inelastic ones. The geometry of the collision is taken into account in the line-of-centers differential cross section by allowing that a chemical reaction may occur only when the energy of the relative velocity in the direction of the line which joins the centers of the molecules at collision is larger than the activation energy. It is shown that the restitution coefficients: (i) depend explicitly on the reaction heat and on the relative translational energy in the direction of the line which joins the centers of the molecules during an inelastic collision; (ii) vanish when the reaction heat is zero; (iii) are larger or smaller than one depending on the direction of the reaction and on the sign of the reaction heat. First approximations to the distribution functions are determined from the system of Boltzmann equations for the last stage of a chemical reaction. It is shown that the deviations from the Maxwellian distribution functions and the production terms of the particle number densities: (i) vanish when the reaction heat is zero provided that the affinity is close to zero and (ii) are negative or positive depending on the sign of the reaction heat and on the direction of the reaction.

  18. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Isomers of Heptane

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H C; Boercker, J; Kunrath, E

    2001-03-26

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for all nine chemical isomers of heptane (C{sub 7}H{sub 16}), following techniques and models developed previously for other smaller alkane hydrocarbon species. These reaction mechanisms are tested at high temperatures by computing shock tube ignition delay times and at lower temperatures by simulating ignition in a rapid compression machine. Although the corresponding experiments have not been reported in the literature for most of these isomers of heptane, intercomparisons between the computed results for these isomers and comparisons with available experimental results for other alkane fuels are used to validate the reaction mechanisms as much as possible. Differences in the overall reaction rates of these fuels are discussed in terms of differences in their molecular structure and the resulting variations in rates of important elementary reactions. Reaction mechanisms in this study are works in progress and the results reported here are subject to change, based on model improvements and corrections of errors not yet discovered.

  19. Chemical mechanism of lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase from rabbit lung. pH-dependence of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gil, J; Martín, J; Acebal, C; Arche, R

    1990-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase is an enzyme that catalyses two reactions: hydrolysis of lysophosphatidylcholine and transacylation between two molecules of lysophosphatidylcholine to give disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Following the kinetic model previously proposed for this enzyme [Martín, Pérez-Gil, Acebal & Arche (1990) Biochem. J. 266, 47-53], the values of essential pK values in free enzyme and substrate-enzyme complexes have now been determined. The chemical mechanism of catalysis was dependent on the deprotonation of a histidine residue with pK about 5.7. This result was supported by the perturbation of pK values by addition of organic solvent. Very high and exothermic enthalpy of ionization was measured, indicating that a conformational re-arrangement in the enzyme accompanies the ionization of the essential histidine residue. These results, as well as the results from previous studies, enabled the proposal of a chemical mechanism for the enzymic reactions catalysed by lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase from rabbit lung. PMID:2241908

  20. Chemical kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, and destruction applied to the Maracaibo basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J.J.; Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a compositional chemical model of hydrocarbon generation, expulsion,a nd destruction for the Cretaceous La Luna Formation source rock of the Maraciabo basin, Venezuela. Applications include both laboratory and geological settings. Laboratory pyrolysis experiments were used to study bulk oil generation, expulsion, and associated changes in composition of the kerogen, extractable organic matter, and expelled and unexpelled hydrocarbons. The laboratory experiments were also used to determine kinetic parameters to quantitatively describe organic reactions, via a computer model that also includes simulation of pressure-driven primary expulsion, over widely varying conditions. We show that the chemical model accuratley simulates the experimental results. Thermal history models for wells in the Maraciabo basin were used to simulate hydrocarbon generation and pore pressure development in the La Luna Formation and expulsion into nearby Cretaceous reservoirs. Results of the modeling indicate that both compaction disequilibrium and organic maturation play important roles in the development of excess pore pressure in the La Luna Formation. The model simulation of the variation of indicators such as Rock-Eval parameters and extract and oil compositions shows generally good agreement with measurements from remaining kerogen, oils, and extracts recovered from the La Luna Formation and from nearby Cretaceous reservoirs.

  1. Chemical sinks of organic aerosol: kinetics and products of the heterogeneous oxidation of erythritol and levoglucosan.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Sean H; Smith, Jared D; Che, Dung L; Worsnop, Douglas R; Wilson, Kevin R; Kroll, Jesse H

    2010-09-15

    The heterogeneous oxidation of pure erythritol (C(4)H(10)O(4)) and levoglucosan (C(6)H(10)O(5)) particles was studied in order to evaluate the effects of atmospheric aging on the mass and chemical composition of atmospheric organic aerosol. In contrast to what is generally observed for the heterogeneous oxidation of reduced organics, substantial volatilization is observed in both systems. However, the ratio of the decrease in particle mass to the decrease in the concentration of the parent species is about three times higher for erythritol than for levoglucosan, indicating that details of chemical structure (such as carbon number, cyclic moieties, and oxygen-containing functional groups) play a governing role in the importance of volatilization reactions. The kinetics of the reaction indicate that while both compounds react at approximately the same rate, reactions of their oxidation products appear to be slowed substantially. Estimates of volatilities of organic species based on elemental composition measurements suggest that the heterogeneous oxidation of oxygenated organics may be an important loss mechanism of organic aerosol.

  2. Kinetics of cadmium, chromium, and lead sorption onto chemically modified sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Mahmood-ul-Hassan, M; Suthar, V; Rafique, E; Ahmad, R; Yasin, M

    2015-07-01

    In this study, cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), and lead (Pb) adsorption potential of unmodified and modified sugarcane bagasse and ground wheat straw was explored from aqueous solution through batch equilibrium technique. Both the materials were chemically modified by treating with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) alone and in combination with nitric acid (HNO3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Two kinetic models, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order were used to follow the adsorption process and reaction fallowed the later model. The Pb removal by both the materials was highest and followed by Cr and Cd. The chemical treatment invariably increased the adsorption capacity and NaOH treatment proved more effective than others. Langmuir maximum sorption capacity (q m) of Pb was utmost (12.8-23.3 mg/g of sugarcane bagasse, 14.5-22.4 mg/g of wheat straw) and of Cd was least (1.5-2.2 mg/g of sugarcane bagasse, 2.5-3.8 mg/g of wheat straw). The q m was in the order of Pb > Cr > Cd for all the three adsorbents. Results demonstrate that agricultural waste materials used in this study could be used to remediate the heavy metal-polluted water.

  3. Electronic Structure Theory and Multi-Structural Statistical Thermodynamics for Computational Chemical Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papajak, Ewa

    This thesis involves the development and application of methods for accurate computational thermochemistry. It consists of two parts. The first part focuses on the accuracy of the electronic structure methods. In particular, various augmentation schemes for one-electron basis sets are presented and tested for density functional theory (DFT) calculations and for wave function theory (WFT) calculations. The relationship between diffuse basis functions and basis set superposition error is discussed. For WFT, we also compare the efficiency of conventional one-electron basis-sets to that of newly developed explicitly correlated methods. Various ways of approaching the complete basis set limit of WFT calculations are explained, and recommendations are made for the best ways of achieving balance between the basis set size, higher-order correlation, and relativistic corrections. Applications of this work include computation of barrier heights, reaction and bond energies, electron affinities, ionization potentials, and noncovalent interactions. The second part of this thesis focuses on the problem of incorporating multi-structural effects and anharmonicity effects in the torsional modes into partition function calculations, especially by using a new multi-structural torsion (MS-T) method. Applications of the MS-T method include partition functions of molecules and radicals important for combustion research. These partition functions are used to obtain thermodynamic functions that are the most reliable results available to date for these molecules. The multi-structural approach is also applied to two kinetics problems: The hydrogen abstraction from carbon-3 of 1-butanol by hydroperoxyl radical; The 1,5-hydrogen shift isomerization of the 1-butoxyl radical. In both cases multi-structural effects play an important role in the final results.

  4. Determination of atropisomeric configurations of macrocyclic bisbibenzyls by HPLC-CD/UV and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ning; Xie, Chun-Feng; Zhu, Xiao-Song; Fan, Pei-Hong; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2011-04-01

    Isoriccardin C (1) and riccardin D (2), isolated from the liverwort Reboulia hemisphaerica, were first characterized to be a mixture of two enantiomeric atropisomers by online chiral high-performance liquid chromatography-circular dichroism (HPLC-CD) analysis. Exemplarily for bisbibenzyls of the diarylether-biphenyl type, the absolute atropisomeric configurations of compunds 1 and 2 were determined by the analysis of their CD data coupled with quantum chemical CD calculations.

  5. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Oxidation of Four Small Alkyl Esters in Laminar Premixed Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Westmoreland, P R; Dryer, F L; Chaos, M; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K; Cool, T A; Wang, J; Yang, B; Hansen, N; Kasper, T

    2008-02-08

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism has been developed for a group of four small alkyl ester fuels, consisting of methyl formate, methyl acetate, ethyl formate and ethyl acetate. This mechanism is validated by comparisons between computed results and recently measured intermediate species mole fractions in fuel-rich, low pressure, premixed laminar flames. The model development employs a principle of similarity of functional groups in constraining the H atom abstraction and unimolecular decomposition reactions in each of these fuels. As a result, the reaction mechanism and formalism for mechanism development are suitable for extension to larger oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, together with an improved kinetic understanding of the structure and chemical kinetics of alkyl ester fuels that can be extended to biodiesel fuels. Variations in concentrations of intermediate species levels in these flames are traced to differences in the molecular structure of the fuel molecules.

  6. Shock tube study of the fuel structure effects on the chemical kinetic mechanisms responsible for soot formation, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Clary, D. W.; Ramachandra, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    Soot formation in oxidation of allene, 1,3-butadiene, vinylacetylene and chlorobenzene and in pyrolysis of ethylene, vinylacetylene, 1-butene, chlorobenzene, acetylen-hydrogen, benzene-acetylene, benzene-butadiene and chlorobenzene-acetylene argon-diluted mixtures was studied behind reflected shock waves. The results are rationalized within the framework of the conceptual models. It is shown that vinylacetylene is much less sooty than allene, which indicates that conjugation by itself is not a sufficient factor for determining the sooting tendency of a molecule. Structural reactivity in the context of the chemical kinetics is the dominant factor in soot formation. Detailed chemical kinetic modeling of soot formation in pyrolysis of acetylene is reported. The main mass growth was found to proceed through a single dominant route composed of conventional radical reactions. The practically irreversible formation reactions of the fused polycyclic aromatics and the overshoot by hydrogen atom over its equilibrium concentration are the g-driving kinetic forces for soot formation.

  7. NASA Data Evaluation: Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, J. B.; Sander, S. P.; Abbatt, J.; Barker, J. R.; Fleming, E. L.; Friedl, R.; Huie, R. E.; Jackman, C. H.; Kolb, C. E., Jr.; Kurylo, M. J., III; Orkin, V. L.; Wine, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric chemistry models must include a large number of processes to accurately describe the temporal and spatial behavior of atmospheric composition. They require a wide range of chemical and physical data (parameters) that describe elementary gas-phase and heterogeneous processes. The review and evaluation of chemical and physical data has, therefore, played an important role in the development of chemical models and in their use in environmental assessment activities. The NASA data panel was originally established in 1977 by the NASA Upper Atmosphere Research Program Office to provide a critical evaluation of kinetic and photochemical data for use in laboratory studies and in atmospheric modeling of stratospheric ozone. Today, the NASA data panel evaluations have a broader atmospheric focus and include Ox, O(1D), singlet O2, HOx, NOx, Organic, FOx, ClOx, BrOx, IOx, SOx, and Na reactions, three-body reactions, equilibrium constants, photochemistry, aqueous chemistry, heterogeneous chemistry and processes, and thermodynamic parameters. The 2011 evaluation (JPL 10-6 available at http://jpldataeval.jpl.nasa.gov.) includes the comprehensive coverage of ~670 bimolecular reactions, 75 three-body reactions, 24 equilibrium constants, 215 photochemical species, 355 aqueous and heterogeneous processes, thermodynamic parameters for 590 species, and over 4000 literature citations. Each evaluation includes (1) recommended values (e.g. rate coefficients, absorption cross sections, and uptake coefficients) with estimated uncertainty factors and (2) a note describing the available experimental and theoretical data and explanation for the recommendation. As new studies have become available over the years the recommendations are critically reviewed and updated as warranted (the next evaluation is scheduled for release in early 2015). This presentation provides an overview of the NASA data panel evaluation process and the methodology used to estimate uncertainties. Examples on

  8. Path-integral calculations of heavy atom kinetic isotope effects in condensed phase reactions using higher-order Trotter factorizations.

    PubMed

    Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Azuri, Asaf; Major, Dan Thomas

    2012-02-01

    A convenient approach to compute kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) in condensed phase chemical reactions is via path integrals (PIs). Usually, the primitive approximation is used in PI simulations, although such quantum simulations are computationally demanding. The efficiency of PI simulations may be greatly improved, if higher-order Trotter factorizations of the density matrix operator are used. In this study, we use a higher-order PI method, in conjunction with mass-perturbation, to compute heavy-atom KIE in the decarboxylation of orotic acid in explicit sulfolane solvent. The results are in good agreement with experiment and show that the mass-perturbation higher-order Trotter factorization provides a practical approach for computing condensed phase heavy-atom KIE.

  9. Non-Isothermic Chemical Kinetics in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Arrhenius Parameters from Experiments with Hyperbolic Temperature Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvador, F.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes a method which adapts itself to the characteristics of the kinetics of a chemical reaction in solution, enabling students to determine the Arrhenius parameters with satisfactory accuracy by means of a single non-isothermic experiment. Both activation energy and the preexponential factor values can be obtained by the method. (JN)

  10. A Microscale Approach to Chemical Kinetics in the General Chemistry Laboratory: The Potassium Iodide Hydrogen Peroxide Iodine-Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattsangi, Prem D.

    2011-01-01

    A microscale laboratory for teaching chemical kinetics utilizing the iodine clock reaction is described. Plastic pipets, 3 mL volume, are used to store and deliver precise drops of reagents and the reaction is run in a 24 well plastic tray using a total 60 drops of reagents. With this procedure, students determine the rate of reaction and the…

  11. Is Case-Based Learning an Effective Teaching Strategy to Challenge Students' Alternative Conceptions regarding Chemical Kinetics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalcinkaya, Eylem; Tastan-Kirik, Ozgecan; Boz, Yezdan; Yildiran, Demet

    2012-01-01

    Background: Case-based learning (CBL) is simply teaching the concept to the students based on the cases. CBL involves a case, which is a scenario based on daily life, and study questions related to the case, which allows students to discuss their ideas. Chemical kinetics is one of the most difficult concepts for students in chemistry. Students…

  12. Free energy calculations, enhanced by a Gaussian ansatz, for the "chemical work" distribution.

    PubMed

    Boulougouris, Georgios C

    2014-05-15

    The evaluation of the free energy is essential in molecular simulation because it is intimately related with the existence of multiphase equilibrium. Recently, it was demonstrated that it is possible to evaluate the Helmholtz free energy using a single statistical ensemble along an entire isotherm by accounting for the "chemical work" of transforming each molecule, from an interacting one, to an ideal gas. In this work, we show that it is possible to perform such a free energy perturbation over a liquid vapor phase transition. Furthermore, we investigate the link between a general free energy perturbation scheme and the novel nonequilibrium theories of Crook's and Jarzinsky. We find that for finite systems away from the thermodynamic limit the second law of thermodynamics will always be an inequality for isothermal free energy perturbations, resulting always to a dissipated work that may tend to zero only in the thermodynamic limit. The work, the heat, and the entropy produced during a thermodynamic free energy perturbation can be viewed in the context of the Crooks and Jarzinsky formalism, revealing that for a given value of the ensemble average of the "irreversible" work, the minimum entropy production corresponded to a Gaussian distribution for the histogram of the work. We propose the evaluation of the free energy difference in any free energy perturbation based scheme on the average irreversible "chemical work" minus the dissipated work that can be calculated from the variance of the distribution of the logarithm of the work histogram, within the Gaussian approximation. As a consequence, using the Gaussian ansatz for the distribution of the "chemical work," accurate estimates for the chemical potential and the free energy of the system can be performed using much shorter simulations and avoiding the necessity of sampling the computational costly tails of the "chemical work." For a more general free energy perturbation scheme that the Gaussian ansatz may not be

  13. Correlation Between Testosterone and PSA Kinetics in Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Diverse Chemical Castrations.

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo O; Denardi, Fernandes; Faria, Eliney F; Silva, Elcio Dias

    2015-09-01

    To assess total testosterone and prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics among diverse chemical castrations, advanced-stage prostate cancer patients were randomized into three groups of 20: Group 1, Leuprolide 3.75 mg; Group 2, Leuprolide 7.5 mg; and Group 3, Goserelin 3.6 mg. All groups were treated with monthly application of the respective drugs. The patients' levels of serum total testosterone and PSA were evaluated at two time periods: before the treatment and 3 months after the treatment. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was utilized to verify the hypothesis of linear correlation between total testosterone and PSA levels. At the beginning the patients' age, stage, grade, PSA, and total testosterone were similar within the three groups, with median age 72, 70, and 70 years in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Three months after the treatment, patients who received Leuprolide 7.5 mg presented significantly lower median total testosterone levels compared with Goserelin 3.6 mg and Leuprolide 3.75 mg (9.5 ng/dL vs. 20.0 ng/dL vs. 30.0 ng/dL, respectively; p = .0072), while those who received Goserelin 3.6 mg presented significantly lower PSA levels compared with Leuprolide 7.5 mg and Leuprolide 3.75 mg (0.67 vs. 1.86 vs. 2.57, respectively; p = .0067). There was no linear correlation between total testosterone and PSA levels. Overall, regarding castration levels of total testosterone, 28.77% of patients did not obtain levels ≤50 ng/dL and 47.80% did not obtain levels ≤20 ng/dL. There was no correlation between total testosterone and PSA kinetics and no equivalence among different pharmacological castrations.

  14. Influence of chemical kinetics on postcolumn reaction in a capillary Taylor reactor with catechol analytes and photoluminescence following electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Moon Chul; Weber, Stephen G

    2005-02-15

    Postcolumn derivatization reactions can enhance detector sensitivity and selectivity, but their successful combination with capillary liquid chromatography has been limited because of the small peak volumes in capillary chromatography. A capillary Taylor reactor (CTR), developed in our laboratory, provides simple and effective mixing and reaction in a 25-microm-radius postcolumn capillary. Homogenization of reactant streams occurs by radial diffusion, and a chemical reaction follows. Three characteristic times for a given reaction process can be predicted using simple physical and chemical parameters. Two of these times are the homogenization time, which governs how long it takes the molecules in the analyte and reagent streams to mix, and the reaction time, which governs how long the molecules in a homogeneous solution take to react. The third characteristic time is an adjustment to the reaction time called the start time, which represents an estimate of the average time the analyte stream spends without exposure to reagent. In this study, laser-induced fluorescence monitored the extent of the postcolumn reaction (reduction of Os(bpy)3(3+) by analyte to the photoluminescent Os(bpy)3(2+)) in a CTR. The reaction time depends on the reaction rates. Analysis of product versus time data yielded second-order reaction rate constants between the PFET reagent, tris(2,2'-bipyridine)osmium, and standards ((ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium cation and p-hydroquinone) or catechols (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. The extent of the reactions in a CTR were then predicted from initial reaction conditions and compared to experimental results. Both the theory and experimental results suggested the reactions of catechols were generally kinetically controlled, while those of the standards were controlled by mixing time (1-2 s). Thus, the extent of homogenization can be monitored in a CTR using the relatively fast reaction of the reagent and p

  15. Quantitative calculations of fluorescence polarization and absorption anisotropy kinetics of double- and triple-chromophore complexes with energy transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, A A

    1994-01-01

    A new method is presented for calculation of the fluorescence depolarization and kinetics of absorption anisotropy for molecular complexes with a limited number of chromophores. The method considers absorption and emission of light by both chromophores, and also energy transfer between them, with regard to their mutual orientations. The chromophores in each individual complex are rigidly positioned. The complexes are randomly distributed and oriented in space, and there is no energy transfer between them. The new "practical" formula for absorption anisotropy and fluorescence depolarization kinetics, P(t) = [3B(t) - 1 + 2A(t)]/[3 + B(t) + 4A(t)], is derived both for double- and triple-chromophore complexes with delta-pulse excitation. The parameter B(t) is given by (a) B(t) = cos2(theta) for double-chromophore complexes, and (b) B(t) = q12(t)cos2(theta 12) + q13(t)-cos2(theta 13) + q23(t)cos2(theta 23) for triple-chromophore complexes, where q12(t) + q13(t) + q23(t) = 1. Here theta ij are the angles between the chromophore transition dipole moments in the individual molecular complex. The parameters qij(t) and A(t) are dependent on chromophore spectroscopic features and on the rates of energy transfer. PMID:7696461

  16. Gas-phase reaction between calcium monocation and fluoromethane: Analysis of the potential energy hypersurface and kinetics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Varela-Alvarez, Adrian; Sordo, Jose A.; Rayon, V. M.; Redondo, P.; Barrientos, C.

    2009-10-14

    The gas-phase reaction between calcium monocation and fluoromethane: Ca{sup +}+CH{sub 3}F{yields}CaF{sup +}+CH{sub 3} was theoretically analyzed. The potential energy hypersurface was explored by using density functional theory methodology with different functionals and Pople's, Dunning's, Ahlrichs', and Stuttgart-Dresden basis sets. Kinetics calculations (energy and total angular momentum resolved microcanonical variational/conventional theory) were accomplished. The theoretically predicted range for the global kinetic rate constant values at 295 K (7.2x10{sup -11}-5.9x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}) agrees reasonably well with the experimental value at the same temperature [(2.6{+-}0.8)x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}]. Explicit consideration of a two transition state model, where the formation of a weakly bounded prereactive complex is preceded by an outer transition state (entrance channel) and followed by an inner transition state connecting with a second intermediate that finally leads to products, is mandatory. Experimental observations on the correlation, or lack of correlation, between reaction rate constants and second ionization energies of the metal might well be rationalized in terms of this two transition state model.

  17. Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations Accelerated on a Hybrid Multicore CPU-GPU Computing Platform.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Koslowski, Axel; Thiel, Walter

    2012-07-10

    In this work, we demonstrate that semiempirical quantum chemical calculations can be accelerated significantly by leveraging the graphics processing unit (GPU) as a coprocessor on a hybrid multicore CPU-GPU computing platform. Semiempirical calculations using the MNDO, AM1, PM3, OM1, OM2, and OM3 model Hamiltonians were systematically profiled for three types of test systems (fullerenes, water clusters, and solvated crambin) to identify the most time-consuming sections of the code. The corresponding routines were ported to the GPU and optimized employing both existing library functions and a GPU kernel that carries out a sequence of noniterative Jacobi transformations during pseudodiagonalization. The overall computation times for single-point energy calculations and geometry optimizations of large molecules were reduced by one order of magnitude for all methods, as compared to runs on a single CPU core.

  18. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Farley

    2010-08-19

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N≥3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N=0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  19. AFNMR: automated fragmentation quantum mechanical calculation of NMR chemical shifts for biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Swails, Jason; Zhu, Tong; He, Xiao; Case, David A

    2015-10-01

    We evaluate the performance of the automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach (AF-QM/MM) on the calculation of protein and nucleic acid NMR chemical shifts. The AF-QM/MM approach models solvent effects implicitly through a set of surface charges computed using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and it can also be combined with an explicit solvent model through the placement of water molecules in the first solvation shell around the solute; the latter substantially improves the accuracy of chemical shift prediction of protons involved in hydrogen bonding with solvent. We also compare the performance of AF-QM/MM on proteins and nucleic acids with two leading empirical chemical shift prediction programs SHIFTS and SHIFTX2. Although the empirical programs outperform AF-QM/MM in predicting chemical shifts, the differences are in some cases small, and the latter can be applied to chemical shifts on biomolecules which are outside the training set employed by the empirical programs, such as structures containing ligands, metal centers, and non-standard residues. The AF-QM/MM described here is implemented in version 5 of the SHIFTS software, and is fully automated, so that only a structure in PDB format is required as input.

  20. Analysis of chemical reaction kinetics of depredating organic pollutants from secondary effluent of wastewater treatment plant in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Jiang, Dengling; Yang, Yong; Cao, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Four subsurface constructed wetlands were built to treat the secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant in Tangshan, China. The chemical pollutant indexes of chemical oxygen demand (COD) were analyzed to evaluate the removal efficiency of organic pollutants from the secondary effluent of the wastewater treatment plant. In all cases, the subsurface constructed wetlands were efficient in treating organic pollutants. Under the same hydraulic loading condition, the horizontal flow wetlands exhibited better efficiency of COD removal than vertical flow wetlands: the removal rates in horizontal flow wetlands could be maintained at 68.4 ± 2.42% to 92.2 ± 1.61%, compared with 63.8 ± 1.19% to 85.0 ± 1.25% in the vertical flow wetlands. Meanwhile, the chemical reaction kinetics of organic pollutants was analyzed, and the results showed that the degradation courses of the four subsurface wetlands all corresponded with the first order reaction kinetics to a large extent.

  1. DFT calculations of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    del Rosal, I; Maron, L; Poteau, R; Jolibois, F

    2008-08-14

    Transition metal hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential use as catalysts for hydrogenation. Among other available techniques, structural properties in transition metal (TM) complexes are often probed by NMR spectroscopy. In this paper we will show that it is possible to establish a viable methodological strategy in the context of density functional theory, that allows the determination of 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydride ligands attached to transition metal atoms in mononuclear systems and clusters with good accuracy with respect to experiment. 13C chemical shifts have also been considered in some cases. We have studied mononuclear ruthenium complexes such as Ru(L)(H)(dppm)2 with L = H or Cl, cationic complex [Ru(H)(H2O)(dppm)2]+ and Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2, in which hydride ligands are characterized by a negative 1H NMR chemical shift. For these complexes all calculations are in relatively good agreement compared to experimental data with errors not exceeding 20% except for the hydrogen atom in Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2. For this last complex, the relative error increases to 30%, probably owing to the necessity to take into account dynamical effects of phenyl groups. Carbonyl ligands are often encountered in coordination chemistry. Specific issues arise when calculating 1H or 13C NMR chemical shifts in TM carbonyl complexes. Indeed, while errors of 10 to 20% with respect to experiment are often considered good in the framework of density functional theory, this difference in the case of mononuclear carbonyl complexes culminates to 80%: results obtained with all-electron calculations are overall in very satisfactory agreement with experiment, the error in this case does not exceed 11% contrary to effective core potentials (ECPs) calculations which yield errors always larger than 20%. We conclude that for carbonyl groups the use of ECPs is not recommended, although their use could save time for very large systems, for

  2. DFT calculations of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in transition metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    del Rosal, I; Maron, L; Poteau, R; Jolibois, F

    2008-08-14

    Transition metal hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential use as catalysts for hydrogenation. Among other available techniques, structural properties in transition metal (TM) complexes are often probed by NMR spectroscopy. In this paper we will show that it is possible to establish a viable methodological strategy in the context of density functional theory, that allows the determination of 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydride ligands attached to transition metal atoms in mononuclear systems and clusters with good accuracy with respect to experiment. 13C chemical shifts have also been considered in some cases. We have studied mononuclear ruthenium complexes such as Ru(L)(H)(dppm)2 with L = H or Cl, cationic complex [Ru(H)(H2O)(dppm)2]+ and Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2, in which hydride ligands are characterized by a negative 1H NMR chemical shift. For these complexes all calculations are in relatively good agreement compared to experimental data with errors not exceeding 20% except for the hydrogen atom in Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2. For this last complex, the relative error increases to 30%, probably owing to the necessity to take into account dynamical effects of phenyl groups. Carbonyl ligands are often encountered in coordination chemistry. Specific issues arise when calculating 1H or 13C NMR chemical shifts in TM carbonyl complexes. Indeed, while errors of 10 to 20% with respect to experiment are often considered good in the framework of density functional theory, this difference in the case of mononuclear carbonyl complexes culminates to 80%: results obtained with all-electron calculations are overall in very satisfactory agreement with experiment, the error in this case does not exceed 11% contrary to effective core potentials (ECPs) calculations which yield errors always larger than 20%. We conclude that for carbonyl groups the use of ECPs is not recommended, although their use could save time for very large systems, for

  3. Autoignition of toluene reference fuels at high pressures modeled with detailed chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Andrae, J.C.G.; Bjoernbom, P.; Cracknell, R.F.; Kalghatgi, G.T.

    2007-04-15

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for the autoignition of toluene reference fuels (TRF) is presented. The toluene submechanism added to the Lawrence Livermore Primary Reference Fuel (PRF) mechanism was developed using recent shock tube autoignition delay time data under conditions relevant to HCCI combustion. For two-component fuels the model was validated against recent high-pressure shock tube autoignition delay time data for a mixture consisting of 35% n-heptane and 65% toluene by liquid volume. Important features of the autoignition of the mixture proved to be cross-acceleration effects, where hydroperoxy radicals produced during n-heptane oxidation dramatically increased the oxidation rate of toluene compared to the case when toluene alone was oxidized. Rate constants for the reaction of benzyl and hydroperoxyl radicals previously used in the modeling of the oxidation of toluene alone were untenably high for modeling of the mixture. To model both systems it was found necessary to use a lower rate and introduce an additional branching route in the reaction between benzyl radicals and O{sub 2}. Good agreement between experiments and predictions was found when the model was validated against shock tube autoignition delay data for gasoline surrogate fuels consisting of mixtures of 63-69% isooctane, 14-20% toluene, and 17% n-heptane by liquid volume. Cross reactions such as hydrogen abstractions between toluene and alkyl and alkylperoxy radicals and between the PRF were introduced for completion of chemical description. They were only of small importance for modeling autoignition delays from shock tube experiments, even at low temperatures. A single-zone engine model was used to evaluate how well the validated mechanism could capture autoignition behavior of toluene reference fuels in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The model could qualitatively predict the experiments, except in the case with boosted intake pressure, where the initial

  4. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly N; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M; Watson, David B

    2007-06-16

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing N(E) equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-N(E) kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  5. Temperature effects in first-principles solid state calculations of the chemical shielding tensor made simple

    SciTech Connect

    Monserrat, Bartomeu Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-10-07

    We study the effects of atomic vibrations on the solid-state chemical shielding tensor using first principles density functional theory calculations. At the harmonic level, we use a Monte Carlo method and a perturbative expansion. The Monte Carlo method is accurate but computationally expensive, while the perturbative method is computationally more efficient, but approximate. We find excellent agreement between the two methods for both the isotropic shift and the shielding anisotropy. The effects of zero-point quantum mechanical nuclear motion are important up to relatively high temperatures: at 500 K they still represent about half of the overall vibrational contribution. We also investigate the effects of anharmonic vibrations, finding that their contribution to the zero-point correction to the chemical shielding tensor is small. We exemplify these ideas using magnesium oxide and the molecular crystals L-alanine and β-aspartyl-L-alanine. We therefore propose as the method of choice to incorporate the effects of temperature in solid state chemical shielding tensor calculations using the perturbative expansion within the harmonic approximation. This approach is accurate and requires a computational effort that is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of dynamical or Monte Carlo approaches, so these effects might be routinely accounted for.

  6. Internet software for the calculation of the lipophilicity and aqueous solubility of chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Tetko, I V; Tanchuk, V Y; Kasheva, T N; Villa, A E

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we describe an Internet Java-based technology that allows scientists to make their analytical software available worldwide. The implementation of this technology is exemplified by programs for the calculation of the lipophilicity and water solubility of chemical compounds available at http://www.lnh.unil.ch/~itetko/logp. Both these molecular properties are key parameters in quantitative structure-activity relationship studies and are used to provide invaluable information for the overall understanding of the uptake distribution, biotransformation, and elimination of a wide variety of chemicals. The compounds can be analyzed in batch or single-compound mode. The single-compound analysis offers the possibility to compare our results with several popular lipophilicity calculation methods, including CLOGP, KOWWIN, and XLOGP. The chemical compounds are analyzed according to SMILES line notation that can be prepared with the JME molecular editor of Peter Ertl. Conversion to SMILES from 56 formats is also available using the molecular structure information interchange hub developed by Pat Walters and Matt Stahl.

  7. Temperature effects in first-principles solid state calculations of the chemical shielding tensor made simple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-10-01

    We study the effects of atomic vibrations on the solid-state chemical shielding tensor using first principles density functional theory calculations. At the harmonic level, we use a Monte Carlo method and a perturbative expansion. The Monte Carlo method is accurate but computationally expensive, while the perturbative method is computationally more efficient, but approximate. We find excellent agreement between the two methods for both the isotropic shift and the shielding anisotropy. The effects of zero-point quantum mechanical nuclear motion are important up to relatively high temperatures: at 500 K they still represent about half of the overall vibrational contribution. We also investigate the effects of anharmonic vibrations, finding that their contribution to the zero-point correction to the chemical shielding tensor is small. We exemplify these ideas using magnesium oxide and the molecular crystals L-alanine and β-aspartyl-L-alanine. We therefore propose as the method of choice to incorporate the effects of temperature in solid state chemical shielding tensor calculations using the perturbative expansion within the harmonic approximation. This approach is accurate and requires a computational effort that is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of dynamical or Monte Carlo approaches, so these effects might be routinely accounted for.

  8. The Coupling of Related Demonstrations to Illustrate Principles in Chemical Kinetics and Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacer, Richard A.

    1997-05-01

    Two very simple lecture demonstrations, both involving the reaction of magnesium with one or more dilute acids, are linked together to illustrate principles in chemical kinetics and equilibrium. In the first, crumpled Mg ribbon is placed in the nipple of a baby bottle holding 200 mL of 0.40 M HCl. The bottle is inverted into a large beaker of water, and the volume of H2 gas generated in one minute is measured. the experiment is repeated with 0.60 M HCl. The rate law, Rate = k[H+]n, is developed from the data. In the second, equal lengths of Mg ribbon are placed in small beakers or Petri dishes, on an overhead projector, containing equal (0.80 to 1.0 M) concentrations of HCl, H3BO3, and CH3CO2H. Acids are not identified; students are merely told that 'Acids A, B, and C are of the same molarity.' Students are then asked to explain why the rates are so different, which serves as a lead-in for the instructor to explain the meaning of a Ka value. Students readily conclude that one of the acids must be a strong acid, but are puzzled by the other two. [The enormous difference in the Ka values of acetic and boric acids results in a striking difference in their reaction rates.

  9. CFD analysis of municipal solid waste combustion using detailed chemical kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Frank, Alex; Castaldi, Marco J

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emissions from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) in waste-to-energy (WtE) facilities are receiving renewed attention to reduce their output further. While NO x emissions are currently 60% below allowed limits, further reductions will decrease the air pollution control (APC) system burden and reduce consumption of NH3. This work combines the incorporation of the GRI 3.0 mechanism as a detailed chemical kinetic model (DCKM) into a custom three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model fully to understand the NO x chemistry in the above-bed burnout zones. Specifically, thermal, prompt and fuel NO formation mechanisms were evaluated for the system and a parametric study was utilized to determine the effect of varying fuel nitrogen conversion intermediates between HCN, NH3 and NO directly. Simulation results indicate that the fuel nitrogen mechanism accounts for 92% of the total NO produced in the system with thermal and prompt mechanisms accounting for the remaining 8%. Results also show a 5% variation in final NO concentration between HCN and NH3 inlet conditions, demonstrating that the fuel nitrogen intermediate assumed is not significant. Furthermore, the conversion ratio of fuel nitrogen to NO was 0.33, revealing that the majority of fuel nitrogen forms N2.

  10. CFD analysis of municipal solid waste combustion using detailed chemical kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Frank, Alex; Castaldi, Marco J

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emissions from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) in waste-to-energy (WtE) facilities are receiving renewed attention to reduce their output further. While NO x emissions are currently 60% below allowed limits, further reductions will decrease the air pollution control (APC) system burden and reduce consumption of NH3. This work combines the incorporation of the GRI 3.0 mechanism as a detailed chemical kinetic model (DCKM) into a custom three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model fully to understand the NO x chemistry in the above-bed burnout zones. Specifically, thermal, prompt and fuel NO formation mechanisms were evaluated for the system and a parametric study was utilized to determine the effect of varying fuel nitrogen conversion intermediates between HCN, NH3 and NO directly. Simulation results indicate that the fuel nitrogen mechanism accounts for 92% of the total NO produced in the system with thermal and prompt mechanisms accounting for the remaining 8%. Results also show a 5% variation in final NO concentration between HCN and NH3 inlet conditions, demonstrating that the fuel nitrogen intermediate assumed is not significant. Furthermore, the conversion ratio of fuel nitrogen to NO was 0.33, revealing that the majority of fuel nitrogen forms N2. PMID:25005043

  11. A new methodology to determine kinetic parameters for one- and two-step chemical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantel, T.; Egolfopoulos, F. N.; Bowman, C. T.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a new methodology to determine kinetic parameters for simple chemical models and simple transport properties classically used in DNS of premixed combustion is presented. First, a one-dimensional code is utilized to performed steady unstrained laminar methane-air flame in order to verify intrinsic features of laminar flames such as burning velocity and temperature and concentration profiles. Second, the flame response to steady and unsteady strain in the opposed jet configuration is numerically investigated. It appears that for a well determined set of parameters, one- and two-step mechanisms reproduce the extinction limit of a laminar flame submitted to a steady strain. Computations with the GRI-mech mechanism (177 reactions, 39 species) and multicomponent transport properties are used to validate these simplified models. A sensitivity analysis of the preferential diffusion of heat and reactants when the Lewis number is close to unity indicates that the response of the flame to an oscillating strain is very sensitive to this number. As an application of this methodology, the interaction between a two-dimensional vortex pair and a premixed laminar flame is performed by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) using the one- and two-step mechanisms. Comparison with the experimental results of Samaniego et al. (1994) shows a significant improvement in the description of the interaction when the two-step model is used.

  12. On role of kinetic fluctuations in laminar-turbulent transition in chemically nonequilibrium boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumin, Anatoli

    2015-11-01

    Zavol'skii and Reutov (1983), Luchini (2008, 2010), Fedorov (2010, 2012, 2014) explored potential role of kinetic fluctuations (KF) in incompressible and calorically perfect gas boundary layer flows. The results indicate that role of KF is comparable with other disturbance sources in flight experiments and in quiet wind tunnels. The analysis is based on the Landau and Lifshitz (1957) concept of fluctuating hydrodynamics representing the dissipative fluxes as an average and fluctuating parts. We are extending analysis of the receptivity problem to the fluctuating dissipative fluxes in chemically reacting nonequilibrium boundary layer flows of binary mixtures. There are new terms in the energy, and the species equations. The species conservation equation includes the dissipative diffusion flux and the species generation due to dissociation. The momentum equation includes fluctuating stress tensor. The energy equation includes fluctuating heat flux, energy flux due to diffusion of the species, and fluctuating dissipative flux due to viscosity. The effects are compared for the cases stemming from constraints of the HTV project (Klentzman and Tumin, AIAA Paper 2013-2882). Supported by AFOSR.

  13. Effect of excluded volume on 2D discrete stochastic chemical kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lampoudi, Sotiria; Gillespie, Dan T.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2009-01-01

    The Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) is widely used in the discrete stochastic simulation of chemical kinetics. The propensity functions which play a central role in this algorithm have been derived under the point-molecule assumption, i.e., that the total volume of the molecules is negligible compared to the volume of the container. It has been shown analytically that for a one dimensional system and the A+A reaction, when the point molecule assumption is relaxed, the propensity function need only be adjusted by replacing the total volume of the system with the free volume of the system. In this paper we investigate via numerical simulations the impact of relaxing the point-molecule assumption in two dimensions. We find that the distribution of times to the first collision is close to exponential in most cases, so that the formalism of the propensity function is still applicable. In addition, we find that the area excluded by the molecules in two dimensions is usually higher than their close-packed area, requiring a larger correction to the propensity function than just the replacement of the total volume by the free volume. PMID:19360139

  14. Features in chemical kinetics. II. A self-emerging definition of slow manifolds.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Paolo; Frezzato, Diego

    2013-06-21

    In the preceding paper of this series (Part I [P. Nicolini and D. Frezzato, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234101 (2013)]) we have unveiled some ubiquitous features encoded in the systems of polynomial differential equations normally applied in the description of homogeneous and isothermal chemical kinetics (mass-action law). Here we proceed by investigating a deeply related feature: the appearance of so-called slow manifolds (SMs) which are low-dimensional hyper-surfaces in the neighborhood of which the slow evolution of the reacting system occurs after an initial fast transient. Indeed a geometrical definition of SM, devoid of subjectivity, "naturally" follows in terms of a specific sub-dimensional domain embedded in the peculiar region of the concentrations phase-space that in Part I we termed as "attractiveness region." Numerical inspections on simple low-dimensional model cases are presented, including the benchmark case of Davis and Skodje [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 859 (1999)] and the preliminary analysis of a simplified model mechanism of hydrogen combustion. PMID:23802946

  15. A reduced chemical kinetic model for IC engine combustion simulations with primary reference fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2008-12-15

    A reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of primary reference fuel (PRF) has been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced reaction mechanism for n-heptane oxidation, a new reduced n-heptane mechanism was generated by including an additional five species and their relevant reactions, by updating the reaction rate constants of several reactions pertaining to oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach, a reduced mechanism for iso-octane oxidation was built and combined with the n-heptane mechanism to form a PRF mechanism. The final version of the PRF mechanism consists of 41 species and 130 reactions. Validation of the present PRF mechanism was performed with measurements from shock tube tests, and HCCI and direct injection engine experiments available in the literature. The results show that the present PRF mechanism gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements for multidimensional CFD simulations. (author)

  16. Survey of high-enthalpy shock facilities in the perspective of radiation and chemical kinetics investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynier, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    This contribution is a survey of the capabilities of the main facilities, shock-tubes, shock-tunnels, expansion tubes and hot-shots that allow the experimental investigation of chemical kinetics and radiation of hypersonic flows encountered during atmospheric entry. At first, the capabilities of the main facilities available in Australia, Asia, Europe, and United States, have been surveyed using the available literature, and the specific use of each facility identified. The second step of the study consists in an analysis of each type of shock facility to identify their advantages and drawbacks. The main objective of this analysis is to support a trade-off for the selection of the type of facility to be developed in order to give Europe a ground test with the capabilities to support future exploration and sample return missions. The last point of the study has been to identify the experimental datasets related to the targeted application, and to select the most attractive for the validation of the future facility.

  17. Molecular structure, vibrational, electronic and thermal properties of 4-vinylcyclohexene by quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Nagabalasubramanian, P B; Periandy, S; Karabacak, Mehmet; Govindarajan, M

    2015-06-15

    The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-vinylcyclohexene (abbreviated as 4-VCH) have been recorded in the region 4000-100cm(-1). The optimized molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 4-VCH have been precisely assigned and analyzed with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) method at 6-311++G(d,p) level basis set. The theoretical frequencies were properly scaled and compared with experimentally obtained FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. Also, the effect due the substitution of vinyl group on the ring vibrational frequencies was analyzed and a detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of this compound has been made on the basis of the calculated total energy distribution (TED). The time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method was employed to predict its electronic properties, such as electronic transitions by UV-Visible analysis, HOMO and LUMO energies, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and various global reactivity and selectivity descriptors (chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity index). Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interaction, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Atomic charges obtained by Mulliken population analysis and NBO analysis are compared. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures are also calculated.

  18. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals. Final Performance Report, August 1, 1985--July 31, 1994

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Curl, R. F.; Glass, G. P.

    1995-06-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study (by infrared absorption spectroscopy) of the chemical kinetic behavior of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. The work typically progressed from the detection and analysis of the infrared spectrum of combustion radical to the utilization of the infrared spectrum thus obtained in the investigation of chemical kinetics of the radical species. The methodology employed was infrared kinetic spectroscopy. In this technique the radical is produced by UV flash photolysis using an excimer laser and then its transient infrared absorption is observed using a single frequency cw laser as the source of the infrared probe light. When the probe laser frequency is near the center of an absorption line of the radical produced by the flash, the transient infrared absorption rises rapidly and then decays as the radical reacts with the precursor or with substances introduced for the purpose of studying the reaction kinetics or with itself. The decay times observed in these studies varied from less than one microsecond to more than one millisecond. By choosing appropriate time windows after the flash and the average infrared detector signal in a window as data channels, the infrared spectrum of the radical may be obtained. By locking the infrared probe laser to the center of the absorption line and measuring the rate of decay of the transient infrared absorption signal as the chemical composition of the gas mixture is varied, the chemical kinetics of the radical may be investigated. In what follows the systems investigated and the results obtained are outlined.

  19. Calculation of chemical quantities for the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Del Signore, John C.; McClenahan, Robert L.

    2007-03-01

    The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) receives, stores, and treats both low-level and transuranic radioactive liquid wastes (RLW). Treatment of RLW requires the use of different chemicals. Examples include the use of calcium oxide to precipitate metals and radioactive elements from the radioactive liquid waste, and the use of hydrochloric acid to clean membrane filters that are used in the treatment process. The RL WTF is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility, as set forth in the LANL Final Safety Analysis Report of October 1995, and a DOE letter of March 11, 1999. A revised safety basis is being prepared for the RLWTF, and will be submitted to the NNSA in early 2007. This set of calculations establishes maximum chemical quantities that will be used in the 2007 safety basis.

  20. An implicit flux-split algorithm to calculate hypersonic flowfields in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1987-01-01

    An implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm that calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium is presented. The flux vectors and flux Jacobians are differenced using a first-order, flux-split technique. The equilibrium composition of the gas is determined by minimizing the Gibbs free energy at every node point. The code is validated by comparing results over an axisymmetric hemisphere against previously published results. The algorithm is also applied to more practical configurations. The accuracy, stability, and versatility of the algorithm have been promising.

  1. The chemically driven phase transformation in a memristive abacus capable of calculating decimal fractions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hanni; Xia, Yidong; Yin, Kuibo; Lu, Jianxin; Yin, Qiaonan; Yin, Jiang; Sun, Litao; Liu, Zhiguo

    2013-01-01

    The accurate calculation of decimal fractions is still a challenge for the binary-coded computations that rely on von Neumann paradigm. Here, we report a kind of memristive abacus based on synaptic Ag-Ge-Se device, in which the memristive long-term potentiation and depression are caused by a chemically driven phase transformation. The growth and the rupture of conductive Ag₂Se dendrites are confirmed via in situ transmission electron microscopy. By detecting the change in memristive synaptic weight, the quantity of input signals applied onto the device can be "counted". This makes it possible to achieve the functions of abacus that is basically a counting frame. We demonstrate through experimental studies that this kind of memristive abacus can calculate decimal fractions in the light of the abacus algorithms. This approach opens up a new route to do decimal arithmetic in memristive devices without encoding binary-coded decimal.

  2. LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for homogeneous gas-phase reactions. 2: Code description and usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part 2 of a series of three reference publications that describe LSENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part 2 describes the code, how to modify it, and its usage, including preparation of the problem data file required to execute LSENS. Code usage is illustrated by several example problems, which further explain preparation of the problem data file and show how to obtain desired accuracy in the computed results. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions. Part 1 (NASA RP-1328) derives the governing equations describes the numerical solution procedures for the types of problems that can be solved by lSENS. Part 3 (NASA RP-1330) explains the kinetics and kinetics-plus-sensitivity-analysis problems supplied with LSENS and presents sample results.

  3. An integrated fingerprinting and kinetic approach to accelerated shelf-life testing of chemical changes in thermally treated carrot puree.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Biniam T; Grauwet, Tara; Magpusao, Johannes; Palmers, Stijn; Michiels, Chris; Hendrickx, Marc; Loey, Ann Van

    2015-07-15

    To have a better understanding of chemical reactions during shelf-life, an integrated analytical and engineering toolbox: "fingerprinting-kinetics" was used. As a case study, a thermally sterilised carrot puree was selected. Sterilised purees were stored at four storage temperatures as a function of time. Fingerprinting enabled selection of volatiles clearly changing during shelf-life. Only these volatiles were identified and studied further. Next, kinetic modelling was performed to investigate the suitability of these volatiles as quality indices (markers) for accelerated shelf-life testing (ASLT). Fingerprinting enabled selection of terpenoids, phenylpropanoids, fatty acid derivatives, Strecker aldehydes and sulphur compounds as volatiles clearly changing during shelf-life. The amount of Strecker aldehydes increased during storage, whereas the rest of the volatiles decreased. Out of the volatiles, based on the applied kinetic modelling, myristicin, α-terpinolene, β-pinene, α-terpineol and octanal were identified as potential markers for ASLT. PMID:25722143

  4. A Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of the Effects of Oxygenated Hydrocarbons on Soot Emissions from Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J

    2005-11-14

    A detailed chemical kinetic modeling approach is used to examine the phenomenon of suppression of sooting in diesel engines by addition of oxygenated hydrocarbon species to the fuel. This suppression, which has been observed experimentally for a few years, is explained kinetically as a reduction in concentrations of soot precursors present in the hot products of a fuel-rich diesel ignition zone when oxygenates are included. Oxygenates decrease the overall equivalence ratio of the igniting mixture, producing higher ignition temperatures and more radical species to consume more soot precursor species, leading to lower soot production. The kinetic model is also used to show how different oxygenates, ester structures in particular, can have different soot-suppression efficiencies due to differences in molecular structure of the oxygenated species.

  5. Free energy calculations, enhanced by a Gaussian ansatz, for the "chemical work" distribution.

    PubMed

    Boulougouris, Georgios C

    2014-05-15

    The evaluation of the free energy is essential in molecular simulation because it is intimately related with the existence of multiphase equilibrium. Recently, it was demonstrated that it is possible to evaluate the Helmholtz free energy using a single statistical ensemble along an entire isotherm by accounting for the "chemical work" of transforming each molecule, from an interacting one, to an ideal gas. In this work, we show that it is possible to perform such a free energy perturbation over a liquid vapor phase transition. Furthermore, we investigate the link between a general free energy perturbation scheme and the novel nonequilibrium theories of Crook's and Jarzinsky. We find that for finite systems away from the thermodynamic limit the second law of thermodynamics will always be an inequality for isothermal free energy perturbations, resulting always to a dissipated work that may tend to zero only in the thermodynamic limit. The work, the heat, and the entropy produced during a thermodynamic free energy perturbation can be viewed in the context of the Crooks and Jarzinsky formalism, revealing that for a given value of the ensemble average of the "irreversible" work, the minimum entropy production corresponded to a Gaussian distribution for the histogram of the work. We propose the evaluation of the free energy difference in any free energy perturbation based scheme on the average irreversible "chemical work" minus the dissipated work that can be calculated from the variance of the distribution of the logarithm of the work histogram, within the Gaussian approximation. As a consequence, using the Gaussian ansatz for the distribution of the "chemical work," accurate estimates for the chemical potential and the free energy of the system can be performed using much shorter simulations and avoiding the necessity of sampling the computational costly tails of the "chemical work." For a more general free energy perturbation scheme that the Gaussian ansatz may not be

  6. Reactions of Th(+) + H2, D2, and HD Studied by Guided Ion Beam Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Cox, Richard M; Armentrout, P B; de Jong, Wibe A

    2016-03-01

    Kinetic energy dependent reactions of Th(+) with H2, D2, and HD were studied using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Formation of ThH(+) and ThD(+) is endothermic in all cases with similar thresholds. Branching ratio results for the reaction with HD indicate that Th(+) reacts via a statistical mechanism, similar to Hf(+). The kinetic energy dependent cross sections for formation of ThH(+) and ThD(+) were evaluated to determine a 0 K bond dissociation energy (BDE) of D0(Th(+)-H) = 2.45 ± 0.07 eV. This value is in good agreement with a previous result obtained from analysis of the Th(+) + CH4 reaction. D0(Th(+)-H) is observed to be larger than its transition metal congeners, TiH(+), ZrH(+), and HfH(+), believed to be a result of lanthanide contraction. The reactions with H2 were also explored using quantum chemical calculations that include a semiempirical estimation and explicit calculation of spin-orbit contributions. These calculations agree nicely and indicate that ThH(+) most likely has a (3)Δ1 ground level with a low-lying (1)Σ(+) excited state. Theory also provides the reaction potential energy surfaces and BDEs that are in reasonable agreement with experiment.

  7. Reactions of Th(+) + H2, D2, and HD Studied by Guided Ion Beam Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Cox, Richard M; Armentrout, P B; de Jong, Wibe A

    2016-03-01

    Kinetic energy dependent reactions of Th(+) with H2, D2, and HD were studied using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Formation of ThH(+) and ThD(+) is endothermic in all cases with similar thresholds. Branching ratio results for the reaction with HD indicate that Th(+) reacts via a statistical mechanism, similar to Hf(+). The kinetic energy dependent cross sections for formation of ThH(+) and ThD(+) were evaluated to determine a 0 K bond dissociation energy (BDE) of D0(Th(+)-H) = 2.45 ± 0.07 eV. This value is in good agreement with a previous result obtained from analysis of the Th(+) + CH4 reaction. D0(Th(+)-H) is observed to be larger than its transition metal congeners, TiH(+), ZrH(+), and HfH(+), believed to be a result of lanthanide contraction. The reactions with H2 were also explored using quantum chemical calculations that include a semiempirical estimation and explicit calculation of spin-orbit contributions. These calculations agree nicely and indicate that ThH(+) most likely has a (3)Δ1 ground level with a low-lying (1)Σ(+) excited state. Theory also provides the reaction potential energy surfaces and BDEs that are in reasonable agreement with experiment. PMID:26414691

  8. Physical and numerical sources of computational inefficiency in integration of chemical kinetic rate equations: Etiology, treatment and prognosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, D. T.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    1986-01-01

    The design of a very fast, automatic black-box code for homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems requires an understanding of the physical and numerical sources of computational inefficiency. Some major sources reviewed in this report are stiffness of the governing ordinary differential equations (ODE's) and its detection, choice of appropriate method (i.e., integration algorithm plus step-size control strategy), nonphysical initial conditions, and too frequent evaluation of thermochemical and kinetic properties. Specific techniques are recommended (and some advised against) for improving or overcoming the identified problem areas. It is argued that, because reactive species increase exponentially with time during induction, and all species exhibit asymptotic, exponential decay with time during equilibration, exponential-fitted integration algorithms are inherently more accurate for kinetics modeling than classical, polynomial-interpolant methods for the same computational work. But current codes using the exponential-fitted method lack the sophisticated stepsize-control logic of existing black-box ODE solver codes, such as EPISODE and LSODE. The ultimate chemical kinetics code does not exist yet, but the general characteristics of such a code are becoming apparent.

  9. First-principles Calculations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shielding Tensors in Complex Ferroelectric Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechkis, Daniel Lawrence

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important experimental probes of local atomistic structure, chemical ordering, and dynamics. Recently, NMR has increasingly been used to study complex ferroelectric perovskite alloys, where spectra can be difficult to interpret. First-principles calculations of NMR spectra can greatly assist in this task. In this work, oxygen, titanium, and niobium NMR chemical shielding tensors, ŝ , were calculated with first-principles methods for ferroelectric transition metal prototypical ABO3 perovskites [SrTiO3, BaTiO 3, PbTiO3 and PbZrO3] and A(B,B')O3 perovskite alloys Pb(Zr1/2Ti1/2)O3 (PZT) and Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN). The principal findings are 1) a large anisotropy between deshielded sigma xx(O) ≃ sigmayy(O) and shielded sigma zz(O) components; 2) a nearly linear dependence on nearest-distance transition-metal/oxygen bond length, rs, was found for both isotropic deltaiso(O) and axial deltaax(O) chemical shifts ( d̂=ŝ reference- ŝ ), across all the systems studied, with deltaiso(O) varying by ≃ 400 ppm; 3) the demonstration that the anisotropy and linear variation arise from large paramagnetic contributions to sigmaxx(O) and sigmayy(O), due to virtual transitions between O(2p) and unoccupied B(nd) states. Using these results, an argument against Ti clustering in PZT, as conjectured from recent 17O NMR magic-angle-spinning measurements, is made. The linear dependence of the chemical shifts on rs provides a scale for determining transition-metal/oxygen bond lengths from experimental 17O NMR spectra. As such, it can be used to assess the degree of local tetragonality in perovskite solid solutions for piezoelectric applications. Results for transition metal atoms show less structural sensitivity, compared to 17O NMR, in homovalent B-site materials, but could be more useful in heterovalent B-site perovskite alloys. This work shows that both 17O and B-site NMR spectroscopy, coupled with first principles

  10. The Study of a Simple Redox Reaction as an Experimental Approach to Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, Horst; Zipp, Arden P.

    1988-01-01

    Recommends using iodide ions and peroxodisulfate ions for studying rate laws instead of the standard iodine clock for kinetic study. Presents the methodology and a discussion of the kinetics involved for a laboratory experiment for a high school or introductory college course. (ML)

  11. Acceleration of the KINETICS Integrated Dynamical/Chemical Computational Model Using MPI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Max; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of a planet's atmosphere not only provides a better theoretical understanding of planetary physics and the formation of planets, but also grants useful insight into Earth's own atmosphere. One of the tools used at JPL for the modeling of planetary atmospheres and protostellar disks is KINETICS. KINETICS can simulate years of complex dynamics and chemistry.

  12. Chemical kinetic study of the oxidation of a biodiesel-bioethanol surrogate fuel: methyl octanoate-ethanol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Togbé, C; May-Carle, J-B; Dayma, G; Dagaut, P

    2010-03-25

    There is a growing interest for using bioethanol-biodiesel fuel blends in diesel engines but no kinetic data and model for their combustion were available. Therefore, the kinetics of oxidation of a biodiesel-bioethanol surrogate fuel (methyl octanoate-ethanol) was studied experimentally in a jet-stirred reactor at 10 atm and constant residence time, over the temperature range 560-1160 K, and for several equivalence ratios (0.5-2). Concentration profiles of reactants, stable intermediates, and final products were obtained by probe sampling followed by online FTIR, and off-line gas chromatography analyses. The oxidation of this fuel in these conditions was modeled using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism consisting of 4592 reversible reactions and 1087 species. The proposed kinetic reaction mechanism yielded a good representation of the kinetics of oxidation of this biodiesel-bioethanol surrogate under the JSR conditions. The modeling was used to delineate the reactions triggering the low-temperature oxidation of ethanol important for diesel engine applications.

  13. Chemical kinetic study of the oxidation of a biodiesel-bioethanol surrogate fuel: methyl octanoate-ethanol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Togbé, C; May-Carle, J-B; Dayma, G; Dagaut, P

    2010-03-25

    There is a growing interest for using bioethanol-biodiesel fuel blends in diesel engines but no kinetic data and model for their combustion were available. Therefore, the kinetics of oxidation of a biodiesel-bioethanol surrogate fuel (methyl octanoate-ethanol) was studied experimentally in a jet-stirred reactor at 10 atm and constant residence time, over the temperature range 560-1160 K, and for several equivalence ratios (0.5-2). Concentration profiles of reactants, stable intermediates, and final products were obtained by probe sampling followed by online FTIR, and off-line gas chromatography analyses. The oxidation of this fuel in these conditions was modeled using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism consisting of 4592 reversible reactions and 1087 species. The proposed kinetic reaction mechanism yielded a good representation of the kinetics of oxidation of this biodiesel-bioethanol surrogate under the JSR conditions. The modeling was used to delineate the reactions triggering the low-temperature oxidation of ethanol important for diesel engine applications. PMID:20235606

  14. Three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of diamond chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, W J; May, P W; Allan, N L; Harvey, J N

    2015-06-01

    A three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo model has been developed to simulate the chemical vapor deposition of a diamond (100) surface under conditions used to grow single-crystal diamond (SCD), microcrystalline diamond (MCD), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films. The model includes adsorption of CHx (x = 0, 3) species, insertion of CHy (y = 0-2) into surface dimer bonds, etching/desorption of both transient adsorbed species and lattice sidewalls, lattice incorporation, and surface migration but not defect formation or renucleation processes. A value of ∼200 kJ mol(-1) for the activation Gibbs energy, ΔG(‡) etch, for etching an adsorbed CHx species reproduces the experimental growth rate accurately. SCD and MCD growths are dominated by migration and step-edge growth, whereas in NCD and UNCD growths, migration is less and species nucleate where they land. Etching of species from the lattice sidewalls has been modelled as a function of geometry and the number of bonded neighbors of each species. Choice of appropriate parameters for the relative decrease in etch rate as a function of number of neighbors allows flat-bottomed etch pits and/or sharp-pointed etch pits to be simulated, which resemble those seen when etching diamond in H2 or O2 atmospheres. Simulation of surface defects using unetchable, immobile species reproduces other observed growth phenomena, such as needles and hillocks. The critical nucleus for new layer growth is 2 adjacent surface carbons, irrespective of the growth regime. We conclude that twinning and formation of multiple grains rather than pristine single-crystals may be a result of misoriented growth islands merging, with each island forming a grain, rather than renucleation caused by an adsorbing defect species. PMID:26049516

  15. Three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of diamond chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, W. J.; May, P. W.; Allan, N. L.; Harvey, J. N.

    2015-06-01

    A three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo model has been developed to simulate the chemical vapor deposition of a diamond (100) surface under conditions used to grow single-crystal diamond (SCD), microcrystalline diamond (MCD), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films. The model includes adsorption of CHx (x = 0, 3) species, insertion of CHy (y = 0-2) into surface dimer bonds, etching/desorption of both transient adsorbed species and lattice sidewalls, lattice incorporation, and surface migration but not defect formation or renucleation processes. A value of ˜200 kJ mol-1 for the activation Gibbs energy, ΔG‡etch, for etching an adsorbed CHx species reproduces the experimental growth rate accurately. SCD and MCD growths are dominated by migration and step-edge growth, whereas in NCD and UNCD growths, migration is less and species nucleate where they land. Etching of species from the lattice sidewalls has been modelled as a function of geometry and the number of bonded neighbors of each species. Choice of appropriate parameters for the relative decrease in etch rate as a function of number of neighbors allows flat-bottomed etch pits and/or sharp-pointed etch pits to be simulated, which resemble those seen when etching diamond in H2 or O2 atmospheres. Simulation of surface defects using unetchable, immobile species reproduces other observed growth phenomena, such as needles and hillocks. The critical nucleus for new layer growth is 2 adjacent surface carbons, irrespective of the growth regime. We conclude that twinning and formation of multiple grains rather than pristine single-crystals may be a result of misoriented growth islands merging, with each island forming a grain, rather than renucleation caused by an adsorbing defect species.

  16. Use of a generalized fisher equation for global optimization in chemical kinetics.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Alejandro F; Ross, John; Morán, Federico; Balsa-Canto, Eva; Banga, Julio R

    2011-08-01

    A new approach for parameter estimation in chemical kinetics has been recently proposed (Ross et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2010, 107, 12777). It makes use of an optimization criterion based on a Generalized Fisher Equation (GFE). Its utility has been demonstrated with two reaction mechanisms, the chlorite-iodide and Oregonator, which are computationally stiff systems. In this Article, the performance of the GFE-based algorithm is compared to that obtained from minimization of the squared distances between the observed and predicted concentrations obtained by solving the corresponding initial value problem (we call this latter approach "traditional" for simplicity). Comparison of the proposed GFE-based optimization method with the "traditional" one has revealed their differences in performance. This difference can be seen as a trade-off between speed (which favors GFE) and accuracy (which favors the traditional method). The chlorite-iodide and Oregonator systems are again chosen as case studies. An identifiability analysis is performed for both of them, followed by an optimal experimental design based on the Fisher Information Matrix (FIM). This allows to identify and overcome most of the previously encountered identifiability issues, improving the estimation accuracy. With the new data, obtained from optimally designed experiments, it is now possible to estimate effectively more parameters than with the previous data. This result, which holds for both GFE-based and traditional methods, stresses the importance of an appropriate experimental design. Finally, a new hybrid method that combines advantages from the GFE and traditional approaches is presented.

  17. Peroxone mineralization of chemical oxygen demand for direct potable water reuse: Kinetics and process control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Englehardt, James D

    2015-04-15

    Mineralization of organics in secondary effluent by the peroxone process was studied at a direct potable water reuse research treatment system serving an occupied four-bedroom, four bath university residence hall apartment. Organic concentrations were measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD) and kinetic runs were monitored at varying O3/H2O2 dosages and ratios. COD degradation could be accurately described as the parallel pseudo-1st order decay of rapidly and slowly-oxidizable fractions, and effluent COD was reduced to below the detection limit (<0.7 mg/L). At dosages ≥4.6 mg L(-1) h(-1), an O3/H2O2 mass ratio of 3.4-3.8, and initial COD <20 mg/L, a simple first order decay was indicated for both single-passed treated wastewater and recycled mineral water, and a relationship is proposed and demonstrated to estimate the pseudo-first order rate constant for design purposes. At this O3/H2O2 mass ratio, ORP and dissolved ozone were found to be useful process control indicators for monitoring COD mineralization in secondary effluent. Moreover, an average second order rate constant for OH oxidation of secondary effluent organics (measured as MCOD) was found to be 1.24 × 10(7) ± 0.64 × 10(7) M(-1) S(-1). The electric energy demand of the peroxone process is estimated at 1.73-2.49 kW h electric energy for removal of one log COD in 1 m(3) secondary effluent, comparable to the energy required for desalination of medium strength seawater. Advantages/disadvantages of the two processes for municipal wastewater reuse are discussed.

  18. Combustion in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines: Experiments and Detailed Chemical Kinetic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, D L

    2002-06-07

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines are being considered as an alternative to diesel engines. The HCCI concept involves premixing fuel and air prior to induction into the cylinder (as is done in current spark-ignition engine) then igniting the fuel-air mixture through the compression process (as is done in current diesel engines). The combustion occurring in an HCCI engine is fundamentally different from a spark-ignition or Diesel engine in that the heat release occurs as a global autoignition process, as opposed to the turbulent flame propagation or mixing controlled combustion used in current engines. The advantage of this global autoignition is that the temperatures within the cylinder are uniformly low, yielding very low emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}, the chief precursors to photochemical smog). The inherent features of HCCI combustion allows for design of engines with efficiency comparable to, or potentially higher than, diesel engines. While HCCI engines have great potential, several technical barriers exist which currently prevent widespread commercialization of this technology. The most significant challenge is that the combustion timing cannot be controlled by typical in-cylinder means. Means of controlling combustion have been demonstrated, but a robust control methodology that is applicable to the entire range of operation has yet to be developed. This research focuses on understanding basic characteristics of controlling and operating HCCI engines. Experiments and detailed chemical kinetic simulations have been applied to the characterize some of the fundamental operational and design characteristics of HCCI engines. Experiments have been conducted on single and multi-cylinder engines to investigate general features of how combustion timing affects the performance and emissions of HCCI engines. Single-zone modeling has been used to characterize and compare the implementation of different control strategies. Multi

  19. Peroxone mineralization of chemical oxygen demand for direct potable water reuse: Kinetics and process control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Englehardt, James D

    2015-04-15

    Mineralization of organics in secondary effluent by the peroxone process was studied at a direct potable water reuse research treatment system serving an occupied four-bedroom, four bath university residence hall apartment. Organic concentrations were measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD) and kinetic runs were monitored at varying O3/H2O2 dosages and ratios. COD degradation could be accurately described as the parallel pseudo-1st order decay of rapidly and slowly-oxidizable fractions, and effluent COD was reduced to below the detection limit (<0.7 mg/L). At dosages ≥4.6 mg L(-1) h(-1), an O3/H2O2 mass ratio of 3.4-3.8, and initial COD <20 mg/L, a simple first order decay was indicated for both single-passed treated wastewater and recycled mineral water, and a relationship is proposed and demonstrated to estimate the pseudo-first order rate constant for design purposes. At this O3/H2O2 mass ratio, ORP and dissolved ozone were found to be useful process control indicators for monitoring COD mineralization in secondary effluent. Moreover, an average second order rate constant for OH oxidation of secondary effluent organics (measured as MCOD) was found to be 1.24 × 10(7) ± 0.64 × 10(7) M(-1) S(-1). The electric energy demand of the peroxone process is estimated at 1.73-2.49 kW h electric energy for removal of one log COD in 1 m(3) secondary effluent, comparable to the energy required for desalination of medium strength seawater. Advantages/disadvantages of the two processes for municipal wastewater reuse are discussed. PMID:25704155

  20. High-level ab-initio calculation of gas-phase NMR chemical shifts and secondary isotope effects of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Alexander A.

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution high-level ab-initio calculations of the chemical shifts of methanol including zero-point vibrational and temperature corrections are presented. For the first time, secondary isotope effects have been calculated via second order vibrational perturbation theory. In comparison with recent experimental gas-phase data and in contrast to other quantum-chemical methods the results are consistent and in very good agreement with the experimental 13C, 17O and 1H chemical shifts reported by Makulski [W. Makulski, J. Mol. Struct. 872 (2008) 81]. Secondary isotope effects can be calculated with remarkable accuracy of a few hundredths of a ppm in comparison to experiment.

  1. Ozonolysis of Mixed Oleic-Acid/Stearic-Acid Particles: Reaction Kinetics and Chemical Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Katrib, Y.; Biskos, G.; Buseck, P. R.; Davidovits, P.; Jayne, J. T.; Mochida, M.; Wise, M. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric particles directly and indirectly affect global climate and have a primary role in regional issues of air pollution, visibility, and human health. Atmospheric particles have a variety of shapes, dimensions, and chemical compositions, and these physicochemical properties evolve (i.e., "age") during transport of the particles through the atmosphere, in part because of the chemical reactions of particle-phase organic molecules with gas-phase atmospheric oxidants. As a global average, hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozone (O3) are responsible quantitatively for most oxidant aging of atmospheric particles. The reactions of the hydroxyl radical occur in the surface region of a particle because of the nearly diffusion-limited bimolecular rate constant of OH with a variety of organic molecules. Ozone, on the other hand, is a selective agent for the unsaturated bonds of organic molecules and may diffuse a considerable distance into particles prior to reaction. The reaction of oleic acid with ozone has recently emerged as a model system to better understand the atmospheric chemical oxidation processes affecting organic particles. The ozonolysis of mixed oleic-acid/stearic-acid (OL/SA) aerosol particles from 0/100 to 100/0 weight percent composition is studied. The magnitude of the divergence of the particle beam inside an aerosol mass spectrometer shows that, in the concentration range 100/0 to 60/40, the mixed OL/SA particles are liquid prior to reaction. Upon ozonolysis, particles with SA composition greater than 25% change shape, indicating that they have solidified. Transmission electron micrographs show that SA(s) forms needles. For SA compositions greater than 10%, the reaction kinetics exhibit an initial fast decay of OL for low O3 exposure with no further loss of OL at higher O3 exposures. For compositions from 50/50 to 10/90, the residual OL concentration remains at 28+/-2% of its initial value. The initial reactive uptake coefficient for O3, as determined by

  2. Is case-based learning an effective teaching strategy to challenge students' alternative conceptions regarding chemical kinetics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalçınkaya, Eylem; Taştan-Kırık, Özgecan; Boz, Yezdan; Yıldıran, Demet

    2012-07-01

    Background: Case-based learning (CBL) is simply teaching the concept to the students based on the cases. CBL involves a case, which is a scenario based on daily life, and study questions related to the case, which allows students to discuss their ideas. Chemical kinetics is one of the most difficult concepts for students in chemistry. Students have generally low levels of conceptual understanding and many alternative conceptions regarding it. Purpose: This study aimed to explore the effect of CBL on dealing with students' alternative conceptions about chemical kinetics. Sample: The sample consists of 53 high school students from one public high school in Turkey. Design and methods : Nonequivalent pre-test and post-test control group design was used. Reaction Rate Concept Test and semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. Convenience sampling technique was followed. For data analysis, the independent samples t-test and ANOVA was performed. Results : Both concept test and interview results showed that students instructed with cases had better understanding of core concepts of chemical kinetics and had less alternative conceptions related to the subject matter compared to the control group students, despite the fact that it was impossible to challenge all the alternative conceptions in the experimental group. Conclusions: CBL is an effective teaching method for challenging students' alternative conceptions in the context of chemical kinetics. Since using cases in small groups and whole class discussions has been found to be an effective way to cope with the alternative conceptions, it can be applied to other subjects and grade levels in high schools with a higher sample size. Furthermore, the effect of this method on academic achievement, motivation and critical thinking skills are other variables that can be investigated for future studies in the subject area of chemistry.

  3. Dissociative electron transfer in polychlorinated aromatics. Reduction potentials from convolution analysis and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Romańczyk, Piotr P; Rotko, Grzegorz; Kurek, Stefan S

    2016-08-10

    Formal potentials of the first reduction leading to dechlorination in dimethylformamide were obtained from convolution analysis of voltammetric data and confirmed by quantum chemical calculations for a series of polychlorinated benzenes: hexachlorobenzene (-2.02 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc), pentachloroanisole (-2.14 V), and 2,4-dichlorophenoxy- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acids (-2.35 V and -2.34 V, respectively). The key parameters required to calculate the reduction potential, electron affinity and/or C-Cl bond dissociation energy, were computed at both DFT-D and CCSD(T)-F12 levels. Comparison of the obtained gas-phase energies and redox potentials with experiment enabled us to verify the relative energetics and the performance of various implicit solvent models. Good agreement with the experiment was achieved for redox potentials computed at the DFT-D level, but only for the stepwise mechanism owing to the error compensation. For the concerted electron transfer/C-Cl bond cleavage process, the application of a high level coupled cluster method is required. Quantum chemical calculations have also demonstrated the significant role of the π*ring and σ*C-Cl orbital mixing. It brings about the stabilisation of the non-planar, C2v-symmetric C6Cl6˙(-) radical anion, explains the experimentally observed low energy barrier and the transfer coefficient close to 0.5 for C6Cl5OCH3 in an electron transfer process followed by immediate C-Cl bond cleavage in solution, and an increase in the probability of dechlorination of di- and trichlorophenoxyacetic acids due to substantial population of the vibrational excited states corresponding to the out-of-plane C-Cl bending at ambient temperatures.

  4. Dissociative electron transfer in polychlorinated aromatics. Reduction potentials from convolution analysis and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Romańczyk, Piotr P; Rotko, Grzegorz; Kurek, Stefan S

    2016-08-10

    Formal potentials of the first reduction leading to dechlorination in dimethylformamide were obtained from convolution analysis of voltammetric data and confirmed by quantum chemical calculations for a series of polychlorinated benzenes: hexachlorobenzene (-2.02 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc), pentachloroanisole (-2.14 V), and 2,4-dichlorophenoxy- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acids (-2.35 V and -2.34 V, respectively). The key parameters required to calculate the reduction potential, electron affinity and/or C-Cl bond dissociation energy, were computed at both DFT-D and CCSD(T)-F12 levels. Comparison of the obtained gas-phase energies and redox potentials with experiment enabled us to verify the relative energetics and the performance of various implicit solvent models. Good agreement with the experiment was achieved for redox potentials computed at the DFT-D level, but only for the stepwise mechanism owing to the error compensation. For the concerted electron transfer/C-Cl bond cleavage process, the application of a high level coupled cluster method is required. Quantum chemical calculations have also demonstrated the significant role of the π*ring and σ*C-Cl orbital mixing. It brings about the stabilisation of the non-planar, C2v-symmetric C6Cl6˙(-) radical anion, explains the experimentally observed low energy barrier and the transfer coefficient close to 0.5 for C6Cl5OCH3 in an electron transfer process followed by immediate C-Cl bond cleavage in solution, and an increase in the probability of dechlorination of di- and trichlorophenoxyacetic acids due to substantial population of the vibrational excited states corresponding to the out-of-plane C-Cl bending at ambient temperatures. PMID:27477334

  5. Structural studies on ethyl isovalerate by microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Mouhib, Halima; Jelisavac, Dragan; Sutikdja, Lilian W; Isaak, Elisabeth; Stahl, Wolfgang

    2011-01-20

    We observed the microwave spectrum of ethyl isovalerate by molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The rotational and centrifugal distortion constants of the most abundant conformer were determined. Its structure was investigated by comparison of the experimental rotational constants with those obtained by ab initio methods. In a first step, the rotational constants of various conformers were calculated at the MP2/6-311++G** level of theory. Surprisingly, no agreement with the experimental results was found. Therefore, we concluded that in the case of ethyl isovalerate more advanced quantum chemical methods are required to obtain a reliable molecular geometry. Ab initio calculations carried out at MP3/6-311++G**, MP4/6-311++G**, and CCSD/6-311++G** levels and also density functional theory calculations using the B3LYP/6-311++G** method gave similar results for the rotational constants, but they were clearly distinct from those obtained at the MP2/6-311++G** level. With use of these more advanced methods, the rotational constants of the lowest energy conformer were in good agreement with those obtained from the microwave spectrum.

  6. Silicon Oxysulfide, OSiS: Rotational Spectrum, Quantum-Chemical Calculations, and Equilibrium Structure.

    PubMed

    Thorwirth, Sven; Mück, Leonie Anna; Gauss, Jürgen; Tamassia, Filippo; Lattanzi, Valerio; McCarthy, Michael C

    2011-06-01

    Silicon oxysulfide, OSiS, and seven of its minor isotopic species have been characterized for the first time in the gas phase at high spectral resolution by means of Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The equilibrium structure of OSiS has been determined from the experimental data using calculated vibration-rotation interaction constants. The structural parameters (rO-Si = 1.5064 Å and rSi-S = 1.9133 Å) are in very good agreement with values from high-level quantum chemical calculations using coupled-cluster techniques together with sophisticated additivity and extrapolation schemes. The bond distances in OSiS are very short in comparison with those in SiO and SiS. This unexpected finding is explained by the partial charges calculated for OSiS via a natural population analysis. The results suggest that electrostatic effects rather than multiple bonding are the key factors in determining bonding in this triatomic molecule. The data presented provide the spectroscopic information needed for radio astronomical searches for OSiS.

  7. Surftherm: A program to analyze thermochemical and kinetic data in gas-phase and surface chemical reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Coltrin, M.E.; Moffat, H.K.

    1994-06-01

    This report documents the Surftherm program that analyzes transport coefficient, thermochemical- and kinetic rate information in complex gas-phase and surface chemical reaction mechanisms. The program is designed for use with the Chemkin (gas-phase chemistry) and Surface Chemkin (heterogeneous chemistry) programs. It was developed as a ``chemist`s companion`` in using the Chemkin packages with complex chemical reaction mechanisms. It presents in tabular form detailed information about the temperature and pressure dependence of chemical reaction rate constants and their reverse rate constants, reaction equilibrium constants, reaction thermochemistry, chemical species thermochemistry and transport properties. This report serves as a user`s manual for use of the program, explaining the required input and the output.

  8. A model of oxygen uptake kinetics in response to exercise: including a means of calculating oxygen demand/deficit/debt.

    PubMed

    Stirling, J R; Zakynthinaki, M S; Saltin, B

    2005-09-01

    We present a new model of the underlying dynamics of the oxygen uptake VO2(v,t) kinetics for various exercise intensities. This model is in the form of a set of nonlinear coupled vector fields for the VO2(v,t) and v, the derivative of the exercise intensity with respect to time. We also present a new and novel means for calculating the oxygen demand, D(v,t), and hence also the oxygen deficit and debt, given the time series of the VO2(v,t). This enables us to give better predictions for these values especially for when exercising at or close to maximal exercise intensities. Our model also allows us to predict the oxygen uptake time series given the time series for the exercise intensity as well as to investigate the oxygen uptake response to nonlinear exercise intensities. Neither of these features is possible using the currently used three-phase model. We also present a review of both the underlying physiology and the three-phase model. This includes for the first time a complete set of the analytical solutions of the three-phase model for the oxygen deficit and debt. PMID:15998492

  9. Recommendations on adopting the values and correlations for calculating the thermophysical and kinetic properties of liquid lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, I. V.; Lezhnin, S. I.; Mosunova, N. A.

    2015-06-01

    Recent years have seen an essentially increased interest in studying the properties of liquid lead, which is primarily connected with the possibility of using it as coolant in nuclear power installations, first of all, in reactors based on fission of heavy nuclei by fast neutrons. The article presents an analysis of published data on the thermophysical and kinetic properties of lead in liquid state, the results of which served as a basis for selecting and recommending correlations to be used in carrying out scientific and engineering calculations. A general assessment of the state of experimental investigations into the thermophysical properties of liquid lead is presented. The presented value of lead solidification temperature is the maximally reliable one. The data on the boiling temperature, melting and vaporization enthalpies, and saturated vapor pressure have been determined with satisfactory accuracy. The published data on the liquid lead heat capacity differ considerably from each other; therefore, the recommended values should be experimentally checked and determined more exactly. The available experimental data on surface tension density, volumetric expansion coefficient, sound velocity, viscosity, and thermal conductivity do not cover the entire range of liquid phase existence temperatures. The temperature region above 1200 K and the crystal-liquid phase transition region are the least studied ones. Additional investigations of these properties in the above-mentioned temperature intervals are necessary. The question about the influence of impurities on the thermophysical properties of lead still remains to be answered and requires experimental investigations.

  10. The Development of a Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanism for Diisobutylene and Comparison to Shock Tube Ignition Times

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, W; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2005-01-21

    There is much demand for chemical kinetic models to represent practical fuels such as gasoline, diesel and aviation fuel. These blended fuels contain hundreds of components whose identity and amounts are often unknown. A chemical kinetic mechanism that would represent the oxidation of all these species with accompanying chemical reactions is intractable with current computational capabilities, chemical knowledge and manpower resources. The use of surrogate fuels is an approach to make the development of chemical kinetic mechanisms for practical fuels tractable. A surrogate fuel model consists of a small number of fuel components that can be used to represent the practical fuel and still predict desired characteristics of the practical fuel. These desired fuel characteristics may include ignition behavior, burning velocity, fuel viscosity, fuel vaporization, and fuel emissions (carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, soot and nitric oxides). Gasoline consists of many different classes of hydrocarbons including n-alkanes, alkenes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, and aromatics. One approach is to use a fuel surrogate that has a single component from each class of hydrocarbon in gasoline so that the unique molecular structure of each class is represented. This approach may lead to reliable predictions of many of the combustion properties of the practical fuel. In order to obtain a fuel surrogate mechanism, detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms must be developed for each component in the surrogate. In this study, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is developed for diisobutylene, a fuel intended to represent alkenes in practical fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and aviation fuel. The fuel component diisobutylene usually consists of a mixture of two conjugate olefins of iso-octane: 1- or 2-pentene, 2,4,4-trimethyl. Diisobutylene has a similar molecular structure to iso-octane, so that its kinetics offers insight into the effect of including a double bond in the carbon

  11. Cluster models and ab initio calculations of (19)F NMR isotropic chemical shifts for inorganic fluorides.

    PubMed

    Body, Monique; Silly, Gilles; Legein, Christophe; Buzaré, Jean-Yves

    2005-05-26

    (19)F NMR isotropic chemical shift (delta(iso)) calculations are performed in crystallized compounds using the GIAO method with the B3LYP hybrid functional at DFT level. Clusters centered on the studied fluorine atoms mimic the crystalline structures. The 6-311+G(d) basis set is chosen for the central fluorine atom, and the LanL2DZ basis set for the others. The metal atoms are described by the 3-21G(2d) basis set or, when not available, by the CRENBL basis set with the corresponding ECP, and augmented with 2d polarization functions when existing. First, for high-symmetry systems (MF, MF(2), and MF(3) compounds), a systematization of the cluster building up from coordination spheres is proposed, generalized to fluoroperovskites and fluoroaluminates KAlF(4) and RbAlF(4). When applied to rather low symmetry systems such as barium fluorometalates BaMgF(4), BaZnF(4), and Ba(2)ZnF(6), the definition of the coordination spheres is far from easy. Then, for structures built up from a MF(6) octahedron network, we may define different "starting clusters": [FM(2)F(8)] for the shared fluorine atoms, [FMF(4)] for the unshared ones, and [FBa(4)](7+) for the "free" ones. Analogous "starting clusters" are then tested on compounds from the NaF-AlF(3), BaF(2)-AlF(3), and CaF(2)-AlF(3) binary systems and for alpha-BaCaAlF(7) that are also built up from a MF(6) octahedron network. For each of these corresponding fluorine sites, delta(iso) values are calculated with the "starting clusters" and several larger clusters and compared to the experimental delta(iso) values. For the barium-containing clusters, the RMS deviation is equal to 51 ppm. It is suggested that this result may be related to the poor quality of the barium basis sets for which no polarization functions are available for the moment. In total, chemical shifts were calculated for 122 fluorine sites, in a various range of compounds. For the clusters without barium, the ab initio method leads to a RMS equal to 22 ppm, which is

  12. Kinetic and chemical mechanisms for the effects of univalent cations on the spectral properties of aromatic amine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Z; Davidson, V L

    1998-01-01

    Univalent cations and pH influence the UV-visible absorption spectrum of the tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) enzyme, aromatic amine dehydrogenase (AADH). Little spectral perturbation was observed when pH was varied in the absence of univalent cations. The addition of alkali metal univalent cations (K+, Na+, Li+, Rb+ or Cs+) to oxidized AADH caused significant changes in its absorption spectrum. The apparent Kd for each cation, determined from titrations of the spectral perturbation, decreased with increasing pH. Transient kinetic studies involving rapid mixing of AADH with cations and pH jump revealed that the rate of the cation-induced spectral changes initially decreased with increasing cation concentration to a minimum value, then increased with increasing cation concentration. A kinetic model was developed to fit these data, determine the true pH-independent Kd values for K+ and Na+, and explain the pH-dependence of the apparent Kd. A chemical reaction mechanism, based on the kinetic data, is presented in which the metallic univalent cation facilitates the chemical modification of the TTQ prosthetic group to form an hydroxide adduct which gives rise to the spectral change. Addition of NH4(+)/NH3 to AADH caused changes in the absorption spectrum which were very different form those caused by addition of the metallic univalent cations. The kinetics of the reaction induced by addition of NH4+/NH3 were also different, being simple saturation kinetics. Another reaction mechanism is proposed for the NH4+/NH3-induced spectral change that involves nucleophilic addition of the unprotonated NH3 to TTQ. The general relevance of these data and models to the physiological reactions of TTQ-dependent enzymes and to the roles of univalent cations in modulating enzyme activity are discussed. PMID:9405291

  13. O₂migration rates in [NiFe] hydrogenases. A joint approach combining free-energy calculations and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Topin, Jérémie; Diharce, Julien; Fiorucci, Sébastien; Antonczak, Serge; Golebiowski, Jérôme

    2014-01-23

    Hydrogenases are promising candidates for the catalytic production of green energy by means of biological ways. The major impediment to such a production is rooted in their inhibition under aerobic conditions. In this work, we model dioxygen migration rates in mutants of a hydrogenase of Desulfovibrio fructusovorans. The approach relies on the calculation of the whole potential of mean force for O2 migration within the wild-type as well as in V74M, V74F, and V74Q mutant channels. The three free-energy barriers along the entire migration pathway are converted into chemical rates through modeling based on Transition State Theory. The use of such a model recovers the trend of O2 migration rates among the series.

  14. Solvent effects on chemical processes. 8. Demethylation kinetics of aspartame in binary aqueous-organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Skwierczynski, R D; Connors, K A

    1994-12-01

    The kinetics of demethylation of aspartame were studied in binary aqueous-organic solvent mixtures at 25 degrees C under two solution conditions, namely 1.0 M HCl (pH 0.28 in water) and carbonate buffer (pH 10.1 in water). Under these conditions solvent effects on the acid dissociation constants of aspartame do not complicate the interpretation of the kinetics. The organic cosolvents were acetone, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, dioxane, tetrahydrofuran, and methanol. The observed kinetic solvent effects were modest in magnitude, not exceeding a factor of 3 in rate constant, relative to the fully aqueous solution. The rate changes included both increases and decreases, and in some solvent mixtures extrema were observed. It is concluded that at least two contributory factors, identified as an electrostatic (dielectric constant) effect and a solvation effect, must be operating to produce the observed kinetic solvent effects.

  15. Kinetics of the chemical reduction of nitrate by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Maroto, J M; García-Herruzo, F; García-Rubio, A; Gómez-Lahoz, C; Vereda-Alonso, C

    2009-02-01

    The use of reactive barriers is one of the preferred remediation technologies for the remediation of groundwater contamination. An adequate design of these barriers requires the understanding of the kinetics of the reaction between the target contaminant and the solid phase in the barrier. A study of the kinetics between metallic iron and aqueous nitrate is presented in this paper. Published literature regarding this reaction indicates that researchers are far from a consensus about the mechanism of this reaction. This paper presents the results obtained from experiments performed at different constant pH values and iron dosages, together with a mathematical analysis of the kinetic results. We have found that an Eley-Rideal kinetic model yields a good explanation of the relatively complicated dependence between rate of nitrate reduction and the pH value of the solution.

  16. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-21

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. Furthermore, these results could serve asmore » guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.« less

  17. Wavy carbon: A new series of carbon structures explored by quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Koichi; Satoh, Hiroko; Iwamoto, Takeaki; Tokoyama, Hiroaki; Yamakado, Hideo

    2015-10-01

    A new carbon family adopting wavy structures has been found by quantum chemical calculations. The key motif of this family is a condensed four-membered ring. Periodically wavy-carbon sheets (wavy-Cn sheets, n = 2, 6, and 8) as well as wavy-C36 tube were found to be very similar to the previously reported prism-Cn carbon tubes (n = 5, 6, and 8) in several respects, including the relative energies per one carbon atom with respect to graphene, CC bond lengths, and CCC bond angles. Because of very high relative energies with respect to graphene (206-253 kJ mol-1), the wavy-carbons may behave as energy reserving materials.

  18. Terahertz absorption spectra of oxidized polyethylene and their analysis by quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Marina; Hosobuchi, Masashi; Xie, Xiaojun; Cheng, Yonghong; Furukawa, Yukio; Mizuno, Maya; Fukunaga, Kaori; Ohki, Yoshimichi

    2014-09-01

    Low-density polyethylene, either cross-linked or not, was oxidized and its absorption spectra were measured in the terahertz (THz) range and infrared range. The absorption was increased by the oxidation in the whole THz range. In accord with this, infrared absorption due to carbonyl groups appears. Although these results indicate that the increase in absorption is induced by oxidation, its attribution to resonance or relaxation is unclear. To clarify this point, the vibrational frequencies of three-dimensional polyethylene models with and without carbonyl groups were quantum chemically calculated. As a result, it was clarified that optically inactive skeletal vibrations in polyethylene become active upon oxidation. Furthermore, several absorption peaks due to vibrational resonances are induced by oxidation at wavenumbers from 20 to 100 cm-1. If these absorption peaks are broadened and are superimposed on each other, the absorption spectrum observed experimentally can be reproduced. Therefore, the absorption is ascribable to resonance.

  19. An Analytical Investigation of Three General Methods of Calculating Chemical-Equilibrium Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, Frank J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1960-01-01

    The Brinkley, Huff, and White methods for chemical-equilibrium calculations were modified and extended in order to permit an analytical comparison. The extended forms of these methods permit condensed species as reaction products, include temperature as a variable in the iteration, and permit arbitrary estimates for the variables. It is analytically shown that the three extended methods can be placed in a form that is independent of components. In this form the Brinkley iteration is identical computationally to the White method, while the modified Huff method differs only'slightly from these two. The convergence rates of the modified Brinkley and White methods are identical; and, further, all three methods are guaranteed to converge and will ultimately converge quadratically. It is concluded that no one of the three methods offers any significant computational advantages over the other two.

  20. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-21

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. Furthermore, these results could serve as guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.

  1. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-03-01

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. These results could serve as guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.

  2. Sidedness and chemical and kinetic properties of the vesamicol receptor of cholinergic synaptic vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kornreich, W.D.; Parsons, S.M.

    1988-07-12

    Cholinergic synaptic vesicles isolated from Torpedo electric organ contain a receptor for the compound l-2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (vesamicol, formerly AH5183), which then occupied blocks storage of acetylcholine (AcCh). The inside or outside orientation of the receptor and its chemical and ligand binding kinetics characteristics were studied. Binding of (/sup 3/H)vesamicol to the receptor is inhibited efficiently by the protein modification reagents 4-(chloromercuri)benzenesulfonate and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and by protease treatment of cholate-solubilized receptor. The receptor in native vesicles is resistant to irreversible inactivation by proteases, elevated temperature, or pH extremes. (/sup 3/H)Vesamicol binding depends on deprotonation of a group of pK/sub a/sub 1// = 6.26 +/- 0.03 and protonation of a group of pK/sub a/sub 2// = 10.60 +/- 0.04, which is probably the tertiary amine of the drug molecule itself. The membrane-impermeant zwitterionic vesamicol analgoue dl-trans-4-oxo-4-((5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-7-(4-phenyl-1-piperidinyl)-1-naphthalenyl)amino)butanoic acid (TPNB) is an effective inhibitor of AcCh active transport. At 0/sup 0/C, 10 ..mu..M unlabeled vesamicol displaced 36 +/- 2% of a low concentration of bound (/sup 3/H)vesamicol at 0.16 +/- 0.02 min/sup -1/ and 64 +/- 2% at 0.013 +/- 0.001 min/sup -1/. One micromolar unlabeled vesamicol behaved similarly. Several types of receptor heterogeneity are consistent with the data. It is concluded that the vesamicol receptor is a stable protein often exhibiting heterogeneity, which faces the cytoplasmic compartment of the cholinergic nerve terminal. It probably contains a binding site carboxylate in a hydrophobic environment, which ion pairs with the protonated tertiary ammonium group of the drug. It also contains a cytoplasmically oriented sulfhydryl group, which is linked to but not part of the binding site.

  3. Power optimization of chemically driven heat engine based on first and second order reaction kinetic theory and probability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-03-01

    The finite-time thermodynamic method based on probability analysis can more accurately describe various performance parameters of thermodynamic systems. Based on the relation between optimal efficiency and power output of a generalized Carnot heat engine with a finite high-temperature heat reservoir (heat source) and an infinite low-temperature heat reservoir (heat sink) and with the only irreversibility of heat transfer, this paper studies the problem of power optimization of chemically driven heat engine based on first and second order reaction kinetic theory, puts forward a model of the coupling heat engine which can be run periodically and obtains the effects of the finite-time thermodynamic characteristics of the coupling relation between chemical reaction and heat engine on the power optimization. The results show that the first order reaction kinetics model can use fuel more effectively, and can provide heat engine with higher temperature heat source to increase the power output of the heat engine. Moreover, the power fluctuation bounds of the chemically driven heat engine are obtained by using the probability analysis method. The results may provide some guidelines for the character analysis and power optimization of the chemically driven heat engines.

  4. A Deep Insight into the Details of the Interisomerization and Decomposition Mechanism of o-Quinolyl and o-Isoquinolyl Radicals. Quantum Chemical Calculations and Computer Modeling.

    PubMed

    Dubnikova, Faina; Tamburu, Carmen; Lifshitz, Assa

    2016-09-29

    The isomerization of o-quinolyl ↔ o-isoquinolyl radicals and their thermal decomposition were studied by quantum chemical methods, where potential energy surfaces of the reaction channels and their kinetics rate parameters were determined. A detailed kinetics scheme containing 40 elementary steps was constructed. Computer simulations were carried out to determine the isomerization mechanism and the distribution of reaction products in the decomposition. The calculated mole percent of the stable products was compared to the experimental values that were obtained in this laboratory in the past, using the single pulse shock tube. The agreement between the experimental and the calculated mole percents was very good. A map of the figures containing the mole percent's of eight stable products of the decomposition plotted vs T are presented. The fast isomerization of o-quinolyl → o-isoquinolyl radicals via the intermediate indene imine radical and the attainment of fast equilibrium between these two radicals is the reason for the identical product distribution regardless whether the reactant radical is o-quinolyl or o-isoquinolyl. Three of the main decomposition products of o-quinolyl radical, are those containing the benzene ring, namely, phenyl, benzonitrile, and phenylacetylene radicals. They undergo further decomposition mainly at high temperatures via two types of reactions: (1) Opening of the benzene ring in the radicals, followed by splitting into fragments. (2) Dissociative attachment of benzonitrile and phenyl acetylene by hydrogen atoms to form hydrogen cyanide and acetylene.

  5. A Deep Insight into the Details of the Interisomerization and Decomposition Mechanism of o-Quinolyl and o-Isoquinolyl Radicals. Quantum Chemical Calculations and Computer Modeling.

    PubMed

    Dubnikova, Faina; Tamburu, Carmen; Lifshitz, Assa

    2016-09-29

    The isomerization of o-quinolyl ↔ o-isoquinolyl radicals and their thermal decomposition were studied by quantum chemical methods, where potential energy surfaces of the reaction channels and their kinetics rate parameters were determined. A detailed kinetics scheme containing 40 elementary steps was constructed. Computer simulations were carried out to determine the isomerization mechanism and the distribution of reaction products in the decomposition. The calculated mole percent of the stable products was compared to the experimental values that were obtained in this laboratory in the past, using the single pulse shock tube. The agreement between the experimental and the calculated mole percents was very good. A map of the figures containing the mole percent's of eight stable products of the decomposition plotted vs T are presented. The fast isomerization of o-quinolyl → o-isoquinolyl radicals via the intermediate indene imine radical and the attainment of fast equilibrium between these two radicals is the reason for the identical product distribution regardless whether the reactant radical is o-quinolyl or o-isoquinolyl. Three of the main decomposition products of o-quinolyl radical, are those containing the benzene ring, namely, phenyl, benzonitrile, and phenylacetylene radicals. They undergo further decomposition mainly at high temperatures via two types of reactions: (1) Opening of the benzene ring in the radicals, followed by splitting into fragments. (2) Dissociative attachment of benzonitrile and phenyl acetylene by hydrogen atoms to form hydrogen cyanide and acetylene. PMID:27583646

  6. Overcoming computational uncertainties to reveal chemical sensitivity in single molecule conduction calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Hush, Noel S.

    2005-06-01

    In the calculation of conduction through single molecule's approximations about the geometry and electronic structure of the system are usually made in order to simplify the problem. Previously [G. C. Solomon, J. R. Reimers, and N. S. Hush, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 6615 (2004)], we have shown that, in calculations employing cluster models for the electrodes, proper treatment of the open-shell nature of the clusters is the most important computational feature required to make the results sensitive to variations in the structural and chemical features of the system. Here, we expand this and establish a general hierarchy of requirements involving treatment of geometrical approximations. These approximations are categorized into two classes: those associated with finite-dimensional methods for representing the semi-infinite electrodes, and those associated with the chemisorption topology. We show that ca. 100 unique atoms are required in order to properly characterize each electrode: using fewer atoms leads to nonsystematic variations in conductivity that can overwhelm the subtler changes. The choice of binding site is shown to be the next most important feature, while some effects that are difficult to control experimentally concerning the orientations at each binding site are actually shown to be insignificant. Verification of this result provides a general test for the precision of computational procedures for molecular conductivity. Predictions concerning the dependence of conduction on substituent and other effects on the central molecule are found to be meaningful only when they exceed the uncertainties of the effects associated with binding-site variation.

  7. Burnup calculations and chemical analysis of irradiated fuel samples studied in LWR-PROTEUS phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, P.; Guenther-Leopold, I.; Berger, H. D.

    2006-07-01

    The isotopic compositions of 5 UO{sub 2} samples irradiated in a Swiss PWR power plant, which were investigated in the LWR-PROTEUS Phase II programme, were calculated using the CASMO-4 and BOXER assembly codes. The burnups of the samples range from 50 to 90 MWd/kg. The results for a large number of actinide and fission product nuclides were compared to those of chemical analyses performed using a combination of chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry. A good agreement of calculated and measured concentrations is found for many of the nuclides investigated with both codes. The concentrations of the Pu isotopes are mostly predicted within {+-}10%, the two codes giving quite different results, except for {sup 242}Pu. Relatively significant deviations are found for some isotopes of Cs and Sm, and large discrepancies are observed for Eu and Gd. The overall quality of the predictions by the two codes is comparable, and the deviations from the experimental data do not generally increase with burnup. (authors)

  8. Overcoming computational uncertainties to reveal chemical sensitivity in single molecule conduction calculations.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2005-06-01

    In the calculation of conduction through single molecule's approximations about the geometry and electronic structure of the system are usually made in order to simplify the problem. Previously [G. C. Solomon, J. R. Reimers, and N. S. Hush, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 6615 (2004)], we have shown that, in calculations employing cluster models for the electrodes, proper treatment of the open-shell nature of the clusters is the most important computational feature required to make the results sensitive to variations in the structural and chemical features of the system. Here, we expand this and establish a general hierarchy of requirements involving treatment of geometrical approximations. These approximations are categorized into two classes: those associated with finite-dimensional methods for representing the semi-infinite electrodes, and those associated with the chemisorption topology. We show that ca. 100 unique atoms are required in order to properly characterize each electrode: using fewer atoms leads to nonsystematic variations in conductivity that can overwhelm the subtler changes. The choice of binding site is shown to be the next most important feature, while some effects that are difficult to control experimentally concerning the orientations at each binding site are actually shown to be insignificant. Verification of this result provides a general test for the precision of computational procedures for molecular conductivity. Predictions concerning the dependence of conduction on substituent and other effects on the central molecule are found to be meaningful only when they exceed the uncertainties of the effects associated with binding-site variation.

  9. Molecular structure, spectroscopic assignments and other quantum chemical calculations of anticancer drugs - A review.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, A S; Deilam, M; Sharifi-Rad, J; Ashrafi, F; Hoseini-Alfatemi, S M

    2015-01-01

    In many texts, both theoretical and experimental studies on molecular structure and spectroscopic assignments of anticancer medicines have been reported. Molecular geometry parameters have been experimentally obtained by x-ray structure determination method and optimized using computational chemistry method like density functional theory. In this review, we consider calculations based on density function theory at B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) levels of theory. Based on optimized geometric parameters of the molecules, molecular structures (length of bonds, bond angles and torsion angles) and vibrational assignments have been obtained. Molecular stability and bond strength have been investigated by applying natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Other molecular properties such as mulliken population analysis, thermodynamic properties and polarizabitities of these drugs have been reported. Calculated energies of HOMO and LUMO show that charge transfer occurs in the molecular. Information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of molecular chemical reactivity has been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface of electrostatic and compared with experiment data. PMID:26638891

  10. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde: IR spectrum and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Taherian, Fatemeh; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2016-05-01

    The structural parameters, and vibrational frequencies of 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5NSA) were studied by the FT-IR and Raman spectra and the quantum chemical calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in order to investigate the intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) present in its structure. The strength and nature of IHB in the optimized structure of 5NSA were studied in detail by means of the atoms in molecules (AIM) and the natural bond orbital (NBO) approaches. The results obtained were then compared with the corresponding data for its parent molecule, salicylaldehyde (SA). Comparisons made between the geometrical structures for 5NSA and SA, their OH/OD stretching and out-of-plane bending modes, their enthalpies for the hydrogen bond, and their AIM parameters demonstrated a stronger H-bonding in 5NSA compared with that in SA. The calculated binding enthalpy (ΔHbind) for 5NSA was -10.92 kcal mol-1. The observed νOH and γOH appeared at about 3120 cm-1 and 786 cm-1 respectively. The stretching frequency shift of H-bond formation was 426 cm-1 which is consistent with ΔHbind and the strength of H-bond in 5NSA. The delocalization energies and electron delocalization indices derived by the NBO and AIM approaches indicate that the resonance effects were responsible for the stronger IHB in 5NSA than in SA.

  11. Efficient stochastic simulation of chemical kinetics networks using a weighted ensemble of trajectories.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Rory M; Sedgewick, Andrew J; Faeder, James R; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2013-09-21

    We apply the "weighted ensemble" (WE) simulation strategy, previously employed in the context of molecular dynamics simulations, to a series of systems-biology models that range in complexity from a one-dimensional system to a system with 354 species and 3680 reactions. WE is relatively easy to implement, does not require extensive hand-tuning of parameters, does not depend on the details of the simulation algorithm, and can facilitate the simulation of extremely rare events. For the coupled stochastic reaction systems we study, WE is able to produce accurate and efficient approximations of the joint probability distribution for all chemical species for all time t. WE is also able to efficiently extract mean first passage times for the systems, via the construction of a steady-state condition with feedback. In all cases studied here, WE results agree with independent "brute-force" calculations, but significantly enhance the precision with which rare or slow processes can be characterized. Speedups over "brute-force" in sampling rare events via the Gillespie direct Stochastic Simulation Algorithm range from ~10(12) to ~10(18) for characterizing rare states in a distribution, and ~10(2) to ~10(4) for finding mean first passage times.

  12. Kinetic studies of chemical shrinkage and residual stress formation in thermoset epoxy adhesives under confined curing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, M.; Geiß, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    Faultless processing of thermoset polymers in demanding applications requires a profound mastering of the curing kinetics considering both the physico-chemical changes in the transition from the liquid to the solid state and the consolidation of the polymers network in the diffusion controlled curing regime past the gel point. Especially in adhesive joints shrinkage stress occurring at an early state of the curing process under confined conditions is likely to cause defects due to local debonding and thus reduce their strength and durability1. Rheometry is considered the method of choice to investigate the change of elastic and viscous properties in the progress of curing. Drawbacks however relate to experimental challenges in accessing the full range of kinetic parameters of thermoset resins with low initial viscosity from the very beginning of the curing reaction to the post-cure consolidation of the polymer due to the formation of secondary chemical bonds. Therefore the scope of this study was to interrelate rheological data with results from in-situ measurements of the shrinkage stress formation in adhesive joints and with the change of refractive index in the progress of curing. This combination of different methods has shown to be valuable in gaining advanced insight into the kinetics of the curing reaction. The experimental results are based on a multi component thermoset epoxy-amine adhesive.

  13. Variation in ruminal in situ degradation of crude protein and starch from maize grains compared to in vitro gas production kinetics and physical and chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Seifried, Natascha; Steingaß, Herbert; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate in situ ruminal dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and starch degradation characteristics and in vitro gas production (GP) kinetics using a set of 20 different maize grain genotypes and (2) to predict the effective degradation (ED) of CP and starch from chemical and physical characteristics alone or in combination with in vitro GP measurements. Maize grains were characterised by different chemical and physical characteristics. Ruminal in situ degradation was measured in three lactating Jersey cows. Ground grains (sieve size: 2 mm) were incubated in bags for 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 48 and 72 h. Bag residues were analysed for CP and starch content. Degradation kinetics was determined and the ED of DM, CP and starch calculated using a ruminal passage rate of 5%/h and 8%/h. The GP of the grains (sieve size: 1 mm) was recorded after 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h incubation in buffered rumen fluid and fitted to an exponential equation to determine GP kinetics. Correlations and stepwise multiple linear regressions were evaluated for the prediction of ED calculated for a passage rate of 5%/h (ED5) for CP (EDCP5) and starch (EDST5). The in situ parameters and ED5 varied widely between genotypes with average values (±SD) of 64% ± 4.2, 62% ± 4.1 and 65% ± 5.2 for ED5 of DM, EDCP5 and EDST5 and were on average 10 percentage points lower for a passage rate of 8%/h. Degradation rates varied between 4.8%/h and 7.4%/h, 4.1%/h and 6.5%/h and 5.3%/h and 8.9%/h for DM, CP and starch, respectively. These rates were in the same range as GP rates (6.0-8.3%/h). The EDCP5 and EDST5 were related to CP concentration and could be evaluated in detail using CP fractions and specific amino acids. In vitro GP measurements and GP rates correlated well with EDCP5 and EDST5 and predicted EDCP5 and EDST5 in combination with the chemical characteristics of the samples. Equations can be used to obtain quick and cost effective information

  14. Two-dimensional calculation of chemical species and electro-magnetic properties in rocket exhaust plume flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Cui, Jisong; Liu, Qingyun

    1993-08-01

    A computational modeling technique and prediction method were presented. Additionally, a comprehensive computer code was programmed. The chemical reactions and radar attenuation that occur in rocket plumes can be predicted precisely by using this code. It is suitable to calculating the parameters of rocket plumes under a near complete-expansion condition using a smokeless (or smoke reduced) propellant. The calculation results also indicate that serious errors will occur in the prediction of chemical and electrical properties in the plume flow field if the chemical reactions are not taken into account.

  15. An upwind, kinetic flux-vector splitting method for flows in chemical and thermal non-equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppard, W. M.; Grossman, B.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed new upwind kinetic difference schemes for flows with non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry. These schemes are derived from the Boltzmann equation with the resulting Euler schemes developed as moments of the discretized Boltzmann scheme with a locally Maxwellian velocity distribution. Splitting the velocity distribution at the Boltzmann level is seen to result in a flux-split Euler scheme and is called Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting (KFVS). Extensions to flows with finite-rate chemistry and vibrational relaxation is accomplished utilizing nonequilibrium kinetic theory. Computational examples are presented comparing KFVS with the schemes of Van Leer and Roe for a quasi-one-dimensional flow through a supersonic diffuser, inviscid flow through two-dimensional inlet, and viscous flow over a cone at zero angle-of-attack. Calculations are also shown for the transonic flow over a bump in a channel and the transonic flow over an NACA 0012 airfoil. The results show that even though the KFVS scheme is a Riemann solver at the kinetic level, its behavior at the Euler level is more similar to the existing flux-vector splitting algorithms than to the flux-difference splitting scheme of Roe.

  16. Recombinant Escherichia coli GMP reductase: kinetic, catalytic and chemical mechanisms, and thermodynamics of enzyme-ligand binary complex formation.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Leonardo Krás Borges; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Rosado, Leonardo Astolfi; Breda, Ardala; Selbach, Bruna Pelegrim; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Basso, Luiz Augusto

    2011-04-01

    Guanosine monophosphate (GMP) reductase catalyzes the reductive deamination of GMP to inosine monophosphate (IMP). GMP reductase plays an important role in the conversion of nucleoside and nucleotide derivatives of guanine to adenine nucleotides. In addition, as a member of the purine salvage pathway, it also participates in the reutilization of free intracellular bases. Here we present cloning, expression and purification of Escherichia coli guaC-encoded GMP reductase to determine its kinetic mechanism, as well as chemical and thermodynamic features of this reaction. Initial velocity studies and isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that GMP reductase follows an ordered bi-bi kinetic mechanism, in which GMP binds first to the enzyme followed by NADPH binding, and NADP(+) dissociates first followed by IMP release. The isothermal titration calorimetry also showed that GMP and IMP binding are thermodynamically favorable processes. The pH-rate profiles showed groups with apparent pK values of 6.6 and 9.6 involved in catalysis, and pK values of 7.1 and 8.6 important to GMP binding, and a pK value of 6.2 important for NADPH binding. Primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects demonstrated that hydride transfer contributes to the rate-limiting step, whereas solvent kinetic isotope effects arise from a single protonic site that plays a modest role in catalysis. Multiple isotope effects suggest that protonation and hydride transfer steps take place in the same transition state, lending support to a concerted mechanism. Pre-steady-state kinetic data suggest that product release does not contribute to the rate-limiting step of the reaction catalyzed by E. coli GMP reductase.

  17. S3 and S4 abundances and improved chemical kinetic model for the lower atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2013-07-01

    Mixing ratios of S3 and S4 are obtained from reanalysis of the spectra of true absorption in the visible range retrieved by Maiorov et al. (Maiorov, B.S. et al. [2005]. Solar Syst. Res. 39, 267-282) from the Venera 11 observations. These mixing ratios are fS3 = 11 ± 3 ppt at 3-10 km and 18 ± 3 ppt at 10-19 km, fS4 = 4 ± 4 ppt at 3-10 km and 6 ± 2 ppt at 10-19 km, and show a steep decrease in both S3 and S4 above 19 km. Photolysis rates of S3 and S4 at various altitudes are calculated using the Venera 11 spectra and constant photolysis yields as free parameters. The chemical kinetic model for the Venus lower atmosphere (Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2007]. Icarus 191, 25-37) has been improved by inclusion of the S4 cycle from Yung et al. (Yung, Y.L. et al. [2009]. J. Geophys. Res. 114, E00B34), reduction of the H2SO4 and CO fluxes at the upper boundary of 47 km by a factor of 4 in accord with the recent photochemical models for the middle atmosphere, by using a closed lower boundary for OCS instead of a free parameter for this species at the surface, and some minor updates. Our model with the S4 cycle but without the SO3 + 2 OCS reaction suggested by Krasnopolsky and Pollack (Krasnopolsky, V.A., Pollack, J.B. [1994]. Icarus 109, 58-78) disagrees with the observations of OCS, CO, S3, and S4. However, inclusion of the S4 cycle improves the model fit to all observational constraints. The best-fit activation energy of 7800 K for thermolysis of S4 supports the S4 enthalpy from Mills (Mills, K.C. [1974]. Thermodynamic Data for Inorganic Sulfides, Selenides and Tellurides. Butterworths, London). Chemistry of the Venus lower atmosphere is initiated by disequilibrium products H2SO4 and CO from the middle atmosphere, photolysis of S3 and S4, and thermochemistry in the lowest scale height. The chemistry is mostly driven by sulfur that is formed in a slow reaction SO + SO, produces OCS, and results in dramatic changes in abundances of OCS, CO, and free sulfur allotropes. The SX + OCS

  18. A Computer Code System for the Calculation of Reactivity and Kinetic Parameters by One-Dimensional Neutron Transport Perturbation Theory.

    1985-02-01

    Version 00 TP1 is a transport theory code, developed to determine reactivity effects and kinetic parameters such as effective delayed neutron fractions and mean generation time by applying the usual perturbation formalism for one-dimensional geometry.

  19. A Computer Program for the Calculation of Reactivity and Kinetic Parameters by Two-Dimensional Neutron Transport Perturbation Theory.

    1985-02-01

    Version 00 TP2 is a transport theory code, developed to determine reactivity effects and kinetic parameters such as effective delayed neutron fractions and mean generation time by applying the usual perturbation formalism for two-dimensional geometry.

  20. Features in chemical kinetics. I. Signatures of self-emerging dimensional reduction from a general format of the evolution law.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Paolo; Frezzato, Diego

    2013-06-21

    Simplification of chemical kinetics description through dimensional reduction is particularly important to achieve an accurate numerical treatment of complex reacting systems, especially when stiff kinetics are considered and a comprehensive picture of the evolving system is required. To this aim several tools have been proposed in the past decades, such as sensitivity analysis, lumping approaches, and exploitation of time scales separation. In addition, there are methods based on the existence of the so-called slow manifolds, which are hyper-surfaces of lower dimension than the one of the whole phase-space and in whose neighborhood the slow evolution occurs after an initial fast transient. On the other hand, all tools contain to some extent a degree of subjectivity which seems to be irremovable. With reference to macroscopic and spatially homogeneous reacting systems under isothermal conditions, in this work we shall adopt a phenomenological approach to let self-emerge the dimensional reduction from the mathematical structure of the evolution law. By transforming the original system of polynomial differential equations, which describes the chemical evolution, into a universal quadratic format, and making a direct inspection of the high-order time-derivatives of the new dynamic variables, we then formulate a conjecture which leads to the concept of an "attractiveness" region in the phase-space where a well-defined state-dependent rate function ω has the simple evolution ω[over dot]=-ω(2) along any trajectory up to the stationary state. This constitutes, by itself, a drastic dimensional reduction from a system of N-dimensional equations (being N the number of chemical species) to a one-dimensional and universal evolution law for such a characteristic rate. Step-by-step numerical inspections on model kinetic schemes are presented. In the companion paper [P. Nicolini and D. Frezzato, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234102 (2013)] this outcome will be naturally related to the

  1. Features in chemical kinetics. I. Signatures of self-emerging dimensional reduction from a general format of the evolution law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolini, Paolo; Frezzato, Diego

    2013-06-01

    Simplification of chemical kinetics description through dimensional reduction is particularly important to achieve an accurate numerical treatment of complex reacting systems, especially when stiff kinetics are considered and a comprehensive picture of the evolving system is required. To this aim several tools have been proposed in the past decades, such as sensitivity analysis, lumping approaches, and exploitation of time scales separation. In addition, there are methods based on the existence of the so-called slow manifolds, which are hyper-surfaces of lower dimension than the one of the whole phase-space and in whose neighborhood the slow evolution occurs after an initial fast transient. On the other hand, all tools contain to some extent a degree of subjectivity which seems to be irremovable. With reference to macroscopic and spatially homogeneous reacting systems under isothermal conditions, in this work we shall adopt a phenomenological approach to let self-emerge the dimensional reduction from the mathematical structure of the evolution law. By transforming the original system of polynomial differential equations, which describes the chemical evolution, into a universal quadratic format, and making a direct inspection of the high-order time-derivatives of the new dynamic variables, we then formulate a conjecture which leads to the concept of an "attractiveness" region in the phase-space where a well-defined state-dependent rate function ω has the simple evolution dot{ω }= - ω ^2 along any trajectory up to the stationary state. This constitutes, by itself, a drastic dimensional reduction from a system of N-dimensional equations (being N the number of chemical species) to a one-dimensional and universal evolution law for such a characteristic rate. Step-by-step numerical inspections on model kinetic schemes are presented. In the companion paper [P. Nicolini and D. Frezzato, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234102 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4809593 this outcome will be naturally

  2. Kinetic resolution of oxazinones: rational exploration of chemical space through the design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Polyssena; Kronig, Christel; Carlone, Armando; Eröksüz, Serap; Berkessel, Albrecht; Bella, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The organocatalytic kinetic resolution of 4-substituted oxazinones has been optimised (selectivity factor S up to 98, chiral oxazinone ee values up to 99.6 % (1 a-g) and product ee values up to 90 % (3 a-g)) in a rational way by applying the Design of Experiments (DoE) approach.

  3. The Utility of the Lambert Function W[a exp(a - bt)] in Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brian Wesley

    2010-01-01

    The mathematical Lambert function W[a exp(a - bt)] is used to find integrated rate laws for several examples, including simple enzyme and Lindemann-Christiansen-Hinshelwood (LCH) unimolecular decay kinetics. The results derived here for the well-known LCH mechanism as well as for a dimer-monomer reaction mechanism appear to be novel. A nonlinear…

  4. An Analogy Using Pennies and Dimes to Explain Chemical Kinetics Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.; Perez, Wanda I.; Lopez, Jose R.; Moore-Russo, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an analogy that uses coins and graphical analysis to teach kinetics concepts and resolve pseudo-first-order rate constants related to transition-metal complexes ligand-solvent exchange reactions. They describe an activity that is directed to upper-division undergraduate and graduate students. The activity…

  5. The Molecular Structure of Phenetole Studied by Microwave Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferres, Lynn; Stahl, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam

    2016-06-01

    A pulsed molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer operating in the frequency range 2 - 26.5 GHz was used to measure the spectrum of phenetole (ethyl phenyl ether or ethoxybenzene, C6H5OC2H5). The conformational landscape is completely determined by the orientations of the phenyl ring and the ethyl group. A two-dimensional potential energy surface was calculated at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Two conformers were found: The trans conformer has a Cs symmetry, and the gauche conformer has the ethyl group tilted out of the phenyl plane by about 70°. Totally 186 rotational transitions were assigned to the more stable planar trans conformer, and fitted using a semi-rigid rotor model to measurement accuracy of 2 kHz. Highly accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined. Several method and basis set combinations were applied to check for convergence and to compare with the experimentally deduced molecular parameters. The inertial defect of the observed conformer Δc = (Ic - Ia - Ib) = -6.718 uÅ2 confirms that the heavy atom skeleton is planar with two pairs of hydrogen atoms out of plane. All lines in the spectrum could be assigned to the trans conformer, which confirms that the gauche conformer cannot be observed under our measurement conditions. In agreement with the rather high torsional barrier of the methyl group (V3 = 1168 wn) calculated by quantum chemical methods, all assigned lines appeared sharp and no signs of splittings were observed for the methyl internal rotation.

  6. Thermal Decomposition of NCN: Shock-Tube Study, Quantum Chemical Calculations, and Master-Equation Modeling.

    PubMed

    Busch, Anna; González-García, Núria; Lendvay, György; Olzmann, Matthias

    2015-07-16

    The thermal decomposition of cyanonitrene, NCN, was studied behind reflected shock waves in the temperature range 1790-2960 K at pressures near 1 and 4 bar. Highly diluted mixtures of NCN3 in argon were shock-heated to produce NCN, and concentration-time profiles of C atoms as reaction product were monitored with atomic resonance absorption spectroscopy at 156.1 nm. Calibration was performed with methane pyrolysis experiments. Rate coefficients for the reaction (3)NCN + M → (3)C + N2 + M (R1) were determined from the initial slopes of the C atom concentration-time profiles. Reaction R1 was found to be in the low-pressure regime at the conditions of the experiments. The temperature dependence of the bimolecular rate coefficient can be expressed with the following Arrhenius equation: k1(bim) = (4.2 ± 2.1) × 10(14) exp[-242.3 kJ mol(-1)/(RT)] cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). The rate coefficients were analyzed by using a master equation with specific rate coefficients from RRKM theory. The necessary molecular data and energies were calculated with quantum chemical methods up to the CCSD(T)/CBS//CCSD/cc-pVTZ level of theory. From the topography of the potential energy surface, it follows that reaction R1 proceeds via isomerization of NCN to CNN and subsequent C-N bond fission along a collinear reaction coordinate without a tight transition state. The calculations reproduce the magnitude and temperature dependence of the rate coefficient and confirm that reaction R1 is in the low-pressure regime under our experimental conditions.

  7. Nuclei-selected NMR shielding calculations: a sublinear-scaling quantum-chemical method.

    PubMed

    Beer, Matthias; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2011-02-21

    An ab initio method for the direct calculation of NMR shieldings for selected nuclei at the Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory level is presented. Our method shows a computational effort scaling only sublinearly with molecular size, as it is motivated by the physical consideration that the chemical shielding is dominated by its local environment. The key feature of our method is to avoid the conventionally performed calculation of all NMR shieldings but instead to solve directly for specific nuclear shieldings. This has important implications not only for the study of large molecules, but also for the simulation of solvent effects and molecular dynamics, since often just a few shieldings are of interest. Our theory relies on two major aspects both necessary to provide a sublinear scaling behavior: First, an alternative expression for the shielding tensor is derived, which involves the response density matrix with respect to the nuclear magnetic moment instead of the response to the external magnetic field. Second, as unphysical long-range contributions occur within the description of distributed gauge origin methods that do not influence the final expectation value, we present a screening procedure to truncate the B-field dependent basis set, which is crucial in order to ensure an early onset of the sublinear scaling. The screening is in line with the r(-2) distance decay of Biot-Savarts law for induced magnetic fields. Our present truncation relies on the introduced concept of "individual gauge shielding contributions" applied to a reformulated shielding tensor, the latter consisting of gauge-invariant terms. The presented method is generally applicable and shows typical speed-ups of about one order of magnitude; moreover, due to the reduced scaling behavior of O(1) as compared to O(N), the wins become larger with increasing system size. We illustrate the validity of our method for several test systems, including ring-current dominated systems and

  8. Kinetics of para-nitrophenol and chemical oxygen demand removal from synthetic wastewater in an anaerobic migrating blanket reactor.

    PubMed

    Kuşçu, Ozlem Selçuk; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2009-01-30

    A laboratory scale anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) was operated at different HRTs (1-10.38 days) in order to determine the para-nitrophenol (p-NP) and COD removal kinetic constants. The reactor was fed with 40 mg L(-1)p-NP and 3000 mg L(-1) glucose-COD. Modified Stover-Kincannon and Grau second-order kinetic models were applied to the experimental data. The predicted p-NP and COD concentrations were calculated using the kinetic constants. It was found that these data were in better agreement with the observed ones in the modified Stover-Kincannon compared to Grau second-order model. The kinetic constants calculated according to Stover-Kincannon model are as follows: the saturation value constant (K(B)) and maximum utilization rate constants (R(max)) were found as 31.55 g CODL(-1)day(-1), 29.49 g CODL(-1)day(-1) for COD removal and 0.428 g p-NPL(-1)day(-1), 0.407 g p-NPL(-1)day(-1) for p-NP removal, respectively (R(2)=1). The values of (a) and (b) were found to be 0.096 day and 1.071 (dimensionless) with high correlation coefficients of R(2)=0.85 for COD removal. Kinetic constants for specific gas production rate were evaluated using modified Stover-Kincannon, Van der Meer and Heerrtjes and Chen and Hasminoto models. It was shown that Stover-Kincannon model is more appropriate for calculating the effluent COD, p-NP concentrations in AMBR compared to the other models. The maximum specific biogas production rate, G(max), and proportionality constant, G(B), were found to be 1666.7 mL L(-1) day(-1) and 2.83 (dimensionless), respectively in modified Stover-Kincannon gas model. The bacteria had low Haldane inhibition constants (K(ID)=14 and 23 mg L(-1)) for p-NP concentrations higher than 40 mg L(-1) while the half velocity constant (K(s)) increased from 10 to 60 and 118 mg L(-1) with increasing p-NP concentrations from 40 to 85 and 125 mg L(-1). PMID:18515004

  9. Kinetics of para-nitrophenol and chemical oxygen demand removal from synthetic wastewater in an anaerobic migrating blanket reactor.

    PubMed

    Kuşçu, Ozlem Selçuk; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2009-01-30

    A laboratory scale anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) was operated at different HRTs (1-10.38 days) in order to determine the para-nitrophenol (p-NP) and COD removal kinetic constants. The reactor was fed with 40 mg L(-1)p-NP and 3000 mg L(-1) glucose-COD. Modified Stover-Kincannon and Grau second-order kinetic models were applied to the experimental data. The predicted p-NP and COD concentrations were calculated using the kinetic constants. It was found that these data were in better agreement with the observed ones in the modified Stover-Kincannon compared to Grau second-order model. The kinetic constants calculated according to Stover-Kincannon model are as follows: the saturation value constant (K(B)) and maximum utilization rate constants (R(max)) were found as 31.55 g CODL(-1)day(-1), 29.49 g CODL(-1)day(-1) for COD removal and 0.428 g p-NPL(-1)day(-1), 0.407 g p-NPL(-1)day(-1) for p-NP removal, respectively (R(2)=1). The values of (a) and (b) were found to be 0.096 day and 1.071 (dimensionless) with high correlation coefficients of R(2)=0.85 for COD removal. Kinetic constants for specific gas production rate were evaluated using modified Stover-Kincannon, Van der Meer and Heerrtjes and Chen and Hasminoto models. It was shown that Stover-Kincannon model is more appropriate for calculating the effluent COD, p-NP concentrations in AMBR compared to the other models. The maximum specific biogas production rate, G(max), and proportionality constant, G(B), were found to be 1666.7 mL L(-1) day(-1) and 2.83 (dimensionless), respectively in modified Stover-Kincannon gas model. The bacteria had low Haldane inhibition constants (K(ID)=14 and 23 mg L(-1)) for p-NP concentrations higher than 40 mg L(-1) while the half velocity constant (K(s)) increased from 10 to 60 and 118 mg L(-1) with increasing p-NP concentrations from 40 to 85 and 125 mg L(-1).

  10. Octafluorodirhenate(III) Revisited: Solid-State Preparation, Characterization, and Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari; Todorova, Tanya K; Pham, Chien Thang; Hartmann, Thomas; Abram, Ulrich; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    A simple method for the high-yield preparation of (NH4)2[Re2F8]·2H2O has been developed that involves the reaction of (n-Bu4N)2[Re2Cl8] with molten ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Using this method, the new salt [NH4]2[Re2F8]·2H2O was prepared in ∼90% yield. The product was characterized in solution by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance ((19)F NMR) spectroscopies and in the solid-state by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the molecular and electronic structure, as well as the electronic absorption spectrum of the [Re2F8](2-) anion. The metal-metal bonding in the Re2(6+) unit was quantified in terms of effective bond order (EBO) and compared to that of its [Re2Cl8](2-) and [Re2Br8](2-) analogues.

  11. Interactions of ionic liquids and acetone: thermodynamic properties, quantum-chemical calculations, and NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Elia; Ferro, Victor R; Palomar, Jose; Ortega, Juan; Rodriguez, Juan Jose

    2013-06-20

    The interactions between ionic liquids (ILs) and acetone have been studied to obtain a further understanding of the behavior of their mixtures, which generally give place to an exothermic process, mutual miscibility, and negative deviation of Raoult's law. COSMO-RS was used as a suitable computational method to systematically analyze the excess enthalpy of IL-acetone systems (>300), in terms of the intermolecular interactions contributing to the mixture behavior. Spectroscopic and COSMO-RS results indicated that acetone, as a polar compound with strong hydrogen bond acceptor character, in most cases, establishes favorable hydrogen bonding with ILs. This interaction is strengthened by the presence of an acidic cation and an anion with dispersed charge and non-HB acceptor character in the IL. COSMO-RS predictions indicated that gas-liquid and vapor-liquid equilibrium data for IL-acetone systems can be finely tuned by the IL selection, that is, acting on the intermolecular interactions between the molecular and ionic species in the liquid phase. NMR measurements for IL-acetone mixtures at different concentrations were also carried out. Quantum-chemical calculations by using molecular clusters of acetone and IL species were finally performed. These results provided additional evidence of the main role played by hydrogen bonding in the behavior of systems containing ILs and HB acceptor compounds, such as acetone. PMID:23688030

  12. The (impossible?) formation of acetaldehyde on the grain surfaces: insights from quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrique-Romero, J.; Rimola, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Balucani, N.

    2016-06-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, it is not clear whether their synthesis occurs on the icy surfaces of interstellar grains or via a series of gas-phase reactions. As a test case of the COMs synthesis in the ISM, we present new quantum chemical calculations on the formation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) from the coupling of the HCO and CH3 radicals, both in gas phase and on water ice surfaces. The binding energies of HCO and CH3 on the amorphous water ice were also computed (2333 and 734 K, respectively). Results indicate that, in gas phase, the products could be either CH3CHO, CH4 + CO, or CH3OCH, depending on the relative orientation of the two radicals. However, on the amorphous water ice, only the CH4 + CO product is possible due to the geometrical constraints imposed by the water ice surface. Therefore, acetaldehyde cannot be synthesized by the CH3 + HCO coupling on the icy grains. We discuss the implications of these results and other cases, such as ethylene glycol and dimethyl ether, in which similar situations can occur, suggesting that formation of these molecules on the grain surfaces might be unlikely.

  13. Norm-conserving pseudopotentials with chemical accuracy compared to all-electron calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willand, Alex; Kvashnin, Yaroslav O.; Genovese, Luigi; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Deb, Arpan Krishna; Sadeghi, Ali; Deutsch, Thierry; Goedecker, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    By adding a nonlinear core correction to the well established dual space Gaussian type pseudopotentials for the chemical elements up to the third period, we construct improved pseudopotentials for the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof [J. Perdew, K. Burke, and M. Ernzerhof, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.3865] functional and demonstrate that they exhibit excellent accuracy. Our benchmarks for the G2-1 test set show average atomization energy errors of only half a kcal/mol. The pseudopotentials also remain highly reliable for high pressure phases of crystalline solids. When supplemented by empirical dispersion corrections [S. Grimme, J. Comput. Chem. 27, 1787 (2006), 10.1002/jcc.20495; S. Grimme, J. Antony, S. Ehrlich, and H. Krieg, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 154104 (2010), 10.1063/1.3382344] the average error in the interaction energy between molecules is also about half a kcal/mol. The accuracy that can be obtained by these pseudopotentials in combination with a systematic basis set is well superior to the accuracy that can be obtained by commonly used medium size Gaussian basis sets in all-electron calculations.

  14. Epoxides, cyclic sulfites, and sulfate from natural pentacyclic triterpenoids: theoretical calculations and chemical transformations.

    PubMed

    García-Granados, Andrés; López, Pilar E; Melguizo, Enrique; Moliz, Juan N; Parra, Andrés; Simeó, Yolanda; Dobado, José A

    2003-06-13

    Several triterpenic derivatives, with the A-ring functionalized, were semisynthesized from oleanolic and maslinic acids. The reactivities of sulfites, sulfate, and epoxides in these triterpene compounds were investigated under different reaction conditions. Moreover, contracted A-ring triterpenes (five-membered rings) were obtained, by different treatments of the sulfate 7. From the epoxide 8, deoxygenated and halohydrin derivatives were semisynthesized with several nucleophiles. Ozonolysis and Beckmann reactions were used to yield 4-aza compounds, from five-membered ring olanediene triterpenes. The X-ray structure of sulfate 7 is given and compared with density functional theory geometries. Theoretical (13)C and (1)H chemical shifts (gauge-invariant atomic orbital method at the B3LYP/6-31G*//B3LYP/6-31G* level) and (3)J(H,H) coupling constants were calculated for compounds 5-9 and 34-36, identifying the (R)- or (S)-sulfur and alpha- or beta-epoxide configurations together with 4-aza or 3-aza structures.

  15. Model-based analysis of coupled equilibrium-kinetic processes: indirect kinetic studies of thermodynamic parameters using the dynamic data.

    PubMed

    Emami, Fereshteh; Maeder, Marcel; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2015-05-01

    Thermodynamic studies of equilibrium chemical reactions linked with kinetic procedures are mostly impossible by traditional approaches. In this work, the new concept of generalized kinetic study of thermodynamic parameters is introduced for dynamic data. The examples of equilibria intertwined with kinetic chemical mechanisms include molecular charge transfer complex formation reactions, pH-dependent degradation of chemical compounds and tautomerization kinetics in micellar solutions. Model-based global analysis with the possibility of calculating and embedding the equilibrium and kinetic parameters into the fitting algorithm has allowed the complete analysis of the complex reaction mechanisms. After the fitting process, the optimal equilibrium and kinetic parameters together with an estimate of their standard deviations have been obtained. This work opens up a promising new avenue for obtaining equilibrium constants through the kinetic data analysis for the kinetic reactions that involve equilibrium processes.

  16. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Modified Hematite by Methane (CH{sub 4}) for Chemical-Looping Combustion: A Global Kinetics Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Monazam, Esmail R; Breault, Ronald W; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Miller, Duane D

    2013-10-01

    Iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) or in its natural form (hematite) is a potential material to capture CO{sub 2} through the chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process. It is known that magnesium (Mg) is an effective methyl cleaving catalyst and as such it has been combined with hematite to assess any possible enhancement to the kinetic rate for the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with methane. Therefore, in order to evaluate its effectiveness as a hematite additive, the behaviors of Mg-modified hematite samples (hematite –5% Mg(OH){sub 2}) have been analyzed with regard to assessing any enhancement to the kinetic rate process. The Mg-modified hematite was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis. The reactivity experiments were conducted in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) using continuous stream of CH{sub 4} (5, 10, and 20%) at temperatures ranging from 700 to 825 {degrees}C over ten reduction cycles. The mass spectroscopy analysis of product gas indicated the presence of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2} and CO in the gaseous product. The kinetic data at reduction step obtained by isothermal experiments could be well fitted by two parallel rate equations. The modified hematite samples showed higher reactivity as compared to unmodified hematite samples during reduction at all investigated temperatures.

  17. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Primary Reference Fuels for Diesel Cetane Number and Spark-Ignition Octane Number

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2010-03-03

    For the first time, a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for primary reference fuel mixtures of n-hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane for diesel cetane ratings. The mechanisms are constructed using existing rules for reaction pathways and rate expressions developed previously for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, n-heptane and iso-octane. These reaction mechanisms are validated by comparisons between computed and experimental results for shock tube ignition and for oxidation under jet-stirred reactor conditions. The combined kinetic reaction mechanism contains the submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for diesel cetane ratings and submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, all in one integrated large kinetic reaction mechanism. Representative applications of this mechanism to two test problems are presented, one describing fuel/air autoignition variations with changes in fuel cetane numbers, and the other describing fuel combustion in a jet-stirred reactor environment with the fuel varying from pure 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane (Cetane number of 15) to pure n-hexadecane (Cetane number of 100). The final reaction mechanism for the primary reference fuels for diesel fuel and gasoline is available on the web.

  18. Kinetics Study of Solid Ammonia Borane Hydrogen Release – Modeling and Experimental Validation for Chemical Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yong-Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Maupin, Gary D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2014-02-24

    Ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage with 19.6 wt% gravimetric hydrogen capacity of which 16.2 wt% hydrogen can be utilized below 200°C. We have investigated the kinetics of hydrogen release from AB and from an AB-methyl cellulose (AB/MC) composite at temperatures of 160-300°C using both experiments and modeling. The purpose of our study was to show safe hydrogen release without thermal runaway effects and to validate system model kinetics. AB/MC released hydrogen at ~20°C lower than neat AB and at a rate that is two times faster. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations were revised to better represent the growth and nucleation process during decomposition of AB. We explored two different reactor concepts; Auger and fixed bed. The current Auger reactor concept turned out to not be appropriate, however, we demonstrated safe self-propagation of the hydrogen release reaction of solid AB/MC in a fixed bed reactor.

  19. Hybrid quantum and classical methods for computing kinetic isotope effects of chemical reactions in solutions and in enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiali; Major, Dan T; Fan, Yao; Lin, Yen-Lin; Ma, Shuhua; Wong, Kin-Yiu

    2008-01-01

    A method for incorporating quantum mechanics into enzyme kinetics modeling is presented. Three aspects are emphasized: 1) combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical methods are used to represent the potential energy surface for modeling bond forming and breaking processes, 2) instantaneous normal mode analyses are used to incorporate quantum vibrational free energies to the classical potential of mean force, and 3) multidimensional tunneling methods are used to estimate quantum effects on the reaction coordinate motion. Centroid path integral simulations are described to make quantum corrections to the classical potential of mean force. In this method, the nuclear quantum vibrational and tunneling contributions are not separable. An integrated centroid path integral-free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM) method along with a bisection sampling procedure was summarized, which provides an accurate, easily convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. In the ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (EA-VTST/MT), these three aspects of quantum mechanical effects can be individually treated, providing useful insights into the mechanism of enzymatic reactions. These methods are illustrated by applications to a model process in the gas phase, the decarboxylation reaction of N-methyl picolinate in water, and the proton abstraction and reprotonation process catalyzed by alanine racemase. These examples show that the incorporation of quantum mechanical effects is essential for enzyme kinetics simulations.

  20. Turbulent Chemically Reacting Flows According to a Kinetic Theory. Ph.D. Thesis; [statistical analysis/gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Z. C.

    1975-01-01

    A review of various methods of calculating turbulent chemically reacting flow such as the Green Function, Navier-Stokes equation, and others is presented. Nonequilibrium degrees of freedom were employed to study the mixing behavior of a multiscale turbulence field. Classical and modern theories are discussed.